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Sample records for arabidopsis halleri metal

  1. Rhizosphere Microbial Community Composition Affects Cadmium and Zinc Uptake by the Metal-Hyperaccumulating Plant Arabidopsis halleri

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    Muehe, E. Marie; Weigold, Pascal; Adaktylou, Irini J.; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Kraemer, Ute; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The remediation of metal-contaminated soils by phytoextraction depends on plant growth and plant metal accessibility. Soil microorganisms can affect the accumulation of metals by plants either by directly or indirectly stimulating plant growth and activity or by (im)mobilizing and/or complexing metals. Understanding the intricate interplay of metal-accumulating plants with their rhizosphere microbiome is an important step toward the application and optimization of phytoremediation. We compared the effects of a “native” and a strongly disturbed (gamma-irradiated) soil microbial communities on cadmium and zinc accumulation by the plant Arabidopsis halleri in soil microcosm experiments. A. halleri accumulated 100% more cadmium and 15% more zinc when grown on the untreated than on the gamma-irradiated soil. Gamma irradiation affected neither plant growth nor the 1 M HCl-extractable metal content of the soil. However, it strongly altered the soil microbial community composition and overall cell numbers. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons of DNA extracted from rhizosphere samples of A. halleri identified microbial taxa (Lysobacter, Streptomyces, Agromyces, Nitrospira, “Candidatus Chloracidobacterium”) of higher relative sequence abundance in the rhizospheres of A. halleri plants grown on untreated than on gamma-irradiated soil, leading to hypotheses on their potential effect on plant metal uptake. However, further experimental evidence is required, and wherefore we discuss different mechanisms of interaction of A. halleri with its rhizosphere microbiome that might have directly or indirectly affected plant metal accumulation. Deciphering the complex interactions between A. halleri and individual microbial taxa will help to further develop soil metal phytoextraction as an efficient and sustainable remediation strategy. PMID:25595759

  2. Differential expression and regulation of iron-regulated metal transporters in Arabidopsis halleri and Arabidopsis thaliana--the role in zinc tolerance.

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    Shanmugam, Varanavasiappan; Lo, Jing-Chi; Wu, Chia-Lin; Wang, Shan-Li; Lai, Chong-Cheong; Connolly, Erin L; Huang, Jing-Ling; Yeh, Kuo-Chen

    2011-04-01

    To avoid zinc (Zn) toxicity, plants have developed a Zn homeostasis mechanism to cope with Zn excess in the surrounding soil. In this report, we uncovered the difference of a cross-homeostasis system between iron (Fe) and Zn in dealing with Zn excess in the Zn hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri ssp. gemmifera and nonhyperaccumulator Arabidopsis thaliana. Arabidopsis halleri shows low expression of the Fe acquisition and deficiency response-related genes IRT1 and IRT2 compared with A. thaliana. In A. thaliana, lowering the expression of IRT1 and IRT2 through the addition of excess Fe to the medium increases Zn tolerance. Excess Zn induces significant Fe deficiency in A. thaliana and reduces Fe accumulation in shoots. By contrast, the accumulation of Fe in shoots of A. halleri was stable under various Zn treatments. Root ferric chelate reductase (FRO) activity and expression of FIT are low in A. halleri compared with A. thaliana. Overexpressing a ZIP family member IRT3 in irt1-1, rescues the Fe-deficient phenotype. A fine-tuned Fe homeostasis mechanism in A. halleri maintains optimum Fe level by Zn-regulated ZIP transporters and prevents high Zn uptake through Fe-regulated metal transporters, and in part be responsible for Zn tolerance. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. The MTP1 promoters from Arabidopsis halleri reveal cis-regulating elements for the evolution of metal tolerance.

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    Fasani, Elisa; DalCorso, Giovanni; Varotto, Claudio; Li, Mingai; Visioli, Giovanna; Mattarozzi, Monica; Furini, Antonella

    2017-06-01

    In the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri, the zinc (Zn) vacuolar transporter MTP1 is a key component of hypertolerance. Because protein sequences and functions are highly conserved between A. halleri and Arabidopsis thaliana, Zn tolerance in A. halleri may reflect the constitutively higher MTP1 expression compared with A. thaliana, based on copy number expansion and different cis regulation. Three MTP1 promoters were characterized in A. halleri ecotype I16. The comparison with the A. thaliana MTP1 promoter revealed different expression profiles correlated with specific cis-acting regulatory elements. The MTP1 5' untranslated region, highly conserved among A. thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata and A. halleri, contains a dimer of MYB-binding motifs in the A. halleri promoters absent in the A. thaliana and A. lyrata sequences. Site-directed mutagenesis of these motifs revealed their role for expression in trichomes. A. thaliana mtp1 transgenic lines expressing AtMTP1 controlled by the native A. halleri promoter were more Zn-tolerant than lines carrying mutations on MYB-binding motifs. Differences in Zn tolerance were associated with different distribution of Zn among plant organs and in trichomes. The different cis-acting elements in the MTP1 promoters of A. halleri, particularly the MYB-binding sites, are probably involved in the evolution of Zn tolerance. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Decomposition in soil microcosms of leaves of the metallophyte Arabidopsis halleri: effect of leaf-associated heavy metals on biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucher, Uriel; Balabane, May; Lamy, Isabelle; Cambier, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    More knowledge is needed concerning the disturbance of soil organic matter cycling due to heavy metal pollution. The present study deals with the impact of heavy metal pollution on litter breakdown. Our aim was to assess whether heavy metals initially present in the leaves of the metallophyte Arabidopsis halleri: (i) slow down the rate of C mineralization, in relation to metal toxicity towards microflora, and/or (ii) increase the amount of organic C resistant to biodegradation, in relation to an intrinsic resistance of metallophyte residues to biodegradation. We incubated uncontaminated soil samples with either metal-free or metal-rich plant material. Metal-free material was grown in a greenhouse, and metal-rich material was collected in situ. During the 2-month period of incubation, we measured evolved CO 2 -C and residual plant C in the coarse organic fraction. Our results of CO 2 -C evolution showed a similar mineralization from the microcosms amended with highly metal-rich leaves of A. halleri and the microcosms amended with the metal-free but otherwise similar plant material. Measuring residual plant C in its input size-fraction gave a more precise insight. Our results suggest that only the large pool of easily decomposable C mineralized similarly from metal-free and from metal-rich plant residues. The pool of less decomposable C seemed on the contrary to be preferentially preserved in the case of metal-rich material. These results support the hypothesis of an annual extra-accumulation in situ of such a slowly decomposable fraction of plant residues which could account to some extent for the observed accumulation of metallophyte litter on the surface of highly metal-polluted soils. - Decomposition of slowly decomposable fractions of metal-rich plant residues is slowed by the metals

  5. Cross-species microarray transcript profiling reveals high constitutive expression of metal homeostasis genes in shoots of the zinc hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri.

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    Becher, Martina; Talke, Ina N; Krall, Leonard; Krämer, Ute

    2004-01-01

    Arabidopsis halleri ssp. halleri (accession Langelsheim) is a naturally selected zinc (Zn)- and cadmium-tolerant Zn hyperaccumulator. This plant differs strikingly from its close relative A. thaliana by accumulating Zn specifically in above-ground tissues. A. thaliana GeneChips were used in order to identify, on a transcriptome-wide scale, genes with a potential involvement in cellular metal uptake or detoxification in the shoots of A. halleri. Compared to A. thaliana, transcript abundance of several genes was found and confirmed to be substantially higher in A. halleri after 4 days of exposure to low as well as high Zn concentrations in the hydroponic culture medium. The identified candidate genes encode proteins closely related to the following A. thaliana proteins: AtZIP6, a putative cellular Zn uptake system and member of the zinc-regulated transporter (ZRT)-iron regulated transporter (IRT)-like protein (ZIP)-family of metal transporters, the putative P-type metal ATPase AtHMA3, the cation diffusion facilitator ZAT/AtCDF1, and the nicotianamine synthase AtNAS3. Heterologous expression in mutant strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggested that AhHMA3, AhCDF1-3, and AhNAS3 can function in cellular Zn detoxification. Our data indicate that, at the transcript level, the Zn tolerance strategy of A. halleri involves high constitutive expression of metal homeostasis genes in the shoots to accommodate higher basal levels of Zn accumulation, and possibly to prepare for sudden increases in Zn influx into shoot cells. Furthermore, profiling of metal homeostasis gene transcripts in shoot and root tissues by real-time RT-PCR indicated that A. halleri and A. thaliana respond differently to changes in plant Zn status.

  6. Use of synchrotron radiation to characterize metals in plants: the case of Cd in the hyperacumulator Arabidopsis halleri

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    Isaure, M.; Sarret, G.; Verbruggen, N.

    2010-12-01

    Phytoremediation uses plants to extract (phytoextraction) or stabilize (phytostabilization) metals accumulated in soils, and can be an alternative to invasive physico-chemical remediation techniques. Its development requires the knowledge of the mechanisms involved in metal tolerance and accumulation in plants, and particularly the way that plants transfer and store metals. In that context, synchrotron radiation based techniques such as micro-focused X-Ray Fluorescence (µXRF), and micro-focused X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure, are particularly suited to determine the localization and the chemical forms of metals in the different tissues, cells and sub-cellular compartments. Arabidopsis halleri is a Zn, Cd hyperaccumulating plant, naturally growing on contaminated sites, and is a model plant to investigate metal hyperaccumulation. This work presents the application of µXRF and Cd µXANES to determine the distribution and speciation of Cd in this species. Results showed that Cd was mainly located in the mesophyll and veins of leaves. It is bound to S ligands in some leaves and to O/N ligands in other ones, and the observed variations may be related to the age of the leaves. Cd speciation seems to differ from other metals, and particularly Zn, generally encountered in hyperaccumulators. High local Cd concentrations were also detected at the base of trichomes, epidermal hairs of leaves, associated to O/N ligands, probably to the cell wall. This phenomenon was also observed on non-hyperaccumulators and is clearly not the major sink for Cd, but trichomes might play a role in the detoxification process. This study illustrates the suitability of synchrotron radiation based techniques to investigate metal distribution and speciation in plants.

  7. Does speciation between Arabidopsis halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata coincide with major changes in a molecular target of adaptation?

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    Camille Roux

    Full Text Available Ever since Darwin proposed natural selection as the driving force for the origin of species, the role of adaptive processes in speciation has remained controversial. In particular, a largely unsolved issue is whether key divergent ecological adaptations are associated with speciation events or evolve secondarily within sister species after the split. The plant Arabidopsis halleri is one of the few species able to colonize soils highly enriched in zinc and cadmium. Recent advances in the molecular genetics of adaptation show that the physiology of this derived ecological trait involves copy number expansions of the AhHMA4 gene, for which orthologs are found in single copy in the closely related A. lyrata and the outgroup A. thaliana. To gain insight into the speciation process, we ask whether adaptive molecular changes at this candidate gene were contemporary with important stages of the speciation process. We first inferred the scenario and timescale of speciation by comparing patterns of variation across the genomic backgrounds of A. halleri and A. lyrata. Then, we estimated the timing of the first duplication of AhHMA4 in A. halleri. Our analysis suggests that the historical split between the two species closely coincides with major changes in this molecular target of adaptation in the A. halleri lineage. These results clearly indicate that these changes evolved in A. halleri well before industrial activities fostered the spread of Zn- and Cd-polluted areas, and suggest that adaptive processes related to heavy-metal homeostasis played a major role in the speciation process.

  8. Interaction between selected bacterial strains and Arabidopsis halleri modulates shoot proteome and cadmium and zinc accumulation

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    Panigati, Monica; Furini, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    The effects of plant–microbe interactions between the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri and eight bacterial strains, isolated from the rhizosphere of A. halleri plants grown in a cadmium- and zinc-contaminated site, were analysed for shoot metal accumulation, shoot proteome, and the transcription of genes involved in plant metal homeostasis and hyperaccumulation. Cadmium and zinc concentrations were lower in the shoots of plants cultivated in the presence of these metals plus the selected bacterial strains compared with plants grown solely with these metals or, as previously reported, with plants grown with these metals plus the autochthonous rhizosphere-derived microorganisms. The shoot proteome of plants cultivated in the presence of these selected bacterial strains plus metals, showed an increased abundance of photosynthesis- and abiotic stress-related proteins (e.g. subunits of the photosynthetic complexes, Rubisco, superoxide dismutase, and malate dehydrogenase) counteracted by a decreased amount of plant defence-related proteins (e.g. endochitinases, vegetative storage proteins, and β-glucosidase). The transcription of several homeostasis genes was modulated by the microbial communities and by Cd and Zn content in the shoot. Altogether these results highlight the importance of plant-microbe interactions in plant protein expression and metal accumulation and emphasize the possibility of exploiting microbial consortia for increasing or decreasing shoot metal content. PMID:21357773

  9. Field evaluation of Cd and Zn phytoextraction potential by the hyperaccumulators Thlaspi caerulescens and Arabidopsis halleri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, S.P.; Lombi, E.; Gray, C.W.; Caille, N.; Dunham, S.J.; Zhao, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    Field trials were undertaken to investigate the effect of the application of metal mobilizing agents, different sowing strategies and length of growing season on the extraction of Cd and Zn from soils by Thlaspi caerulescens and Arabidopsis halleri. None of the mobilizing agents used enhanced metal accumulation by T. caerulescens. Between 1998 and 2000, on average across plots where Cd or Zn exceeded allowable limits, T. caerulescens removed 1.3 and 0.3% of the total soil Cd and Zn. In one season when T. caerulescens was grown for 14 months, 21.7 and 4.4% of the total soil Cd and Zn was removed. This was larger than values found when T. caerulescens was grown for 4 months. A. halleri accumulated similar concentrations of Zn, but lower Cd concentrations than T. caerulescens. The results indicate that metal phytoextraction using T. caerulescens can be used to clean up soils moderately contaminated by Cd. - The hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens (the Ganges ecotype) is more efficient at phytoextracting Cd than Zn from contaminated soil

  10. Between-species differences in gene copy number are enriched among functions critical for adaptive evolution in Arabidopsis halleri.

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    Suryawanshi, Vasantika; Talke, Ina N; Weber, Michael; Eils, Roland; Brors, Benedikt; Clemens, Stephan; Krämer, Ute

    2016-12-22

    Gene copy number divergence between species is a form of genetic polymorphism that contributes significantly to both genome size and phenotypic variation. In plants, copy number expansions of single genes were implicated in cultivar- or species-specific tolerance of high levels of soil boron, aluminium or calamine-type heavy metals, respectively. Arabidopsis halleri is a zinc- and cadmium-hyperaccumulating extremophile species capable of growing on heavy-metal contaminated, toxic soils. In contrast, its non-accumulating sister species A. lyrata and the closely related reference model species A. thaliana exhibit merely basal metal tolerance. For a genome-wide assessment of the role of copy number divergence (CND) in lineage-specific environmental adaptation, we conducted cross-species array comparative genome hybridizations of three plant species and developed a global signal scaling procedure to adjust for sequence divergence. In A. halleri, transition metal homeostasis functions are enriched twofold among the genes detected as copy number expanded. Moreover, biotic stress functions including mostly disease Resistance (R) gene-related genes are enriched twofold among genes detected as copy number reduced, when compared to the abundance of these functions among all genes. Our results provide genome-wide support for a link between evolutionary adaptation and CND in A. halleri as shown previously for Heavy metal ATPase4. Moreover our results support the hypothesis that elemental defences, which result from the hyperaccumulation of toxic metals, allow the reduction of classical defences against biotic stress as a trade-off.

  11. Contrasted zinc hyperaccumulation levels between metallicolous and non-metallicolous populations of Arabidopsis halleri is driven by divergent selection

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    Babst-Kostecka, Alicja; Waldmann, Patrik; Pauwels, Maxime; Schat, Henk; Bourceaux, Angélique; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Grodzińska, Krystyna; Frérot, Hélène

    2017-04-01

    Approximately 400 species that can survive and reproduce in metalliferous environments have developed "metal hyperaccumulation" capacity, allowing them to allocate large amounts of trace elements to their aerial parts without showing severe toxicity symptoms. The potential of hyperaccumulators to be applied in phytoremediation efforts is of great research and commercial interest. Yet, the genetic basis and evolutionary significance of this trait are to date insufficiently understood. This lack of knowledge limits the efficiency and large-scale use of such plants in reducing soil pollution through "green and clean technologies" (phytoremediation). In this context, the objective of this study was to find some evidence of selection acting on metal hyperaccumulation, thus supporting the existence of genetic adaptation for this trait. Here, we collected six metallicolous and five non-metallicolous populations of the pseudometallophyte model species Arabidopsis halleri in Poland that are genetically and geographically close. We asexually propagated genotypes that were sampled in natural populations to produce several clones of each individual. These were subsequently used in a soil culture experiment with artificially zinc-contaminated compost for accumulation assessment. The zinc content of shoots was determined after five weeks of culture using the colorimetric reagent zincon. The heritability and the genetic differentiation of the zinc accumulation trait were estimated (Qst statistic) and the latter was compared to the differentiation at neutral molecular markers (Fst statistic). Despite significantly (Pselection, supporting the occurrence of local adaptation. These findings encourage further genetic and genomic research to uncover the genetic basis of local adaptation of A. halleri to contaminated environments. In particular, due to their enhanced zinc hyperaccumulation capacities non-metallicolous populations may be particularly promising for phytoremediation

  12. Fate of cadmium in the rhizosphere of Arabidopsis halleri grown in a contaminated dredged sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, Séphanie, E-mail: huguet.st@gmail.com [ISTerre, Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement (LCABIE), Institut des sciences analytiques et de physico-chimie pour l' environnement et les matériaux (IPREM UMR 5254), Université de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour and CNRS, Hélioparc, 2 Av. Pierre Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); INERIS, Parc technologique Alata, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); EMDouai, MPE-GCE, 930 Boulevard Lahure, 59500 Douai (France); Isaure, Marie-Pierre [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique Bio-Inorganique et Environnement (LCABIE), Institut des sciences analytiques et de physico-chimie pour l' environnement et les matériaux (IPREM UMR 5254), Université de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour and CNRS, Hélioparc, 2 Av. Pierre Angot, 64053 Pau Cedex 9 (France); Bert, Valérie [INERIS, Parc technologique Alata, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Laboudigue, Agnès [EMDouai, MPE-GCE, 930 Boulevard Lahure, 59500 Douai (France); Proux, Olivier [OSUG, UMS832 CNRS/UJF, 414 rue de la piscine, 38400 Saint-Martin d' Hères (France); Flank, Anne-Marie; Vantelon, Delphine [Beamline LUCIA, SLS, Swiss Light Source, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Synchrotron SOLEIL, F-91192 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Sarret, Géraldine, E-mail: geraldine.sarret@ujf-grenoble.fr [ISTerre, Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France)

    2015-12-01

    In regions impacted by mining and smelting activities, dredged sediments are often contaminated with metals. Phytotechnologies could be used for their management, but more knowledge on the speciation of metals in the sediment and on their fate after colonization by plant roots is needed. This work was focused on a dredged sediment from the Scarpe river (North of France), contaminated with Zn and Cd. Zn, Cd hyperaccumulating plants Arabidopsis halleri from metallicolous and non-metallicolous origin were grown on the sediment for five months in a pot experiment. The nature and extent of the modifications in Cd speciation with or without plant were determined by electron microscopy, micro X-ray fluorescence and bulk and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In addition, changes in Cd exchangeable and bioavailable pools were evaluated, and Cd content in leachates was measured. Finally, Cd plant uptake and plant growth parameters were monitored. In the original sediment, Cd was present as a mixed Zn, Cd, Fe sulfide. After five months, although pots still contained reduced sulfur, Cd-bearing sulfides were totally oxidized in vegetated pots, whereas a minor fraction (8%) was still present in non-vegetated ones. Secondary species included Cd bound to O-containing groups of organic matter and Cd phosphates. Cd exchangeability and bioavailability were relatively low and did not increase during changes in Cd speciation, suggesting that Cd released by sulfide oxidation was readily taken up with strong interactions with organic matter and phosphate ligands. Thus, the composition of the sediment, the oxic conditions and the rhizospheric activity (regardless of the plant origin) created favorable conditions for Cd stabilization. However, it should be kept in mind that returning to anoxic conditions may change Cd speciation, so the species formed cannot be considered as stable on the long term. - Highlights: • Cd was present as a mixed Zn, Cd, Fe sulfide in the sediment before

  13. Relationships between soil and leaf mineral composition are element-specific, environment-dependent and geographically structured in the emerging model Arabidopsis halleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Ricardo J; Höreth, Stephan; de Melo, J Romário F; Syllwasschy, Lara; Lee, Gwonjin; Garbin, Mário L; Clemens, Stephan; Krämer, Ute

    2017-02-01

    Leaf mineral composition, the leaf ionome, reflects the complex interaction between a plant and its environment including local soil composition, an influential factor that can limit species distribution and plant productivity. Here we addressed within-species variation in plant-soil interactions and edaphic adaptation using Arabidopsis halleri, a well-suited model species as a facultative metallophyte and metal hyperaccumulator. We conducted multi-element analysis of 1972 paired leaf and soil samples from 165 European populations of A. halleri, at individual resolution to accommodate soil heterogeneity. Results were further confirmed under standardized conditions upon cultivation of 105 field-collected genotypes on an artificially metal-contaminated soil in growth chamber experiments. Soil-independent between- and within-population variation set apart leaf accumulation of zinc, cadmium and lead from all other nutrient and nonessential elements, concurring with differential hypothesized ecological roles in either biotic interaction or nutrition. For these metals, soil-leaf relationships were element-specific, differed between metalliferous and nonmetalliferous soils and were geographically structured both in the field and under standardized growth conditions, implicating complex scenarios of recent ecological adaptation. Our study provides an example and a reference for future related work and will serve as a basis for the molecular-genetic dissection and ecological analysis of the observed phenotypic variation. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Zinc distribution and speciation in Arabidopsis halleri x Arabidops is lyrata progenies presenting various zinc accumulation capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarret, Geraldine; Willems, Glenda; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Frerot, Helene; Pairis, Sebastien; Geoffroy, Nicolas; Manceau, Alain; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2010-04-08

    - The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the chemical form and localization of zinc (Zn) in plant leaves and their Zn accumulationcapacity. - An interspecific cross between Arabidopsis halleri sp. halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata sp. petrea segregating for Zn accumulation was used. Zinc (Zn) speciation and Zn distribution in the leaves of the parent plants and of selected F1 and F2 progenies were investigated by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques and chemical analyses. - A correlation was observed between the proportion of Zn being in octahedral coordination complexed to organic acids and free in solution (Zn?OAs + Znaq) and Zn content in the leaves. This pool varied between 40percent and 80percent of total leaf Zn depending on the plant studied. Elemental mapping of the leaves revealed different Zn partitioning between the veins and the leaf tissue. The vein : tissue fluorescence ratio was negatively correlated with Zn accumulation. - The higher proportion of Zn?OAs + Znaq and the depletion of the veins in the stronger accumulators are attributed to a higher xylem unloading and vacuolar sequestration in the leaf cells. Elemental distributions in the trichomes were also investigated, and results support the role of carboxyl and⁄ or hydroxyl groups as major Zn ligands in these cells.

