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Sample records for arabidopsis leaf peroxisomes

  1. Requirement of the C3HC4 zinc RING finger of the Arabidopsis PEX10 for photorespiration and leaf peroxisome contact with chloroplasts.

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    Schumann, Uwe; Prestele, Jakob; O'Geen, Henriette; Brueggeman, Robert; Wanner, Gerhard; Gietl, Christine

    2007-01-16

    Plant peroxisomes perform multiple vital metabolic processes including lipid mobilization in oil-storing seeds, photorespiration, and hormone biosynthesis. Peroxisome biogenesis requires the function of peroxin (PEX) proteins, including PEX10, a C(3)HC(4) Zn RING finger peroxisomal membrane protein. Loss of function of PEX10 causes embryo lethality at the heart stage. We investigated the function of PEX10 with conditional sublethal mutants. Four T-DNA insertion lines expressing pex10 with a dysfunctional RING finger were created in an Arabidopsis WT background (DeltaZn plants). They could be normalized by growth in an atmosphere of high CO(2) partial pressure, indicating a defect in photorespiration. beta-Oxidation in mutant glyoxysomes was not affected. However, an abnormal accumulation of the photorespiratory metabolite glyoxylate, a lowered content of carotenoids and chlorophyll a and b, and a decreased quantum yield of photosystem II were detected under normal atmosphere, suggesting impaired leaf peroxisomes. Light and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated leaf peroxisomes of the DeltaZn plants to be more numerous, multilobed, clustered, and not appressed to the chloroplast envelope as in WT. We suggest that inactivation of the RING finger domain in PEX10 has eliminated protein interaction required for attachment of peroxisomes to chloroplasts and movement of metabolites between peroxisomes and chloroplasts.

  2. In Silico Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase

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    Álvaro D. Fernández-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available NADPH, whose regeneration is critical for reductive biosynthesis and detoxification pathways, is an essential component in cell redox homeostasis. Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles with a complex biochemical machinery involved in signaling and stress processes by molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO. NADPH is required by several peroxisomal enzymes involved in β-oxidation, NO, and glutathione (GSH generation. Plants have various NADPH-generating dehydrogenases, one of which is 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH. Arabidopsis contains three 6PGDH genes that probably are encoded for cytosolic, chloroplastic/mitochondrial, and peroxisomal isozymes, although their specific functions remain largely unknown. This study focuses on the in silico analysis of the biochemical characteristics and gene expression of peroxisomal 6PGDH (p6PGDH with the aim of understanding its potential function in the peroxisomal NADPH-recycling system. The data show that a group of plant 6PGDHs contains an archetypal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS, while in silico gene expression analysis using affymetrix microarray data suggests that Arabidopsis p6PGDH appears to be mainly involved in xenobiotic response, growth, and developmental processes.

  3. Hormonal Regulation of Leaf Morphogenesis in Arabidopsis

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    Lin-Chuan Li; Ding-Ming Kang; Zhang-Liang Chen; Li-Jia Qu

    2007-01-01

    Leaf morphogenesis is strictly controlled not only by intrinsic genetic factors, such as transcriptional factors, but also by environmental cues, such as light, water and pathogens. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism of how leaf rnorphogenesis is regulated by genetic programs and environmental cues is far from clear. Numerous series of events demonstrate that plant hormones, mostly small and simple molecules,play crucial roles in plant growth and development, and in responses of plants to environmental cues such as light. With more and more genetics and molecular evidence obtained from the model plant Arabidopsis,several fundamental aspects of leaf rnorphogenesis including the initiation of leaf primordia, the determination of leaf axes, the regulation of cell division and expansion in leaves have been gradually unveiled.Among these phytohormones, auxin is found to be essential in the regulation of leaf morphogenesis.

  4. Discovering Peroxisomal Functions in Arabidopsis:from Proteomics to Genetics

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    Jianping Hu

    2012-01-01

    Plant peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that mediate a suite of metabolic processes crucial to development.To fully understand the function of these organelles,we performed mass spec analysis of proteins from three peroxisomal variants,i.e.,peroxisomes from green and senescent leaves and etiolated seedlings.Using in vivo subcellular targeting studies,more than 40 novel proteins were confirmed to be associated with peroxisomes.To assess the function of the new peroxisomal proteins,we screened more than 60 T-DNA insertion mutants of nearly 40 genes and uncovered the role for a subset of the proteins in development and defense.The role for peroxisomes in plant immune response was further elucidated using pathogenesis analysis and with peroxisome biogenesis proteins added to the tests.Our work provides a more comprehensive map of peroxisomal metabolism and takes an important step forward toward completely defining the dynamic peroxisomal metabolic networks.It also establishes a foundation for further investigations into how the various peroxisome-associated metabolic functions/pathways are connected to the plant defense network.

  5. Peroxisomal NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase is required for Arabidopsis stomatal movement.

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    Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B; Valderrama, Raquel; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Luque, Francisco; Viñegla, Benjamin; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2016-03-01

    Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles characterized by a simple morphological structure but have a complex biochemical machinery involved in signaling processes through molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO). Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) is an essential component in cell redox homeostasis, and its regeneration is critical for reductive biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. Plants have several NADPH-generating dehydrogenases, with NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP-ICDH) being one of these enzymes. Arabidopsis contains three genes that encode for cytosolic, mitochondrial/chloroplastic, and peroxisomal NADP-ICDH isozymes although the specific function of each of these remains largely unknown. Using two T-DNA insertion lines of the peroxisomal NADP-ICDH designated as picdh-1 and picdh-2, the data show that the peroxisomal NADP-ICDH is involved in stomatal movements, suggesting that peroxisomes are a new element in the signaling network of guard cells.

  6. Using Co-Expression Analysis and Stress-Based Screens to Uncover Arabidopsis Peroxisomal Proteins Involved in Drought Response.

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    Jiying Li

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are essential organelles that house a wide array of metabolic reactions important for plant growth and development. However, our knowledge regarding the role of peroxisomal proteins in various biological processes, including plant stress response, is still incomplete. Recent proteomic studies of plant peroxisomes significantly increased the number of known peroxisomal proteins and greatly facilitated the study of peroxisomes at the systems level. The objectives of this study were to determine whether genes that encode peroxisomal proteins with related functions are co-expressed in Arabidopsis and identify peroxisomal proteins involved in stress response using in silico analysis and mutant screens. Using microarray data from online databases, we performed hierarchical clustering analysis to generate a comprehensive view of transcript level changes for Arabidopsis peroxisomal genes during development and under abiotic and biotic stress conditions. Many genes involved in the same metabolic pathways exhibited co-expression, some genes known to be involved in stress response are regulated by the corresponding stress conditions, and function of some peroxisomal proteins could be predicted based on their co-expression pattern. Since drought caused expression changes to the highest number of genes that encode peroxisomal proteins, we subjected a subset of Arabidopsis peroxisomal mutants to a drought stress assay. Mutants of the LON2 protease and the photorespiratory enzyme hydroxypyruvate reductase 1 (HPR1 showed enhanced susceptibility to drought, suggesting the involvement of peroxisomal quality control and photorespiration in drought resistance. Our study provided a global view of how genes that encode peroxisomal proteins respond to developmental and environmental cues and began to reveal additional peroxisomal proteins involved in stress response, thus opening up new avenues to investigate the role of peroxisomes in plant adaptation to

  7. Sucrose Production Mediated by Lipid Metabolism Suppresses the Physical Interaction of Peroxisomes and Oil Bodies during Germination of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Cui, Songkui; Hayashi, Yasuko; Otomo, Masayoshi; Mano, Shoji; Oikawa, Kazusato; Hayashi, Makoto; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-09-16

    Physical interaction between organelles is a flexible event and essential for cells to adapt rapidly to environmental stimuli. Germinating plants utilize oil bodies and peroxisomes to mobilize storage lipids for the generation of sucrose as the main energy source. Although membrane interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes has been widely observed, its underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we present genetic evidence for control of the physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes. We identified alleles of the sdp1 mutant altered in oil body morphology. This mutant accumulates bigger and more oil body aggregates compared with the wild type and showed defects in lipid mobilization during germination. SUGAR DEPENDENT 1 (SDP1) encodes major triacylglycerol lipase in Arabidopsis Interestingly, sdp1 seedlings show enhanced physical interaction between oil bodies and peroxisomes compared with the wild type, whereas exogenous sucrose supplementation greatly suppresses the interaction. The same phenomenon occurs in the peroxisomal defective 1 (ped1) mutant, defective in lipid mobilization because of impaired peroxisomal β-oxidation, indicating that sucrose production is a key factor for oil body-peroxisomal dissociation. Peroxisomal dissociation and subsequent release from oil bodies is dependent on actin filaments. We also show that a peroxisomal ATP binding cassette transporter, PED3, is the potential anchor protein to the membranes of these organelles. Our results provide novel components linking lipid metabolism and oil body-peroxisome interaction whereby sucrose may act as a negative signal for the interaction of oil bodies and peroxisomes to fine-tune lipolysis.

  8. Peroxisomal hydroxypyruvate reductase is not essential for photorespiration in Arabidopsis but its absence causes an increase in the stoichiometry of photorespiratory CO2 release.

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    Cousins, Asaph B; Walker, Berkley J; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Smith, Steven M; Badger, Murray R

    2011-09-01

    Recycling of carbon by the photorespiratory pathway involves enzymatic steps in the chloroplast, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Most of these reactions are essential for plants growing under ambient CO(2) concentrations. However, some disruptions of photorespiratory metabolism cause subtle phenotypes in plants grown in air. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana lacking both of the peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase genes (pmdh1pmdh2) or hydroxypyruvate reductase (hpr1) are viable in air and have rates of photosynthesis only slightly lower than wild-type plants. To investigate how disruption of the peroxisomal reduction of hydroxypyruvate to glycerate influences photorespiratory carbon metabolism we analyzed leaf gas exchange in A. thaliana plants lacking peroxisomal HPR1 expression. In addition, because the lack of HPR1 could be compensated for by other reactions within the peroxisomes using reductant supplied by PMDH a triple mutant lacking expression of both peroxisomal PMDH genes and HPR1 (pmdh1pmdh2hpr1) was analyzed. Rates of photosynthesis under photorespiratory conditions (ambient CO(2) and O(2) concentrations) were slightly reduced in the hpr1 and pmdh1pmdh2hpr1 plants indicating other reactions can help bypass this disruption in the photorespiratory pathway. However, the CO(2) compensation points (Γ) increased under photorespiratory conditions in both mutants indicating changes in photorespiratory carbon metabolism in these plants. Measurements of Γ*, the CO(2) compensation point in the absence of mitochondrial respiration, and the CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction demonstrated that the increase in Γ in the hpr1 and pmdh1pmdh2hpr1 plants is not associated with changes in mitochondrial respiration but with an increase in the non-respiratory CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction.

  9. Arabidopsis DAYU/ABERRANT PEROXISOME MORPHOLOGY9 is a key regulator of peroxisome biogenesis and plays critical roles during pollen maturation and germination in planta.

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    Li, Xin-Ran; Li, Hong-Ju; Yuan, Li; Liu, Man; Shi, Dong-Qiao; Liu, Jie; Yang, Wei-Cai

    2014-02-01

    Pollen undergo a maturation process to sustain pollen viability and prepare them for germination. Molecular mechanisms controlling these processes remain largely unknown. Here, we report an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, dayu (dau), which impairs pollen maturation and in vivo germination. Molecular analysis indicated that DAU encodes the peroxisomal membrane protein ABERRANT PEROXISOME MORPHOLOGY9 (APEM9). DAU is transiently expressed from bicellular pollen to mature pollen during male gametogenesis. DAU interacts with peroxisomal membrane proteins PEROXIN13 (PEX13) and PEX16 in planta. Consistently, both peroxisome biogenesis and peroxisome protein import are impaired in dau pollen. In addition, the jasmonic acid (JA) level is significantly decreased in dau pollen, and the dau mutant phenotype is partially rescued by exogenous application of JA, indicating that the male sterility is mainly due to JA deficiency. In addition, the phenotypic survey of peroxin mutants indicates that the PEXs most likely play different roles in pollen germination. Taken together, these data indicate that DAU/APEM9 plays critical roles in peroxisome biogenesis and function, which is essential for JA production and pollen maturation and germination.

  10. Functional overlap of the Arabidopsis leaf and root microbiota.

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    Bai, Yang; Müller, Daniel B; Srinivas, Girish; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Potthoff, Eva; Rott, Matthias; Dombrowski, Nina; Münch, Philipp C; Spaepen, Stijn; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja; Hüttel, Bruno; McHardy, Alice C; Vorholt, Julia A; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-12-17

    Roots and leaves of healthy plants host taxonomically structured bacterial assemblies, and members of these communities contribute to plant growth and health. We established Arabidopsis leaf- and root-derived microbiota culture collections representing the majority of bacterial species that are reproducibly detectable by culture-independent community sequencing. We found an extensive taxonomic overlap between the leaf and root microbiota. Genome drafts of 400 isolates revealed a large overlap of genome-encoded functional capabilities between leaf- and root-derived bacteria with few significant differences at the level of individual functional categories. Using defined bacterial communities and a gnotobiotic Arabidopsis plant system we show that the isolates form assemblies resembling natural microbiota on their cognate host organs, but are also capable of ectopic leaf or root colonization. While this raises the possibility of reciprocal relocation between root and leaf microbiota members, genome information and recolonization experiments also provide evidence for microbiota specialization to their respective niche.

  11. Mechanisms of Salt Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana Carrying a Peroxisomal Ascorbate Peroxidase Gene from Barley

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    XU Wei-Feng; SHI Wei-Ming; A. UEDA; T. TAKABE

    2008-01-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases (APX), localized in the cytosol, peroxisome, mitochondria, and chloroplasts of plant cells,catalyze the reduction of H2O2 to water by using ascorbic acid as the specific electron donor. To determine the role of peroxisomal type ascorbate peroxidasc (pAPX), an antioxidant enzyme, in protection against salt-induced oxidative stress, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plant carrying a pAPX gene (HvAPX1) from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) was analyzed. The transgenic line pAPX3 was found to be more tolerant to salt stress than the wild type. Irrespective of salt stress, there were no significant differences in Na+, K+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ contents and the ratio of K+ to Na+ between pAPX3 and the wild type. Clearly, the salt tolerance in pAPX3 was not due to the maintenance and reestablishment of cellular ion homeostasis. However, the degree of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation (measured as the levels of malondialdehyde)accumulation under salt stress was higher in the wild type than in pAPX3. The mechanism of salt tolerance in transgenic pAPX3 can thus be explained by reduction of oxidative stress injury. Under all conditions tested, activities of superoxide,glutathionc reductase, and catalase were not significantly different between pAPX3 and the wild type. In contrast, the activity of APX was significantly higher in the transgcnic plant than in wild type under salt stress. These results suggested that in higher plants, HvAPX1 played an important role in salt tolerance and was a candidate gene for developing salt-tolerant crop plants.

  12. Leaf Positioning of Arabidopsis in Response to Blue Light

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    Shin-ichiro Inoue; Toshinori Kinoshita; Atsushi Takemiya; Michio Doi; Ken-ichiro Shimazaki

    2008-01-01

    Appropriate leaf positioning is essential for optimizing photosynthesis and plant growth. However, it has not been elucidated how green leaves reach and maintain their position for capturing light. We show here the regulation of leaf positioning under blue light stimuli. When 1-week-old Arabidopsis seedlings grown under white light were transferred to red light (25 μmol m-2s-t) for 5 d, new petioles that appeared were almost horizontal and their leaves were curled and slanted downward. However, when a weak blue light from above (0.1 μmol m-2s-1) was superimposed on red light, the new petioles grew obliquely upward and the leaves were flat and horizontal. The leaf positioning required both phototropin1 (phot1) and nonphototropic hypocotyl 3 (NPH3), and resulted in enhanced plant growth. In an nph3 mutant, neither optimal leaf positioning nor leaf flattening by blue light was found, and blue light-induced growth enhancement was drastically reduced. When blue light was increased from 0.1 to 5 μmol m-2s-1, normal leaf positioning and leaf flattening were induced in both phot1 and nph3 mutants, suggesting that phot2 signaling became functional and that the signaling was independent of phot1 and NPH3 in these responses. When plants were irradiated with blue light (0.1 μmol m-2s-1) from the side and red light from above, the new leaves became oriented toward the source of blue light. When we transferred these plants to both blue light and red light from above, the leaf surface changed its orientation to the new blue light source within a few hours, whereas the petioles initially were unchanged but then gradually rotated, suggesting the plasticity of leaf positioning in response to blue light. We showed the tissue expression of NPH3 and its plasma membrane localization via the coiled-coil domain and the C-terminal region. We conclude that NPH3-mediated phototropin signaling optimizes the efficiency of light perception by inducing both optimal leaf positioning and leaf

  13. Arabidopsis PEROXIN11c-e, FISSION1b, and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN3A Cooperate in Cell Cycle–Associated Replication of Peroxisomes[W

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    Lingard, Matthew J.; Gidda, Satinder K.; Bingham, Scott; Rothstein, Steven J.; Mullen, Robert T.; Trelease, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Although participation of PEROXIN11 (PEX11), FISSION1 (FISl), and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) has been well established during induced peroxisome proliferation in response to external stimuli, their roles in cell cycle–associated constitutive replication/duplication have not been fully explored. Herein, bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells revealed homooligomerization of all five PEX11 isoforms (PEX11a-e) and heterooligomerizations of all five PEX11 isoforms with FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A. Intracellular protein targeting experiments demonstrated that FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A, targeted to peroxisomes only when coexpressed with PEX11d or PEX11e. Simultaneous silencing of PEX11c-e or individual silencing of DRP3A, but not FIS1a nor FIS1b, resulted in ∼40% reductions in peroxisome number. During G2 in synchronized cell cultures, peroxisomes sequentially enlarged, elongated, and then doubled in number, which correlated with peaks in PEX11, FIS1, and DRP3A expression. Overall, these data support a model for the replication of preexisting peroxisomes wherein PEX11c, PEX11d, and PEX11e act cooperatively during G2 to promote peroxisome elongation and recruitment of FIS1b to the peroxisome membrane, where DRP3A stimulates fission of elongated peroxisomes into daughter peroxisomes, which are then distributed between daughter cells. PMID:18539750

  14. Arabidopsis PEROXIN11c-e, FISSION1b, and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN3A cooperate in cell cycle-associated replication of peroxisomes.

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    Lingard, Matthew J; Gidda, Satinder K; Bingham, Scott; Rothstein, Steven J; Mullen, Robert T; Trelease, Richard N

    2008-06-01

    Although participation of PEROXIN11 (PEX11), FISSION1 (FISl), and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN (DRP) has been well established during induced peroxisome proliferation in response to external stimuli, their roles in cell cycle-associated constitutive replication/duplication have not been fully explored. Herein, bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells revealed homooligomerization of all five PEX11 isoforms (PEX11a-e) and heterooligomerizations of all five PEX11 isoforms with FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A. Intracellular protein targeting experiments demonstrated that FIS1b, but not FIS1a nor DRP3A, targeted to peroxisomes only when coexpressed with PEX11d or PEX11e. Simultaneous silencing of PEX11c-e or individual silencing of DRP3A, but not FIS1a nor FIS1b, resulted in approximately 40% reductions in peroxisome number. During G2 in synchronized cell cultures, peroxisomes sequentially enlarged, elongated, and then doubled in number, which correlated with peaks in PEX11, FIS1, and DRP3A expression. Overall, these data support a model for the replication of preexisting peroxisomes wherein PEX11c, PEX11d, and PEX11e act cooperatively during G2 to promote peroxisome elongation and recruitment of FIS1b to the peroxisome membrane, where DRP3A stimulates fission of elongated peroxisomes into daughter peroxisomes, which are then distributed between daughter cells.

  15. Peroxisomal Polyamine Oxidase and NADPH-Oxidase cross-talk for ROS homeostasis which affects respiration rate in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Efthimios A. Andronis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the intracellular compartments is of critical importance as ROS have been linked with nearly all cellular processes and more importantly with diseases and aging. PAs are nitrogenous molecules with an evolutionary conserved role in the regulation of metabolic and energetic status of cells. Recent evidence also suggests that polyamines (PA are major regulators of ROS homeostasis. In Arabidopsis the backconversion of the PAs spermidine (Spd and spermine (Spm to putrescine (Put and Spd, respectively is catalyzed by two peroxisomal PA oxidases (AtPAO. However, the physiological role of this pathway remains largely elusive. Here we explore the role of peroxisomal PA backconversion and in particular that catalyzed by the highly expressed AtPAO3 in the regulation of ROS homeostasis and mitochondrial respiratory burst. Exogenous PAs exert an NADPH-oxidase dependent stimulation of oxygen consumption, with Spd exerting the strongest effect. This increase is attenuated by treatment with the NADPH-oxidase blocker diphenyleneiodonium iodide (DPI. Loss-of-function of AtPAO3 gene results to increased NADPH-oxidase-dependent production of superoxide anions (O2.-, but not H2O2, which activate the mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway (AOX. On the contrary, overexpression of AtPAO3 results to an increased but balanced production of both H2O2 and O2.-. These results suggest that the ratio of O2.-/H2O2 regulates respiratory chain in mitochondria, with PA-dependent production of O2.- by NADPH-oxidase tilting the balance of electron transfer chain in favor of the AOX pathway. In addition, AtPAO3 seems to be an important component in the regulating module of ROS homeostasis, while a conserved role for PA backconversion and ROS across kingdoms is discussed.

  16. Organ-specific quality control of plant peroxisomes is mediated by autophagy.

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    Yoshimoto, Kohki; Shibata, Michitaro; Kondo, Maki; Oikawa, Kazusato; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Shirasu, Ken; Nishimura, Mikio; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2014-03-15

    Peroxisomes are essential organelles that are characterized by the possession of enzymes that produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as part of their normal catalytic cycle. During the metabolic process, peroxisomal proteins are inevitably damaged by H2O2 and the integrity of the peroxisomes is impaired. Here, we show that autophagy, an intracellular process for vacuolar degradation, selectively degrades dysfunctional peroxisomes. Marked accumulation of peroxisomes was observed in the leaves but not roots of autophagy-related (ATG)-knockout Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. The peroxisomes in leaf cells contained markedly increased levels of catalase in an insoluble and inactive aggregate form. The chemically inducible complementation system in ATG5-knockout Arabidopsis provided the evidence that these accumulated peroxisomes were delivered to vacuoles for degradation by autophagy. Interestingly, autophagosomal membrane structures specifically recognized the abnormal peroxisomes at the site of the aggregates. Thus, autophagy is essential for the quality control of peroxisomes in leaves and for proper plant development under natural growth conditions.

  17. Peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase is not essential for photorespiration in Arabidopsis but its absence causes an increase in the stoichiometry of photorespiratory CO2 release.

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    Cousins, Asaph B; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Zhou, Wenxu; Smith, Steven M; Badger, Murray R

    2008-10-01

    Peroxisomes are important for recycling carbon and nitrogen that would otherwise be lost during photorespiration. The reduction of hydroxypyruvate to glycerate catalyzed by hydroxypyruvate reductase (HPR) in the peroxisomes is thought to be facilitated by the production of NADH by peroxisomal malate dehydrogenase (PMDH). PMDH, which is encoded by two genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), reduces NAD(+) to NADH via the oxidation of malate supplied from the cytoplasm to oxaloacetate. A double mutant lacking the expression of both PMDH genes was viable in air and had rates of photosynthesis only slightly lower than in the wild type. This is in contrast to other photorespiratory mutants, which have severely reduced rates of photosynthesis and require high CO(2) to grow. The pmdh mutant had a higher O(2)-dependent CO(2) compensation point than the wild type, implying that either Rubisco specificity had changed or that the rate of CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation was increased in the pmdh plants. Rates of gross O(2) evolution and uptake were similar in the pmdh and wild-type plants, indicating that chloroplast linear electron transport and photorespiratory O(2) uptake were similar between genotypes. The CO(2) postillumination burst and the rate of CO(2) released during photorespiration were both greater in the pmdh mutant compared with the wild type, suggesting that the ratio of photorespiratory CO(2) release to Rubisco oxygenation was altered in the pmdh mutant. Without PMDH in the peroxisome, the CO(2) released per Rubisco oxygenation reaction can be increased by over 50%. In summary, PMDH is essential for maintaining optimal rates of photorespiration in air; however, in its absence, significant rates of photorespiration are still possible, indicating that there are additional mechanisms for supplying reductant to the peroxisomal HPR reaction or that the HPR reaction is altogether circumvented.

  18. Decreased glutathione reductase2 leads to early leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

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    Ding, Shunhua; Wang, Liang; Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR) catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) and participates in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, which scavenges H2 O2 . Here, we report that chloroplastic/mitochondrial GR2 is an important regulator of leaf senescence. Seed development of the homozygous gr2 knockout mutant was blocked at the globular stage. Therefore, to investigate the function of GR2 in leaf senescence, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants with decreased GR2 using RNAi. The GR2 RNAi plants displayed early onset of age-dependent and dark- and H2 O2 -induced leaf senescence, which was accompanied by the induction of the senescence-related marker genes SAG12 and SAG13. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis revealed that genes related to leaf senescence, oxidative stress, and phytohormone pathways were upregulated directly before senescence in RNAi plants. In addition, H2 O2 accumulated to higher levels in RNAi plants than in wild-type plants and the levels of H2 O2 peaked in RNAi plants directly before the early onset of leaf senescence. RNAi plants showed a greater decrease in GSH/GSSG levels than wild-type plants during leaf development. Our results suggest that GR2 plays an important role in leaf senescence by modulating H2 O2 and glutathione signaling in Arabidopsis.

  19. Differentially phased leaf growth and movements in Arabidopsis depend on coordinated circadian and light regulation.

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    Dornbusch, Tino; Michaud, Olivier; Xenarios, Ioannis; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to vastly studied hypocotyl growth, little is known about diel regulation of leaf growth and its coordination with movements such as changes in leaf elevation angle (hyponasty). We developed a 3D live-leaf growth analysis system enabling simultaneous monitoring of growth and movements. Leaf growth is maximal several hours after dawn, requires light, and is regulated by daylength, suggesting coupling between growth and metabolism. We identify both blade and petiole positioning as important components of leaf movements in Arabidopsis thaliana and reveal a temporal delay between growth and movements. In hypocotyls, the combination of circadian expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) and PIF5 and their light-regulated protein stability drives rhythmic hypocotyl elongation with peak growth at dawn. We find that PIF4 and PIF5 are not essential to sustain rhythmic leaf growth but influence their amplitude. Furthermore, EARLY FLOWERING3, a member of the evening complex (EC), is required to maintain the correct phase between growth and movement. Our study shows that the mechanisms underlying rhythmic hypocotyl and leaf growth differ. Moreover, we reveal the temporal relationship between leaf elongation and movements and demonstrate the importance of the EC for the coordination of these phenotypic traits.

  20. Overexpression of the Rap2.4f transcriptional factor in Arabidopsis promotes leaf senescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Senescence is a complex and highly regulated process. Leaf senescence is influenced by endogenous developmental and external environmental signals. In this work, we found that expression of an Ap2/DREB-type transcription factor gene, Arabidopsis Rap2.4f (At4g28140), was upregulated by salt, mannitol, and dark treatments. Constitutively overexpressing Rap2.4f under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter led to an increased chlorophyll degradation rate and upregulation of many senescence-associated genes in the transgenic Arabidopsis lines. Our results show that Rap2.4f is a positive regulator of senescence, promoting both developmental and dark-induced leaf senescence.

  1. REVOLUTA and WRKY53 connect early and late leaf development in Arabidopsis

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    Xie, Yakun; Huhn, Kerstin; Brandt, Ronny;

    2014-01-01

    that class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIPIII) transcription factors, which are known to be involved in basic pattern formation, have an additional role in controlling the onset of leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Several potential direct downstream genes of the HD-ZIPIII protein REVOLUTA (REV) have...... of WRKY53 in response to oxidative stress, and mutations in HD-ZIPIII genes strongly delay the onset of senescence. Thus, a crosstalk between early and late stages of leaf development appears to contribute to reproductive success....

  2. Effect of plant growth regulators on leaf anatomy of the has mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Janosević, D; Uzelac, B; Budimir, S

    2008-12-01

    In this study, the effect of plant growth regulators on leaf morphogenesis of the recessive T-DNA insertion mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed. The morpho-anatomical analysis revealed that leaves of the has mutant are small and narrow, with lobed blades and disrupted tissue organization. When has plants were grown on the medium supplied with plant growth regulators: benzylaminopurine (BAP) or ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), the leaf anatomy was partially restored to the wild type, although plants still exhibited morphological abnormalities.

  3. Modulation of leaf conductance by root to shoot signaling under water stress in Arabidopsis

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    Fan Yi-juan; Liu Qing; Wei Kai-fa; Li Bing-bing; Ren Hui-bo; Gao Zhi-hui; Jia Wen-suo

    2006-01-01

    Signal communication between root and shoot plays a crucial role in plant resistance to water stress. While many studies on root to shoot signals have been carried out in many plant species, no information is available for the model plant, Arabidopsis, whose adoption has great significance for further probing the molecular aspects of long distance stress signals. Here, we introduced the establishment of techniques for investigations of root to shoot signals in Arabidopsis. Stomatal movements in relation to root signals were probed by using these techniques. The results show that Arabidopsis is a suitable plant species for partial roots drying (PRD)experiments. In the PRD system, while no significant differences were found in leaf water potential between well-watered and stressed plants, water stress led to a decrease in leaf conductance, which suggests a regulation of stomatal movements by root to shoot signals. While water stress caused a significant increase in the concentration of sap abscisic acid (ABA) of xylem, no increase in xylem sap pH was observed. Moreover, the increase in the ABA content of xylem coincided with the decrease in leaf conductance,which suggests a possible role of ABA in the regulation of stomatal movements. Infrared temperature images showed that leaf temperatures of PRD plant were higher compared with those of well-watered plants, which further indicates that stomatal movements can be modulated by root signals. The confirmation of root to shoot signaling in Arabidopsis has established a basis for further investigation into the molecular mechanisms of the root to shoot signaling under water stress.

  4. The Arabidopsis calmodulin-like proteins AtCML30 and AtCML3 are targeted to mitochondria and peroxisomes, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigri, Fatima; Flosdorff, Sandra; Pilz, Sahra; Kölle, Eva; Dolze, Esther; Gietl, Christine; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2012-02-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous sensor/transducer of calcium signals in eukaryotic organisms. While CaM mediated calcium regulation of cytosolic processes is well established, there is growing evidence for the inclusion of organelles such as chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes into the calcium/calmodulin regulation network. A number of CaM-binding proteins have been identified in these organelles and processes such as protein import into chloroplasts and mitochondria have been shown to be governed by CaM regulation. What have been missing to date are the mediators of this regulation since no CaM or calmodulin-like protein (CML) has been identified in any of these organelles. Here we show that two Arabidopsis CMLs, AtCML3 and AtCML30, are localized in peroxisomes and mitochondria, respectively. AtCML3 is targeted via an unusual C-terminal PTS1-like tripeptide while AtCML30 utilizes an N-terminal, non-cleavable transit peptide. Both proteins possess the typical structure of CaMs, with two pairs of EF-hand motifs separated by a short linker domain. They furthermore display common characteristics, such as calcium-dependent alteration of gel mobility and calcium-dependent exposure of a hydrophobic surface. This indicates that they can function in a similar manner as canonical CaMs. The presence of close homologues to AtCML3 and AtCML30 in other plants further indicates that organellar targeting of these CMLs is not a specific feature of Arabidopsis. The identification of peroxisomal and mitochondrial CMLs is an important step in the understanding how these organelles are integrated into the cellular calcium/calmodulin signaling pathways.

  5. APUM23, a PUF family protein, functions in leaf development and organ polarity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tengbo; Kerstetter, Randall A; Irish, Vivian F

    2014-03-01

    The normal biological function of leaves, such as intercepting light and exchanging gases, relies on proper differentiation of adaxial and abaxial polarity. KANADI (KAN) genes, members of the GARP family, are key regulators of abaxial identity in leaf morphogenesis. This study identified a mutant allele (apum23-3) of APUM23, which encodes a Pumilio/PUF domain protein and acts as an enhancer of the kan mutant. Arabidopsis APUM23 has been shown to function in pre-rRNA processing and play pleiotropic roles in plant development. The apum23-3 mutant also synergistically interacts with other leaf polarity mutants, affects proliferation of division-competent cells, and alters the expression of important leaf polarity genes. These phenotypes show that APUM23 has critical functions in plant development, particularly in polarity formation. The PUF gene family is conserved across kingdoms yet it has not been well characterized in plants. These results illuminating the functions of APUM23 suggest a novel role for PUF genes in Arabidopsis leaf development.

  6. Identification and genetic mapping of four novel genes that regulate leaf development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and genetic characterizations of mutants have led to a better understanding of many developmental processes in the model system Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the leaf development that is specific to plants has been little studied. With the aim of contributing to the genetic dissection of leaf development, we have performed a large-scare screening for mutants with abnormal leaves. Among a great number of leaf mutants we have generated by T-DNA and transposon tagging and ethylmethae sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis, four independent mutant lines have been identified and studied genetically. Phenotypes of these mutant lines represent the defects of four novel nuclear genes designated LL1 (LOTUS LEAF 1), LL2 (LOTUS LEAF 2), URO (UPRIGHT ROSETTE), and EIL (ENVIRONMENTCONDITION INDUCED LESION). The phenotypic analysis indicates that these genes play important roles during leaf development. For the further genetic analysis of these genes and the map-based cloning of LL1 and LL2, we have mapped these genes to chromosome regions with an efficient and rapid mapping method.

  7. Identification and genetic mapping of four novel genes that regulate leaf development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNYUE; YingLiGuo; 等

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and genetic characterizations of mutants have led to a better understanding of many developmental processes in the model system Arabidopsis thaliana.However,the leaf development that is specific to plants has been little studies.With the aim of contributing to the genetic dissection of leaf development,we have performed a large-scare screening for mutants with abnormal leaves.Among a great number of leaf mutants we have generated by T-DNA and transposon tagging and ethylmethae sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis,four independent mutant lines have been identified and studied genetically.Phenotypes of these mutant lines represent the defects of four novel muclear genes designated LL1(LOTUS LEAF 1),LL2(LOTUS LEAF2),URO(UPRIGHT ROSETTE),and EIL(ENVIRONMENT CONDITION INDUCED LESION).The phenotypic analysis indicates that these genes play important roles during leaf development.For the further genetic analysis of these genes and the map-based cloning of LL1 and LL2,we have mapped these genes to chromosome regions with an efficient and rapid mapping method.

  8. Comparison of Leaf Plastochron Index and Allometric Analyses of Tooth Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot; Meicenheimer

    2000-03-01

    Two methods of analyses were used to investigate tooth development in serrate (se) mutant and wild-type Columbia-1 (Col-1) Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. There were almost twice as many teeth with deeper sinuses and two orders of toothing on the margins of serrate compared with Columbia-1 leaves. The main objective of this study was to test three hypotheses relative to the source of polymorphism in tooth development: (i) Teeth share similar growth rates and initial sizes, but the deeper teeth are initiated earlier in leaf development. (ii) Teeth share similar timing of initiation and growth rates, but the deeper teeth have a larger initial size. (iii) Teeth share similar timing of initiation and initial sizes, but the deeper teeth have a faster growth rate. Leaf plastochron index (LPI) was used as the time variable for leaf development. Results showed teeth in se were initiated at -27 LPI, 15 plastochrons earlier than those of Col-1. Serrate leaf expansion was biphasic, with the early phase expanding at half the relative plastochron rate of the later phase, which equaled the constant relative expansion rate of Col-1 leaves. Allometric analyses of tooth development obscured the interactions between time of tooth and leaf initiation and the early phase of leaf expansion characteristic of serrate leaves and teeth. Timing of developmental events that allometric analysis obscured can be readily detected with the LPI as a developmental index.

  9. Leaf hydraulic conductance varies with vein anatomy across Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type and leaf vein mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caringella, Marissa A; Bongers, Franca J; Sack, Lawren

    2015-12-01

    Leaf venation is diverse across plant species and has practical applications from paleobotany to modern agriculture. However, the impact of vein traits on plant performance has not yet been tested in a model system such as Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies analysed cotyledons of A. thaliana vein mutants and identified visible differences in their vein systems from the wild type (WT). We measured leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf ), vein traits, and xylem and mesophyll anatomy for A. thaliana WT (Col-0) and four vein mutants (dot3-111 and dot3-134, and cvp1-3 and cvp2-1). Mutant true leaves did not possess the qualitative venation anomalies previously shown in the cotyledons, but varied quantitatively in vein traits and leaf anatomy across genotypes. The WT had significantly higher mean Kleaf . Across all genotypes, there was a strong correlation of Kleaf with traits related to hydraulic conductance across the bundle sheath, as influenced by the number and radial diameter of bundle sheath cells and vein length per area. These findings support the hypothesis that vein traits influence Kleaf , indicating the usefulness of this mutant system for testing theory that was primarily established comparatively across species, and supports a strong role for the bundle sheath in influencing Kleaf .

  10. Testing models for the leaf economics spectrum with leaf and whole-plant traits in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonder, Benjamin; Vasseur, François; Violle, Cyrille; Shipley, Bill; Enquist, Brian J; Vile, Denis

    2015-05-08

    The leaf economics spectrum (LES) describes strong relationships between multiple functional leaf traits that determine resource fluxes in vascular plants. Five models have been proposed to explain these patterns: two based on patterns of structural allocation, two on venation networks and one on resource allocation to cell walls and cell contents. Here we test these models using data for leaf and whole-plant functional traits. We use structural equation modelling applied to multiple ecotypes, recombinant inbred lines, near isogenic lines and vascular patterning mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that express LES trait variation. We show that a wide variation in multiple functional traits recapitulates the LES at the whole-plant scale. The Wright et al. (2004) model and the Blonder et al. (2013) venation network model cannot be rejected by data, while two simple models and the Shipley et al. (2006) allocation model are rejected. Venation networks remain a key hypothesis for the origin of the LES, but simpler explanations also cannot be ruled out.

  11. A VAMP-associated protein, PVA31 is involved in leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Mie; Nakai, Yusuke; Arima, Keita; Nishiyama, Sayo; Hirano, Tomoko; Sato, Masa H

    2015-01-01

    VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs) are highly conserved among eukaryotes. Here, we report a functional analysis of one of the VAPs, PVA31, and demonstrate its novel function on leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. The expression of PVA31 is highly induced in senescence leaves, and localizes to the plasma membrane as well as the ARA7-positive endosomes. Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrates that PVA31 is interacted with the plasma membrane localized-VAMP proteins, VAMP721/722/724 but not with the endosome-localized VAMPs, VAMP711 and VAMP727, indicating that PVA31 is associated with VAMP721/722/724 on the plasma membrane. Strong constitutive expression of PVA31 under the control of the Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter induces the typical symptom of leaf senescence earlier than WT in normal growth and an artificially induced senescence conditions. In addition, the marker genes for the SA-mediated signaling pathways, PR-1, is promptly expressed with elicitor application. These data indicate that PVA31-overexpressing plants exhibit the early senescence phenotype in their leaves, and suggest that PVA31 is involved in the SA-mediated programmed cell death process during leaf senescence and PR-protein secretion during pathogen infection in Arabidopsis.

  12. Enhancement of leaf photosynthetic capacity through increased stomatal density in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yu; Sugano, Shigeo S; Shimada, Tomoo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2013-05-01

    Photosynthetic rate is determined by CO2 fixation and CO2 entry into the plant through pores in the leaf epidermis called stomata. However, the effect of increased stomatal density on photosynthetic rate remains unclear. This work investigated the effect of alteration of stomatal density on leaf photosynthetic capacity in Arabidopsis thaliana. Stomatal density was modulated by overexpressing or silencing STOMAGEN, a positive regulator of stomatal development. Leaf photosynthetic capacity and plant growth were examined in transgenic plants. Increased stomatal density in STOMAGEN-overexpressing plants enhanced the photosynthetic rate by 30% compared to wild-type plants. Transgenic plants showed increased stomatal conductance under ambient CO2 conditions and did not show alterations in the maximum rate of carboxylation, indicating that the enhancement of photosynthetic rate was caused by gas diffusion changes. A leaf photosynthesis-intercellular CO2 concentration response curve showed that photosynthetic rate was increased under high CO2 conditions in association with increased stomatal density. STOMAGEN overexpression did not alter whole plant biomass, whereas its silencing caused biomass reduction. Our results indicate that increased stomatal density enhanced leaf photosynthetic capacity by modulating gas diffusion. Stomatal density may be a target trait for plant engineering to improve photosynthetic capacity.

  13. Nitric Oxide Regulates Dark-Induced Leaf Senescence Through EIN2 in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Han Niu; Fang-Qing Guo

    2012-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)-deficient mutant nos1/noa1 exhibited an early leaf senescence phenotype.ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 2 (EIN2) was previously reported to function as a positive regulator of ethyleneinduced senescence.The aim of this study was to address the question of how NO interacts with ethylene to regulate leaf senescence by characterizing the double mutant ein2-1 nos1/noa1 (Arabidopsis thaliana).Double mutant analysis revealed that the nos1/noa1-mediated,dark-induced early senescence phenotype was suppressed by mutations in EIN2,suggesting that EIN2 is involved in nitric oxide signaling in the regulation of leaf senescence.The results showed that chlorophyll degradation in the double mutant leaves was significantly delayed.In addition,nos1/noa1-mediated impairment in photochemical efficiency and integrity of thylakoid membranes was reverted by EIN2 mutations.The rapid upregulation of the known senescence marker genes in the nos1/noa1 mutant was severely inhibited in the double mutant during leaf senescence.Interestingly,the response of dark-grown nos1/noa1 mutant seedlings to ethylene was similar to that of wild type seedlings.Taken together,our findings suggest that EIN2 is involved in the regulation of early leaf senescence caused by NO deficiency,but NO deficiency caused by NOS1/NOA1 mutations does not affect ethylene signaling.

  14. In vivo packaging of triacylglycerols enhances Arabidopsis leaf biomass and energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winichayakul, Somrutai; Scott, Richard William; Roldan, Marissa; Hatier, Jean-Hugues Bertrand; Livingston, Sam; Cookson, Ruth; Curran, Amy Christina; Roberts, Nicholas John

    2013-06-01

    Our dependency on reduced carbon for energy has led to a rapid increase in the search for sustainable alternatives and a call to focus on energy densification and increasing biomass yields. In this study, we generated a uniquely stabilized plant structural protein (cysteine [Cys]-oleosin) that encapsulates triacylglycerol (TAG). When coexpressed with diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (DGAT1) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we observed a 24% increase in the carbon dioxide (CO2) assimilation rate per unit of leaf area and a 50% increase in leaf biomass as well as approximately 2-, 3-, and 5-fold increases in the fatty acid content of the mature leaves, senescing leaves, and roots, respectively. We propose that the coexpression led to the formation of enduring lipid droplets that prevented the futile cycle of TAG biosynthesis/lipolysis and instead created a sustained demand for de novo lipid biosynthesis, which in turn elevated CO2 recycling in the chloroplast. Fatty acid profile analysis indicated that the formation of TAG involved acyl cycling in Arabidopsis leaves and roots. We also demonstrate that the combination of Cys-oleosin and DGAT1 resulted in the highest accumulation of fatty acids in the model single-cell eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results support the notion that the prevention of lipolysis is vital to enabling TAG accumulation in vegetative tissues and confirm the earlier speculation that elevating fatty acid biosynthesis in the leaf would lead to an increase in CO2 assimilation. The Cys-oleosins have applications in biofuels, animal feed, and human nutrition as well as in providing a tool for investigating fatty acid biosynthesis and catabolism.

  15. Influence of atmospheric oxygen on leaf structure and starch deposition in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonell, K. M.; Kuang, A.; Porterfield, D. M.; Crispi, M. L.; Xiao, Y.; McClure, G.; Musgrave, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    Plant culture in oxygen concentrations below ambient is known to stimulate vegetative growth, but apart from reports on increased leaf number and weight, little is known about development at subambient oxygen concentrations. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (cv. Columbia) plants were grown full term in pre-mixed atmospheres with oxygen partial pressures of 2.5, 5.1, 10.1, 16.2, and 21.3 kPa O2, 0.035 kPa CO2 and the balance nitrogen under continuous light. Fully expanded leaves were harvested and processed for light and transmission electron microscopy or for starch quantification. Growth in subambient oxygen concentrations caused changes in leaf anatomy (increased thickness, stomatal density and starch content) that have also been described for plants grown under carbon dioxide enrichment. However, at the lowest oxygen treatment (2.5 kPa), developmental changes occurred that could not be explained by changes in carbon budget caused by suppressed photorespiration, resulting in very thick leaves and a dwarf morphology. This study establishes the leaf parameters that change during growth under low O2, and identifies the lower concentration at which O2 limitation on transport and biosynthetic pathways detrimentally affects leaf development. Grant numbers: NAG5-3756, NAG2-1020, NAG2-1375.

  16. Hpa1 harpin needs nitroxyl terminus to promote vegetative growth and leaf photosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiaojie Li; Liping Han; Yanying Zhao; Zhenzhen You; Chunling Zhang; Zhenzhen You; Hansong Dong; Chunling Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Hpa1 is a harpin protein produced by Xanthomonas oryzae, an important bacterial pathogen of rice, and has the growth-promoting activity in plants. To understand the molecular basis for the function of Hpa1, we generated an inactive variant protein, Hpa1NT, by deleting the nitroxyl-terminal region of the Hpa1 sequence and compared Hpa1NT with the full-length protein in terms of the effects on vegetative growth and related physiological responses in Arabidopsis. When Hpa1 was applied to plants, it acted to enhance the vegetative growth but did not affect the floral development. Enhanced plant growth was accompanied by induced expression of growth-promoting genes in plant leaves. The growth-promoting activity of Hpa1 was further correlated with a physiological consequence shown as promoted leaf photosynthesis as a result of facilitated CO2 conduction through leaf stomata and mesophyll cells. On the contrary, plant growth, growth-promoting gene expression, and the physiological consequence changed little in response to the Hpa1NT treatment. These analyses suggest that Hpa1 requires the nitroxyl-terminus to facilitate CO2 transport inside leaf cells and promote leaf photosynthesis and vegetative growth of the plant.

  17. Leaf Downward Curvature and Delayed Flowering Caused by AtLH Overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUHao; YULin; TANGXiang-Rong; SHENRui-Juan; HEYu-Ke

    2004-01-01

    AtLHgene of Arabidopsis is a BcpLH(leafy head) homolog of Chinese cabbage, which encodes a double-stranded RNA-binding protein related to the curvature of folding leaf leading to the formation of leafy head. In order to elucidate the regulatory function of AtLH in the development of leaf curvature, we made a construct of 35S::AtLHand transformed it to Arabidopsis. In transgenic plants for sense-AtLH, transcripts of AtLH gene were increased significantly in leaves and flowers, giving rise to the AtLH-overexpressed plants in which the rosette leaves curved downward or outward in a manner of enhanced epinastic growth. Compared with normal plants, bolting and flowering time of the transgenic plants was significantly delayed. Moreover, the apical dominance of transgenic plants was weaker in vegetative shoots since more axillary shoots emerged from axil of rosette leaves, while stronger in flowering shoots because fewer cauline inflorescences were observed on the main inflorescence. In other aspects, these transgenic plants exhibited an increase in root-stimulating response to IAA and decrease in root-inhibitory reaction on ABA. It indicates that overexpression of AtLH causes downward curvature of transgenic plants.

  18. Improvements in the transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana em>C24 leaf-discs by Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Graaff, Eric; Hooykaas, P J

    1996-01-01

    We report here an efficient Arabidopsis leafdisc transformation protocol yielding an average transformation frequency of 1.6 transgenic shoots per leaf explant 4 weeks after the bacterial infection period. Subsequent cultivation in vitro is such that a high percentage (85-90%) of the primary tran...

  19. Gene Network Analysis and Functional Studies of Senescence-associated Genes Reveal Novel Regulators of Arabidopsis Leaf Senescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhonghai Li; Jinying Peng; Xing Wen; Hongwei Guo

    2012-01-01

    Plant leaf senescence has been recognized as the last phase of plant development,a highly ordered process regulated by genes known as senescence associated genes (SAGs).However,the function of most of SAGs in regulating leaf senescence as well as regulators of those functionally known SAGs are still unclear.We have previously developed a curated database of genes potentially associated with leaf senescence,the Leaf Senescence Database (LSD).In this study,we built gene networks to identify common regulators of leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana using promoting or delaying senescence genes in LSD.Our results demonstrated that plant hormones cytokinin,auxin,nitric oxide as well as small molecules,such as Ca2+,delay leaf senescence.By contrast,ethylene,ABA,SA and JA as well as small molecules,such as oxygen,promote leaf senescence,altogether supporting the idea that phytohormones play a critical role in regulating leaf senescence.Functional analysis of candidate SAGs in LSD revealed that a WRKY transcription factor WRKY75 and a Cys2/His2-type transcription factor AZF2 are positive regulators of leaf senescence and loss-of-function of WRKY75 or AZF2 delayed leaf senescence.We also found that silencing of a protein phosphatase,AtMKP2,promoted early senescence.Collectively,LSD can serve as a comprehensive resource for systematic study of the molecular mechanism of leaf senescence as well as offer candidate genes for functional analyses.

  20. Peroxisomal polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis is a promising strategy for bioplastic production in high biomass crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbrook, Kimberley; Gebbie, Leigh; Schenk, Peer M; Poirier, Yves; Brumbley, Stevens M

    2011-12-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are bacterial carbon storage polymers with diverse plastic-like properties. PHA biosynthesis in transgenic plants is being developed as a way to reduce the cost and increase the sustainability of industrial PHA production. The homopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is the simplest form of these biodegradable polyesters. Plant peroxisomes contain the substrate molecules and necessary reducing power for PHB biosynthesis, but peroxisomal PHB production has not been explored in whole soil-grown transgenic plants to date. We generated transgenic sugarcane (Saccharum sp.) with the three-enzyme Ralstonia eutropha PHA biosynthetic pathway targeted to peroxisomes. We also introduced the pathway into Arabidopsis thaliana, as a model system for studying and manipulating peroxisomal PHB production. PHB, at levels up to 1.6%-1.8% dry weight, accumulated in sugarcane leaves and A. thaliana seedlings, respectively. In sugarcane, PHB accumulated throughout most leaf cell types in both peroxisomes and vacuoles. A small percentage of total polymer was also identified as the copolymer poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) in both plant species. No obvious deleterious effect was observed on plant growth because of peroxisomal PHA biosynthesis at these levels. This study highlights how using peroxisomal metabolism for PHA biosynthesis could significantly contribute to reaching commercial production levels of PHAs in crop plants.

  1. Programming of Plant Leaf Senescence with Temporal and Inter-Organellar Coordination of Transcriptome in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hee Jung; Kim, Jeongsik; Jeong, Hyobin; Yang, Jin Ok; Lee, Il Hwan; Jun, Ji Hyung; Choi, Seung Hee; Park, Su Jin; Kang, Byeongsoo; Kim, You Wang; Phee, Bong-Kwan; Kim, Jin Hee; Seo, Chaehwa; Park, Charny; Kim, Sang Cheol; Park, Seongjin; Lee, Byungwook; Lee, Sanghyuk; Hwang, Daehee; Lim, Pyung Ok

    2016-01-01

    Plant leaves, harvesting light energy and fixing CO2, are a major source of foods on the earth. Leaves undergo developmental and physiological shifts during their lifespan, ending with senescence and death. We characterized the key regulatory features of the leaf transcriptome during aging by analyzing total- and small-RNA transcriptomes throughout the lifespan of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves at multidimensions, including age, RNA-type, and organelle. Intriguingly, senescing leaves showed more coordinated temporal changes in transcriptomes than growing leaves, with sophisticated regulatory networks comprising transcription factors and diverse small regulatory RNAs. The chloroplast transcriptome, but not the mitochondrial transcriptome, showed major changes during leaf aging, with a strongly shared expression pattern of nuclear transcripts encoding chloroplast-targeted proteins. Thus, unlike animal aging, leaf senescence proceeds with tight temporal and distinct interorganellar coordination of various transcriptomes that would be critical for the highly regulated degeneration and nutrient recycling contributing to plant fitness and productivity. PMID:26966169

  2. Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase lowers leaf respiration and alters photorespiration and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaz, Tiago; Bagard, Matthieu; Pracharoenwattana, Itsara; Lindén, Pernilla; Lee, Chun Pong; Carroll, Adam J; Ströher, Elke; Smith, Steven M; Gardeström, Per; Millar, A Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Malate dehydrogenase (MDH) catalyzes a reversible NAD(+)-dependent-dehydrogenase reaction involved in central metabolism and redox homeostasis between organelle compartments. To explore the role of mitochondrial MDH (mMDH) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), knockout single and double mutants for the highly expressed mMDH1 and lower expressed mMDH2 isoforms were constructed and analyzed. A mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has no detectable mMDH activity but is viable, albeit small and slow growing. Quantitative proteome analysis of mitochondria shows changes in other mitochondrial NAD-linked dehydrogenases, indicating a reorganization of such enzymes in the mitochondrial matrix. The slow-growing mmdh1mmdh2 mutant has elevated leaf respiration rate in the dark and light, without loss of photosynthetic capacity, suggesting that mMDH normally uses NADH to reduce oxaloacetate to malate, which is then exported to the cytosol, rather than to drive mitochondrial respiration. Increased respiratory rate in leaves can account in part for the low net CO(2) assimilation and slow growth rate of mmdh1mmdh2. Loss of mMDH also affects photorespiration, as evidenced by a lower postillumination burst, alterations in CO(2) assimilation/intercellular CO(2) curves at low CO(2), and the light-dependent elevated concentration of photorespiratory metabolites. Complementation of mmdh1mmdh2 with an mMDH cDNA recovered mMDH activity, suppressed respiratory rate, ameliorated changes to photorespiration, and increased plant growth. A previously established inverse correlation between mMDH and ascorbate content in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has been consolidated in Arabidopsis and may potentially be linked to decreased galactonolactone dehydrogenase content in mitochondria in the mutant. Overall, a central yet complex role for mMDH emerges in the partitioning of carbon and energy in leaves, providing new directions for bioengineering of plant growth rate and a new insight into the molecular mechanisms

  3. Branching patterns in leaf starches from Arabidopsis mutants deficient in diverse starch synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fan; Bertoft, Eric; Szydlowski, Nicolas; d'Hulst, Christophe; Seetharaman, Koushik

    2015-01-12

    This is the first report on the cluster structure of transitory starch from Arabidopsis leaves. In addition to wild type, the molecular structures of leaf starch from mutants deficient in starch synthases (SS) including single enzyme mutants ss1-, ss2-, or ss3-, and also double mutants ss1-ss2- and ss1-ss3- were characterized. The mutations resulted in increased amylose content. Clusters from whole starch were isolated by partial hydrolysis using α-amylase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The clusters were then further hydrolyzed with concentrated α-amylase of B. amyloliquefaciens to produce building blocks (α-limit dextrins). Structures of the clusters and their building blocks were characterized by chromatography of samples before and after debranching treatment. While the mutations increased the size of clusters, the reasons were different as reflected by the composition of their unit chains and building blocks. In general, all mutants contained more of a-chains that preferentially increased the number of small building blocks with only two chains. The clusters of the double mutant ss1-ss3- were very large and possessed also more of large building blocks with four or more chains. The results from transitory starch are compared with those from agriculturally important crops in the context that to what extent the Arabidopsis can be a true biotechnological reflection for starch modifications through genetic means.

  4. Chloroplast Dysfunction Causes Multiple Defects in Cell Cycle Progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf Mutant

    KAUST Repository

    Hudik, Elodie

    2014-07-18

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants.

  5. Investigations on the photoregulation of chloroplast movement and leaf positioning in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In-Seob; Cho, Hae-Young; Moni, Akhi; Lee, Ah-Young; Briggs, Winslow R

    2013-01-01

    We recently investigated the roles of the phototropin 1 (PHOT1) LOV (light, oxygen or voltage) domains in mediating phototropic curvature in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings expressing either wild-type PHOT1 or PHOT1 with one or both LOV domains inactivated by a single amino acid replacement. We have now investigated the role of the PHOT1 LOV domains in chloroplast movement and in leaf positioning in response to blue light. Low fluence rate blue light is known to mediate a chloroplast accumulation response and high fluence rate blue light an avoidance response in Arabidopsis leaves. As was the case for phototropism, LOV2 of PHOT1 is essential for chloroplast accumulation and LOV1 is dispensable. PHOT1 LOV2 is also essential to maintain developing primary leaves in a horizontal position under white light from above and LOV1 is again dispensable. A red light pulse given to dark-adapted light-grown plants followed by 2 h of darkness enhances both the chloroplast accumulation response under dim blue light and the chloroplast avoidance response under strong blue light. The effect is far-red reversible. This photoreversible response is normal in a phyB null mutant but does not appear in a phyA null mutant. These results suggest that phyA mediates the enhancement, induced by a red light pulse, of blue light-induced chloroplast movements.

  6. Chloroplast dysfunction causes multiple defects in cell cycle progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudik, Elodie; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Domenichini, Séverine; Bourge, Mickaël; Soubigout-Taconnat, Ludivine; Mazubert, Christelle; Yi, Dalong; Bujaldon, Sandrine; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; De Veylder, Lieven; Bergounioux, Catherine; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile

    2014-09-01

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants.

  7. Brain peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trompier, D; Vejux, A; Zarrouk, A; Gondcaille, C; Geillon, F; Nury, T; Savary, S; Lizard, G

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are essential organelles in higher eukaryotes as they play a major role in numerous metabolic pathways and redox homeostasis. Some peroxisomal abnormalities, which are often not compatible with life or normal development, were identified in severe demyelinating and neurodegenerative brain diseases. The metabolic roles of peroxisomes, especially in the brain, are described and human brain peroxisomal disorders resulting from a peroxisome biogenesis or a single peroxisomal enzyme defect are listed. The brain abnormalities encountered in these disorders (demyelination, oxidative stress, inflammation, cell death, neuronal migration, differentiation) are described and their pathogenesis are discussed. Finally, the contribution of peroxisomal dysfunctions to the alterations of brain functions during aging and to the development of Alzheimer's disease is considered.

  8. Differentially Phased Leaf Growth and Movements in Arabidopsis Depend on Coordinated Circadian and Light Regulation[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbusch, Tino; Michaud, Olivier; Xenarios, Ioannis; Fankhauser, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to vastly studied hypocotyl growth, little is known about diel regulation of leaf growth and its coordination with movements such as changes in leaf elevation angle (hyponasty). We developed a 3D live-leaf growth analysis system enabling simultaneous monitoring of growth and movements. Leaf growth is maximal several hours after dawn, requires light, and is regulated by daylength, suggesting coupling between growth and metabolism. We identify both blade and petiole positioning as important components of leaf movements in Arabidopsis thaliana and reveal a temporal delay between growth and movements. In hypocotyls, the combination of circadian expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) and PIF5 and their light-regulated protein stability drives rhythmic hypocotyl elongation with peak growth at dawn. We find that PIF4 and PIF5 are not essential to sustain rhythmic leaf growth but influence their amplitude. Furthermore, EARLY FLOWERING3, a member of the evening complex (EC), is required to maintain the correct phase between growth and movement. Our study shows that the mechanisms underlying rhythmic hypocotyl and leaf growth differ. Moreover, we reveal the temporal relationship between leaf elongation and movements and demonstrate the importance of the EC for the coordination of these phenotypic traits. PMID:25281688

  9. The ABCG transporter PEC1/ABCG32 is required for the formation of the developing leaf cuticle in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Guillaume; Garroum, Imène; Mazurek, Sylwester; Daraspe, Jean; Mucciolo, Antonio; Sankar, Martial; Humbel, Bruno M; Nawrath, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The cuticle is an essential diffusion barrier on aerial surfaces of land plants whose structural component is the polyester cutin. The PERMEABLE CUTICLE1/ABCG32 (PEC1) transporter is involved in plant cuticle formation in Arabidopsis. The gpat6 pec1 and gpat4 gapt8 pec1 double and triple mutants are characterized. Their PEC1-specific contributions to aliphatic cutin composition and cuticle formation during plant development are revealed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The composition of cutin changes during rosette leaf expansion in Arabidopsis. C16:0 monomers are in higher abundance in expanding than in fully expanded leaves. The atypical cutin monomer C18:2 dicarboxylic acid is more prominent in fully expanded leaves. Findings point to differences in the regulation of several pathways of cutin precursor synthesis. PEC1 plays an essential role during expansion of the rosette leaf cuticle. The reduction of C16 monomers in the pec1 mutant during leaf expansion is unlikely to cause permeability of the leaf cuticle because the gpat6 mutant with even fewer C16:0 monomers forms a functional rosette leaf cuticle at all stages of development. PEC1/ABCG32 transport activity affects cutin composition and cuticle structure in a specific and non-redundant fashion.

  10. YUCCA6 over-expression demonstrates auxin function in delaying leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Jeong Im

    2011-04-21

    The Arabidopsis thaliana YUCCA family of flavin monooxygenase proteins catalyses a rate-limiting step in de novo auxin biosynthesis. A YUCCA6 activation mutant, yuc6-1D, has been shown to contain an elevated free IAA level and to display typical high-auxin phenotypes. It is reported here that Arabidopsis plants over-expressing YUCCA6, such as the yuc6-1D activation mutant and 35S:YUC6 transgenic plants, displayed dramatic longevity. In addition, plants over-expressing YUCCA6 exhibited classical, delayed dark-induced and hormone-induced senescence in assays using detached rosette leaves. However, plants over-expressing an allele of YUCCA6, that carries mutations in the NADPH cofactor binding site, exhibited neither delayed leaf senescence phenotypes nor phenotypes typical of auxin overproduction. When the level of free IAA was reduced in yuc6-1D by conjugation to lysine, yuc6-1D leaves senesced at a rate similar to the wild-type leaves. Dark-induced senescence in detached leaves was accompanied by a decrease in their free IAA content, by the reduced expression of auxin biosynthesis enzymes such as YUCCA1 and YUCCA6 that increase cellular free IAA levels, and by the increased expression of auxin-conjugating enzymes encoded by the GH3 genes that reduce the cellular free auxin levels. Reduced transcript abundances of SAG12, NAC1, and NAC6 during senescence in yuc6-1D compared with the wild type suggested that auxin delays senescence by directly or indirectly regulating the expression of senescence-associated genes. 2011 The Author(s).

  11. Structural assessment of the impact of environmental constraints on Arabidopsis thaliana leaf growth: a 3D approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Nathalie; Massonnet, Catherine; Dauzat, Myriam; Granier, Christine

    2012-09-01

    Light and soil water content affect leaf surface area expansion through modifications in epidermal cell numbers and area, while effects on leaf thickness and mesophyll cell volumes are far less documented. Here, three-dimensional imaging was applied in a study of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf growth to determine leaf thickness and the cellular organization of mesophyll tissues under moderate soil water deficit and two cumulative light conditions. In contrast to surface area, thickness was highly conserved in response to water deficit under both low and high cumulative light regimes. Unlike epidermal and palisade mesophyll tissues, no reductions in cell number were observed in the spongy mesophyll; cells had rather changed in volume and shape. Furthermore, leaf features of a selection of genotypes affected in leaf functioning were analysed. The low-starch mutant pgm had very thick leaves because of unusually large palisade mesophyll cells, together with high levels of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. By means of an open stomata mutant and a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase overexpressor, it was shown that stomatal conductance does not necessarily have a major impact on leaf dimensions and cellular organization, pointing to additional mechanisms for the control of CO(2) diffusion under high and low stomatal conductance, respectively.

  12. Ethylene Response Factor6 acts as a central regulator of leaf growth under water-limiting conditions in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Marieke; Skirycz, Aleksandra; Claeys, Hannes; Maleux, Katrien; Dhondt, Stijn; De Bodt, Stefanie; Vanden Bossche, Robin; De Milde, Liesbeth; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Matsui, Minami; Inzé, Dirk

    2013-05-01

    Leaf growth is a complex developmental process that is continuously fine-tuned by the environment. Various abiotic stresses, including mild drought stress, have been shown to inhibit leaf growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we identify the redundant Arabidopsis transcription factors ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR5 (ERF5) and ERF6 as master regulators that adapt leaf growth to environmental changes. ERF5 and ERF6 gene expression is induced very rapidly and specifically in actively growing leaves after sudden exposure to osmotic stress that mimics mild drought. Subsequently, enhanced ERF6 expression inhibits cell proliferation and leaf growth by a process involving gibberellin and DELLA signaling. Using an ERF6-inducible overexpression line, we demonstrate that the gibberellin-degrading enzyme GIBBERELLIN 2-OXIDASE6 is transcriptionally induced by ERF6 and that, consequently, DELLA proteins are stabilized. As a result, ERF6 gain-of-function lines are dwarfed and hypersensitive to osmotic stress, while the growth of erf5erf6 loss-of-function mutants is less affected by stress. Besides its role in plant growth under stress, ERF6 also activates the expression of a plethora of osmotic stress-responsive genes, including the well-known stress tolerance genes STZ, MYB51, and WRKY33. Interestingly, activation of the stress tolerance genes by ERF6 occurs independently from the ERF6-mediated growth inhibition. Together, these data fit into a leaf growth regulatory model in which ERF5 and ERF6 form a missing link between the previously observed stress-induced 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid accumulation and DELLA-mediated cell cycle exit and execute a dual role by regulating both stress tolerance and growth inhibition.

  13. Effects of mutations in the Arabidopsis Cold Shock Domain Protein 3 (AtCSP3) gene on leaf cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongil; Karlson, Dale

    2012-08-01

    The cold shock domain is among the most evolutionarily conserved nucleic acid binding domains from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes, including plants. Although eukaryotic cold shock domain proteins have been extensively studied as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators during various developmental processes, their functional roles in plants remains poorly understood. In this study, AtCSP3 (At2g17870), which is one of four Arabidopsis thaliana c old s hock domain proteins (AtCSPs), was functionally characterized. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed high expression of AtCSP3 in reproductive and meristematic tissues. A homozygous atcsp3 loss-of-function mutant exhibits an overall reduced seedling size, stunted and orbicular rosette leaves, reduced petiole length, and curled leaf blades. Palisade mesophyll cells are smaller and more circular in atcsp3 leaves. Cell size analysis indicated that the reduced size of the circular mesophyll cells appears to be generated by a reduction of cell length along the leaf-length axis, resulting in an orbicular leaf shape. It was also determined that leaf cell expansion is impaired for lateral leaf development in the atcsp3 loss-of-function mutant, but leaf cell proliferation is not affected. AtCSP3 loss-of-function resulted in a dramatic reduction of LNG1 transcript, a gene that is involved in two-dimensional leaf polarity regulation. Transient subcellular localization of AtCSP3 in onion epidermal cells confirmed a nucleocytoplasmic localization pattern. Collectively, these data suggest that AtCSP3 is functionally linked to the regulation of leaf length by affecting LNG1 transcript accumulation during leaf development. A putative function of AtCSP3 as an RNA binding protein is also discussed in relation to leaf development.

  14. Overexpressing Arabidopsis ABF3 increases tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses and reduces leaf size in alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Su, Guoxia; Li, Min; Ke, Qingbo; Kim, Soo Young; Li, Hongbing; Huang, Jin; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xi-Ping; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2016-12-01

    Arabidopsis ABSCISIC ACID-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR 3 (ABF3), a bZIP transcription factor, plays an important role in regulating multiple stress responses in plants. Overexpressing AtABF3 increases tolerance to various stresses in several plant species. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), one of the most important perennial forage crops worldwide, has high yields, high nutritional value, and good palatability and is widely distributed in irrigated and semi-arid regions throughout the world. However, drought and salt stress pose major constraints to alfalfa production. In this study, we developed transgenic alfalfa plants (cv. Xinjiang Daye) expressing AtABF3 under the control of the sweetpotato oxidative stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SAF plants) via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. After drought stress treatment, we selected two transgenic lines with high expression of AtABF3, SAF5 and SAF6, for further characterization. Under normal conditions, SAF plants showed smaller leaf size compared to non-transgenic (NT) plants, while no other morphological changes were observed. Moreover, SAF plants exhibited enhanced drought stress tolerance and better growth under drought stress treatment, which was accompanied by a reduced transpiration rate and lower reactive oxygen species contents. In addition, SAF plants showed an increased tolerance to salt and oxidative stress. Therefore, these transgenic AtABF3 alfalfa plants might be useful for breeding forage crops with enhanced tolerance to environmental stress for use in sustainable agriculture on marginal lands.

  15. Genetic analyses of the interaction between abscisic acid and gibberellins in the control of leaf development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ming-Hau; Shen, Hwei-Ling; Cheng, Wan-Hsing

    2015-07-01

    Although abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs) play pivotal roles in many physiological processes in plants, their interaction in the control of leaf growth remains elusive. In this study, genetic analyses of ABA and GA interplay in leaf growth were performed in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results indicate that for the ABA and GA interaction, leaf growth of both the aba2/ga20ox1 and aba2/GA20ox1 plants, which were derived from the crosses of aba2×ga20ox1 and aba2×GA20ox1 overexpressor, respectively, exhibits partially additive effects but is similar to the aba2 mutant. Consistently, the transcriptome analysis suggests that a substantial proportion (45-65%) of the gene expression profile of aba2/ga20ox1 and aba2/GA20ox1 plants overlap and share a pattern similar to the aba2 mutant. Thus, these data suggest that ABA deficiency dominates leaf growth regardless of GA levels. Moreover, the gene ontology (GO) analysis indicates gene enrichment in the categories of hormone response, developmental and metabolic processes, and cell wall organization in these three genotypes. Leaf developmental genes are also involved in the ABA-GA interaction. Collectively, these data support that the genetic relationship of ABA and GA interaction involves multiple coordinated pathways rather than a simple linear pathway for the regulation of leaf growth.

  16. Higher peroxidase activity, leaf nutrient contents and carbon isotope composition changes in Arabidopsis thaliana are related to rutin stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M Iftikhar; Reigosa, Manuel J

    2014-09-15

    Rutin, a plant secondary metabolite that is used in cosmetics and food additive and has known medicinal properties, protects plants from UV-B radiation and diseases. Rutin has been suggested to have potential in weed management, but its mode of action at physiological level is unknown. Here, we report the biochemical, physiological and oxidative response of Arabidopsis thaliana to rutin at micromolar concentrations. It was found that fresh weight; leaf mineral contents (nitrogen, sodium, potassium, copper and aluminum) were decreased following 1 week exposure to rutin. Arabidopsis roots generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species after rutin treatment, consequently increasing membrane lipid peroxidation, decreasing leaf Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+) contents and losing root viability. Carbon isotope composition in A. thaliana leaves was less negative after rutin application than the control. Carbon isotope discrimination values were decreased following rutin treatment, with the highest reduction compared to the control at 750μM rutin. Rutin also inhibited the ratio of CO2 from leaf to air (ci/ca) at all concentrations. Total protein contents in A. thaliana leaves were decreased following rutin treatment. It was concluded carbon isotope discrimination coincided with protein degradation, increase lipid peroxidation and a decrease in ci/ca values may be the primary action site of rutin. The present results suggest that rutin possesses allelopathic potential and could be used as a candidate to develop environment friendly natural herbicide.

  17. SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Directly Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Domain of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE and Negatively Regulates Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dong; Cui, Yanjiao; Xu, Fan; Xu, Xinxin; Gao, Guanxiao; Wang, Yaxin; Guo, Zhaoxia; Wang, Dan; Wang, Ning Ning

    2015-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the regulation of leaf senescence. We previously reported that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (AtSARK) positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we report the involvement of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C-type protein phosphatase, SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (SSPP), in the negative regulation of Arabidopsis leaf senescence. SSPP transcript levels decreased greatly during both natural senescence and SARK-induced precocious senescence. Overexpression of SSPP significantly delayed leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that the cytosol-localized SSPP could interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the plasma membrane-localized AtSARK. In vitro assays showed that SSPP has protein phosphatase function and can dephosphorylate the cytosolic domain of AtSARK. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of SSPP effectively rescued AtSARK-induced precocious leaf senescence and changes in hormonal responses. All our results suggested that SSPP functions in sustaining proper leaf longevity and preventing early senescence by suppressing or perturbing SARK-mediated senescence signal transduction.

  18. Dynamics of Jasmonate Metabolism upon Flowering and across Leaf Stress Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Widemann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The jasmonic acid (JA signaling pathway plays important roles in adaptation of plants to environmental cues and in specific steps of their development, particularly in reproduction. Recent advances in metabolic studies have highlighted intricate mechanisms that govern enzymatic conversions within the jasmonate family. Here we analyzed jasmonate profile changes upon Arabidopsis thaliana flower development and investigated the contribution of catabolic pathways that were known to turnover the active hormonal compound jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile upon leaf stress. We report a rapid decline of JA-Ile upon flower opening, concomitant with the massive accumulation of its most oxidized catabolite, 12COOH-JA-Ile. Detailed genetic analysis identified CYP94C1 as the major player in this process. CYP94C1 is one out of three characterized cytochrome P450 enzymes that define an oxidative JA-Ile turnover pathway, besides a second, hydrolytic pathway represented by the amido-hydrolases IAR3 and ILL6. Expression studies combined with reporter gene analysis revealed the dominant expression of CYP94C1 in mature anthers, consistent with the established role of JA signaling in male fertility. Significant CYP94B1 expression was also evidenced in stamen filaments, but surprisingly, CYP94B1 deficiency was not associated with significant changes in JA profiles. Finally, we compared global flower JA profiles with those previously reported in leaves reacting to mechanical wounding or submitted to infection by the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. These comparisons revealed distinct dynamics of JA accumulation and conversions in these three biological systems. Leaf injury boosts a strong and transient JA and JA-Ile accumulation that evolves rapidly into a profile dominated by ω-oxidized and/or Ile-conjugated derivatives. In contrast, B. cinerea-infected leaves contain mostly unconjugated jasmonates, about half of this content being ω-oxidized. Finally, developing

  19. Dynamics of Jasmonate Metabolism upon Flowering and across Leaf Stress Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widemann, Emilie; Smirnova, Ekaterina; Aubert, Yann; Miesch, Laurence; Heitz, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway plays important roles in adaptation of plants to environmental cues and in specific steps of their development, particularly in reproduction. Recent advances in metabolic studies have highlighted intricate mechanisms that govern enzymatic conversions within the jasmonate family. Here we analyzed jasmonate profile changes upon Arabidopsis thaliana flower development and investigated the contribution of catabolic pathways that were known to turnover the active hormonal compound jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) upon leaf stress. We report a rapid decline of JA-Ile upon flower opening, concomitant with the massive accumulation of its most oxidized catabolite, 12COOH-JA-Ile. Detailed genetic analysis identified CYP94C1 as the major player in this process. CYP94C1 is one out of three characterized cytochrome P450 enzymes that define an oxidative JA-Ile turnover pathway, besides a second, hydrolytic pathway represented by the amido-hydrolases IAR3 and ILL6. Expression studies combined with reporter gene analysis revealed the dominant expression of CYP94C1 in mature anthers, consistent with the established role of JA signaling in male fertility. Significant CYP94B1 expression was also evidenced in stamen filaments, but surprisingly, CYP94B1 deficiency was not associated with significant changes in JA profiles. Finally, we compared global flower JA profiles with those previously reported in leaves reacting to mechanical wounding or submitted to infection by the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. These comparisons revealed distinct dynamics of JA accumulation and conversions in these three biological systems. Leaf injury boosts a strong and transient JA and JA-Ile accumulation that evolves rapidly into a profile dominated by ω-oxidized and/or Ile-conjugated derivatives. In contrast, B. cinerea-infected leaves contain mostly unconjugated jasmonates, about half of this content being ω-oxidized. Finally, developing flowers present an

  20. Distinct palisade tissue development processes promoted by leaf autonomous signalling and long-distance signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munekage, Yuri Nakajima; Inoue, Shio; Yoneda, Yuki; Yokota, Akiho

    2015-06-01

    Plants develop palisade tissue consisting of cylindrical mesophyll cells located at the adaxial side of leaves in response to high light. To understand high light signalling in palisade tissue development, we investigated leaf autonomous and long-distance signal responses of palisade tissue development using Arabidopsis thaliana. Illumination of a developing leaf with high light induced cell height elongation, whereas illumination of mature leaves with high light increased cell density and suppressed cell width expansion in palisade tissue of new leaves. Examination using phototropin1 phototropin2 showed that blue light signalling mediated by phototropins was involved in cell height elongation of the leaf autonomous response rather than the cell density increase induced by long-distance signalling. Hydrogen peroxide treatment induced cylindrical palisade tissue cell formation in both a leaf autonomous and long-distance manner, suggesting involvement of oxidative signals. Although constitutive expression of transcription factors involved in systemic-acquired acclimation to excess light, ZAT10 and ZAT12, induced cylindrical palisade tissue cell formation, knockout of these genes did not affect cylindrical palisade tissue cell formation. We conclude that two distinct signalling pathways - leaf autonomous signalling mostly dependent on blue light signalling and long-distance signalling from mature leaves that sense high light and oxidative stress - control palisade tissue development in A. thaliana.

  1. Leaf biomechanical properties in Arabidopsis thaliana polysaccharide mutants affect drought survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Ronald; Boak, Merewyn; Nagle, Kayla; Peethambaran, Bela; Layton, Bradley

    2015-11-26

    Individual sugars are the building blocks of cell wall polysaccharides, which in turn comprise a plant׳s overall architectural structure. But which sugars play the most prominent role in maintaining a plant׳s mechanical stability during large cellular deformations induced by drought? We investigated the individual contributions of several genes that are involved in the synthesis of monosaccharides which are important for cell wall structure. We then measured drought tolerance and mechanical integrity during simulated drought in Arabidopsis thaliana. To assess mechanical properties, we designed a small-scale tensile tester for measuring failure strain, ultimate tensile stress, work to failure, toughness, and elastic modulus of 6-week-old leaves in both hydrated and drought-simulated states. Col-0 mutants used in this study include those deficient in lignin, cellulose, components of hemicellulose such as xylose and fucose, the pectic components arabinose and rhamnose, as well as mutants with enhanced arabinose and total pectin content. We found that drought tolerance is correlated to the mechanical and architectural stability of leaves as they experience dehydration. Of the mutants, S096418 with mutations for reduced xylose and galactose was the least drought tolerant, while the arabinose-altered CS8578 mutants were the least affected by water loss. There were also notable correlations between drought tolerance and mechanical properties in the diminished rhamnose mutant, CS8575 and the dehydrogenase-disrupted S120106. Our findings suggest that components of hemicellulose and pectins affect leaf biomechanical properties and may play an important role in the ability of this model system to survive drought.

  2. Blue light-dependent nuclear positioning in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Kosei; Sakai, Tatsuya; Takagi, Shingo

    2007-09-01

    The plant nucleus changes its intracellular position not only upon cell division and cell growth but also in response to environmental stimuli such as light. We found that the nucleus takes different intracellular positions depending on blue light in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells. Under dark conditions, nuclei in mesophyll cells were positioned at the center of the bottom of cells (dark position). Under blue light at 100 mumol m(-2) s(-1), in contrast, nuclei were located along the anticlinal walls (light position). The nuclear positioning from the dark position to the light position was fully induced within a few hours of blue light illumination, and it was a reversible response. The response was also observed in epidermal cells, which have no chloroplasts, suggesting that the nucleus has the potential actively to change its position without chloroplasts. Light-dependent nuclear positioning was induced specifically by blue light at >50 mumol m(-2) s(-1). Furthermore, the response to blue light was induced in phot1 but not in phot2 and phot1phot2 mutants. Unexpectedly, we also found that nuclei as well as chloroplasts in phot2 and phot1phot2 mutants took unusual intracellular positions under both dark and light conditions. The lack of the response and the unusual positioning of nuclei and chloroplasts in the phot2 mutant were recovered by externally introducing the PHOT2 gene into the mutant. These results indicate that phot2 mediates the blue light-dependent nuclear positioning and the proper positioning of nuclei and chloroplasts. This is the first characterization of light-dependent nuclear positioning in spermatophytes.

  3. Endopolyploidy as a potential alternative adaptive strategy for Arabidopsis leaf size variation in response to UV-B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegas, Vasilis C; Wargent, Jason J; Pesquet, Edouard; Granqvist, Emma; Paul, Nigel D; Doonan, John H

    2014-06-01

    The extent of endoreduplication in leaf growth is group- or even species-specific, and its adaptive role is still unclear. A survey of Arabidopsis accessions for variation at the level of endopolyploidy, cell number, and cell size in leaves revealed extensive genetic variation in endopolyploidy level. High endopolyploidy is associated with increased leaf size, both in natural and in genetically unstructured (mapping) populations. The underlying genes were identified as quantitative trait loci that control endopolyploidy in nature by modulating the progression of successive endocycles during organ development. This complex genetic architecture indicates an adaptive mechanism that allows differential organ growth over a broad geographic range and under stressful environmental conditions. UV-B radiation was identified as a significant positive climatic predictor for high endopolyploidy. Arabidopsis accessions carrying the increasing alleles for endopolyploidy also have enhanced tolerance to UV-B radiation. UV-absorbing secondary metabolites provide an additional protective strategy in accessions that display low endopolyploidy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that high constitutive endopolyploidy is a significant predictor for organ size in natural populations and is likely to contribute to sustaining plant growth under high incident UV radiation. Endopolyploidy may therefore form part of the range of UV-B tolerance mechanisms that exist in natural populations.

  4. Leaf expansion in Arabidopsis is controlled by a TCP-NGA regulatory module likely conserved in distantly related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Patricia; Navarrete-Gómez, Marisa; Carbonero, Pilar; Oñate-Sánchez, Luis; Ferrándiz, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The NGATHA (NGA) clade of transcription factors (TFs) forms a small subfamily of four members in Arabidopsis thaliana. NGA genes act redundantly to direct the development of apical tissues in the gynoecium, where they have been shown to be essential for style and stigma specification. In addition, NGA genes have a more general role in controlling lateral organ growth. The four NGA genes in Arabidopsis are expressed in very similar domains, although little is known about the nature of their putative regulators. Here, we have identified a conserved region within the four NGA promoters that we have used as a bait to screen a yeast library, aiming to identify such NGA regulators. Three members of the TCP family of TFs, named after the founding factors TEOSINTE BRANCHED 1, CYCLOIDEA and PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR 1 AND 2), were recovered from this screening, of which two [TCP2 and TCP3, members of the CINCINNATA (CIN) family of TCP genes (CIN-TCP) subclade] were shown to activate the NGA3 promoter in planta. We provide evidence that support that CIN-TCP genes are true regulators of NGA gene expression, and that part of the CIN-TCP role in leaf development is mediated by NGA upregulation. Moreover, we have found that this TCP-NGA regulatory interaction is likely conserved in angiosperms, including important crop species, for which the regulation of leaf development is a target for biotechnological improvement.

  5. Bundle-sheath aquaporins play a role in controlling Arabidopsis leaf hydraulic conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Nir; Shatil-Cohen, Arava; Moshelion, Menachem

    2015-01-01

    The role of molecular mechanisms in the regulation of leaf hydraulics (K(leaf)) is still not well understood. We hypothesized that aquaporins (AQPs) in the bundle sheath may regulate K(leaf). To examine this hypothesis, AQP genes were constitutively silenced using artificial microRNAs and recovery was achieved by targeting the expression of the tobacco AQP (NtAQP1) to bundle-sheath cells in the silenced plants. Constitutively silenced PIP1 plants exhibited decreased PIP1 transcript levels and decreased K(leaf). However, once the plants were recovered with NtAQP1, their K(leaf) values were almost the same as those of WT plants. We also demonstrate the important role of ABA, acting via AQP, in that recovery and K(leaf) regulation. These results support our previously raised hypothesis concerning the role of bundle-sheath AQPs in the regulation of leaf hydraulics.

  6. High-contrast three-dimensional imaging of the Arabidopsis leaf enables the analysis of cell dimensions in the epidermis and mesophyll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granier Christine

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the wide spread application of confocal and multiphoton laser scanning microscopy in plant biology, leaf phenotype assessment still relies on two-dimensional imaging with a limited appreciation of the cells' structural context and an inherent inaccuracy of cell measurements. Here, a successful procedure for the three-dimensional imaging and analysis of plant leaves is presented. Results The procedure was developed based on a range of developmental stages, from leaf initiation to senescence, of soil-grown Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh. Rigorous clearing of tissues, made possible by enhanced leaf permeability to clearing agents, allowed the optical sectioning of the entire leaf thickness by both confocal and multiphoton microscopy. The superior image quality, in resolution and contrast, obtained by the latter technique enabled the three-dimensional visualisation of leaf morphology at the individual cell level, cell segmentation and the construction of structural models. Image analysis macros were developed to measure leaf thickness and tissue proportions, as well as to determine for the epidermis and all layers of mesophyll tissue, cell density, volume, length and width. For mesophyll tissue, the proportion of intercellular spaces and the surface areas of cells were also estimated. The performance of the procedure was demonstrated for the expanding 6th leaf of the Arabidopsis rosette. Furthermore, it was proven to be effective for leaves of another dicotyledon, apple (Malus domestica Borkh., which has a very different cellular organisation. Conclusions The pipeline for the three-dimensional imaging and analysis of plant leaves provides the means to include variables on internal tissues in leaf growth studies and the assessment of leaf phenotypes. It also allows the visualisation and quantification of alterations in leaf structure alongside changes in leaf functioning observed under environmental constraints. Data

  7. Modulation of ethylene- and heat-controlled hyponastic leaf movement in Arabidopsis thaliana by the plant defence hormones jasmonate and salicylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanten, M. van; Ritsema, T.; Polko, J.K.; Leon-Reyes, A.; Voesenek, L.A.C.J.; Millenaar, F.F.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Peeters, A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Upward leaf movement (hyponastic growth) is adopted by several plant species including Arabidopsis thaliana, as a mechanism to escape adverse growth conditions. Among the signals that trigger hyponastic growth are, the gaseous hormone ethylene, low light intensities, and supra-optimal temperatures (

  8. Re-evaluating the role of phenolic glycosides and ascorbic acid in ozone scavenging in the leaf apoplast of Arabidopsis thaliana L

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine if membrane-bound G-proteins are involved in the regulation of defense responses against ozone in the leaf apoplast, the apoplastic concentrations of ascorbic acid and phenolic glycosides in Arabidopsis thaliana L. lines with null mutations in the alpha- and beta-subunits were compared ...

  9. Delayed degradation of chlorophylls and photosynthetic proteins in Arabidopsis autophagy mutants during stress-induced leaf yellowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Ye-Sol; Park, Ohkmae K; Hörtensteiner, Stefan; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2014-07-01

    Plant autophagy, one of the essential proteolysis systems, balances proteome and nutrient levels in cells of the whole plant. Autophagy has been studied by analysing Arabidopsis thaliana autophagy-defective atg mutants, but the relationship between autophagy and chlorophyll (Chl) breakdown during stress-induced leaf yellowing remains unclear. During natural senescence or under abiotic-stress conditions, extensive cell death and early yellowing occurs in the leaves of atg mutants. A new finding is revealed that atg5 and atg7 mutants exhibit a functional stay-green phenotype under mild abiotic-stress conditions, but leaf yellowing proceeds normally in wild-type leaves under these conditions. Under mild salt stress, atg5 leaves retained high levels of Chls and all photosystem proteins and maintained a normal chloroplast structure. Furthermore, a double mutant of atg5 and non-functional stay-green nonyellowing1-1 (atg5 nye1-1) showed a much stronger stay-green phenotype than either single mutant. Taking these results together, it is proposed that autophagy functions in the non-selective catabolism of Chls and photosynthetic proteins during stress-induced leaf yellowing, in addition to the selective degradation of Chl-apoprotein complexes in the chloroplasts through the senescence-induced STAY-GREEN1/NYE1 and Chl catabolic enzymes.

  10. Leaf Age-Dependent Photoprotective and Antioxidative Response Mechanisms to Paraquat-Induced Oxidative Stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustaka, Julietta; Tanou, Georgia; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P.; Moustakas, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana young and mature leaves to the herbicide paraquat (Pq) resulted in a localized increase of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the leaf veins and the neighboring mesophyll cells, but this increase was not similar in the two leaf types. Increased H2O2 production was concomitant with closed reaction centers (qP). Thirty min after Pq exposure despite the induction of the photoprotective mechanism of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in mature leaves, H2O2 production was lower in young leaves mainly due to the higher increase activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Later, 60 min after Pq exposure, the total antioxidant capacity of young leaves was not sufficient to scavenge the excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) that were formed, and thus, a higher H2O2 accumulation in young leaves occurred. The energy allocation of absorbed light in photosystem II (PSII) suggests the existence of a differential photoprotective regulatory mechanism in the two leaf types to the time-course Pq exposure accompanied by differential antioxidant protection mechanisms. It is concluded that tolerance to Pq-induced oxidative stress is related to the redox state of quinone A (QA). PMID:26096005

  11. Leaf Age-Dependent Photoprotective and Antioxidative Response Mechanisms to Paraquat-Induced Oxidative Stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julietta Moustaka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana young and mature leaves to the herbicide paraquat (Pq resulted in a localized increase of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in the leaf veins and the neighboring mesophyll cells, but this increase was not similar in the two leaf types. Increased H2O2 production was concomitant with closed reaction centers (qP. Thirty min after Pq exposure despite the induction of the photoprotective mechanism of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ in mature leaves, H2O2 production was lower in young leaves mainly due to the higher increase activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX. Later, 60 min after Pq exposure, the total antioxidant capacity of young leaves was not sufficient to scavenge the excess reactive oxygen species (ROS that were formed, and thus, a higher H2O2 accumulation in young leaves occurred. The energy allocation of absorbed light in photosystem II (PSII suggests the existence of a differential photoprotective regulatory mechanism in the two leaf types to the time-course Pq exposure accompanied by differential antioxidant protection mechanisms. It is concluded that tolerance to Pq-induced oxidative stress is related to the redox state of quinone A (QA.

  12. H2O2 in plant peroxisomes: an in vivo analysis uncovers a Ca2+-dependent scavenging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Alex; Drago, Ilaria; Behera, Smrutisanjita; Zottini, Michela; Pizzo, Paola; Schroeder, Julian I; Pozzan, Tullio; Schiavo, Fiorella Lo

    2010-01-01

    Summary Oxidative stress is a major challenge for all cells living in an oxygen-based world. Among reactive oxygen species, H2O2, is a well known toxic molecule and, nowadays, considered a specific component of several signalling pathways. In order to gain insight into the roles played by H2O2 in plant cells, it is necessary to have a reliable, specific and non-invasive methodology for its in vivo detection. Hence, the genetically-encoded H2O2 sensor HyPer was expressed in plant cells in different subcellular compartments such as cytoplasm and peroxisomes. Moreover, with the use of the new GFP-based Cameleon Ca2+ indicator, D3cpv-KVK-SKL, targeted to peroxisomes, we demonstrated that the induction of cytoplasmic Ca2+ increase is followed by Ca2+ rise in the peroxisomal lumen. The analyses of HyPer fluorescence ratios were performed in leaf peroxisomes of tobacco and pre- and post-bolting Arabidopsis plants. These analyses allowed us to demonstrate that an intraperoxisomal Ca2+ rise in vivo stimulates catalase activity, increasing peroxisomal H2O2 scavenging efficiency. PMID:20230493

  13. Ectopic expression of soybean GmKNT1 in Arabidopsis results in altered leaf morphology and flower identity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Liu; Da Ha; Zongming Xie; Chunmei Wang; Huiwen Wang; Wanke Zhang; Jinsong Zhang; Shouyi Chen

    2008-01-01

    Plant morphology is specified by leaves and flowers, and the shoot apical meristem (SAM) defines the architecture of plant leaves and flowers. Here, we reported the characterization of a soybean KNOX gene GmKNT1, which was highly homologous to Arabidopsis STM. The GmKNT1 was strongly expressed in roots, flowers and developing seeds. Its expression could be induced by IAA, ABA and JA, but inhibited by GA or cytokinin. Staining of the transgenic plants overexpressing GmKNT1-GUS fusion protein revealed that the GmKNT1 was mainly expressed at lobe region, SAM of young leaves, sepal and carpel, not in seed and mature leaves. Scanning electron micros- copy (SEM) disclosed multiple changes in morphology of the epidermal cells and stigma. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpress- ing the GmKNT1 showed small and lobed leaves, shortened internodes and small clustered inflorescence. The lobed leaves might result from the function of the meristems located at the boundary of the leaf. Compared with wild type plants, transgenic plants had higher ex- pression of the SAM-related genes including the CUP, WUS, CUC1, KNAT2 and KNAT6. These results indicated that the GmKNT1 could affect multiple aspects of plant growth and development by regulation of downstream genes expression.

  14. WRKY40 and WRKY6 act downstream of the green leaf volatile E-2-hexenal in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabella, Rossana; Rauwerda, Han; Allmann, Silke; Scala, Alessandra; Spyropoulou, Eleni A; de Vries, Michel; Boersma, Maaike R; Breit, Timo M; Haring, Michel A; Schuurink, Robert C

    2015-09-01

    Plants are known to be responsive to volatiles, but knowledge about the molecular players involved in transducing their perception remains scarce. We study the response of Arabidopsis thaliana to E-2-hexenal, one of the green leaf volatiles (GLV) that is produced upon wounding, herbivory or infection with pathogens. We have taken a transcriptomics approach to identify genes that are induced by E-2-hexenal, but not by defence hormones or other GLVs. Furthermore, by studying the promoters of early E-2-hexenal-induced genes we determined that the only statistically enriched cis-element was the W-box motif. Since members of the plant-specific family of WRKY transcription factors act in trans on this cis-element, we focused on WRKY6, 40 and 53 that were most strongly induced by E-2-hexenal. Root elongation of Arabidopsis seedlings of the wrky40 wrky6 double mutant was much less inhibited than in wt plants, similar to the E-2-hexenal-responsive mutant her1, which is perturbed in γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) metabolism. The induction of several of the E-2-hexenal-specific genes was much higher in the wrky40, wrky6 or wrky40 wrky6 mutants, including GAD4, a glutamate decarboxylase that catalyzes the formation of GABA from glutamate. In conclusion, WRKY6 and 40 seem to act as important players transducing E-2-hexenal perception.

  15. Chloroplast Dysfunction Causes Multiple Defects in Cell Cycle Progression in the Arabidopsis crumpled leaf Mutant1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudik, Elodie; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Domenichini, Séverine; Bourge, Mickaël; Soubigout-Taconnat, Ludivine; Mazubert, Christelle; Yi, Dalong; Bujaldon, Sandrine; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; De Veylder, Lieven; Bergounioux, Catherine; Benhamed, Moussa; Raynaud, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    The majority of research on cell cycle regulation is focused on the nuclear events that govern the replication and segregation of the genome between the two daughter cells. However, eukaryotic cells contain several compartmentalized organelles with specialized functions, and coordination among these organelles is required for proper cell cycle progression, as evidenced by the isolation of several mutants in which both organelle function and overall plant development were affected. To investigate how chloroplast dysfunction affects the cell cycle, we analyzed the crumpled leaf (crl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which is deficient for a chloroplastic protein and displays particularly severe developmental defects. In the crl mutant, we reveal that cell cycle regulation is altered drastically and that meristematic cells prematurely enter differentiation, leading to reduced plant stature and early endoreduplication in the leaves. This response is due to the repression of several key cell cycle regulators as well as constitutive activation of stress-response genes, among them the cell cycle inhibitor SIAMESE-RELATED5. One unique feature of the crl mutant is that it produces aplastidic cells in several organs, including the root tip. By investigating the consequence of the absence of plastids on cell cycle progression, we showed that nuclear DNA replication occurs in aplastidic cells in the root tip, which opens future research prospects regarding the dialogue between plastids and the nucleus during cell cycle regulation in higher plants. PMID:25037213

  16. Characterization of temperature-sensitive mutants reveals a role for receptor-like kinase SCRAMBLED/STRUBBELIG in coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation during Arabidopsis leaf development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Zhong, Si-Hui; Cui, Xiao-Feng; Li, Jianming; He, Zu-Hua

    2012-12-01

    The balance between cell proliferation and cell differentiation is essential for leaf patterning. However, identification of the factors coordinating leaf patterning and cell growth behavior is challenging. Here, we characterized a temperature-sensitive Arabidopsis mutant with leaf blade and venation defects. We mapped the mutation to the sub-2 allele of the SCRAMBLED/STRUBBELIG (SCM/SUB) receptor-like kinase gene whose functions in leaf development have not been demonstrated. The sub-2 mutant displayed impaired blade development, asymmetric leaf shape and altered venation patterning under high ambient temperature (30°C), but these defects were less pronounced at normal growth temperature (22°C). Loss of SCM/SUB function results in reduced cell proliferation and abnormal cell expansion, as well as altered auxin patterning. SCM/SUB is initially expressed throughout leaf primordia and becomes restricted to the vascular cells, coinciding with its roles in early leaf patterning and venation formation. Furthermore, constitutive expression of the SCM/SUB gene also restricts organ growth by inhibiting the transition from cell proliferation to expansion. We propose the existence of a SCM/SUB-mediated developmental stage-specific signal for leaf patterning, and highlight the importance of the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation for leaf morphogenesis.

  17. Antiphase light and temperature cycles affect PHYTOCHROME B-controlled ethylene sensitivity and biosynthesis, limiting leaf movement and growth of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bours, Ralph; van Zanten, Martijn; Pierik, Ronald; Bouwmeester, Harro; van der Krol, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    In the natural environment, days are generally warmer than the night, resulting in a positive day/night temperature difference (+DIF). Plants have adapted to these conditions, and when exposed to antiphase light and temperature cycles (cold photoperiod/warm night [-DIF]), most species exhibit reduced elongation growth. To study the physiological mechanism of how light and temperature cycles affect plant growth, we used infrared imaging to dissect growth dynamics under +DIF and -DIF in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that -DIF altered leaf growth patterns, decreasing the amplitude and delaying the phase of leaf movement. Ethylene application restored leaf growth in -DIF conditions, and constitutive ethylene signaling mutants maintain robust leaf movement amplitudes under -DIF, indicating that ethylene signaling becomes limiting under these conditions. In response to -DIF, the phase of ethylene emission advanced 2 h, but total ethylene emission was not reduced. However, expression analysis on members of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase ethylene biosynthesis gene family showed that ACS2 activity is specifically suppressed in the petiole region under -DIF conditions. Indeed, petioles of plants under -DIF had reduced ACC content, and application of ACC to the petiole restored leaf growth patterns. Moreover, acs2 mutants displayed reduced leaf movement under +DIF, similar to wild-type plants under -DIF. In addition, we demonstrate that the photoreceptor PHYTOCHROME B restricts ethylene biosynthesis and constrains the -DIF-induced phase shift in rhythmic growth. Our findings provide a mechanistic insight into how fluctuating temperature cycles regulate plant growth.

  18. Peroxisomes : Membrane events accompanying peroxisome proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opalinski, Lukasz; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles surrounded by a single membrane that display a variety of metabolic functions. These vary with the organism in which they occur and with environmental conditions. Peroxisomes multiply by division of existing organelles and can be formed from ER. The peroxisomal

  19. Myosin inhibitors block accumulation movement of chloroplasts in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paves, H; Truve, E

    2007-01-01

    Chloroplasts alter their distribution within plant cells depending on the external light conditions. Myosin inhibitors 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine hydrochloride (ML-7) were used to study the possible role of myosins in chloroplast photorelocation in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells. None of these agents had an effect on the chloroplast high-fluence-rate avoidance movement but all of the three myosin inhibitors blocked the accumulation movement of chloroplasts after a high-fluence-rate irradiation of the leaves. The results suggest that myosins have a role in A. thaliana chloroplast photorelocation.

  20. A workflow for mathematical modeling of subcellular metabolic pathways in leaf metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eNägele

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade genome sequencing has experienced a rapid technological development resulting in numerous sequencing projects and applications in life science. In plant molecular biology, the availability of sequence data on whole genomes has enabled the reconstruction of metabolic networks. Enzymatic reactions are predicted by the sequence information. Pathways arise due to the participation of chemical compounds as substrates and products in these reactions. Although several of these comprehensive networks have been reconstructed for the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the integration of experimental data is still challenging. Particularly the analysis of subcellular organization of plant cells limits the understanding of regulatory instances in these metabolic networks in vivo. In this study, we develop an approach for the functional integration of experimental high-throughput data into such large-scale networks. We present a subcellular metabolic network model comprising 524 metabolic intermediates and 548 metabolic interactions derived from a total of 2769 reactions. We demonstrate how to link the metabolite covariance matrix of different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions with the subcellular metabolic network model for the inverse calculation of the biochemical Jacobian, finally resulting in the calculation of a matrix which satisfies a Lyaponov equation involving a covariance matrix. In this way, differential strategies of metabolite compartmentation and involved reactions were identified in the accessions when exposed to low temperature.

  1. Plant Peroxisome Multiplication: Highly Regulated and Still Enigmatic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Plant peroxisomes play a key role in numerous physiological processes and are able to adapt to environmental changes by altering their content, morphology, and abundance. Peroxisomes can multiply through elongation, constriction, and fission; this process requires the action of conserved, as well as species-specific proteins. Genetic and morphological analyses have been used with the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to determine at the mechanistic level how plant peroxisomes increase their abundance. The five-member PEX11 family promotes early steps of peroxisome multiplication with an unknown mechanism and some subfamily specificities. The dynamin-related protein (DRP)3 subfamily of dynaminrelated large guanosine triphosphatases mediates late steps of both peroxisomal and mitochondrial multiplication. New genetic and biochemical tools will be needed to identify additional, especially plant-specific, constituents of the peroxisome multiplication pathways.

  2. Salicylic acid 3-hydroxylase regulates Arabidopsis leaf longevity by mediating salicylic acid catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kewei; Halitschke, Rayko; Yin, Changxi; Liu, Chang-Jun; Gan, Su-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) plays critical roles in plant defense, stress responses, and senescence. Although SA biosynthesis is well understood, the pathways by which SA is catabolized remain elusive. Here we report the identification and characterization of an SA 3-hydroxylase (S3H) involved in SA catabolism during leaf senescence. S3H is associated with senescence and is inducible by SA and is thus a key part of a negative feedback regulation system of SA levels during senescence. The enzyme converts SA (with a Km of 58.29 µM) to both 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) and 2,5-DHBA in vitro but only 2,3-DHBA in vivo. The s3h knockout mutants fail to produce 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates, accumulate very high levels of SA and its sugar conjugates, and exhibit a precocious senescence phenotype. Conversely, the gain-of-function lines contain high levels of 2,3-DHBA sugar conjugates and extremely low levels of SA and its sugar conjugates and display a significantly extended leaf longevity. This research reveals an elegant SA catabolic mechanism by which plants regulate SA levels by converting it to 2,3-DHBA to prevent SA overaccumulation. The research also provides strong molecular genetic evidence for an important role of SA in regulating the onset and rate of leaf senescence.

  3. Impacts of high ATP supply from chloroplasts and mitochondria on the leaf metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eLiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts and mitochondria are the major ATP producing organelles in plant leaves. Arabidopsis thaliana purple acid phosphatase 2 (AtPAP2 is a phosphatase dually targeted to the outer membranes of both organelles and it plays a role in the import of selected nuclear-encoded proteins into these two organelles. Overexpression (OE of AtPAP2 in Arabidopsis thaliana accelerates plant growth and promotes flowering, seed yield and biomass at maturity. Measurement of ADP/ATP/NADP+/NADPH contents in the leaves of 20-day-old OE and wild-type lines at the end of night and at 1 and 8 h following illumination in a 16/8 h photoperiod revealed that the ATP levels and ATP/NADPH ratios were significantly increased in the OE line at all three time points. The AtPAP2 OE line is therefore a good model to investigate the impact of high energy on the global molecular status of Arabidopsis. In this study, transcriptome, proteome and metabolome profiles of the high ATP transgenic line were examined and compared with those of wild-type plants. A comparison of OE and WT at the end of the night provide valuable information on the impact of higher ATP output from mitochondria on plant physiology, as mitochondrial respiration is the major source of ATP in the dark in leaves. Similarly, comparison of OE and WT following illumination will provide information on the impact of higher energy output from chloroplasts on plant physiology. Overexpression of AtPAP2 was found to significantly affect the transcript and protein abundances of genes encoded by the two organellar genomes. For example, the protein abundances of many ribosomal proteins encoded by the chloroplast genome were higher in the AtPAP2 OE line under both light and dark conditions, while the protein abundances of multiple components of the photosynthetic complexes were lower. RNA-seq data also showed that the transcription of the mitochondrial genome is greatly affected by the availability of energy. These data

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox 12 (ATHB12), a homeodomain-leucine zipper protein, regulates leaf growth by promoting cell expansion and endoreduplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Yoon-Sun; Um, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Sunghan; Kim, Kyunga; Park, Hee-Jung; Lim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Woo-Young; Jun, Sang Eun; Yoon, Eun Kyung; Lim, Jun; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Kim, Donggiun; Park, Jongbum; Kim, Gyung-Tae; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox 12 (ATHB12), a homeodomain-leucine zipper class I (HD-Zip I) gene, is highly expressed in leaves and stems, and induced by abiotic stresses, but its role in development remains obscure. To understand its function during plant development, we studied the effects of loss and gain of function. Expression of ATHB12 fused to the EAR-motif repression domain (SRDX) - P35 S ::ATHB12SRDX (A12SRDX) and PATHB 12 ::ATHB12SRDX - slowed both leaf and root growth, while the growth of ATHB12-overexpressing seedlings (A12OX) was accelerated. Microscopic examination revealed changes in the size and number of leaf cells. Ploidy was reduced in A12SRDX plants, accompanied by decreased cell expansion and increased cell numbers. By contrast, cell size was increased in A12OX plants, along with increased ploidy and elevated expression of cell cycle switch 52s (CCS52s), which are positive regulators of endoreduplication, indicating that ATHB12 promotes leaf cell expansion and endoreduplication. Overexpression of ATHB12 led to decreased phosphorylation of Arabidopsis thaliana ribosomal protein S6 (AtRPS6), a regulator of cell growth. In addition, induction of ATHB12 in the presence of cycloheximide increased the expression of several genes related to cell expansion, such as EXPANSIN A10 (EXPA10) and DWARF4 (DWF4). Our findings strongly suggest that ATHB12 acts as a positive regulator of endoreduplication and cell growth during leaf development.

  5. Arabidopsis plants grown in the field and climate chambers significantly differ in leaf morphology and photosystem components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants exhibit phenotypic plasticity and respond to differences in environmental conditions by acclimation. We have systematically compared leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown in the field and under controlled low, normal and high light conditions in the laboratory to determine their most prominent phenotypic differences. Results Compared to plants grown under field conditions, the "indoor plants" had larger leaves, modified leaf shapes and longer petioles. Their pigment composition also significantly differed; indoor plants had reduced levels of xanthophyll pigments. In addition, Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 levels were up to three times higher in the indoor plants, but differences in the PSI antenna were much smaller, with only the low-abundance Lhca5 protein showing altered levels. Both isoforms of early-light-induced protein (ELIP were absent in the indoor plants, and they had less non-photochemical quenching (NPQ. The field-grown plants had a high capacity to perform state transitions. Plants lacking ELIPs did not have reduced growth or seed set rates, but their mortality rates were sometimes higher. NPQ levels between natural accessions grown under different conditions were not correlated. Conclusion Our results indicate that comparative analysis of field-grown plants with those grown under artificial conditions is important for a full understanding of plant plasticity and adaptation.