  15. Population genomic footprints of selection and associations with climate in natural populations of Arabidopsis halleri from the Alps

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    Fischer, Martin C; Rellstab, Christian; Tedder, Andrew; Zoller, Stefan; Gugerli, Felix; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Holderegger, Rolf; Widmer, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Natural genetic variation is essential for the adaptation of organisms to their local environment and to changing environmental conditions. Here, we examine genomewide patterns of nucleotide variation in natural populations of the outcrossing herb Arabidopsis halleri and associations with climatic variation among populations in the Alps. Using a pooled population sequencing (Pool-Seq) approach, we discovered more than two million SNPs in five natural populations and identified highly differentiated genomic regions and SNPs using FST-based analyses. We tested only the most strongly differentiated SNPs for associations with a nonredundant set of environmental factors using partial Mantel tests to identify topo-climatic factors that may underlie the observed footprints of selection. Possible functions of genes showing signatures of selection were identified by Gene Ontology analysis. We found 175 genes to be highly associated with one or more of the five tested topo-climatic factors. Of these, 23.4% had unknown functions. Genetic variation in four candidate genes was strongly associated with site water balance and solar radiation, and functional annotations were congruent with these environmental factors. Our results provide a genomewide perspective on the distribution of adaptive genetic variation in natural plant populations from a highly diverse and heterogeneous alpine environment. PMID:24102711

  16. Early Zn2+-induced effects on membrane potential account for primary heavy metal susceptibility in tolerant and sensitive Arabidopsis species

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    Kenderešová, Lucia; Staňová, Andrea; Pavlovkin, Ján; Ďurišová, Eva; Nadubinská, Miriam; Čiamporová, Milada; Ovečka, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Uptake of heavy metals by plant root cells depends on electro-physiological parameters of the plasma membrane. In this study, responses of the plasma membrane in root cells were analysed where early reactions to the metal ion-induced stress are localized. Three different Arabidopsis species with diverse strategies of their adaptation to heavy metals were compared: sensitive Arabidopsis thaliana and tolerant A. halleri and A. arenosa. Methods Plants of A. thaliana Col-0 ecotype and plants of A. arenosa and A. halleri originating from natural metallicolous populations were exposed to high concentrations of Zn2+. Plants were tested for root growth rate, cellular tolerance, plant morphology and cell death in the root apex. In addition, the membrane potential (EM) of mature cortical root cells and changes in the pH of the liquid culture media were measured. Key Results Primary roots of A. halleri and A. arenosa plants grew significantly better at increased Zn2+ concentrations than A. thaliana plants. Elevated Zn2+ concentrations in the culture medium induced rapid changes in EM. The reaction was species-specific and concentration-dependent. Arabidopsis halleri revealed the highest insensitivity of the plasma membrane and the highest survival rate under prolonged treatment with extra-high concentrations. Plants were able to effectively adjust the pH in the control, but much less at Zn2+-induced lower pH. Conclusions The results indicate a similar mode of early reaction to Zn2+, but with different extent in tolerant and sensitive species of Arabidopsis. The sensitivity of A. thaliana and a high tolerance of A. halleri and A. arenosa were demonstrated. Plasma membrane depolarization was lowest in the hyperaccumulator A. halleri and highest in A. thaliana. This indicates that rapid membrane voltage changes are an excellent tool to monitor the effects of heavy metals. PMID:22645116

  17. High paternal diversity in the self-incompatible herb Arabidopsis halleri despite clonal reproduction and spatially restricted pollen dispersal.

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    Llaurens, V; Castric, V; Austerlitz, F; Vekemans, X

    2008-03-01

    The number of sires fertilizing a given dam is a key parameter of the mating system in species with spatially restricted offspring dispersal, since genetic relatedness among maternal sibs determines the intensity of sib competition. In flowering plants, the extent of multiple paternity is determined by factors such as floral biology, properties of the pollen vector, selfing rate, spatial organization of the population, and genetic compatibility between neighbours. To assess the extent of multiple paternity and identify ecological factors involved, we performed a detailed study of mating patterns in a small population of a self-incompatible clonal herb, Arabidopsis halleri. We mapped and genotyped 364 individuals and 256 of their offspring at 12 microsatellite loci and jointly analysed the level of multiple paternity, pollen and seed dispersal, and spatial genetic structure. We found very low levels of correlated paternity among sibs (P(full-sib) = 3.8%) indicating high multiple paternity. Our estimate of the outcrossing rate was 98.7%, suggesting functional self-incompatibility. The pollen dispersal distribution was significantly restricted (mean effective pollen dispersal distance: 4.42 m) but long-distance successful pollination occurred and immigrating pollen was at most 10% of all pollination events. Patterns of genetic structure indicated little extent of clonal reproduction, and a low but significant spatial genetic structure typical for a self-incompatible species. Overall, in spite of restricted pollen dispersal, the multiple paternity in this self-incompatible species was very high, a result that we interpret as a consequence of high plant density and high pollinator service in this population.

  18. Photosynthetic Efficiency as Bioindicator of Environmental Pressure in A. halleri[OPEN

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    Sitko, Krzysztof; Rusinowski, Szymon

    2017-01-01

    In earlier ecophysiological studies that were conducted on Arabidopsis halleri plants, scientists focused on the mechanisms of Cd and Zn hyperaccumulation but did not take into consideration the environmental factors that can significantly affect the physiological responses of plants in situ. In this study, we investigated A. halleri that was growing on two nonmetalliferous and three metalliferous sites, which were characterized by different environmental conditions. We compared these populations in order to find differences within the metallicolous and nonmetallicolous groups that have not yet been investigated. The concentrations of several elements in the plant and soil samples also were investigated. To our knowledge, the concentration and fluorescence of chlorophyll were measured for A. halleri in situ for the first time. Our study confirmed the hyperaccumulation of Cd and Zn for each metallicolous population. For the metallicolous populations, the inhibition of parameters that describe the efficiency of the photosynthetic apparatus with increasing accumulations of heavy metals in the shoots also was observed. It was found that the nonmetallicolous plant populations from the summit of Ciemniak Mountain had larger antenna dimensions and chlorophyll content but a lower percentage of active reaction centers. To our knowledge, in this study, the internal high physiological diversity within the populations that inhabit metalliferous and nonmetalliferous sites is presented for the first time. PMID:28455400

  19. Photosynthetic Efficiency as Bioindicator of Environmental Pressure inA. halleri.

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    Sitko, Krzysztof; Rusinowski, Szymon; Kalaji, Hazem M; Szopiński, Michał; Małkowski, Eugeniusz

    2017-09-01

    In earlier ecophysiological studies that were conducted on Arabidopsis halleri plants, scientists focused on the mechanisms of Cd and Zn hyperaccumulation but did not take into consideration the environmental factors that can significantly affect the physiological responses of plants in situ. In this study, we investigated A. halleri that was growing on two nonmetalliferous and three metalliferous sites, which were characterized by different environmental conditions. We compared these populations in order to find differences within the metallicolous and nonmetallicolous groups that have not yet been investigated. The concentrations of several elements in the plant and soil samples also were investigated. To our knowledge, the concentration and fluorescence of chlorophyll were measured for A. halleri in situ for the first time. Our study confirmed the hyperaccumulation of Cd and Zn for each metallicolous population. For the metallicolous populations, the inhibition of parameters that describe the efficiency of the photosynthetic apparatus with increasing accumulations of heavy metals in the shoots also was observed. It was found that the nonmetallicolous plant populations from the summit of Ciemniak Mountain had larger antenna dimensions and chlorophyll content but a lower percentage of active reaction centers. To our knowledge, in this study, the internal high physiological diversity within the populations that inhabit metalliferous and nonmetalliferous sites is presented for the first time. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. The changes of contents of selected free amino acids associated with cadmium stress in Noccaea caerulescens and Arabidopsis halleri

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemanová, V.; Pavlík, Milan; Pavlíková, D.; Tlustoš, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 9 (2013), s. 417-422 ISSN 1214-1178 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : heavy metals * nitrogen-transport amino acids * Thlaspi caerulescens Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.113, year: 2013 http://www.agriculturejournals.cz/publicFiles/100270.pdf

  1. Protein Biochemistry and Expression Regulation of Cadmium/Zinc Pumping ATPases in the Hyperaccumulator Plants Arabidopsis halleri and Noccaea caerulescens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mishra, S.; Mishra, Archana; Küpper, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, May 22 (2017), č. článku 835. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000336 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cellular compartmentation * zinc homeostasis * cadmium * metal hyperaccumulator plants Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  2. Tissue organization and cell ultrastructure in the roots of three Arabidopsis species grown at different zinc concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Čiamporová

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is known to be heavy metal-sensitive in contrast to its relative species A. arenosa and A. halleri classified as pseudometallophytes. Quantitative differences in primary root anatomy previously found between A. thaliana and the non-metallicolous (NM and metallicolous (M populations of the non-model Arabidopsis species necessitated further research at cellular and ultrastructural levels. Seedlings of A. thaliana, ecotype Columbia and a natural population Ratkovo, the NM and M populations of A. arenosa and A. halleri were grown on agar medium containing 10 μM (control and 1000 μM Zn2+ for 5 days. Light microscopy confirmed the higher number of cells in the endodermal, cortical and epidermal layers and a higher incidence of additional cell tiers, the so-called middle cortex (MC in the tolerant genotypes. Such differences were present in untreated plants and even more pronounced in plants exposed to excess of zinc (Zn. Electron microscopy of the root tissues at comparable distances from the root tip showed Casparian bands only in the radial cell walls of endodermis of A. halleri M population originating from severely (Cu, Cd and Pb contaminated site. Casparian bands were not differentiated yet in the roots of the other species and populations, and they were not formed in the cell walls between endodermis and MC cells. In the apical cytoplasm of trichoblast bulges, autophagic vacuoles were found only in the sensitive A. thaliana and small vacuoles in the other genotypes. The enhanced concentration of Zn confirmed the higher metal sensitivity of the model species and did not substantially disturb the root cell ultrastructure of the tolerant Arabidopsis species.

  3. Divergent biology of facultative heavy metal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, Hermann; Słomka, Aneta

    2017-12-01

    Among heavy metal plants (the metallophytes), facultative species can live both in soils contaminated by an excess of heavy metals and in non-affected sites. In contrast, obligate metallophytes are restricted to polluted areas. Metallophytes offer a fascinating biology, due to the fact that species have developed different strategies to cope with the adverse conditions of heavy metal soils. The literature distinguishes between hyperaccumulating, accumulating, tolerant and excluding metallophytes, but the borderline between these categories is blurred. Due to the fact that heavy metal soils are dry, nutrient limited and are not uniform but have a patchy distribution in many instances, drought-tolerant or low nutrient demanding species are often regarded as metallophytes in the literature. In only a few cases, the concentrations of heavy metals in soils are so toxic that only a few specifically adapted plants, the genuine metallophytes, can cope with these adverse soil conditions. Current molecular biological studies focus on the genetically amenable and hyperaccumulating Arabidopsis halleri and Noccaea (Thlaspi) caerulescens of the Brassicaceae. Armeria maritima ssp. halleri utilizes glands for the excretion of heavy metals and is, therefore, a heavy metal excluder. The two endemic zinc violets of Western Europe, Viola lutea ssp. calaminaria of the Aachen-Liège area and Viola lutea ssp. westfalica of the Pb-Cu-ditch of Blankenrode, Eastern Westphalia, as well as Viola tricolor ecotypes of Eastern Europe, keep their cells free of excess heavy metals by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi which bind heavy metals. The Caryophyllaceae, Silene vulgaris f. humilis and Minuartia verna, apparently discard leaves when overloaded with heavy metals. All Central European metallophytes have close relatives that grow in areas outside of heavy metal soils, mainly in the Alps, and have, therefore, been considered as relicts of the glacial epoch in the past. However, the current

  4. The Ferroportin Metal Efflux Proteins Function in Iron and Cobalt Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relatively little is known about how metals such as iron are effluxed from cells, a necessary step for transport from the root to the shoot. Ferroportin is the sole iron efflux transporter in animals, and there are two closely related orthologs in Arabidopsis, FPN1 and FPN2. FPN1 localizes to the pl...

  5. Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Deepa; Choi, Hyunju; Huh, Sung Un; Bassin, Barbara; Kim, Jeongsik; Martinoia, Enrico; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Paek, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Youngsook

    2017-07-11

    Plant pathogens cause huge yield losses. Plant defense often depends on toxic secondary metabolites that inhibit pathogen growth. Because most secondary metabolites are also toxic to the plant, specific transporters are needed to deliver them to the pathogens. To identify the transporters that function in plant defense, we screened Arabidopsis thaliana mutants of full-size ABCG transporters for hypersensitivity to sclareol, an antifungal compound. We found that atabcg34 mutants were hypersensitive to sclareol and to the necrotrophic fungi Alternaria brassicicola and Botrytis cinerea AtABCG34 expression was induced by A brassicicola inoculation as well as by methyl-jasmonate, a defense-related phytohormone, and AtABCG34 was polarly localized at the external face of the plasma membrane of epidermal cells of leaves and roots. atabcg34 mutants secreted less camalexin, a major phytoalexin in A thaliana , whereas plants overexpressing AtABCG34 secreted more camalexin to the leaf surface and were more resistant to the pathogen. When treated with exogenous camalexin, atabcg34 mutants exhibited hypersensitivity, whereas BY2 cells expressing AtABCG34 exhibited improved resistance. Analyses of natural Arabidopsis accessions revealed that AtABCG34 contributes to the disease resistance in naturally occurring genetic variants, albeit to a small extent. Together, our data suggest that AtABCG34 mediates camalexin secretion to the leaf surface and thereby prevents A brassicicola infection.

  6. From the Soil to the Seed. Metal Transport in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerinot, Mary Lou [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2015-02-27

    Deficiencies of micronutrients such as Fe, Mn, and Zn commonly limit plant growth and crop yields. The long-term goals of our program are to understand how plants acquire metal micronutrients from the soil and distribute them while protecting themselves from the potential redox damage metals can cause to living tissues. Metals serve as important co-factors for photosynthesis and respiration, yet we still know very little about metal transport. Our approach combines experimental and computational tools from the physical sciences with biochemistry and molecular biology. Specifically, we combine mutant analysis with synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) spectroscopy, a technique that allows us to image the elemental composition of living plant material in 3-D. By analyzing the phenotypes of lines carrying mutations in various metal transporters, we have identified the genes responsible for uptake of zinc from the soil as well as genes involved in loading the seeds with metal micronutrients. Several of these transporters affect the localization of metals in the seed without affecting the overall metal content. Understanding how seeds obtain and store nutrients is key to developing crops with higher agronomic and nutritional value.

  7. Phytochelatin-metal(loid) transport into vacuoles shows different substrate preferences in barley and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Yong; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Lee, Youngsook; Schroeder, Julian I; Ahn, Sang-Nag; Lee, Hyun-Sook; Wicker, Thomas; Martinoia, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) are toxic to all living organisms, including plants and humans. In plants, Cd and As are detoxified by phytochelatins (PCs) and metal(loid)-chelating peptides and by sequestering PC-metal(loid) complexes in vacuoles. Consistent differences have been observed between As and Cd detoxification. Whereas chelation of Cd by PCs is largely sufficient to detoxify Cd, As-PC complexes must be sequestered into vacuoles to be fully detoxified. It is not clear whether this difference in detoxification pathways is ubiquitous among plants or varies across species. Here, we have conducted a PC transport study using vacuoles isolated from Arabidopsis and barley. Arabidopsis vacuoles accumulated low levels of PC2 -Cd, and vesicles from yeast cells expressing either AtABCC1 or AtABCC2 exhibited negligible PC2 -Cd transport activity compared with PC2 -As. In contrast, barley vacuoles readily accumulated comparable levels of PC2 -Cd and PC2 -As. PC transport in barley vacuoles was inhibited by vanadate, but not by ammonium, suggesting the involvement of ABC-type transporters. Interestingly, barley vacuoles exhibited enhanced PC2 transport activity when essential metal ions, such as Zn(II), Cu(II) and Mn(II), were added to the transport assay, suggesting that PCs might contribute to the homeostasis of essential metals and detoxification of non-essential toxic metal(loid)s. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Phytochelatin–metal(loid) transport into vacuoles shows different substrate preferences in barley and Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Yong; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Lee, Youngsook; Schroeder, Julian I.; Ahn, Sang-Nag; Lee, Hyun-Sook; Wicker, Thomas; Martinoia, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) are toxic to all living organisms, including plants and humans. In plants, Cd and As are detoxified by phytochelatins (PCs) and metal(loid)-chelating peptides and by sequestering PC–metal(loid) complexes in vacuoles. Consistent differences have been observed between As and Cd detoxification. Whereas chelation of Cd by PCs is largely sufficient to detoxify Cd, As–PC complexes must be sequestered into vacuoles to be fully detoxified. It is not clear whether this difference in detoxification pathways is ubiquitous among plants or varies across species. Here, we have conducted a PC transport study using vacuoles isolated from Arabidopsis and barley. Arabidopsis vacuoles accumulated low levels of PC2–Cd, and vesicles from yeast cells expressing either AtABCC1 or AtABCC2 exhibited negligible PC2–Cd transport activity compared with PC2–As. In contrast, barley vacuoles readily accumulated comparable levels of PC2–Cd and PC2–As. PC transport in barley vacuoles was inhibited by vanadate, but not by ammonium, suggesting the involvement of ABC-type transporters. Interestingly, barley vacuoles exhibited enhanced PC2 transport activity when essential metal ions, such as Zn(II), Cu(II) and Mn(II), were added to the transport assay, suggesting that PCs might contribute to the homeostasis of essential metals and detoxification of non-essential toxic metal(loid)s. PMID:24313707

  9. Evolution and genetic differentiation among relatives of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Marcus A; Matschinger, Michaela

    2007-04-10

    Arabidopsis thaliana is one of the most intensively studied plant species. More recently, information is accumulating about its closest relatives, the former genus Cardaminopsis. A. thaliana diverged from these relatives, actually treated within three major lineages (Arabidopsis lyrata, Arabidopsis halleri, and Arabidopsis arenosa), approximately 5 mya. Significant karyotype evolution in A. thaliana with base chromosome number reduction from x=8 to x=5 might indicate and favor effective genetic isolation from these other species, although hybrids are occurring naturally and have been also constituted under controlled conditions. We tested the evolutionary significance to separate the x=5 from the x=8 lineage using DNA sequence data from the plastome and the nuclear ribosomal DNA based on an extensive, representative worldwide sampling of nearly all taxonomic entities. We conclude that (i) A. thaliana is clearly separated phylogenetically from the x=8 lineage, (ii) five major lineages outside A. thaliana can be identified (A. lyrata, A. arenosa, A. halleri, Arabidopsis croatica, and Arabidopsis pedemontana) together with Arabidopsis cebennensis, and (iii) centers of genetic and morphological diversity are mostly in congruence and are located close to the Balkans in Austria and Slovakia outside glaciated and permafrost regions with few notable exceptions.