  6. PEX16: a multifaceted regulator of peroxisome biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eKim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are formed by two distinct pathways: the growth and fission of mature peroxisomes and de novo synthesis at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. While many of the molecular mechanisms underlying these two pathways remain to be elucidated, it is generally accepted that their relative contribution to peroxisome formation may vary depending on the species, cell type and/or physiological status of the organism. One pertinent example of the apparent differences in the regulation of peroxisome biogenesis among evolutionarily diverse species is the involvement of the peroxin PEX16. In Yarrowia lipolytica, for instance, PEX16 is an intraperoxisomal peripheral membrane protein that participates in peroxisomal fission. By contrast, Human PEX16 is an integral membrane protein that is thought to function at the ER during the early stages of de novo peroxisome formation and also recruits peroxisomal membrane proteins directly to mature peroxisomes. Similarly, PEX16 in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana is speculated to be a PMP receptor at the ER and peroxisomes, and is also required for the formation of other ER-derived organelles, such as oil and protein bodies. Here we briefly review the current knowledge of Y. lipolytica, human and A. thaliana PEX16 in the context of our overall understanding of peroxisome biogenesis and the role of the ER in this process in these three divergent species.

  7. Additive and non-additive effects of simulated leaf and inflorescence damage on survival, growth and reproduction of the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Adriana; Ågren, Jon

    2012-08-01

    Herbivores may damage both leaves and reproductive structures, and although such combined damage may affect plant fitness non-additively, this has received little attention. We conducted a 2-year field experiment with a factorial design to examine the effects of simulated leaf (0, 12.5, 25, or 50% of leaf area removed) and inflorescence damage (0 vs. 50% of inflorescences removed) on survival, growth and reproduction in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata. Leaf and inflorescence damage negatively and independently reduced flower, fruit and seed production in the year of damage; leaf damage also reduced rosette size by the end of the first season and flower production in the second year. Leaf damage alone reduced the proportion of flowers forming a fruit and fruit production per plant the second year, but when combined with inflorescence damage no such effect was observed (significant leaf × inflorescence damage interaction). Damage to leaves (sources) caused a greater reduction in future reproduction than did simultaneous damage to leaves and inflorescences (sinks). This demonstrates that a full understanding of the effects of herbivore damage on plant fitness requires that consequences of damage to vegetative and reproductive structures are evaluated over more than 1 year and that non-additive effects are considered.

  8. Suppressor of Overexpression of CO 1 Negatively Regulates Dark-Induced Leaf Degreening and Senescence by Directly Repressing Pheophytinase and Other Senescence-Associated Genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junyi; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Ren, Jun; Qiu, Kai; Li, Zhongpeng; Xie, Zuokun; Gao, Jiong; Zhou, Xin; Kuai, Benke

    2017-03-01

    Although the biochemical pathway of chlorophyll (Chl) degradation has been largely elucidated, how Chl is rapidly yet coordinately degraded during leaf senescence remains elusive. Pheophytinase (PPH) is the enzyme for catalyzing the removal of the phytol group from pheophytin a, and PPH expression is significantly induced during leaf senescence. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of PPH, we used a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) one-hybrid system to screen for its trans-regulators. SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CO 1 (SOC1), a key flowering pathway integrator, was initially identified as one of the putative trans-regulators of PPH After dark treatment, leaves of an SOC1 knockdown mutant (soc1-6) showed an accelerated yellowing phenotype, whereas those of SOC1-overexpressing lines exhibited a partial stay-green phenotype. SOC1 and PPH expression showed a negative correlation during leaf senescence. Substantially, SOC1 protein could bind specifically to the CArG box of the PPH promoter in vitro and in vivo, and overexpression of SOC1 significantly inhibited the transcriptional activity of the PPH promoter in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protoplasts. Importantly, soc1-6 pph-1 (a PPH knockout mutant) double mutant displayed a stay-green phenotype similar to that of pph-1 during dark treatment. These results demonstrated that SOC1 inhibits Chl degradation via negatively regulating PPH expression. In addition, measurement of the Chl content and the maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II of soc1-6 and SOC1-OE leaves after dark treatment suggested that SOC1 also negatively regulates the general senescence process. Seven SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENES (SAGs) were thereafter identified as its potential target genes, and NONYELLOWING1 and SAG113 were experimentally confirmed. Together, we reveal that SOC1 represses dark-induced leaf Chl degradation and senescence in general in Arabidopsis.

  9. Changes in leaf proteome profile of Arabidopsis thaliana in response to salicylic acid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Riddhi Datta; Ragini Sinha; Sharmila Chattopadhyay

    2013-06-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has been implicated in determining the outcome of interactions between many plants and their pathogens. Global changes in response to this phytohormone have been observed at the transcript level, but little is known of how it induces changes in protein abundance. To this end we have investigated the effect of 1 mM SA on soluble proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves by proteomic analysis. An initial study at transcript level has been performed on temporal landscape, which revealed that induction of most of the SA-responsive genes occurs within 3 to 6 h post treatment (HPT) and the expression peaked within 24 HPT. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis has been used to identify differentially expressed proteins and 63 spots have been identified successfully. This comparative proteomic profiling of SA treated leaves versus control leaves demonstrated the changes of many defence related proteins like pathogenesis related protein 10a (PR10a), disease-resistance-like protein, putative late blight-resistance protein, WRKY4, MYB4, etc. along with gross increase in the rate of energy production, while other general metabolism rate is slightly toned down, presumably signifying a transition from ‘normal mode’ to ‘defence mode’.

  10. Cell wall accumulation of fluorescent proteins derived from a trans-Golgi cisternal membrane marker and paramural bodies in interdigitated Arabidopsis leaf epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Kae; Kobayashi, Megumi; Sato, Mayuko; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Ueda, Takashi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Nagata, Noriko; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Higaki, Takumi

    2017-01-01

    In most dicotyledonous plants, leaf epidermal pavement cells develop jigsaw puzzle-like shapes during cell expansion. The rapid growth and complicated cell shape of pavement cells is suggested to be achieved by targeted exocytosis that is coordinated with cytoskeletal rearrangement to provide plasma membrane and/or cell wall materials for lobe development during their morphogenesis. Therefore, visualization of membrane trafficking in leaf pavement cells should contribute an understanding of the mechanism of plant cell morphogenesis. To reveal membrane trafficking in pavement cells, we observed monomeric red fluorescent protein-tagged rat sialyl transferases, which are markers of trans-Golgi cisternal membranes, in the leaf epidermis of Arabidopsis thaliana. Quantitative fluorescence imaging techniques and immunoelectron microscopic observations revealed that accumulation of the red fluorescent protein occurred mostly in the curved regions of pavement cell borders and guard cell ends during leaf expansion. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that apoplastic vesicular membrane structures called paramural bodies were more frequent beneath the curved cell wall regions of interdigitated pavement cells and guard cell ends in young leaf epidermis. In addition, pharmacological studies showed that perturbations in membrane trafficking resulted in simple cell shapes. These results suggested possible heterogeneity of the curved regions of plasma membranes, implying a relationship with pavement cell morphogenesis.

  11. SHORT-ROOT and SCARECROW regulate leaf growth in Arabidopsis by stimulating S-phase progression of the cell cycle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, S.; Coppens, F.; Winter, F. de; Swarup, K.; Merks, R.M.H.; Inze, D.; Bennett, M.J.; Beemster, G.T.S.

    2010-01-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) are required for stem cell maintenance in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root meristem, ensuring its indeterminate growth. Mutation of SHR and SCR genes results in disorganization of the quiescent center and loss of stem cell activity, resulting in the ce

  12. Genome-wide association studies identify heavy metal ATPase3 as the primary determinant of natural variation in leaf cadmium in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Yin Chao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanism of cadmium (Cd accumulation in plants is important to help reduce its potential toxicity to both plants and humans through dietary and environmental exposure. Here, we report on a study to uncover the genetic basis underlying natural variation in Cd accumulation in a world-wide collection of 349 wild collected Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. We identified a 4-fold variation (0.5-2 µg Cd g(-1 dry weight in leaf Cd accumulation when these accessions were grown in a controlled common garden. By combining genome-wide association mapping, linkage mapping in an experimental F2 population, and transgenic complementation, we reveal that HMA3 is the sole major locus responsible for the variation in leaf Cd accumulation we observe in this diverse population of A. thaliana accessions. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of HMA3 from 149 A. thaliana accessions reveals the existence of 10 major natural protein haplotypes. Association of these haplotypes with leaf Cd accumulation and genetics complementation experiments indicate that 5 of these haplotypes are active and 5 are inactive, and that elevated leaf Cd accumulation is associated with the reduced function of HMA3 caused by a nonsense mutation and polymorphisms that change two specific amino acids.

  13. Peroxisomal disorders in neurology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R.J.A.; Heymans, H.S.A.; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Barth, P.G.; Bosch, H. van den; Tager, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Although peroxisomes were initially believed to play only a minor role in mammalian metabolism, it is now clear that they catalyse essential reactions in a number of different metabolic pathways and thus play an indispensable role in intermediary metabolism. The metabolic pathways in which peroxisom

  14. Overexpression of the Transcription Factors GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 Differentially Regulates Wax and Cutin Biosynthesis, Alters Cuticle Properties, and Changes Leaf Phenotypes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available SHINE (SHN/WIN clade proteins, transcription factors of the plant-specific APETALA 2/ethylene-responsive element binding factor (AP2/ERF family, have been proven to be involved in wax and cutin biosynthesis. Glycine max is an important economic crop, but its molecular mechanism of wax biosynthesis is rarely characterized. In this study, 10 homologs of Arabidopsis SHN genes were identified from soybean. These homologs were different in gene structures and organ expression patterns. Constitutive expression of each of the soybean SHN genes in Arabidopsis led to different leaf phenotypes, as well as different levels of glossiness on leaf surfaces. Overexpression of GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 in Arabidopsis exhibited 7.8-fold and 9.9-fold up-regulation of leaf cuticle wax productions, respectively. C31 and C29 alkanes contributed most to the increased wax contents. Total cutin contents of leaves were increased 11.4-fold in GmSHN1 overexpressors and 5.7-fold in GmSHN9 overexpressors, mainly through increasing C16:0 di-OH and dioic acids. GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 also altered leaf cuticle membrane ultrastructure and increased water loss rate in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Transcript levels of many wax and cutin biosynthesis and leaf development related genes were altered in GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 overexpressors. Overall, these results suggest that GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 may differentially regulate the leaf development process as well as wax and cutin biosynthesis.

  15. Overexpression of the Transcription Factors GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 Differentially Regulates Wax and Cutin Biosynthesis, Alters Cuticle Properties, and Changes Leaf Phenotypes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yangyang; Wu, Hanying; Zhao, Mingming; Wu, Wang; Xu, Yinong; Gu, Dan

    2016-04-21

    SHINE (SHN/WIN) clade proteins, transcription factors of the plant-specific APETALA 2/ethylene-responsive element binding factor (AP2/ERF) family, have been proven to be involved in wax and cutin biosynthesis. Glycine max is an important economic crop, but its molecular mechanism of wax biosynthesis is rarely characterized. In this study, 10 homologs of Arabidopsis SHN genes were identified from soybean. These homologs were different in gene structures and organ expression patterns. Constitutive expression of each of the soybean SHN genes in Arabidopsis led to different leaf phenotypes, as well as different levels of glossiness on leaf surfaces. Overexpression of GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 in Arabidopsis exhibited 7.8-fold and 9.9-fold up-regulation of leaf cuticle wax productions, respectively. C31 and C29 alkanes contributed most to the increased wax contents. Total cutin contents of leaves were increased 11.4-fold in GmSHN1 overexpressors and 5.7-fold in GmSHN9 overexpressors, mainly through increasing C16:0 di-OH and dioic acids. GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 also altered leaf cuticle membrane ultrastructure and increased water loss rate in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Transcript levels of many wax and cutin biosynthesis and leaf development related genes were altered in GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 overexpressors. Overall, these results suggest that GmSHN1 and GmSHN9 may differentially regulate the leaf development process as well as wax and cutin biosynthesis.

  16. Isolation and RNA gel blot analysis of genes that could serve as potential molecular markers for leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, S; Ito, M; Nishida, I; Watanabe, A

    2001-02-01

    Nine cDNAs, representing genes in which the transcripts accumulated in senescent leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana, were isolated by differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (DDRT-PCR) and the genes were designated yellow-leaf-specific gene 1 to 9 (YLS1-YLS9). Sequence analysis revealed that none of the YLS genes, except YLS6, had been reported as senescence-up-regulated genes. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that the transcripts of YLS3 accumulated at the highest level at an early senescence stage, whereas the transcripts from the other YLS genes reached their maximum levels in late senescence stages. Transcripts of YLS genes showed various accumulation patterns under natural senescence, and under artificial senescence induced by darkness, ethylene or ABA. These expression characteristics of YLS genes will be useful as potential molecular markers, which will enhance our understanding of natural and artificial senescence processes.

  17. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses.

  18. Effect of clinorotation on the leaf mesophyll structure and pigment content in Arabidopsis thaliana L. and Pisum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamchuk, N I

    2004-07-01

    Properties of mesophyll cells and photosynthetic membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Pisum sativum (L.) plants grown in a horizontal clinostat and in control conditions were compared. Obtained data have show that under clinorotation conditions seedlings have experienced the following cell morphology changes structural chloroplast rearrangement in palisade cells, pigment content alteration, and cell aging acceleration.

  19. The ULTRAPETALA1 trxG factor contributes to patterning the Arabidopsis adaxial-abaxial leaf polarity axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The SAND domain protein ULTRAPETALA1 (ULT1) functions as a trithorax group factor that regulates a variety of developmental processes in Arabidopsis. We have recently shown that ULT1 regulates developmental patterning in the gynoecia and leaves. ULT1 acts together with the KANADI1 (KAN1) transcripti...

  20. Urea retranslocation from senescing Arabidopsis leaves is promoted by DUR3-mediated urea retrieval from leaf apoplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Anne; Kojima, Soichi; Hajirezaei, Mohammad; Melzer, Michael; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2015-02-01

    In plants, urea derives either from root uptake or protein degradation. Although large quantities of urea are released during senescence, urea is mainly seen as a short-lived nitrogen (N) catabolite serving urease-mediated hydrolysis to ammonium. Here, we investigated the roles of DUR3 and of urea in N remobilization. During natural leaf senescence urea concentrations and DUR3 transcript levels showed a parallel increase with senescence markers like ORE1 in a plant age- and leaf age-dependent manner. Deletion of DUR3 decreased urea accumulation in leaves, whereas the fraction of urea lost to the leaf apoplast was enhanced. Under natural and N deficiency-induced senescence DUR3 promoter activity was highest in the vasculature, but was also found in surrounding bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. An analysis of petiole exudates from wild-type leaves revealed that N from urea accounted for >13% of amino acid N. Urea export from senescent leaves further increased in ureG-2 deletion mutants lacking urease activity. In the dur3 ureG double insertion line the absence of DUR3 reduced urea export from leaf petioles. These results indicate that urea can serve as an early metabolic marker for leaf senescence, and that DUR3-mediated urea retrieval contributes to the retranslocation of N from urea during leaf senescence.

  1. Impact of salt stress, cell death, and autophagy on peroxisomes: quantitative and morphological analyses using small fluorescent probe N-BODIPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Deirdre; Sanad, Marwa N. M. E.; Duscha, Kerstin; Lyons, Madison; Liu, Fuquan; Bozhkov, Peter; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Hu, Jianping; Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard; Steel, Patrick G.; Smertenko, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Plant peroxisomes maintain a plethora of key life processes including fatty acid β-oxidation, photorespiration, synthesis of hormones, and homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Abundance of peroxisomes in cells is dynamic; however mechanisms controlling peroxisome proliferation remain poorly understood because measuring peroxisome abundance is technically challenging. Counting peroxisomes in individual cells of complex organs by electron or fluorescence microscopy is expensive and time consuming. Here we present a simple technique for quantifying peroxisome abundance using the small probe Nitro-BODIPY, which in vivo fluoresces selectively inside peroxisomes. The physiological relevance of our technique was demonstrated using salinity as a known inducer of peroxisome proliferation. While significant peroxisome proliferation was observed in wild-type Arabidopsis leaves following 5-hour exposure to NaCl, no proliferation was detected in the salt-susceptible mutants fry1-6, sos1-14, and sos1-15. We also found that N-BODIPY detects aggregation of peroxisomes during final stages of programmed cell death and can be used as a marker of this stage. Furthermore, accumulation of peroxisomes in an autophagy-deficient Arabidopsis mutant atg5 correlated with N-BODIPY labeling. In conclusion, the technique reported here enables quantification of peroxisomes in plant material at various physiological settings. Its potential applications encompass identification of genes controlling peroxisome homeostasis and capturing stress-tolerant genotypes. PMID:28145408

  2. A mutation in the cytosolic O-acetylserine (thiol lyase induces a genome-dependent early leaf death phenotype in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schippers Jos HM

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine is a component in organic compounds including glutathione that have been implicated in the adaptation of plants to stresses. O-acetylserine (thiol lyase (OAS-TL catalyses the final step of cysteine biosynthesis. OAS-TL enzyme isoforms are localised in the cytoplasm, the plastids and mitochondria but the contribution of individual OAS-TL isoforms to plant sulphur metabolism has not yet been fully clarified. Results The seedling lethal phenotype of the Arabidopsis onset of leaf death3-1 (old3-1 mutant is due to a point mutation in the OAS-A1 gene, encoding the cytosolic OAS-TL. The mutation causes a single amino acid substitution from Gly162 to Glu162, abolishing old3-1 OAS-TL activity in vitro. The old3-1 mutation segregates as a monogenic semi-dominant trait when backcrossed to its wild type accession Landsberg erecta (Ler-0 and the Di-2 accession. Consistent with its semi-dominant behaviour, wild type Ler-0 plants transformed with the mutated old3-1 gene, displayed the early leaf death phenotype. However, the old3-1 mutation segregates in an 11:4:1 (wild type: semi-dominant: mutant ratio when backcrossed to the Colombia-0 and Wassilewskija accessions. Thus, the early leaf death phenotype depends on two semi-dominant loci. The second locus that determines the old3-1 early leaf death phenotype is referred to as odd-ler (for old3 determinant in the Ler accession and is located on chromosome 3. The early leaf death phenotype is temperature dependent and is associated with increased expression of defence-response and oxidative-stress marker genes. Independent of the presence of the odd-ler gene, OAS-A1 is involved in maintaining sulphur and thiol levels and is required for resistance against cadmium stress. Conclusions The cytosolic OAS-TL is involved in maintaining organic sulphur levels. The old3-1 mutation causes genome-dependent and independent phenotypes and uncovers a novel function for the mutated OAS-TL in cell

  3. Abscisic acid as an internal integrator of multiple physiological processes modulates leaf senescence onset in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei eSong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have shown that exogenous abscisic acid (ABA promotes leaf abscission and senescence. However, owing to a lack of genetic evidence, ABA function in plant senescence has not been clearly defined. Here, two-leaf early-senescence mutants (eas that were screened by chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and named eas1-1 and eas1-2 showed high photosynthetic capacity in the early stage of plant growth compared with the wild type. Gene mapping showed that eas1-1 and eas1-2 are two novel ABA2 allelic mutants. Under unstressed conditions, the eas1 mutations caused plant dwarf, early germination, larger stomatal apertures, and early leaf senescence compared with those of the wild type. Flow cytometry assays showed that the cell apoptosis rate in eas1 mutant leaves was higher than that of the wild type after day 30. A significant increase in the transcript levels of several senescence-associated genes, especially SAG12, was observed in eas1 mutant plants in the early stage of plant growth. More importantly, ABA-activated calcium channel activity in plasma membrane and induced the increase of cytoplasmic calcium concentration in guard cells are suppressed due to the mutation of EAS1. In contrast, the eas1 mutants lost chlorophyll and ion leakage significant faster than in the wild type under treatment with calcium channel blocker. Hence, our results indicate that endogenous ABA level is an important factor controlling the onset of leaf senescence through Ca2+ signaling.

  4. PMP27 PROMOTES PEROXISOMAL PROLIFERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARSHALL, PA; KRIMKEVICH, YI; LARK, RH; DYER, JM; VEENHUIS, M; GOODMAN, JM; Krimkevich, Yelena I.; Lark, Richard H.; Dyer, John M.; Goodman, Joel M.

    1995-01-01

    Peroxisomes perform many essential functions in eukaryotic cells. The weight of evidence indicates that these organelles divide by budding from preexisting peroxisomes. This process is not understood at the molecular level. Peroxisomal proliferation can be induced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by olea

  5. Routine sample preparation and HPLC analysis for ascorbic acid (vitamin C) determination in wheat plants and Arabidopsis leaf tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalai, Gabriella; Janda, T; Pál, Magda

    2014-06-01

    Plants have developed various mechanisms to protect themselves against oxidative stress. One of the most important non-enzymatic antioxidants is ascorbic acid. There is thus a need for a rapid, sensitive method for the analysis of the reduced and oxidised forms of ascorbic acid in crop plants. In this paper a simple, economic, selective, precise and stable HPLC method is presented for the detection of ascorbate in plant tissue. The sensitivity, the short retention time and the simple isocratic elution mean that the method is suitable for the routine quantification of ascorbate in a high daily sample number. The method has been found to be better than previously reported methods, because of the use of an economical, readily available mobile phase, UV detection and the lack of complicated extraction procedures. The method has been tested on Arabidopsis plants with different ascorbate levels and on wheat plants during Cd stress.

  6. Determination of Inter-leaf Translocated Free Glyphosate in Arabidopsis thaliana using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LCMS/MS) after Derivatization with Fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl Chloride (FMOC-Cl)

    KAUST Repository

    Raji, Misjudeen

    2014-02-03

    Glyphosate is a broad-spectrum herbicide widely used for eliminating weeds in crop fields. Its mode of action is believed to be via translocation from the source to the sink tissues where it then interferes with the activities of 5-enol-pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). In this study, the translocation of glyphosate in the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana was investigated using an HPLC-MS/MS method following derivatization of the secondary amino group in the analyte using N-(9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyloxy) chloride. To eliminate the errant precipitation that occurred when the reagent and the analyte are mixed, optimization of this method was required. The method linearity has a correlation coefficient higher than 0.99 over the concentration range of 0.005-2 μM. The limits of detection and quantitation were estimated to be 0.002 μM and 0.008 μM respectively. The repeatability of the method (as%R.S.D) ranged from 10% to 13%. The presented method was employed for the determination of free glyphosate in young untreated leaves of the specimen plants after treating a single leaf and allowing it to stand for 12 hours.

  7. Overexpression of Medicago sativa TMT elevates the α-tocopherol content in Arabidopsis seeds, alfalfa leaves, and delays dark-induced leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jishan; Jia, Huili; Feng, Guangyan; Wang, Zan; Li, Jun; Gao, Hongwen; Wang, Xuemin

    2016-08-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a major forage legume for livestock and a target for improving their dietary quality. Vitamin E is an essential vitamin that animals must obtain from their diet for proper growth and development. γ-tocopherol methyltransferase (γ-TMT), which catalyzes the conversion of δ- and γ-tocopherols (or tocotrienols) to β- and α-tocopherols (or tocotrienols), respectively, is the final enzyme involved in the vitamin E biosynthetic pathway. The overexpression of M. sativa L.'s γ-TMT (MsTMT) increased the α-tocopherol content 10-15 fold above that of wild type Arabidopsis seeds without altering the total content of vitamin E. Additionally, in response to osmotic stress, the biomass and the expression levels of several osmotic marker genes were significantly higher in the transgenic lines compared with wild type. Overexpression of MsTMT in alfalfa led to a modest, albeit significant, increase in α-tocopherol in leaves and was also responsible for a delayed leaf senescence phenotype. Additionally, the crude protein content was increased, while the acid and neutral detergent fiber contents were unchanged in these transgenic lines. Thus, increased α-tocopherol content occurred in transgenic alfalfa without compromising the nutritional qualities. The targeted metabolic engineering of vitamin E biosynthesis through MsTMT overexpression provides a promising approach to improve the α-tocopherol content of forage crops.

  8. A genetic link between epigenetic repressor AS1-AS2 and a putative small subunit processome in leaf polarity establishment of Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Matsumura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the DEAD-box RNA helicase family is ubiquitous in eukaryotes, its developmental role remains unelucidated. Here, we report that cooperative action between the Arabidopsis nucleolar protein RH10, an ortholog of human DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX47, and the epigenetic repressor complex of ASYMMETRIC-LEAVES1 (AS1 and AS2 (AS1-AS2 is critical to repress abaxial (ventral genes ETT/ARF3 and ARF4, which leads to adaxial (dorsal development in leaf primordia at shoot apices. Double mutations of rh10-1 and as2 (or as1 synergistically up-regulated the abaxial genes, which generated abaxialized filamentous leaves with loss of the adaxial domain. DDX47 is part of the small subunit processome (SSUP that mediates rRNA biogenesis. In rh10-1 we found various defects in SSUP-related events, such as: accumulation of 35S/33S rRNA precursors; reduction in the 18S/25S ratio; and nucleolar hypertrophy. Double mutants of as2 with mutations of genes that encode other candidate SSUP-related components such as nucleolin and putative rRNA methyltransferase exhibited similar synergistic defects caused by up-regulation of ETT/ARF3 and ARF4. These results suggest a tight link between putative SSUP and AS1-AS2 in repression of the abaxial-determining genes for cell fate decisions for adaxial development.

  9. A genetic link between epigenetic repressor AS1-AS2 and a putative small subunit processome in leaf polarity establishment of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yoko; Ohbayashi, Iwai; Takahashi, Hiro; Kojima, Shoko; Ishibashi, Nanako; Keta, Sumie; Nakagawa, Ayami; Hayashi, Rika; Saéz-Vásquez, Julio; Echeverria, Manuel; Sugiyama, Munetaka; Nakamura, Kenzo; Machida, Chiyoko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the DEAD-box RNA helicase family is ubiquitous in eukaryotes, its developmental role remains unelucidated. Here, we report that cooperative action between the Arabidopsis nucleolar protein RH10, an ortholog of human DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX47, and the epigenetic repressor complex of ASYMMETRIC-LEAVES1 (AS1) and AS2 (AS1-AS2) is critical to repress abaxial (ventral) genes ETT/ARF3 and ARF4, which leads to adaxial (dorsal) development in leaf primordia at shoot apices. Double mutations of rh10-1 and as2 (or as1) synergistically up-regulated the abaxial genes, which generated abaxialized filamentous leaves with loss of the adaxial domain. DDX47 is part of the small subunit processome (SSUP) that mediates rRNA biogenesis. In rh10-1 we found various defects in SSUP-related events, such as: accumulation of 35S/33S rRNA precursors; reduction in the 18S/25S ratio; and nucleolar hypertrophy. Double mutants of as2 with mutations of genes that encode other candidate SSUP-related components such as nucleolin and putative rRNA methyltransferase exhibited similar synergistic defects caused by up-regulation of ETT/ARF3 and ARF4. These results suggest a tight link between putative SSUP and AS1-AS2 in repression of the abaxial-determining genes for cell fate decisions for adaxial development. PMID:27334696

  10. The DOF transcription factor Dof5.1 influences leaf axial patterning by promoting Revoluta transcription in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Hyungsae

    2010-10-05

    Dof proteins are transcription factors that have a conserved single zinc finger DNA-binding domain. In this study, we isolated an activation tagging mutant Dof5.1-D exhibiting an upward-curling leaf phenotype due to enhanced expression of the REV gene that is required for establishing adaxialabaxial polarity. Dof5.1-D plants also had reduced transcript levels for IAA6 and IAA19 genes, indicating an altered auxin biosynthesis in Dof5.1-D. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay using the Dof5.1 DNA-binding motif and the REV promoter region indicated that the DNA-binding domain of Dof5.1 binds to a TAAAGT motif located in the 5′-distal promoter region of the REV promoter. Further, transient and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays verified binding activity of the Dof5.1 DNA-binding motif with the REV promoter. Consistent with binding assays, constitutive over-expression of the Dof5.1 DNA-binding domain in wild-type plants caused a downward-curling phenotype, whereas crossing Dof5.1-D to a rev mutant reverted the upward-curling phenotype of the Dof5.1-D mutant leaf to the wild-type. These results suggest that the Dof5.1 protein directly binds to the REV promoter and thereby regulates adaxialabaxial polarity. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Phosphorylation switch modulates the interdigitated pattern of PIN1 localization and cell expansion in Arabidopsis leaf epidermis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongjiang Li; Deshu Lin; Pankaj Dhonukshe; Shingo Nagawa; Dandan Chen; Ji(r)í Friml; Ben Scheres; Hongwei Guo; Zhenbiao Yang

    2011-01-01

    Within a multicellular tissue cells may coordinately form a singular or multiple polar axes,but it is unclear whether a common mechanism governs different types of polar axis formation. The phosphorylation status of PIN proteins,which is directly affected by the PINOID (PID) protein kinase and the PP2A protein phosphatase,is known to regulate the apical-basal polarity of PIN localization in bipolar cells of roots and shoot apices. Here,we provide evidence that the phosphorylation status-mediated PIN polarity switch is widely used to modulate cellular processes in Arabidopsis including multipolar pavement cells (PC) with interdigitated lobes and indentations. The degree of PC interdigitation was greatly reduced either when the FYPP1 gene,which encodes a PP2A called phytochromeassociated serine/threonine protein phosphatase,was knocked out or when the PID gene was overexpressed (35S::PID).These genetic modifications caused PIN1 localization to switch from lobe to indentation regions. The PP2A and PID mediated switching of PIN1 localization is strikingly similar to their regulation of the apical-basal polarity switch of PIN proteins in other cells. Our findings suggest a common mechanism for the regulation of PIN1 polarity formation,a fundamental cellular process that is crucial for pattern formation both at the tissue/organ and cellular levels.

  12. CCR1, an enzyme required for lignin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, mediates cell proliferation exit for leaf development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Jingshi; Luo, Dexian; Xu, Deyang;

    2015-01-01

    exit in leaves. CCR1 is expressed basipetally in the leaf, and ccr1 mutants exhibited multiple abnormalities, including increased cell proliferation. The ccr1 phenotypes are not due to the reduced lignin content, but instead are due to the dramatically increased level of ferulic acid (FeA......), an intermediate in lignin biosynthesis. FeA is known to have antioxidant activity, and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in ccr1 were markedly reduced. We also characterized another double mutant in CAFFEIC ACID O-METHYLTRANSFERASE (comt) and CAFFEOYL CoA 3-O-METHYLTRANSFERASE (ccoaomt), in which the FeA...... level was dramatically reduced. Cell proliferation in comt ccoaomt leaves was decreased, accompanied by elevated ROS levels, and the mutant phenotypes were partially rescued by treatment with FeA or another antioxidant (N-acetyl-L-cysteine). Taken together, our results suggest that CCR1, FeA and ROS...

  13. Proteomics of the Peroxisome

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Genomes provide us with a blue print for the potential of a cell. However, the activity of a cell is expressed in its proteome. Full understanding of the complexity of cells demands a comprehensive view of the proteome; its interactions, activity states and organization. Comprehensive proteomic approaches applied to peroxisomes have yielded new insights into the organelle and its dynamic interplay with other cellular structures. As technologies and methodologies improve proteomics hold the pr...

  14. [Peroxisomal diseases--a survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theron, J J; van Papendorp, D H

    1996-06-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous cytoplasmic structures in mammalian tissues. The metabolic functions of these organelles include synthesis of plasmalogens and other ether lipids, beta-oxidation, especially of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs, > C22) and their derivatives, inactivation of hydrogen peroxide by peroxisomal catalase and involvement in several other metabolic pathways, e.g. gluconeogenesis, catabolism of purines and polyamines and detoxification of ethanol. Peroxisomal diseases which may arise from genetic faults in the biogenesis of the organelle or aberrant targeting of one or more proteins to the peroxisome, are divided into three groups based on the extent of loss of peroxisomal functions. Prototype of the first group is the cerebro-hepato-renal syndrome of Zellweger (ZS) which shows generalised loss of peroxisomal functions and absence of demonstrable mature peroxisomes in the liver. Other syndromes which are briefly discussed include neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD) and infantile Refsum syndrome (IRS) which may be regarded as milder variants of ZS, and diseases caused by loss of a limited number of peroxisomal functions (rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctate). However, the group of peroxisomal diseases with the highest incidence are those syndromes where only a single peroxisomal function is impaired. The most common peroxisomal disease, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (XALD) belongs to this group. XALD develops as a result of an isolated defect of peroxisomal acyl-CoA synthetase with resultant accumulation of VLCFAs, especially C26:0. Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 is caused by deficient activity of peroxisomal alanine: glyoxylate aminotransferase due to aberrant targeting of this enzyme to mitochondria and not peroxisomes, a unique example of a genetic enzyme trafficking defect. The primary diagnosis of these syndromes is usually based on clinical findings and measurement of accumulated or depleted metabolites in the body e.g. VLCFAs, bile acid

  15. Dual targeting of peroxisomal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eAst

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellular compartmentalization into organelles serves to separate biological processes within the environment of a single cell. While some metabolic reactions are specific to a single organelle, others occur in more than one cellular compartment. Specific targeting of proteins to compartments inside of eukaryotic cells is mediated by defined sequence motifs. To achieve multiple targeting to different compartments cells use a variety of strategies. Here, we focus on mechanisms leading to dual targeting of peroxisomal proteins. In many instances, isoforms of peroxisomal proteins with distinct intracellular localization are encoded by separate genes. But also single genes can give rise to differentially localized proteins. Different isoforms can be generated by use of alternative transcriptional start sites, by differential splicing or ribosomal read-through of stop codons. In all these cases different peptide variants are produced, of which only one carries a peroxisomal targeting signal. Alternatively, peroxisomal proteins contain additional signals that compete for intracellular targeting. Dual localization of proteins residing in both the cytoplasm and in peroxisomes may also result from use of inefficient targeting signals. The recent observation that some bona fide cytoplasmic enzymes were also found in peroxisomes indicates that dual targeting of proteins to both the cytoplasm and the peroxisome might be more widespread. Although current knowledge of proteins exhibiting only partial peroxisomal targeting is far from being complete, we speculate that the metabolic capacity of peroxisomes might be larger than previously assumed.

  16. Transport proteins regulate the flux of metabolites and cofactors across the membrane of plants peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eLinka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In land plants, peroxisomes play key roles in various metabolic pathways, including the most prominent examples lipid mobilization and photorespiration. Given the large number of substrates that are exchanged across the peroxisomal membrane, a wide spectrum of metabolite and cofactor transporters is required and need to be efficiently coordinated. These peroxisomal transport proteins are a perquisite for metabolic reactions inside plant peroxisomes and the entire peroxisomal permeome is closely linked to the adaption of photosynthetic organisms during land plant evolution to fulfill and optimize their new metabolic demands in cells, tissues, and organs. This review assesses for the first time the distribution of these peroxisomal transporters within the algal and plant species underlining their evolutionary relevance. Despite the importance of peroxisomal transporters, the majority of these proteins, however, are still unknown at the molecular level in plants as well as in other eukaryotic organisms. Up to date, four transport proteins have been recently identified and functionally characterized in Arabidopsis so far: One transporter for the import of fatty acids and three carrier proteins for the uptake of the cofactors ATP and NAD into plant peroxisomes. The transport of the three substrates across the peroxisomal membrane is essential for the degradation of fatty acids and fatty acids-related compounds via β-oxidation. This metabolic pathway plays multiple functions for growth and development in plants that has been crucial for during land plant evolution. Here, we describe the current state of their physiological roles in Arabidopsis and discuss novel features in their putative transport mechanisms.

  17. Evolving models for peroxisome biogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettema, Ewald H; Erdmann, Ralf; van der Klei, Ida; Veenhuis, Marten

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made towards our understanding of the mechanism of peroxisome formation, in particular concerning sorting of peroxisomal membrane proteins, matrix protein import and organelle multiplication. Here we evaluate the progress made in recent years. We focus mainly on progres

  18. Combined Genetic and Modeling Approaches Reveal That Epidermal Cell Area and Number in Leaves Are Controlled by Leaf and Plant Developmental Processes in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tisne, S.; Reymond, M.; Vile, D.; Fabre, J.; Dauzat, M.; Koornneef, M.; Granier, C.

    2008-01-01

    Both leaf production and leaf expansion are tightly linked to cell expansion and cell division, but the functional relationships between all these variables are not clearly established. To get insight into these relationships, a quantitative genetic analysis was performed in 118 recombinant inbred l

  19. Peroxisome homeostasis: Mechanisms of division and selective degradation of peroxisomes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsho, Masanori; Yamashita, Shun-ichi; Fujiki, Yukio

    2016-05-01

    Peroxisome number and quality are maintained by its biogenesis and turnover and are important for the homeostasis of peroxisomes. Peroxisomes are increased in number by division with dynamic morphological changes including elongation, constriction, and fission. In the course of peroxisomal division, peroxisomal morphogenesis is orchestrated by Pex11β, dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1), and mitochondrial fission factor (Mff). Conversely, peroxisome number is reduced by its degradation. Peroxisomes are mainly degraded by pexophagy, a type of autophagy specific for peroxisomes. Upon pexophagy, an adaptor protein translocates on peroxisomal membrane and connects peroxisomes to autophagic machineries. Molecular mechanisms of pexophagy are well studied in yeast systems where several specific adaptor proteins are identified. Pexophagy in mammals also proceeds in a manner dependent on adaptor proteins. In this review, we address the recent progress in studies on peroxisome morphogenesis and pexophagy.

  20. Assessing the regulation of leaf redox status under water stress conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana: Col-0 ecotype (wild-type and vtc-2), expressing mitochondrial and cytosolic roGFP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossa, Ricard; Pintó-Marijuan, Marta; Jiang, Keni; Alegre, Leonor; Feldman, Lewis J

    2013-07-01

    Using Arabidopsis plants Col-0 and vtc2 transformed with a redox sensitive green fluorescent protein, (c-roGFP) and (m-roGFP), we investigated the effects of a progressive water stress and re-watering on the redox status of the cytosol and the mitochondria. Our results establish that water stress affects redox status differently in these two compartments, depending on phenotype and leaf age, furthermore we conclude that ascorbate plays a pivotal role in mediating redox status homeostasis and that Col-0 Arabidopsis subjected to water stress increase the synthesis of ascorbate suggesting that ascorbate may play a role in buffering changes in redox status in the mitochondria and the cytosol, with the presumed buffering capacity of ascorbate being more noticeable in young compared with mature leaves. Re-watering of water-stressed plants was paralleled by a return of both the redox status and ascorbate to the levels of well-watered plants. In contrast to the effects of water stress on ascorbate levels, there were no significant changes in the levels of glutathione, thereby suggesting that the regeneration and increase in ascorbate in water-stressed plants may occur by other processes in addition to the regeneration of ascorbate via the glutathione. Under water stress in vtc2 lines it was observed stronger differences in redox status in relation to leaf age, than due to water stress conditions compared with Col-0 plants. In the vtc2 an increase in DHA was observed in water-stressed plants. Furthermore, this work confirms the accuracy and sensitivity of the roGFP1 biosensor as a reporter for variations in water stress-associated changes in redox potentials.

  1. Cell organelles from crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) plants : I. Enzymes in isolated peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, M; Burkhard, C; Schnarrenberger, C

    1978-01-01

    Cell organelles were isolated from the CAM plants Crassula lycopodioides Lam., Bryophyllum calycinum Salisb. and Sedum rubrotinctum R.T. Clausen by isopycnic centrifugation in sucrose gradients. The inclusion of 2.5% Ficoll in the grinding medium proved to be essential for a satisfactory separation of cell organelles during the subsequent centrifugation. Peroxisomes, mitochondria, and whole and broken chloroplasts were at least partially resolved as judged by marker-enzyme-activity profiles. The isolated peroxisomes contained activities of glycollate oxidase, catalase, hydroxypyruvate reductase, glycine aminotransferase, serine-glyoxylate aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase, comparable to activities found in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf peroxisomes. In contrast to spinach, however, only little, if any, particulate malate dehydrogenase activity could be attributed to isolated peroxisomes of the three CAM plants.

  2. Permeability of the peroxisomal membrane: lessons from the glyoxylate cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus eKunze

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glyoxylate serves as intermediate in various metabolic pathways, although high concentrations of this metabolite are toxic to the cell. In many organisms glyoxylate is fed into the glyoxylate cycle. Enzymes participating in this metabolism are located on both sides of the peroxisomal membrane. The permeability of this membrane for small metabolites paves the way for exchange of intermediates between proteins catalyzing consecutive reactions. A model, in which soluble enzymes accumulate in close proximity to both ends of pore-like structures forming a transmembrane metabolon could explain the rapid and targeted exchange of intermediates. The metabolites passing the membrane differ between the three model organisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana and Candida albicans, which reflects the ease of evolutionary adaptation processes whenever specific transporter proteins are not involved. The atypical permeability properties of the peroxisomal membrane together with a flexible structural arrangement ensuring the swift and selective transport across the membrane might represent the molecular basis for the functional versatility of peroxisomes.

  3. A Mutation in Plant-Specific SWI2/SNF2-Like Chromatin-Remodeling Proteins, DRD1 and DDM1, Delays Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eun Ju; Choi, Seung Hee; Kim, Ji Hong; Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Min Hee; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Woo, Hye Ryun; Kim, Jin-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Leaf senescence is a finely regulated complex process; however, evidence for the involvement of epigenetic processes in the regulation of leaf senescence is still fragmentary. Therefore, we chose to examine the functions of DRD1, a SWI2/SNF2 chromatin remodeling protein, in epigenetic regulation of leaf senescence, particularly because drd1-6 mutants exhibited a delayed leaf senescence phenotype. Photosynthetic parameters such as Fv/Fm and ETRmax were decreased in WT leaves compared to leaves of drd1-6 mutants after dark treatment. The WT leaves remarkably lost more chlorophyll and protein content during dark-induced senescence (DIS) than the drd1-6 leaves did. The induction of senescence-associated genes was noticeably inhibited in the drd1-6 mutant after 5-d of DIS. We compared changes in epigenetic regulation during DIS via quantitative expression analysis of 180-bp centromeric (CEN) and transcriptionally silent information (TSI) repeats. Their expression levels significantly increased in both the WT and the drd1-6 mutant, but did much less in the latter. Moreover, the delayed leaf senescence was observed in ddm1-2 mutants as well as the drd1-6, but not in drd1-p mutants. These data suggest that SWI2/SNF2 chromatin remodeling proteins such as DRD1 and DDM1 may influence leaf senescence possibly via epigenetic regulation.

  4. Peroxisomes as dynamic organelles : peroxisome abundance in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saraya, Ruchi; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisomes are cell organelles that are present in almost all eukaryotic cells and involved in a large range of metabolic pathways. The organelles are highly dynamic in nature: their number and enzyme content is highly variable and continuously adapts to prevailing environmental conditions. This re

  5. 氮磷施肥对拟南芥叶片碳氮磷化学计量特征的影响%Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization on leaf carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus stoichiometry of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严正兵; 金南瑛; 韩廷申; 方精云; 韩文轩

    2013-01-01

    Aims Arabidopsis thaliana,a widely used model organism in plant biology,is an ideal plant to test the growth rate hypothesis (GRH) and homeostasis theory about plant nutrition.Our objectives are to test i) whether GRH applies to this plant species,ii) how leaf nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) of A.thaliana follow the homeostasis theory and iii) whether the allometric relationship between leaf N and P content is consistent with the 3/4 power function (N-P3/4) for individual plant species.Methods Based on a pot experiment in a phytotron with N and P fertilizer additions,we measured the leaf carbon (C),N and P content and leafbiomass ofA.thaliana.Specific growth rate (mg·mg-1·d-1) was the leafbiomass increment divided by the initial biomass at planting,and by the days after planting.The homeostasis of plant elements is indicated by the exponent (reciprocal of the regulation coefficient) of the power function of leaf nutrient against soil nutrient concentrations.Important findings P is the limiting nutrient of the culture substrate for A.thaliana,while N fertilization could cause toxic effects in cases of excessive N uptake.The growth ofA.thaliana is consistent with GRH—the specific growth rate decreases with increasing leaf N∶P or C∶P.Leaf P content shows a significant regulation coefficient (3.51) (leaf-P-substrate-p1/3.51),but leaf N content has no significant relationship with substrate N.There is a significant allometric relationship between leaf N and P content,which is inconsistent with the 3/4 power function (N-p3/4).The power exponent (0.209) between leaf N content and leaf P content in the P fertilization treatments is significantly lower than the exponent (0.466) in the N fertilization treatments,suggesting that fertilization may affect the allometry between nutrients.Our findings can offer reference for future field studies on plant ecological stoichiometry at scales from species to community to ecosystem.%研究植物碳(C)氮(N)磷(P)化学计量

  6. Reference: 710 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n factor family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Treatment with abscisic acid (ABA) induced AtMYB44 tr...anscript accumulation within 30 min. The gene was also activated under various abiotic stre...sses, such as dehydration, low temperature, and salinity. In transgenic Arabidopsis carrying an At...MYB44 promoter-driven beta-glucuronidase (GUS) construct, strong GUS activity was observed in the vasculature... and leaf epidermal guard cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing AtMYB44 is more

  7. PredPlantPTS1: A Web Server for the Prediction of Plant Peroxisomal Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reumann, Sigrun; Buchwald, Daniela; Lingner, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of subcellular protein localization is essential to correctly assign unknown proteins to cell organelle-specific protein networks and to ultimately determine protein function. For metazoa, several computational approaches have been developed in the past decade to predict peroxisomal proteins carrying the peroxisome targeting signal type 1 (PTS1). However, plant-specific PTS1 protein prediction methods have been lacking up to now, and pre-existing methods generally were incapable of correctly predicting low-abundance plant proteins possessing non-canonical PTS1 patterns. Recently, we presented a machine learning approach that is able to predict PTS1 proteins for higher plants (spermatophytes) with high accuracy and which can correctly identify unknown targeting patterns, i.e., novel PTS1 tripeptides and tripeptide residues. Here we describe the first plant-specific web server PredPlantPTS1 for the prediction of plant PTS1 proteins using the above-mentioned underlying models. The server allows the submission of protein sequences from diverse spermatophytes and also performs well for mosses and algae. The easy-to-use web interface provides detailed output in terms of (i) the peroxisomal targeting probability of the given sequence, (ii) information whether a particular non-canonical PTS1 tripeptide has already been experimentally verified, and (iii) the prediction scores for the single C-terminal 14 amino acid residues. The latter allows identification of predicted residues that inhibit peroxisome targeting and which can be optimized using site-directed mutagenesis to raise the peroxisome targeting efficiency. The prediction server will be instrumental in identifying low-abundance and stress-inducible peroxisomal proteins and defining the entire peroxisomal proteome of Arabidopsis and agronomically important crop plants. PredPlantPTS1 is freely accessible at ppp.gobics.de.

  8. PredPlantPTS1: a web server for the prediction of plant peroxisomal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrun eReumann

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of subcellular protein localization is essential to correctly assign unknown proteins to cell organelle-specific protein networks and to ultimately determine protein function. For metazoa, several computational approaches have been developed in the past decade to predict peroxisomal proteins carrying the peroxisome targeting signal type 1 (PTS1. However, plant-specific PTS1 protein prediction methods have been lacking up to now, and pre-existing methods generally were incapable of correctly predicting low-abundance plant proteins possessing non-canonical PTS1 patterns. Recently, we presented a machine learning approach that is able to predict PTS1 proteins for higher plants (spermatophytes with high accuracy and which can correctly identify unknown targeting patterns, i.e. novel PTS1 tripeptides and tripeptide residues. Here we describe the first plant-specific web server PredPlantPTS1 for the prediction of plant PTS1 proteins using the above-mentioned underlying models. The server allows the submission of protein sequences from diverse spermatophytes and also performs well for mosses and algae. The easy-to-use web interface provides detailed output in terms of (i the peroxisomal targeting probability of the given sequence, (ii information whether a particular non-canonical PTS1 tripeptide has already been experimentally verified, and (iii the prediction scores for the single C-terminal 14 amino acid residues. The latter allows identification of predicted residues that inhibit peroxisome targeting and which can be optimized using site-directed mutagenesis to raise the peroxisome targeting efficiency. The prediction server will be instrumental in identifying low-abundance and stress-inducible peroxisomal proteins and defining the entire peroxisomal proteome of Arabidopsis and agronomically important crop plants. PredPlantPTS1 is freely accessible at ppp.gobics.de.

  9. The exportomer: the peroxisomal receptor export machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platta, Harald W; Hagen, Stefanie; Erdmann, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    Peroxisomes constitute a dynamic compartment of almost all eukaryotic cells. Depending on environmental changes and cellular demands peroxisomes can acquire diverse metabolic roles. The compartmentalization of peroxisomal matrix enzymes is a prerequisite to carry out their physiologic function. The matrix proteins are synthesized on free ribosomes in the cytosol and are ferried to the peroxisomal membrane by specific soluble receptors. Subsequent to cargo release into the peroxisomal matrix, the receptors are exported back to the cytosol to facilitate further rounds of matrix protein import. This dislocation step is accomplished by a remarkable machinery, which comprises enzymes required for the ubiquitination as well as the ATP-dependent extraction of the receptor from the membrane. Interestingly, receptor ubiquitination and dislocation are the only known energy-dependent steps in the peroxisomal matrix protein import process. The current view is that the export machinery of the receptors might function as molecular motor not only in the dislocation of the receptors but also in the import step of peroxisomal matrix protein by coupling ATP-dependent removal of the peroxisomal import receptor with cargo translocation into the organelle. In this review we will focus on the architecture and function of the peroxisomal receptor export machinery, the peroxisomal exportomer.

  10. Crosstalk between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean; Demarquoy; Fran?oise; Le; Borgne

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria and peroxisomes are small ubiquitous organelles. They both play major roles in cell metabolism,especially in terms of fatty acid metabolism,reactive oxygen species(ROS) production,and ROS scavenging,and it is now clear that they metabolically interact with each other. These two organelles share some properties,such as great plasticity and high potency to adapt their form and number according to cell requirements. Their functions are connected,and any alteration in the function of mitochondria may induce changes inperoxisomal physiology. The objective of this paper was to highlight the interconnection and the crosstalk existing between mitochondria and peroxisomes. Special emphasis was placed on the best known connections between these organelles:origin,structure,and metabolic interconnections.

  11. PeroxisomeDB 2.0: an integrative view of the global peroxisomal metabolome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Agatha; Real-Chicharro, Alejandro; Gabaldón, Toni; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Pujol, Aurora

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisomes are essential organelles that play a key role in redox signalling and lipid homeostasis. They contain a highly diverse enzymatic network among different species, mirroring the varied metabolic needs of the organisms. The previous PeroxisomeDB version organized the peroxisomal proteome of humans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on genetic and functional information into metabolic categories with a special focus on peroxisomal disease. The new release (http://www.peroxisomeDB.org) adds peroxisomal proteins from 35 newly sequenced eukaryotic genomes including fungi, yeasts, plants and lower eukaryotes. We searched these genomes for a core ensemble of 139 peroxisomal protein families and identified 2706 putative peroxisomal protein homologs. Approximately 37% of the identified homologs contained putative peroxisome targeting signals (PTS). To help develop understanding of the evolutionary relationships among peroxisomal proteins, the new database includes phylogenetic trees for 2386 of the peroxisomal proteins. Additional new features are provided, such as a tool to capture kinetic information from Brenda, CheBI and Sabio-RK databases and more than 1400 selected bibliographic references. PeroxisomeDB 2.0 is a freely available, highly interactive functional genomics platform that offers an extensive view on the peroxisomal metabolome across lineages, thus facilitating comparative genomics and systems analysis of the organelle. PMID:19892824

  12. A fluorescent reporter protein containing AtRMR1 domains is targeted to the storage and central vacuoles in Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco leaf cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scabone, Camila María; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Petruccelli, Silvana

    2011-10-01

    To develop a new strategy to target recombinant proteins to the vacuolar storage system in transgenic plants, the ability of the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of Arabidopsis receptor homology-transmembrane-RING H2-1 (AtRMR1) was evaluated. A secreted version of RFP (secRFP) and a fusion of it to the transmembrane and cytosolic domains of AtRMR1 (RFP-TMCT) were produced and studied both in transient and stable expression assays. Transient expression in leaves of Nicotiana tabacum showed that secRFP is secreted to the apoplast while its fusion to TMCT of AtRMR1 is sufficient to prevent secretion of the reporter. In tobacco leaves, RFP-TMCT reporter showed an endoplasmic reticulum pattern in early expression stages while in late expression stages, it was found in the vacuolar lumen. For the first time, the role of TM and CT domains of AtRMR1 in stable expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is presented; the fusion of TMCT to secRFP is sufficient to sort RFP to the lumen of the central vacuoles in leaves and roots and to the lumen of PSV in cotyledons of mature embryos. In addition, biochemical studies performed in extract from transgenic plants showed that RFP-TMCT is an integral membrane protein. Full-length RFP-TMCT was also found in the vacuolar lumen, suggesting internalization into destination vacuole. Not colocalization of RFP-TMCT with tonoplast and plasma membrane markers were observed. This membrane vacuolar determinant sorting signal could be used for future application in molecular pharming as an alternative means to sort proteins of interest to vacuoles.

  13. Pharmacological Regulation of Peroxisome Number in Glia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    been shown that the upregulation of lipoprotein lipase (rate-limiting enzyme in triglyceride hydrolysis ) by LXR ligands is due to the actions of...cytosol destined for peroxisomal import. As peroxisomes mature, enzymes required for proper function are imported. The fission of mature peroxisomes has...produce hydroxycholesterol occurs on the ER membrane through the action of various cytochrome P450 enzymes (Lund et al. 1999, Russell 2003

  14. Origin and growth of peroxisomes in yeast: The molecular mechanism of peroxisome formation in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are single membrane bound organelles, which occur in most eukaryotic cells. Their size, number and function, highly depend on the organism in which they occur. The origin of peroxisomes is debated for decades. Two different models have been proposed: the organelles form by fission of pre-existing peroxisomes or originate from another organelle, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER).The work described in this thesis strongly supports the model that peroxisomes are not formed from the ER. ...

  15. The Arabidopsis thaliana natriuretic peptide AtPNP-A is a systemic regulator of leaf dark respiration and signals via the phloem

    KAUST Repository

    Ruzvidzo, Oziniel

    2011-09-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) belong to a novel class of peptidic signaling molecules that share some structural similarity to the N-terminal domain of expansins and affect physiological processes such as water and ion homeostasis at nano-molar concentrations. Here we show that a recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) rapidly increased the rate of dark respiration in treated leaves after 5 min. In addition, we observed increases in lower leaves, and with a lag time of 10 min, the effect spread to the upper leaves and subsequently (after 15 min) to the opposite leaves. This response signature is indicative of phloem mobility of the signal, a hypothesis that was further strengthened by the fact that cold girdling, which affects phloem but not xylem or apoplastic processes, delayed the long distance AtPNP-A effect. We conclude that locally applied AtPNP-A can induce a phloem-mobile signal that rapidly modifies plant homeostasis in distal parts. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  16. Divide et impera : The dictum of peroxisomes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagotu, S.; Veenhuis, M; van der Klei, I.J.

    2010-01-01

    Several new proteins and pathways that play a role in peroxisome proliferation have been identified in the last few years. A surprising finding was that proteins well known for their function in mitochondrial fission (Fis1, Dnm1) are responsible for peroxisome fission as well. In this contribution w

  17. Inhibition of Arabidopsis chloroplast β-amylase BAM3 by maltotriose suggests a mechanism for the control of transitory leaf starch mobilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Wenxu; Francisco, Perigio; Wong, Russell; Zhang, Dongke

    2017-01-01

    Starch breakdown in leaves at night is tightly matched to the duration of the dark period, but the mechanism by which this regulation is achieved is unknown. In Arabidopsis chloroplasts, β-amylase BAM3 hydrolyses transitory starch, producing maltose and residual maltotriose. The aim of the current research was to investigate the regulatory and kinetic properties of BAM3. The BAM3 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and first assayed using a model substrate. Enzyme activity was stimulated by treatment with dithiothreitol and was increased 40% by 2–10 μM Ca2+ but did not require Mg2+. In order to investigate substrate specificity and possible regulatory effects of glucans, we developed a GC-MS method to assay reaction products. BAM3 readily hydrolysed maltohexaose with a Km of 1.7 mM and Kcat of 4300 s-1 but activity was 3.4-fold lower with maltopentaose and was negligible with maltotetraose. With maltohexaose or amylopectin as substrates and using [UL-13C12]maltose in an isotopic dilution method, we discovered that BAM3 activity is inhibited by maltotriose at physiological (mM) concentrations, but not by maltose. In contrast, the extracellular β-amylase of barley is only weakly inhibited by maltotriose. Our results may explain the impaired starch breakdown in maltotriose-accumulating mutants such as dpe1 which lacks the chloroplast disproportionating enzyme (DPE1) metabolising maltotriose to glucose. We hypothesise that the rate of starch breakdown in leaves can be regulated by inhibition of BAM3 by maltotriose, the concentration of which is determined by DPE, which is in turn influenced by the stromal concentration of glucose. Since the plastid glucose transporter pGlcT catalyses facilitated diffusion between stroma and cytosol, changes in consumption of glucose in the cytosol are expected to lead to concomitant changes in plastid glucose and maltotriose, and hence compensatory changes in BAM3 activity. PMID:28225829

  18. The emerging role of photorespiration and non-photorespiratory peroxisomal metabolism in pathogen defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørhagen, K; Laxa, M; Peterhänsel, C; Reumann, S

    2013-07-01

    Photorespiration represents one of the major highways of primary plant metabolism and is the most prominent example of metabolic cell organelle integration, since the pathway requires the concerted action of plastidial, peroxisomal, mitochondrial and cytosolic enzymes and organellar transport proteins. Oxygenation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate by Rubisco leads to the formation of large amounts of 2-phosphoglycolate, which are recycled to 3-phosphoglycerate by the photorespiratory C2 cycle, concomitant with stoichiometric production rates of H2 O2 in peroxisomes. Apart from its significance for agricultural productivity, a secondary function of photorespiration in pathogen defence has emerged only recently. Here, we summarise literature data supporting the crosstalk between photorespiration and pathogen defence and perform a meta-expression analysis of photorespiratory genes during pathogen attack. Moreover, we screened Arabidopsis proteins newly predicted using machine learning methods to be targeted to peroxisomes, the central H2 O2 -producing organelle of photorespiration, for homologues of known pathogen defence proteins and analysed their expression during pathogen infection. The analyses further support the idea that photorespiration and non-photorespiratory peroxisomal metabolism play multi-faceted roles in pathogen defence beyond metabolism of reactive oxygen species.

  19. Glyoxylate Reductase Isoform 1 is Localized in the Cytosol and Not Peroxisomes in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steven L. K. Ching; Satinder K. Gidda; Amanda Rochon; Owen R. van Cauwenberghe; Barry J. Shelp; Robert T. Mullen

    2012-01-01

    Glyoxylate reductase (GLYR) is a key enzyme in plant metabolism which catalyzes the detoxification of both photorespiratory glyoxylate and succinic semialdehdye,an intermediate of the γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) pathway.Two isoforms of GLYR exist in plants,GLYR1 and GLYR2,and while GLYR2 is known to be localized in plastids,GLYR1 has been reported to be localized in either peroxisomes or the cytosol.Here,we reappraised the intracellular localization of GLYR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana L.Heynh (ecotype Lansberg erecta) using both transiently-transformed suspension cells and stably-transformed plants,in combination with fluorescence microscopy.The results indicate that GLYR1 is localized exclusively to the cytosol regardless of the species,tissue and/or cell type,or exposure of plants to environmental stresses that would increase flux through the GABA pathway.Moreover,the C-terminal tripeptide sequence of GLYR1,-SRE,despite its resemblance to a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal,is not sufficient for targeting to peroxisomes.Collectively,these results define the cytosol as the intracellular location of GLYR1 and provide not only important insight to the metabolic roles of GLYR1 and the compartmentation of the GABA and photorespiratory pathways in plant cells,but also serve as a useful reference for future studies of proteins proposed to be localized to peroxisomes and/or the cytosol.

  20. PEX11β induces peroxisomal gene expression and alters peroxisome number during early Xenopus laevis development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanovski Sashko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisomes are organelles whose roles in fatty acid metabolism and reactive oxygen species elimination have contributed much attention in understanding their origin and biogenesis. Many studies have shown that de novo peroxisome biogenesis is an important regulatory process, while yeast studies suggest that total peroxisome numbers are in part regulated by proteins such as Pex11, which can facilitate the division of existing peroxisomes. Although de novo biogenesis and divisions are likely important mechanisms, the regulation of peroxisome numbers during embryonic development is poorly understood. Peroxisome number and function are particularly crucial in oviparous animals such as frogs where large embryonic yolk and fatty acid stores must be quickly metabolized, and resulting reactive oxygen species eliminated. Here we elucidate the role of Pex11β in regulating peroxisomal gene expression and number in Xenopus laevis embryogenesis. Results Microinjecting haemagglutinin (HA tagged Pex11β in early embryos resulted in increased RNA levels for peroxisome related genes PMP70 and catalase at developmental stages 10 and 20, versus uninjected embryos. Catalase and PMP70 proteins were found in punctate structures at stage 20 in control embryos, whereas the injection of ectopic HA-Pex11β induced their earlier localization in punctate structures at stage 10. Furthermore, the peroxisomal marker GFP-SKL, which was found localized as peroxisome-like structures at stage 20, was similarly found at stage 10 when co-microinjected with HA-Pex11β. Conclusions Overexpressed Pex11β altered peroxisomal gene levels and induced the early formation of peroxisomes-like structures during development, both of which demonstrate that Pex11β may be a key regulator of peroxisome number in early Xenopus embryos.

  1. Study on the Cell Cycle Regulation during Leaf Development in Arabidopsis thaliana by Flow Cytometry%利用流式细胞仪研究拟南芥叶发育过程中细胞周期的调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾民环; 许德阳; 薛景石; 袁振环; 黄海; 崔晓峰

    2012-01-01

    叶的形态建成依赖于细胞不断地分裂增殖和不同类型细胞的特化.在叶发育早期,叶细胞主要通过旺盛的有丝分裂来增加原基中细胞的数目.随着叶片的生长,叶细胞自顶部向基部逐渐退出有丝分裂进入内复制来增加细胞的倍性,同时伴随细胞的扩展和分化.本文介绍利用流式细胞仪研究双子叶模式植物拟南芥叶发育过程中细胞周期调控的方法和具体研究实例.我们发现至少存在3种类型的细胞周期异常的拟南芥叶发育突变体.此外,我们还介绍利用流式细胞仪测定DNA复制效率的方法.%Leaf morphogenesis relies on continuous cell proliferation and specification of distinct types of cells. During early leaf development, leaf cells mainly undergo vigorous mitotic cell divisions to boost the number of primordial cells. Along leaf growth, leaf cells gradually exit from the mitotic cell cycle from leaf tip to base and enter the endoreduplication, which is frequently associated with cell expansion and differentiation, resulting in cells with increased nuclear ploidy levels. Here we describe the methods and several examples employing flow cytometry to investigate the cell cycle regulation during leaf development in Arabidopsis thaliana, a model dicotyledonous plant. We found that there are at least three types of leaf developmental mutants with abnormal cell cycle. In addition, we introduce the assay to measure the efficiency of DNA replication in Arabidopsis.

  2. The Early-Acting Peroxin PEX19 Is Redundantly Encoded, Farnesylated, and Essential for Viability in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M McDonnell

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are single-membrane bound organelles that are essential for normal development in plants and animals. In mammals and yeast, the peroxin (PEX proteins PEX3 and PEX19 facilitate the early steps of peroxisome membrane protein (PMP insertion and pre-peroxisome budding from the endoplasmic reticulum. The PEX3 membrane protein acts as a docking site for PEX19, a cytosolic chaperone for PMPs that delivers PMPs to the endoplasmic reticulum or peroxisomal membrane. PEX19 is farnesylated in yeast and mammals, and we used immunoblotting with prenylation mutants to show that PEX19 also is fully farnesylated in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana plants. We examined insertional alleles disrupting either of the two Arabidopsis PEX19 isoforms, PEX19A or PEX19B, and detected similar levels of PEX19 protein in the pex19a-1 mutant and wild type; however, PEX19 protein was nearly undetectable in the pex19b-1 mutant. Despite the reduction in PEX19 levels in pex19b-1, both pex19a-1 and pex19b-1 single mutants lacked notable peroxisomal β-oxidation defects and displayed normal levels and localization of peroxisomal matrix and membrane proteins. The pex19a-1 pex19b-1 double mutant was embryo lethal, indicating a redundantly encoded critical role for PEX19 during embryogenesis. Expressing YFP-tagged versions of either PEX19 isoform rescued this lethality, confirming that PEX19A and PEX19B act redundantly in Arabidopsis. We observed that pex19b-1 enhanced peroxisome-related defects of a subset of peroxin-defective mutants, supporting a role for PEX19 in peroxisome function. Together, our data indicate that Arabidopsis PEX19 promotes peroxisome function and is essential for viability.

  3. Physical interaction between peroxisomes and chloroplasts elucidated by in situ laser analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Kazusato; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Mano, Shoji; Kondo, Maki; Yamada, Kenji; Hayashi, Makoto; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Kadota, Akeo; Sakamoto, Wataru; Higashi, Shoichi; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Shigemasa, Akinori; Iino, Takanori; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Nishimura, Mikio

    2015-03-30

    Life on earth relies upon photosynthesis, which consumes carbon dioxide and generates oxygen and carbohydrates. Photosynthesis is sustained by a dynamic environment within the plant cell involving numerous organelles with cytoplasmic streaming. Physiological studies of chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes show that these organelles actively communicate during photorespiration, a process by which by-products produced by photosynthesis are salvaged. Nevertheless, the mechanisms enabling efficient exchange of metabolites have not been clearly defined. We found that peroxisomes along chloroplasts changed shape from spherical to elliptical and their interaction area increased during photorespiration. We applied a recent femtosecond laser technology to analyse adhesion between the organelles inside palisade mesophyll cells of Arabidopsis leaves and succeeded in estimating their physical interactions under different environmental conditions. This is the first application of this estimation method within living cells. Our findings suggest that photosynthetic-dependent interactions play a critical role in ensuring efficient metabolite flow during photorespiration.

  4. High incidence of hyperoxaluria in generalized peroxisomal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.S. van Woerden; J.W. Groothoff; F.A. Wijburg; M. Duran; R.J.A. Wanders; P.G. Barth; B.T. Poll-The

    2006-01-01

    The Zellweger spectrum disorders (ZSDs) are characterized by a generalized loss of peroxisomal functions caused by deficient peroxisomal assembly. Clinical presentation and survival are heterogeneous. Although most peroxisomal enzymes are unstable in the cytosol of peroxisome-deficient cells of ZSD

  5. The cyclic nucleotide gated cation channel AtCNGC10 traffics from the ER via Golgi vesicles to the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis root and leaf cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Marilou A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels (CNGCs maintain cation homeostasis essential for a wide range of physiological processes in plant cells. However, the precise subcellular locations and trafficking of these membrane proteins are poorly understood. This is further complicated by a general deficiency of information about targeting pathways of membrane proteins in plants. To investigate CNGC trafficking and localization, we have measured Atcngc5 and Atcngc10 expression in roots and leaves, analyzed AtCNGC10-GFP fusions transiently expressed in protoplasts, and conducted immunofluorescence labeling of protoplasts and immunoelectron microscopic analysis of high pressure frozen leaves and roots. Results AtCNGC10 mRNA and protein levels were 2.5-fold higher in roots than leaves, while AtCNGC5 mRNA and protein levels were nearly equal in these tissues. The AtCNGC10-EGFP fusion was targeted to the plasma membrane in leaf protoplasts, and lightly labeled several intracellular structures. Immunofluorescence microscopy with affinity purified CNGC-specific antisera indicated that AtCNGC5 and AtCNGC10 are present in the plasma membrane of protoplasts. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that AtCNGC10 was associated with the plasma membrane of mesophyll, palisade parenchyma and epidermal cells of leaves, and the meristem, columella and cap cells of roots. AtCNCG10 was also observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi cisternae and vesicles of 50–150 nm in size. Patch clamp assays of an AtCNGC10-GFP fusion expressed in HEK293 cells measured significant cation currents. Conclusion AtCNGC5 and AtCNGC10 are plasma membrane proteins. We postulate that AtCNGC10 traffics from the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi apparatus and associated vesicles to the plasma membrane. The presence of the cation channel, AtCNGC10, in root cap meristem cells, cell plate, and gravity-sensing columella cells, combined with the previously reported

  6. Metabolite Profiling for Leaf Senescence in Barley Reveals Decreases in Amino Acids and Glycolysis Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Avila-Ospina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is a long developmental phase important for plant performance and nutrient management. Cell constituents are recycled in old leaves to provide nutrients that are redistributed to the sink organs. Up to now, metabolomic changes during leaf senescence have been mainly studied in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.. The metabolite profiling conducted in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. during primary leaf senescence under two nitrate regimes and in flag leaf shows that amino acids, hexose, sucrose and glycolysis intermediates decrease during senescence, while minor carbohydrates accumulate. Tricarboxylic acid (TCA compounds changed with senescence only in primary leaves. The senescence-related metabolite changes in the flag leaf were globally similar to those observed in primary leaves. The effect of senescence on the metabolite changes of barley leaves was similar to that previously described in Arabidopsis except for sugars and glycolysis compounds. This suggests a different role of sugars in the control of leaf senescence in Arabidopsis and in barley.

  7. Origin and growth of peroxisomes in yeast : The molecular mechanism of peroxisome formation in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are single membrane bound organelles, which occur in most eukaryotic cells. Their size, number and function, highly depend on the organism in which they occur. The origin of peroxisomes is debated for decades. Two different models have been proposed: the organelles form by fission of pre

  8. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celien eLismont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction-oxidation or ‘redox’ reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from ‘omics’ technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of

  9. Reference: 412 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the tobacco arcA gene, mediates hormone responses and plays a regulatory role in multiple developmental processes...in RACK1A confer defects in multiple developmental processes including seed germination, leaf production, an...ltiple hormone responsiveness and developmental processes in Arabidopsis. 11 2697-708 16829549 2006 Journal

  10. Senescence-specific Alteration of Hydrogen Peroxide Levels in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oilseed Rape Spring Variety Brassica napus L.cv.Mozart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefan Bieker; Lena Riester; Mark Stahl; Jürgen Franzaring; Ulrike Zentgraf

    2012-01-01

    In order to analyze the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production in senescence in more detail,we manipulated intracellular H2O2 levels in Arabidopsis thaliala (L.) Heynh by using the hydrogenperoxide-sensitive part of the Escherichia coli transcription regulator OxyR,which was directed to the cytoplasm as well as into the peroxisomes.H2O2 levels were lowered and senescence was delayed in both transgenic lines,but OxyR was found to be more effective in the cytoplasm.To transfer this knowledge to crop plants,we analyzed oilseed rape plants Brassica napus L.cv.Mozart for H2O2 and its scavenging enzymes catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) during leaf and plant development.H2O2 levels were found to increase during bolting and flowering time,but no increase could be observed in the very late stages of senescence.With increasing H2O2 levels,CAT and APX activities declined,so it is likely that similar mechanisms are used in oilseed rape and Arabidopsis to control H2O2 levels.Under elevated CO2 conditions,oilseed rape senescence was accelerated and coincided with an earlier increase in H2O2 levels,indicating that H2O2 may be one of the signals to inducing senescence in a broader range of Brassicaceae.

  11. Senescence-specific alteration of hydrogen peroxide levels in Arabidopsis thaliana and oilseed rape spring variety Brassica napus L. cv. Mozart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieker, Stefan; Riester, Lena; Stahl, Mark; Franzaring, Jürgen; Zentgraf, Ulrike

    2012-08-01

    In order to analyze the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production in senescence in more detail, we manipulated intracellular H(2)O(2) levels in Arabidopsis thaliala (L.) Heynh by using the hydrogen-peroxide-sensitive part of the Escherichia coli transcription regulator OxyR, which was directed to the cytoplasm as well as into the peroxisomes. H(2)O(2) levels were lowered and senescence was delayed in both transgenic lines, but OxyR was found to be more effective in the cytoplasm. To transfer this knowledge to crop plants, we analyzed oilseed rape plants Brassica napus L. cv. Mozart for H(2)O(2) and its scavenging enzymes catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) during leaf and plant development. H(2)O(2) levels were found to increase during bolting and flowering time, but no increase could be observed in the very late stages of senescence. With increasing H(2)O(2) levels, CAT and APX activities declined, so it is likely that similar mechanisms are used in oilseed rape and Arabidopsis to control H(2)O(2) levels. Under elevated CO(2) conditions, oilseed rape senescence was accelerated and coincided with an earlier increase in H(2)O(2) levels, indicating that H(2)O(2) may be one of the signals to inducing senescence in a broader range of Brassicaceae.

  12. Plant peroxisomes: A nitro-oxidative cocktail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Corpas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although peroxisomes are very simple organelles, research on different species has provided us with an understanding of their importance in terms of cell viability. In addition to the significant role played by plant peroxisomes in the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS, data gathered over the last two decades show that these organelles are an endogenous source of nitric oxide (NO and related molecules called reactive nitrogen species (RNS. Molecules such as NO and H2O2 act as retrograde signals among the different cellular compartments, thus facilitating integral cellular adaptation to physiological and environmental changes. However, under nitro-oxidative conditions, part of this network can be overloaded, possibly leading to cellular damage and even cell death. This review aims to update our knowledge of the ROS/RNS metabolism, whose important role in plant peroxisomes is still underestimated. However, this pioneering approach, in which key elements such as β-oxidation, superoxide dismutase (SOD and NO have been mainly described in relation to plant peroxisomes, could also be used to explore peroxisomes from other organisms.

  13. Elucidating the Role of Transport Processes in Leaf Glucosinolate Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Svend Roesen; Olsen, Carl Erik; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan;

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a strategy to defend its leaves against herbivores is to accumulate glucosinolates along the midrib and at the margin. Although it is generally assumed that glucosinolates are synthesized along the vasculature in an Arabidopsis leaf, thereby suggesting...... that the margin accumulation is established through transport, little is known about these transport processes. Here, we show through leaf apoplastic fluid analysis and glucosinolate feeding experiments that two glucosinolate transporters, GTR1 and GTR2, essential for long-distance transport of glucosinolates...... in Arabidopsis, also play key roles in glucosinolate allocation within a mature leaf by effectively importing apoplastically localized glucosinolates into appropriate cells. Detection of glucosinolates in root xylem sap unambiguously shows that this transport route is involved in root-to-shoot glucosinolate...

  14. Formation of Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Derived Protrusions and Vesicles in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Yamashita

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that have inner and outer membranes. In plants, the inner membrane has been well studied but relatively little is known about the outer membrane. Here we report that Arabidopsis cells have mitochondrial outer membrane-derived structures, some of which protrude from the main body of mitochondria (mitochondrial outer-membrane protrusions; MOPs, while others form vesicle-like structures without a matrix marker. The latter vesicle-like structures are similar to some mammalian MDVs (mitochondrial-derived vesicles. Live imaging demonstrated that a plant MDV budded off from the tip of a MOP. MDVs were also observed in the drp3a drp3b double mutant, indicating that they could be formed without the mitochondrial fission factors DRP3A and DRP3B. Double staining studies showed that the MDVs were not peroxisomes, endosomes, Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN. The numbers of MDVs and MOPs increased in senescent leaves and after dark treatment. Together, these results suggest that MDVs and MOPs are related to leaf senescence.

  15. Ubiquitin in the peroxisomal protein import pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Tânia; Rodrigues, Tony A; Pinto, Manuel P; Carvalho, Andreia F; Azevedo, Jorge E; Grou, Cláudia P

    2014-03-01

    PEX5 is the shuttling receptor for newly synthesized peroxisomal matrix proteins. Alone, or with the help of an adaptor protein, this receptor binds peroxisomal matrix proteins in the cytosol and transports them to the peroxisomal membrane docking/translocation module (DTM). The interaction between cargo-loaded PEX5 and the DTM ultimately results in its insertion into the DTM with the concomitant translocation of the cargo protein across the organelle membrane. PEX5 is not consumed in this event; rather it is dislocated back into the cytosol so that it can promote additional rounds of protein transportation. Remarkably, the data collected in recent years indicate that dislocation is preceded by monoubiquitination of PEX5 at a conserved cysteine residue. This mandatory modification is not the only type of ubiquitination occurring at the DTM. Indeed, several findings suggest that defective receptors jamming the DTM are polyubiquitinated and targeted to the proteasome for degradation.

  16. Peroxisome Ca(2+) homeostasis in animal and plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Alex; Drago, Ilaria; Zottini, Michela; Pizzo, Paola; Pozzan, Tullio

    2013-01-01

    Ca(2+) homeostasis in peroxisomes has been an unsolved problem for many years. Recently novel probes to monitor Ca(2+) levels in the lumen of peroxisomes in living cells of both animal and plant cells have been developed. Here we discuss the contrasting results obtained in mammalian cells with chemiluminecsent (aequorin) and fluorescent (cameleon) probes targeted to peroxisomes. We briefly discuss the different characteristics of these probes and the possible pitfalls of the two approaches. We conclude that the contrasting results obtained with the two probes may reflect a heterogeneity among peroxisomes in mammalian cells. We also discuss the results obtained in plant peroxisomes. In particular we demonstrate that Ca(2+) increases in the cytoplasm are mirrored by similar rises of Ca(2+) concentration the lumen of peroxisomes. The increases in peroxisome Ca(2+) level results in the activation of a catalase isoform, CAT3. Other functional roles of peroxisomal Ca(2+) changes in plant physiology are briefly discussed.

  17. Super-resolution microscopy reveals compartmentalization of peroxisomal membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present...... the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins....... Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5...

  18. Peroxisomes,oxidative stress,and inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stanley; R; Terlecky; Laura; J; Terlecky; Courtney; R; Giordano

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are intracellular organelles mediating a wide variety of biosynthetic and biodegradative reactions.Included among these are the metabolism of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive species,molecules whose levels help define the oxidative state of cells.Loss of oxidative equilibrium in cells of tissues and organs potentiates inflammatory responses which can ultimately trigger human disease.The goal of this article is to review evidence for connections between peroxisome function,oxidative stress,and inflammation in the context of human health and degenerative disease.Dysregulated points in this nexus are identified and potential remedial approaches are presented.

  19. Incredibly close-A newly identified peroxisome-ER contact site in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldiner, Maya; Zalckvar, Einat

    2017-02-01

    Peroxisomes are tiny organelles that control important and diverse metabolic processes via their interplay with other organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this issue, Costello et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201607055) and Hua et al. (2017. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201608128) identify a peroxisome-ER contact site in human cells held together by a tethering complex of VAPA/B (vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated proteins A/B) and ACBD5 (acyl Co-A binding protein 5).

  20. LeafJ: an ImageJ plugin for semi-automated leaf shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloof, Julin N; Nozue, Kazunari; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Palmer, Christine M

    2013-01-21

    High throughput phenotyping (phenomics) is a powerful tool for linking genes to their functions (see review and recent examples). Leaves are the primary photosynthetic organ, and their size and shape vary developmentally and environmentally within a plant. For these reasons studies on leaf morphology require measurement of multiple parameters from numerous leaves, which is best done by semi-automated phenomics tools. Canopy shade is an important environmental cue that affects plant architecture and life history; the suite of responses is collectively called the shade avoidance syndrome (SAS). Among SAS responses, shade induced leaf petiole elongation and changes in blade area are particularly useful as indices. To date, leaf shape programs (e.g. SHAPE, LAMINA, LeafAnalyzer, LEAFPROCESSOR) can measure leaf outlines and categorize leaf shapes, but can not output petiole length. Lack of large-scale measurement systems of leaf petioles has inhibited phenomics approaches to SAS research. In this paper, we describe a newly developed ImageJ plugin, called LeafJ, which can rapidly measure petiole length and leaf blade parameters of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. For the occasional leaf that required manual correction of the petiole/leaf blade boundary we used a touch-screen tablet. Further, leaf cell shape and leaf cell numbers are important determinants of leaf size. Separate from LeafJ we also present a protocol for using a touch-screen tablet for measuring cell shape, area, and size. Our leaf trait measurement system is not limited to shade-avoidance research and will accelerate leaf phenotyping of many mutants and screening plants by leaf phenotyping.

  1. The proteome of human liver peroxisomes: identification of five new peroxisomal constituents by a label-free quantitative proteomics survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gronemeyer

    Full Text Available The peroxisome is a key organelle of low abundance that fulfils various functions essential for human cell metabolism. Severe genetic diseases in humans are caused by defects in peroxisome biogenesis or deficiencies in the function of single peroxisomal proteins. To improve our knowledge of this important cellular structure, we studied for the first time human liver peroxisomes by quantitative proteomics. Peroxisomes were isolated by differential and Nycodenz density gradient centrifugation. A label-free quantitative study of 314 proteins across the density gradient was accomplished using high resolution mass spectrometry. By pairing statistical data evaluation, cDNA cloning and in vivo colocalization studies, we report the association of five new proteins with human liver peroxisomes. Among these, isochorismatase domain containing 1 protein points to the existence of a new metabolic pathway and hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase like 2 protein is likely involved in the transport or β-oxidation of fatty acids in human peroxisomes. The detection of alcohol dehydrogenase 1A suggests the presence of an alternative alcohol-oxidizing system in hepatic peroxisomes. In addition, lactate dehydrogenase A and malate dehydrogenase 1 partially associate with human liver peroxisomes and enzyme activity profiles support the idea that NAD(+ becomes regenerated during fatty acid β-oxidation by alternative shuttling processes in human peroxisomes involving lactate dehydrogenase and/or malate dehydrogenase. Taken together, our data represent a valuable resource for future studies of peroxisome biochemistry that will advance research of human peroxisomes in health and disease.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of effectors of peroxisome biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsey A Saleem

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are intracellular organelles that house a number of diverse metabolic processes, notably those required for beta-oxidation of fatty acids. Peroxisomes biogenesis can be induced by the presence of peroxisome proliferators, including fatty acids, which activate complex cellular programs that underlie the induction process. Here, we used multi-parameter quantitative phenotype analyses of an arrayed mutant collection of yeast cells induced to proliferate peroxisomes, to establish a comprehensive inventory of genes required for peroxisome induction and function. The assays employed include growth in the presence of fatty acids, and confocal imaging and flow cytometry through the induction process. In addition to the classical phenotypes associated with loss of peroxisomal functions, these studies identified 169 genes required for robust signaling, transcription, normal peroxisomal development and morphologies, and transmission of peroxisomes to daughter cells. These gene products are localized throughout the cell, and many have indirect connections to peroxisome function. By integration with extant data sets, we present a total of 211 genes linked to peroxisome biogenesis and highlight the complex networks through which information flows during peroxisome biogenesis and function.

  3. Super-resolution Microscopy Reveals Compartmentalization of Peroxisomal Membrane Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiani, Silvia; Waithe, Dominic; Reglinski, Katharina; Cruz-Zaragoza, Luis Daniel; Garcia, Esther; Clausen, Mathias P; Schliebs, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf; Eggeling, Christian

    2016-08-12

    Membrane-associated events during peroxisomal protein import processes play an essential role in peroxisome functionality. Many details of these processes are not known due to missing spatial resolution of technologies capable of investigating peroxisomes directly in the cell. Here, we present the use of super-resolution optical stimulated emission depletion microscopy to investigate with sub-60-nm resolution the heterogeneous spatial organization of the peroxisomal proteins PEX5, PEX14, and PEX11 around actively importing peroxisomes, showing distinct differences between these peroxins. Moreover, imported protein sterol carrier protein 2 (SCP2) occupies only a subregion of larger peroxisomes, highlighting the heterogeneous distribution of proteins even within the peroxisome. Finally, our data reveal subpopulations of peroxisomes showing only weak colocalization between PEX14 and PEX5 or PEX11 but at the same time a clear compartmentalized organization. This compartmentalization, which was less evident in cases of strong colocalization, indicates dynamic protein reorganization linked to changes occurring in the peroxisomes. Through the use of multicolor stimulated emission depletion microscopy, we have been able to characterize peroxisomes and their constituents to a yet unseen level of detail while maintaining a highly statistical approach, paving the way for equally complex biological studies in the future.

  4. Peroxisome division and inheritance in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Kuravi, Venkata Kasinath

    2006-01-01

    The cell is the basic unit of life. Based on their structure and composition, cells can be classified in two major groups, the prokaryotes (bacteria, Arcaea) and the eukaryotes. A major mophological difference between the two is that eukaryotic cells harbour membrane-bound compartments (organelles) such as mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum, vacuoles, peroxisomes etc., while these compartments are absent in prokarytes. Each organelle is specialized to perform distinct tasks. For example,...

  5. The peroxisomal receptor dislocation pathway: to the exportomer and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platta, Harald W; Hagen, Stefanie; Reidick, Christina; Erdmann, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    The biogenesis of peroxisomes is an ubiquitin-dependent process. In particular, the import of matrix proteins into the peroxisomal lumen requires the modification of import receptors with ubiquitin. The matrix proteins are synthesized on free polyribosomes in the cytosol and are recognized by import receptors via a peroxisomal targeting sequence (PTS). Subsequent to the transport of the receptor/cargo-complex to the peroxisomal membrane and the release of the cargo into the peroxisomal lumen, the PTS-receptors are exported back to the cytosol for further rounds of matrix protein import. The exportomer represents the molecular machinery required for the retrotranslocation of the PTS-receptors. It comprises enzymes for the ubiquitination as well as for the ATP-dependent extraction of the PTS-receptors from the peroxisomal membrane. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates a mechanistic interconnection of the ATP-dependent removal of the PTS-receptors with the translocation of the matrix protein into the organellar lumen. Interestingly, the components of the peroxisomal exportomer seem also to be involved in cellular tasks that are distinct from the ubiquitination and dislocation of the peroxisomal PTS-receptors. This includes work that indicates a central function of this machinery in the export of peroxisomal matrix proteins in plants, while a subset of exportomer components is involved in the meiocyte formation in some fungi, the peroxisome-chloroplast contact during photorespiration in plants and possibly even the selective degradation of peroxisomes via pexophagy. In this review, we want to discuss the central role of the exportomer during matrix protein import, but also highlight distinct roles of exportomer constituents in additional cellular processes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Peroxisomes: biogenesis, functions and diseases.

  6. Reference: 494 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hn C et al. 2007 Jan. Plant J. 49(2):194-207. Green-leaf volatiles are commonly emitted from mechanically an...ngi, and induce several important plant defense pathways. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the major volatile released upon mechanical...ighest expression of CHAT occurs in the leaves and stems. Upon mechanical damage, the (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl aceta

  7. The impact of peroxisomes on cellular ageing and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvambigai eManivannan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are ubiquitous eukaryotic organelles, which perform a plethora of functions including hydrogen peroxide metabolism and β-oxidation of fatty acids. Reactive oxygen species produced by peroxisomes are a major contributing factor to cellular oxidative stress, which is supposed to significantly accelerate ageing and cell death according to the free radical theory of ageing. However, relative to mitochondria, the role of the other oxidative organelles, the peroxisomes, in these degenerative pathways has not been extensively investigated. In this contribution we discuss our current knowledge on the role of peroxisomes in ageing and cell death, with focus on studies performed in yeast.

  8. Leaf-produced floral signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevaart, Jan A D

    2008-10-01

    Florigen is the hypothetical leaf-produced signal that induces floral initiation at the shoot apex. The nature of florigen has remained elusive for more than 70 years. But recent progress toward understanding the regulatory network for flowering in Arabidopsis has led to the suggestion that FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) or its product is the mobile flower-inducing signal that moves from an induced leaf through the phloem to the shoot apex. In the past year, physical and chemical evidence has shown that it is FT protein, and not FT mRNA, that moves from induced leaves to the apical meristem. These results have established that FT is the main, if not the only, component of the universal florigen.

  9. Transcriptional analyses of natural leaf senescence in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is an important biological process that contributes to grain yield in crops. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying natural leaf senescence, we harvested three different developmental ear leaves of maize, mature leaves (ML, early senescent leaves (ESL, and later senescent leaves (LSL, and analyzed transcriptional changes using RNA-sequencing. Three sets of data, ESL vs. ML, LSL vs. ML, and LSL vs. ESL, were compared, respectively. In total, 4,552 genes were identified as differentially expressed. Functional classification placed these genes into 18 categories including protein metabolism, transporters, and signal transduction. At the early stage of leaf senescence, genes involved in aromatic amino acids (AAAs biosynthetic process and transport, cellular polysaccharide biosynthetic process, and the cell wall macromolecule catabolic process, were up-regulated. Whereas, genes involved in amino acid metabolism, transport, apoptosis, and response to stimulus were up-regulated at the late stage of leaf senescence. Further analyses reveals that the transport-related genes at the early stage of leaf senescence potentially take part in enzyme and amino acid transport and the genes upregulated at the late stage are involved in sugar transport, indicating nutrient recycling mainly takes place at the late stage of leaf senescence. Comparison between the data of natural leaf senescence in this study and previously reported data for Arabidopsis implies that the mechanisms of leaf senescence in maize are basically similar to those in Arabidopsis. A comparison of natural and induced leaf senescence in maize was performed. Athough many basic biological processes involved in senescence occur in both types of leaf senescence, 78.07% of differentially expressed genes in natural leaf senescence were not identifiable in induced leaf senescence, suggesting that differences in gene regulatory network may exist between these two leaf senescence

  10. Arabidopsis ECERIFERUM9 involvement in cuticle formation and maintenance of plant water status

    Science.gov (United States)

    A unique set of allelic Arabidopsis mutants are described that exhibit either suppressed or completely inhibited expression of a gene designated ECERIFERUM9 (CER9). These mutants exhibit a dramatic elevation in the total amount of leaf cutin monomers, and a dramatic shift in the leaf cuticular wax p...

  11. The impact of peroxisomes on cellular aging and death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manivannan, Selvambigai; Scheckhuber, Christian Quintus; Veenhuis, Marten; Klei, Ida Johanna van der; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous eukaryotic organelles, which perform a plethora of functions including hydrogen peroxide metabolism and β-oxidation of fatty acids. Reactive oxygen species produced by peroxisomes are a major contributing factor to cellular oxidative stress, which is supposed to significan

  12. Yeast peroxisomes : function and biogenesis of a versatile cell organelle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klei, IJ; Veenhuis, M

    1997-01-01

    Yeast peroxisomes harbour enzymes involved in the metabolism of specific growth substrates, Sequestration of these enzymes increases the efficiency of such pathways. Currently, 16 genes involved in peroxisome biogenesis have been identified, and analysis of their products suggests novel mechanisms f

  13. Hansenula polymorpha pex11 cells are affected in peroxisome retention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, Arjen M; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2009-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized the Hansenula polymorpha PEX11 gene. Our morphological data are consistent with previous observations that peroxisome proliferation can be regulated by modulating Pex11p levels. Surprisingly, pex11 cells also showed a defect in peroxisome retention in mother cells du

  14. Yeast methylotrophy and autophagy in a methanol-oscillating environment on growing Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Kawaguchi

    Full Text Available The yeast Candida boidinii capable of growth on methanol proliferates and survives on the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. The local methanol concentration at the phyllosphere of growing A. thaliana exhibited daily periodicity, and yeast cells responded by altering both the expression of methanol-inducible genes and peroxisome proliferation. Even under these dynamically changing environmental conditions, yeast cells proliferated 3 to 4 times in 11 days. Among the C1-metabolic enzymes, enzymes in the methanol assimilation pathway, but not formaldehyde dissimilation or anti-oxidizing enzymes, were necessary for yeast proliferation at the phyllosphere. Furthermore, both peroxisome assembly and pexophagy, a selective autophagy pathway that degrades peroxisomes, were necessary for phyllospheric proliferation. Thus, the present study sheds light on the life cycle and physiology of yeast in the natural environment at both the molecular and cellular levels.

  15. Properties of peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase from Agave americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, J L; Zafra, M F; Alejandre, M J; García-Peregrín, E

    1982-09-01

    Adenine nucleotides were tested as effectors of peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase from Agave americana leaves in the presence of different concentrations of acetyl-CoA and oxalacetate substrates. ATP inhibited both enzyme activities but with a different inhibition profile. 1.0-7.5 mM ADP did not inhibit the peroxisomal citrate synthase in the presence of high substrate concentrations, while the mitochondrial enzyme was strongly inhibited by 1.0 mM ADP in the same conditions. Likewise, a different pattern was obtained with AMP on both peroxisomal and mitochondrial activities. The rate of citrate formation as function of acetyl-CoA and oxalacetate concentration was also studied in both fractions. Maximal velocity was highest in the peroxisomal fraction, whether acetyl-CoA or oxalacetate were the variable substrates. These differences indicate that peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthases seem to be two different isoenzymes.

  16. Yeast Methylotrophy and Autophagy in a Methanol-Oscillating Environment on Growing Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Kosuke Kawaguchi; Hiroya Yurimoto; Masahide Oku; Yasuyoshi Sakai

    2011-01-01

    The yeast Candida boidinii capable of growth on methanol proliferates and survives on the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. The local methanol concentration at the phyllosphere of growing A. thaliana exhibited daily periodicity, and yeast cells responded by altering both the expression of methanol-inducible genes and peroxisome proliferation. Even under these dynamically changing environmental conditions, yeast cells proliferated 3 to 4 times in 11 days. Among the C1-metabolic enzymes, enzymes ...

  17. Leaf hydraulic conductance varies with vein anatomy across A rabidopsis thaliana wild-type and leaf vein mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caringella, M.A.; Bongers, F.J.; Sack, L.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf venation is diverse across plant species and has practical applications from paleobotany to modern agriculture. However, the impact of vein traits on plant performance has not yet been tested in a model system such as Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous studies analysed cotyledons of A. thaliana vei

  18. Lipid rafts are essential for peroxisome biogenesis in HepG2 cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenberg, J.; Rembacz, K.P.; Hoekstra, M.; Pellicoro, A.; Heuvel, F.A. van den; Heegsma, J.; Ijzendoorn, S.C. van; Holzinger, A.; Imanaka, T.; Moshage, H.; Faber, K.N.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisomes are particularly abundant in the liver and are involved in bile salt synthesis and fatty acid metabolism. Peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) are required for peroxisome biogenesis [e.g., the interacting peroxisomal biogenesis factors Pex13p and Pex14p] and its metabolic function [e.g.,

  19. Lipid Rafts Are Essential for Peroxisome Biogenesis in HepG2 Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenberg, Jannes; Rembacz, Krzysztof; Hoekstra, Mark; Pellicoro, Antonella; van den Heuvel, F.A.J.; Heegsma, J.; van IJzendoorn, S.C.D.; Holzinger, A.; Imanaka, T.; Moshage, Albert Johannes (Han); Faber, Klaas Nico

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisomes are particularly abundant in the liver and are involved in bile salt synthesis and fatty acid metabolism. Peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) are required for peroxisome biogenesis [e.g., the interacting peroxisomal biogenesis factors Pex13p and Pex14p] and its metabolic function [e.g.,

  20. The significance of peroxisome function in chronological aging of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefevre, Sophie D.; van Roermund, Carlo W.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We studied the chronological lifespan of glucose-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae in relation to the function of intact peroxisomes. We analyzed four different peroxisome-deficient (pex) phenotypes. These included Delta pex3 cells that lack peroxisomal membranes and in which all peroxisomal pr

  1. Comparative proteomics and metallomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf tissues: evaluation of the selenium addition in transgenic and nontransgenic plants using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and laser ablation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Bruna C M; Barbosa, Herbert S; Pessôa, Gustavo S; Salazar, Marcela M; Pereira, Gonçalo A G; Gonçalves, Danieli C; Ramos, Carlos H I; Arruda, Marco A Z

    2014-04-01

    The main goal of this work is to evaluate some differential protein species in transgenic (T) and nontransgenic (NT) Arabidopsis thaliana plants after their cultivation in the presence or absence of sodium selenite. The transgenic line was obtained through insertion of CaMV 35S controlling nptII gene. Comparative proteomics through 2D-DIGE is carried out in four different groups (NT × T; NT × Se-NT (where Se is selenium); Se-NT × Se-T, and T × Se-T). Although no differential proteins are achieved in the T × Se-T group, for the others, 68 differential proteins (by applying a regulation factor ≥1.5) are achieved, and 27 of them accurately characterized by ESI-MS/MS. These proteins are classified into metabolism, energy, signal transduction, disease/defense categories, and some of them are involved in the glycolysis pathway-Photosystems I and II and ROS combat. Additionally, laser ablation imaging is used for evaluating the Se and sulfur distribution in leaves of different groups, corroborating some results obtained and related to proteins involved in the glycolysis pathway. From these results, it is possible to conclude that the genetic modification also confers to the plant resistance to oxidative stress.

  2. Modelling autophagy selectivity by receptor clustering on peroxisomes

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Aidan I

    2016-01-01

    When subcellular organelles are degraded by autophagy, typically some, but not all, of each targeted organelle type are degraded. Autophagy selectivity must not only select the correct type of organelle, but must discriminate between individual organelles of the same kind. In the context of peroxisomes, we use computational models to explore the hypothesis that physical clustering of autophagy receptor proteins on the surface of each organelle provides an appropriate all-or-none signal for degradation. The pexophagy receptor proteins NBR1 and p62 are well characterized, though only NBR1 is essential for pexophagy (Deosaran {\\em et al.}, 2013). Extending earlier work by addressing the initial nucleation of NBR1 clusters on individual peroxisomes, we find that larger peroxisomes nucleate NBR1 clusters first and lose them due to competitive coarsening last, resulting in significant size-selectivity favouring large peroxisomes. This effect can explain the increased catalase signal that results from experimental s...

  3. Hypervulnerability to Sound Exposure through Impaired Adaptive Proliferation of Peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmaghani, Sedigheh; Defourny, Jean; Aghaie, Asadollah; Beurg, Maryline; Dulon, Didier; Thelen, Nicolas; Perfettini, Isabelle; Zelles, Tibor; Aller, Mate; Meyer, Anaïs; Emptoz, Alice; Giraudet, Fabrice; Leibovici, Michel; Dartevelle, Sylvie; Soubigou, Guillaume; Thiry, Marc; Vizi, E Sylvester; Safieddine, Saaid; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Avan, Paul; Petit, Christine

    2015-11-05

    A deficiency in pejvakin, a protein of unknown function, causes a strikingly heterogeneous form of human deafness. Pejvakin-deficient (Pjvk(-/-)) mice also exhibit variable auditory phenotypes. Correlation between their hearing thresholds and the number of pups per cage suggest a possible harmful effect of pup vocalizations. Direct sound or electrical stimulation show that the cochlear sensory hair cells and auditory pathway neurons of Pjvk(-/-) mice and patients are exceptionally vulnerable to sound. Subcellular analysis revealed that pejvakin is associated with peroxisomes and required for their oxidative-stress-induced proliferation. Pjvk(-/-) cochleas display features of marked oxidative stress and impaired antioxidant defenses, and peroxisomes in Pjvk(-/-) hair cells show structural abnormalities after the onset of hearing. Noise exposure rapidly upregulates Pjvk cochlear transcription in wild-type mice and triggers peroxisome proliferation in hair cells and primary auditory neurons. Our results reveal that the antioxidant activity of peroxisomes protects the auditory system against noise-induced damage.

  4. Transcriptional coactivator PGC-1alpha promotes peroxisomal remodeling and biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagattin, Alessia; Hugendubler, Lynne; Mueller, Elisabetta

    2010-11-23

    Mitochondria and peroxisomes execute some analogous, nonredundant functions including fatty acid oxidation and detoxification of reactive oxygen species, and, in response to select metabolic cues, undergo rapid remodeling and division. Although these organelles share some components of their division machinery, it is not known whether a common regulator coordinates their remodeling and biogenesis. Here we show that in response to thermogenic stimuli, peroxisomes in brown fat tissue (BAT) undergo selective remodeling and expand in number and demonstrate that ectopic expression of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α recapitulates these effects on the peroxisomal compartment, both in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, β-adrenergic stimulation of PGC-1α(-/-) cells results in blunted induction of peroxisomal gene expression. Surprisingly, PPARα was not required for the induction of critical biogenesis factors, suggesting that PGC-1α orchestrates peroxisomal remodeling through a PPARα-independent mechanism. Our data suggest that PGC-1α is critical to peroxisomal physiology, establishing a role for this factor as a fundamental orchestrator of cellular adaptation to energy demands.

  5. Catalase Deficiency Accelerates Diabetic Renal Injury Through Peroxisomal Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Inah; Lee, Jiyoun; Huh, Joo Young; Park, Jehyun; Lee, Hi Bahl; Ho, Ye-Shih; Ha, Hunjoo

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in diabetes complications, including diabetic nephropathy (DN). Plasma free fatty acids (FFAs) as well as glucose are increased in diabetes, and peroxisomes and mitochondria participate in FFA oxidation in an interconnected fashion. Therefore, we investigated whether deficiency of catalase, a major peroxisomal antioxidant, accelerates DN through peroxisomal dysfunction and abnormal renal FFA metabolism. Diabetes was induced by multiple injections of low-dose streptozotocin into catalase knock-out (CKO) and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice. Murine mesangial cells (MMCs) transfected with catalase small interfering RNA followed by catalase overexpression were used to further elucidate the role of endogenous catalase. Despite equivalent hyperglycemia, parameters of DN, along with markers of oxidative stress, were more accelerated in diabetic CKO mice than in diabetic WT mice up to 10 weeks of diabetes. CKO mice and MMCs showed impaired peroxisomal/mitochondrial biogenesis and FFA oxidation. Catalase deficiency increased mitochondrial ROS and fibronectin expression in response to FFAs, which were effectively restored by catalase overexpression or N-acetylcysteine. These data provide unprecedented evidence that FFA-induced peroxisomal dysfunction exacerbates DN and that endogenous catalase plays an important role in protecting the kidney from diabetic stress through maintaining peroxisomal and mitochondrial fitness. PMID:22315314

  6. Induction of peroxisome proliferation in rainbow trout exposed to ciprofibrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J H; Kostecki, P T; Calabrese, E J; Baldwin, L A

    1990-07-01

    Rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), average body weight of 450 g, were treated with 15, 25, or 35 mg/kg of ciprofibrate via intraperitoneal injection every other day for 2 to 3 weeks. The effects on hepatic peroxisomal acyl-CoA oxidase, polypeptide PPA-80, catalase, and liver weight were measured. The treatment of trout with ciprofibrate showed significant dose-related increases in peroxisomal acyl-CoA activity, polypeptide PPA-80, and catalase after 3 weeks of exposure. Peroxisomal oxidase activity showed a significant (p = 0.0008) increase (78%) at 35 mg/kg and a marginal (p = 0.1) increase (27%) at 25 mg/kg after 3 weeks of exposure. Densitometric analysis of polypeptide PPA-80 and catalase showed increases up to 48 and 236% at 35 mg/kg, respectively. Morphometric analysis on livers of trout administered 35 mg/kg for 3 weeks showed a 2.3-fold increase of peroxisomal volume density, as compared to control. This study demonstrates the induction of peroxisome proliferation in rainbow trout administered ciprofibrate, a known peroxisome proliferator in rodents.

  7. The Yarrowia lipolytica gene PAY5 encodes a peroxisomal integral membrane protein homologous to the mammalian peroxisome assembly factor PAF-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eitzen, Gary A.; Titorenko, Vladimir I.; Smith, Jennifer J.; Veenhuis, Marten; Szilard, Rachel K.; Rachubinski, Richard A.

    1996-01-01

    Pay mutants of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica fail to assemble functional peroxisomes. One mutant strain, pay5-1, lacks normal peroxisomes and instead contains irregular vesicular structures surrounded by multiple unit membranes. The pay5-1 mutant is not totally deficient in peroxisomal matrix protei

  8. Cedar leaf oil poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedar leaf oil is made from some types of cedar trees. Cedar leaf oil poisoning occurs when someone swallows this substance. ... The substance in cedar leaf oil that can be harmful is thujone (a hydrocarbon).

  9. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A

    2011-08-23

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation.

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors and Lipoprotein Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Kersten

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma lipoproteins are responsible for carrying triglycerides and cholesterol in the blood and ensuring their delivery to target organs. Regulation of lipoprotein metabolism takes place at numerous levels including via changes in gene transcription. An important group of transcription factors that mediates the effect of dietary fatty acids and certain drugs on plasma lipoproteins are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs. Three PPAR isotypes can be distinguished, all of which have a major role in regulating lipoprotein metabolism. PPARα is the molecular target for the fibrate class of drugs. Activation of PPARα in mice and humans markedly reduces hepatic triglyceride production and promotes plasma triglyceride clearance, leading to a clinically significant reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. In addition, plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol levels are increased upon PPARα activation in humans. PPARγ is the molecular target for the thiazolidinedione class of drugs. Activation of PPARγ in mice and human is generally associated with a modest increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol and a decrease in plasma triglycerides. The latter effect is caused by an increase in lipoprotein lipase-dependent plasma triglyceride clearance. Analogous to PPARα, activation of PPARβ/δ leads to increased plasma HDL-cholesterol and decreased plasma triglyceride levels. In this paper, a fresh perspective on the relation between PPARs and lipoprotein metabolism is presented. The emphasis is on the physiological role of PPARs and the mechanisms underlying the effect of synthetic PPAR agonists on plasma lipoprotein levels.

  11. Leaf Collection Posting Log

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset contains leaf collection dates for area and subarea where leaf collection service is provided by Montgomery County Department of Transportation. Update...

  12. Analysis of the role of Arabidopsis class I TCP genes AtTCP7, AtTCP8, AtTCP22, and AtTCP23 in leaf development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Martínez, José A; Sinha, Neelima

    2013-01-01

    TCP family of plant-specific transcription factors regulates plant form through control of cell proliferation and differentiation. This gene family is comprised of two groups, class I and class II. While the role of class II TCP genes in plant development is well known, data about the function of some class I TCP genes is lacking. We studied a group of phylogenetically related class I TCP genes: AtTCP7, AtTCP8, AtTCP22, and AtTCP23. The similar expression pattern in young growing leaves found for this group suggests similarity in gene function. Gene redundancy is characteristic in this group, as also seen in the class II TCP genes. We generated a pentuple mutant tcp8 tcp15 tcp21 tcp22 tcp23 and show that loss of function of these genes results in changes in leaf developmental traits. We also determined that these factors are able to mutually interact in a yeast two-hybrid assay and regulate the expression of KNOX1 genes. To circumvent the issue of genetic redundancy, dominant negative forms with SRDX repressor domain were used. Analysis of transgenic plants expressing AtTCP7-SRDX and AtTCP23-SRDX indicate a role of these factors in the control of cell proliferation.

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors for hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daisuke; Usuda; Tsugiyasu; Kanda

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors(PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which is composed of four members encoded by distinct genes(α, β, γ, and δ). The genes undergo transactivation or transrepression under specific mechanisms that lead to the induction or repression of target gene expression. As is the case with other nuclear receptors, all four PPAR isoforms contain five or six structural regions in four functional domains; namely, A/B, C, D, and E/F. PPARs have many functions, particularly functions involving control of vascular tone, inflammation, and energy homeostasis, and are, therefore, important targets for hypertension, obesity, obesity-induced inflammation, and metabolic syndrome in general. Hence, PPARs also represent drug targets, and PPARα and PPARγ agonists are used clinically in the treatment of dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus, respectively. Because of their pleiotropic effects, they have been identified as active in a number of diseases and are targets for the development of a broad range of therapies for a variety of diseases. It is likely that the range of PPARγ agonist therapeutic actions will result in novel approaches to lifestyle and other diseases. The combination of PPARs with reagents or with other cardiovascular drugs, such as diuretics and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor blockers, should be studied.This article provides a review of PPAR isoform characteristics, a discussion of progress in our understanding of the biological actions of PPARs, and a summary of PPAR agonist development for patient management. We also include a summary of the experimental and clinical evidence obtained from animal studies and clinical trials conducted to evaluate the usefulness and effectiveness of PPAR agonists in the treatment of lifestyle-related diseases.