  10. Transgenerational adaptation to heavy metal salts in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad eReza Rahavi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to abiotic and biotic stress results in changes in plant physiology and triggers genomic instability. Recent reports suggest that the progeny of stressed plants also exhibit changes in genome stability, stress tolerance and methylation.Here we analyzed whether exposure to Ni2+, Cd2+ and Cu2+ salts leads to transgenerational changes in the homologous recombination frequency and in the stress tolerance. We found that immediate progeny of stressed plants indeed exhibit increased recombination frequency. When the progeny of stressed plants was propagated without stress, the recombination frequency changed back to normal. Exposure of plants to heavy metals for five consecutive generations (S1-S5 showed that recombination frequency was maintained at high level. Skipping stress after propagation on 50 mM Ni2+ or Cd2+ for 2-3 generations did not decrease the recombination frequency, suggesting certain acclimation to upregulated recombination. Analysis of the progeny of plants exposed to Cu2+ and Ni2+ showed that the plants had higher stress tolerance to the same heavy metal salts. The tolerance was higher in plants propagated on stress for 3-5 generations, which had longer roots than plants propagated on heavy metals only for 1-2 generations. Also the tolerance was more prominent upon exposure to higher concentration of salts. The progeny of stressed plants was also more tolerant to NaCl and MMS.

  11. Expression of the Znt1 zinc transporter from the metal hyperaccumulator noccaea caerulescens confers enhanced zinc and cadmium tolerance and accumulation to arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Ya Fen; Hassan, Zeshan; Talukdar, S.; Schat, Henk; Aarts, Mark G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Prompt regulation of transition metal transporters is crucial for plant zinc homeostasis. NcZNT1 is one of such transporters, found in the metal hyperaccumulator Brassicaceae species Noccaea caerulescens. It is orthologous to AtZIP4 from Arabidopsis thaliana, an important actor in Zn homeostasis.

  12. Both heavy metal-amendment of soil and aphid-infestation increase Cd and Zn concentrations in phloem exudates of a metal-hyperaccumulating plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolpe, Clemens; Giehren, Franziska; Krämer, Ute; Müller, Caroline

    2017-07-01

    Plants that are able to hyperaccumulate heavy metals show increased concentrations of these metals in their leaf tissue. However, little is known about the concentrations of heavy metals and of organic defence metabolites in the phloem sap of these plants in response to either heavy metal-amendment of the soil or biotic challenges such as aphid-infestation. In this study, we investigated the effects of heavy metal-exposure and of aphid-infestation on phloem exudate composition of the metal hyperaccumulator species Arabidopsis halleri L. O'Kane & Al-Shehbaz (Brassicaceae). The concentrations of elements and of organic defence compounds, namely glucosinolates, were measured in phloem exudates of young and old (mature) leaves of plants challenged either by amendment of the soil with cadmium and zinc and/or by an infestation with the generalist aphid Myzus persicae. Metal-amendment of the soil led to increased concentrations of Cd and Zn, but also of two other elements and one indole glucosinolate, in phloem exudates. This enhanced defence in the phloem sap of heavy metal-hyperaccumulating plants can thus potentially act as effective protection against aphids, as predicted by the elemental defence hypothesis. Aphid-infestation also caused enhanced Cd and Zn concentrations in phloem exudates. This result provides first evidence that metal-hyperaccumulating plants can increase heavy metal concentrations tissue-specifically in response to an attack by phloem-sucking herbivores. Overall, the concentrations of most elements, including the heavy metals, and glucosinolates were higher in phloem exudates of young leaves than in those of old leaves. This defence distribution highlights that the optimal defence theory, which predicts more valuable tissue to be better defended, is applicable for both inorganic and organic defences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Metal-binding thermodynamics of the histidine-rich sequence from the metal-transport protein IRT1 of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossoehme, Nicholas E; Akilesh, Shreeram; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Wilcox, Dean E

    2006-10-16

    The widespread ZIP family of transmembrane metal-transporting proteins is characterized by a large intracellular loop that contains a histidine-rich sequence whose biological role is unknown. To provide a chemical basis for this role, we prepared and studied a peptide corresponding to this sequence from the first iron-regulated transporter (IRT1) of Arabidopsis thaliana, which transports Fe2+ as well as Mn2+, Co2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements, which required novel experiments and data analysis, and supporting spectroscopic methods were used to quantify IRT1's metal-binding affinity and associated thermodynamics. The peptide, PHGHGHGHGP, binds metal ions with 1:1 stoichiometry and stabilities that are consistent with the Irving-Williams series. Comparison of the metal-binding thermodynamics of the peptide with those of trien provides new insight about enthalpic and entropic contributions to the stability of the metal-peptide complex. Although Fe2+ and other IRT1-transported metal ions do not bind very tightly, this His-rich sequence has a very high entropy-driven affinity for Fe3+, which may have biological significance.

  14. Population genetic structure of the round stingray Urobatis halleri (Elasmobranchii: Rajiformes) in southern California and the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, S M; Lowe, C G; Feldheim, K A; Wilson, R R; Brusslan, J A

    2010-08-01

    The round stingray, Urobatis halleri, is a viviparous elasmobranch that inhabits inshore, benthic habitats ranging from the western U.S.A. to Panama. The population genetic structure of this species was inferred with seven polymorphic microsatellite loci in samples collected at three sites in coastal southern California, one near Santa Catalina Island, California and one in the eastern Gulf of California. Urobatis halleri is relatively common, but little is known of its movement patterns or population structure. Small F(ST) values (-0.0017 to 0.0005) suggested little structure among coastal populations of southern and Baja California. The population sampled at Santa Catalina Island, which is separated by a deep-water channel from the coastal sites, however, was significantly divergent (large F(ST), 0.0251) from the other populations, suggesting low connectivity with coastal populations. The Santa Catalina Island population also had the lowest allele richness and lowest average heterozygosity, suggesting recent population bottlenecks in size.

  15. The assembly of metals chelation by thiols and vacuolar compartmentalization conferred increased tolerance to and accumulation of cadmium and arsenic in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiangbo [Key Laboratory of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093 (China); Inner Mongolia Key Laboratory of Biomass-Energy Conversion, The Institute of Bioengineering and Technology, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 040100 (China); Xu, Wenzhong [Key Laboratory of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093 (China); Ma, Mi, E-mail: mami@ibcas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simultaneous transformation of AsPCS1 and ScYCF1 into Arabidopsis thaliana which is sensitive to heavy metals, leads to transgenic plants tolerant to Arsenic and cadmium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dual-gene transgenic Arabidopsis showed higher accumulation of Arsenic and cadmium than single and non-transgenic plants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results proved that improved thiol peptides synthesis and vacuolar compartmentation in plant dramatically boosted the survival rates of plants when exposed to heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new strategy for efficient phytoremediation of heavy metals by stacking genes transformation in plants was developed in this article. - Abstract: Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana were developed to increase tolerance for and accumulation of heavy metals and metalloids by simultaneous overexpression of AsPCS1 and YCF1 (derived from garlic and baker's yeast) based on the fact that chelation of metals and vacuolar compartmentalization are the main strategies for heavy metals/metalloids detoxification and tolerance in plants. Dual-gene transgenic lines had the longest roots and the highest accumulation of Cd and As than single-gene transgenic lines and wildtype. When grown on cadmium or arsenic (arsenite/arsenate), Dual-gene transgenic lines accumulated over 2-10 folds cadmium/arsenite and 2-3 folds arsenate than wild type or plants expressing AsPCS1 or YCF1 alone. Such stacking modified genes involved in chelation of toxic metals and vacuolar compartmentalization represents a highly promising new tool for use in phytoremediation efforts.

  16. The assembly of metals chelation by thiols and vacuolar compartmentalization conferred increased tolerance to and accumulation of cadmium and arsenic in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jiangbo; Xu, Wenzhong; Ma, Mi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Simultaneous transformation of AsPCS1 and ScYCF1 into Arabidopsis thaliana which is sensitive to heavy metals, leads to transgenic plants tolerant to Arsenic and cadmium. ► Dual-gene transgenic Arabidopsis showed higher accumulation of Arsenic and cadmium than single and non-transgenic plants. ► Our results proved that improved thiol peptides synthesis and vacuolar compartmentation in plant dramatically boosted the survival rates of plants when exposed to heavy metals. ► A new strategy for efficient phytoremediation of heavy metals by stacking genes transformation in plants was developed in this article. - Abstract: Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana were developed to increase tolerance for and accumulation of heavy metals and metalloids by simultaneous overexpression of AsPCS1 and YCF1 (derived from garlic and baker's yeast) based on the fact that chelation of metals and vacuolar compartmentalization are the main strategies for heavy metals/metalloids detoxification and tolerance in plants. Dual-gene transgenic lines had the longest roots and the highest accumulation of Cd and As than single-gene transgenic lines and wildtype. When grown on cadmium or arsenic (arsenite/arsenate), Dual-gene transgenic lines accumulated over 2–10 folds cadmium/arsenite and 2–3 folds arsenate than wild type or plants expressing AsPCS1 or YCF1 alone. Such stacking modified genes involved in chelation of toxic metals and vacuolar compartmentalization represents a highly promising new tool for use in phytoremediation efforts.

  17. Root architecture and morphometric analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana grown in Cd/Cu/Zn-gradient agar dishes: A new screening technique for studying plant response to metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Rocco; Sofo, Adriano; Terzano, Roberto; Gattullo, Concetta Eliana; Amato, Mariana; Scopa, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    A new screening strategy using Petri dishes with a gradient of distances between germinating seeds and a metal-contaminated medium was used for studying alterations in root architecture and morphology of Arabidopsis thaliana treated with cadmium, copper and zinc at sub-toxic concentrations. Metal concentrations in the dishes were determined by anodic stripping voltammetry on digested agar samples collected along the gradient, and kriging statistical interpolation method was performed. After two weeks, all agar dishes were scanned at high resolution and the root systems analyzed. In the presence of all the three metals, primary root length did not significantly change compared to controls, excepting for zinc applied alone (+45% of controls). In metal-treated seedlings, root system total length increased due to the higher number of lateral roots. The seedlings closer to the agar sectors including metals showed a marked curvature and a higher root branching in comparison to those further away from the metals. This behavior, together with an observed increase in root diameter in metal-treated seedlings could be interpreted as compensatory growth, and a thicker roots could act as a barrier to protect root from the metals. We therefore propose that the remodeling of the root architecture in response to metals could be a pollution 'escaping strategy' aimed at seeking metal-free patches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Similarities between Reproductive and Immune Pistil Transcriptomes of Arabidopsis Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana; John-Arputharaj, Ajay; Pallmann, Maria; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Independent lines of evidence suggest that members from ancient and polymorphic gene families such as defensins and receptor-like kinases mediate intercellular communication during both the immune response and reproduction. Here, we report a large-scale analysis to investigate the extent of overlap between these processes by comparing differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the pistil transcriptomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis halleri during self-pollination and interspecific pollination and during infection with Fusarium graminearum In both Arabidopsis species, the largest number of DEGs was identified in infected pistils, where genes encoding regulators of cell division and development were most frequently down-regulated. Comparison of DEGs between infection and various pollination conditions showed that up to 79% of down-regulated genes are shared between conditions and include especially defensin-like genes. Interspecific pollination of A. thaliana significantly up-regulated thionins and defensins. The significant overrepresentation of similar groups of DEGs in the transcriptomes of reproductive and immune responses of the pistil makes it a prime system in which to study the consequences of plant-pathogen interactions on fertility and the evolution of intercellular communication in pollination. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Arabidopsis thaliana Yellow Stripe1-Like4 and Yellow Stripe1-Like6 localize to internal cellular membranes and are involved in metal ion homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-Hsuan eChu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the Yellow Stripe1-Like (YSL family of transporter proteins are able to transport metal-nicotianamine (NA complexes. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the roles of the Arabidopsis YSLs that are most closely related to the founding member of the family, ZmYS1 (e.g., AtYSL1, AtYSL2 and AtYSL3, but there is little information concerning members of the other two well-conserved YSL clades. Here, we provide evidence that AtYSL4 and AtYSL6, which are the only genes in Arabidopsis belong to YSL Group II, are localized to vacuole membranes and to internal membranes resembling endoplasmic reticulum. Both single and double mutants for YSL4 and YSL6 were rigorously analyzed, and have surprisingly mild phenotypes, in spite of the strong and wide-ranging expression of YSL6. However, in the presence of toxic levels of Mn and Ni, plants with mutations in YSL4 and YSL6 and plants overexpressing GFP-tagged YSL6 showed growth defects, indicating a role for these transporters in heavy metal stress responses.

  20. A γ-Glutamyl Cyclotransferase Protects Arabidopsis Plants from Heavy Metal Toxicity by Recycling Glutamate to Maintain Glutathione Homeostasis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulose, Bibin; Chhikara, Sudesh; Coomey, Joshua; Jung, Ha-il; Vatamaniuk, Olena; Dhankher, Om Parkash

    2013-01-01

    Plants detoxify toxic metals through a GSH-dependent pathway. GSH homeostasis is maintained by the γ-glutamyl cycle, which involves GSH synthesis and degradation and the recycling of component amino acids. The enzyme γ-glutamyl cyclotransferase (GGCT) is involved in Glu recycling, but the gene(s) encoding GGCT has not been identified in plants. Here, we report that an Arabidopsis thaliana protein with a cation transport regulator-like domain, hereafter referred to as GGCT2;1, functions as γ-glutamyl cyclotransferase. Heterologous expression of GGCT2;1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced phenotypes that were consistent with decreased GSH content attributable to either GSH degradation or the diversion of γ-glutamyl peptides to produce 5-oxoproline (5-OP). 5-OP levels were further increased by the addition of arsenite and GSH to the medium, indicating that GGCT2;1 participates in the cellular response to arsenic (As) via GSH degradation. Recombinant GGCT2;1 converted both GSH and γ-glutamyl Ala to 5-OP in vitro. GGCT2;1 transcripts were upregulated in As-treated Arabidopsis, and ggct2;1 knockout mutants were more tolerant to As and cadmium than the wild type. Overexpression of GGCT2;1 in Arabidopsis resulted in the accumulation of 5-OP. Under As toxicity, the overexpression lines showed minimal changes in de novo Glu synthesis, while the ggct2;1 mutant increased nitrogen assimilation by severalfold, resulting in a very low As/N ratio in tissue. Thus, our results suggest that GGCT2;1 ensures sufficient GSH turnover during abiotic stress by recycling Glu. PMID:24214398

  1. Mutations in Arabidopsis Yellow Stripe-Like1 and Yellow Stripe-Like3 Reveal Their Roles in Metal Ion Homeostasis and Loading of Metal Ions in Seeds1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Brian M.; Chu, Heng-Hsuan; DiDonato, Raymond J.; Roberts, Louis A.; Eisley, Robynn B.; Lahner, Brett; Salt, David E.; Walker, Elsbeth L.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we describe two members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Yellow Stripe-Like (YSL) family, AtYSL1 and AtYSL3. The YSL1 and YSL3 proteins are members of the oligopeptide transporter family and are predicted to be integral membrane proteins. YSL1 and YSL3 are similar to the maize (Zea mays) YS1 phytosiderophore transporter (ZmYS1) and the AtYSL2 iron (Fe)-nicotianamine transporter, and are predicted to transport metal-nicotianamine complexes into cells. YSL1 and YSL3 mRNAs are expressed in both root and shoot tissues, and both are regulated in response to the Fe status of the plant. β-Glucuronidase reporter expression, driven by YSL1 and YSL3 promoters, reveals expression patterns of the genes in roots, leaves, and flowers. Expression was highest in senescing rosette leaves and cauline leaves. Whereas the single mutants ysl1 and ysl3 had no visible phenotypes, the ysl1ysl3 double mutant exhibited Fe deficiency symptoms, such as interveinal chlorosis. Leaf Fe concentrations are decreased in the double mutant, whereas manganese, zinc, and especially copper concentrations are elevated. In seeds of double-mutant plants, the concentrations of Fe, zinc, and copper are low. Mobilization of metals from leaves during senescence is impaired in the double mutant. In addition, the double mutant has reduced fertility due to defective anther and embryo development. The proposed physiological roles for YSL1 and YSL3 are in delivery of metal micronutrients to and from vascular tissues. PMID:16815956

  2. Taming the wild: resolving the gene pools of non-model Arabidopsis lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Nora; Schmickl, Roswitha; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh; Lučanová, Magdalena; Kolář, Filip; Marhold, Karol; Koch, Marcus A

    2014-10-27

    Wild relatives in the genus Arabidopsis are recognized as useful model systems to study traits and evolutionary processes in outcrossing species, which are often difficult or even impossible to investigate in the selfing and annual Arabidopsis thaliana. However, Arabidopsis as a genus is littered with sub-species and ecotypes which make realizing the potential of these non-model Arabidopsis lineages problematic. There are relatively few evolutionary studies which comprehensively characterize the gene pools across all of the Arabidopsis supra-groups and hypothesized evolutionary lineages and none include sampling at a world-wide scale. Here we explore the gene pools of these various taxa using various molecular markers and cytological analyses. Based on ITS, microsatellite, chloroplast and nuclear DNA content data we demonstrate the presence of three major evolutionary groups broadly characterized as A. lyrata group, A. halleri group and A. arenosa group. All are composed of further species and sub-species forming larger aggregates. Depending on the resolution of the marker, a few closely related taxa such as A. pedemontana, A. cebennensis and A. croatica are also clearly distinct evolutionary lineages. ITS sequences and a population-based screen based on microsatellites were highly concordant. The major gene pools identified by ITS sequences were also significantly differentiated by their homoploid nuclear DNA content estimated by flow cytometry. The chloroplast genome provided less resolution than the nuclear data, and it remains unclear whether the extensive haplotype sharing apparent between taxa results from gene flow or incomplete lineage sorting in this relatively young group of species with Pleistocene origins. Our study provides a comprehensive overview of the genetic variation within and among the various taxa of the genus Arabidopsis. The resolved gene pools and evolutionary lineages will set the framework for future comparative studies on genetic

  3. RNA-seq analysis of the effect of kanamycin and the ABC transporter AtWBC19 on Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings reveals changes in metal content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayalew Mentewab

    Full Text Available Plants are exposed to antibiotics produced by soil microorganisms, but little is known about their responses at the transcriptional level. Likewise, few endogenous mechanisms of antibiotic resistance have been reported. The Arabidopsis thaliana ATP Binding Cassette (ABC transporter AtWBC19 (ABCG19 is known to confer kanamycin resistance, but the exact mechanism of resistance is not well understood. Here we examined the transcriptomes of control seedlings and wbc19 mutant seedlings using RNA-seq analysis. Exposure to kanamycin indicated changes in the organization of the photosynthetic apparatus, metabolic fluxes and metal uptake. Elemental analysis showed a 60% and 80% reduction of iron uptake in control and wbc19 mutant seedlings respectively, upon exposure to kanamycin. The drop in iron content was accompanied by the upregulation of the gene encoding for FERRIC REDUCTION OXIDASE 6 (FRO6 in mutant seedlings but not by the differential expression of other transport genes known to be induced by iron deficiency. In addition, wbc19 mutants displayed a distinct expression profile in the absence of kanamycin. Most notably the expression of several zinc ion binding proteins, including ZINC TRANSPORTER 1 PRECURSOR (ZIP1 was increased, suggesting abnormal zinc uptake. Elemental analysis confirmed a 50% decrease of zinc content in wbc19 mutants. Thus, the antibiotic resistance gene WBC19 appears to also have a role in zinc uptake.