  14. A proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase is associated with the peroxisomal membrane of yeasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, A.C.; Veenhuis, M.; Sulter, G.J.; Harder, W.

    1987-01-01

    The association of an ATPase with the yeast peroxisomal membrane was established by both biochemical and cytochemical procedures. Peroxisomes were purified from protoplast homogenates of the methanol-grown yeast Hansenula polymorpha by differential and sucrose gradient centrifugation. Biochemical an

  15. Myelin peroxisomes - essential organelles for the maintenance of white matter in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassmann, Celia M

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are cellular compartments primarily associated with lipid metabolism. Most cell types, including nervous system cells, harbor several hundred of these organelles. The importance of peroxisomes for central nervous system white matter is evidenced by a variety of human peroxisomal disorders with neurological impairment frequently involving the white matter. Moreover, the most frequent childhood white matter disease, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, is a peroxisomal disorder. During the past decade advances in imaging techniques have enabled the identification of peroxisomes within the myelin sheath, especially close to nodes of Ranvier. Although the function of myelin peroxisomes is not solved yet on molecular level, recently acquired knowledge suggests a central role for these organelles in axo-glial metabolism. This review focuses on the biology of myelin peroxisomes as well as on the pathology of myelin and myelinated axons that is observed as a consequence of partial or complete peroxisomal dysfunction in the brain.

  16. Violent death in a rare peroxisomal disease--Zellweger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinescu, Bogdan; Martius, Eliza; Pelin, Ana Maria

    2015-10-01

    Peroxisomal diseases are rare (1:50,000), genetically determined disorders (autosomal recessive), systemic, multiorgan illnesses with prominent involvement of the nervous system, caused either by the failure to form or to maintain the peroxisome, or by a defect in the function of a single or multiple peroxisomal enzymes. Peroxisomes contain approximately 50 enzymes which are responsible for many metabolic reactions, and play an important role in the oxidation of saturated very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA). The authors present the case of a Romanian boy, who died at the age of 1.6 of one of the peroxisomal diseases-Zellweger syndrome. Newborn infants with Zellweger syndrome have a typical dysmorphic facies, neonatal seizures, profound hypotonia, and eye abnormalities. Major abnormalities are present in the liver (fibrotic), kidney (cortical cysts), and brain (lipid-laden macrophages and histiocytes in cortical and periventricular areas, demyelination, centrosylvian polymicrogyria and pachygyria)-cerebro-hepato-renal syndrome (CHRS) (Zellweger). Infants with Zellweger syndrome rarely live more than a few months, but in this case the survival was longer, and the cause of death was not directly the peroxisomal disease but a violent cause of death-mechanical asphyxia with tracheo-bronchial food aspiration. The authors present the results of investigations carried out during the child's life, but also data collected at the autopsy and hystopathological postnecroptic investigations. By presenting this case, the authors wish to bring to your attention a rare pathology in forensic practice by the paradox of finding a common violent cause of death, asphyxia with food aspiration, in a rare metabolic-genetic disease, which is usually fatal by itself.

  17. Multiplex micro-respiratory measurements of Arabidopsis tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sew, Yun Shin; Ströher, Elke; Holzmann, Cristián; Huang, Shaobai; Taylor, Nicolas L; Jordana, Xavier; Millar, A Harvey

    2013-11-01

    Researchers often want to study the respiratory properties of individual parts of plants in response to a range of treatments. Arabidopsis is an obvious model for this work; however, because of its size, it represents a challenge for gas exchange measurements of respiration. The combination of micro-respiratory technologies with multiplex assays has the potential to bridge this gap, and make measurements possible in this model plant species. We show the adaptation of the commercial technology used for mammalian cell respiration analysis to study three critical tissues of interest: leaf sections, root tips and seeds. The measurement of respiration in single leaf discs has allowed the age dependence of the respiration rate in Arabidopsis leaves across the rosette to be observed. The oxygen consumption of single root tips from plate-grown seedlings shows the enhanced respiration of root tips and their time-dependent susceptibility to salinity. The monitoring of single Arabidopsis seeds shows the kinetics of respiration over 48 h post-imbibition, and the effect of the phytohormones gibberellic acid (GA3 ) and abscisic acid (ABA) on respiration during seed germination. These studies highlight the potential for multiplexed micro-respiratory assays to study oxygen consumption in Arabidopsis tissues, and open up new possibilities to screen and study mutants and to identify differences in ecotypes or populations of different plant species.

  18. Peroxisystem: harnessing systems cell biology to study peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldiner, Maya; Zalckvar, Einat

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modelling of cells, recently dubbed systems cell biology, has been harnessed to study the organisation and dynamics of simple biological systems. Here, we suggest that the peroxisome, a fascinating dynamic organelle, can be used as a good candidate for studying a complete biological system. We discuss several aspects of peroxisomes that can be studied using high-throughput systematic approaches and be integrated into a predictive model. Such approaches can be used in the future to study and understand how a more complex biological system, like a cell and maybe even ultimately a whole organism, works.

  19. Peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase in CAM plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, M F; Segovia, J L; Alejandre, M J; García-Peregrín, E

    1981-12-01

    Citrate synthase wa studied for the first time in peroxisomes and mitochondria of crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Cellular organelles were isolated from Agave americana leaves by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and characterized by the use of catalase and cytochrome oxidase as marker enzymes, respectively. 48,000 X g centrifugation caused the breakdown of the cellular organelles. The presence of a glyoxylate cycle enzyme (citrate synthase) and a glycollate pathway enzyme (catalase) in the same organelles, besides the absence of another glyoxalate cycle enzyme (malate synthase) is reported for the first time, suggesting that peroxisomal and glyoxysomal proteins are synthesized at the same time and housed in he same organelle.

  20. Infantile Refsum disease: deficiency of catalase-containing particles (peroxisomes), alkyldihydroxyacetone phosphate synthase and peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzyme proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanders, R J; Schutgens, R B; Schrakamp, G; van den Bosch, H; Tager, J M; Schram, A W; Hashimoto, T; Poll-Thé, B T; Saudubrau, J M

    1986-08-01

    In recent years a number of biochemical abnormalities have been described in patients with the infantile form of Refsum disease, including the accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, trihydroxycoprostanoic acid and pipecolic acid. In this paper we show that catalase-containing particles (peroxisomes), alkyl dihydroxyacetone phosphate synthase and acyl-CoA oxidase protein are deficient in patients with infantile Refsum disease. These findings suggest that in the infantile form of Refsum disease, as in the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome the multiplicity of biochemical abnormalities is due to a deficiency of peroxisomes and hence to a generalized loss of peroxisomal functions. As a consequence the infantile form of Refsum disease can be diagnosed biochemically by methods already available for the prenatal and postnatal diagnosis of the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome.

  1. The relevance of the non-canonical PTS1 of peroxisomal catalase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Chris; Aksam, Eda Bener; Gunkel, Katja; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2012-01-01

    Catalase is sorted to peroxisomes via a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1), which binds to the receptor protein Pex5. Analysis of the C-terminal sequences of peroxisomal catalases from various species indicated that catalase never contains the typical C-terminal PTS1 tripeptide-SKL, bu

  2. Psychosine-induced alterations in peroxisomes of Twitcher Mouse Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Miguel Agustin; Haq, Ehtishamul; Uto, Takuhiro; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar Kaur

    2008-01-01

    Krabbe’s disease is a neuroinflammatory disorder in which galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) accumulates in nervous tissue. To gain insight into whether the psychosine-induced effects in nervous tissue extend to peripheral organs, we investigated the expression of cytokines and their effects on peroxisomal structure/function in twitcher mouse liver (animal model of Krabbe disease). Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated TNF-α and IL-6 expression, which was confirmed by mRNAs quantitation. Despite the presence of TNF-α, lipidomic analysis did not indicate a significant decrease in sphingomyelin or an increase in ceramide fractions. Ultrastructural analysis of catalase-dependent staining of liver sections showed reduced reactivity without significant changes in peroxisomal contents. This observation was confirmed by assaying catalase activity and quantitation of its mRNA, both of which were found significantly decreased in twitcher mouse liver. Western blot analysis demonstrated a generalized reduction of peroxisomal matrix and membrane proteins. These observations indicate that twitcher mouse pathobiology extends to the liver, where the induction of TNF-α and IL-6 compromise peroxisomal structure and function. PMID:18602885

  3. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation.

  4. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhshandehroo, M.; Knoch, B.; Müller, M.R.; Kersten, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPAR alpha serves as a molecular target for hypolip

  5. Peroxisomal catalase deficiency modulates yeast lifespan depending on growth conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawalek, Adam; Lefevre, Sophie D.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the role of peroxisomal catalase in chronological aging of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha in relation to various growth substrates. Catalase-deficient (cat) cells showed a similar chronological life span (CLS) relative to the wild-type control upon growth on carbon and nitrogen sources th

  6. Peroxisome Fission is Associated with Reorganization of Specific Membrane Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krygowska, Malgorzata; Veenhuis, Marten; Klei, Ida J. van der; Nagotu, Shirisha

    2011-01-01

    Membrane remodeling is an important aspect in organelle biogenesis. We show that different peroxisome membrane proteins that play a role in organelle biogenesis and proliferation (Pex8, Pex10, Pex14, Pex25 and Pex11) are subject to spatiotemporal behavior during organelle development. Using fluoresc

  7. Immunological detection of alkaline-diaminobenzidine-negative peroxisomes of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans: Purification and unique pH optima of peroxisomal catalase

    OpenAIRE

    Togo, Summanuna H.; Maebuchi, Motohiro; Yokota, Sadaki; Bun-ya, Masanori; Kawahara, Akira; Kamiryo, Tatsuyuki

    2000-01-01

    We purified catalase-2 of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and identified peroxisomes in this organism. The peroxisomes of C. elegans were not detectable by cytochemical staining using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine, a commonly used method depending on the peroxidase activity of peroxisomal catalase at pH 9 in which genuine peroxidases are inactive. The cDNA sequences of C. elegans predict two catalases very similar to each other throughout the molecule, except for the short C-terminal sequence; ca...

  8. Phylloquinone (vitamin K(1) ) biosynthesis in plants: two peroxisomal thioesterases of Lactobacillales origin hydrolyze 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl-CoA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhalm, Joshua R; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Buller, Nicole E; Elowsky, Christian G; Olsen, Laura J; Basset, Gilles J C

    2012-07-01

    It is not known how plants cleave the thioester bond of 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl-CoA (DHNA-CoA), a necessary step to form the naphthoquinone ring of phylloquinone (vitamin K(1) ). In fact, only recently has the hydrolysis of DHNA-CoA been demonstrated to be enzyme driven in vivo, and the cognate thioesterase characterized in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis. With a few exceptions in certain prokaryotic (Sorangium and Opitutus) and eukaryotic (Cyanidium, Cyanidioschyzon and Paulinella) organisms, orthologs of DHNA-CoA thioesterase are missing outside of the cyanobacterial lineage. In this study, genomic approaches and functional complementation experiments identified two Arabidopsis genes encoding functional DHNA-CoA thioesterases. The deduced plant proteins display low percentages of identity with cyanobacterial DHNA-CoA thioesterases, and do not even share the same catalytic motif. GFP-fusion experiments demonstrated that the Arabidopsis proteins are targeted to peroxisomes, and subcellular fractionations of Arabidopsis leaves confirmed that DHNA-CoA thioesterase activity occurs in this organelle. In vitro assays with various aromatic and aliphatic acyl-CoA thioester substrates showed that the recombinant Arabidopsis enzymes preferentially hydrolyze DHNA-CoA. Cognate T-DNA knock-down lines display reduced DHNA-CoA thioesterase activity and phylloquinone content, establishing in vivo evidence that the Arabidopsis enzymes are involved in phylloquinone biosynthesis. Extraordinarily, structure-based phylogenies coupled to comparative genomics demonstrate that plant DHNA-CoA thioesterases originate from a horizontal gene transfer with a bacterial species of the Lactobacillales order.

  9. Whole organ, venation and epidermal cell morphological variations are correlated in the leaves of Arabidopsis mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Rubio-Díaz, Silvia; Dhondt, Stijn; Hernández-Romero, Diana; Sánchez-Soriano, Joaquín; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2011-12-01

    Despite the large number of genes known to affect leaf shape or size, we still have a relatively poor understanding of how leaf morphology is established. For example, little is known about how cell division and cell expansion are controlled and coordinated within a growing leaf to eventually develop into a laminar organ of a definite size. To obtain a global perspective of the cellular basis of variations in leaf morphology at the organ, tissue and cell levels, we studied a collection of 111 non-allelic mutants with abnormally shaped and/or sized leaves, which broadly represent the mutational variations in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf morphology not associated with lethality. We used image-processing techniques on these mutants to quantify morphological parameters running the gamut from the palisade mesophyll and epidermal cells to the venation, whole leaf and rosette levels. We found positive correlations between epidermal cell size and leaf area, which is consistent with long-standing Avery's hypothesis that the epidermis drives leaf growth. In addition, venation parameters were positively correlated with leaf area, suggesting that leaf growth and vein patterning share some genetic controls. Positional cloning of the genes affected by the studied mutations will eventually establish functional links between genotypes, molecular functions, cellular parameters and leaf phenotypes.

  10. Functional Redundancy and Divergence within the Arabidopsis RETICULATA-RELATED Gene Family1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Esteve-Bruna, David; González-Bayón, Rebeca; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Caldana, Camila; Hannah, Matthew A.; Willmitzer, Lothar; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    A number of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants exhibit leaf reticulation, having green veins that stand out against paler interveinal tissues, fewer cells in the interveinal mesophyll, and normal perivascular bundle sheath cells. Here, to examine the basis of leaf reticulation, we analyzed the Arabidopsis RETICULATA-RELATED (RER) gene family, several members of which cause leaf reticulation when mutated. Although transcripts of RE, RER1, and RER3 were mainly detected in the bundle sheath cells of expanded leaves, functional RER3:GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN was visualized in the chloroplast membranes of all photosynthetic cells. Leaf reticulation in the re and rer3 loss-of-function mutants occurred, along with accumulation of reactive oxygen species, in a photoperiod-dependent manner. A comparison of re and rer3 leaf messenger RNA expression profiles showed more than 200 genes were similarly misexpressed in both mutants. In addition, metabolic profiles of mature leaves revealed that several biosynthetic pathways downstream of pyruvate are altered in re and rer3. Double mutant analysis showed that only re rer1 and rer5 rer6 exhibited synergistic phenotypes, indicating functional redundancy. The redundancy between RE and its closest paralog, RER1, was confirmed by overexpressing RER1 in re mutants, which partially suppressed leaf reticulation. Our results show that RER family members can be divided into four functional modules with divergent functions. Moreover, these results provide insights into the origin of the reticulated phenotype, suggesting that the RER proteins functionally interconnect photoperiodic growth, amino acid homeostasis, and reactive oxygen species metabolism during Arabidopsis leaf growth. PMID:23596191

  11. OSCILLATOR: A system for analysis of diurnal leaf growth using infrared photography combined with wavelet transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bours Ralph

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantification of leaf movement is an important tool for characterising the effects of environmental signals and the circadian clock on plant development. Analysis of leaf movement is currently restricted by the attachment of sensors to the plant or dependent upon visible light for time-lapse photography. The study of leaf growth movement rhythms in mature plants under biological relevant conditions, e.g. diurnal light and dark conditions, is therefore problematic. Results Here we present OSCILLATOR, an affordable system for the analysis of rhythmic leaf growth movement in mature plants. The system contains three modules: (1 Infrared time-lapse imaging of growing mature plants (2 measurement of projected distances between leaf tip and plant apex (leaf tip tracking growth-curves and (3 extraction of phase, period and amplitude of leaf growth oscillations using wavelet analysis. A proof-of-principle is provided by characterising parameters of rhythmic leaf growth movement of different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions as well as of Petunia hybrida and Solanum lycopersicum plants under diurnal conditions. The amplitude of leaf oscillations correlated to published data on leaf angles, while amplitude and leaf length did not correlate, suggesting a distinct leaf growth profile for each accession. Arabidopsis mutant accession Landsberg erecta displayed a late phase (timing of peak oscillation compared to other accessions and this trait appears unrelated to the ERECTA locus. Conclusions OSCILLATOR is a low cost and easy to implement system that can accurately and reproducibly quantify rhythmic growth of mature plants for different species under diurnal light/dark cycling.

  12. Diverse intracellular pathogens activate type III interferon expression from peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odendall, Charlotte; Dixit, Evelyn; Stavru, Fabrizia; Bierne, Helene; Franz, Kate M; Durbin, Ann Fiegen; Boulant, Steeve; Gehrke, Lee; Cossart, Pascale; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    Type I interferon responses are considered the primary means by which viral infections are controlled in mammals. Despite this view, several pathogens activate antiviral responses in the absence of type I interferons. The mechanisms controlling type I interferon-independent responses are undefined. We found that RIG-I like receptors (RLRs) induce type III interferon expression in a variety of human cell types, and identified factors that differentially regulate expression of type I and type III interferons. We identified peroxisomes as a primary site of initiation of type III interferon expression, and revealed that the process of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation upregulates peroxisome biogenesis and promotes robust type III interferon responses in human cells. These findings highlight the importance of different intracellular organelles in specific innate immune responses.

  13. Myelin lesions associated with lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Phyllis L; Kaye, Edward M; Powers, James M

    2010-09-01

    Abnormalities of myelin are common in lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders. Most display a primary loss of myelin in which the myelin sheath and/or oligodendrocytes are selectively targeted by diverse pathogenetic processes. The most severe and, hence, clinically relevant are heritable diseases predominantly of infants and children, the leukodystrophies: metachromatic, globoid cell (Krabbe disease) and adreno-leukodystrophy. Our still limited understanding of these diseases has derived from multiple sources: originally, neurological-neuropathologic-neurochemical correlative studies of the natural disease in humans or other mammals, which has been enhanced by more sophisticated and contemporary techniques of cell and molecular biology. Transgenic mouse models seem to be the most promising methodology, allowing the examination of the cellular role of lysosomes and peroxisomes for formation and maintenance of both myelin and axons, and providing initial platforms to evaluate therapies. Treatment options are woefully inadequate and in their nascent stages, but still inspire some hope for the future.

  14. Fenofibrate: metabolism and species differences for peroxisome proliferation in cultured hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornu-Chagnon, M C; Dupont, H; Edgar, A

    1995-06-01

    The hypolipidemic agent fenofibrate, which is a peroxisome proliferator in some rodents in vivo, was studied in cultured hepatocytes for its metabolism and effects on enzymatic induction related to peroxisome proliferation so as to lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in peroxisome proliferation. [14C]-Fenofibrate was completely metabolized within 24 hr by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes and the metabolic pattern corresponded to that found in vivo. The main products were fenofibric acid and its glucuronidated form. Carbonyl reduction of fenofibric acid also occurred. The metabolic pattern of [14C]fenofibric acid was nearly the same as that of fenofibrate. Fenofibrate, fenofibric acid, and its reduced metabolite all induced peroxisomal (cyanide-insensitive) palmitoyl-CoA oxidation activity (PCOA) in rat hepatocytes, whereas derivatives lacking the carboxyl group were nearly inactive. The known species differences with respect to sensitivity to peroxisome proliferators in vivo was mirrored in cultured cells because fenofibric acid did not induce peroxisomal PCOA in primary culture of guinea pig hepatocytes nor in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. The mechanistic association between the induction of CYP4A1-catalyzed lauric acid omega-hydroxylase (LAH) activity and peroxisomal PCOA induction was investigated. Fenofibric acid concomitantly induced LAH activity and peroxisomal PCOA in rat hepatocytes. Specific inhibition of LAH activity (-52%) by 10-undecynoic acid partially prevented induction of peroxisomal PCOA (-32%). The putative role of dicarboxylic acids, the oxidation product of omega-hydroxymonocarboxylic acids, in PCOA induction was further substantiated by the observed induction of peroxisomal PCOA by 1-12-dodecanedioic acid. We conclude that (1) fenofibric acid is the possible proximate peroxisome proliferator of fenofibrate in rat hepatocytes, (2) cultured hepatocytes reflect in vivo sensitivity to fenofibrate with respect to

  15. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Rakhshandehroo; Bianca Knoch; Michael Müller; Sander Kersten

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPAR alpha serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPAR alpha binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPAR alpha governs biologi...

  16. The role of peroxisomes in the integration of metabolism and evolutionary diversity of photosynthetic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Igamberdiev, A.U.; Lea, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    The peroxisome is a metabolic compartment serving for the rapid oxidation of substrates, a process that is not coupled to energy conservation. In plants and algae, peroxisomes connect biosynthetic and oxidative metabolic routes and compartmentalize potentially lethal steps of metabolism such as t......The peroxisome is a metabolic compartment serving for the rapid oxidation of substrates, a process that is not coupled to energy conservation. In plants and algae, peroxisomes connect biosynthetic and oxidative metabolic routes and compartmentalize potentially lethal steps of metabolism....... The appearance of seed plants was connected to the acquirement by storage tissues, of a peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation function linked to the glyoxylate cycle, which is induced during seed germination and maturation. Rearrangement of the peroxisomal photorespiratory function between different tissues of higher...

  17. Arabidopsis Growth Simulation Using Image Processing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junmei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide a method to represent the virtual Arabidopsis plant at each growth stage. It includes simulating the shape and providing growth parameters. The shape is described with elliptic Fourier descriptors. First, the plant is segmented from the background with the chromatic coordinates. With the segmentation result, the outer boundary series are obtained by using boundary tracking algorithm. The elliptic Fourier analysis is then carried out to extract the coefficients of the contour. The coefficients require less storage than the original contour points and can be used to simulate the shape of the plant. The growth parameters include total area and the number of leaves of the plant. The total area is obtained with the number of the plant pixels and the image calibration result. The number of leaves is derived by detecting the apex of each leaf. It is achieved by using wavelet transform to identify the local maximum of the distance signal between the contour points and the region centroid. Experiment result shows that this method can record the growth stage of Arabidopsis plant with fewer data and provide a visual platform for plant growth research.

  18. Reference: 517 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d isolated aleurone layers of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were used in experiments designed to iden...tify components of the Arabidopsis seed that contribute to seed dormancy and to lea

  19. Modeling leaf venation morphogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Laguna, M F; Jagla, E A

    2007-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the formation of leaf venation patterns is driven by mechanical instabilities in the growing leaf. In contrast to the prevalent canalization hypothesis based on polar auxin transport, mechanical instabilities lead very naturally to hierarchical patterns with an abundant number of closed loops as they exists in almost every leaf venation. We propose a continuum model where the vein formation is driven by a mechanical collapse of the mesophyll layer in the growing leaf, and present a numerical study of this model using a phase field approach. The results show the same qualitative features as real venation patterns and, furthermore, have the same statistical properties.

  20. LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 interacts with catalases to regulate hypersensitive cell death in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yansha; Chen, Lichao; Mu, Jinye; Zuo, Jianru

    2013-10-01

    LESION SIMULATING DISEASE1 (lsd1) is an important negative regulator of programmed cell death (PCD) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The loss-of-function mutations in lsd1 cause runaway cell death triggered by reactive oxygen species. lsd1 encodes a novel zinc finger protein with unknown biochemical activities. Here, we report the identification of CATALASE3 (CAT3) as an lsd1-interacting protein by affinity purification and mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. The Arabidopsis genome contains three homologous catalase genes (CAT1, CAT2, and CAT3). Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analyses demonstrated that lsd1 interacted with all three catalases both in vitro and in vivo, and the interaction required the zinc fingers of lsd1. We found that the catalase enzymatic activity was reduced in the lsd1 mutant, indicating that the catalase enzyme activity was partially dependent on lsd1. Consistently, the lsd1 mutant was more sensitive to the catalase inhibitor 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole than the wild type, suggesting that the interaction between lsd1 and catalases is involved in the regulation of the reactive oxygen species generated in the peroxisome. Genetic studies revealed that lsd1 interacted with CATALASE genes to regulate light-dependent runaway cell death and hypersensitive-type cell death. Moreover, the accumulation of salicylic acid was required for PCD regulated by the interaction between lsd1 and catalases. These results suggest that the lsd1-catalase interaction plays an important role in regulating PCD in Arabidopsis.

  1. Specificity of the peroxisome proliferation response in mussels exposed to environmental pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cajaraville, Miren P. [Biologia Zelularra eta Histologia Laborategia, Zoologia eta Biologia Zelularra Saila, Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, UPV/EHU, 644 P.K., E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain)]. E-mail: mirenp.cajaraville@ehu.es; Ortiz-Zarragoitia, Maren [Biologia Zelularra eta Histologia Laborategia, Zoologia eta Biologia Zelularra Saila, Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, UPV/EHU, 644 P.K., E-48080 Bilbao, Basque Country (Spain)

    2006-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferation has been proposed as novel biomarker of exposure to organic pollutants in aquatic organisms. Peroxisome proliferator compounds comprise a heterogeneous group of substances known for their ability to cause massive proliferation of peroxisomes and liver carcinogenesis in sensitive species such as rodents. Recently, several marine organisms (mussels and fish) have been shown as target species of peroxisome proliferators. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the specificity of the peroxisome proliferation response in mussels. For this purpose, mussels (Mytilus edulis) were exposed for three weeks to North Sea crude oil (NSO), a mixture of NSO, alkylphenols and extra PAHs (MIX), diallylphthalate (DAP), bisphenol-A (BPA) and tetrabromodiphenylether (TBDE), or transplanted for three weeks to four stations showing different copper concentrations in a copper mine. Peroxisome proliferation was assessed by measuring the activity of the peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation enzyme acyl-CoA oxidase (AOX) and the volume density occupied by peroxisomes (V {sub VP}) in the digestive gland. Mussels exposed to NSO and MIX showed significantly increased AOX activities and V {sub VP} compared to control animals. Significantly higher V {sub VP} was also found in DAP and TBDE exposed mussels. V {sub VP} did not vary in mussels transplanted into a copper concentration gradient. Our results confirm the usefulness and specificity of peroxisome proliferation as a suitable biomarker of exposure to organic contaminants such as oil derived hydrocarbons, phthalate plasticizers and polybrominated flame retardants in mussels.

  2. Hemoglobin is essential for normal growth of Arabidopsis organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Hunt, Peter; Dennis, Elizabeth;

    2006-01-01

    lines are viable but show a mutant phenotype affecting the regions where AHb1 is expressed. Arabidopsis lines with an insertional knockout or overexpression of AHb2, a class II 3-on-3 hemoglobin, were generated. Seedlings overexpressing AHb2 show enhanced survival of hypoxic stress. The AHb2 knockout...... lines develop normally. However, when AHb2 knockout is combined with AHb1 silencing, seedlings die at an early vegetative stage suggesting that the two 3-on-3 hemoglobins, AHb1 and AHb2, together play an essential role for normal development of Arabidopsis seedlings. In conclusion, these results...... suggests that 3-on-3 hemoglobins apart from a role in hypoxic stress play a general role under non-stressed conditions where they are essential for normal development by controlling the level of NO which tends to accumulate in floral buds and leaf hydathodes of plants...

  3. Apple fruit copper amine oxidase isoforms: peroxisomal MdAO1 prefers diamines as substrates, whereas extracellular MdAO2 exclusively utilizes monoamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Adel; Trobacher, Christopher P; Cooke, Alison R; Meyers, Ashley J; Hall, J Christopher; Shelp, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    4-Aminobutyrate (GABA) accumulates in apple fruit during controlled atmosphere storage. A potential source of GABA is the polyamine putrescine, which can be oxidized via copper-containing amine oxidase (CuAO), resulting in the production 4-aminobutanal/Δ(1)-pyrroline, with the consumption of O2 and release of H2O2 and ammonia. Five putative CuAO genes (MdAO genes) were cloned from apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Empire) fruit, and the deduced amino acid sequences found to contain the active sites typically conserved in CuAOs. Genes encoding two of these enzymes, MdAO1 and MdAO2, were highly expressed in apple fruit and selected for further analysis. Amino acid sequence analysis predicted the presence of a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal 1 tripeptide in MdAO1 and an N-terminal signal peptide and N-glycosylation site in MdAO2. Transient expression of green fluorescent fusion proteins in Arabidopsis protoplasts or onion epidermal cells revealed a peroxisomal localization for MdAO1 and an extracellular localization for MdAO2. The enzymatic activities of purified recombinant MdAO1 and MdAO2 were measured continuously as H2O2 production using a coupled reaction. MdAO1 did not use monoamines or polyamines and displayed high catalytic efficiency for 1,3-diaminopropane, putrescine and cadaverine, whereas MdAO2 exclusively utilized aliphatic and aromatic monoamines, including 2-phenylethylamine and tyramine. Together, these results indicate that MdAO1 may contribute to GABA production via putrescine oxidation in the peroxisome of apple fruit under controlled atmosphere conditions. MdAO2 seems to be involved in deamination of 2-phenylethylamine, which is a step in the biosynthesis of 2-phenylethanol, a contributor to fruit flavor and flower fragrance.

  4. The Origin and Biosynthesis of the Benzenoid Moiety of Ubiquinone (Coenzyme Q) in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Anna; Widhalm, Joshua R; Fatihi, Abdelhak; Cahoon, Rebecca E; Wamboldt, Yashitola; Elowsky, Christian; Mackenzie, Sally A; Cahoon, Edgar B; Chapple, Clint; Dudareva, Natalia; Basset, Gilles J

    2014-05-01

    It is not known how plants make the benzenoid ring of ubiquinone, a vital respiratory cofactor. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana uses for that purpose two separate biosynthetic branches stemming from phenylalanine and tyrosine. Gene network modeling and characterization of T-DNA mutants indicated that acyl-activating enzyme encoded by At4g19010 contributes to the biosynthesis of ubiquinone specifically from phenylalanine. CoA ligase assays verified that At4g19010 prefers para-coumarate, ferulate, and caffeate as substrates. Feeding experiments demonstrated that the at4g19010 knockout cannot use para-coumarate for ubiquinone biosynthesis and that the supply of 4-hydroxybenzoate, the side-chain shortened version of para-coumarate, can bypass this blockage. Furthermore, a trans-cinnamate 4-hydroxylase mutant, which is impaired in the conversion of trans-cinnamate into para-coumarate, displayed similar defects in ubiquinone biosynthesis to that of the at4g19010 knockout. Green fluorescent protein fusion experiments demonstrated that At4g19010 occurs in peroxisomes, resulting in an elaborate biosynthetic architecture where phenylpropanoid intermediates have to be transported from the cytosol to peroxisomes and then to mitochondria where ubiquinone is assembled. Collectively, these results demonstrate that At4g19010 activates the propyl side chain of para-coumarate for its subsequent β-oxidative shortening. Evidence is shown that the peroxisomal ABCD transporter (PXA1) plays a critical role in this branch.

  5. 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid accumulation during seed development represses seed germination in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Anuja; Hernández, M Luisa; He, Zhesi; Andriotis, Vasilios M E; Vaistij, Fabián E; Larson, Tony R; Graham, Ian A

    2011-02-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana COMATOSE (CTS) encodes an ABC transporter involved in peroxisomal import of substrates for β-oxidation. Various cts alleles and mutants disrupted in steps of peroxisomal β-oxidation have previously been reported to exhibit a severe block on seed germination. Oxylipin analysis on cts, acyl CoA oxidase1 acyl CoA oxidase2 (acx1 acx2), and keto acyl thiolase2 dry seeds revealed that they contain elevated levels of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), jasmonic acid (JA), and JA-Ile. Oxylipin and transcriptomic analysis showed that accumulation of these oxylipins occurs during late seed maturation in cts. Analysis of double mutants generated by crossing cts with mutants in the JA biosynthesis pathway indicate that OPDA, rather than JA or JA-Ile, contributes to the block on germination in cts seeds. We found that OPDA was more effective at inhibiting wild-type germination than was JA and that this effect was independent of CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 but was synergistic with abscisic acid (ABA). Consistent with this, OPDA treatment increased ABA INSENSITIVE5 protein abundance in a manner that parallels the inhibitory effect of OPDA and OPDA+ABA on seed germination. These results demonstrate that OPDA acts along with ABA to regulate seed germination in Arabidopsis.

  6. TRiP: Tracking Rhythms in Plants, an automated leaf movement analysis program for circadian period estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Greenham, Kathleen; Lou, Ping; Remsen, Sara E; Farid, Hany; McClung, C. Robertson

    2015-01-01

    Background A well characterized output of the circadian clock in plants is the daily rhythmic movement of leaves. This process has been used extensively in Arabidopsis to estimate circadian period in natural accessions as well as mutants with known defects in circadian clock function. Current methods for estimating circadian period by leaf movement involve manual steps throughout the analysis and are often limited to analyzing one leaf or cotyledon at a time. Results In this study, we describ...

  7. Peroxisomes in Different Skeletal Cell Types during Intramembranous and Endochondral Ossification and Their Regulation during Osteoblast Differentiation by Distinct Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guofeng Qian

    Full Text Available Ossification defects leading to craniofacial dysmorphism or rhizomelia are typical phenotypes in patients and corresponding knockout mouse models with distinct peroxisomal disorders. Despite these obvious skeletal pathologies, to date no careful analysis exists on the distribution and function of peroxisomes in skeletal tissues and their alterations during ossification. Therefore, we analyzed the peroxisomal compartment in different cell types of mouse cartilage and bone as well as in primary cultures of calvarial osteoblasts. The peroxisome number and metabolism strongly increased in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification from the reserve to the hypertrophic zone, whereas in bone, metabolically active osteoblasts contained a higher numerical abundance of this organelle than osteocytes. The high abundance of peroxisomes in these skeletal cell types is reflected by high levels of Pex11β gene expression. During culture, calvarial pre-osteoblasts differentiated into secretory osteoblasts accompanied by peroxisome proliferation and increased levels of peroxisomal genes and proteins. Since many peroxisomal genes contain a PPAR-responsive element, we analyzed the gene expression of PPARɑ/ß/ɣ in calvarial osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells, revealing higher levels for PPARß than for PPARɑ and PPARɣ. Treatment with different PPAR agonists and antagonists not only changed the peroxisomal compartment and associated gene expression, but also induced complex alterations of the gene expression patterns of the other PPAR family members. Studies in M3CT3-E1 cells showed that the PPARß agonist GW0742 activated the PPRE-mediated luciferase expression and up-regulated peroxisomal gene transcription (Pex11, Pex13, Pex14, Acox1 and Cat, whereas the PPARß antagonist GSK0660 led to repression of the PPRE and a decrease of the corresponding mRNA levels. In the same way, treatment of calvarial osteoblasts with GW0742 increased in peroxisome number and

  8. Expression of NO scavenging hemoglobin is involved in the timing of bolting in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Jensen, Erik Østergaard

    2008-01-01

    -symbiotic hemoglobin gene, GLB2, in Arabidopsis thaliana. Lines with GLB1 silencing had a significant delay of bolting and after bolting, shoots reverted to the rosette vegetative phase by formation of aerial rosettes at lateral meristems. Lines with overexpression of GLB1 or GLB2 bolted earlier than wild type plants...... molecule, NO. So far, NO scavenging has only been demonstrated for class 1 non-symbiotic hemoglobins. A direct assay in Arabidopsis leaf cells shows that GLB1 as well as the class 2 non-symbiotic hemoglobin, GLB2, scavenge NO in vivo. NO has also been demonstrated to be a growth stimulating signal...

  9. Single-membrane-bounded peroxisome division revealed by isolation of dynamin-based machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Yuuta; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Yoshida, Yamato; Ohnuma, Mio; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Yoshida, Masaki; Nishida, Keiji; Yagisawa, Fumi; Hirooka, Shunsuke; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Misumi, Osami; Kawano, Shigeyuki; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2013-06-01

    Peroxisomes (microbodies) are ubiquitous single-membrane-bounded organelles and fulfill essential roles in the cellular metabolism. They are found in virtually all eukaryotic cells and basically multiply by division. However, the mechanochemical machinery involved in peroxisome division remains elusive. Here, we first identified the peroxisome-dividing (POD) machinery. We isolated the POD machinery from Cyanidioschyzon merolae, a unicellular red alga containing a single peroxisome. Peroxisomal division in C. merolae can be highly synchronized by light/dark cycles and the microtubule-disrupting agent oryzalin. By proteomic analysis based on the complete genome sequence of C. merolae, we identified a dynamin-related protein 3 (DRP3) ortholog, CmDnm1 (Dnm1), that predominantly accumulated with catalase in the dividing-peroxisome fraction. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that Dnm1 formed a ring at the division site of the peroxisome. The outlines of the isolated dynamin rings were dimly observed by phase-contrast microscopy and clearly stained for Dnm1. Electron microscopy revealed that the POD machinery was formed at the cytoplasmic side of the equator. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the POD machinery consisted of an outer dynamin-based ring and an inner filamentous ring. Down-regulation of Dnm1 impaired peroxisomal division. Surprisingly, the same Dnm1 serially controlled peroxisomal division after mitochondrial division. Because genetic deficiencies of Dnm1 orthologs in multiperoxisomal organisms inhibited both mitochondrial and peroxisomal proliferation, it is thought that peroxisomal division by contraction of a dynamin-based machinery is universal among eukaryotes. These findings are useful for understanding the fundamental systems in eukaryotic cells.

  10. Infantile refsum disease: gastrointestinal presentation of a peroxisomal disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, H; Meiron, D; Schutgens, R B; Wanders, R J; Berant, M

    1992-01-01

    This article describes two siblings with infantile Refsum disease (IRD) whose initial presentation was that of malabsorption and mimicked a-beta- or homozygous hypo-beta-lipoproteinemia. Failure to recognize IRD in the first-born child precluded proper genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis in subsequent pregnancies and also caused considerable delay in diagnosing IRD in the second child. The clinical heterogeneity of peroxisomal disorders constitutes a diagnostic challenge, which demands a high degree of awareness from the part of the clinician. This is particularly the case with IRD, where protracted diarrhea with low serum cholesterol levels appears to be a frequently occurring initial feature during the 1st months of life.

  11. Peroxisomal assembly : membrane proliferation precedes the induction of the abundant matrix proteins in the methylotrophic yeast Candida boidinii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, Marten; Goodman, Joel M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxisomes are massively induced when methylotrophic yeasts are cultured in medium containing methanol. These organelles contain enzymes that catalyze the initial steps of methanol assimilation. In Candida boidinii, a methylotrophic yeast, the peroxisomal matrix (internal compartment) is composed a

  12. Detection and Quantification of Free Radicals in Peroxisomal Disorders: A Comparative Study with Oxidative Stress Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elmaksoud, Sohair Abd-El Mawgood; El-Bassyouni, Hala; Afifi, Hanan; Thomas, Manal Micheal; Shalaby, Aliaa; Hamid, Tamer Ahmed Abdel; Hamid, Nehal Abdel; El-Ghobary, Hany

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Free radicals have been thought to participate in pathogenesis of peroxisomal disorders. Objective The aim of the work is to detect free oxide radicals in blood of patients with peroxisomal disorders and to study their relation with various oxidative stress parameters. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with peroxisomal disorders and 14 age and sex matched healthy subjects were included in the study. Patients with peroxisomal disorders were subdivided according to diagnosis into peroxisomal biogenesis disorders and single enzyme deficiency. Oxidative stress was evaluated in both patients and control subjects by assessment of free radicals, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide metabolites and superoxide dismutase. Results There was increase in free radicals, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide metabolites in patients compared with control subjects. However, there was decrease in superoxide dismutase levels in patients compared with control subjects. Conclusion We concluded that there is excess free radicals production accompanied with decrease in antioxidant defenses in patients with peroxisomal disorders. These results strongly support a role of free radicals in the pathophysiology of peroxisomal disorders and strengthen the importance of oxidative stress phenomenon in peroxisomal disorders pathogenesis. PMID:26674249

  13. Free acetate production by rat hepatocytes during peroxisomal fatty acid and dicarboxylic acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, F; Bergseth, S; Rørtveit, T; Christiansen, E N; Bremer, J

    1989-06-25

    The fate of the acetyl-CoA units released during peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation was studied in isolated hepatocytes from normal and peroxisome-proliferated rats. Ketogenesis and hydrogen peroxide generation were employed as indicators of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation, respectively. Butyric and hexanoic acids were employed as mitochondrial substrates, 1, omega-dicarboxylic acids as predominantly peroxisomal substrates, and lauric acid as a substrate for both mitochondria and peroxisomes. Ketogenesis from dicarboxylic acids was either absent or very low in normal and peroxisome-proliferated hepatocytes, but free acetate release was detected at rates that could account for all the acetyl-CoA produced in peroxisomes by dicarboxylic and also by monocarboxylic acids. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation also led to free acetate generation but at low rates relative to ketogenesis. The origin of the acetate released was confirmed employing [1-14C]dodecanedioic acid. Thus, the activity of peroxisomes might contribute significantly to the free acetate generation known to occur during fatty acid oxidation in rats and possibly also in humans.

  14. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PEROXISOMAL PROTEIN IMPORT (PIM-) MUTANTS OF HANSENULA-POLYMORPHA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WATERHAM, HR; TITORENKO, [No Value; VANDERKLEI, IJ; HARDER, W; VEENHUIS, M

    1992-01-01

    In the course of our studies on the molecular mechanisms involved in peroxisome biogenesis, we have isolated several mutants of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha impaired in the import of peroxisomal matrix proteins. These mutants are characterized by the presence of few small intact per

  15. Adult peroxisomal acyl-coenzyme A oxidase deficiency with cerebellar and brainstem atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Ferdinandusse; S. Barker; K. Lachlan; M. Duran; H.R. Waterham; R.J.A. Wanders; S. Hammans

    2010-01-01

    Peroxisomal acyl-coenzyme A oxidase deficiency ( formerly also called pseudoneonatal adrenoleucodystrophy) is a disorder of peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation with a severe presentation. Most patients present at birth or in early infancy, and the mean age of death was 5 years in a recently published c

  16. Studies on the peroxisomal oxidation of palmitate and lignocerate in rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R.J.A.; Roermund, C.W.T. van; Wijland, M.J.A. van; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Schram, A.W.; Bosch, H. van den; Tager, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the pathways involved in the peroxisomal oxidation of palmitate and lignocerate, measured as the cyanide-insensitive formation of acetyl units, in rat-liver homogenates. The peroxisomal β-oxidation of both fatty acids is dependent on the presence of ATP, coenzyme A, NAD+ and Mg2

  17. The membrane remodeling protein Pex11p activates the GTPase Dnm1p during peroxisomal fission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Chris; Opalinski, Lukasz; Landgraf, Christiane; Costello, Joseph; Schrader, Michael; Krikken, Arjen M; Knoops, Kèvin; Kram, Anita M; Volkmer, Rudolf; van der Klei, Ida J

    2015-01-01

    The initial phase of peroxisomal fission requires the peroxisomal membrane protein Peroxin 11 (Pex11p), which remodels the membrane, resulting in organelle elongation. Here, we identify an additional function for Pex11p, demonstrating that Pex11p also plays a crucial role in the final step of peroxi

  18. HUMAN CATALASE IS IMPORTED AND ASSEMBLED IN PEROXISOMES OF SACCHAROMYCES-CEREVISIAE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEHOOP, MJ; HOLTMAN, WL; AB, G

    1993-01-01

    To study the conservation of peroxisomal targeting signals, we have determined the intracellular localization of human peroxisomal catalase when expressed in yeast. Using immunofluorescence, differential centrifugation and immuno-electron microscopy, we show that the protein is targeted to the perox

  19. Activity of peroxisomal enzymes and intracellular distribution of catalase in Zellweger syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrakamp, G.; Bosch, H. van den; Roest, B.; Kos, M.; Meijer, A.J.; Heymans, H.S.A.; Tegelaers, W.H.H.; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Tager, J.M.; Wanders, R.J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The activity of peroxisomal enzymes was studied in human liver and cultured human skin fibroblasts in relation to the finding (Goldfischer, S. et al. (1973) Science 182, 62–64) that morphologically distinct peroxisomes are not detectable in patients with the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger) syndrome

  20. Location of catalase in crystalline peroxisomes of methanol-grown Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, Ineke; Roggenkamp, Rainer; Harder, Willem; Veenhuis, Marten

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the intraperoxisomal location of catalase in peroxisomes of methanol-grown Hansenula polymorpha by (immuno)cytochemical means. In completely crystalline peroxisomes, in which the crystalline matrix is composed of octameric alcohol oxidase (AO) molecules, most of the catalase protein

  1. Molecular Characterization of Peroxisome Biogenesis Disorders with Zellweger Syndrome Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nassiri

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome biogenesis disorders, Zellweger syndrome spectrum (PBD, ZSS are constituted of three different phenotypically disorders: Zellweger syndrome (ZS, the most severe; neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD; and infantile refsum disease (IRD, the least severe, that have been originally described based on their biochemical and molecular bases of these disorders which had been fully determined. Individuals with PBD, ZSS usually come to clinical attention in the newborn period or later in childhood. The diagnosis of PBD, ZSS can be definitively determined by biochemical assays. Measurement of plasma very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA levels is the most commonly used and most informative initial screen. Mutations in thirteen different PEX genes - those that encode peroxins, the proteins required for normal peroxisome assembly - have been identified in PBD, ZSS. Mutations in PEX1, the most common cause of PBD, ZSS, are observed in about 68% of affected individuals. Sequence analysis is available clinically for the following seven genes: PEX1, PXMP3 (PEX2, PRXR1 (PEX5, PEX6, PEX10, PEX12, and PEX26.

  2. In silicio search for genes encoding peroxisomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, A J; Hettema, E H; van den Berg, M; Koerkamp, M G; van Ijlst, L; Distel, B; Tabak, H F

    2000-01-01

    The biogenesis of peroxisomes involves the synthesis of new proteins that after, completion of translation, are targeted to the organelle by virtue of peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). Two types of PTSs have been well characterized for import of matrix proteins (PTS1 and PTS2). Induction of the genes encoding these matrix proteins takes place in oleate-containing medium and is mediated via an oleate response element (ORE) present in the region preceding these genes. The authors have searched the yeast genome for OREs preceding open reading frames (ORFs), and for ORFs that contain either a PTS1 or PTS2. Of the ORFs containing an ORE, as well as either a PTS1 or a PTS2, many were known to encode bona fide peroxisomal matrix proteins. In addition, candidate genes were identified as encoding putative new peroxisomal proteins. For one case, subcellular location studies validated the in silicio prediction. This gene encodes a new peroxisomal thioesterase.

  3. Leaf growth is conformal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, Karen; Armon, Shahaf; Shraiman, Boris I.; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-10-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour.

  4. Leaf growth is conformal

    CERN Document Server

    Alim, Karen; Shraiman, Boris I; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Growth pattern dynamics lie at the heart of morphogenesis. Here, we investigate the growth of plant leaves. We compute the conformal transformation that maps the contour of a leaf at a given stage onto the contour of the same leaf at a later stage. Based on the mapping we predict the local displacement field in the leaf blade and find it to agree with the experimentally measured displacement field to 92%. This approach is applicable to any two-dimensional system with locally isotropic growth, enabling the deduction of the whole growth field just from observation of the tissue contour.

  5. Gravitropism in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Eriko; Horiguchi, Gorou; Tsukaya, Hirokazu

    2006-02-01

    In higher plants, stems and roots show negative and positive gravitropism, respectively. However, current knowledge on the graviresponse of leaves is lacking. In this study, we analyzed the positioning and movement of rosette leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana under light and dark conditions. We found that the radial positioning of rosette leaves was not affected by the direction of gravity under continuous white light. In contrast, when plants were shifted to darkness, the leaves moved upwards, suggesting negative gravitropism. Analysis of the phosphoglucomutase and shoot gravitropism 2-1 mutants revealed that the sedimenting amyloplasts in the leaf petiole are important for gravity perception, as is the case in stems and roots. In addition, our detailed physiological analyses revealed a unique feature of leaf movement after the shift to darkness, i.e. movement could be divided into negative gravitropism and nastic movement. The orientation of rosette leaves is ascribed to a combination of these movements.

  6. Development of Crystalline Peroxisomes in Methanol-Grown Cells of the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha and Its Relation to Environmental Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M.; Dijken, J.P. van; Pilon, S.A.F.; Harder, W.

    1978-01-01

    The development of peroxisomes has been studied in cells of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha during growth on methanol in batch and chemostat cultures. During bud formation, new peroxisomes were generated by the separation of small peroxisomes from mature organelles in the mother cells. The number of

  7. De novo peroxisome biogenesis in Penicillium chrysogenum is not dependent on the Pex11 family members or Pex16.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Opaliński

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the role of the three members of the Pex11 protein family in peroxisome formation in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. Two of these, Pex11 and Pex11C, are components of the peroxisomal membrane, while Pex11B is present at the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that Pex11 is a major factor involved in peroxisome proliferation. We also demonstrate that P. chrysogenum cells deleted for known peroxisome fission factors (all Pex11 family proteins and Vps1 still contain peroxisomes. Interestingly, we find that, unlike in mammals, Pex16 is not essential for peroxisome biogenesis in P. chrysogenum, as partially functional peroxisomes are present in a pex16 deletion strain. We also show that Pex16 is not involved in de novo biogenesis of peroxisomes, as peroxisomes were still present in quadruple Δpex11 Δpex11B Δpex11C Δpex16 mutant cells. By contrast, pex3 deletion in P. chrysogenum led to cells devoid of peroxisomes, suggesting that Pex3 may function independently of Pex16. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of intact peroxisomes is important for the efficiency of ß-lactam antibiotics production by P. chrysogenum. Remarkably, distinct from earlier results with low penicillin producing laboratory strains, upregulation of peroxisome numbers in a high producing P. chrysogenum strain had no significant effect on penicillin production.

  8. De novo peroxisome biogenesis in Penicillium chrysogenum is not dependent on the Pex11 family members or Pex16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opaliński, Łukasz; Bartoszewska, Magdalena; Fekken, Susan; Liu, Haiyin; de Boer, Rinse; van der Klei, Ida; Veenhuis, Marten; Kiel, Jan A K W

    2012-01-01

    We have analyzed the role of the three members of the Pex11 protein family in peroxisome formation in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. Two of these, Pex11 and Pex11C, are components of the peroxisomal membrane, while Pex11B is present at the endoplasmic reticulum. We show that Pex11 is a major factor involved in peroxisome proliferation. We also demonstrate that P. chrysogenum cells deleted for known peroxisome fission factors (all Pex11 family proteins and Vps1) still contain peroxisomes. Interestingly, we find that, unlike in mammals, Pex16 is not essential for peroxisome biogenesis in P. chrysogenum, as partially functional peroxisomes are present in a pex16 deletion strain. We also show that Pex16 is not involved in de novo biogenesis of peroxisomes, as peroxisomes were still present in quadruple Δpex11 Δpex11B Δpex11C Δpex16 mutant cells. By contrast, pex3 deletion in P. chrysogenum led to cells devoid of peroxisomes, suggesting that Pex3 may function independently of Pex16. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of intact peroxisomes is important for the efficiency of ß-lactam antibiotics production by P. chrysogenum. Remarkably, distinct from earlier results with low penicillin producing laboratory strains, upregulation of peroxisome numbers in a high producing P. chrysogenum strain had no significant effect on penicillin production.

  9. Characterization of xanthophyll pigments, photosynthetic performance, photon energy dissipation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination during artemisinin-induced stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Iftikhar Hussain

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a potent antimalarial drug, is phytotoxic to many crops and weeds. The effects of artemisinin on stress markers, including fluorescence parameters, photosystem II photochemistry, photon energy dissipation, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species generation and carbon isotope discrimination in Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia (Col-0 seedlings were grown in perlite and watered with 50% Hoagland nutrient solution. Adult plants of Arabidopsis were treated with artemisinin at 0, 40, 80, 160 μM for one week. Artemisinin, in the range 40-160 μM, decreased the fresh biomass, chl a, b and leaf mineral contents. Photosynthetic efficiency, yield and electron transport rate in Arabidopsis were also reduced following exposure to 80 and 160 μM artemisinin. The ΦNPQ and NPQ were less than control. Artemisinin treatment caused an increase in root oxidizability and lipid peroxidation (MDA contents of Arabidopsis. Calcium and nitrogen contents decreased after 80 and 160 μM artemisinin treatment compared to control. δ13C values were less negative following treatment with artemisinin as compared to the control. Artemisinin also decreased leaf protein contents in Arabidopsis. Taken together, these data suggest that artemisinin inhibits many physiological and biochemical processes in Arabidopsis.

  10. ABA receptor PYL9 promotes drought resistance and leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Chan, Zhulong; Gao, Jinghui; Xing, Lu; Cao, Minjie; Yu, Chunmei; Hu, Yuanlei; You, Jun; Shi, Haitao; Zhu, Yingfang; Gong, Yuehua; Mu, Zixin; Wang, Haiqing; Deng, Xin; Wang, Pengcheng; Bressan, Ray A; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-02-16

    Drought stress is an important environmental factor limiting plant productivity. In this study, we screened drought-resistant transgenic plants from 65 promoter-pyrabactin resistance 1-like (PYL) abscisic acid (ABA) receptor gene combinations and discovered that pRD29A::PYL9 transgenic lines showed dramatically increased drought resistance and drought-induced leaf senescence in both Arabidopsis and rice. Previous studies suggested that ABA promotes senescence by causing ethylene production. However, we found that ABA promotes leaf senescence in an ethylene-independent manner by activating sucrose nonfermenting 1-related protein kinase 2s (SnRK2s), which subsequently phosphorylate ABA-responsive element-binding factors (ABFs) and Related to ABA-Insensitive 3/VP1 (RAV1) transcription factors. The phosphorylated ABFs and RAV1 up-regulate the expression of senescence-associated genes, partly by up-regulating the expression of Oresara 1. The pyl9 and ABA-insensitive 1-1 single mutants, pyl8-1pyl9 double mutant, and snrk2.2/3/6 triple mutant showed reduced ABA-induced leaf senescence relative to the WT, whereas pRD29A::PYL9 transgenic plants showed enhanced ABA-induced leaf senescence. We found that leaf senescence may benefit drought resistance by helping to generate an osmotic potential gradient, which is increased in pRD29A::PYL9 transgenic plants and causes water to preferentially flow to developing tissues. Our results uncover the molecular mechanism of ABA-induced leaf senescence and suggest an important role of PYL9 and leaf senescence in promoting resistance to extreme drought stress.