  4. Range-wide genetic structure of Arabidopsis halleri (Brassicaceae): glacial persistence in multiple refugia and origin of the Northern Hemisphere disjunction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrámková-Fuxová, G.; Záveská, E.; Kolář, Filip; Lučanová, Magdalena; Španiel, S.; Marhold, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 185, č. 3 (2017), s. 321-342 ISSN 0024-4074 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Cruciferae * extra-Mediterranean refugia * DNA sequencing Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 2.277, year: 2016

  5. Nitric oxide responsive heavy metal-associated gene AtHMAD1 contributes to development and disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qari Muhammad Imran

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of plants to different biotic and abiotic stress condition instigates significant change in the cellular redox status; resulting in the elevation of reactive nitrogen species that play signaling role in mediating defense responses. Heavy metal associated (HMA domain containing genes are required for spatio-temporal transportation of metal ions that bind with various enzymes and co-factors within the cell. To uncover the underlying mechanisms mediated by AtHMA genes, we identified 14 Arabidopsis HMA genes that were differentially expressed in response to nitrosative stress through RNA-seq analysis. Of those 14 genes, the expression of eight HMA genes was significantly increased, whereas that of six genes was significantly reduced. We further validated the RNA-seq results through quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Gene ontology analysis revealed the involvement of these genes in biological processes such as hemostasis and transport. The majority of these nitric oxide (NO-responsive AtHMA gene products are carrier/transport proteins. AtHMAD1 (At1g51090 showed the highest fold change to S-nitrosocystein. We therefore, further investigated its role in oxidative and nitrosative mediated stress conditions and found that AtHMAD1 has antagonistic role in shoot and root growth. Characterization of AtHMAD1 through functional genomics showed that the knock out mutant athmad1 plants were resistant to virulent Pseudomonas syringae (DC3000 and showed early induction and high transcript accumulation of pathogenesis related gene. Furthermore, inoculation of athamd1 with avirulent strain of the same bacteria showed negative regulation of R-gene mediated resistance. These results were supported by hypersensitive cell death response and cell death induced electrolyte leakage. AtHMAD1 was also observed to negatively regulate systemic acquired resistance SAR as the KO mutant showed induction of SAR marker genes. Overall, these results imply that NO

  6. An advanced field experimental design to assess plant tolerance to heavy metal pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łopata, Barbara; Szarek-Łukaszewska, Grażyna; Babst-Kostecka, Alicja

    2016-04-01

    the plant development, 2) the percentage of leaves showing visible symptoms of Zn toxicity (i.e. leaf chlorosis, mottling, necrosis, anthocyanescence), and measurement of 3) number of stems, 4) length of the longest stem, 5) effective photosystem II yield, and 6) chlorophyll content. Upon termination of the experiment, we are going to harvest all plant material for genetic, physiological and chemical analyses. This ongoing project is conducted in southern Poland and as a study object we chose the model pseudometallophyte Arabidopsis halleri (Brassicaceae). However, our enhanced experimental design can easily be adapted to other locations and species, thereby facilitating the intercomparisons between results obtained by different researchers and from a variety of geographic locations. The obtained plant material can be used in interdisciplinary approaches in support of efforts to improve environmental health and landscape quality at polluted sites.

  7. A Genome Scan for Genes Underlying Microgeographic-Scale Local Adaptation in a Wild Arabidopsis Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Shosei; Iwasaki, Takaya; Hanada, Kousuke; Nagano, Atsushi J.; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hikosaka, Kouki; Ito, Motomi; Morinaga, Shin-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive divergence at the microgeographic scale has been generally disregarded because high gene flow is expected to disrupt local adaptation. Yet, growing number of studies reporting adaptive divergence at a small spatial scale highlight the importance of this process in evolutionary biology. To investigate the genetic basis of microgeographic local adaptation, we conducted a genome-wide scan among sets of continuously distributed populations of Arabidopsis halleri subsp. gemmifera that show altitudinal phenotypic divergence despite gene flow. Genomic comparisons were independently conducted in two distinct mountains where similar highland ecotypes are observed, presumably as a result of convergent evolution. Here, we established a de novo reference genome and employed an individual-based resequencing for a total of 56 individuals. Among 527,225 reliable SNP loci, we focused on those showing a unidirectional allele frequency shift across altitudes. Statistical tests on the screened genes showed that our microgeographic population genomic approach successfully retrieve genes with functional annotations that are in line with the known phenotypic and environmental differences between altitudes. Furthermore, comparison between the two distinct mountains enabled us to screen out those genes that are neutral or adaptive only in either mountain, and identify the genes involved in the convergent evolution. Our study demonstrates that the genomic comparison among a set of genetically connected populations, instead of the commonly-performed comparison between two isolated populations, can also offer an effective screening for the genetic basis of local adaptation. PMID:26172569

  8. Molecular and physiological responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    - Changes in tissue transcriptomes and productivity of Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated during exposure of plants to two widely-used engineered metal oxide nanoparticles, titanium dioxide (nano-titanium) and cerium dioxide (nano-cerium). Microarray analyses confirmed that e...

  9. An Arabidopsis callose synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole

    2002-01-01

    in the Arabidopsis mpk4 mutant which exhibits systemic acquired resistance (SAR), elevated beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity, and increased callose levels. In addition, AtGsl5 is a likely target of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent SAR, since AtGsl5 mRNA accumulation is induced by SA in wild-type plants, while...... expression of the nahG salicylate hydroxylase reduces AtGsl5 mRNA levels in the mpk4 mutant. These results indicate that AtGsl5 is likely involved in callose synthesis in flowering tissues and in the mpk4 mutant....

  10. Photorepair mutants of Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, C.Z.; Yee, J.; Mitchell, D.L.; Britt, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    UV radiation induces two major DNA damage products, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and, at a lower frequency, the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidinone dimer (6-4 product). Although Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce a CPD-specific photolyase that eliminates only this class of dimer, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Crotalus atrox, and Xenopus laevis have recently been shown to photoreactivate both CPDs and 6-4 products. We describe the isolation and characterization of two new classes of mutants of Arabidopsis, termed uvr2 and uvr3, that are defective in the photoreactivation of CPDs and 6-4 products, respectively. We demonstrate that the CPD photolyase mutation is genetically linked to a DNA sequence encoding a type II (metazoan) CPD photolyase. In addition, we are able to generate plants in which only CPDs or 6-4 products are photoreactivated in the nuclear genome by exposing these mutants to UV light and then allowing them to repair one or the other class of dimers. This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the biological consequences of each of these two major UV-induced photoproducts in an intact living system

  11. Arabidopsis peroxisome proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Bussell

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The analytical depth of investigation of the peroxisomal proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana has not yet reached that of other major cellular organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. This is primarily due to the difficulties associated with isolating and obtaining purified samples of peroxisomes from Arabidopsis. So far only a handful of research groups have been successful in obtaining such fractions. To make things worse, enriched peroxisome fractions frequently suffer from significant organellar contamination, lowering confidence in localization assignment of the identified proteins. As with other cellular compartments, identification of peroxisomal proteins forms the basis for investigations of the dynamics of the peroxisomal proteome. It is therefore not surprising that, in terms of functional analyses by proteomic means, there remains a considerable gap between peroxisomes and chloroplasts or mitochondria. Alternative strategies are needed to overcome the obstacle of hard-to-obtain organellar fractions. This will help to close the knowledge gap between peroxisomes and other organelles and provide a full picture of the physiological pathways shared between organelles. In this review we briefly summarize the status quo and discuss some of the methodological alternatives to classic organelle proteomic approaches.

  12. The Arabidopsis thaliana ABC protein superfamily, a complete inventory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Fernández, R; Davies, T G; Coleman, J O; Rea, P A

    2001-08-10

    We describe the first complete inventory of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins from a multicellular organism, the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. By the application of several search criteria, Arabidopsis was found to contain a total of 129 open reading frames (ORFs) capable of encoding ABC proteins, of which 103 possessed contiguous transmembrane spans and were identified as putative intrinsic membrane proteins. Fifty-two of the putative intrinsic membrane proteins contained at least two transmembrane domains (TMDs) and two nucleotide-binding folds (NBFs) and could be classified as belonging to one of five subfamilies of full-molecule transporters. The other 51 putative membrane proteins, all of which were half-molecule transporters, fell into five subfamilies. Of the remaining ORFs identified, all of which encoded proteins lacking TMDs, 11 could be classified into three subfamilies. There were no obvious homologs in other organisms for 15 of the ORFs which encoded a heterogeneous group of non-intrinsic ABC proteins (NAPs). Unrooted phylogenetic analyses substantiated the subfamily designations. Notable features of the Arabidopsis ABC superfamily was the presence of a large yeast-like PDR subfamily, and the absence of genes encoding bona fide cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), sulfonylurea receptor (SUR), and heavy metal tolerance factor 1 (HMT1) homologs. Arabidopsis was unusual in its large allocation of ORFs (a minimum of 0.5%) to members of the ABC protein superfamily.

  13. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  14. Reference: 783 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available xpression of the Arabidopsis 10-kilodalton acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein ACBP6 en...phospholipid metabolism in Arabidopsis, including the possibility of ACBP6 in the cytosolic trafficking of phosphatidylcholine. Overe

  15. Reference: 774 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available an essential gene, the disruption of which causes embryonic lethality. Plants carrying a hypomorphic smg7 mu...e progression from anaphase to telophase in the second meiotic division in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis SMG7 is

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240660 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al to auxin transport protein EIR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|3377507|gb|AAC39513; identical to root gravitropism control protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|4322486|gb|AAD16060 2e-63 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240660 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al to auxin transport protein EIR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|3377507|gb|AAC39513; identical to root gravitropism control protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|4322486|gb|AAD16060 3e-40 ...

  18. Reference: 173 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mical approaches to elucidate the action mechanisms of sirtinol in Arabidopsis. A...tic and chemical analyses of the action mechanisms of sirtinol in Arabidopsis. 8 3129-34 15710899 2005 Feb P

  19. Reference: 765 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available el K et al. 2008 Jul. Plant Physiol. 147(3):1046-61. The genome of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contai...ne family in Arabidopsis. 3 1046-61 18467451 2008 Jul Plant physiology Alerding Anne B|Bandara Aloka B|Crosby Kevin C|Owens Daniel K|Westwood James H|Winkel Brenda S J

  20. Reference: 278 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nthia D et al. 2005 Oct. Plant Physiol. 139(2):722-33. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants lacking a ... is involved in specific aspects of abscisic acid and auxin signaling in Arabidopsis. 2 722-33 16183844 2005 Oct Plant physio

  1. Reference: 222 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g et al. 2005 Jun. Plant Physiol. 138(2):827-36. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains about 130 ATP-b...resistance in Arabidopsis. 2 827-36 15923333 2005 Jun Plant physiology Lee Joohyun|Lee Kiyoul|Lee Miyoung|Lee Youngsook|Noh Eun Woon

  2. Reference: 128 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available s et al. 2004 Nov. Plant Physiol. 136(3):3524-36. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) possesses two isoforms ...lism in mature leaves. Molecular physiological analysis of the two plastidic ATP/ADP transporters from Arabi...dopsis. 3 3524-36 15516503 2004 Nov Plant physiology Jeblick Wolfgang|Lemke Lilia|Linka Nicole|Neuhaus H Ekkehard|Reiser Jens

  3. Alleviation of Copper Toxicity in Arabidopsis Thaliana and Zinnia Elegans by Silicon Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    While the role of silicon in plants has been studied for over 150 years, and this element can mitigate the effects of certain heavy metals, its role in Cu metabolism is unclear. Therefore, the role of Si in plant response to Cu stress was investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heyn) and Zinnia el...

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase N

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ostergaard, L

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the neutral peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATP N) has been determined to a resolution of 1.9 A and a free R value of 20.5%. ATP N has the expected characteristic fold of the class III peroxidases, with a C(alpha) r.m.s.d. of 0.82 A when compared with horseradish peroxidase C...... (HRP C). HRP C is 54% identical to ATP N in sequence. When the structures of four class III plant peroxidases are superimposed, the regions with structural differences are non-randomly distributed; all are located in one half of the molecule. The architecture of the haem pocket of ATP N is very similar...... to that of HRP C, in agreement with the low small-molecule substrate specificity of all class III peroxidases. The structure of ATP N suggests that the pH dependence of the substrate turnover will differ from that of HRP C owing to differences in polarity of the residues in the substrate-access channel. Since...

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana—Aphid Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Joe; Singh, Vijay; Shah, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Aphids are important pests of plants that use their stylets to tap into the sieve elements to consume phloem sap. Besides the removal of photosynthates, aphid infestation also alters source-sink patterns. Most aphids also vector viral diseases. In this chapter, we will summarize on recent significant findings in plant-aphid interaction, and how studies involving Arabidopsis thaliana and Myzus persicae (Sülzer), more commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), are beginning to provide important insights into the molecular basis of plant defense and susceptibility to aphids. The recent demonstration that expression of dsRNA in Arabidopsis can be used to silence expression of genes in GPA has further expanded the utility of Arabidopsis for evaluating the contribution of the aphid genome-encoded proteins to this interaction. PMID:22666177

  6. Image of Arabidopsis phenotype - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us Arab...idopsis Phenome Database Image of Arabidopsis phenotype Data detail Data name Image of Arab...idopsis phenotype DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc01509-002 Description of data contents Mutant images in Observation of Arab...idopsis phenotype Data file File name: piam_image.tar.gz File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/arab...tory of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Image of Arabidopsis phenotype - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive ...

  7. A novel role for methyl cysteinate, a cysteine derivative, in cesium accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, Eri; Miyazaki, Takae; Hayaishi-Satoh, Aya

    2017-01-01

    Phytoaccumulation is a technique to extract metals from soil utilising ability of plants. Cesium is a valuable metal while radioactive isotopes of cesium can be hazardous. In order to establish a more efficient phytoaccumulation system, small molecules which promote plants to accumulate cesium were...... investigated. Through chemical library screening, 14 chemicals were isolated as 'cesium accumulators' in Arabidopsis thaliana. Of those, methyl cysteinate, a derivative of cysteine, was found to function within the plant to accumulate externally supplemented cesium. Moreover, metabolite profiling demonstrated...

  8. BRX promotes Arabidopsis shoot growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beuchat, J.; Scacchi, E.; Tarkowská, Danuše; Ragni, L.; Strnad, Miroslav; Hardtke, C.S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 188, č. 1 (2010), s. 23-29 ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Arabidopsis * auxin * brassinosteroid Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 6.516, year: 2010

  9. Exploiting natural variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, J.A.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.; Sanchez-Serrano, J.J.; Salinas, J.

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana. This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of

  10. Enrichment and Analysis of Intact Phosphoproteins in Arabidopsis Seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma K Aryal

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation regulates diverse cellular functions and plays a key role in the early development of plants. To complement and expand upon previous investigations of protein phosphorylation in Arabidopsis seedlings we used an alternative approach that combines protein extraction under non-denaturing conditions with immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC enrichment of intact phosphoproteins in Rubisco-depleted extracts, followed by identification using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. In-gel trypsin digestion and analysis of selected gel spots identified 144 phosphorylated peptides and residues, of which only 18 phosphopeptides and 8 phosphosites were found in the PhosPhAt 4.0 and P3DB Arabidopsis thaliana phosphorylation site databases. More than half of the 82 identified phosphoproteins were involved in carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis/respiration or oxidative stress response mechanisms. Enrichment of intact phosphoproteins prior to 2-DE and LC-MS/MS appears to enhance detection of phosphorylated threonine and tyrosine residues compared with methods that utilize peptide-level enrichment, suggesting that the two approaches are somewhat complementary in terms of phosphorylation site coverage. Comparing results for young seedlings with those obtained previously for mature Arabidopsis leaves identified five proteins that are differentially phosphorylated in these tissues, demonstrating the potential of this technique for investigating the dynamics of protein phosphorylation during plant development.

  11. Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us Arab...idopsis Phenome Database Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype Data detail Data name Observation of Arab...-hunting line. Data file File name: riken_piam_main.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/arabid_...Site Policy | Contact Us Observation of Arabidopsis phenotype - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive ...

  12. Different myrosinase and idioblast distribution in Arabidopsis and Brassica napus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, Erik; Jørgensen, Lise Bolt; Höglund, Anna-Stina

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, Myrosinase, Myrosinase Binding Protein, Glucosinolates, Myrosin Cell, Immunocytochemistry......Arabidopsis, Brassica napus, Myrosinase, Myrosinase Binding Protein, Glucosinolates, Myrosin Cell, Immunocytochemistry...

  13. Reference: 297 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is (Arabidopsis thaliana) mineral responses. Confocal microscopic studies localiz...nder normal growth conditions, it significantly altered the expression patterns of WAKL4 under various conditions of miner...oter complemented the phenotypes. Our results suggest versatile roles for WAKL4 in Arabidopsis mineral nutri...tion responses. Involvement of a cell wall-associated kinase, WAKL4, in Arabidopsis mineral responses. 4 170

  14. Assessing Gravitropic Responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Richard; Cox, Benjamin; Silber, Logan; Sangari, Arash; Assadi, Amir; Masson, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana was the first higher organism to have its genome sequenced and is now widely regarded as the model dicot. Like all plants, Arabidopsis develops distinct growth patterns in response to different environmental stimuli. This can be seen in the gravitropic response of roots. Methods to investigate this particular tropism are presented here. First, we describe a high-throughput time-lapse photographic analysis of root growth and curvature response to gravistimulation allowing the quantification of gravitropic kinetics and growth rate at high temporal resolution. Second, we present a protocol that allows a quantitative evaluation of gravitropic sensitivity using a homemade 2D clinostat. Together, these approaches allow an initial comparative analysis of the key phenomena associated with root gravitropism between different genotypes and/or accessions.

  15. Reference: 153 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rnando et al. 2005 Jan. Plant Physiol. 137(1):70-82. An Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) L. Heynh mutant d...no acid biosynthesis and enhanced growth. 1 70-82 15618410 2005 Jan Plant physiology Balbo Ilse|Carrari Fern

  16. Reference: 322 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available neko et al. 2006 Feb. Plant Physiol. 140(2):591-602. Hypocotyl segments of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana...gene, ROOT PRIMORDIUM DEFECTIVE 1, is required for the maintenance of active cell proliferation. 2 591-602 16407439 2006 Feb Plant physiology Konishi Mineko|Sugiyama Munetaka

  17. Reference: 208 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available oshiteru et al. 2005 Jul. Plant Cell Physiol. 46(7):1165-72. We isolated an Arabidopsis albino and pale gree... in histidine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. 7 1165-72 15870096 2005 Jul Plant & cell physiology Ito Takuya|Noutoshi Yoshiteru|Shinozaki Kazuo

  18. Reference: 537 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ukika et al. 2007 Mar. Plant Cell Physiol. 48(3):555-61. Gibberellin levels in imbibed Arabidopsis thaliana ...uppression of germination of dark-imbibed Arabidopsis thaliana seeds. 3 555-61 17289793 2007 Mar Plant & cell physio

  19. Reference: 218 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thea et al. 2005 Jun. Plant J. 42(5):757-71. Despite the fact that Arabidopsis is largely self-pollinating, its flowers...nsible for the complex mixture of sesquiterpenes emitted from Arabidopsis flowers. 5 757-71 15918888 2005 Ju

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK070842 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070842 J023074O14 At4g35000.1 L-ascorbate peroxidase 3 (APX3) identical to ascorbat...e peroxidase 3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:2444019, L-ascorbate peroxidase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|1523791...|emb|CAA66926; similar to ascorbate peroxidase [Gossypium hirsutum] gi|1019946|gb|AAB52954 1e-112 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK108458 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108458 002-143-D05 At4g35000.1 L-ascorbate peroxidase 3 (APX3) identical to ascorbat...e peroxidase 3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:2444019, L-ascorbate peroxidase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|152379...1|emb|CAA66926; similar to ascorbate peroxidase [Gossypium hirsutum] gi|1019946|gb|AAB52954 2e-35 ...

  2. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR…

  3. Reference: 255 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ases, AtIPK1 and AtIPK2beta, for the later steps of phytate synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Coincident disruption...olyphosphate kinases in phosphate signaling biology. Generation of phytate-free seeds in Arabidopsis through disruption

  4. Characterization of a New Family of Metal Transporters; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mary Lou Geurinot; David Eide

    2002-01-01

    Metal ions are critical nutrients, yet overaccumulation of these same metals can also be toxic. To maintain appropriate intracellular levels, cells require specific metal uptake systems that are subject to precise homeostatic regulation. The long-range goal of our research is to define the molecular mechanism(s) and regulation of metal ion uptake in eukaryotic cells. Integrating genetic, molecular biological and biochemical approaches, we have examined these processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both are proven model systems for studying fundamental cellular processes. Our work has focused on the ZIP family of metal transporters which we identified; this family has representatives in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. IRT, one of the founding members of the ZIP family, is an essential cation transporter that is expressed in the epidermal cells of iron deficient plant roots and is responsible for uptake of iron from the soil. We now know that there are 15 ZIP genes in the Arabidopsis and the similarities among their encoded gene products. The ZIP family members display different substrate specificities for metals and different tissue distributions in Arabidopsis. Moreover, the family members respond differentially to metal deficiencies. For example, IRT1, ZIP6 and ZIP9 mRNA are expressed mainly in the roots of iron deficient plants whereas ZIP4 responds to both iron and zinc deficiency. Work in both yeast and Arabidopsis has addressed substrate specificity as well as how these transporters are regulated in response to metal availability

  5. Characterization of a New Family of Metal Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Lou Geurinot; David Eide

    2002-04-29

    Metal ions are critical nutrients, yet overaccumulation of these same metals can also be toxic. To maintain appropriate intracellular levels, cells require specific metal uptake systems that are subject to precise homeostatic regulation. The long-range goal of our research is to define the molecular mechanism(s) and regulation of metal ion uptake in eukaryotic cells. Integrating genetic, molecular biological and biochemical approaches, we have examined these processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both are proven model systems for studying fundamental cellular processes. Our work has focused on the ZIP family of metal transporters which we identified; this family has representatives in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. IRT, one of the founding members of the ZIP family, is an essential cation transporter that is expressed in the epidermal cells of iron deficient plant roots and is responsible for uptake of iron from the soil. We now know that there are 15 ZIP genes in the Arabidopsis and the similarities among their encoded gene products. The ZIP family members display different substrate specificities for metals and different tissue distributions in Arabidopsis. Moreover, the family members respond differentially to metal deficiencies. For example, IRT1, ZIP6 and ZIP9 mRNA are expressed mainly in the roots of iron deficient plants whereas ZIP4 responds to both iron and zinc deficiency. Work in both yeast and Arabidopsis has addressed substrate specificity as well as how these transporters are regulated in response to metal availability

  6. Reference: 207 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e have isolated an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ispH null mutant that has an albino phenotype and have... generated Arabidopsis transgenic lines showing various albino patterns caused by IspH transgene-induced gen...e silencing. The initiation of albino phenotypes rendered by IspH gene silencing ...can arise independently from multiple sites of the same plant. After a spontaneous initiation, the albino ph...on site. The development of chloroplasts is severely impaired in the IspH-deficient albino

  7. Reference: 39 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available membrane proteins that is evolutionarily conserved among higher plants. The enzym...nimal extracellular matrix are synthesized by evolutionarily related enzymes even... gene of Arabidopsis encodes a xyloglucan galactosyltransferase that is evolutionarily related to animal exo

  8. Reference: 368 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al. 2006 May. Plant Cell 18(5):1213-25. To investigate how and when sister chromatid cohesion is released f...rom chromosomes in plants, we isolated the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of separase (AESP) and investigated

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243192 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243192 J100039M06 At3g20330.1 68416.m02576 aspartate carabmoyltransferase, chloro...loroplast precursor (EC 2.1.3.2) (Aspartate transcarbamylase) (ATCase) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 3e-22 ...

  10. Reference: 150 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ridization, Pht1;4 was found mainly expressed in inorgan...physiological characterization of Arabidopsis pht1;4 high affinity phosphate transporter mutants. Using GUS-gene trap and in situ hyb

  11. Reference: 504 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available o et al. 2007 Feb. Plant Cell Physiol. 48(2):375-80. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes a small family ... 17202180 2007 Feb Plant & cell physiology Iwama Ayako|Kakimoto Tatsuo|Kato Tomoh

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119708 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119708 002-157-E08 At1g28330.1 dormancy-associated protein, putative (DRM1) identical to dormancy...-associated protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:2995990; similar to dormancy-associated protei

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060981 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060981 006-202-H08 At1g28330.1 dormancy-associated protein, putative (DRM1) identical to dormancy...-associated protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:2995990; similar to dormancy-associated protei

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK099152 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK099152 J023070H02 At4g01900.1 P II nitrogen sensing protein (GLB I) identical to P II nitrogen... sensing protein GLB I (GI:7268574) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to nitrogen regulatory prot

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068407 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068407 J013149B08 At4g01900.1 P II nitrogen sensing protein (GLB I) identical to P II nitrogen... sensing protein GLB I (GI:7268574) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; similar to nitrogen regulatory prot

  16. Reference: 643 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lament disruption and cytoplasmic disorganisation in the tip growth zone. Mutant ...that plant CAP has evolved to attain plant-specific signalling functions. Arabidopsis CAP1 - a key regulator of actin organisation

  17. Reference: 645 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rter AtDUR3 in nitrogen nutrition in Arabidopsis. In transgenic lines expressing ... impaired growth on urea as a sole nitrogen source were used to investigate a role of the H+/urea co-transpo

  18. Reference: 758 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ol for future investigations into the biological roles of RLPs. A genome-wide fun...ctional investigation into the roles of receptor-like proteins in Arabidopsis. 2 503-17 18434605 2008 Jun Pl

  19. Reference: 572 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available largely unknown. Here, we examined the functional roles of GRP2 in Arabidopsis t...under cold stress. These results provide new evidence indicating that GRP2 plays important roles in seed ger

  20. Reference: 681 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available inity and abscisic acid, suggesting that these genes play specific roles in the control of proline biosynthe...icated P5CS genes of Arabidopsis play distinct roles in stress regulation and dev

  1. Reference: 627 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available omal processing protease (GPP) from the fat-storing cotyledons of watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris) by column ...ptidase, and a Lon-protease. Specific antibodies against the peroxisomal Deg-protease from Arabidopsis (Deg15) identify the watermelo

  2. Reference: 107 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available duction in hypocotyl elongation in the dark, demonstrating a role for endospermic TAG reserves in fueling sk...ve mobilization in the Arabidopsis endosperm fuels hypocotyl elongation in the dark, is independent of absci

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At3g03050.1 68416.m00301 cellulose synthase family protein (CslD3) similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose syntha

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At3g03050.1 68416.m00301 cellulose synthase family protein (CslD3) similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose syntha

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK110467 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110467 002-166-G08 At3g03050.1 cellulose synthase family protein (CslD3) similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-7 (gi:962

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066835 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066835 J013087I16 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-171 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102695 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102695 J033103F21 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At3g03050.1 68416.m00301 cellulose synthase family protein (CslD3) similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose syntha

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100523 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100523 J023100P04 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065259 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065259 J013002J18 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102134 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102134 J033085F12 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  12. Reference: 21 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ication of a number of mutant lines with altered Chl fluorescence characteristics. Analysis of photosynthesis...cation of mutants of Arabidopsis defective in acclimation of photosynthesis to th

  13. Reference: 789 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ylakoid membranes. Microarray analysis of the chl27-t mutant showed repression of numerous nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis...d CHL27 proteins. Role of Arabidopsis CHL27 protein for photosynthesis, chloroplast development and gene exp

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242788 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3) identical to transcription factor 3 (TCP3) [Arabidopsis thaliana] (GI:3243274); similar to flower development protein cycloidea (cyc3) GI:6358611 from [Misopates orontium] 8e-22 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241658 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3) identical to transcription factor 3 (TCP3) [Arabidopsis thaliana] (GI:3243274); similar to flower development protein cycloidea (cyc3) GI:6358611 from [Misopates orontium] 1e-41 ...

  16. Reference: 241 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available development of Arabidopsis thaliana. 9 2473-85 16024589 2005 Sep The Plant cell Bevan Mike|Calderon-Villalobos Luz I A|Dohmann Esther M N|Kuhnle Carola|Li Hanbing|Schwechheimer Claus

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK101318 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101318 J033034D12 At2g02180.1 tobamovirus multiplication protein 3 (TOM3) identical to tobamovirus multipl...ication protein (TOM3) GI:15425641 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-125 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066854 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066854 J013075C10 At2g02180.1 tobamovirus multiplication protein 3 (TOM3) identical to tobamovirus multipl...ication protein (TOM3) GI:15425641 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-119 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104882 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104882 001-044-H04 At2g02180.1 tobamovirus multiplication protein 3 (TOM3) identical to tobamovirus multip...lication protein (TOM3) GI:15425641 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-119 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061395 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061395 006-305-E02 At2g02180.1 tobamovirus multiplication protein 3 (TOM3) identical to tobamovirus multip...lication protein (TOM3) GI:15425641 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-125 ...

  1. Reference: 313 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ze that LEA proteins act by mitigating water loss and maintaining cellular stability within the desiccated seed, although the mechani...sms of their actions remain largely unknown. The model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidops

  2. The fifth international conference on Arabidopsis research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangarter, R.; Scholl, R.; Davis, K.; Feldmann, K.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations made in conjunction with the Fifth International Conference on Arabidopsis Research held August 19--22, 1993 at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

  3. Local evolution of seed flotation in Arabidopsis.

    OpenAIRE

    Susana Saez-Aguayo; Corinne Rondeau-Mouro; Audrey Macquet; Ilkka Kronholm; Marie-Christine Ralet; Adeline Berger; Christine Sallé; Damien Poulain; Fabienne Granier; Lucy Botran; Olivier Loudet; Juliette de Meaux; Annie Marion-Poll; Helen M North

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was mod...

  4. Local Evolution of Seed Flotation in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Saez Aguayo, S.; Rondeau Mouro, C.; Macquet, A.; Kronholm, I.; Ralet, M.C.; Berger, A.; Sallé, C.; Poulain, D.; Granier, F.; Botran, L.; Loudet, O.; De Meaux, J.; Marion-Poll, A.; North, H.; Botran, L.

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was mod...

  5. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  6. Pretreatment with low-dose gamma irradiation enhances tolerance to the stress of cadmium and lead in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wencai; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Lin; Xu, Hangbo; Jin, Qingsheng; Jiao, Zhen

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metals are important environmental pollutants with negative impact on plant growth and development. To investigate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of heavy metal stress mitigated by low-dose gamma irradiation, the dry seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to a Cobalt-60 gamma source at doses ranging from 25 to 150Gy before being subjected to 75µM CdCl2 or 500µM Pb(NO3)2. Then, the growth parameters, and physiological and molecular changes were determined in response to gamma irradiation. Our results showed that 50-Gy gamma irradiation gave maximal beneficial effects on the germination index and root length in response to cadmium/lead stress in Arabidopsis seedlings. The hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde contents in seedlings irradiated with 50-Gy gamma rays under stress were significantly lower than those of controls. The antioxidant enzyme activities and proline levels in the irradiated seedlings were significantly increased compared with the controls. Furthermore, a transcriptional expression analysis of selected genes revealed that some components of heavy metal detoxification were stimulated by low-dose gamma irradiation under cadmium/lead stress. Our results suggest that low-dose gamma irradiation alleviates heavy metal stress, probably by modulating the physiological responses and gene expression levels related to heavy metal resistance in Arabidopsis seedlings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bioavailability of nanoparticulate hematite to Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marusenko, Yevgeniy; Shipp, Jessie; Hamilton, George A.; Morgan, Jennifer L.L.; Keebaugh, Michael; Hill, Hansina; Dutta, Arnab; Zhuo, Xiaoding; Upadhyay, Nabin; Hutchings, James; Herckes, Pierre; Anbar, Ariel D.; Shock, Everett; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2013-01-01

    The environmental effects and bioavailability of nanoparticulate iron (Fe) to plants are currently unknown. Here, plant bioavailability of synthesized hematite Fe nanoparticles was evaluated using Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) as a model. Over 56-days of growing wild-type A. thaliana, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had lower plant biomass, lower chlorophyll concentrations, and lower internal Fe concentrations than the Fe-treatment. Results for the no-Fe and nanoparticle-Fe treatments were consistently similar throughout the experiment. These results suggest that nanoparticles (mean diameter 40.9 nm, range 22.3–67.0 nm) were not taken up and therefore not bioavailable to A. thaliana. Over 14-days growing wild-type and transgenic (Type I/II proton pump overexpression) A. thaliana, the Type I plant grew more than the wild-type in the nanoparticle-Fe treatment, suggesting Type I plants cope better with Fe limitation; however, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had similar growth for all plant types. -- Highlights: ► Iron nanoparticles were synthesized and assessed for bioavailability to Arabidopsis. ► Arabidopsis grew better in the presence of EDTA-bound iron than nanoparticulate iron. ► Arabidopsis grew the same in the presence of nanoparticulate iron compared to no iron. -- Synthesized iron nanoparticles were not bioavailable to Arabidopsis thaliana in agar nutrient media

  8. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  9. Transgenerational Adaptation to Heavy Metal Salts in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Rahavi, Mohammad Reza; Migicovsky, Zoë; Titov, Viktor; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to abiotic and biotic stress results in changes in plant physiology and triggers genomic instability. Recent reports suggest that the progeny of stressed plants also exhibit changes in genome stability, stress tolerance, and methylation. Here we analyzed whether exposure to Ni2+, Cd2+, and Cu2+ salts leads to transgenerational changes in homologous recombination frequency and stress tolerance. We found that the immediate progeny of stressed plants exhibited an increased rate of recom...

  10. The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara Elizabeth

    2016-05-11

    Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  11. In vitro culture of Arabidopsis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Michael; Friml, Jirí

    2008-01-01

    Embryogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana follows a nearly invariant cell division pattern and provides an ideal system for studies of early plant development. However, experimental manipulation with embryogenesis is difficult, as the embryo develops deeply inside maternal tissues. Here, we present a method to culture zygotic Arabidopsis embryos in vitro. It enables culturing for prolonged periods of time from the first developmental stages on. The technique omits excision of the embryo by culturing the entire ovule, which facilitates the manual procedure. It allows pharmacological manipulation of embryo development and does not interfere with standard techniques for localizing gene expression and protein localization in the cultivated embryos.

  12. DNA methylation increases throughout Arabidopsis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-García, L; Cervera, M T; Martínez-Zapater, J M

    2005-10-01

    We used amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) to analyze the stability of DNA methylation throughout Arabidopsis development. AFLP can detect genome-wide changes in cytosine methylation produced by DNA demethylation agents, such as 5-azacytidine, or specific mutations at the DDM1 locus. In both cases, cytosine demethylation is associated with a general increase in the presence of amplified fragments. Using this approach, we followed DNA methylation at methylation sensitive restriction sites throughout Arabidopsis development. The results show a progressive DNA methylation trend from cotyledons to vegetative organs to reproductive organs.

  13. Reference: 576 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available shi et al. 2007 Jun. Plant Physiol. 144(2):1039-51. In the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway, isoforms of gl... the induction of these genes in photosynthetic tissues. The physiological functions of AtHEMA2 and AtFC1 we...ynthetic enzymes, AtHEMA2 and AtFC1, under stress conditions and their physiological functions in Arabidopsi...s. 2 1039-51 17416636 2007 Jun Plant physiology Aono Mitsuko|Kikuta Akihiro|Koide Masumi|Masuda Tatsuru|Naga

  14. Reference: 727 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available epigenetic control of gene expression during plant development. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis SET domain protein, SDG...h, thus affecting fertilization. Using an SDG4-GFP fusion construct, the chromosomal localization of SDG4 wa...s established in tobacco BY-2 cells. In Arabidopsis, sdg4 knockout showed reproductive defects. Tissue-speci...fic expression analyses indicated that SDG4 is the major ASH1-related gene expres...sed in the pollen. Immunological analyses demonstrated that SDG4 was involved in the methylation of histone

  15. Glufosinate ammonium selection of transformed Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Detlef; Glazebrook, Jane

    2006-12-01

    INTRODUCTIONOne of the most commonly used markers for the selection of transgenic Arabidopsis is resistance to glufosinate ammonium, an herbicide that is sold under a variety of trade names including Basta and Finale. Resistance to glufosinate ammonium is conferred by the bacterial bialophos resistance gene (BAR) encoding the enzyme phosphinotricin acetyl transferase (PAT). This protocol describes the use of glufosinate ammonium to select transformed Arabidopsis plants. The major advantage of glufosinate ammonium selection is that it can be performed on plants growing in soil and does not require the use of sterile techniques.

  16. Role of Heavy Metal Pumps in Transport of Zinc from Soil to Seeds of Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Irene

    . In Arabidopsis roots, the heavy metal ATPases AtHMA2 and AtHMA4 are localized to the pericycle cells and are important for the export of zinc, in order for zinc to enter the xylem and get to the shoot. I have identified a new novel role for AtHMA2 and AtHMA4 in the developing seed. The Arabidopsis seed consists...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068130 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068130 J013132D11 At5g04140.2 glutamate synthase (GLU1) / ferredoxin-dependent glutamate... synthase (Fd-GOGAT 1) identical to ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase precursor [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:3869251 0.0 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241281 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-12 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241762 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 9e-17 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 3e-13 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242986 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor, putative / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum a...nd contains PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-13 ...

  2. Reference: 55 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available /H+ antiporter in leaf vacuoles in Arabidopsis and also suggest that its contribu...nce of NaCl, nhx1 seedling establishment was impaired. These results place AtNHX1 as the dominant K+ and Na+

  3. Reference: 591 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available loroplast development, we systematically analyzed albino and pale green Arabidopsis thaliana mutants by use ...e focused on one of these albino mutants, designated apg3-1 (for a lbino or p ale g reen mutant 3). A gene e

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065420 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065420 J013022D10 At5g13630.1 magnesium-chelatase subunit chlH, chloroplast, puta...tive / Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase, putative (CHLH) nearly identical to magnesium chelatase subunit GI:11...54627 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF02514 CobN/magnesium chelatase family protein 1e-166 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK062262 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062262 001-047-H04 At5g13630.1 magnesium-chelatase subunit chlH, chloroplast, put...ative / Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase, putative (CHLH) nearly identical to magnesium chelatase subunit GI:1...154627 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF02514 CobN/magnesium chelatase family protein 0.0 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069545 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069545 J023025I06 At5g13630.1 magnesium-chelatase subunit chlH, chloroplast, puta...tive / Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase, putative (CHLH) nearly identical to magnesium chelatase subunit GI:11...54627 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF02514 CobN/magnesium chelatase family protein 0.0 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK067323 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067323 J013106B16 At5g13630.1 magnesium-chelatase subunit chlH, chloroplast, puta...tive / Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase, putative (CHLH) nearly identical to magnesium chelatase subunit GI:11...54627 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF02514 CobN/magnesium chelatase family protein 0.0 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060612 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060612 001-025-F03 At5g13630.1 magnesium-chelatase subunit chlH, chloroplast, put...ative / Mg-protoporphyrin IX chelatase, putative (CHLH) nearly identical to magnesium chelatase subunit GI:1...154627 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profile: PF02514 CobN/magnesium chelatase family protein 0.0 ...

  9. Reference: 689 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the high affinity of MOT1 allows plants to obtain scarce Mo from soil. An Arabidopsis thaliana high-affinity... molybdate transporter required for efficient uptake of molybdate from soil. 47 18807-12 18003916 2007 Nov P

  10. Light signal perception in Arabidopsis rosettes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, J.B.; Pierik, R.; Krol, van der A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Light signals are important signals for future and present competition. We used an architectural model of Arabidopsis development to show that vertical growth of neighboring vegetation is more important than proximity for early detection of competition. Self-signaling is greatly enhanced when own

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103188 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK103188 J033121M03 At3g56850.1 ABA-responsive element-binding protein 3 (AREB3) id...entical to ABA-responsive element binding protein 3 (AREB3) [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9967421 2e-32 ...

  12. Reference: 56 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Y et al. 2003 Nov. Plant Physiol. 133(3):1170-80. Mutations in the QUARTET loci in Arabidopsis result in fai...cell wall degradation. 3 1170-80 14551328 2003 Nov Plant physiology Osborne Erin|Poindexter Patricia D|Rhee Seung Y|Somerville Chris R

  13. Reference: 724 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t Sjoerd et al. 2008 Mar. Plant Physiol. 146(3):1293-304. Colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana roots by nonp... 3 1293-304 18218967 2008 Mar Plant physiology Bakker Daniel|Joosten Ruth G|Pel Michiel J C|Pieterse Corné M

  14. Reference: 751 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Jayashree et al. 2008 Jun. Plant Physiol. 147(2):672-81. Transcription corepressors play important roles in ...unctions during Arabidopsis embryo and floral development. 2 672-81 18390806 2008 Jun Plant physiology Bui Minh|Liu Zhongchi|Sitaraman Jayashree

  15. Reference: 386 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available drea et al. 2006 Jul. Plant Physiol. 141(3):942-56. In many plant species, a subset of the genes of the chlo...d mesophyll cell proliferation in Arabidopsis. 3 942-56 16698900 2006 Jul Plant physiology Hricová Andrea|Micol José Luis|Quesada Victor

  16. Reference: 276 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sholpan et al. 2005 Oct. Plant Physiol. 139(2):847-56. Plant acclimation to environmental stress is controll...role in reactive oxygen and abiotic stress signaling in Arabidopsis. 2 847-56 16183833 2005 Oct Plant phys...iology Coutu Jesse|Davletova Sholpan|Mittler Ron|Schlauch Karen

  17. Reference: 215 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Shinya et al. 2005 Jun. Plant Physiol. 138(2):870-81. Plants have mechanisms for repairing and tolerating de...-damaging agents. Roles of Arabidopsis AtREV1 and AtREV7 in translesion synthesis. 2 870-81 15908599 2005 Jun Plant physio

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241942 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein similar to fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-protein 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|13377776|gb|AAK20857; 3e-21 ... ...AK241942 J075088H12 At3g12660.1 68416.m01578 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121828 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121828 J033099G20 At3g46550.1 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family protein similar to fasciclin-like arab...inogalactan protein FLA8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|10880493|gb|AAG24276 4e-87 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119375 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119375 001-132-A06 At3g46550.1 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family protein similar to fasciclin-like ara...binogalactan protein FLA8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|10880493|gb|AAG24276 2e-85 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241942 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein similar to fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-protein 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|13377776|gb|AAK20857 9e-20 ... ...AK241942 J075088H12 At2g24450.1 68415.m02922 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241942 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein similar to fasciclin-like arabinogalactan-protein 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|13377776|gb|AAK20857 2e-15 ... ...AK241942 J075088H12 At4g31370.1 68417.m04448 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109762 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109762 002-146-G11 At3g12660.1 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family protein similar to fasciclin-like ara...binogalactan-protein 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|13377776|gb|AAK20857; 3e-24 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK108772 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108772 002-150-H07 At3g12660.1 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family protein similar to fasciclin-like ara...binogalactan-protein 1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|13377776|gb|AAK20857; 1e-35 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK289211 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available protein similar to fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein FLA8 [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|10880493|gb|AAG24276 4e-90 ... ...AK289211 J100060N06 At3g46550.1 68416.m05053 fasciclin-like arabinogalactan family

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071661 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071661 J023105D07 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-33 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 9e-19 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 8e-18 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241786 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241786 J065207F05 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-19 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 8e-44 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-14 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242428 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242428 J080089P09 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-16 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-11 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK108506 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK108506 002-143-H11 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 7e-14 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4e-41 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At5g37770.1 68418.m04547 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-25 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-26 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-19 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-20 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-44 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-17 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK062711 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK062711 001-106-C02 At5g37770.1 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 2, touch...-induced (TCH2) identical to calmodulin-related protein 2,touch-induced SP:P25070 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 9e-34 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288095 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288095 J075191E21 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-16 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242346 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242346 J080012M07 At2g41100.1 68415.m05076 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-26 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288095 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288095 J075191E21 At2g41100.2 68415.m05077 touch-responsive protein / calmodulin-related protein 3, touch...-induced (TCH3) identical to calmodulin-related protein 3, touch-induced SP:P25071 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-15 ...