  11. The quantitative basis of the Arabidopsis innate immune system to endemic pathogens depends on pathogen genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corwin, Jason A; Copeland, Daniel; Feusier, Julie

    2016-01-01

    the Arabidopsis-Botrytis pathosystem to explore the quantitative genetic architecture underlying host innate immune system in a population of Arabidopsis thaliana. By infecting a diverse panel of Arabidopsis accessions with four phenotypically and genotypically distinct isolates of the fungal necrotroph B...... of pathogen genetic variation in analyzing host quantitative resistance. While known resistance genes, such as receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs), were found to be enriched among associated genes, they only account for a small fraction of the total......, including defense hormone signaling and ROS production, as well as novel processes, such as leaf development. Validation of single gene T-DNA knockouts in a Col-0 background demonstrate a high success rate (60%) when accounting for differences in environmental and Botrytis genetic variation. This study...

  12. Auxin distribution and transport during embryogenesis and seed germi-nation of Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Auxin distribution during embryogenesis and seed germination were studied with transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing GUS gene driven by a synthetic DR5 promoter, an auxin responsive promoter. The results showed that GUS activity is higher in ends of hypophysis and cotyledon primordia of heart-, torpedo- and cotyledon-stage embryos, leaf tip area, lateral root primordia, root apex and cotyledon of young seedlings.And GUS accumulated in root apex of the seedlings grown on auxin transport inhibitor containing media.All these suggested that above-mentioned part of the organs and tissues have a higher level of auxin, and auxin polar transport inhibitor could cause the accumulation of auxin in root apex. And auxin transport inhibitor also resulted in aberration of Arabidopsis leaf pattern formation, root gravitropism and elongation.

  13. Temporal heterogeneity of cold acclimation phenotypes in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, Peter A; Pandey, Subedar; Atkin, Owen K

    2010-02-01

    To predict the effects of temperature changes on plant growth and performance, it is crucial to understand the impact of thermal history on leaf morphology, anatomy and physiology. Here, we document a comprehensive range of leaf phenotypes in 25/20 degrees C-grown Arabidopsis thaliana plants that were shifted to 5 degrees C for up to 2 months. When warm-grown, pre-existing (PE) leaves were exposed to cold, leaf thickness increased due to an increase in mesophyll cell size. Leaves that were entirely cold-developed (CD) were twice as thick (eight cell layers) as their warm-developed (WD) counterparts (six layers), and also had higher epidermal and stomatal cell densities. After 4 d of cold, PE leaves accumulated high levels of total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC). However, glucose and starch levels declined thereafter, and after 45 d in the cold, PE leaves exhibited similar TNC to CD leaves. A similar phenomenon was observed in delta(13)C and a range of photosynthetic parameters. In cold-treated PE leaves, an increase in respiration (R(dark)) with cold exposure time was evident when measured at 25 degrees C but not 5 degrees C. Cold acclimation was associated with a large increase in the ratio of leaf R(dark) to photosynthesis. The data highlight the importance of understanding developmental thermal history in determining individual phenotypic traits.

  14. Regulation of leaf photosynthetic rate correlating with leaf carbohydrate status and activation state of Rubisco under a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Minobu

    2008-09-01

    . The plant water content, leaf chlorophyll and Rubisco contents were not affected significantly by the manipulations. There is a previous report in Arabidopsis thaliana that the amount of protein-bound RuBP in leaf extract correlates negatively with the activation ratio of Rubisco in the leaf extract. Therefore, the results obtained from the manipulation experiments indicate that there is a regulatory mechanism for the leaf photosynthetic rate that correlates negatively with leaf carbohydrate (sucrose and starch) status and positively with the activation state of Rubisco under a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances.

  15. Apoplastic polyesters in Arabidopsis surface tissues--a typical suberin and a particular cutin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Rochus; Briesen, Isabel; Wojciechowski, Tobias; Faust, Andrea; Yephremov, Alexander; Nawrath, Christiane; Schreiber, Lukas

    2005-11-01

    Cutinized and suberized cell walls form physiological important plant-environment interfaces as they act as barriers limiting water and nutrient loss and protect from radiation and invasion by pathogens. Due to the lack of protocols for the isolation and analysis of cutin and suberin in Arabidopsis, the model plant for molecular biology, mutants and transgenic plants with a defined altered cutin or suberin composition are unavailable, causing that structure and function of these apoplastic barriers are still poorly understood. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that Arabidopsis leaf cuticle thickness ranges from only 22 nm in leaf blades to 45 nm on petioles, causing the difficulty in cuticular membrane isolation. We report the use of polysaccharide hydrolases to isolate Arabidopsis cuticular membranes, suitable for depolymerization and subsequent compositional analysis. Although cutin characteristic omega-hydroxy acids (7%) and mid-chain hydroxylated fatty acids (8%) were detected, the discovery of alpha,omega-diacids (40%) and 2-hydroxy acids (14%) as major depolymerization products reveals a so far novel monomer composition in Arabidopsis cutin, but with chemical analogy to root suberin. Histochemical and TEM analysis revealed that suberin depositions were localized to the cell walls in the endodermis of primary roots and the periderm of mature roots of Arabidopsis. Enzyme digested and solvent extracted root cell walls when subjected to suberin depolymerization conditions released omega-hydroxy acids (43%) and alpha,omega-diacids (24%) as major components together with carboxylic acids (9%), alcohols (6%) and 2-hydroxyacids (0.1%). This similarity to suberin of other species indicates that Arabidopsis roots can serve as a model for suberized tissue in general.

  16. ABCD2 identifies a subclass of peroxisomes in mouse adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Liu, Jingjing; Lester, Joshua D; Pijut, Sonja S; Graf, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter D2 (D2) is an ABC half transporter that is thought to promote the transport of very long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs into peroxisomes. Both D2 and peroxisomes increase during adipogenesis. Although peroxisomes are essential to both catabolic and anabolic lipid metabolism, their function, and that of D2, in adipose tissues remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the D2 localization and the proteome of D2-containing organelles, in adipose tissue. Centrifugation of mouse adipose homogenates generated a fraction enriched with D2, but deficient in peroxisome markers including catalase, PEX19, and ABCD3 (D3). Electron microscopic imaging of this fraction confirmed the presence of D2 protein on an organelle with a dense matrix and a diameter of ∼ 200 nm, the typical structure and size of a microperoxisome. D2 and PEX19 antibodies recognized distinct structures in mouse adipose. Immunoisolation of the D2-containing compartment confirmed the scarcity of PEX19 and proteomic profiling revealed the presence of proteins associated with peroxisome, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and mitochondria. D2 is localized to a distinct class of peroxisomes that lack many peroxisome proteins, and may associate physically with mitochondria and the ER.

  17. Peroxisome proliferation due to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP): species differences and possible mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elcombe, C.R.; Mitchell, A.M.

    1986-12-01

    The exposure of cultured rat hepatocytes to mono(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate (MEHP) for 72 hr resulted in marked induction of peroxisomal enzyme activity (..beta..-oxidation; cyanide-insensitive palmitoyl CoA oxidase) and concomitant increases in the number of peroxisomes. Similar treatment of cultured guinea pig, marmoset, or human hepatocytes revealed little or no effect of MEHP. In order to eliminate possible confounding influences of biotransformation, the proximate peroxisome proliferator(s) derived from MEHP have been identified. Using cultured hepatocytes these agents were found to be metabolite VI (mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl) phthalate) and metabolite IX (mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl) phthalate). The addition of these active metabolites to cultured guinea pig, marmoset, or human hepatocytes again revealed little effect upon peroxisomes or related enzyme activities (peroxisomal ..beta..-oxidation or microsomal lauric acid hydroxylation). These studies demonstrate a marked species difference in the response of hepatocytes to MEHP-elicited peroxisome proliferation. Preliminary studies have also suggested that peroxisome proliferation due to MEHP may be due to an initial biochemical lesion of fatty acid metabolism.

  18. The peroxisomal protein import machinery displays a preference for monomeric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Marta O; Francisco, Tânia; Rodrigues, Tony A; Lismont, Celien; Domingues, Pedro; Pinto, Manuel P; Grou, Cláudia P; Fransen, Marc; Azevedo, Jorge E

    2015-04-01

    Peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and transported by the shuttling receptor PEX5 to the peroxisomal membrane docking/translocation machinery, where they are translocated into the organelle matrix. Under certain experimental conditions this protein import machinery has the remarkable capacity to accept already oligomerized proteins, a property that has heavily influenced current models on the mechanism of peroxisomal protein import. However, whether or not oligomeric proteins are really the best and most frequent clients of this machinery remain unclear. In this work, we present three lines of evidence suggesting that the peroxisomal import machinery displays a preference for monomeric proteins. First, in agreement with previous findings on catalase, we show that PEX5 binds newly synthesized (monomeric) acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and urate oxidase (UOX), potently inhibiting their oligomerization. Second, in vitro import experiments suggest that monomeric ACOX1 and UOX are better peroxisomal import substrates than the corresponding oligomeric forms. Finally, we provide data strongly suggesting that although ACOX1 lacking a peroxisomal targeting signal can be imported into peroxisomes when co-expressed with ACOX1 containing its targeting signal, this import pathway is inefficient.

  19. An Arabidopsis callose synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole

    2002-01-01

    in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while...... expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant....

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  1. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rakhshandehroo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  2. Mitochondria are targets for peroxisome-derived oxidative stress in cultured mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Brees, Chantal; Rubio, Noemí; Nordgren, Marcus; Apanasets, Oksana; Kunze, Markus; Baes, Myriam; Agostinis, Patrizia; Fransen, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Many cellular processes are driven by spatially and temporally regulated redox-dependent signaling events. Although mounting evidence indicates that organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can function as signaling platforms for oxidative stress-regulated pathways, little is known about the role of peroxisomes in these processes. In this study, we employ targeted variants of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed to gain a better insight into the interplay between peroxisomes and cellular oxidative stress. We show that the phototoxic effects of peroxisomal KillerRed induce mitochondria-mediated cell death and that this process can be counteracted by targeted overexpression of a select set of antioxidant enzymes, including peroxisomal glutathione S-transferase kappa 1, superoxide dismutase 1, and mitochondrial catalase. We also present evidence that peroxisomal disease cell lines deficient in plasmalogen biosynthesis or peroxisome assembly are more sensitive to KillerRed-induced oxidative stress than control cells. Collectively, these findings confirm and extend previous observations suggesting that disturbances in peroxisomal redox control and metabolism can sensitize cells to oxidative stress. In addition, they lend strong support to the ideas that peroxisomes and mitochondria share a redox-sensitive relationship and that the redox communication between these organelles is not only mediated by diffusion of reactive oxygen species from one compartment to the other. Finally, these findings indicate that mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress, and this may have profound implications for our views on cellular aging and age-related diseases.

  3. ABCD2 identifies a subclass of peroxisomes in mouse adipose tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoxi, E-mail: xiaoxi.liu@uky.edu; Liu, Jingjing, E-mail: jingjing.liu0@gmail.com; Lester, Joshua D., E-mail: joshua.lester@uky.edu; Pijut, Sonja S., E-mail: srhee2@uky.edu; Graf, Gregory A., E-mail: Gregory.Graf@uky.edu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We examined the D2 localization and the proteome of D2-containing compartment in mouse adipose tissue. • We confirmed the presence of D2 on a subcellular compartment that has typical structure as a microperoxisome. • We demonstrated the scarcity of peroxisome markers on D2-containing compartment. • The D2-containing compartment may be a subpopulation of peroxisome in mouse adipose tissue. • Proteomic data suggests potential association between D2-containing compartment and mitochondria and ER. - Abstract: ATP-binding cassette transporter D2 (D2) is an ABC half transporter that is thought to promote the transport of very long-chain fatty acyl-CoAs into peroxisomes. Both D2 and peroxisomes increase during adipogenesis. Although peroxisomes are essential to both catabolic and anabolic lipid metabolism, their function, and that of D2, in adipose tissues remain largely unknown. Here, we investigated the D2 localization and the proteome of D2-containing organelles, in adipose tissue. Centrifugation of mouse adipose homogenates generated a fraction enriched with D2, but deficient in peroxisome markers including catalase, PEX19, and ABCD3 (D3). Electron microscopic imaging of this fraction confirmed the presence of D2 protein on an organelle with a dense matrix and a diameter of ∼200 nm, the typical structure and size of a microperoxisome. D2 and PEX19 antibodies recognized distinct structures in mouse adipose. Immunoisolation of the D2-containing compartment confirmed the scarcity of PEX19 and proteomic profiling revealed the presence of proteins associated with peroxisome, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and mitochondria. D2 is localized to a distinct class of peroxisomes that lack many peroxisome proteins, and may associate physically with mitochondria and the ER.

  4. Measurement of peroxisomal enzyme activities in the liver of brown trout (Salmo trutta, using spectrophotometric methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resende Albina D

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was aimed primarily at testing in the liver of brown trout (Salmo trutta spectrophotometric methods previously used to measure the activities of catalase and hydrogen peroxide producing oxidases in mammals. To evaluate the influence of temperature on the activities of those peroxisomal enzymes was the second objective. A third goal of this work was the study of enzyme distribution in crude cell fractions of brown trout liver. Results The assays revealed a linear increase in the activity of all peroxisomal enzymes as the temperature rose from 10° to 37°C. However, while the activities of hydrogen peroxide producing oxidases were strongly influenced by temperature, catalase activity was only slightly affected. A crude fraction enriched with peroxisomes was obtained by differential centrifugation of liver homogenates, and the contamination by other organelles was evaluated by the activities of marker enzymes for mitochondria (succinate dehydrogenase, lysosomes (aryl sulphatase and microsomes (NADPH cytochrome c reductase. For peroxisomal enzymes, the activities per mg of protein (specific activity in liver homogenates were strongly correlated with the activities per g of liver and with the total activities per liver. These correlations were not obtained with crude peroxisomal fractions. Conclusions The spectrophotometric protocols originally used to quantify the activity of mammalian peroxisomal enzymes can be successfully applied to the study of those enzymes in brown trout. Because the activity of all studied peroxisomal enzymes rose in a linear mode with temperature, their activities can be correctly measured between 10° and 37°C. Probably due to contamination by other organelles and losses of soluble matrix enzymes during homogenisation, enzyme activities in crude peroxisomal fractions do not correlate with the activities in liver homogenates. Thus, total homogenates will be used in future seasonal and

  5. Expression of a nitric oxide degrading enzyme induces a senescence programme in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishina, Tatiana E; Lamb, Chris; Zeier, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to act as a factor delaying leaf senescence and fruit maturation in plants. Here we show that expression of a NO degrading dioxygenase (NOD) in Arabidopsis thaliana initiates a senescence-like phenotype, an effect that proved to be more pronounced in older than in younger leaves. This senescence phenotype was preceded by a massive switch in gene expression in which photosynthetic genes were down-regulated, whereas many senescence-associated genes (SAGs) and the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase gene ACS6 involved in ethylene synthesis were up-regulated. External fumigation of NOD plants with NO as well as environmental conditions known to stimulate endogenous NO production attenuated the induced senescence programme. For instance, both high light conditions and nitrate feeding reduced the senescence phenotype and attenuated the down-regulation of photosynthetic genes as well as the up-regulation of SAGs. Treatment of plants with the cytokinin 6-benzylaminopurin (BAP) reduced the down-regulation of photosynthesis, although it had no consistent effect on SAG expression. Metabolic changes during NOD-induced senescence comprehended increases in salicylic acid (SA) levels, accumulation of the phytoalexin camalexin and elevation of leaf gamma-tocopherol contents, all of which occurred during natural senescence in Arabidopsis leaves as well. Moreover, NO fumigation delayed the senescence process induced by darkening individual Arabidopsis Columbia-0 (Col-0) leaves. Our data thus support the notion that NO acts as a negative regulator of leaf senescence.

  6. Heterochrony underpins natural variation in Cardamine hirsuta leaf form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartolano, Maria; Pieper, Bjorn; Lempe, Janne; Tattersall, Alex; Huijser, Peter; Tresch, Achim; Darrah, Peter R.; Hay, Angela; Tsiantis, Miltos

    2015-01-01

    A key problem in biology is whether the same processes underlie morphological variation between and within species. Here, by using plant leaves as an example, we show that the causes of diversity at these two evolutionary scales can be divergent. Some species like the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have simple leaves, whereas others like the A. thaliana relative Cardamine hirsuta bear complex leaves comprising leaflets. Previous work has shown that these interspecific differences result mostly from variation in local tissue growth and patterning. Now, by cloning and characterizing a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for C. hirsuta leaf shape, we find that a different process, age-dependent progression of leaf form, underlies variation in this trait within species. This QTL effect is caused by cis-regulatory variation in the floral repressor ChFLC, such that genotypes with low-expressing ChFLC alleles show both early flowering and accelerated age-dependent changes in leaf form, including faster leaflet production. We provide evidence that this mechanism coordinates leaf development with reproductive timing and may help to optimize resource allocation to the next generation. PMID:26243877

  7. Dataset of Arabidopsis plants that overexpress FT driven by a meristem-specific KNAT1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duplat-Bermúdez, L; Ruiz-Medrano, R; Landsman, D; Mariño-Ramírez, L; Xoconostle-Cázares, B

    2016-09-01

    In this dataset we integrated figures comparing leaf number and rosette diameter in three Arabidopsis FT overexpressor lines (AtFTOE) driven by KNAT1 promoter, "A member of the KNOTTED class of homeodomain proteins encoded by the STM gene of Arabidopsis" [5], vs Wild Type (WT) Arabidopsis plats. Also, presented in the tables are some transcriptomic data obtained by RNA-seq Illumina HiSeq from rosette leaves of Arabidopsis plants of AtFTOE 2.1 line vs WT with accession numbers SRR2094583 and SRR2094587 for AtFTOE replicates 1-3 and AtWT for control replicates 1-2 respectively. Raw data of paired-end sequences are located in the public repository of the National Center for Biotechnology Information of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, United States of America, Bethesda, MD, USA as Sequence Read Archive (SRA). Performed analyses of differential expression genes are visualized by Mapman and presented in figures. "Transcriptomic analysis of Arabidopsis overexpressing flowering locus T driven by a meristem-specific promoter that induces early flowering" [2], described the interpretation and discussion of the obtained data.

  8. Azospirillum brasilense ameliorates the response of Arabidopsis thaliana to drought mainly via enhancement of ABA levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ana C; Bottini, Rubén; Pontin, Mariela; Berli, Federico J; Moreno, Daniela; Boccanlandro, Hernán; Travaglia, Claudia N; Piccoli, Patricia N

    2015-01-01

    Production of phytohormones is one of the main mechanisms to explain the beneficial effects of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) such as Azospirillum sp. The PGPRs induce plant growth and development, and reduce stress susceptibility. However, little is known regarding the stress-related phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) produced by bacteria. We investigated the effects of Azospirillum brasilense Sp 245 strain on Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 and aba2-1 mutant plants, evaluating the morphophysiological and biochemical responses when watered and in drought. We used an in vitro-grown system to study changes in the root volume and architecture after inoculation with Azospirillum in Arabidopsis wild-type Col-0 and on the mutant aba2-1, during early growth. To examine Arabidopsis development and reproductive success as affected by the bacteria, ABA and drought, a pot experiment using Arabidopsis Col-0 plants was also carried out. Azospirillum brasilense augmented plant biomass, altered root architecture by increasing lateral roots number, stimulated photosynthetic and photoprotective pigments and retarded water loss in correlation with incremented ABA levels. As well, inoculation improved plants seed yield, plants survival, proline levels and relative leaf water content; it also decreased stomatal conductance, malondialdehyde and relative soil water content in plants submitted to drought. Arabidopsis inoculation with A. brasilense improved plants performance, especially in drought.

  9. Effects related to gene-gene interactions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor on essential hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞浩

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of the gene-gene interaction among the single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα/δ/γ on essential hypertension(EH).Methods

  10. Intra-ER sorting of the peroxisomal membrane protein Pex3 relies on its luminal domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Fakieh

    2013-06-01

    Pex3 is an evolutionarily conserved type III peroxisomal membrane protein required for peroxisome formation. It is inserted into the ER membrane and sorted via an ER subdomain (the peroxisomal ER, or pER to peroxisomes. By constructing chimeras between Pex3 and the type III ER membrane protein Sec66, we have been able to separate the signals that mediate insertion of Pex3 into the ER from those that mediate sorting within the ER to the pER subdomain. The N-terminal 17-amino acid segment of Pex3 contains two signals that are each sufficient for sorting to the pER: a chimeric protein containing the N-terminal domain of Pex3 fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic segments of Sec66 sorts to the pER in wild type cells, and does not colocalise with peroxisomes. Subsequent transport to existing peroxisomes requires the Pex3 transmembrane segment. When expressed in Drosophila S2R+ cells, ScPex3 targeting to peroxisomes is dependent on the intra-ER sorting signals in the N-terminal segment. The N-terminal segments of both human and Drosophila Pex3 contain intra-ER sorting information and can replace that of ScPex3. Our analysis has uncovered the signals within Pex3 required for the various steps of its transport to peroxisomes. Our generation of versions of Pex3 that are blocked at each stage along its transport pathway provides a tool to dissect the mechanism, as well as the molecular machinery required at each step of the pathway.

  11. Degradation of the cleaved leader peptide of thiolase by a peroxisomal proteinase.

    OpenAIRE

    Authier, F; Bergeron, J J; Ou, W J; Rachubinski, R A; Posner, B I; Walton, P A

    1995-01-01

    A peroxisomal location for insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) has been defined by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of stably transfected CHO cells overexpressing IDE and digitonin-permeabilization studies in normal nontransfected fibroblasts. The functional significance of IDE in degrading cleaved leader peptides of peroxisomal proteins targeted by the type II motif was evaluated with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the type II leader peptide of prethiolase. The peptide effectively com...

  12. Oxaliplatin neurotoxicity involves peroxisome alterations. PPARγ agonism as preventive pharmacological approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Zanardelli

    Full Text Available The development of neuropathic syndromes is an important, dose limiting side effect of anticancer agents like platinum derivates, taxanes and vinca alkaloids. The causes of neurotoxicity are still unclear but the impairment of the oxidative equilibrium is strictly related to pain. Two intracellular organelles, mitochondria and peroxisomes cooperate to the maintaining of the redox cellular state. Whereas a relationship between chemotherapy-dependent mitochondrial alteration and neuropathy has been established, the role of peroxisome is poor explored. In order to study the mechanisms of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity, peroxisomal involvement was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. In primary rat astrocyte cell culture, oxaliplatin (10 µM for 48 h or 1 µM for 5 days increased the number of peroxisomes, nevertheless expression and functionality of catalase, the most important antioxidant defense enzyme in mammalian peroxisomes, were significantly reduced. Five day incubation with the selective Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor-γ (PPAR-γ antagonist G3335 (30 µM induced a similar peroxisomal impairment suggesting a relationship between PPARγ signaling and oxaliplatin neurotoxicity. The PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone (10 µM reduced the harmful effects induced both by G3335 and oxaliplatin. In vivo, in a rat model of oxaliplatin induced neuropathy, a repeated treatment with rosiglitazone (3 and 10 mg kg(-1 per os significantly reduced neuropathic pain evoked by noxious (Paw pressure test and non-noxious (Cold plate test stimuli. The behavioral effect paralleled with the prevention of catalase impairment induced by oxaliplatin in dorsal root ganglia. In the spinal cord, catalase protection was showed by the lower rosiglitazone dosage without effect on the astrocyte density increase induced by oxaliplatin. Rosiglitazone did not alter the oxaliplatin-induced mortality of the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. These results highlight the role

  13. Mitochondrial and peroxisomal beta-oxidation capacities of organs from a non-oilseed plant.

    OpenAIRE

    Masterson, C.; Wood, C.

    2001-01-01

    Until recently, beta-oxidation was believed to be exclusively located in the peroxisomes of all higher plants. Whilst this is true for germinating oilseeds undergoing gluconeogenesis, evidence demonstrating mitochondrial beta-oxidation in other plant systems has refuted this central dogma of plant lipid metabolism. This report describes a comparative study of the dual mitochondrial and peroxisomal beta-oxidation capacities of plant organs. Oxidation of [1-(14)C] palmitate was measured in the ...

  14. Peroxisome biogenesis in mammalian cells: The impact of genes and environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Rebecca L; Lismont, Celien; Terlecky, Stanley R; Fransen, Marc

    2016-05-01

    The initiation and progression of many human diseases are mediated by a complex interplay of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. As all diseases begin with an imbalance at the cellular level, it is essential to understand how various types of molecular aberrations, metabolic changes, and environmental stressors function as switching points in essential communication networks. In recent years, peroxisomes have emerged as important intracellular hubs for redox-, lipid-, inflammatory-, and nucleic acid-mediated signaling pathways. In this review, we focus on how nature and nurture modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function in mammalian cells. First, we review emerging evidence that changes in peroxisome activity can be linked to the epigenetic regulation of cell function. Next, we outline how defects in peroxisome biogenesis may directly impact cellular pathways involved in the development of disease. In addition, we discuss how changes in the cellular microenvironment can modulate peroxisome biogenesis and function. Finally, given the importance of peroxisome function in multiple aspects of health, disease, and aging, we highlight the need for more research in this still understudied field.

  15. Peroxisomes contribute to the acylcarnitine production when the carnitine shuttle is deficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante, Sara; Ijlst, Lodewijk; Te Brinke, Heleen; Koster, Janet; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Wanders, Ronald J A; Ventura, Fátima V; Houten, Sander M

    2013-09-01

    Fatty acid β-oxidation may occur in both mitochondria and peroxisomes. While peroxisomes oxidize specific carboxylic acids such as very long-chain fatty acids, branched-chain fatty acids, bile acids, and fatty dicarboxylic acids, mitochondria oxidize long-, medium-, and short-chain fatty acids. Oxidation of long-chain substrates requires the carnitine shuttle for mitochondrial access but medium-chain fatty acid oxidation is generally considered carnitine-independent. Using control and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2)- and carnitine/acylcarnitine translocase (CACT)-deficient human fibroblasts, we investigated the oxidation of lauric acid (C12:0). Measurement of the acylcarnitine profile in the extracellular medium revealed significantly elevated levels of extracellular C10- and C12-carnitine in CPT2- and CACT-deficient fibroblasts. The accumulation of C12-carnitine indicates that lauric acid also uses the carnitine shuttle to access mitochondria. Moreover, the accumulation of extracellular C10-carnitine in CPT2- and CACT-deficient cells suggests an extramitochondrial pathway for the oxidation of lauric acid. Indeed, in the absence of peroxisomes C10-carnitine is not produced, proving that this intermediate is a product of peroxisomal β-oxidation. In conclusion, when the carnitine shuttle is impaired lauric acid is partly oxidized in peroxisomes. This peroxisomal oxidation could be a compensatory mechanism to metabolize straight medium- and long-chain fatty acids, especially in cases of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation deficiency or overload.

  16. Leaf anatomy and photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuijs, H.N.C.

    2016-01-01

    Keywords: CO2 diffusion, C3 photosynthesis, mesophyll conductance, mesophyll resistance, re-assimilation, photorespiration, respiration, tomato Herman Nicolaas Cornelis Berghuijs (2016). Leaf anatomy and photosynthesis; unravelling the CO2 diffusion pathway in C3 leaves. PhD thesis. Wageningen Unive

  17. Rapid and dynamic subcellular reorganization following mechanical stimulation of Arabidopsis epidermal cells mimics responses to fungal and oomycete attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takemoto Daigo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cells respond to the presence of potential fungal or oomycete pathogens by mounting a basal defence response that involves aggregation of cytoplasm, reorganization of cytoskeletal, endomembrane and other cell components and development of cell wall appositions beneath the infection site. This response is induced by non-adapted, avirulent and virulent pathogens alike, and in the majority of cases achieves penetration resistance against the microorganism on the plant surface. To explore the nature of signals that trigger this subcellular response and to determine the timing of its induction, we have monitored the reorganization of GFP-tagged actin, microtubules, endoplasmic reticulum (ER and peroxisomes in Arabidopsis plants – after touching the epidermal surface with a microneedle. Results Within 3 to 5 minutes of touching the surface of Arabidopsis cotyledon epidermal cells with fine glass or tungsten needles, actin microfilaments, ER and peroxisomes began to accumulate beneath the point of contact with the needle. Formation of a dense patch of actin was followed by focusing of actin cables on the site of contact. Touching the cell surface induced localized depolymerization of microtubules to form a microtubule-depleted zone surrounding a dense patch of GFP-tubulin beneath the needle tip. The concentration of actin, GFP-tubulin, ER and peroxisomes remained focused on the contact site as the needle moved across the cell surface and quickly dispersed when the needle was removed. Conclusion Our results show that plant cells can detect the gentle pressure of a microneedle on the epidermal cell surface and respond by reorganizing subcellular components in a manner similar to that induced during attack by potential fungal or oomycete pathogens. The results of our study indicate that during plant-pathogen interactions, the basal defence response may be induced by the plant's perception of the physical force exerted by the

  18. Shoot Branching and Leaf Dissection in Tomato Are Regulated by Homologous Gene Modules[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Bernhard L.; Schmitz, Gregor; Rossmann, Susanne; Piron, Florence; Ding, Jia; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Theres, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Aerial plant architecture is predominantly determined by shoot branching and leaf morphology, which are governed by apparently unrelated developmental processes, axillary meristem formation, and leaf dissection. Here, we show that in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), these processes share essential functions in boundary establishment. Potato leaf (C), a key regulator of leaf dissection, was identified to be the closest paralog of the shoot branching regulator Blind (Bl). Comparative genomics revealed that these two R2R3 MYB genes are orthologs of the Arabidopsis thaliana branching regulator REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEMS1 (RAX1). Expression studies and complementation analyses indicate that these genes have undergone sub- or neofunctionalization due to promoter differentiation. C acts in a pathway independent of other identified leaf dissection regulators. Furthermore, the known leaf complexity regulator Goblet (Gob) is crucial for axillary meristem initiation and acts in parallel to C and Bl. Finally, RNA in situ hybridization revealed that the branching regulator Lateral suppressor (Ls) is also expressed in leaves. All four boundary genes, C, Bl, Gob, and Ls, may act by suppressing growth, as indicated by gain-of-function plants. Thus, leaf architecture and shoot architecture rely on a conserved mechanism of boundary formation preceding the initiation of leaflets and axillary meristems. PMID:22039213

  19. Proteomic identification of putative microRNA394 target genes in Arabidopsis thaliana identifies major latex protein family members critical for normal development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litholdo, Celso G; Parker, Benjamin; Eamens, Andrew L;

    2016-01-01

    expression was reduced through an artificial miRNA technology, displayed severe developmental defects, including changes in leaf patterning and morphology, shoot apex defects, and eventual premature death. These phenotypic characteristics resemble those of Arabidopsis plants modified to over-express LCR...

  20. Meta-analysis of Arabidopsis KANADI1 direct target genes identifies basic growth-promoting module acting upstream of hormonal signaling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Yakun; Straub, Daniel; Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere;

    2015-01-01

    An intricate network of antagonistically acting transcription factors mediates formation of a flat leaf lamina of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. In this context, members of the class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIPIII) transcription factor family specify the adaxial domain (future upper side...

  1. Reference: 774 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available an essential gene, the disruption of which causes embryonic lethality. Plants carrying a hypomorphic smg7 mu...e progression from anaphase to telophase in the second meiotic division in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis SMG7 is

  2. Reference: 398 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available plays attenuated chloroplast movements under intermediate and high light intensitie...hese movements. In this work, we describe plastid movement impaired 2 (pmi2), a mutant in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that dis

  3. Reference: 173 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mical approaches to elucidate the action mechanisms of sirtinol in Arabidopsis. A...tic and chemical analyses of the action mechanisms of sirtinol in Arabidopsis. 8 3129-34 15710899 2005 Feb P

  4. Reference: 718 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available displayed a moderate but significant decrease in germination in the presence of D...NA damage. This report links Ubc13-Uev with functions in DNA damage response in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis UEV

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068856 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eme oxygenase (HY1) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4877362, heme oxygenase 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4530591 GB:AF132475; annotation upd...ated per Seth J. Davis at University of Wisconsin-Madison 3e-90 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104955 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available B:AF132475; annotation updated per Seth J. Davis at University of Wisconsin-Madison 3e-90 ... ...heme oxygenase (HY1) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4877362, heme oxygenase 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4530591 G

  7. Reference: 110 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on process. Our study shows that an Arabidopsis SNM protein, although structurally closer to the SNM1/PSO2 members, shares some prope...rties with ARTEMIS but also has novel characteristics. Arabidopsis plants defective

  8. Different mechanisms are responsible for chlorophyll dephytylation during fruit ripening and leaf senescence in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, Luzia; Hofstetter, Silvia Schelbert; Christ, Bastien; Lira, Bruno Silvestre; Rossi, Magdalena; Hörtensteiner, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Chlorophyll breakdown occurs in different green plant tissues (e.g. during leaf senescence and in ripening fruits). For different plant species, the PHEOPHORBIDE A OXYGENASE (PAO)/phyllobilin pathway has been described to be the major chlorophyll catabolic pathway. In this pathway, pheophorbide (i.e. magnesium- and phytol-free chlorophyll) occurs as a core intermediate. Most of the enzymes involved in the PAO/phyllobilin pathway are known; however, the mechanism of dephytylation remains uncertain. During Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf senescence, phytol hydrolysis is catalyzed by PHEOPHYTINASE (PPH), which is specific for pheophytin (i.e. magnesium-free chlorophyll). By contrast, in fruits of different Citrus spp., chlorophyllase, hydrolyzing phytol from chlorophyll, was shown to be active. Here, we enlighten the process of chlorophyll breakdown in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), both in leaves and fruits. We demonstrate the activity of the PAO/phyllobilin pathway and identify tomato PPH (SlPPH), which, like its Arabidopsis ortholog, was specifically active on pheophytin. SlPPH localized to chloroplasts and was transcriptionally up-regulated during leaf senescence and fruit ripening. SlPPH-silencing tomato lines were impaired in chlorophyll breakdown and accumulated pheophytin during leaf senescence. However, although pheophytin transiently accumulated in ripening fruits of SlPPH-silencing lines, ultimately these fruits were able to degrade chlorophyll like the wild type. We conclude that PPH is the core phytol-hydrolytic enzyme during leaf senescence in different plant species; however, fruit ripening involves other hydrolases, which are active in parallel to PPH or are the core hydrolases in fruits. These hydrolases remain unidentified, and we discuss the question of whether chlorophyllases might be involved.

  9. The alpha/beta hydrolase CGI-58 and peroxisomal transport protein PXA1 coregulate lipid homeostasis and signaling in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    COMPARATIVE GENE IDENTIFICATION-58 (CGI-58) is a key regulator of lipid metabolism and signaling in mammals, but its underlying mechanisms are unclear. Disruption of CGI-58 in either mammals or plants results in a significant increase in triacylglycerol (TAG), suggesting that CGI-58 activity is evol...

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptors and The Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is a growing threat to global health by virtue of its association with insulin resistance, inflammation, hypertension, and dyslipidemia, collectively known as the metabolic syndrome (MetS. The nuclear receptors PPARα and PPARγ are therapeutic targets for hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, respectively, and drugs that modulate these receptors are currently in clinical use. More recent work on the PPARδ has uncovered a dual benefit for both hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance, highlighting the broad potential of PPARs in the treatment of metabolic disease. CONTENT: We have learned much about PPARs, the metabolic fat sensors, and the molecular pathways they regulate. Through their distinct tissue distribution and specific target gene activation, the three PPARs together control diverse aspects of fatty acid metabolism, energy balance, insulin sensitivity glucose homeostasis, inflammation, hypertension and atherosclerosis. These studies have advanced our understanding of the etiology for the MetS. Mechanisms revealed by these studies highlight the importance of emerging concepts, such as the endocrine function of adipose tissue, tissue-tissue cross-talk and lipotoxicity, in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and CVD. SUMMARY: The elucidation of key regulators of energy balance and insulin signaling have revolutionized our understanding of fat and sugar metabolism and their intimate link. The three ‘lipidsensing’ (PPARα, PPARγ and PPARδ exemplify this connection, regulating diverse aspects of lipid and glucose homeostasis, and serving as bonafide therapeutic targets. KEYWORDS: peroxisome proliferator, activated receptor, metabolic syndrome.

  11. Arabidopsis PED2 positively modulates plant drought stress resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haitao Shi; Tiantian Ye; Fan Yang; Zhulong Chan

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that functions in seed germination, plant development, and multiple stress responses. Arabidopsis Peroxisome defective 2 (AtPED2) (also known as AtPEXOXIN14, AtPEX14), is involved in the intracellular transport of thiolase from the cytosol to glyoxysomes, and perosisomal matrix protein import in plants. In this study, we assigned a new role for AtPED2 in drought stress resistance. The transcript level of AtPED2 was down-regulated by ABA and abiotic stress treatments. AtPED2 knockout mutants were insensitive to ABA-mediated seed germination, primary root elongation, and stomatal response, while AtPED2 over-expressing plants were sensitive to ABA in comparison to wide type (WT). AtPED2 also positively regulated drought stress resistance, as evidenced by the changes of water loss rate, electrolyte leakage, and survival rate. Notably, AtPED2 positively modulated expression of several stress-responsive genes (RAB18, RD22, RD29A, and RD29B), positively affected underlying antioxidant enzyme activities and negatively regulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) level under drought stress conditions. Moreover, multiple carbon metabolites including amino acids, organic acids, sugars, sugar alcohols, and aromatic amines were also positively regulated by AtPED2. Taken together, these results indicated a positive role for AtPED2 in drought resistance, through modulation of stress-responsive genes expression, ROS metabolism, and metabolic homeostasis, at least partially.

  12. Positive regulation of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation pathway by fatty acids through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activan>ated receptors (PPAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, C; Keller, H; Mahfoudi, A; Laudet, V; Krey, G; Wahli, W

    1993-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators regulate the transcription of genes by activating ligand-dependent transcription factors, which, due to their structure and function, can be assigned to the superfamily of nuclear hormone receptors. Three such peroxisome proliferator-activan>ated receptors (PPAR alpha, beta, and gamma) have been cloned in Xenopus laevis. Their mRNAs are expressed differentially; xPPAR alpha and beta but not xPPAR gamma are expressed in oocytes and embryos. In the adult, expression of xPPAR alpha and beta appears to be ubiquitous, and xPPAR gamma is mainly observed in adipose tissue and kidney. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that PPARs are nuclear proteins, and that their cytoplasmic-nuclear translocation is independent of exogenous activators. A target gene of PPARs is the gene encoding acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids. A peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE), to which PPARs bind, has been identified within the promoter of the ACO gene. Besides the known xenobiotic activators of PPARs, such as hypolipidemic drugs, natural activators have been identified. Polyunsaturated fatty acids at physiological concentrations are efficient activators of PPARs, and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), which is the alkyne homolog of arachidonic acid, is the most potent activator of xPPAR alpha described to date. Taken together, our data suggest that PPARs have an important role in lipid metabolism.

  13. Rapid expression of transgenes driven by seed-specific constructs in leaf tissue: DHA production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xue-Rong

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic engineering of seed biosynthetic pathways to diversify and improve crop product quality is a highly active research area. The validation of genes driven by seed-specific promoters is time-consuming since the transformed plants must be grown to maturity before the gene function can be analysed. Results In this study we demonstrate that genes driven by seed-specific promoters contained within complex constructs can be transiently-expressed in the Nicotiana benthamiana leaf-assay system by co-infiltrating the Arabidopsis thaliana LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2 gene. A real-world case study is described in which we first assembled an efficient transgenic DHA synthesis pathway using a traditional N. benthamiana Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV 35S-driven leaf assay before using the LEC2-extended assay to rapidly validate a complex seed-specific construct containing the same genes before stable transformation in Arabidopsis. Conclusions The LEC2-extended N. benthamiana assay allows the transient activation of seed-specific promoters in leaf tissue. In this study we have used the assay as a rapid preliminary screen of a complex seed-specific transgenic construct prior to stable transformation, a feature that will become increasingly useful as genetic engineering moves from the manipulation of single genes to the engineering of complex pathways. We propose that the assay will prove useful for other applications wherein rapid expression of transgenes driven by seed-specific constructs in leaf tissue are sought.

  14. A role for AUXIN RESISTANT3 in the coordination of leaf growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Candela, Héctor; Robles, Pedro; López-Torrejón, Gema; del Pozo, Juan C; Micol, José Luis

    2010-10-01

    The characteristically flat structure of Arabidopsis thaliana vegetative leaves requires coordinating the growth of the epidermal, palisade mesophyll, spongy mesophyll and vascular tissues. Mutations disrupting such coordination or the specific growth properties of any of these tissues can cause hyponasty, epinasty, waviness or other deviations from flatness. Here, we show that the incurvata6 (icu6) semi-dominant allele of the AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3) gene causes leaf hyponasty. Cotyledons and leaves of icu6/AXR3 plants exhibited reduced size of adaxial pavement cells, and abnormal expansion of palisade mesophyll cells. Enhanced auxin responses in the adaxial domain of icu6/AXR3 developing cotyledons and leaves correlated with increased cell divisions in the adaxial epidermis. Leaf incurvature in icu6/AXR3 leaves was alleviated by loss-of-function alleles of the ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1 (AS1) and AS2 genes, which restrict the expression of class I KNOX genes to the shoot apical meristem and regulate cell proliferation in leaf primordia. Taken together, our results suggest that an interaction between auxin responses and the AS1-AS2 pathway coordinates tissue growth during Arabidopsis thaliana leaf expansion.

  15. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  17. Chromosomal proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehs, C P; McElwain, E F; Spiker, S

    1988-07-01

    In plants with large genomes, each of the classes of the histones (H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4) are not unique polypeptides, but rather families of closely related proteins that are called histone variants. The small genome and preponderance of single-copy DNA in Arabidopsis thaliana has led us to ask if this plant has such families of histone variants. We have thus isolated histones from Arabidopsis and analyzed them on four polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic systems: an SDS system; an acetic acid-urea system; a Triton transverse gradient system; and a two-dimensional system combining SDS and Triton-acetic acid-urea systems. This approach has allowed us to identify all four of the nucleosomal core histones in Arabidopsis and to establish the existence of a set of H2A and H2B variants. Arabidopsis has at least four H2A variants and three H2B variants of distinct molecular weights as assessed by electrophoretic mobility on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Thus, Arabidopsis displays a diversity in these histones similar to the diversity displayed by plants with larger genomes such as wheat.The high mobility group (HMG) non-histone chromatin proteins have attracted considerable attention because of the evidence implicating them as structural proteins of transcriptionally active chromatin. We have isolated a group of non-histone chromatin proteins from Arabidopsis that meet the operational criteria to be classed as HMG proteins and that cross-react with antisera to HMG proteins of wheat.

  18. Color reduction of melanin by lysosomal and peroxisomal enzymes isolated from mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Jun; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Yoon, Jihee; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-02-01

    Lysosomes and peroxisomes are organelles with many functions in all eukaryotic cells. Lysosomes contain hydrolytic enzymes (lysozyme) that degrade molecules, whereas peroxisomes contain enzymes such as catalase that convert hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to water and oxygen and neutralize toxicity. In contrast, melanin is known as a helpful element to protect the skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. However, a high quantity of melanin leads to hyperpigmentation or skin cancer in human. New materials have already been discovered to inhibit tyrosinase in melanogenesis; however, melanin reduction does not suggest their preparation. In this study, we report that the color intensity because of melanin decreased by the cellular activation of lysosomes and peroxisomes. An increase in the superficial intensity of lysosome and peroxisome activities of HeLa cells was observed. In addition, a decrease in the amount of melanin has also been observed in mammalian cells without using any other chemical, showing that the process can work in vivo for treating melanin. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that the amount of melanin decreases by the lysosome and peroxisome activity after entering the cells, and functional organelles are effective in color reduction. This mechanism can be used in vivo for treating melanin.

  19. Functional analysis of the theobroma cacao NPR1 gene in arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verica Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Arabidopsis thaliana NPR1 gene encodes a transcription coactivator (NPR1 that plays a major role in the mechanisms regulating plant defense response. After pathogen infection and in response to salicylic acid (SA accumulation, NPR1 translocates from the cytoplasm into the nucleus where it interacts with other transcription factors resulting in increased expression of over 2000 plant defense genes contributing to a pathogen resistance response. Results A putative Theobroma cacao NPR1 cDNA was isolated by RT-PCR using degenerate primers based on homologous sequences from Brassica, Arabidopsis and Carica papaya. The cDNA was used to isolate a genomic clone from Theobroma cacao containing a putative TcNPR1 gene. DNA sequencing revealed the presence of a 4.5 kb coding region containing three introns and encoding a polypeptide of 591 amino acids. The predicted TcNPR1 protein shares 55% identity and 78% similarity to Arabidopsis NPR1, and contains each of the highly conserved functional domains indicative of this class of transcription factors (BTB/POZ and ankyrin repeat protein-protein interaction domains and a nuclear localization sequence (NLS. To functionally define the TcNPR1 gene, we transferred TcNPR1 into an Arabidopsis npr1 mutant that is highly susceptible to infection by the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Driven by the constitutive CaMV35S promoter, the cacao TcNPR1 gene partially complemented the npr1 mutation in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, resulting in 100 fold less bacterial growth in a leaf infection assay. Upon induction with SA, TcNPR1 was shown to translocate into the nucleus of leaf and root cells in a manner identical to Arabidopsis NPR1. Cacao NPR1 was also capable of participating in SA-JA signaling crosstalk, as evidenced by the suppression of JA responsive gene expression in TcNPR1 overexpressing transgenic plants. Conclusion Our data indicate that the TcNPR1 is a functional

  20. Impact of plant shoot architecture on leaf cooling: a coupled heat and mass transfer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, L J; Franklin, K A; Homer, M E

    2013-08-01

    Plants display a range of striking architectural adaptations when grown at elevated temperatures. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, these include elongation of petioles, and increased petiole and leaf angles from the soil surface. The potential physiological significance of these architectural changes remains speculative. We address this issue computationally by formulating a mathematical model and performing numerical simulations, testing the hypothesis that elongated and elevated plant configurations may reflect a leaf-cooling strategy. This sets in place a new basic model of plant water use and interaction with the surrounding air, which couples heat and mass transfer within a plant to water vapour diffusion in the air, using a transpiration term that depends on saturation, temperature and vapour concentration. A two-dimensional, multi-petiole shoot geometry is considered, with added leaf-blade shape detail. Our simulations show that increased petiole length and angle generally result in enhanced transpiration rates and reduced leaf temperatures in well-watered conditions. Furthermore, our computations also reveal plant configurations for which elongation may result in decreased transpiration rate owing to decreased leaf liquid saturation. We offer further qualitative and quantitative insights into the role of architectural parameters as key determinants of leaf-cooling capacity.

  1. Multiple components are integrated to determine leaf complexity in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenhua; Chen, Jianghua; Weng, Lin; Li, Xin; Cao, Xianglin; Hu, Xiaohe; Luo, Da; Yang, Jun

    2013-05-01

    Transcription factors and phytohormones have been reported to play crucial roles to regulate leaf complexity among plant species. Using the compound-leafed species Lotus japonicus, a model legume plant with five visible leaflets, we characterized four independent mutants with reduced leaf complexity, proliferating floral meristem (pfm), proliferating floral organ-2 (pfo-2), fused leaflets1 (ful1) and umbrella leaflets (uml), which were further identified as loss-of-function mutants of Arabidopsis orthologs LEAFY (LFY), UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO), CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON 2 (CUC2) and PIN-FORMED 1 (PIN1), respectively. Comparing the leaf development of wild-type and mutants by a scanning electron microscopy approach, leaflet initiation and/or dissection were found to be affected in these mutants. Expression and phenotype analysis indicated that PFM/LjLFY and PFO/LjUFO determined the basipetal leaflet initiation manner in L. japonicus. Genetic analysis of ful1 and uml mutants and their double mutants revealed that the CUC2-like gene and auxin pathway also participated in leaflet dissection in L. japonicus, and their functions might influence cytokinin biogenesis directly or indirectly. Our results here suggest that multiple genes were interplayed and played conserved functions in controlling leaf complexity during compound leaf development in L. japonicus.

  2. Accumulation of eicosapolyenoic acids enhances sensitivity to abscisic acid and mitigates the effects of drought in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaowei; Li, Yaxiao; Liu, Shiyang; Xia, Fei; Li, Xinzheng; Qi, Baoxiu

    2014-04-01

    IgASE1, a C₁₈ Δ(9)-specific polyunsaturated fatty acid elongase from the marine microalga Isochrysis galbana, is able to convert linoleic acid and α-linolenic acid to eicosadienoic acid and eicosatrienoic acid in Arabidopsis. Eicosadienoic acid and eicosatrienoic acid are precursors of arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid, which are synthesized via the Δ(8) desaturation biosynthetic pathways. This study shows that the IgASE1-expressing transgenic Arabidopsis exhibited altered morphology (decreased leaf area and biomass) and enhanced drought resistance compared to wild-type plants. The transgenic Arabidopsis were hypersensitive to abscisic acid (ABA) during seed germination, post-germination growth, and seedling development. They had elevated leaf ABA levels under well-watered and dehydrated conditions and their stomata were more sensitive to ABA. Exogenous application of eicosadienoic acid and eicosatrienoic acid can mimic ABA and drought responses in the wild type plants, similar to that found in the transgenic ones. The transcript levels of genes involved in the biosynthesis of ABA (NCED3, ABA1, AAO3) as well as other stress-related genes were upregulated in this transgenic line upon osmotic stress (300 mM mannitol). Taken together, these results indicate that these two eicosapolyenoic acids or their derived metabolites can mitigate the effects of drought in transgenic Arabidopsis, at least in part, through the action of ABA.

  3. Post-translational regulation and trafficking of the granulin-containing protease RD21 of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gu

    Full Text Available RD21-like proteases are ubiquitous, plant-specific papain-like proteases typified by carrying a C-terminal granulin domain. RD21-like proteases are involved in immunity and associated with senescence and various types of biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we interrogated Arabidopsis RD21 regulation and trafficking by site-directed mutagenesis, agroinfiltration, western blotting, protease activity profiling and protein degradation. Using an introduced N-glycan sensor, deglycosylation experiments and glyco-engineered N. benthamiana plants, we show that RD21 passes through the Golgi where it becomes fucosylated. Our studies demonstrate that RD21 is regulated at three post-translational levels. Prodomain removal is not blocked in the catalytic Cys mutant, indicating that RD21 is activated by a proteolytic cascade. However, RD21 activation in Arabidopsis does not require vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs or aleurain-like protease AALP. In contrast, granulin domain removal requires the catalytic Cys and His residues and is therefore autocatalytic. Furthermore, SDS can (re-activate latent RD21 in Arabidopsis leaf extracts, indicating the existence of a third layer of post-translational regulation, possibly mediated by endogenous inhibitors. RD21 causes a dominant protease activity in Arabidopsis leaf extracts, responsible for SDS-induced proteome degradation.

  4. Comparing Leaf and Root Insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Geldenhuys

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider two ways of inserting a key into a binary search tree: leaf insertion which is the standard method, and root insertion which involves additional rotations. Although the respective cost of constructing leaf and root insertion binary search trees trees, in terms of comparisons, are the same in the average case, we show that in the worst case the construction of a root insertion binary search tree needs approximately 50% of the number of comparisons required by leaf insertion.

  5. Studies on the Rice LEAF INCLINATION1 (LC1),an IAA-amido Synthetase, Reveal the Effects of Auxin in Leaf Inclination Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Qing Zhao; Jing-Jing Xiang; Hong-Wei Xue

    2013-01-01

    The angle of rice leaf inclination is an important agronomic trait and closely related to the yields and architecture of crops.Although few mutants with altered leaf angles have been reported,the molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated,especially whether hormones are involved in this process.Through genetic screening,a rice gain-offunction mutant leaf inclination1,Ic1-D,was identified from the Shanghai T-DNA Insertion Population (SHIP).Phenotypic analysis confirmed the exaggerated leaf angles of Ic1-D due to the stimulated cell elongation at the lamina joint.LC1 is transcribed in various tissues and encodes OsGH3-1,an indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) amido synthetase,whose homolog of Arabidopsis functions in maintaining the auxin homeostasis by conjugating excess IAA to various amino acids.Indeed,recombinant LC1 can catalyze the conjugation of IAA to Ala,Asp,and Asn in vitro,which is consistent with the decreased free IAA amount in Ic1-D mutant.Ic1-D is insensitive to IAA and hypersensitive to exogenous BR,in agreement with the microarray analysis that reveals the altered transcriptions of genes involved in auxin signaling and BR biosynthesis.These results indicate the crucial roles of auxin homeostasis in the leaf inclination control.

  6. Hepatic peroxisomes are deficient in infantile refsum disease: a cytochemical study of 4 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roels, F; Cornelis, A; Poll-The, B T; Aubourg, P; Ogier, H; Scotto, J; Saudubray, J M

    1986-10-01

    We examined liver biopsies from 4 patients with the infantile form of Refsum disease. No peroxisomes were visualized by light microscopy after cytochemical staining for catalase, a marker enzyme for this organelle. Absence of peroxisomes was confirmed by electron microscopy in 3 patients; in the 4th patient we observed organelles of peculiar size and structure and with minimal catalase activity. Light microscopy also showed birefringent macrophages containing P.A.S.-positive material; they were abundant in the 3 older children, and rare in the youngest (8 months). Peroxisomes and birefringent macrophages were absent in 2 patients with the cerebrohepatorenal syndrome of Zellweger. The simultaneous presence of these unique light microscopical characteristics may be of diagnostic value.