  6. Reference: 677 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ae et al. 2007 Dec. Plant Cell Physiol. 48(12):1713-23. Methionine residues of proteins are a major target f... in cold acclimation in Arabidopsis. 12 1713-23 17956860 2007 Dec Plant & cell physiology Bae Min Seok|Cho Eun Ju|Kwon Soon Il|Kwon Sun Jae|Park Ohkmae K

  7. Reference: 763 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ín M Carmen et al. 2008 Jun. Plant Physiol. 147(2):562-72. Plant cells contain different O-acetylserine(thio...footprints of mutant plants had predicted functions associated with various physiological responses that are...f the cytosol to maintain discrete concentrations of hydrogen peroxide in Arabidopsis. 2 562-72 18441224 2008 Jun Plant physio

  8. Reference: 516 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hien et al. 2007 Mar. Plant Physiol. 143(3):1189-202. Far-red (FR) insensitive 219 (FIN219) was previously s...ing in Arabidopsis. 3 1189-202 17220357 2007 Mar Plant physiology Chen Ing-Chien|Chung Shu-Shiang|Hsieh Hsu-Liang|Huang I-Ching|Liu Ming-Jung|Wang Zhi-Gong

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068433 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068433 J013156D16 At1g20620.2 catalase 3 (SEN2) almost identical to catalase 3 SP...:Q42547, GI:3123188 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; identical to catalase 3 (SEN2) mRNA, partial cds GI:3158369 1e-63 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121261 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121261 J023104H13 At1g55350.4 calpain-type cysteine protease family identical to calpain...-like protein GI:20268660 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profiles: PF00648 Calpain family... cysteine protease, PF01067 Calpain large subunit,domain III; identical to cDNA calpain-like protein GI:20268659 0.0 ...

  11. Self-consuming innate immunity in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    . However, it has been unclear by which molecular mechanisms plants execute PCD during innate immune responses. We recently examined HR PCD in autophagy-deficient Arabidopsis knockout mutants (atg) and find that PCD conditioned by one class of plant innate immune receptors is suppressed in atg mutants...

  12. Regulated Proteolysis of Arabidopsis Argonaute1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kausika, Swathi Pranavi

    on the function of poorly characterized N domain. Arabidopsis thaliana AGO1 is a peripheral membrane protein and membrane association is important for function. Previous studies in the model plant showed that mutation in the N domain resulted in reduced levels of AGO1 at the membrane. In this study we use N...

  13. Divergent regulation of Arabidopsis SAUR genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourik, van Hilda; Dijk, van Aalt D.J.; Stortenbeker, Niek; Angenent, Gerco C.; Bemer, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Background: Small Auxin-Upregulated RNA (SAUR) genes encode growth regulators that induce cell elongation. Arabidopsis contains more than 70 SAUR genes, of which the growth-promoting function has been unveiled in seedlings, while their role in other tissues remained largely unknown. Here, we

  14. Reference: 250 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available bolite profiling of dark-treated leaves of the wild type and mutants revealed a drama...s accumulated in long-term dark-treated leaves. Analysis of three independent insertional mutants of Arabidopsis ETFQO revealed a dra...matic reduction in their ability to withstand extended darkness, resulting in senes

  15. Die Regulation der Camalexinbiosynthese in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Rauhut, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Camalexin ist das charakteristische Phytoalexin von Arabidopsis thaliana. Bei Pathogeninfektion wird die Synthese von Camalexin z. B. durch die Erkennung von Peptidoglycan oder Nep1-artigen Proteinen (NLPs) ausgelöst. Pflanzen, welche ein NLP unter der Kontrolle eines Ethanol-induzierbaren Promotors exprimieren zeigten eine starke Induktion der Tryptophan- und Camalexinbiosynthesegene und eine reproduzierbare Camalexinakkumulation. Retrobiosynthetische NMR-Analysen und Markierungsexperimente ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241438 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241438 J065162G03 At4g32040.1 68417.m04561 homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) / home...odomain containing protein 1 (H1) identical to homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) SP:P48002 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4e-98 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK289177 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK289177 J100024E07 At4g32040.1 68417.m04561 homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) / home...odomain containing protein 1 (H1) identical to homeobox protein knotted-1 like 5 (KNAT5) SP:P48002 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4e-98 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK111761 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK111761 J023058F21 At3g20740.1 fertilization-independent endosperm protein (FIE) c...ontains 6 WD-40 repeats (PF00400); identical to fertilization-independent endosperm protein (GI:4567095) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-158 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242200 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242200 J075166M12 At3g20740.1 68416.m02624 fertilization-independent endosperm pr...otein (FIE) contains 6 WD-40 repeats (PF00400); identical to fertilization-independent endosperm protein (GI:4567095) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-142 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103126 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0S proteasome beta subunit PBB1 (PBB1) GB:AAC32066 [Arabidopsis thaliana] (Genetics 149 (2), 677-692 (1998)); contains Pfam profile: PF00227 proteasome A-type and B-type; 1e-129 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK058440 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 20S proteasome beta subunit PBB1 (PBB1) GB:AAC32066 [Arabidopsis thaliana] (Genetics 149 (2), 677-692 (1998)); contains Pfam profile: PF00227 proteasome A-type and B-type; 1e-92 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242707 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242707 J090040M15 At1g70550.2 68414.m08120 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241860 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241860 J065216G12 At1g70550.1 68414.m08119 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242707 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242707 J090040M15 At1g70550.1 68414.m08119 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241860 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241860 J065216G12 At1g70550.2 68414.m08120 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242472 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242472 J080303B22 At1g70550.2 68414.m08120 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK073288 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073288 J033028L24 At1g70550.2 expressed protein similar to hypothetical protein G...B:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16072 [Arabidop

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242472 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242472 J080303B22 At1g70550.1 68414.m08119 expressed protein similar to hypotheti...cal protein GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242472 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242472 J080303B22 At5g46200.1 68418.m05684 expressed protein contains similarity to carboxyl-term...inal proteinase contains Pfam profile PF03080: Arabidopsis proteins of unknown function; expression supported by MPSS 2e-33 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104980 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104980 001-125-D09 At1g70550.2 expressed protein similar to hypothetical protein ...GB:AAD31338 [Arabidopsis thaliana] and to putative putative carboxyl-terminal peptidase GB:AAC16072 [Arabido

  11. Reference: 632 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ludmila et al. 2007 Sep. Plant J. 51(5):874-85. One of the earliest responses of plants to environmental str...elopment in reaction to adverse environmental conditions. We show that the AtCHR12 chromatin-remodeling gene...R12 mediates temporary growth arrest in Arabidopsis thaliana upon perceiving environmental

  12. Reference: 43 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iam L et al. 2003 Sep. Development 130(18):4249-58. The mechanisms regulating cell layer organisation in dev...guments. Insertion mutations show that ARABIDOPSIS CRINKLY4 is required for regulation of cellular organisation...e plays a role in cell layer organisation during ovule integument and sepal margin development. 18 4249-58 1

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243046 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available like protein identical to SP|Q9S7R5 TWIN SISTER of FT protein (TFL1 like protein) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; c...AK243046 J100010A16 At4g20370.1 68417.m02973 twin sister of FT protein (TSF) / TFL1

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240877 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available like protein identical to SP|Q9S7R5 TWIN SISTER of FT protein (TFL1 like protein) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; c...AK240877 J065027B08 At4g20370.1 68417.m02973 twin sister of FT protein (TSF) / TFL1

  15. Reference: 206 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ,5-trichlorophenol (TCP). To determine its importance in detoxifying xenobiotics ...oxification as bound-residue formation. Functional importance of the family 1 glucosyltransferase UGT72B1 in the metabolism of xenobi...otics in Arabidopsis thaliana. 4 556-66 15860014 2005 May The Plant journal Brazier-Hicks Melissa|Edwards Robert

  16. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  17. Reference: 749 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available former mutant had decreased electron transport rates, a lower DeltapH gradient across the grana membranes, r...the PSII particles of these plants were organized in unusual two-dimensional arrays in the grana membranes. ...d the electron transport rate in grana membranes of Arabidopsis. 4 1012-28 18381925 2008 Apr The Plant cell

  18. Reference: 486 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available time in many plant species through the photoperiod and vernalization pathways, re...cipates in both the photoperiod and vernalization pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana by regulating expression ... of VIN3 in a photoperiod-dependent manner. A PHD finger protein involved in both the vernalization and photoperiod pathways

  19. Reference: 412 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the tobacco arcA gene, mediates hormone responses and plays a regulatory role in multiple developmental processes...in RACK1A confer defects in multiple developmental processes including seed germination, leaf production, an...ltiple hormone responsiveness and developmental processes in Arabidopsis. 11 2697-708 16829549 2006 Journal

  20. Reference: 145 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mediating seedling deetiolation. In summary, our results support the notion that FRS family members play distinct roles...g nuclear gene expression. Arabidopsis FHY3/FAR1 gene family and distinct roles of its members in light cont

  1. Reference: 691 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ants. Nine genomic sequences encode putative Bsas proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The physiological roles ...thione in the bsas mutants indicated that cytosolic Bsas1;1, plastidic Bsas2;1, and mitochondrial Bsas2;2 play major roles...ucial role of Bsas3;1 in beta-cyano-Ala metabolism in vivo. Physiological roles o

  2. Reference: 109 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ) and RELATIVE OF EARLY FLOWERING 6 (REF6), play divergent roles in the regulation of Arabidopsis flowering.... show that ELF6 and REF6 have different cellular roles and are also regulated differentially despite their s...in higher eukaryotes. Divergent roles of a pair of homologous jumonji/zinc-finger-class transcription factor

  3. Reference: 590 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 590 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u17450124i Caro Elena et al. 2007 May. Nature... to root epidermis patterning in Arabidopsis. 7141 213-7 17450124 2007 May Nature Caro Elena|Castellano M Mar|Gutierrez Crisanto

  4. Reference: 239 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 239 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16015335i Bundock Paul et al. 2005 Jul. Natur...functions. An Arabidopsis hAT-like transposase is essential for plant development. 7048 282-4 16015335 2005 Jul Nature Bundock Paul|Hooykaas Paul

  5. Reference: 81 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 81 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u15075397i Culligan Kevin...le checkpoint in Arabidopsis thaliana. 5 1091-104 15075397 2004 May The Plant cell Britt Anne|Culligan Kevin|Tissier Alain

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241627 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241627 J065187G05 At3g12280.1 68416.m01533 retinoblastoma-related protein (RBR1) nearly identical to retin...oblastoma-related protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:8777927; contains Pfam profiles: PF01858 retinoblastoma...-associated protein A domain, PF01857 retinoblastoma-associated protein B domain 0.0 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121431 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121431 J023138G19 At3g12280.1 retinoblastoma-related protein (RBR1) nearly identical to retinoblastoma...-related protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:8777927; contains Pfam profiles: PF01858 retinoblastoma...-associated protein A domain, PF01857 retinoblastoma-associated protein B domain 0.0 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240830 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240830 J065014C16 At3g12280.1 68416.m01533 retinoblastoma-related protein (RBR1) nearly identical to retin...oblastoma-related protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:8777927; contains Pfam profiles: PF01858 retinoblastoma...-associated protein A domain, PF01857 retinoblastoma-associated protein B domain 0.0 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK064987 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064987 J013001D03 At3g12280.1 retinoblastoma-related protein (RBR1) nearly identical to retinoblastoma...-related protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:8777927; contains Pfam profiles: PF01858 retinoblastoma...-associated protein A domain, PF01857 retinoblastoma-associated protein B domain 0.0 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241364 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2) identical to Dof zinc finger protein ADOF2 GI:3608263 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; identical to cDNA adof...AK241364 J065152E11 At3g21270.1 68416.m02688 Dof-type zinc finger domain-containing protein (ADOF

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288349 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2) identical to Dof zinc finger protein ADOF2 GI:3608263 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; identical to cDNA adof...AK288349 J090023P19 At3g21270.1 68416.m02688 Dof-type zinc finger domain-containing protein (ADOF

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287447 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2) identical to Dof zinc finger protein ADOF2 GI:3608263 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; identical to cDNA adof...AK287447 J043016O04 At3g21270.1 68416.m02688 Dof-type zinc finger domain-containing protein (ADOF

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121003 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121003 J023045B21 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-167 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 8e-63 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109812 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109812 002-147-H02 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 5e-90 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-26 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069071 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069071 J023010H01 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-167 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-47 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK110534 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110534 002-168-A07 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-114 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 3e-31 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-28 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 8e-25 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 1e-126 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-45 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 5e-25 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 2e-65 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 1e-24 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-29 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 3e-66 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-124 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105393 001-123-B04 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-45 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-130 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 1e-125 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK061162 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061162 006-209-A01 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 3e-35 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-98 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 8e-98 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 4e-27 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060286 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060286 001-006-C08 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 6e-78 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 4e-50 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 5e-48 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241112 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241112 J065091K02 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 3e-13 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK289251 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK289251 J100081E23 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 6e-21 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241112 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241112 J065091K02 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 1e-14 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240855 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240855 J065021H02 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 7e-25 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288612 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288612 J090053J15 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 5e-24 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287737 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287737 J065143M09 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 7e-14 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287434 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287434 J043012F24 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 2e-27 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241784 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241784 J065206N09 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 4e-11 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241112 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241112 J065091K02 At4g16390.1 68417.m02481 chloroplastic RNA-binding protein P67,... putative nearly identical to 67kD chloroplastic RNA-binding protein, P67 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:9755842 1e-16 ...

  14. Reference: 438 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ity and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. 18 6902-12 16943431 2006 Sep Molecular and cellular bio...logy Chen Zhizhong|Gong Zhizhong|Hong Xuhui|Jablonowski Daniel|Ren Xiaozhi|Schaffrath Raffael|Zhang Hairong|Zhou Xiaofeng|Zhu Jian-Kang

  15. Reference: 356 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 006 Mar Plant molecular biology Deng Xingwang|Dong Li|Wang Lei|Xue Yongbiao|Zhang Yansheng|Zhang Yu'e ...ein CEGENDUO negatively regulates auxin-mediated lateral root formation in Arabidopsis. 4 599-615 16525894 2

  16. Reference: 223 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 223 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u15923347i Dohmann Es... cause the cop/det/fus mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis. 7 1967-78 15923347 2005 Jul The Plant cell Dohmann Esther M N|Kuhnle Carola|Schwechheimer Claus

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241402 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241402 J065159A02 At4g19070.1 68417.m02810 cadmium-responsive protein / cadmium i...nduced protein (AS8) identical to cadmium induced protein AS8 SP:P42735 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-11 ...

  18. Reference: 369 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available availability is the hydrolysis of phospholipids. Hydrolyzed phospholipids are replaced by nonphosphorus lipids such as galactolipids... and sulfolipids, which help to maintain the functionali...we show that an Arabidopsis pldz2 mutant is defective in the hydrolysis of phospholipids... and has a reduced capacity to accumulate galactolipids under limiting Pi conditions. Morphological a

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288349 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288349 J090023P19 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affecting germination... 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 1e-23 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241364 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241364 J065152E11 At2g46590.1 68415.m05811 Dof zinc finger protein DAG2 / Dof affecting germination... 2 (DAG2) identical to SP|Q9ZPY0 DOF zinc finger protein DAG2 (Dof affecting germination 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 2e-20 ...

  1. Reference: 439 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available or IID (TFIID) complex. Overexpression of atTAF10 under the control of the 35S promoter in Arabidopsis impro...is TATA box-binding protein (TBP)-associated factor 10 (atTAF10), which constitutes the transcriptional fact

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104030 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104030 001-020-C01 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manga...nese superoxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|3273751|gb|AAC24832 9e-99 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK070528 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070528 J023060D13 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manga...nese superoxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|3273751|gb|AAC24832 9e-99 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104160 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104160 006-211-E09 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manga...nese superoxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|3273751|gb|AAC24832 9e-99 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119904 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119904 002-182-A05 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manga...nese superoxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|3273751|gb|AAC24832 9e-78 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK064663 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064663 002-115-A10 At2g34450.1 high mobility group (HMG1/2) family protein simila...r to HMG protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:2832361; contains Pfam profile PF00505: HMG (high mobility group) box 2e-27 ...

  7. Polyamines and Paraquat Toxicity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina, Kurepa; Jan, Smalle; Marc Van, Montagu; Dirk, Inze; Laboratorium voor Genetica, Department of Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology, Universiteit Gent; Laboratorium voor Genetica, Department of Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology, Universiteit Gent; Laboratorium voor Genetica, Department of Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology, Universiteit Gent; Laboratorium voor Genetica, Department of Genetics, Flanders Interuniversity Institute for Biotechnology, Universiteit Gent:Laboratoire Associe de l'Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique(France), Universiteit Gent

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between paraquat toxicity and polyamine levels was analyzed in Arabidopsis wild-type and gi-3 plants. Paraquat treatment led to an increase in putrescine, but not of spermidine and spermine content. Additionally, polyamine feeding offered high levels of protection against paraquat toxicity with spermidine being the most effective protectant.

  8. Reference: 379 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available randomization of Arabidopsis hypocotyl orientation provides a fitness advantage to seedlings developing in p...hypocotyls requires GIL1 and confers a fitness advantage. 4 641-8 16640600 2006 May The Plant journal Allen Trudie|Ingles Patricia J|Praekelt Uta|Smith Harry|Whitelam Garry C

  9. Reference: 112 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ecca A et al. 2004 Oct. Plant Physiol. 136(2):3095-103; discussion 3002. The gravitropism defective 2 (grv2)... mutants of Arabidopsis show reduced shoot phototropism and gravitropism. Amyloplasts in the shoot endoderma...g via amyloplasts sedimentation and the subsequent more general tropic growth response. The gravitropism

  10. Reference: 389 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 389 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16716192i Jolivet Sy...of the Ski8/Rec103 homolog in Arabidopsis. 6 615-22 16716192 2006 Jun Genes to cells Froger Nicole|Jolivet Sylvie|Mercier Raphaël|Vezon Daniel

  11. Database Description - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Arabidopsis Phenome Database Database Description General information of database Database n...ame Arabidopsis Phenome Database Alternative name - DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc01509-000 Creator Creator Name: H... BioResource Center Hiroshi Masuya Database classification Plant databases - Arabidopsis thaliana Organism T...axonomy Name: Arabidopsis thaliana Taxonomy ID: 3702 Database description The Arabidopsis thaliana phenome i...heir effective application. We developed the new Arabidopsis Phenome Database integrating two novel database

  12. A transcriptomic study reveals differentially expressed genes and pathways respond to simulated acid rain in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting-Wu; Niu, Li; Fu, Bin; Chen, Juan; Wu, Fei-Hua; Chen, Juan; Wang, Wen-Hua; Hu, Wen-Jun; He, Jun-Xian; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Acid rain, as a worldwide environmental issue, can cause serious damage to plants. In this study, we provided the first case study on the systematic responses of arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.) to simulated acid rain (SiAR) by transcriptome approach. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the expression of a set of genes related to primary metabolisms, including nitrogen, sulfur, amino acid, photosynthesis, and reactive oxygen species metabolism, were altered under SiAR. In addition, transport and signal transduction related pathways, especially calcium-related signaling pathways, were found to play important roles in the response of arabidopsis to SiAR stress. Further, we compared our data set with previously published data sets on arabidopsis transcriptome subjected to various stresses, including wound, salt, light, heavy metal, karrikin, temperature, osmosis, etc. The results showed that many genes were overlapped in several stresses, suggesting that plant response to SiAR is a complex process, which may require the participation of multiple defense-signaling pathways. The results of this study will help us gain further insights into the response mechanisms of plants to acid rain stress.

  13. Comparison of the spaceflight transcriptome of four commonly used Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This experiment compared the spaceflight transcriptomes of four commonly used natural variants (ecotypes) of Arabidopsis thaliana using RNAseq. In nature Arabidopsis...

  14. Building a hair: tip growth in Arabidopsis thaliana root hairs.

    OpenAIRE

    Carol, Rachel J; Dolan, Liam

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana root hair is used as a model for studying tip growth in plants. We review recent advances, made using physiological and genetic approaches, which give rise to different, yet compatible, current views of the establishment and maintenance of tip growth in epidermal cells. For example, an active calcium influx channel localized at the tip of Arabidopsis root hairs has been identified by patch-clamp measurements. Actin has been visualized in vivo in Arabidopsis root hairs...

  15. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo...

  16. Hypermethylated SUPERMAN epigenetic alleles in arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, S E; Meyerowitz, E M

    1997-08-22

    Mutations in the SUPERMAN gene affect flower development in Arabidopsis. Seven heritable but unstable sup epi-alleles (the clark kent alleles) are associated with nearly identical patterns of excess cytosine methylation within the SUP gene and a decreased level of SUP RNA. Revertants of these alleles are largely demethylated at the SUP locus and have restored levels of SUP RNA. A transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying an antisense methyltransferase gene, which shows an overall decrease in genomic cytosine methylation, also contains a hypermethylated sup allele. Thus, disruption of methylation systems may yield more complex outcomes than expected and can result in methylation defects at known genes. The clark kent alleles differ from the antisense line because they do not show a general decrease in genomic methylation.

  17. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-02-07

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  18. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK101133 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available F|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-10 ... ...eneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum and contains P...AK101133 J033026F23 At1g12980.1 AP2 domain-containing transcription factor, putative / enhancer of shoot reg

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119645 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PF|00847 AP2 domain; identical to cDNA enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 GI:18028939, enhancer of shoot regeneration ESR1 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:18028940 1e-10 ... ...ve / enhancer of shoot regeneration (ESR1) similar to gb|D38124 EREBP-3 from Nicotiana tabacum and contains ...AK119645 002-130-G05 At1g12980.1 AP2 domain-containing transcription factor, putati

  1. Reference: 788 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f PCD by chaperoning and inhibiting Cys proteases during their trafficking to vacuoles...es become the de facto lytic vacuoles that mediate PCD. Arabidopsis protein disulfi...de isomerase-5 inhibits cysteine proteases during trafficking to vacuoles before ... before PCD of the endothelial cells. During this transitional phase of endothelial cell development, the protein storage vacuol...apse of protein storage vacuoles, lytic vacuole shrinkage and degradation, and nuclear condensation and frag

  2. Reference: 567 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Tamara et al. 2007 Mar. Plant Cell 19(3):831-46. Arabidopsis thaliana seedling growth with pure oxylipins r...oic acid (9-HOT) was a potent inducer of root waving. Studies with noxy2 (for nonresponding to oxylipin...ive) revealed at least three signaling cascades mediating the oxylipin actions. Treatment with 9-HOT resulte...ing genes are consistent with mechanistic links among these processes. The nature of the changes detected suggests that oxylipin

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065950 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065950 J013049M07 At3g11820.1 syntaxin 121 (SYP121) / syntaxin-related protein (S...YR1) contains Pfam profiles: PF00804 syntaxin and PF05739: SNARE domain; identical to cDNA syntaxin-related ...protein At-SYR1 (At-Syr1) GI:4206788, SP|Q9ZSD4 Syntaxin 121 (AtSYP121) (Syntaxin-related protein At-Syr1) {Arabidopsis thaliana} 5e-88 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071591 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071591 J023105C08 At2g29570.1 proliferating cell nuclear antigen 2 (PCNA2) identi...cal to SP|Q9ZW35 Proliferating cell nuclear antigen 2 (PCNA 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; nearly identical to SP|Q43124 Proliferating... cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) {Brassica napus}; contains Pfam profiles PF00705: Proliferating... cell nuclear antigen N-terminal domain, PF02747: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen C-terminal domain 1e-132 ...

  5. Reference: 494 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hn C et al. 2007 Jan. Plant J. 49(2):194-207. Green-leaf volatiles are commonly emitted from mechanically an...ngi, and induce several important plant defense pathways. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the major volatile released upon mechanical...ighest expression of CHAT occurs in the leaves and stems. Upon mechanical damage, the (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl aceta

  6. Reference: 307 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mo et al. 2006 Jan. Plant Physiol. 140(1):115-26. The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates physiologic...esponse on the basis of results obtained by reverse-genetics approaches, its physiological relevance in the ...on confers distinct and indispensable physiological functions in the ABA response. ABA-hypersensitive germin...mination among Arabidopsis protein phosphatase 2Cs. 1 115-26 16339800 2006 Jan Plant physio

  7. Reference: 710 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available kyun et al. 2008 Feb. Plant Physiol. 146(2):623-35. AtMYB44 belongs to the R2R3 MYB subgroup 22 transcriptio... Arabidopsis. 2 623-35 18162593 2008 Feb Plant physiology Cheong Jong-Joo|Choi Yang Do|Han Sang Won|Jung Choonkyun|Kim Chung Ho|Koo Yeon Jong|Nahm Baek Hie|Seo Jun Sung|Song Sang Ik

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK064381 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064381 002-108-E01 At1g55350.4 calpain-type cysteine protease family identical to calpain...-like protein GI:20268660 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profiles: PF00648 Calpain famil...y cysteine protease, PF01067 Calpain large subunit,domain III; identical to cDNA calpain-like protein GI:20268659 0.0 ...

  9. Reference: 295 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 295 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16284313i Fujita Yas...ng that enhances drought stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. 12 3470-88 16284313 200...5 Dec The Plant cell Fujita Miki|Fujita Yasunari|Hiratsu Keiichiro|Maruyama Kyonoshin|Ohme-Takagi Masaru|Par

  10. Reference: 495 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . Emission of methanethiol from Arabidopsis plants supplied with 10 mM L-methionine was undetectable (cation in an alternat...>homocysteine-->cystathionine-->cysteine) in which methanethiol is an intermediate. Functional characterizat...wth on L-methionine as sole nitrogen source and conferred a high rate of methanethiol emission. The purified...mol min(-1) g(-1) FW), suggesting that AtMGL is not an important source of volatile methanethiol. Knocking o

  11. Reference: 125 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available et al. 2004 Nov. Plant Physiol. 136(3):3616-27. The actin cytoskeleton mediates cellular processes through t...AP and AtPIR participate in a variety of growth and developmental processes. Mutations in AtNAP and AtPIR ca...ting trichome cell growth. Arabidopsis NAP and PIR regulate actin-based cell morphogenesis and multiple developmental processes

  12. Reference: 435 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis. 7107 106-9 16936718 2006 Sep Nature Fobis-Loisy Isabelle|Gaude Thierry|Jaillais Yvon|Miège Christine|Rollin Claire ... 435 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16936718i Jaillais Yvon et al. 2006 Sep. Natu...re 443(7107):106-9. Polarized cellular distribution of the phytohormone auxin and i

  13. Reference: 584 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ing in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot and root stem cell organizers. 7137 811-4 17429400 2007 Apr Nature Hashimo...nda K et al. 2007 Apr. Nature 446(7137):811-4. Throughout the lifespan of a plant, which in some cases can l... 584 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u17429400i Sarkar Ana

  14. Reference: 497 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hal albino phenotype. Rescue of tha2 mutants and tha1 tha2 double mutants by overproduction of feedback-inse...-specific expression of feedback-insensitive Thr deaminase in both tha1 and tha2 Thr aldolase mutants greatl...nsitive Thr deaminase (OMR1) shows that Gly formation by THA1 and THA2 is not essential in Arabidopsis. Seed

  15. Reference: 2 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available at share 60 to 80% protein sequence identity. Gene disruptions of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) ortho... that these syntaxins are not essential for growth in yeast. However, we have isolated and characterized gene disruption...s in two genes from each family, finding that disruption of individual syntaxins from these fami...lies is lethal in the male gametophyte of Arabidopsis. Complementation of the syp21-1 gene disruption

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK110331 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110331 002-164-D12 At2g31510.1 IBR domain-containing protein / ARIADNE-like prote...in ARI7 (ARI7) identical to ARIADNE-like protein ARI7 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:29125028; contains similarit...y to Swiss-Prot:Q94981 ariadne-1 protein (Ari-1) [Drosophila melanogaster]; contains Pfam profile PF01485: IBR domain 3e-59 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242789 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242789 J090057B20 At2g31510.1 68415.m03850 IBR domain-containing protein / ARIADN...E-like protein ARI7 (ARI7) identical to ARIADNE-like protein ARI7 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:29125028; contai...ns similarity to Swiss-Prot:Q94981 ariadne-1 protein (Ari-1) [Drosophila melanogaster]; contains Pfam profile PF01485: IBR domain 8e-12 ...

  18. Comparative Analysis of the Arabidopsis Pollen Transcriptome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Honys, David; Twell, D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 132, - (2003), s. 640ů652 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5038207 Grant - others:Royal Society(GB) NATO Postdoctoral Fellowship (to D.H.) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910; CEZ:MSM 113100003 Keywords : transcriptome profiling * Arabidopsis pollen * male gametophyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.634, year: 2003

  19. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  20. Telomere-binding proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentgraf, U

    1995-02-01

    The nucleoprotein structure of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres was investigated. A protein specifically binding to telomeric sequences was characterized by gel mobility shift assays with synthetic oligonucleotides consisting of four 7 bp telomeric repeats of Arabidopsis (TTTAGGG) and crude nuclear protein extracts of Arabidopsis leaves. These DNA-protein binding studies revealed that the binding affinity of this telomere-binding protein to the G-rich single-strand as well as to the double-stranded telomeric DNA is much higher than to the C-rich single-strand. The molecular mass of the protein was identified by SDS-PAGE to be 67 kDa. The isoelectric points were determined to be 5.0, 4.85 and 4.7, respectively, indicating that either one protein with different modifications or three slightly different proteins have been isolated. An RNA component, possibly serving as a template for reverse transcription of a plant telomerase, does not mediate the DNA-protein contact because the DNA-protein interactions were not RNAse-sensitive.

  1. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogány, Miklós; Dankó, Tamás; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Schwarczinger, Ildikó; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2015-09-24

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is simultaneously used both by plant cells, to recognize and inactivate invading pathogens, and by microbes, to overcome the immune system of the plant and successfully colonize host cells. In this review, we present available results on the group of proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana whose functions in microbial pathogenesis were confirmed. Pathogen-derived proteolytic factors are also discussed when they are involved in the cleavage of host metabolites. Considering the wealth of review papers available in the field of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system results on the ubiquitin cascade are not presented. Arabidopsis and its pathogens are conferred with abundant sets of proteases. This review compiles a list of those that are apparently involved in an interaction between the plant and its pathogens, also presenting their molecular partners when available.

  2. Involvement of NRAMP1 from Arabidopsis thaliana in iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curie, C; Alonso, J M; Le Jean, M; Ecker, J R; Briat, J F

    2000-05-01

    Nramp genes code for a widely distributed class of proteins involved in a variety of processes, ranging from the control of susceptibility to bacterial infection in mammalian cells and taste behaviour in Drosophila to manganese uptake in yeast. Some of the NRAMP proteins in mammals and in yeast are capable of transporting metal ions, including iron. In plants, iron transport was shown to require a reduction/Fe(II) transport system. In Arabidopsis thaliana this process involves the IRT1 and Fro2 genes. Here we report the sequence of five NRAMP proteins from A. thaliana. Sequence comparison suggests that there are two classes of NRAMP proteins in plants: A. thaliana (At) NRAMP1 and Oriza sativa (Os) NRAMP1 and 3 (two rice isologues) represent one class, and AtNRAMP2-5 and OsNRAMP2 the other. AtNramp1 and OsNramp1 are able to complement the fet3fet4 yeast mutant defective both in low- and high-affinity iron transports, whereas AtNramp2 and OsNramp2 fail to do so. In addition, AtNramp1 transcript, but not AtNramp2 transcript, accumulates in response to iron deficiency in roots but not in leaves. Finally, overexpression of AtNramp1 in transgenic A. thaliana plants leads to an increase in plant resistance to toxic iron concentration. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AtNramp1 participates in the control of iron homoeostasis in plants.

  3. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis ABC transporter MRP7 modifies cadmium root-to-shoot transport and accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojas, Sylwia [Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa str. 1, 02-096 Warszawa (Poland); Hennig, Jacek [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Pawinskiego str. 5A, 02-106 Warszawa (Poland); Plaza, Sonia; Geisler, Markus [Institute of Plant Biology, University of Zuerich, CH-8008 Zuerich (Switzerland); Siemianowski, Oskar; Sklodowska, Aleksandra [Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa str. 1, 02-096 Warszawa (Poland); Ruszczynska, Anna; Bulska, Ewa [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura str.1, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland); Antosiewicz, Danuta M., E-mail: dma@biol.uw.edu.p [Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, Miecznikowa str. 1, 02-096 Warszawa (Poland)

    2009-10-15

    Arabidopsis MRPs/ABCCs have been shown to remove various organic and inorganic substrates from the cytosol to other subcellular compartments. Here we first demonstrate that heterologous expression of AtMRP7 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi) modifies cadmium accumulation, distribution and tolerance. Arabidopsis MRP7 was localized both in the tonoplast and in the plasma membrane when expressed in tobacco. Its overexpression increased tobacco Cd-tolerance and resulted in enhanced cadmium concentration in leaf vacuoles, indicating more efficient detoxification by means of vacuolar storage. Heterologous AtMRP7 expression also led to more efficient retention of Cd in roots, suggesting a contribution to the control of cadmium root-to-shoot translocation. The results underscore the use of AtMRP7 in plant genetic engineering to modify the heavy-metal accumulation pattern for a broad range of applications. - AtMRP7 expression in tobacco enhances Cd-tolerance and increases Cd storage in vacuoles

  4. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis ABC transporter MRP7 modifies cadmium root-to-shoot transport and accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojas, Sylwia; Hennig, Jacek; Plaza, Sonia; Geisler, Markus; Siemianowski, Oskar; Sklodowska, Aleksandra; Ruszczynska, Anna; Bulska, Ewa; Antosiewicz, Danuta M.

    2009-01-01

    Arabidopsis MRPs/ABCCs have been shown to remove various organic and inorganic substrates from the cytosol to other subcellular compartments. Here we first demonstrate that heterologous expression of AtMRP7 in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi) modifies cadmium accumulation, distribution and tolerance. Arabidopsis MRP7 was localized both in the tonoplast and in the plasma membrane when expressed in tobacco. Its overexpression increased tobacco Cd-tolerance and resulted in enhanced cadmium concentration in leaf vacuoles, indicating more efficient detoxification by means of vacuolar storage. Heterologous AtMRP7 expression also led to more efficient retention of Cd in roots, suggesting a contribution to the control of cadmium root-to-shoot translocation. The results underscore the use of AtMRP7 in plant genetic engineering to modify the heavy-metal accumulation pattern for a broad range of applications. - AtMRP7 expression in tobacco enhances Cd-tolerance and increases Cd storage in vacuoles

  5. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo......M hip implant. A Danish surveillance programme has been initiated addressing these problems....

  6. Comparative analysis of drought resistance genes in Arabidopsis and rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijatmiko, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    Keywords: rice, Arabidopsis, drought, genetic mapping,microarray, transcription factor, AP2/ERF, SHINE, wax, stomata, comparative genetics, activation tagging, Ac/Ds, En/IThis thesis describes the use of genomics information and tools from Arabidopsis and

  7. Proteomic analysis of the Arabidopsis nucleolus suggests novel nucleolar functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pendle, Alison F; Clark, Gillian P; Boon, Reinier

    2005-01-01

    analysis of plant (Arabidopsis thaliana) nucleoli, in which we have identified 217 proteins. This allows a direct comparison of the proteomes of an important nuclear structure between two widely divergent species: human and Arabidopsis. The comparison identified many common proteins, plant...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK063098 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063098 001-111-C03 At1g07370.1 proliferating cell nuclear antigen 1 (PCNA1) ident...ical to SP|Q9M7Q7 Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen 1 (PCNA 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; nearly identical to SP|Q43124 Proliferati...ng cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) {Brassica napus}; contains Pfam profiles PF00705: Proliferating... cell nuclear antigen N-terminal domain, PF02747: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen C-terminal domain 7e-88 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243048 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243048 J100010D20 At1g07370.1 68414.m00786 proliferating cell nuclear antigen 1 (...PCNA1) identical to SP|Q9M7Q7 Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen 1 (PCNA 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; near...ly identical to SP|Q43124 Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) {Brassica napus}; contains Pfam profiles PF00705: Proliferating... cell nuclear antigen N-terminal domain, PF02747: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen C-terminal domain 1e-131 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243048 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243048 J100010D20 At2g29570.1 68415.m03591 proliferating cell nuclear antigen 2 (...PCNA2) identical to SP|Q9ZW35 Proliferating cell nuclear antigen 2 (PCNA 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; nearly i...dentical to SP|Q43124 Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) {Brassica napus}; contains Pfam profiles PF00705: Proliferating... cell nuclear antigen N-terminal domain, PF02747: Proliferating cell nuclear antigen C-terminal domain 1e-132 ...