  7. Serine acts as a metabolic signal for the transcriptional control of photorespiration-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Stefan; Florian, Alexandra; Wittmiß, Maria; Jahnke, Kathrin; Hagemann, Martin; Fernie, Alisdair R; Bauwe, Hermann

    2013-05-01

    Photosynthetic carbon assimilation including photorespiration is dynamically regulated during the day/night cycle. This includes transcriptional regulation, such as the light induction of corresponding genes, but little is known about the contribution of photorespiratory metabolites to the regulation of gene expression. Here, we examined diurnal changes in the levels of photorespiratory metabolites, of enzymes of the photorespiratory carbon cycle, and of corresponding transcripts in wild-type plants of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and in a mutant with altered photorespiratory flux due to the absence of the peroxisomal enzyme Hydroxypyruvate Reductase1 (HPR1). Metabolomics of the wild type showed that the relative amounts of most metabolites involved in photorespiration increased after the onset of light, exhibited maxima at the end of the day, and decreased during the night. In accordance with those findings, both the amounts of messenger RNAs encoding photorespiratory enzymes and the respective protein contents showed a comparable accumulation pattern. Deletion of HPR1 did not significantly alter most of the metabolite patterns relative to wild-type plants; only serine accumulated to a constitutively elevated amount in this mutant. In contrast, the hpr1 mutation resulted in considerable deregulation of the transcription of photorespiration-related genes. This transcriptional deregulation could also be induced by the external application of l-serine but not glycine to the Arabidopsis wild type, suggesting that serine acts as a metabolic signal for the transcriptional regulation of photorespiration, particularly in the glycine-to-serine interconversion reactions.

  8. Dataset of Arabidopsis plants that overexpress FT driven by a meristem-specific KNAT1 promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Duplat-Bermúdez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this dataset we integrated figures comparing leaf number and rosette diameter in three Arabidopsis FT overexpressor lines (AtFTOE driven by KNAT1 promoter, “A member of the KNOTTED class of homeodomain proteins encoded by the STM gene of Arabidopsis” [5], vs Wild Type (WT Arabidopsis plats. Also, presented in the tables are some transcriptomic data obtained by RNA-seq Illumina HiSeq from rosette leaves of Arabidopsis plants of AtFTOE 2.1 line vs WT with accession numbers SRR2094583 and SRR2094587 for AtFTOE replicates 1–3 and AtWT for control replicates 1–2 respectively. Raw data of paired-end sequences are located in the public repository of the National Center for Biotechnology Information of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, United States of America, Bethesda, MD, USA as Sequence Read Archive (SRA. Performed analyses of differential expression genes are visualized by Mapman and presented in figures. “Transcriptomic analysis of Arabidopsis overexpressing flowering locus T driven by a meristem-specific promoter that induces early flowering” [2], described the interpretation and discussion of the obtained data.

  9. Target of rapamycin signaling regulates metabolism, growth, and life span in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Maozhi; Venglat, Prakash; Qiu, Shuqing; Feng, Li; Cao, Yongguo; Wang, Edwin; Xiang, Daoquan; Wang, Jinghe; Alexander, Danny; Chalivendra, Subbaiah; Logan, David; Mattoo, Autar; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2012-12-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) is a major nutrition and energy sensor that regulates growth and life span in yeast and animals. In plants, growth and life span are intertwined not only with nutrient acquisition from the soil and nutrition generation via photosynthesis but also with their unique modes of development and differentiation. How TOR functions in these processes has not yet been determined. To gain further insights, rapamycin-sensitive transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines (BP12) expressing yeast FK506 Binding Protein12 were developed. Inhibition of TOR in BP12 plants by rapamycin resulted in slower overall root, leaf, and shoot growth and development leading to poor nutrient uptake and light energy utilization. Experimental limitation of nutrient availability and light energy supply in wild-type Arabidopsis produced phenotypes observed with TOR knockdown plants, indicating a link between TOR signaling and nutrition/light energy status. Genetic and physiological studies together with RNA sequencing and metabolite analysis of TOR-suppressed lines revealed that TOR regulates development and life span in Arabidopsis by restructuring cell growth, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, gene expression, and rRNA and protein synthesis. Gain- and loss-of-function Ribosomal Protein S6 (RPS6) mutants additionally show that TOR function involves RPS6-mediated nutrition and light-dependent growth and life span in Arabidopsis.

  10. Enhancement of Thiamin Content in Arabidopsis thaliana by Metabolic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Stockwell, Virginia O; Goyer, Aymeric

    2015-12-01

    Thiamin is an essential nutrient in the human diet. Severe thiamin deficiency leads to beriberi, a lethal disease which is common in developing countries. Thiamin biofortification of staple food crops is a possible strategy to alleviate thiamin deficiency-related diseases. In plants, thiamin plays a role in the response to abiotic and biotic stresses, and data from the literature suggest that boosting thiamin content could increase resistance to stresses. Here, we tested an engineering strategy to increase thiamin content in Arabidopsis. Thiamin is composed of a thiazole ring linked to a pyrimidine ring by a methylene bridge. THI1 and THIC are the first committed steps in the synthesis of the thiazole and pyrimidine moieties, respectively. Arabidopsis plants were transformed with a vector containing the THI1-coding sequence under the control of a constitutive promoter. Total thiamin leaf content in THI1 plants was up approximately 2-fold compared with the wild type. THI1-overexpressing lines were then crossed with pre-existing THIC-overexpressing lines. Resulting THI1 × THIC plants accumulated up to 3.4- and 2.6-fold more total thiamin than wild-type plants in leaf and seeds, respectively. After inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae, THI1 × THIC plants had lower populations than the wild-type control. However, THI1 × THIC plants subjected to various abiotic stresses did not show any visible or biochemical changes compared with the wild type. We discuss the impact of engineering thiamin biosynthesis on the nutritional value of plants and their resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  11. [Regulation pattern of the FRUITFULL (FUL) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tingting; Xie, Hua; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rongcai

    2010-11-01

    FRUITFULL (FUL) is an MADS box gene that functions early in controlling flowering time, meristem identity and cauline leaf morphology and later in carpel and fruit development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to clarify the regulation of FUL expression the upstream regulatory region, -2148 bp - +96 bp and the first intron of the FUL gene were cloned, and vectors with a series of deletion of FUL promoter, and the ones fused with the first intron were constructed. Vectors harboring the fusion of cis-acting elements with the constitutive promoters of TUBULIN and ACTIN were also constructed. Beta-Glucuronidase activity assays of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed that two cis-elements were involved in the repression of FUL expression, with one of the two being probably the binding site of the transcriptional factor AP1. And the two CArG boxes played a important role in FUL initiation particularly. Furthermore, the first intron of FUL was shown to participate in the development of carpel and stamen as an enhancer.

  12. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-07-08

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana's roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes.

  13. Functional transient genetic transformation of Arabidopsis leaves by biolistic bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Shoko; Lacroix, Benoît; Krichevsky, Alexander; Lazarowitz, Sondra G; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2009-01-01

    Transient gene expression is an indispensable tool for studying functions of gene products. In the case of plants, transient introduction of genes by Agrobacterium infiltration is a method of choice for many species. However, this technique does not work efficiently in Arabidopsis leaf tissue, the most widely used model system for basic plant biology research. Here we present an optimized protocol for biolistic delivery of plasmid DNA into the epidermis of Arabidopsis leaves, which can be easily performed using the Bio-Rad Helios gene gun system. This protocol yields efficient and reproducible transient expression of diverse genes and is exemplified here for use in a functional assay of a transcription repressor and for the subcellular localization and cell-to-cell movement of plant viral movement protein. This protocol is suitable for studies of biological function and subcellular localization of the gene product of interest directly in planta by utilizing different types of activity-based assays. Using this procedure, the data are obtained after 2-4 d of work.

  14. BODYGUARD is required for the biosynthesis of cutin in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobson, Liina; Lindgren, Leif Ove; Verdier, Gaëtan; Laanemets, Kristiina; Brosché, Mikael; Beisson, Fred; Kollist, Hannes

    2016-07-01

    The cuticle plays a critical role in plant survival during extreme drought conditions. There are, however, surprisingly, many gaps in our understanding of cuticle biosynthesis. An Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA mutant library was screened for mutants with enhanced transpiration using a simple condensation spot method. Five mutants, named cool breath (cb), were isolated. The cb5 mutant was found to be allelic to bodyguard (bdg), which is affected in an α/β-hydrolase fold protein important for cuticle structure. The analysis of cuticle components in cb5 (renamed as bdg-6) and another T-DNA mutant allele (bdg-7) revealed no impairment in wax synthesis, but a strong decrease in total cutin monomer load in young leaves and flowers. Root suberin content was also reduced. Overexpression of BDG increased total leaf cutin monomer content nearly four times by affecting preferentially C18 polyunsaturated ω-OH fatty acids and dicarboxylic acids. Whole-plant gas exchange analysis showed that bdg-6 had higher cuticular conductance and rate of transpiration; however, plant lines overexpressing BDG resembled the wild-type with regard to these characteristics. This study identifies BDG as an important component of the cutin biosynthesis machinery in Arabidopsis. We also show that, using BDG, cutin can be greatly modified without altering the cuticular water barrier properties and transpiration.

  15. 7 CFR 29.2528 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.2528 Section 29.2528 Agriculture Regulations...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2528 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  16. 7 CFR 29.3033 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3033 Section 29.3033 Agriculture Regulations... Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  17. 7 CFR 29.3525 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3525 Section 29.3525 Agriculture Regulations... Type 95) § 29.3525 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  18. Leaf growth of contrasting Poa species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiorani, Fabio

    2002-01-01

    In the grass genus Poa a wide variation in final leaf size and leaf growth rate exists. In this thesis leaf growth was analyzed at different levels. At the cellular level, inherent variation in leaf elongation rate and final leaf size was correlated to the length of the elongation zone and to merist

  19. 7 CFR 29.1028 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.1028 Section 29.1028 Agriculture Regulations... Type 92) § 29.1028 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf....

  20. Refsum disease: a defect in the alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid in peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, I; Pahan, K; Singh, A K; Barbosa, E

    1993-10-01

    The oxidation of phytanic acid to pristanic acid was previously demonstrated to be deficient in monolayer cultures of skin fibroblasts (Herndon et al. 1969. J. Clin. Invest. 48: 1017-1032). However, identification of subcellular organelle with deficient enzyme activity has not been established. To define the subcellular organelle with deficient enzyme activity in the catabolism of phytanic acid, we measured the oxidation of [1-14C] phytanic acid to 14CO2 and pristanic acid in different subcellular organelles isolated from cultured skin fibroblasts from control and Refsum patients. The rates of oxidation of phytanic acid in peroxisomes, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum were 37.1 +/- 2.65, 1.9 +/- 0.3, and 0.4 +/- 0.07 pmol/h per mg protein, respectively, from control fibroblasts. The phytanic acid oxidation activity in mitochondria (2.04 +/- 0.7 pmol/h per mg protein) and endoplasmic reticulum (0.43 +/- 0.2 pmol/h per mg protein) from Refsum fibroblasts was similar to control fibroblasts. However, phytanic acid oxidation in peroxisomes from Refsum fibroblasts was not detected at all the protein concentrations tested. On the other hand, the peroxisomes from Refsum fibroblasts had normal rates of activation and oxidation of palmitic and lignoceric acids, suggesting that the peroxisomes isolated from Refsum fibroblasts were metabolically active. The phytanoyl-CoA ligase, the first enzyme in the alpha-oxidation pathway, had activity similar to that in peroxisomes from control (9.86 +/- 0.09 nmol/h per mg protein) and Refsum (10.25 +/- 0.31 nmol/h per mg protein) fibroblasts. The data described here clearly demonstrate that pathognomonic accumulation of phytanic acid in patients with Refsum disease is due to the deficient activity of peroxisomal alpha-oxidation enzyme system.

  1. Redox-regulated cargo binding and release by the peroxisomal targeting signal receptor, Pex5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Changle; Hagstrom, Danielle; Polley, Soumi Guha; Subramani, Suresh

    2013-09-20

    In its role as a mobile receptor for peroxisomal matrix cargo containing a peroxisomal targeting signal called PTS1, the protein Pex5 shuttles between the cytosol and the peroxisome lumen. Pex5 binds PTS1 proteins in the cytosol via its C-terminal tetratricopeptide domains and delivers them to the peroxisome lumen, where the receptor·cargo complex dissociates. The cargo-free receptor is exported to the cytosol for another round of import. How cargo release and receptor recycling are regulated is poorly understood. We found that Pex5 functions as a dimer/oligomer and that its protein interactions with itself (homo-oligomeric) and with Pex8 (hetero-oligomeric) control the binding and release of cargo proteins. These interactions are controlled by a redox-sensitive amino acid, cysteine 10 of Pex5, which is essential for the formation of disulfide bond-linked Pex5 forms, for high affinity cargo binding, and for receptor recycling. Disulfide bond-linked Pex5 showed the highest affinity for PTS1 cargo. Upon reduction of the disulfide bond by dithiothreitol, Pex5 transitioned to a noncovalent dimer, concomitant with the partial release of PTS1 cargo. Additionally, dissipation of the redox balance between the cytosol and the peroxisome lumen caused an import defect. A hetero-oligomeric interaction between the N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-110) of Pex5 and a conserved motif at the C terminus of Pex8 further facilitates cargo release, but only under reducing conditions. This interaction is also important for the release of PTS1 proteins. We suggest a redox-regulated model for Pex5 function during the peroxisomal matrix protein import cycle.

  2. Exploiting Natural Variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, J.A.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana . This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of

  3. Exploiting natural variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Molenaar; J.J.B. Keurentjes

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana. This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of g

  4. The salty tale of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, D

    2000-06-29

    High concentrations of sodium chloride are toxic to most plant species. New insights into the mechanisms by which plants tolerate salt have emerged from the identification of genes in Arabidopsis thaliana that play a critical part in physiological resistance to salt.

  5. Nuclear receptor corepressor-dependent repression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor delta-mediated transactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsdam, Anne-M; Nielsen, Curt A F; Neve, Søren

    2002-01-01

    delta-RXR alpha heterodimer bound to an acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO)-type peroxisome-proliferator response element recruited a glutathione S-transferase-NCoR fusion protein in a ligand-independent manner. Contrasting with most other nuclear receptors, PPAR delta was found to interact equally well......The nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) was isolated as a peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid system. NCoR interacted strongly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR delta, whereas interactions with the ligand-binding domains...

  6. Characterization of human and murine PMP20 peroxisomal proteins that exhibit antioxidant activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, H; Avraham, S; Jiang, S; London, R; Van Veldhoven, P P; Subramani, S; Rogers, R A; Avraham, H

    1999-10-15

    We have isolated the cDNAs encoding human and mouse homologues of a yeast protein, termed peroxisomal membrane protein 20 (PMP20). Comparison of the amino acid sequences of human (HsPMP20) and mouse (MmPMP20) PMP20 proteins revealed a high degree of identity (93%), whereas resemblance to the yeast Candida boidinii PMP20A and PMP20B (CbPMP20A and CbPMP20B) was less (30% identity). Both HsPMP20 and MmPMP20 lack transmembrane regions, as do CbPMP20A and CbPMP20B. HsPMP20 mRNA expression was low in human fetal tissues, especially in the brain. In adult tissues, HsPMP20 mRNA was expressed in the majority of tissues tested. HsPMP20 and MmPMP20 contained the C-terminal tripeptide sequence Ser-Gln-Leu (SQL), which is similar to the peroxisomal targeting signal 1 utilized for protein import into peroxisomes. HsPMP20 bound directly to the human peroxisomal targeting signal 1 receptor, HsPEX5. Mutagenesis analysis showed that the C-terminal tripeptide sequence, SQL, of HsPMP20 is necessary for its binding to HsPEX5. Subcellular fractionation of HeLa cells, expressing epitope-tagged PMP20, revealed that HsPMP20 is localized in the cytoplasm and in a particulate fraction containing peroxisomes. Double-staining immunofluorescence studies showed colocalization of HsPMP20 and thiolase, a bona fide peroxisomal protein. The amino acid sequence alignment of HsPMP20, MmPMP20, CbPMP20A, and CbPMP20B displayed high similarity to thiol-specific antioxidant proteins. HsPMP20 exerted an inhibitory effect on the inactivation of glutamine synthetase in the thiol metal-catalyzed oxidation system but not in the nonthiol metal-catalyzed oxidation system, suggesting that HsPMP20 possesses thiol-specific antioxidant activity. In addition, HsPMP20 removed hydrogen peroxide by its thiol-peroxidase activity. These results indicate that HsPMP20 is imported into the peroxisomal matrix via PEX5p and may work to protect peroxisomal proteins against oxidative stress. Because some portion of PMP20 might

  7. (TECTONA GRANDIS LEAF POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yash Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the adsorption potential of Teak (Tectona grandis leaf powder (TLP toremove Methylene blue (MB and Malachite Green (MG dye molecules from aqueoussolution was investigated. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the influenceof operational parameters such as, pH (2−9, adsorbent dosage (1−7 g/L, contact time(15−150 minutes and initial dye concentration (20−120 mg/L at stirring speed of 150rpm for the adsorption of MB and MG on TLP. Maximum removal efficiency of 98.4%and 95.1% was achieved for MB and MG dye, respectively. The experimentalequilibrium data were analysed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isothermmodels and it was found that, it fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm model. Thesurface structure and morphology of the adsorbent was characterized using scanningelectron microscopy (SEM and the presence of functional groups and its interactionwith the dye molecules were analysed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR. Based on the investigation, it has been demonstrated that the teak leaf powderhas good potential for effective adsorption of methylene blue and malachite green dye.

  8. The BIG gene is required for auxin-mediated organ growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaola; Lu, Wenwen; Ma, Yurong; Qin, Qianqian; Hou, Suiwen

    2013-04-01

    Control of organ size by cell expansion and cell proliferation is a fundamental process during development, but the importance of BIG in this process is still poorly understood. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new allele mutant of BIG in Arabidopsis: big-j588. The mutant displayed small aerial organs that were characterized by reduced cell size in the epidermis and short roots with decreased cell numbers. The big-j588 axr1 double and big-j588 arf7 arf19 triple mutants displayed more severe defects in leaf expansion and root elongation than their parents, implying BIG is involved in auxin-dependent organ growth. Genetic analysis suggests that BIG may act synergistically with PIN1 to affect leaf growth. The PIN1 protein level decreased in both the root cells and the tips of leaf pavement cell lobes of big-j588. Further analysis showed that the auxin maxima in the roots and the leaves of big-j588 decreased. Therefore, we concluded that the small leaves and the short roots of big-j588 were associated with reduction of auxin maxima. Overall, our study suggested that BIG is required for Arabidopsis organ growth via auxin action.

  9. The artificial leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Daniel G

    2012-05-15

    To convert the energy of sunlight into chemical energy, the leaf splits water via the photosynthetic process to produce molecular oxygen and hydrogen, which is in a form of separated protons and electrons. The primary steps of natural photosynthesis involve the absorption of sunlight and its conversion into spatially separated electron-hole pairs. The holes of this wireless current are captured by the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) to oxidize water to oxygen. The electrons and protons produced as a byproduct of the OEC reaction are captured by ferrodoxin of photosystem I. With the aid of ferrodoxin-NADP(+) reductase, they are used to produce hydrogen in the form of NADPH. For a synthetic material to realize the solar energy conversion function of the leaf, the light-absorbing material must capture a solar photon to generate a wireless current that is harnessed by catalysts, which drive the four electron/hole fuel-forming water-splitting reaction under benign conditions and under 1 sun (100 mW/cm(2)) illumination. This Account describes the construction of an artificial leaf comprising earth-abundant elements by interfacing a triple junction, amorphous silicon photovoltaic with hydrogen- and oxygen-evolving catalysts made from a ternary alloy (NiMoZn) and a cobalt-phosphate cluster (Co-OEC), respectively. The latter captures the structural and functional attributes of the PSII-OEC. Similar to the PSII-OEC, the Co-OEC self-assembles upon oxidation of an earth-abundant metal ion from 2+ to 3+, may operate in natural water at room temperature, and is self-healing. The Co-OEC also activates H(2)O by a proton-coupled electron transfer mechanism in which the Co-OEC is increased by four hole equivalents akin to the S-state pumping of the Kok cycle of PSII. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies have established that the Co-OEC is a structural relative of Mn(3)CaO(4)-Mn cubane of the PSII-OEC, where Co replaces Mn and the cubane is extended in a

  10. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asako eUchiyama

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010. To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV, the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV, which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP, Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread.

  11. Leaf-Like Sepals Induced by Ectopic Expression of a SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP)-Like MADS-Box Gene from the Basal Eudicot Epimedium sagittatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhineng; Zeng, Shaohua; Li, Yanbang; Li, Mingyang; Souer, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Epimedium L. (Berberidaceae, Ranales), a perennial traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has become a new popular landscape plant for ground cover and pot culture in many countries based on its excellent ornamental characteristics and, distinctive and diverse floral morphology. However, little is known about the molecular genetics of flower development in Epimedium sagittatum. Here, we describe the characterization of EsSVP that encodes a protein sharing 68, 54, and 35% similarity with SVP, AGAMOUS-like 24 (AGL24) and SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) in Arabidopsis, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated that EsSVP transcripts were principally found in petiole and leaf tissues, with little expression in roots and flowers and no in fruits. The highest EsSVP expression was observed in leaves. The flowering time of 35S::EsSVP in most Arabidopsis thaliana and in all petunia plants was not affected in both photoperiod conditions, but 35S::EsSVP 5# and 35S::EsSVP 1# Arabidopsis lines induced late and early flowering under long day (LD, 14 h light/10 h dark) and short day (SD, 10 h light/14 h dark) conditions, respectively. The 35S::EsSVP Arabidopsis produced extra secondary inflorescence or floral meristems in the axils of the leaf-like sepals with excrescent trichomes, and leaf-like sepals not able to enclose the inner three whorls completely. Moreover, almost all transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed persistent sepals around the completely matured fruits. Upon ectopic expression of 35S::EsSVP in Petunia W115, sepals were enlarged, sometimes to the size of leaves; corollas were greenish and did not fully open. These results suggest that EsSVP is involved in inflorescence meristem identity and flowering time regulation in some conditions. Although, the SVP homologs might have suffered functional diversification among diverse species between core and basal eudicots, the protein functions are conserved between Arabidopsis/Petunia and Epimedium.

  12. HANABA TARANU regulates the shoot apical meristem and leaf development in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lian; Yan, Shuangshuang; Jiang, Li; Liu, Meiling; Zhang, Juan; Zhao, Jianyu; Zhao, Wensheng; Han, Ying-Yan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xiaolan

    2015-12-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) is essential for continuous organogenesis in higher plants, while the leaf is the primary source organ and the leaf shape directly affects the efficiency of photosynthesis. HANABA TARANU (HAN) encodes a GATA3-type transcription factor that functions in floral organ development, SAM organization, and embryo development in Arabidopsis, but is involved in suppressing bract outgrowth and promoting branching in grass species. Here the function of the HAN homologue CsHAN1 was characterized in cucumber, an important vegetable with great agricultural and economic value. CsHAN1 is predominantly expressed at the junction of the SAM and the stem, and can partially rescue the han-2 floral organ phenotype in Arabidopsis. Overexpression and RNAi of CsHAN1 transgenic cucumber resulted in retarded growth early after embryogenesis and produced highly lobed leaves. Further, it was found that CsHAN1 may regulate SAM development through regulating the WUSCHEL (WUS) and SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) pathways, and mediate leaf development through a complicated gene regulatory network in cucumber.

  13. Methanol metabolism in a peroxisome-deficient mutant of Hansenula polymorpha : A physiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, Ida J. van der; Harder, Willem; Veenhuis, Marten

    1991-01-01

    We have studied methanol-utilization in a peroxisome-deficient (PER) mutant of Hansenula polymorpha. In spite of the fact that in carbon-limited chemostat cultures under induced conditions the enzymes involved in methanol metabolism were present at wildtype (WT) levels, this mutant is unable to grow

  14. Protein refolding in peroxisomes is dependent upon an HSF1-regulated function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heldens, Lonneke; van Genesen, Siebe T.; Hanssen, Lars L. P.; Hageman, Jurre; Kampinga, Harm H.; Lubsen, Nicolette H.

    2012-01-01

    Post-heat shock refolding of luciferase requires chaperones. Expression of a dominant negative HSF1 mutant (dnHSF1), which among other effects depletes cells of HSF1-regulated chaperones, blocked post-heat shock refolding of luciferase targeted to the cytoplasm, nucleus, or peroxisomes, while refold

  15. Peroxisome biogenesis and degradation in yeast : A structure/function analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M; Salomons, FA; Van der Klei, IJ

    2000-01-01

    In yeast, peroxisomes are the site of specific catabolic pathways that characteristically include hydrogen peroxide producing oxidases and catalase. During the last 10 years, much progress has been made in unravelling the molecular mechanisms involved in the biogenesis of this organelle. At present,

  16. A vesicle carrier that mediates peroxisome protein traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Sheung Kwan; Yoda, Naofumi; Schekman, Randy

    2010-12-14

    Pex19p, a soluble cytoplasmic transport protein, is required for the traffic of the peroxisomal membrane proteins Pex3p and Pex15p from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the peroxisome. We documented Pex15p traffic from the ER using a chimeric protein containing a C-terminal glycosylation acceptor peptide. Pex15Gp expressed in wild-type yeast cells is N-glycosylated and functions properly in the peroxisome. In contrast, pex19Δ-mutant cells accumulate the glycoprotein Pex15Gp in the ER. We developed a cell-free preperoxisomal vesicle-budding reaction in which Pex15Gp and Pex3p are packaged into small vesicles in the presence of cytosol, Pex19p, and ATP. Secretory vesicle budding (COPII) detected by the packaging of a SNARE protein (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive attachment protein receptor) occurs in the same incubation but does not depend on Pex19p. Conversely a dominant GTPase mutant Sar1p which inhibits COPII has no effect on Pex3p packaging. Pex15Gp and Pex3p budded vesicles sediment as low-buoyant-density membranes on a Nycodenz gradient and copurify by affinity isolation using native but not Triton X-100-treated budded vesicles. ER-peroxisome transport vesicles appear to rely on a novel budding mechanism requiring Pex19p and additional unknown factors.

  17. Malnutrition-associated liver steatosis and ATP depletion is caused by peroxisomal and mitochondrial dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zutphen, Tim; Ciapaite, Jolita; Bloks, Vincent W.; Ackereley, Cameron; Gerding, Albert; Jurdzinski, Angelika; de Moraes, Roberta Allgayer; Zhang, Ling; Wolters, Justina C.; Bischoff', Rainer; Wanders, Ronald J.; Houten, Sander M.; Bronte-Tinkew, Dana; Shatseva, Tatiana; Lewis, Gary F.; Groen, Albert K.; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Bakker, Barbara M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Kim, Peter K.; Bandsma, Robert H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Severe malnutrition in young children is associated with signs of hepatic dysfunction such as steatosis and hypoalbuminemia, but its etiology is unknown. Peroxisomes and mitochondria play key roles in various hepatic metabolic functions including lipid metabolism and energy produc

  18. FORMATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF PROTEIN COMPLEXES BETWEEN PEROXISOMAL ALCOHOL OXIDASE AND GROEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EVERS, ME; LANGER, T; HARDER, W; HARTL, FU; VEENHUIS, M; Hartl, Franz-Ulrich

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the use of yeast peroxisomal alcohol oxidase (AO) as a model protein for in vitro binding by GroEL. Dilution of denatured AO in neutral buffer leads to aggregation of the protein, which is prevented by the addition of GroEL. Formation of complexes between GroEL and denatured AO was d

  19. Targeting sequences of the two major peroxisomal proteins in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Hans; Didion, Thomas; Thiemann, Astrid; Veenhuis, Marten; Roggenkamp, Rainer

    1992-01-01

    Dihydroxyacetone synthase (DAS) and methanol oxidase (MOX) are the major enzyme constituents of the peroxisomal matrix in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha when grown on methanol as a sole carbon source. In order to characterize their topogenic signals the localization of truncated polyp

  20. TARGETING SEQUENCES OF THE 2 MAJOR PEROXISOMAL PROTEINS IN THE METHYLOTROPHIC YEAST HANSENULA-POLYMORPHA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HANSEN, H; DIDION, T; THIEMANN, A; VEENHUIS, M; ROGGENKAMP, R

    1992-01-01

    Dihydroxyacetone synthase (DAS) and methanol oxidase (MOX) are the major enzyme constituents of the peroxisomal matrix in the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha when grown on methanol as a sole carbon source. In order to characterize their topogenic signals the localization of truncated polyp

  1. Malnutrition-associated liver steatosis and ATP depletion is caused by peroxisomal and mitochondrial dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zutphen, Tim; Ciapaite, Jolita; Bloks, Vincent W.; Ackereley, Cameron; Gerding, Albert; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Allgayer de Moraes, Roberta; Zhang, Ling; Wolters, Justina C; Bischoff, Rainer; Wanders, Ronald J; Houten, Sander M; Bronte-Tinkew, Dana; Shatseva, Tatiana; Lewis, Gary F; Groen, Albert K; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Bakker, Barbara M; Jonker, Johan W; Kim, Peter K; Bandsma, Robert H J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Severe malnutrition in young children is associated with signs of hepatic dysfunction such as steatosis and hypoalbuminemia, but its etiology is unknown. Peroxisomes and mitochondria play key roles in various hepatic metabolic functions including lipid metabolism and energy produc

  2. The N-terminus of amine oxidase of Hansenula polymorpha contains a peroxisomal targeting signal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Klaas Nico; Keizer-Gunnink, Ineke; Pluim, Dick; Harder, Willem; AB, Geert; Veenhuis, Marten

    1995-01-01

    Here we describe the identification of the targeting sequence of peroxisomal amine oxidase (AMO) of H. polymorpha. Deletion analysis revealed that essential targeting information is located within the extreme N-terminal 16 amino acids. Moreover, this sequence can direct a reporter protein to the per

  3. Positive selection of novel peroxisome biogenesis-defective mutants of the yeast Pichia pastoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Monique A.; Waterham, Hans R.; Ksheminska, Galyna P.; Fayura, Liubov R.; Cereghino, Joan Lin; Stasyk, Oleh V.; Veenhuis, Marten; Kulachkovsky, Aleksander R.; Sibirny, Andrei A.; Cregg, James M.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed two novel schemes for the direct selection of peroxisome-biogenesis-defective (pex) mutants of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. Both schemes take advantage of our observation that methanol-induced pex mutants contain little or no alcohol oxidase (AOX) activity. AOX is a pe

  4. Epidermis-type lipoxygenase 3 regulates adipocyte differentiation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenborg, Philip; Jørgensen, Claus; Petersen, Rasmus K;

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is essential for adipogenesis. Although several fatty acids and their derivatives are known to bind and activate PPAR gamma, the nature of the endogenous ligand(s) promoting the early stages of adipocyte differenti...

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta activation leads to increased transintestinal cholesterol efflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrins, Carlos L. J.; van der Velde, Astrid E.; van den Oever, Karin; Levels, Johannes H. M.; Huet, Stephane; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPAR delta) is involved in regulation of energy homeostasis. Activation of PPAR delta markedly increases fecal neutral sterol secretion, the last step in reverse cholesterol transport. This phenomenon can neither be explained by increased hepatobilia

  6. Ethanol metabolism in a peroxisome-deficient mutant of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulter, G.J.; Klei, I.J. van der; Schanstra, J.P.; Harder, W.; Veenhuis, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes ethanol metabolism in a peroxisome-deficient (PER) mutant of Hansenula polymorpha. The PER mutant was able to use ethanol as sole-carbon source but showed reduced growth rates compared to wild-type cells together with a reduced rate of ethanol utilization under µmax conditions.

  7. p24 proteins play a role in peroxisome proliferation in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurbatova, Elena; Otzen, Marleen; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2009-01-01

    Emp24 is a member of the p24 protein family, which was initially localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and COP vesicles, but has recently shown to be associated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisomes as well. Using cell fractionation and electron- and fluorescence microscopy, we show that

  8. Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) regulation in cardiac metabolism and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Azzouzi, H.

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear receptor family of ligand activated transcription factors and consist of the three isoforms, PPAR, PPAR/ and PPAR. Considerable evidence has established the importance of PPARs in myocardial lipid homeostasis and car

  9. Differential Roles of Arabidopsis Dynamin-Related Proteins DRP3A,DRP3B,and DRP5B in Organelle Division

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyaw Aung; Jianping Hu

    2012-01-01

    Dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) are key components of the organelle division machineries,functioning as molecular scissors during the fission process.In Arabidopsis,DRP3A and DRP3B are shared by peroxisomal and mitochondrial division,whereas the structurally-distinct DRP5B (ARC5) protein is involved in the division of chloroplasts and peroxisomes.Here,we further investigated the roles of DRP3A,DRP3B,and DRP5B in organelle division and plant development.Despite DRP5B's lack of stable association with mitochondria,drp5B mutants show defects in mitochondrial division.The drp3A-2 drp3B-2 drp5B-2 triple mutant exhibits enhanced mitochondrial division phenotypes over drp3A-2 drp3B-2,but its peroxisomal morphology and plant growth phenotypes resemble those of the double mutant.We further demonstrated that DRP3A and DRP3B form a supercomplex in vivo,in which DRP3A is the major component,yet DRP5B is not a constituent of this complex.We thus conclude that DRP5B participates in the division of three types of organelles in Arabidopsis,acting independently of the DRP3 complex.Our findings will help elucidate the precise composition of the DRP3 complex at organelle division sites,and will be instrumental to studies aimed at understanding how the same protein mediates the morphogenesis of distinct organelles that are linked by metabolism.

  10. Zinc oxide nanoparticles affect biomass accumulation and photosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping eWang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dramatic increase in the use of nanoparticles (NPs in a variety of applications greatly increased the likelihood of the release of NPs into the environment. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs are among the most commonly used NPs, and it has been shown that ZnO NPs were harmful to several different plants. We report here the effects of ZnO NPs exposure on biomass accumulation and photosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We found that 200 and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treatments reduced Arabidopsis growth by ~20% and 80%, respectively, in comparison to the control. Pigments measurement showed Chlorophyll a and b contents were reduced more than 50%, whereas carotenoid contents remain largely unaffected in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated Arabidopsis plants. Consistent with this, net rate of photosynthesis, leaf stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration and transpiration rate were all reduced more than 50% in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that expression levels of chlorophyll synthesis genes including CHLOROPHYLL A OXYGENASE (CAO, CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLG, COPPER RESPONSE DEFECT 1 (CRD1, MAGNESIUM-PROTOPORPHYRIN IX METHYLTRANSFERASE (CHLM and MG-CHELATASE SUBUNIT D (CHLD, and photosystem structure gene PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT D-2 (PSAD2, PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT E-2 (PSAE2, PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAK and PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAN were reduced about 5-fold in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. On the other hand, elevated expression, though to different degrees, of several carotenoids synthesis genes including GERANYLGERANYL PYROPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 6 (GGPS6, PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY PHYTOENE DESATURASE (PDS, and ZETA-CAROTENE DESATURASE (ZDS were observed in ZnO NPs treated plants. Taken together, these results suggest that toxicity effects of ZnO NPs observed in Arabidopsis was likely due to the inhibition of the expression of chlorophyll synthesis genes and photosystem structure genes, which results in the inhibition of

  11. Leaf segmentation in plant phenotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharr, Hanno; Minervini, Massimo; French, Andrew P.; Klukas, Christian; Kramer, David M.; Liu, Xiaoming; Luengo, Imanol; Pape, Jean Michel; Polder, Gerrit; Vukadinovic, Danijela; Yin, Xi; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.

    2016-01-01

    Image-based plant phenotyping is a growing application area of computer vision in agriculture. A key task is the segmentation of all individual leaves in images. Here we focus on the most common rosette model plants, Arabidopsis and young tobacco. Although leaves do share appearance and shape cha

  12. Three-dimensional patterns of cell division and expansion throughout the development of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalve, Shweta; Fotschki, Joanna; Beeckman, Tom; Vissenberg, Kris; Beemster, Gerrit T S

    2014-12-01

    Variations in size and shape of multicellular organs depend on spatio-temporal regulation of cell division and expansion. Here, cell division and expansion rates were quantified relative to the three spatial axes in the first leaf pair of Arabidopsis thaliana. The results show striking differences in expansion rates: the expansion rate in the petiole is higher than in the leaf blade; expansion rates in the lateral direction are higher than longitudinal rates between 5 and 10 days after stratification, but become equal at later stages of leaf blade development; and anticlinal expansion co-occurs with, but is an order of magnitude slower than periclinal expansion. Anticlinal expansion rates also differed greatly between tissues: the highest rates occurred in the spongy mesophyll and the lowest in the epidermis. Cell division rates were higher and continued for longer in the epidermis compared with the palisade mesophyll, causing a larger increase of palisade than epidermal cell area over the course of leaf development. The cellular dynamics underlying the effect of shading on petiole length and leaf thickness were then investigated. Low light reduced leaf expansion rates, which was partly compensated by increased duration of the growth phase. Inversely, shading enhanced expansion rates in the petiole, so that the blade to petiole ratio was reduced by 50%. Low light reduced leaf thickness by inhibiting anticlinal cell expansion rates. This effect on cell expansion was preceded by an effect on cell division, leading to one less layer of palisade cells. The two effects could be uncoupled by shifting plants to contrasting light conditions immediately after germination. This extended kinematic analysis maps the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of cell division and expansion, providing a framework for further research to understand the molecular regulatory mechanisms involved.

  13. Cystein-specific ubiquitination protects the peroxisomal import receptor Pex5p against proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzkopff, Benjamin; Platta, Harald W; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2015-05-14

    Peroxisomal matrix protein import is mediated by dynamic import receptors, which cycle between the peroxisomal membrane and the cytosol. Proteins with a type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) are bound by the import receptor Pex5p in the cytosol and guided to the peroxisomal membrane. After cargo translocation into the peroxisomal matrix, the receptor is released from the membrane back to the cytosol in an ATP-dependent manner by the AAA-type ATPases Pex1p and Pex6p. These mechanoenzymes recognize ubiquitinated Pex5p-species as substrates for membrane extraction. The PTS1-receptor is either polyubiquitinated via peptide-bonds at two certain lysines and results in proteasomal degradation, or monoubiquitinated via a thioester-bond at a conserved cysteine, which enables the recycling of Pex5p and further rounds of matrix protein import. To investigate the physiological relevance of the conserved N-terminal cysteine of Pex5p, the known target amino acids for ubiquitination were substituted by site-directed mutagenesis. In contrast to Pex5pC6A, Pex5pC6K turned out to be functional in PTS1 import and utilization of oleic acid, independent of the lysines at position 18 and 24. In contrast to wild-type Pex5p, Pex5pC6K displays an ubiquitination pattern, similar to the polyubiquitination pattern of Pex4p or Pex22p mutant strains. Moreover, Pex5pC6K displays a significantly reduced steady-state level when the deubiquitination enzyme Ubp15p is missing. Thus, our results indicate that not the cysteine residue but the position of ubiquitination is important for Pex5p function. The presence of the cysteine prevents polyubiquitination and rapid degradation of Pex5p.

  14. Involvement of the Phospholipid Sterol Acyltransferase1 in Plant Sterol Homeostasis and Leaf Senescence1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier-Navé, Pierrette; Berna, Anne; Noiriel, Alexandre; Compagnon, Vincent; Carlsson, Anders S.; Banas, Antoni; Stymne, Sten; Schaller, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Genes encoding sterol ester-forming enzymes were recently identified in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome. One belongs to a family of six members presenting homologies with the mammalian Lecithin Cholesterol Acyltransferases. The other one belongs to the superfamily of Membrane-Bound O-Acyltransferases. The physiological functions of these genes, Phospholipid Sterol Acyltransferase1 (PSAT1) and Acyl-CoA Sterol Acyltransferase1 (ASAT1), respectively, were investigated using Arabidopsis mutants. Sterol ester content decreased in leaves of all mutants and was strongly reduced in seeds from plants carrying a PSAT1-deficient mutation. The amount of sterol esters in flowers was very close to that of the wild type for all lines studied. This indicated further functional redundancy of sterol acylation in Arabidopsis. We performed feeding experiments in which we supplied sterol precursors to psat1-1, psat1-2, and asat1-1 mutants. This triggered the accumulation of sterol esters (stored in cytosolic lipid droplets) in the wild type and the asat1-1 lines but not in the psat1-1 and psat1-2 lines, indicating a major contribution of the PSAT1 in maintaining free sterol homeostasis in plant cell membranes. A clear biological effect associated with the lack of sterol ester formation in the psat1-1 and psat1-2 mutants was an early leaf senescence phenotype. Double mutants lacking PSAT1 and ASAT1 had identical phenotypes to psat1 mutants. The results presented here suggest that PSAT1 plays a role in lipid catabolism as part of the intracellular processes at play in the maintenance of leaf viability during developmental aging. PMID:19923239

  15. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  16. Increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activity reduces imatinib uptake and efficacy in chronic myeloid leukemia mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jueqiong; Lu, Liu; Kok, Chung H; Saunders, Verity A; Goyne, Jarrad M; Dang, Phuong; Leclercq, Tamara M; Hughes, Timothy P; White, Deborah L

    2017-02-02

    Imatinib is actively transported by OCT-1 influx transporter, and low OCT-1 activity in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia blood mononuclear cells is significantly associated with poor molecular response to imatinib. Here we report that, in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia mononuclear cells and BCR-ABL1+ cell lines, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (GW1929, rosiglitazone, pioglitazone) significantly decrease OCT-1 activity; conversely, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists (GW9662, T0070907) increase OCT-1 activity. Importantly, these effects can lead to corresponding changes in sensitivity to Bcr-Abl kinase inhibition. Results were confirmed in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-transduced K562 cells. Furthermore, we identified a strong negative correlation between OCT-1 activity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma transcriptional activity in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia patients (n=84; preceptor gamma activation has a negative impact on the intracellular uptake of imatinib and consequent Bcr-Abl kinase inhibition. The inter-patient variability of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation likely accounts for the heterogeneity observed in patient OCT-1 activity at diagnosis. Recently, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist pioglitazone was reported to act synergistically with imatinib targeting the residual chronic myeloid leukemia stem cell pool. Our findings suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma ligands have differential effects on circulating mononuclear cells compared to stem cells. Since the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation on imatinib uptake in mononuclear cells may counteract the clinical benefit of this activation in stem cells, caution should be applied when combining these therapies, especially in patients with high peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

  17. [Peroxisomal neurologic diseases and Refsum disease: very long chain fatty acids and phytanic acid as diagnostic markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molzer, B; Stöckler, S; Bernheimer, H

    1992-01-01

    Peroxisomal disorders are genetic metabolic diseases with generalized, multiple, or single functional disturbances of the peroxisome. According to the extent of the functional disturbances 3 groups of diseases can be differentiated: disorders with generalized loss of peroxisomal functions (Zellweger syndrome, ZS; neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, NALD; infantile Refsum's disease), disorders with multiple enzymatic defects (e.g. rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata), and disorders with a single enzymatic defect in the peroxisome, the most important being adrenoleukodystrophy/adrenomyeloneuropathy (ALD/AMN). Adult Refsum's disease, a genetic neurological disorder with phytanic acid accumulation, is due to a mitochondrial enzyme deficiency, but is often considered together with peroxisomal diseases because of phytanic acid (PHYT) accumulation in most peroxisomal diseases. The main clinical and pathological criteria of the major disorders and the biochemical parameters of their differentiation are presented. Elevated levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA) and/or PHYT are the primary diagnostic markers for all peroxisomal disorders and adult Refsum's disease, respectively. Our investigations disclosed 30 ALD/AMN hemizygotes, 16 ALD/AMN heterozygotes, 8 cases of ZS/NALD and 7 patients with adult Refsum's disease. In addition, 15 cases of peroxisomal disorders were confirmed by biochemical investigations in autopsy material. With regard to peroxisomal disorders, therapeutic concepts exist only for ALD/AMN: corticosteroid substitution for adrenal insufficiency, dietary treatment, and bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Adult Refsum's disease can be treated successfully by dietary therapy. In case of dietary treatment and BMT, assay of VLCFA and/or PHYT is important for the biochemical evaluation of these therapies.

  18. Harnessing Yeast Peroxisomes for Biosynthesis of Fatty-Acid-Derived Biofuels and Chemicals with Relieved Side-Pathway Competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Yongjin J.; Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhu, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    to peroxisomes can increase the production of fatty-acid-derived fatty alcohols, alkanes and olefins up to 700%. In addition, we demonstrate that biosynthesis of these chemicals in the peroxisomes results in significantly decreased accumulation of byproducts formed by competing enzymes. We further demonstrate...... environment for biosynthesis. Peroxisomes are cellular organelles where fatty acids are degraded, a process that is inhibited under typical fermentation conditions making them an interesting workhouse for production of fatty-acid-derived molecules. Here, we show that targeting synthetic pathways...

  19. Effect of Plant Growth Regulators on Leaf Number, Leaf Area and Leaf Dry Matter in Grape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahoor Ahmad BHAT

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Influence of phenylureas (CPPU and brassinosteriod (BR along with GA (gibberellic acid were studied on seedless grape vegetative characteristics like leaf number, leaf area and leaf dry matter. Growth regulators were sprayed on the vines either once (7 days after fruit set or 15 days after fruit set or twice (7+15 days after fruit set. CPPU 2 ppm+BR 0.4 ppm+GA 25 ppm produced maximum number of leaves (18.78 while as untreated vines produced least leaf number (16.22 per shoot. Maximum leaf area (129.70 cm2 and dry matter content (26.51% was obtained with higher CPPU (3 ppm and BR (0.4 ppm combination along with GA 25 ppm. Plant growth regulators whether naturally derived or synthetic are used to improve the productivity and quality of grapes. The relatively high value of grapes justifies more expensive inputs. A relatively small improvement in yield or fruit quality can justify the field application of a very costly product. Application of new generation growth regulators like brassinosteroids and phenylureas like CPPU have been reported to increase the leaf number as well as leaf area and dry matter thereby indirectly influencing the fruit yield and quality in grapes.

  20. An International Bioinformatics Infrastructure to Underpin the Arabidopsis Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    The future bioinformatics needs of the Arabidopsis community as well as those of other scientific communities that depend on Arabidopsis resources were discussed at a pair of recent meetings held by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) and the North American Arabidopsis Steering C...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.2 68418.m07919 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.1 68418.m07918 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.1 68418.m07918 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.4 68418.m07921 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.3 68418.m07920 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.2 68418.m07919 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241761 J065205C18 At5g63090.4 68418.m07921 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-32 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240652 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240652 J023098G11 At5g63090.3 68418.m07920 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries... protein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-13 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105527 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105527 001-127-G05 At5g63090.4 LOB domain protein / lateral organ boundaries prot...ein (LOB) identical to LOBa [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:17484100, SP|Q9FML4 LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES protein {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-52 ...

  10. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR…

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240730 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240730 J043030K09 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 2e-11 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288052 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288052 J075151I09 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 6e-14 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240911 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240911 J065037E05 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 4e-22 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241119 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241119 J065094C22 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 2e-13 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243149 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243149 J100032I21 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 7e-12 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241581 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241581 J065181K09 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 4e-15 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287479 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287479 J043023O14 At2g32440.1 68415.m03963 ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase, putati...ve / cytochrome P450, putative identical to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase / cytochrome P450 CYP88A (GI:1302...1856) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to ent-kaurenoic acid hydroxylase [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:13021853 1e-17 ...

  18. Reference: 631 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ggest that atRZ-1a has a negative impact on seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis under salt o...binding protein, atRZ-1a, has a negative impact on seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis thali

  19. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3528 Section 29.3528 Agriculture... Type 95) § 29.3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is affected to some extent by the size and shrinkage of the veins or fibers (See...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface...

  1. Disruption of Arabidopsis CHY1 Reveals an Important Role of Metabolic Status in Plant Cold Stress Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hai Dong; Bethany K. Zolman; Bonnie Bartel; Byeong-ha Lee; Becky Stevenson; Manu Agarwal; Jian-Kang Zhu

    2009-01-01

    To study cold signaling, we screened for Arabidopsis mutants with altered cold-induced transcription of a firefly luciferase reporter gene driven by the CBF3 promoter (CBF3-LUC). One mutant, chyl-10, displayed reduced cold-induction of CBF3-LUC luminescence. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that expression of endogenous CBFs also was reduced in the chy1 mutant, chyl-10 mutant plants are more sensitive to freezing treatment than wild-type after cold acclimation. Both the wild-type and chy1 mutant plants are sensitive to darkness-induced starvation at warm temperatures, although chy1 plants are slightly more sensitive. This dark-sensitivity is suppressed by cold temperature in the wildtype but not in chy1. Constitutive CBF3 expression partially rescues the sensitivity of chy1-10 plants to dark treatment in the cold. The chy1 mutant accumulates higher levels of reactive oxygen species, and application of hydrogen peroxide can reduce cold-induction of CBF3-LUC in wild-type. Map-based cloning of the gene defective in the mutant revealed a nonsense mutation in CHY1, which encodes a peroxisomal β-hydroxyisobutyryl (HIBYL)-CoA hydrolase needed for valine catabolism and fatty acid β-oxidation. Our results suggest a role for peroxisomal metabolism in cold stress signaling, and plant tolerance to cold stress and darkness-induced starvation.

  2. Genetics of Ophraella leaf beetles

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal is to collect samples of each species of Ophraella leaf beetle encountered, not to exceed 50 specimens per species, for genetic analysis using DNA...

  3. Agave Americana Leaf Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Hulle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental problems, the problem of waste disposal and the depletion of non-renewable resources have stimulated the use of green materials compatible with the environment to reduce environmental impacts. Therefore, there is a need to design products by using natural resources. Natural fibers seem to be a good alternative since they are abundantly available and there are a number of possibilities to use all the components of a fiber-yielding crop; one such fiber-yielding plant is Agave Americana. The leaves of this plant yield fibers and all the parts of this plant can be utilized in many applications. The “zero-waste” utilization of the plant would enable its production and processing to be translated into a viable and sustainable industry. Agave Americana fibers are characterized by low density, high tenacity and high moisture absorbency in comparison with other leaf fibers. These fibers are long and biodegradable. Therefore, we can look this fiber as a sustainable resource for manufacturing and technical applications. Detailed discussion is carried out on extraction, characterization and applications of Agave Americana fiber in this paper.

  4. Why do leaf-tying caterpillars abandon their leaf ties?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Sliwinski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Leaf-tying caterpillars act as ecosystem engineers by building shelters between overlapping leaves, which are inhabited by other arthropods. Leaf-tiers have been observed to leave their ties and create new shelters (and thus additional microhabitats, but the ecological factors affecting shelter fidelity are poorly known. For this study, we explored the effects of resource limitation and occupant density on shelter fidelity and assessed the consequences of shelter abandonment. We first quantified the area of leaf material required for a caterpillar to fully develop for two of the most common leaf-tiers that feed on white oak, Quercus alba. On average, Psilocorsis spp. caterpillars consumed 21.65 ± 0.67 cm2 leaf material to complete development. We also measured the area of natural leaf ties found in a Maryland forest, to determine the distribution of resources available to caterpillars in situ. Of 158 natural leaf ties examined, 47% were too small to sustain an average Psilocorsis spp. caterpillar for the entirety of its development. We also manipulated caterpillar densities within experimental ties on potted trees to determine the effects of cohabitants on the likelihood of a caterpillar to leave its tie. We placed 1, 2, or 4 caterpillars in ties of a standard size and monitored the caterpillars twice daily to track their movement. In ties with more than one occupant, caterpillars showed a significantly greater propensity to leave their tie, and left sooner and at a faster rate than those in ties as single occupants. To understand the consequences of leaf tie abandonment, we observed caterpillars searching a tree for a site to build a shelter in the field. This is a risky behavior, as 17% of the caterpillars observed died while searching for a shelter site. Caterpillars that successfully built a shelter traveled 110 ± 20 cm and took 28 ± 7 min to find a suitable site to build a shelter. In conclusion, leaf-tying caterpillars must frequently

  5. A CURLY LEAF homologue controls both vegetative and reproductive development of tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boureau, L; How-Kit, A; Teyssier, E; Drevensek, S; Rainieri, M; Joubès, J; Stammitti, L; Pribat, A; Bowler, C; Hong, Y; Gallusci, P

    2016-03-01

    The Enhancer of Zeste Polycomb group proteins, which are encoded by a small gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana, participate to the control of plant development. In the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), these proteins are encoded by three genes (SlEZ1, SlEZ2 and SlEZ3) that display specific expression profiles. Using a gene specific RNAi strategy, we demonstrate that repression of SlEZ2 correlates with a general reduction of H3K27me3 levels, indicating that SlEZ2 is part of an active PRC2 complex. Reduction of SlEZ2 gene expression impacts the vegetative development of tomato plants, consistent with SlEZ2 having retained at least some of the functions of the Arabidopsis CURLY LEAF (CLF) protein. Notwithstanding, we observed significant differences between transgenic SlEZ2 RNAi tomato plants and Arabidopsis clf mutants. First, we found that reduced SlEZ2 expression has dramatic effects on tomato fruit development and ripening, functions not described in Arabidopsis for the CLF protein. In addition, repression of SlEZ2 has no significant effect on the flowering time or the control of flower organ identity, in contrast to the Arabidopsis clf mutation. Taken together, our results are consistent with a diversification of the function of CLF orthologues in plants, and indicate that although partly conserved amongst plants, the function of EZ proteins need to be newly investigated for non-model plants because they might have been recruited to specific developmental processes.

  6. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 7490 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tivation tagging line) Z023307_obs_6 rosette leaf:present in greater numbers in organism http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u21i AT3G04030|AT3G04040|AT3G04050

  7. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 12627 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tivation tagging line) Z030533_obs_4 rosette leaf:present in greater numbers in organism http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u21i AT1G27580|AT1G27590|AT1G27595

  8. Association between peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gene single nucleotide polymorphisms and arterial stiffness in adult Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许如意

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR)and arterial stiffness in adult Chinese population(>50 years).Methods

  9. Sulfonylureas and glinides exhibit peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activity: A combined virtual screening and biological assay approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarsi, M.; Podvinec, M.; Roth, A.; Hug, H.; Kersten, A.H.; Albrecht, H.; Schwede, T.; Meyer, U.A.; Rucker, C.

    2007-01-01

    Most drugs currently employed in the treatment of type 2 diabetes either target the sulfonylurea receptor stimulating insulin release (sulfonylureas, glinides), or target the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) improving insulin resistance (thiazolidinediones). Our work shows that sulf

  10. Overexpression of the poplar NF-YB7 transcription factor confers drought tolerance and improves water-use efficiency in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Tang, Sha; An, Yi; Zheng, Dong-Chao; Xia, Xin-Li; Yin, Wei-Lun

    2013-11-01

    Water deficit is a serious environmental factor limiting the growth and productivity of plants worldwide. Improvement of drought tolerance and efficient water use are significant strategies to overcome this dilemma. In this study, a drought-responsive transcription factor, nuclear factor Y subunit B 7 (PdNF-YB7), induced by osmotic stress (PEG6000) and abscisic acid, was isolated from fast-growing poplar clone NE-19 [Populus nigra × (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra)]. Ectopic overexpression of PdNF-YB7 (oxPdB7) in Arabidopsis enhanced drought tolerance and whole-plant and instantaneous leaf water-use efficiency (WUE, the ratio of biomass produced to water consumed). Overexpressing lines had an increase in germination rate and root length and decrease in water loss and displayed higher photosynthetic rate, instantaneous leaf WUE, and leaf water potential to exhibit enhanced drought tolerance under water scarcity. Additionally, overexpression of PdNF-YB7 in Arabidopsis improved whole-plant WUE by increasing carbon assimilation and reducing transpiration with water abundance. These drought-tolerant, higher WUE transgenic Arabidopsis had earlier seedling establishment and higher biomass than controls under normal and drought conditions. In contrast, Arabidopsis mutant nf-yb3 was more sensitive to drought stress with lower WUE. However, complementation analysis indicated that complementary lines (nf-yb3/PdB7) had almost the same drought response and WUE as wild-type Col-0. Taken together, these results suggest that PdNF-YB7 positively confers drought tolerance and improves WUE in Arabidopsis; thus it could potentially be used in breeding drought-tolerant plants with increased production even under water deficiency.

  11. Rice blast fungus (Magnaporthe oryzae) infects Arabidopsis via a mechanism distinct from that required for the infection of rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju-Young; Jin, Jianming; Lee, Yin-Won; Kang, Seogchan; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2009-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes rice (Oryza sativa) blast. Although M. oryzae as a whole infects a wide variety of monocotyledonous hosts, no dicotyledonous plant has been reported as a host. We found that two rice pathogenic strains of M. oryzae, KJ201 and 70-15, interacted differentially with 16 ecotypes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Strain KJ201 infected all ecotypes with varying degrees of virulence, whereas strain 70-15 caused no symptoms in certain ecotypes. In highly susceptible ecotypes, small chlorotic lesions appeared on infected leaves within 3 d after inoculation and subsequently expanded across the affected leaves. The fungus produced spores in susceptible ecotypes but not in resistant ecotypes. Fungal cultures recovered from necrotic lesions caused the same symptoms in healthy plants, satisfying Koch's postulates. Histochemical analyses showed that infection by the fungus caused an accumulation of reactive oxygen species and eventual cell death. Similar to the infection process in rice, the fungus differentiated to form appressorium and directly penetrated the leaf surface in Arabidopsis. However, the pathogenic mechanism in Arabidopsis appears distinct from that in rice; three fungal genes essential for pathogenicity in rice played only limited roles in causing disease symptoms in Arabidopsis, and the fungus seems to colonize Arabidopsis as a necrotroph through the secretion of phytotoxic compounds, including 9,12-octadecadienoic acid. Expression of PR-1 and PDF1.2 was induced in response to infection by the fungus, suggesting the activation of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent signaling pathways. However, the roles of these signaling pathways in defense against M. oryzae remain unclear. In combination with the wealth of genetic and genomic resources available for M. oryzae, this newly established pathosystem allows comparison of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying

  12. The Arabidopsis KINβγ Subunit of the SnRK1 Complex Regulates Pollen Hydration on the Stigma by Mediating the Level of Reactive Oxygen Species in Pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin-Qi; Liu, Chang Zhen; Li, Dan Dan; Zhao, Ting Ting; Li, Fei; Jia, Xiao Na; Zhao, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Pollen-stigma interactions are essential for pollen germination. The highly regulated process of pollen germination includes pollen adhesion, hydration, and germination on the stigma. However, the internal signaling of pollen that regulates pollen-stigma interactions is poorly understood. KINβγ is a plant-specific subunit of the SNF1-related protein kinase 1 complex which plays important roles in the regulation of plant development. Here, we showed that KINβγ was a cytoplasm- and nucleus-localized protein in the vegetative cells of pollen grains in Arabidopsis. The pollen of the Arabidopsis kinβγ mutant could not germinate on stigma, although it germinated normally in vitro. Further analysis revealed the hydration of kinβγ mutant pollen on the stigma was compromised. However, adding water to the stigma promoted the germination of the mutant pollen in vivo, suggesting that the compromised hydration of the mutant pollen led to its defective germination. In kinβγ mutant pollen, the structure of the mitochondria and peroxisomes was destroyed, and their numbers were significantly reduced compared with those in the wild type. Furthermore, we found that the kinβγ mutant exhibited reduced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in pollen. The addition of H2O2 in vitro partially compensated for the reduced water absorption of the mutant pollen, and reducing ROS levels in pollen by overexpressing Arabidopsis CATALASE 3 resulted in compromised hydration of pollen on the stigma. These results indicate that Arabidopsis KINβγ is critical for the regulation of ROS levels by mediating the biogenesis of mitochondria and peroxisomes in pollen, which is required for pollen-stigma interactions during pollination.

  13. Expression of the Salmonella spp. virulence factor SifA in yeast alters Rho1 activity on peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinh, Dani B N; Ko, Dennis C; Rachubinski, Richard A; Aitchison, John D; Miller, Samuel I

    2010-10-15

    The Salmonella typhimurium effector protein SifA regulates the assembly and tubulation of the Salmonella phagosome. SifA localizes to the phagosome and interacts with the membrane via its prenylated tail. SifA is a structural homologue of another bacterial effector that acts as a GTP-exchange factor for Rho family GTPases and can bind GDP-RhoA. When coexpressed with a bacterial lipase that is activated by RhoA, SifA can induce tubulation of mammalian endosomes. In an effort to develop a genetic system to study SifA function, we expressed SifA and characterized its activity in yeast. GFP-SifA predominantly localized to yeast peroxisomal membranes. Under peroxisome-inducing conditions, GFP-SifA reduced the number of free peroxisomes and promoted the formation of large peroxisomes with membrane invaginations. GFP-SifA activity depended on the recruitment to peroxisomes of wild-type Rho1p and Pex25p, a receptor for Rho1p. GFP-SifA could also rescue the actin organization defects in pex25Δ and rho1 mutants, suggesting that SifA may recruit and potentiate Rho1p activity. We reexamined the distribution of GFP-SifA in mammalian cells and found the majority colocalizing with LAMP1-positive compartment and not with the peroxisomal marker PMP70. Together, these data suggest that SifA may use a similar mode of action via Rho proteins to alter yeast peroxisomal and mammalian endosomal membranes. Further definition of SifA activity on yeast peroxisomes could provide more insight into its role in regulating host membrane dynamics and small GTPases.

  14. Genetic Variation and Divergence of Genes Involved in Leaf Adaxial-abaxial Polarity Establishment in Brassica rapa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianli eLiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in leaf adaxial–abaxial (ad-ab polarity are one of the main factors that are responsible for leaf curvature. In Chinese cabbage, to form a leafy head, leaf incurvature is an essential prerequisite. Identifying ad-ab patterning genes and investigating its genetic variations will facilitate in elucidating the mechanism underlying leaf incurvature during head formation. In the present study we conducted comparative genomic analysis of the identification of 45 leaf ad-ab patterning genes in Brassica rapa based on 26 homologs in Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that these genes underwent expansion and were retained after whole genome triplication (WGT. We also assessed the nucleotide diversity and selection footprints of these 45 genes in a collection of 94 Brassica rapa accessions that were composed of heading and non-heading morphotypes. Six of the 45 genes showed significant negative Tajima’s D indices and nucleotide diversity reduction in heading accessions compared to that in non-heading accessions, indicating that these underwent purifying selection. Further testing of the BrARF3.1 gene, which was one of the selection signals from a larger collection, confirmed that purifying selection did occur. Our results provide genetic evidence that ad-ab patterning genes are involved in leaf incurvature that is associated in the formation of a leafy head, as well as promote an understanding of the genetic mechanism underlying leafy head formation in Chinese cabbage.

  15. Identification of peroxisome-proliferator responsive element in the mouse HSL gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Yumie; Kanaya, Tomoka; Horino, Yoko

    2007-01-12

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis in adipose tissue. Several studies suggest that protein phosphorylation regulates the HSL enzymatic activity. On the other hand, the precise mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of the HSL gene remains to be elucidated. Here, we identified a functional peroxisome-proliferator responsive element (PPRE) in the mouse HSL promoter by reporter assay in CV-1 cells using serial deletion and point mutants of the 5'-flanking region. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed that both peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPARgamma) and retinoid X receptor (RXRalpha) interacted with the region. Binding of the PPARgamma/RXRalpha heterodimer to the PPRE sequence was also confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. These results indicate that the HSL gene is transcriptionally regulated by PPARgamma/RXRalpha heterodimer, and suggest that a cis-acting element regulates the HSL gene expression.

  16. Infantile Refsum disease: an inherited peroxisomal disorder. Comparison with Zellweger syndrome and neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poll-The, B T; Saudubray, J M; Ogier, H A; Odièvre, M; Scotto, J M; Monnens, L; Govaerts, L C; Roels, F; Cornelis, A; Schutgens, R B

    1987-09-01

    Three patients affected by infantile Refsum disease are described with mental retardation, minor facial dysmorphia, chorioretinopathy, sensorineural hearing deficit, hepatomegaly, failure to thrive and hypocholesterolaemia. Initially, only an accumulation of phytanic acid was thought to be present. More recent findings showed a biochemical profile very similar to that found in classical Zellweger syndrome or neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. Morphologically typical peroxisomes were absent in the liver. All three disorders are associated with multiple peroxisomal dysfunction. Because of these similarities pertinent clinical data of our three patients are compared with those of reported patients diagnosed as having infantile Refsum disease, neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy or Zellweger syndrome who survived for several years. Attention is drawn to the difference in severity of clinical features, ranging from infantile Refsum's disease to neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy and, finally, to Zellweger syndrome.

  17. Jasmonate Signal Pathway in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yi Shan; Zhi-Long Wang; Daoxin Xie

    2007-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs), which include jasmonic acid and its cyclopentane derivatives are synthesized from the octadecanoid pathway and widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. JAs modulate the expression of numerous genes and mediate responses to stress, wounding, insect attack, pathogen infection, and UV damage. They also affect a variety of processes in many plant developmental processes. The JA signal pathway involves two important events: the biosynthesis of JA and the transduction of JA signal. Several important Arabidopsis mutants in jasmonate signal pathway were described in this review.

  18. Isozymes of Superoxide Dismutase in Mitochondria and Peroxisomes Isolated from Petals of Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) during Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droillard, M J; Paulin, A

    1990-11-01

    The balance between reactions involving free radicals and processes which ameliorate their effect plays an important role in the regulation of plant senescence. In this study a method was developed to isolate peroxisomes and mitochondria from carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L. cv Ember) petals. Based on electron microscopy and marker enzyme levels, the proportion of peroxisomes to mitochondria increases during senescence. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) content of these fractions was examined. Mitochondria and peroxisomes were shown to contain two electrophoretically distinct SODs, a manganese-, and an ironcontaining SOD. The Mn- and Fe-SOD were found to have relative molecular weights of 75,000 and 48,000 and isoelectric points of 4.85 and 5.00, respectively. The presence of a Fe-SOD in mitochondria and peroxisomes is unique because this enzyme is usually located in chloroplasts. The activity of these two isoenzymes decreased during senescence in mitochondria but remained high in peroxisomes from senescent tissue. It is suggested that peroxisomes play a particular role in the process of senescence.

  19. Immunocytochemical localization of L-alpha-hydroxyacid oxidase in dense bar of dumb-bell-shaped peroxisomes of monkey kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, S; Hashimoto, T

    1995-07-01

    Localization of the B of L-alpha hydroxyacid oxidase (HOX-B) in monkey kidney peroxisomes was investigated by immunoelectron microscopic techniques. Kidneys of Japanese monkeys, Macaca fuscata, were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde + 0.25% glutaraldehyde and embedded in LR White resin. Thin sections were stained for HOX-B and catalase by the immunogold technique. HOX-B was localized in the marginal plates of normal peroxisomes and the dense bar of dumb-bell-shaped peroxisomes. Catalase was detected in the matrix of normal peroxisomes and in the terminal dilatations of dumb-bell-shaped peroxisomes. There were no gold particles indicating presence of catalase associated with the marginal plates or with the dense bars. Immunoblot analysis of monkey kidney homogenate showed that HOX-B has a molecular mass of 42 kDa that was slightly larger than that of rat kidney HOX-B (39 kDa). The results show that the dense bar of dumb-bell-shaped peroxisomes in monkey kidney is composed of at least HOX-B and is a variation of the marginal plates.

  20. Isolation of protoplasts from tissues of 14-day-old seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zhiyang; Jung, Ha-Il; Vatamaniuk, Olena K

    2009-08-17

    Protoplasts are plant cells that have had their cell walls enzymatically removed. Isolation of protoplasts from different plant tissues was first reported more than 40 years ago and has since been adapted to study a variety of cellular processes, such as subcellular localization of proteins, isolation of intact organelles and targeted gene-inactivation by double stranded RNA interference (RNAi). Most of the protoplast isolation protocols use leaf tissues of mature Arabidopsis (e.g. 35-day-old plants). We modified existing protocols by employing 14-day-old Arabidopsis seedlings. In this procedure, one gram of 14-day-old seedlings yielded 5 10(6)-10(7) protoplasts that remain intact at least 96 hours. The yield of protoplasts from seedlings is comparable with preparations from leaves of mature Arabidopsis, but instead of 35-36 days, isolation of protoplasts is completed in 15 days. This allows decreasing the time and growth chamber space that are required for isolating protoplasts when mature plants are used, and expedites the downstream studies that require intact protoplasts.

  1. SUPPRESSOR OF APICAL DOMINANCE1 of Sporisorium reilianum Modulates Inflorescence Branching Architecture in Maize and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghareeb, Hassan; Drechsler, Frank; Löfke, Christian; Teichmann, Thomas; Schirawski, Jan

    2015-12-01

    The biotrophic fungus Sporisorium reilianum causes head smut of maize (Zea mays) after systemic plant colonization. Symptoms include the formation of multiple female inflorescences at subapical nodes of the stalk because of loss of apical dominance. By deletion analysis of cluster 19-1, the largest genomic divergence cluster in S. reilianum, we identified a secreted fungal effector responsible for S. reilianum-induced loss of apical dominance, which we named SUPPRESSOR OF APICAL DOMINANCE1 (SAD1). SAD1 transcript levels were highly up-regulated during biotrophic fungal growth in all infected plant tissues. SAD1-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins expressed by recombinant S. reilianum localized to the extracellular hyphal space. Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana)-expressing green fluorescent protein-SAD1 displayed an increased number of secondary rosette-leaf branches. This suggests that SAD1 manipulates inflorescence branching architecture in maize and Arabidopsis through a conserved pathway. Using a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid library of S. reilianum-infected maize tissues, we identified potential plant interaction partners that had a predicted function in ubiquitination, signaling, and nuclear processes. Presence of SAD1 led to an increase of the transcript levels of the auxin transporter PIN-FORMED1 in the root and a reduction of the branching regulator TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 in the stalk. This indicates a role of SAD1 in regulation of apical dominance by modulation of branching through increasing transcript levels of the auxin transporter PIN1 and derepression of bud outgrowth.

  2. The ARABIDOPSIS accession Pna-10 is a naturally occurring sng1 deletion mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Bergelson, Joy; Chapple, Clint

    2010-01-01

    Sinapoylmalate is the major sinapate ester found in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana, where it plays an important role in UV-B protection. Metabolic profiling of rosette leaves from 96 Arabidopsis accessions revealed that the Pna-10 accession accumulates sinapoylglucose instead of sinapoylmalate. This unique leaf sinapate ester profile is similar to that of the previously characterized sinapoylglucose accumulator1 (sng1) mutants. SNG1 encodes sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransferase (SMT), a serine carboxypeptidase-like (SCPL) enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of sinapoylglucose to sinapoylmalate. In the reference Columbia genome, the SNG1 gene is located in a cluster of five SCPL genes on Chromosome II. PCR and sequencing analysis of the same genomic region in the Pna-10 accession revealed a 13-kb deletion that eliminates the SNG1 gene (At2g22990) and the gene encoding sinapoylglucose:anthocyanin sinapoyltransferase (SAT) (At2g23000). In addition to its sinapoylmalate-deficient phenotype, and consistent with the loss of SAT, Pna-10 is unable to accumulate sinapoylated anthocyanins. Interestingly, the Pna-17 accession, collected from the same location as Pna-10, has no such deletion. Further analysis of 135 lines collected from the same location as Pna-10 and Pna-17 revealed that four more lines contain the deletion found in Pna-10 accession, suggesting that either the deletion found in Pna-10 is a recent event that has not yet been eliminated through selection or that sinapoylmalate is dispensable for the growth of Arabidopsis under field conditions.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide improves drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana by microRNA expressions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiejie Shen

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is a gasotransmitter and plays an important role in many physiological processes in mammals. Studies of its functions in plants are attracting ever growing interest, for example, its ability to enhance drought resistance in Arabidopsis. A general role of microRNAs (miRNAs in plant adaptive responses to drought stress has thereby increased our interest to delve into the possible interplay between H2S and miRNAs. Our results showed that treating wild type (WT Arabidopsis seedlings with polyethylene glycol 8000 (PEG8000 to simulate drought stress caused an increase in production rate of endogenous H2S; and a significant transcriptional reformation of relevant miRNAs, which were also triggered by exogenous H2S in WT. When lcd mutants (with lower H2S production rate than WT were treated with PEG8000, they showed lower levels of miRNA expression changes than WT. In addition, we detected significant changes in target gene expression of those miRNAs and the corresponding phenotypes in lcd, including less roots, retardation of leaf growth and development and greater superoxide dismutase (SOD activity under drought stress. We thereby conclude that H2S can improve drought resistance through regulating drought associated miRNAs in Arabidopsis.

  4. Natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana as a tool for highlighting differential drought responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumaya Bouchabke

    Full Text Available To test whether natural variation in Arabidopsis could be used to dissect out the genetic basis of responses to drought stress, we characterised a number of accessions. Most of the accessions belong to a core collection that was shown to maximise the genetic diversity captured for a given number of individual accessions in Arabidopsis thaliana. We measured total leaf area (TLA, Electrolyte Leakage (EL, Relative Water Content (RWC, and Cut Rosette Water Loss (CRWL in control and mild water deficit conditions. A Principal Component Analysis revealed which traits explain most of the variation and showed that some accessions behave differently compared to the others in drought conditions, these included Ita-0, Cvi-0 and Shahdara. This study relied on genetic variation found naturally within the species, in which populations are assumed to be adapted to their environment. Overall, Arabidopsis thaliana showed interesting phenotypic variations in response to mild water deficit that can be exploited to identify genes and alleles important for this complex trait.

  5. Natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana as a tool for highlighting differential drought responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchabke, Oumaya; Chang, Fengqi; Simon, Matthieu; Voisin, Roger; Pelletier, Georges; Durand-Tardif, Mylène

    2008-02-27

    To test whether natural variation in Arabidopsis could be used to dissect out the genetic basis of responses to drought stress, we characterised a number of accessions. Most of the accessions belong to a core collection that was shown to maximise the genetic diversity captured for a given number of individual accessions in Arabidopsis thaliana. We measured total leaf area (TLA), Electrolyte Leakage (EL), Relative Water Content (RWC), and Cut Rosette Water Loss (CRWL) in control and mild water deficit conditions. A Principal Component Analysis revealed which traits explain most of the variation and showed that some accessions behave differently compared to the others in drought conditions, these included Ita-0, Cvi-0 and Shahdara. This study relied on genetic variation found naturally within the species, in which populations are assumed to be adapted to their environment. Overall, Arabidopsis thaliana showed interesting phenotypic variations in response to mild water deficit that can be exploited to identify genes and alleles important for this complex trait.

  6. Interaction between Calpain 5, Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta genes: a polygenic approach to obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz Agustín

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Context Obesity is a multifactorial disorder, that is, a disease determined by the combined effect of genes and environment. In this context, polygenic approaches are needed. Objective To investigate the possibility of the existence of a crosstalk between the CALPAIN 10 homologue CALPAIN 5 and nuclear receptors of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors family. Design Cross-sectional, genetic association study and gene-gene interaction analysis. Subjects The study sample comprise 1953 individuals, 725 obese (defined as body mass index ≥ 30 and 1228 non obese subjects. Results In the monogenic analysis, only the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARD gene was associated with obesity (OR = 1.43 [1.04–1.97], p = 0.027. In addition, we have found a significant interaction between CAPN5 and PPARD genes (p = 0.038 that reduces the risk for obesity in a 55%. Conclusion Our results suggest that CAPN5 and PPARD gene products may also interact in vivo.

  7. Pathway Compartmentalization in Peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Produce Versatile Medium Chain Fatty Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiayuan; Stevens, Joseph; Feng, Xueyang

    2016-05-27

    Fatty alcohols are value-added chemicals and important components of a variety of industries, which have a >3 billion-dollar global market annually. Long chain fatty alcohols (>C12) are mainly used in surfactants, lubricants, detergents, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics while medium chain fatty alcohols (C6-C12) could be used as diesel-like biofuels. Microbial production of fatty alcohols from renewable feedstock stands as a promising strategy to enable sustainable supply of fatty alcohols. In this study, we report, for the first time, that medium chain fatty alcohols could be produced in yeast via targeted expression of a fatty acyl-CoA reductase (TaFAR) in the peroxisome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By tagging TaFAR enzyme with peroxisomal targeting signal peptides, the TaFAR could be compartmentalized into the matrix of the peroxisome to hijack the medium chain fatty acyl-CoA generated from the beta-oxidation pathway and convert them to versatile medium chain fatty alcohols (C10 &C12). The overexpression of genes encoding PEX7 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase further improved fatty alcohol production by 1.4-fold. After medium optimization in fed-batch fermentation using glucose as the sole carbon source, fatty alcohols were produced at 1.3 g/L, including 6.9% 1-decanol, 27.5% 1-dodecanol, 2.9% 1-tetradecanol and 62.7% 1-hexadecanol. This work revealed that peroxisome could be engineered as a compartmentalized organelle for producing fatty acid-derived chemicals in S. cerevisiae.

  8. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor A Ligands as Anticancer Drugs Targeting Mitochondrial Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Grabacka, Maja; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cells show metabolic features distinctive from normal tissues, with characteristically enhanced aerobic glycolysis, glutaminolysis and lipid synthesis. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR α) is activated by nutrients (fatty acids and their derivatives) and influences these metabolic pathways acting antagonistically to oncogenic Akt and c-Myc. Therefore PPAR α can be regarded as a candidate target molecule in supplementary anticancer pharmacotherapy as well as dietary ther...

  9. Analysis of functional redundancies within the Arabidopsis TCP transcription factor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danisman, Selahattin; van Dijk, Aalt D J; Bimbo, Andrea; van der Wal, Froukje; Hennig, Lars; de Folter, Stefan; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H

    2013-12-01

    Analyses of the functions of TEOSINTE-LIKE1, CYCLOIDEA, and PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR1 (TCP) transcription factors have been hampered by functional redundancy between its individual members. In general, putative functionally redundant genes are predicted based on sequence similarity and confirmed by genetic analysis. In the TCP family, however, identification is impeded by relatively low overall sequence similarity. In a search for functionally redundant TCP pairs that control Arabidopsis leaf development, this work performed an integrative bioinformatics analysis, combining protein sequence similarities, gene expression data, and results of pair-wise protein-protein interaction studies for the 24 members of the Arabidopsis TCP transcription factor family. For this, the work completed any lacking gene expression and protein-protein interaction data experimentally and then performed a comprehensive prediction of potential functional redundant TCP pairs. Subsequently, redundant functions could be confirmed for selected predicted TCP pairs by genetic and molecular analyses. It is demonstrated that the previously uncharacterized class I TCP19 gene plays a role in the control of leaf senescence in a redundant fashion with TCP20. Altogether, this work shows the power of combining classical genetic and molecular approaches with bioinformatics predictions to unravel functional redundancies in the TCP transcription factor family.

  10. The Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox gene ATHB12 is involved in symptom development caused by geminivirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungan Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Geminiviruses are single-stranded DNA viruses that infect a number of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Arabidopsis is susceptible to infection with the Curtovirus, Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV. Infection of Arabidopsis with BSCTV causes severe symptoms characterized by stunting, leaf curling, and the development of abnormal inflorescence and root structures. BSCTV-induced symptom development requires the virus-encoded C4 protein which is thought to interact with specific plant-host proteins and disrupt signaling pathways important for controlling cell division and development. Very little is known about the specific plant regulatory factors that participate in BSCTV-induced symptom development. This study was conducted to identify specific transcription factors that are induced by BSCTV infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Arabidopsis plants were inoculated with BSCTV and the induction of specific transcription factors was monitored using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. We found that the ATHB12 and ATHB7 genes, members of the homeodomain-leucine zipper family of transcription factors previously shown to be induced by abscisic acid and water stress, are induced in symptomatic tissues of Arabidopsis inoculated with BSCTV. ATHB12 expression is correlated with an array of morphological abnormalities including leaf curling, stunting, and callus-like structures in infected Arabidopsis. Inoculation of plants with a BSCTV mutant with a defective c4 gene failed to induce ATHB12. Transgenic plants expressing the BSCTV C4 gene exhibited increased ATHB12 expression whereas BSCTV-infected ATHB12 knock-down plants developed milder symptoms and had lower ATHB12 expression compared to the wild-type plants. Reporter gene studies demonstrated that the ATHB12 promoter was responsive to BSCTV infection and the highest expression levels were observed in symptomatic tissues where cell cycle genes also were

  11. Reference: 136 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 136 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u15548601i Woodward Andrew...r PEX7 is necessary for peroxisome function and dependent on PEX5. 2 573-83 15548601 2005 Feb Molecular biology of the cell Bartel Bonnie|Woodward Andrew W

  12. Mutations affecting the expression of the MOX gene encoding peroxisomal methanol oxidase in Hansenula polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallini, V; Berardi, E; Strabbioli, R

    2000-11-01

    In this study, aimed at identifying genetic factors acting positively upon the MOX gene, we report the isolation and characterisation of several methanol utilisation-defective (Mut-) mutants of Hansenula polymorpha. These fall into 12 complementation groups, eight of which show significant reductions in alcohol (methanol) oxidase activity in methanol. Three of these groups, identifying the MUT3, MUT5 and MUT10 loci, exhibit extremely low levels of MOX promoter activity, not only in methanol medium, but also during growth in glycerol or methylamine. We suggest that these loci play a significant role in the derepression of the MOX gene expression. One of these genes (MUT10) also seems to be involved in the utilisation of carbon sources other than methanol, and it is apparent that the same gene plays some role in the biogenesis or in the enlargement of the peroxisome. Three other genes (MUT7, MUT8 and MUT9) appear to be involved in peroxisome biogenesis, whereas most other mutants harbour lesions that leave the peroxisome biogenesis and proliferation unaffected.

  13. A class I KNOX gene from the palm species Elaeis guineensis (Arecaceae) is associated with meristem function and a distinct mode of leaf dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouannic, Stefan; Collin, Myriam; Vidal, Benjamin; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Tregear, James W

    2007-01-01

    Class I Knotted-like homeobox (KNOX) transcription factors are important regulators of shoot apical meristem function and leaf morphology by their contribution to dissected leaf development. Palms are of particular interest as they produce dissected leaves generated by a distinct mechanism compared with eudicots. The question addressed here was whether class I KNOX genes might be involved in meristem function and leaf dissection in palms. Here, we characterized the EgKNOX1 gene from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis, Arecaceae) and compared it with available sequences from other plant species using phylogenetic analysis. Gene expression pattern was investigated using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization. Functional analysis was carried out by ectopic expression in Arabidopsis and rice. EgKNOX1 was orthologous to STM from Arabidopsis and to OSH1 from rice. It was expressed in the central zone of both vegetative and reproductive meristems. During leaf development, its expression was associated with plications from which the leaflets originate. Different modes of leaf dissection are seen to involve a similar class of genes to control meristematic activities, which govern the production of dissected morphologies.

  14. Expression of the dspA/E gene of Erwinia amylovora in non-host plant Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Murat Aksoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Erwinia amylovora genome, the hrp gene cluster containing the dspA/E/EB/F operon plays a crucial role in mediating the pathogenicity and the hypersensitive response (HR in the host plant. The role of the dspA/E gene derived from E. amylovora was investigated by monitoring the expression of the β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter system in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana cv. Pri-Gus seedlings. A mutant ΔdspA/E strain of E. amylovora was generated to contain a deletion of the dspA/E gene for the purpose of this study. Two-week-old seedlings of GUS transgenic Arabidopsis were vacuum-infiltrated with the wild-type and the mutant (ΔdspA/E E. amylovora strains. The Arabidopsis seedlings were fixed and stained for GUS activity after 3–5 days following infiltration. The appearance of dense spots with blue staining on the Arabidopsis leaves indicated the typical characteristic of GUS activity. This observation indicated that the wild-type E. amylovora strain had induced a successful and efficient infection on the A. thaliana Pri-Gus leaves. In contrast, there was no visible GUS expression on leaf tissues which were inoculated with the ΔdspA/E mutant E. amylovora strain. These results indicate that the dspA/E gene is required by the bacterial cells to induce HR in non-host plants.

  15. Broad-spectrum acquired resistance in barley induced by the Pseudomonas pathosystem shares transcriptional components with Arabidopsis systemic acquired resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebrook, E H; Creissen, G; McGrann, G R D; Dreos, R; Lamb, C; Boyd, L A

    2012-05-01

    Inducible resistance responses play a central role in the defense of plants against pathogen attack. Acquired resistance (AR) is induced alongside defense toward primary attack, providing broad-spectrum protection against subsequent pathogen challenge. The localization and molecular basis of AR in cereals is poorly understood, in contrast with the well-characterized systemic acquired resistance (SAR) response in Arabidopsis. Here, we use Pseudomonas syringae as a biological inducer of AR in barley, providing a clear frame of reference to the Arabidopsis-P. syringae pathosystem. Inoculation of barley leaf tissue with the nonadapted P. syringae pv. tomato avrRpm1 (PstavrRpm1) induced an active local defense response. Furthermore, inoculation of barley with PstavrRpm1 resulted in the induction of broad-spectrum AR at a distance from the local lesion, "adjacent" AR, effective against compatible isolates of P. syringae and Magnaporthe oryzae. Global transcriptional profiling of this adjacent AR revealed similarities with the transcriptional profile of SAR in Arabidopsis, as well as transcripts previously associated with chemically induced AR in cereals, suggesting that AR in barley and SAR in Arabidopsis may be mediated by analogous pathways.

  16. High throughput selection of novel plant growth regulators: Assessing the translatability of small bioactive molecules from Arabidopsis to crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Furlán, Cecilia; Miranda, Giovanna; Reggiardo, Martín; Hicks, Glenn R; Norambuena, Lorena

    2016-04-01

    Plant growth regulators (PGRs) have become an integral part of agricultural and horticultural practices. Accordingly, there is an increased demand for new and cost-effective products. Nevertheless, the market is limited by insufficient innovation. In this context chemical genomics has gained increasing attention as a powerful approach addressing specific traits. Here is described the successful implementation of a highly specific, sensitive and efficient high throughput screening approach using Arabidopsis as a model. Using a combination of techniques, 10,000 diverse compounds were screened and evaluated for several important plant growth traits including root and leaf growth. The phenotype-based selection allowed the compilation of a collection of putative Arabidopsis growth regulators with a broad range of activities and specificities. A subset was selected for evaluating their bioactivity in agronomically valuable plants. Their validation as growth regulators in commercial species such as tomato, lettuce, carrot, maize and turfgrasses reinforced the success of the screening in Arabidopsis and indicated that small molecules activity can be efficiently translated to commercial species. Therefore, the chemical genomics approach in Arabidopsis is a promising field that can be incorporated in PGR discovery programs and has a great potential to develop new products that can be efficiently used in crops.

  17. Arabidopsis Deficient in Cutin Ferulate encodes a transferase required for feruloylation of ω-hydroxy fatty acids in cutin polyester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Ouellet, Mario; Nafisi, Majse; Baidoo, Edward E K; Benke, Peter; Stranne, Maria; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D; Sakuragi, Yumiko; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2012-02-01

    The cuticle is a complex aliphatic polymeric layer connected to the cell wall and covers surfaces of all aerial plant organs. The cuticle prevents nonstomatal water loss, regulates gas exchange, and acts as a barrier against pathogen infection. The cuticle is synthesized by epidermal cells and predominantly consists of an aliphatic polymer matrix (cutin) and intracuticular and epicuticular waxes. Cutin monomers are primarily C(16) and C(18) unsubstituted, ω-hydroxy, and α,ω-dicarboxylic fatty acids. Phenolics such as ferulate and p-coumarate esters also contribute to a minor extent to the cutin polymer. Here, we present the characterization of a novel acyl-coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent acyl-transferase that is encoded by a gene designated Deficient in Cutin Ferulate (DCF). The DCF protein is responsible for the feruloylation of ω-hydroxy fatty acids incorporated into the cutin polymer of aerial Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) organs. The enzyme specifically transfers hydroxycinnamic acids using ω-hydroxy fatty acids as acyl acceptors and hydroxycinnamoyl-CoAs, preferentially feruloyl-CoA and sinapoyl-CoA, as acyl donors in vitro. Arabidopsis mutant lines carrying DCF loss-of-function alleles are devoid of rosette leaf cutin ferulate and exhibit a 50% reduction in ferulic acid content in stem insoluble residues. DCF is specifically expressed in the epidermis throughout all green Arabidopsis organs. The DCF protein localizes to the cytosol, suggesting that the feruloylation of cutin monomers takes place in the cytoplasm.

  18. Reference: 572 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available et al. 2007 May. Plant J. 50(3):439-51. Although glycine-rich RNA-binding protein 2 (GRP2) has been implicated in plant re...sponses to environmental stresses, the function and importance of GRP2 in stress responses are largely unknown. Here...haliana under high-salinity, cold or osmotic stress. GRP2 affects seed germination of Arabidopsis plants under salt stre...ss, but does not influence seed germination and seedling growth of Arabidopsis plants under osmotic stre...ss. GRP2 accelerates seed germination and seedling growth in Arabidopsis plants under cold stre

  19. Reference: 446 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rk E et al. 2006 Nov. Plant Physiol. 142(3):1004-13. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) QUARTET (QRT) genes are require...d for pollen separation during normal floral development. In qrt mutants, the four products of microsporogenesis re...main fused and pollen grains are released as tetrads. In Arabid...opsis, tetrad analysis in qrt mutants has been used to map all five centromeres, easily distinguish sporophy...tic from gametophytic mutations, and accurately assess crossover interference. Using a combination of forward and re

  20. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 3951 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u13557i ... 11-2511-1: Leaves - dark... green (Ds tagging line) Leaves - dark green (line id:11-2511-1) leaf:dark green http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u82i AT4G00500|AT4G00520

  1. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 5587 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u1861i ... 16-0021-1: Leaves - dark... green (Ds tagging line) Leaves - dark green (line id:16-0021-1) leaf:dark green http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u82i AT2G38740

  2. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 5067 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u14561i ... 15-3777-1: Leaves - dark... green (Ds tagging line) Leaves - dark green (line id:15-3777-1) leaf:dark green http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u82i AT1G21700|AT1G21710

  3. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 12838 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u8389i F29851_T1_Rosette_..._2_pic.jpg F29851_obs_11 (FOX hunting) F29851_obs_11 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  4. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 2459 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u12213i F10349_T1_Rosette...__1_pic.jpg F10349_obs_8 (FOX hunting) F10349_obs_8 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  5. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 12854 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u8402i ... Z040039_obs_4 (Ac...tivation tagging line) Z040039_obs_4 rosette leaf:epinastic http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u25i AT5G11200|AT5G11210

  6. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 2583 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u12325i F24805_T1_Rosette...__1_pic.jpg F24805_obs_11 (FOX hunting) F24805_obs_11 rosette leaf:dark green http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u26i ...

  7. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 3847 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u13463i F07645_T1_Rosette...__4_pic.jpg F07645_obs_4 (FOX hunting) F07645_obs_4 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  8. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 9124 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u5044i S05051_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg S05051_obs_8 (FOX hunting) S05051_obs_8 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  9. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 14124 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u9546i F14424_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg F14424_obs_9 (FOX hunting) F14424_obs_9 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  10. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 14090 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u9515i F27206_T1_Rosette_..._2_pic.jpg F27206_obs_17 (FOX hunting) F27206_obs_17 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  11. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 6031 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u2260i S03609_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg S03609_obs_35 (FOX hunting) S03609_obs_35 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  12. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 9384 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u5279i F13916_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg F13916_obs_7 (FOX hunting) F13916_obs_7 rosette leaf:round http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u19i AT4G34290

  13. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 4451 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u14006i F28001_T1_Rosette...__1_pic.jpg F28001_obs_6 (FOX hunting) F28001_obs_6 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  14. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 4615 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u14154i S00205_T1_Rosette...__1_pic.jpg S00205_obs_6 (FOX hunting) S00205_obs_6 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  15. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 6895 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u3038i F29124_T2_Rosette_..._2_pic.jpg F29124_obs_58 (FOX hunting) F29124_obs_58 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  16. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 11934 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u7575i S06816_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg S06816_obs_3 (FOX hunting) S06816_obs_3 rosette leaf:round http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u19i ...

  17. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 5225 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u1535i F20538_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg F20538_obs_11 (FOX hunting) F20538_obs_11 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  18. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 8594 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u4568i F29105_T1_Rosette_..._3_pic.jpg F29105_obs_7 (FOX hunting) F29105_obs_7 rosette leaf:epinastic http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u25i AT4G38970

  19. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 5421 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u1711i F23918_T1_Rosette_..._2_pic.jpg F23918_obs_4 (FOX hunting) F23918_obs_4 rosette leaf:round http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u19i ...

  20. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 4767 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u14291i F28809_T1_Rosette...__1_pic.jpg F28809_obs_5 (FOX hunting) F28809_obs_5 rosette leaf:decreased width http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u24i ...

  1. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 11912 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u7555i S03712_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg S03712_obs_4 (FOX hunting) S03712_obs_4 rosette leaf:round http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u19i ...

  2. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 1708 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u11538i ... Z035646_obs_6 (A...ctivation tagging line) Z035646_obs_6 leaf:increased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u79i AT4G36610|AT4G36620

  3. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 12724 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u8286i F17918_T2_Rosette_..._7_pic.jpg F17918_obs_122 (FOX hunting) F17918_obs_122 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  4. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 640 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u10577i F12804_T1_Rosette...__1_pic.jpg F12804_obs_5 (FOX hunting) F12804_obs_5 rosette leaf:round http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u19i AT3G04120

  5. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 3852 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u13468i F15325_T1_Rosette...__3_pic.jpg F15325_obs_19 (FOX hunting) F15325_obs_19 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  6. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 3797 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u13418i S02816_T1_Rosette...__2_pic.jpg S02816_obs_19 (FOX hunting) S02816_obs_19 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  7. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 2769 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u12493i S03721_T1_Rosette...__1_pic.jpg S03721_obs_14 (FOX hunting) S03721_obs_14 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  8. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 4941 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u14448i F07209_T1_Rosette...__2_pic.jpg F07209_obs_5 (FOX hunting) F07209_obs_5 rosette leaf:desaturated green http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u27i ...

  9. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 8893 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u4837i F07209_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg F07209_obs_6 (FOX hunting) F07209_obs_6 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  10. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 10496 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u627i F17918_T2_Rosette__...6_pic.jpg F17918_obs_72 (FOX hunting) F17918_obs_72 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  11. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 2008 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u11808i F28809_T1_Rosette...__2_pic.jpg F28809_obs_6 (FOX hunting) F28809_obs_6 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  12. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 6200 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u2412i F09034_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg F09034_obs_5 (FOX hunting) F09034_obs_5 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  13. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 5535 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u1814i F06130_T2_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg F06130_obs_46 (FOX hunting) F06130_obs_46 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  14. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 12685 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u8250i S07639_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg S07639_obs_2 (FOX hunting) S07639_obs_2 rosette leaf:abnormal,shape http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u20i ...

  15. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 10562 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u6339i F07909_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg F07909_obs_6 (FOX hunting) F07909_obs_6 rosette leaf:patchy http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u28i ...

  16. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 11765 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u7422i F22320_T1_Rosette_..._1_pic.jpg F22320_obs_12 (FOX hunting) F22320_obs_12 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  17. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 4000 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u13600i S00908_T1_Rosette...__3_pic.jpg S00908_obs_6 (FOX hunting) S00908_obs_6 rosette leaf:involute http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u29i ...

  18. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 14553 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u9932i F21415_T1_Rosette_..._2_pic.jpg F21415_obs_7 (FOX hunting) F21415_obs_7 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  19. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 129 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u10116i F16207_T1_Rosette...__1_pic.jpg F16207_obs_12 (FOX hunting) F16207_obs_12 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  20. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 13170 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u8688i F16207_T1_Rosette_..._2_pic.jpg F16207_obs_11 (FOX hunting) F16207_obs_11 rosette leaf:decreased size http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u23i ...

  1. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype: 8758 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u1ria143u4715i F12520_T1_Rosette_..._2_pic.jpg F12520_obs_7 (FOX hunting) F12520_obs_7 rosette leaf:round http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria143i/cria143u2ria143u19i ...

  2. Thermal de-acclimation: how permanent are leaf phenotypes when cold-acclimated plants experience warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, Peter A; Pandey, Subedar; Atkin, Owen K

    2010-07-01

    We quantified a broad range of Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0) leaf phenotypes for initially warm-grown (25/20 degrees C day/night) plants that were exposed to cold (5 degrees C) for periods of a few hours to 45 d before being transferred back to the warm, where leaves were allowed to mature. This allowed us to address the following questions: (1) For how long do warm-grown plants have to experience cold before developing leaves become irreversibly cold acclimated? (2) To what extent is the de-acclimation process associated with changes in leaf anatomy and physiology? We show that leaves that experience cold for extended periods during early development exhibit little plasticity in either photosynthesis or respiration, and they do not revert to a warm-associated carbohydrate profile. The eventual expansion rate in the warm was inversely related to the duration of previous cold treatment. Moreover, cold exposure of immature/developing leaves for as little as 5 d resulted in irreversible changes in the morphology of leaves that subsequently matured in the warm, with 15 d cold being sufficient for a permanent alteration of leaf anatomy. Collectively, these results highlight the impact of transitory cold during early leaf development in determining the eventual phenotype of leaves that mature in the warm.

  3. Acetylation of cell wall is required for structural integrity of the leaf surface and exerts a global impact on plant stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nafisi, Majse; Stranne, Maria; Fimognari, Lorenzo;

    2015-01-01

    -dense deposits. A large number of trichomes were collapsed and surface permeability of the leaves was enhanced in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. A massive reprogramming of the transcriptome was observed in rwa2 as compared to the wild type, including a coordinated up-regulation of genes involved in responses...... acetylation is essential for maintaining the structural integrity of leaf epidermis, and that reduction of cell wall acetylation leads to global stress responses in Arabidopsis....

  4. Zinc distribution and speciation in Arabidopsis halleri x Arabidops is lyrata progenies presenting various zinc accumulation capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarret, Geraldine; Willems, Glenda; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Frerot, Helene; Pairis, Sebastien; Geoffroy, Nicolas; Manceau, Alain; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2010-04-08

    - The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the chemical form and localization of zinc (Zn) in plant leaves and their Zn accumulationcapacity. - An interspecific cross between Arabidopsis halleri sp. halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata sp. petrea segregating for Zn accumulation was used. Zinc (Zn) speciation and Zn distribution in the leaves of the parent plants and of selected F1 and F2 progenies were investigated by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques and chemical analyses. - A correlation was observed between the proportion of Zn being in octahedral coordination complexed to organic acids and free in solution (Zn?OAs + Znaq) and Zn content in the leaves. This pool varied between 40percent and 80percent of total leaf Zn depending on the plant studied. Elemental mapping of the leaves revealed different Zn partitioning between the veins and the leaf tissue. The vein : tissue fluorescence ratio was negatively correlated with Zn accumulation. - The higher proportion of Zn?OAs + Znaq and the depletion of the veins in the stronger accumulators are attributed to a higher xylem unloading and vacuolar sequestration in the leaf cells. Elemental distributions in the trichomes were also investigated, and results support the role of carboxyl and⁄ or hydroxyl groups as major Zn ligands in these cells.

  5. Meselect - A Rapid and Effective Method for the Separation of the Main Leaf Tissue Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svozil, Julia; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baerenfaller, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Individual tissues of complex eukaryotic organisms have specific gene expression programs that control their functions. Therefore, tissue-specific molecular information is required to increase our understanding of tissue-specific processes. Established methods in plants to obtain specific tissues or cell types from their organ or tissue context typically require the enzymatic degradation of cell walls followed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) using plants engineered for localized expression of green fluorescent protein. This has facilitated the acquisition of valuable data, mainly on root cell type-specific transcript and protein expression. However, FACS of different leaf cell types is difficult because of chlorophyll autofluorescence that interferes with the sorting process. Furthermore, the cell wall composition is different in each cell type. This results in long incubation times for refractory cell types, and cell sorting itself can take several hours. To overcome these limitations, we developed Meselect (mechanical separation of leaf compound tissues), a rapid and effective method for the separation of leaf epidermal, vascular and mesophyll tissues. Meselect is a novel combination of mechanical separation and rapid protoplasting, which benefits from the unique cell wall composition of the different tissue types. Meselect has several advantages over cell sorting: it does not require expensive equipment such as a cell sorter and does not depend on specific fluorescent reporter lines, the use of blenders as well as the inherent mixing of different cell types and of intact and damaged cells can be avoided, and the time between wounding of the leaf and freezing of the sample is short. The efficacy and specificity of the method to enrich the different leaf tissue types has been confirmed using Arabidopsis leaves, but it has also been successfully used for leaves of other plants such as tomato or cassava. The method is therefore useful for plant

  6. Transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana via Agrobacterium tumefacience with an endochitinase gene from Trichoderma, and enhanced resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Fu-ming; XU Tong

    2004-01-01

    @@ Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is an important pathogen to many crops and is especially damaging to rape in China. As a model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (ColO) was transformed by spraying Agrobacterium tumefacience with Trichoderma endochitinase gene ThEn-42 at initial bud stage. Eleven seedlings (corresponding to about 0.22 percent transformation) exhibited resistance to hygromycin. The DNA fragment unique to endochitinase ( ThEn-42 ) was amplified by Arabidopsis leaf-PCR or genomic DNA PCR. Unfertile, dwarf and normal phenotypes appeared in the T1 generation. In addition, an enhanced resistance to S. sclerotiorum was observed. The mortality percentage (7.7% to 33.3%) in transgenic plants was significantly lower than in non-transgenic plants (86. 7%) 10 days after inoculation with the pathogen.

  7. Arabidopsis RAV1 is down-regulated by brassinosteroid and may act as a negative regulator during plant development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xin HU; Yong Hong WANG; Xin Fang LIU; Jia Yang LI

    2004-01-01

    RAV1 is a novel DNA-binding protein with two distinct DNA-binding domains unique in higher plants,but its role in plant growth and development remains unknown. Using cDNA array,we found that transcription of RAV1 is downregulated by epibrassinolide (epiBL) in Arabidopsis suspension cells. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that epiBL-regulated RAV1 transcription involves neither protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation nor newly synthesized protein,and does not require the functional BRI1,suggesting that this regulation might be through a new BR signaling pathway.Overexpressing RAV1 in Arabidopsis results in a retardation of lateral root and rosette leaf development,and the underexpression causes an earlier flowering phenotype,implying that RAV1 may function as a negative regulatory component of growth and development.

  8. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MANGOSTEEN LEAF NITROGEN CONTENTS AND LEAF SPAD VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Setiawan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated nitrogen contents on mangosteen leaf and related on leaf SPAD value. The experiment was conducted using mangosteen trees grown in commercial orchard in Bogor, Indonesia during May to October 2010. Mangosteen trees of 3 different ages, young (20-year-old, middle-aged (35-year-old, and old (50-year-old trees, each of five trees, were selected for study, and the canopy of each tree was divided into 9 sectors based on height (bottom, middle, top and width (inner, center, outer. SPAD values had a negative correlation with leaf N content in all ages and could be explained by regressionl equations N level (% DW = -0.0099 × SPAD + 2.2366; R² = 0.91; N level (% DW = -0.0177 × SPAD + 2.8001; R² = 0.67; and N level (% DW = -0.0187 × SPAD + 2.7785; R² = 0.45 in young, middle-aged and old trees, respectively. It is suggested that the SPAD value determined by a portable chlorophyll meter can be used to obtain a quick estimation of mangosteen leaf N status. Keywords: age, fruiting position, Garcinia mangostana L., nitrogen, SPAD

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065259 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065259 J013002J18 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102134 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102134 J033085F12 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066835 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066835 J013087I16 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-171 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100523 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100523 J023100P04 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102695 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102695 J033103F21 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  14. Reference: 488 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Inactivation of ATAB2 strongly affects Arabidopsis development and thylakoid mem...n center subunits is decreased and the association of their mRNAs with polysomes is affected. ATAB2 is a chl

  15. Reference: 212 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available identified in pea (Pisum sativum) using biochemical approaches. The Arabidopsis (...C75-IV, which we studied using a range of molecular, genetic, and biochemical techniques. Expression of atTO

  16. Reference: 480 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available activity was analyzed. Compared to all other Suc transporters, AtSUC9 had an ult...abidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) L. Heynh., was expressed in Xenopus (Xenopus laevis) oocytes, and transport

  17. Reference: 507 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available een them. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate the two pathways and the metabolic cro...ss-talk. To identify such regulatory mechanisms, we isolated and characterized the Arabidopsis T-DNA inserti

  18. Reference: 278 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available functional ERA1 gene, which encodes the beta-subunit of protein farnesyltransferase (PFT), exhibit pleiotropic effects...gnaling and meristem development. Here, we report the effects of T-DNA insertion mutations in the Arabidopsi

  19. Reference: 185 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available organisms, we suggest that AtARP4 is likely to exert its effects on plant develop...nuclear actin-related protein AtARP4 in Arabidopsis has multiple effects on plant development, including ear

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069960 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltrans...T1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-60 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK064768 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltrans...T1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-112 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061551 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltran...MT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-67 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104764 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltran...MT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-67 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK098998 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltrans...T1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 8e-57 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061859 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethyltransferase 1 / caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (OMT1) identical to O-methyltran...MT1) (Flavonol 3- O-methyltransferase 1) (Caffeic acid/5-hydroxyferulic acid O- methyltransferase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-100 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103387 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ntical to SC35-like splicing factor SCL28, 28 kD [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9843655; contains Pfam profile PF00076: RNA recognition motif. (a.k.a. RRM, RBD, or RNP domain) 2e-34 ...

  7. Reference: 564 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 39-44 17360695 2007 Feb Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the Un...tion in plants. Arabidopsis plasma membrane protein crucial for Ca2+ influx and touch sensing in roots. 9 36

  8. Reference: 796 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America DeBolt...required for normal microtubule dynamics and organization in Arabidopsis. 46 18064-9 19004800 2008 Nov Pro

  9. Reference: 67 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A complete knockout of AGD2 renders embryos inviable. We suggest that AGD2 synthesizes an important amino a...no acid-derived molecule important for activating defense signaling. Divergent roles in Arabidopsis thaliana

  10. Reference: 420 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available are found in various compartments in plant cells. The cytosolic and chloroplast APXs appear to play important...d development, suggesting that APX3 may not be an important antioxidant enzyme in Arabidopsis, at least unde

  11. Reference: 771 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available RCADIAN TIMEKEEPER (XCT), an Arabidopsis thaliana gene important for light regula...l elongation in xct is hyposensitive to red light but hypersensitive to blue light. Finally, XCT is important

  12. Reference: 797 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available that the level of GMPase activity regulates Arabidopsis sensitivity to NH(4)(+). Further analysis showed that defective N-glycosylati...on of proteins, unfolded protein response, and cell death in the roots are likely i

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241712 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241712 J065197H24 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6e-27 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242957 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242957 J090089I15 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-28 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287726 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287726 J065138E17 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-88 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242387 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242387 J080051E14 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-45 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK106306 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106306 002-101-C10 At4g37750.1 ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) ident...ical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-89 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241272 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241272 J065132I19 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-88 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240892 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240892 J065030K10 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-88 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109848 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109848 002-148-F05 At4g37750.1 ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) ident...ical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-73 ...