  11. Reference: 538 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d A et al. 2007 Apr. Plant Physiol. 143(4):1576-89. Membrane proteins within the sieve element-companion cel...RS6, selected from hybridomas raised against sieve elements isolated from Califor...psis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotype Columbia that is associated specifically with the plasma membrane of sieve... elements, but not companion cells, and accumulates at the earliest stages of sieve...ch domain, and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic domain. The amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of the 21.5-kD sieve

  12. Heavy ion induced mutation in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy ions, He, C, Ar and Ne were irradiated to the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana for inducing the new mutants. In the irradiated generation (M{sub 1}), germination and survival rate were observed to estimate the relative biological effectiveness in relation to the LET including the inactivation cross section. Mutation frequencies were compared by using three kinds of genetic loci after irradiation with C ions and electrons. Several interesting new mutants were selected in the selfed progenies of heavy ion irradiated seeds. (author)

  13. Reference: 517 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available l C et al. 2007 Mar. Plant Physiol. 143(3):1173-88. Seed dormancy is a common phase of the plant life cycle,... and several parts of the seed can contribute to dormancy. Whole seeds, seeds lacking the testa, embryos, an...eriments designed to identify components of the Arabidopsis seed that contribute to seed dormancy and to learn more about how dormanc... the primary determinant of seed dormancy. Embryos from dormant seeds, however, h...abscisic acid and is sufficient and necessary for seed dormancy. 3 1173-88 17220360 2007 Mar Plant physiolog

  14. Reference: 624 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on of dihydrocamalexic acid to camalexin by CYP71B15 (PAD3). This article reports... characterization of CYP71A13. Plants carrying cyp71A13 mutations produce greatly reduced amounts of camalexin...f CYP79B2 and CYP71A13 in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in conversion of Trp to IAN. Exogenously supplied IAN restored camalexin...hat CYP71A13 catalyzes the conversion of IAOx to IAN in camalexin synthesis and p...rovide further support for the role of camalexin in resistance to A. brassicicola. Arabidopsis cytochrome P4

  15. Reference: 413 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ion, and, in the absence of fertilization, flowers senesce. In the Arabidopsis thal...iana mutant fruit without fertilization, a mutation in AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR8 (AR...F8) results in the uncoupling of fruit development from pollination and fertilization and gives rise to seed...ARF8 acts as an inhibitor to stop further carpel development in the absence of fertilization and the generat... involved in pollination and fertilization and in the carpel wall. After fertilization, the level of GUS act

  16. Reference: 705 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available w that in Arabidopsis thaliana, the degree of H3K36 methylation is regulated by distinct methyltransferases. The SET2 homologs SDG...8 and SDG26 each can methylate oligonucleosomes in vitro, and both proteins are locali...zed in the nucleus. While the previously reported loss-of-function sdg8 mutants h...ave an early-flowering phenotype, the loss-of-function sdg26 mutants show a late-flowering phenotype. Consis...tently, several MADS-box flowering repressors are down-regulated by sdg8 but up-regulated by sdg26. The sdg8 but not the sdg

  17. Reference: 462 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available . ATAF1 was one of the first identified NAC proteins in Arabidopsis. In present study, we characterized the ATAF1 express...ion and biological function in response to water deficit stress. ATAF1 mRNA express...ater treatment, suggesting a general role in drought stress responses. Transient expression analysis in onio...otein. Yeast transactivation analysis showed that ATAF1 had ability to activate reporter gene expression. Fu...ught response test. This ataf1 phenotype was coincident with the enhanced expression of stress responsive ma

  18. Reference: 423 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ed T-DNA knockouts to Arabidopsis FAAH (AtFAAH; At5g64440) and generated plants overexpressing AtFAAH. Here ...d seedling growth was hypersensitive to exogenously applied NAE. On the other hand, seeds and seedlings of AtFAAH overexpress...ssors displayed enhanced seedling growth and increased cell size. AtFAAH expression...s fatty acid amide hydrolase expression modifies plant growth and sensitivity to N-acylethanolamines. 32 121...ors had lower endogenous NAE content, and seedlings were less sensitive to exogenous NAE. Moreover, AtFAAH overexpre

  19. Reference: 453 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ctor. We demonstrate that this protein functions as a transcriptional repressor in vivo. The express...ion of all members of the CYCLINA2 (CYCA2) family was reduced in an ILP1 overexpressing l...ine, and the mouse (Mus musculus) homolog of ILP1 repressed cyclin A2 expression in mouse NIH3T3 cells. T-DN...A insertion mutants of ILP1 showed reduced polyploidy and upregulated all CYCA2 express...ion. Furthermore, loss of CYCA2;1 expression induces an increase in polyploidy in Arabidopsis. We demo

  20. Reference: 595 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available t critical for ring formation or positioning despite its conservation. atftsZ1-1(D159N) and atftsZ1-1(G366A)...hese mutants. However, atftsZ1-1(D159N) exhibits loss of proper midplastid FtsZ positioning...1 are related to its in vivo function. Effects of mutations in Arabidopsis FtsZ1 on plastid division, FtsZ ring formation and positio...ning, and FtsZ filament morphology in vivo. 6 775-91 17468127 2007 Jun Plant & cell

  1. Reference: 562 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Akie et al. 2007 Mar. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104(11):4724-9. Roots display hydrotropism in response t...olecular mechanism underlying hydrotropism remains unknown. Here, we report that roots of the Arabidopsis mu...tant mizu-kussei1 (miz1), which are impaired in hydrotropism, show normal gravitropism and elongation growth.... The roots of miz1 plants showed reduced phototropism and a modified wavy growth...wild-type plants. These results suggest that the pathway inducing hydrotropism is independent of the pathway

  2. Mutaciones de Arabidopsis que producen el fenotipo de nrb2

    OpenAIRE

    TOLOSA ALMENDROS, VÍCTOR MANUEL

    2015-01-01

    [ES] En la resistencia basal de Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) frente a patógenos biotrofos hay una señal fundamental: el ácido salicílico (SA). Pese a la importancia de esta molécula en plantas, todavía se desconocen muchos pasos importantes en esta ruta. El uso de mutantes que presentan alguna alteración en la ruta de señalización del SA puede ser una herramienta útil para estudiar esta ruta. A partir de un rastreo genético en Arabidopsis, hemos identificado catorce ...

  3. Arabidopsis transformation with large bacterial artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose M; Stepanova, Anna N

    2014-01-01

    The study of a gene's function requires, in many cases, the ability to reintroduce the gene of interest or its modified version back into the organism of choice. One potential caveat of this approach is that not only the coding region but also the regulatory sequences of a gene should be included in the corresponding transgenic construct. Even in species with well-annotated genomes, such as Arabidopsis, it is nearly impossible to predict which sequences are responsible for the proper expression of a gene. One way to circumvent this problem is to utilize a large fragment of genomic DNA that contains the coding region of the gene of interest and at least 5-10 kb of flanking genomic sequences. To facilitate these types of experiments, libraries harboring large genomic DNA fragments in binary vectors have been constructed for Arabidopsis and several other plant species. Working with these large clones, however, requires some special precautions. In this chapter, we describe the experimental procedures and extra cautionary measures involved in the identification of the clone containing the gene of interest, its transfer from E. coli to Agrobacterium, and the generation, verification, and analysis of the corresponding transgenic plants.

  4. Arabidopsis Growth Simulation Using Image Processing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junmei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to provide a method to represent the virtual Arabidopsis plant at each growth stage. It includes simulating the shape and providing growth parameters. The shape is described with elliptic Fourier descriptors. First, the plant is segmented from the background with the chromatic coordinates. With the segmentation result, the outer boundary series are obtained by using boundary tracking algorithm. The elliptic Fourier analysis is then carried out to extract the coefficients of the contour. The coefficients require less storage than the original contour points and can be used to simulate the shape of the plant. The growth parameters include total area and the number of leaves of the plant. The total area is obtained with the number of the plant pixels and the image calibration result. The number of leaves is derived by detecting the apex of each leaf. It is achieved by using wavelet transform to identify the local maximum of the distance signal between the contour points and the region centroid. Experiment result shows that this method can record the growth stage of Arabidopsis plant with fewer data and provide a visual platform for plant growth research.

  5. Diuretics Prime Plant Immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Mika; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are agrochemicals that activate the plant immune system, thereby enhancing disease resistance. Due to their prophylactic and durable effects on a wide spectrum of diseases, plant activators can provide synergistic crop protection when used in combination with traditional pest controls. Although plant activators have achieved great success in wet-rice farming practices in Asia, their use is still limited. To isolate novel plant activators applicable to other crops, we screened a chemical library using a method that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of three diuretics, bumetanide, bendroflumethiazide and clopamide, as immune-priming compounds. These drugs upregulate the immunity-related cell death of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells induced with an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a concentration-dependent manner. The application of these compounds to Arabidopsis plants confers disease resistance to not only the avirulent but also a virulent strain of the pathogen. Unlike salicylic acid, an endogenous phytohormone that governs disease resistance in response to biotrophic pathogens, the three diuretic compounds analyzed here do not induce PR1 or inhibit plant growth, showing potential as lead compounds in a practical application. PMID:23144763

  6. Bacterial RNAs activate innate immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boyoung; Park, Yong-Soon; Lee, Soohyun; Song, Geun Cheol; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The common molecular patterns of microbes play a critical role in the regulation of plant innate immunity. However, little is known about the role of nucleic acids in this process in plants. We pre-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaves with total RNAs from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto DC3000) and subsequently inoculated these plants with the same bacterial cells. Total Pto DC3000 RNAs pre-infiltrated into Arabidopsis leaves elicited plant immune responses against Pto DC3000. However, sheared RNAs and RNase A application failed to induce immunity, suggesting that intact bacterial RNAs function in plant innate immunity. This notion was supported by the positive regulation of superoxide anion levels, callose deposition, two mitogen-activated protein kinases and defense-related genes observed in bacterial RNA-pre-treated leaves. Intriguingly, the Pto DC3000 population was not compromised in known pattern recognition receptor mutants for chitin, flagellin and elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu). Plant defense-related mutant analyses further revealed that bacterial RNA-elicited innate immunity was normally required for salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling. Notably, among total RNAs, the abundant bacterial RNA species 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs were the major determinants of this response. Our findings provide evidence that bacterial RNA serves as a microbe-associated molecular pattern in plants. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Local evolution of seed flotation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Saez-Aguayo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was modified in the variants by ten independent causal mutations in four different loci. Seven distinct mutations affected one locus, coding the MUM2 β-D-galactosidase, and represent a striking example of allelic heterogeneity. The modification of mucilage release has thus evolved a number of times independently in two restricted geographical zones. All the natural mutants identified still accumulated mucilage polysaccharides in seed coat epidermal cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR relaxometry their production and retention was shown to reduce water mobility into internal seed tissues during imbibition, which would help to maintain seed buoyancy. Surprisingly, despite released mucilage being an excellent hydrogel it did not increase the rate of water uptake by internal seed tissues and is more likely to play a role in retaining water around the seed.

  8. Local evolution of seed flotation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez-Aguayo, Susana; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Macquet, Audrey; Kronholm, Ilkka; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Berger, Adeline; Sallé, Christine; Poulain, Damien; Granier, Fabienne; Botran, Lucy; Loudet, Olivier; de Meaux, Juliette; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was modified in the variants by ten independent causal mutations in four different loci. Seven distinct mutations affected one locus, coding the MUM2 β-D-galactosidase, and represent a striking example of allelic heterogeneity. The modification of mucilage release has thus evolved a number of times independently in two restricted geographical zones. All the natural mutants identified still accumulated mucilage polysaccharides in seed coat epidermal cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry their production and retention was shown to reduce water mobility into internal seed tissues during imbibition, which would help to maintain seed buoyancy. Surprisingly, despite released mucilage being an excellent hydrogel it did not increase the rate of water uptake by internal seed tissues and is more likely to play a role in retaining water around the seed.

  9. Genome-Wide Analysis of Genes Encoding Methionine-Rich Proteins in Arabidopsis and Soybean Suggesting Their Roles in the Adaptation of Plants to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Duc Chu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation and reduction of methionine (Met play important roles in scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS and signaling in living organisms. To understand the impacts of Met oxidation and reduction in plants during stress, we surveyed the genomes of Arabidopsis and soybean (Glycine max L. for genes encoding Met-rich proteins (MRPs. We found 121 and 213 genes encoding MRPs in Arabidopsis and soybean, respectively. Gene annotation indicated that those with known function are involved in vital cellular processes such as transcriptional control, calcium signaling, protein modification, and metal transport. Next, we analyzed the transcript levels of MRP-coding genes under normal and stress conditions. We found that 57 AtMRPs were responsive either to drought or to high salinity stress in Arabidopsis; 35 GmMRPs were responsive to drought in the leaf of late vegetative or early reproductive stages of soybean. Among the MRP genes with a known function, the majority of the abiotic stress-responsive genes are involved in transcription control and calcium signaling. Finally, Arabidopsis plant which overexpressed an MRP-coding gene, whose transcripts were downregulated by abiotic stress, was more sensitive to paraquat than the control. Taken together, our report indicates that MRPs participate in various vital processes of plants under normal and stress conditions.

  10. Induction and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants by Ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Y. H.; Choi, J. D.; Park, J. Y.; Lee, J. R.; Sohn, H. S.

    2008-03-01

    This study was conducted to search the proper conditions and times for irradiating proton beam to seeds generally used for induction of mutant. Arabidopsis as model plants has good characters that is a short generation time, producing a lot of seeds, sequenced genome, developed maker. This points were the best materials for plant breeding for this study. The data of inducing mutants of Arabidopsis is used to be applicate to crops have more longer generation that is the final goals of this study. The goals of this project were to inducing and characterizing arabidopsis mutants by the proton ion beam and γ-ray. As well as, the purpose of this study was securing more than 10 lines of arabidopsis mutants in this project and also to know the changed DNA structure of the mutants using the basic data for applying to the more study

  11. Chromatin reprogramming: gender equality during Arabidopsis germline differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Yannick; Martienssen, Robert A.

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale histone H3 reprogramming during male germline differentiation is conserved between animals and plants. A new report now shows that H3 reprogramming also occurs in the female germline of the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:21215930

  12. Light responses in Photoperiodism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony R. Cashmore

    2006-08-01

    ADO1: An Arabidopsis blue light photoreceptor We have reported the characterization of an Arabidopsis gene encoding the ADAGIO 1 (ADO1) protein (Jarillo et al., 2001a). ADO1 contains a LOV domain, similar to WHITE COLLAR 1 (WC1), a photoreceptor for entrainment of Neurospora circadian rhythms (Froehlich et al., 2002), as well as PHOT1 and PHOT2, the blue light photoreceptors for phototropism (Briggs et al., 2001; Christie et al., 1998; Jarillo et al., 2001b; Kinoshita et al., 2001). Loss of function ado1 mutants show an unusually long periodicity for their free running circadian rhythm (Jarillo et al., 2001a). This observation holds for plants grown under white light as well as blue light and surprisingly, plants grown under red light also show altered circadian properties. The similarity of the LOV domain of ADO1 to those of PHOT1, PHOT2 and WC1 (known flavoprotein photoreceptors) as well as the genetic and molecular properties of ADO1, indicate that ADO1 is likely a new class of blue light photoreceptor. Indeed, the LOV domain of the related FKF1/ADO3 has been shown to bind FMN, and exhibit the in vitro photochemistry characteristic of PHOT1 (Imaizumi et al., 2003). Furthermore, ZTL/ADO1 has been shown to participate in the circadian and proteasome mediated degradation of the Arabidopsis clock protein, TOC1 (Mas et al., 2003). We also showed that the ado1 mutation selectively confers hypersensitivity to red light — when grown under red light (but not blue light) the ado1 mutant possesses an unusually short hypocotyl. This red light hypersensivity is even more severe in a triple ado1 ado2 ado3 mutant — ADO2 and ADO3 being the two other members of this ADAGIO gene family. This finding of a mutant phenotype under red light is somewhat unexpected for a protein thought to function as a photoreceptor for blue light. We have pursued our studies of ADO1 by preparing a mutant gene for which we have altered the codon for the cysteine residue conserved in all LOV

  13. A spatial dissection of the Arabidopsis floral transcriptome by MPSS

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Leon Nidia; Arteaga-Vazquez Mario; Sakai Hajime; Kaushik Shail; Peiffer Jason A; Ghazal Hassan; Vielle-Calzada Jean-Philippe; Meyers Blake C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background We have further characterized floral organ-localized gene expression in the inflorescence of Arabidopsis thaliana by comparison of massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS) data. Six libraries of RNA sequence tags from immature inflorescence tissues were constructed and matched to their respective loci in the annotated Arabidopsis genome. These signature libraries survey the floral transcriptome of wild-type tissue as well as the floral homeotic mutants, apetala1, ape...

  14. Identification of Polyadenylation Sites within Arabidopsis Thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal

    2011-09-01

    Machine Learning (ML) is a field of artificial intelligence focused on the design and implementation of algorithms that enable creation of models for clustering, classification, prediction, ranking and similar inference tasks based on information contained in data. Many ML algorithms have been successfully utilized in a variety of applications. The problem addressed in this thesis is from the field of bioinformatics and deals with the recognition of polyadenylation (poly(A)) sites in the genomic sequence of the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. During the RNA processing, a tail consisting of a number of consecutive adenine (A) nucleotides is added to the terminal nucleotide of the 3’- untranslated region (3’UTR) of the primary RNA. The process in which these A nucleotides are added is called polyadenylation. The location in the genomic DNA sequence that corresponds to the start of terminal A nucleotides (i.e. to the end of 3’UTR) is known as a poly(A) site. Recognition of the poly(A) sites in DNA sequence is important for better gene annotation and understanding of gene regulation. In this study, we built an artificial neural network (ANN) for the recognition of poly(A) sites in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. Our study demonstrates that this model achieves improved accuracy compared to the existing predictive models for this purpose. The key factor contributing to the enhanced predictive performance of our ANN model is a distinguishing set of features used in creation of the model. These features include a number of physico-chemical characteristics of relevance, such as dinucleotide thermodynamic characteristics, electron-ion interaction potential, etc., but also many of the statistical properties of the DNA sequences from the region surrounding poly(A) site, such as nucleotide and polynucleotide properties, common motifs, etc. Our ANN model was compared in performance with several other ML models, as well as with the PAC tool that is specifically developed for

  15. New metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, U.

    1983-12-01

    The aim of this report is to estimate the exposure to various metals and metal compounds and discuss the available information of the possible toxic effects of these metals and compounds. In the first section, some metals are defined as those with either a large or a fast increasing exposure to living organisms. The available information on toxicity is discussed in the second section. In the third section interesting metals are defined as compounds having a large exposure and an apparent insufficient knowledge of their possible toxic effects. Comments on each of these metals are also to be found in the third section. (G.B.)

  16. Reference: 351 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available similarly high levels of ABA. ABA levels decreased rapidly upon imbibition, although they fell further in ND than in D. Gene express...e family (CYP707A)] genes. Of these, only the AtCYP707A2 gene was differentially expressed between D and ND seeds, being express...ed to a much higher level in ND seeds. Similarly, a barley CYP707 homologue, (HvABA8'OH-1) was express...ins. Consistent with this, in situ hybridization studies showed HvABA8'OH-1 mRNA expression was stronger in ... plays a key role in dormancy release. Constitutive expression of a CYP707A gene in transgenic Arabidopsis r

  17. A Space Flight Cultivation Protocol for Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, H. G.

    2008-06-01

    A tube-based method is presented for the cultivation and manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana during space flight experimentation. Seeds were germinated on rock-wool plugs and subsequently transferred into modified polypropylene conical tubes (cut to 5 cm lengths) at 7 days after planting. Each tube contained four side-situated slits through which capillary mat strips were woven. An additional capillary mat wick extended from below the tube up through the bottom to the mid-interior portion. The incorporation of Fibrous Ion Exchange Resin Substrate provided nutrients. The tubes were transferred to plant compartments containing a horticulture foam matrix that received water inputs. Vigorous seedling development through to seed production was achieved. Dispersed seeds frequently germinated on top of the foam substrate, yielding a 2nd generation of seedlings. The methods used herein could be applied to other plant species to be flown in space.

  18. Metal lagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemercier, Guy.

    1974-01-01

    The metal lagging described is characterized by the fact that it is formed of closed sacks composed of an elastic metal mass, compressed in an outer envelope made of a fine mesh metal fabric. The metal mass is composed of stainless steel wool stuffed into the envelope. This lagging is particularly intended for the thermal protection of the end slab of LMFBR type reactors [fr

  19. Metabolic and transcriptomic changes induced in Arabidopsis by the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SS101

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortel, van de J.E.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Dekkers, E.; Pineda, A.; Guillod, L.; Bouwmeester, K.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Dicke, M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic resistance induced in plants by nonpathogenic rhizobacteria is typically effective against multiple pathogens. Here, we show that root-colonizing Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SS101 (Pf.SS101) enhanced resistance in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) against several bacterial pathogens,

  20. Numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, X.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana. I studied numerical and structural chromosome aberrations in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Arabidopsis thaliana. The large genomic changes are important for

  1. Silicone metalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  2. Update History of This Database - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Arabidopsis Phenome Database Update History of This Database Date Update contents 2017/02/27... Arabidopsis Phenome Database English archive site is opened. - Arabidopsis Phenome Database (http://jphenom...e.info/?page_id=95) is opened. About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database... Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - Arabidopsis Phenome Database | LSDB Archive ...

  3. Standardized Method for High-throughput Sterilization of Arabidopsis Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Benson E; Rivero, Luz; Calhoun, Chistopher S; Grotewold, Erich; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2017-10-17

    Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) seedlings often need to be grown on sterile media. This requires prior seed sterilization to prevent the growth of microbial contaminants present on the seed surface. Currently, Arabidopsis seeds are sterilized using two distinct sterilization techniques in conditions that differ slightly between labs and have not been standardized, often resulting in only partially effective sterilization or in excessive seed mortality. Most of these methods are also not easily scalable to a large number of seed lines of diverse genotypes. As technologies for high-throughput analysis of Arabidopsis continue to proliferate, standardized techniques for sterilizing large numbers of seeds of different genotypes are becoming essential for conducting these types of experiments. The response of a number of Arabidopsis lines to two different sterilization techniques was evaluated based on seed germination rate and the level of seed contamination with microbes and other pathogens. The treatments included different concentrations of sterilizing agents and times of exposure, combined to determine optimal conditions for Arabidopsis seed sterilization. Optimized protocols have been developed for two different sterilization methods: bleach (liquid-phase) and chlorine (Cl2) gas (vapor-phase), both resulting in high seed germination rates and minimal microbial contamination. The utility of these protocols was illustrated through the testing of both wild type and mutant seeds with a range of germination potentials. Our results show that seeds can be effectively sterilized using either method without excessive seed mortality, although detrimental effects of sterilization were observed for seeds with lower than optimal germination potential. In addition, an equation was developed to enable researchers to apply the standardized chlorine gas sterilization conditions to airtight containers of different sizes. The protocols described here allow easy, efficient, and

  4. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  5. A bacterial haloalkane dehalogenase gene as a negative selectable marker in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næsted, Henrik; Fennema, M.; Hao, L.

    1999-01-01

    , including Arabidopsis, tobacco, oil seed rape and rice, do not express detectable haloalkane dehalogenase activities, and that wild-type Arabidopsis grows in the presence of DCE. In contrast, DCE applied as a volatile can be used to select on plates or in soil transgenic Arabidopsis which express dhl...

  6. Sensitive detection and measurement of oligogalacturonides in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela ePontiggia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Oligogalacturonides (OGs are pectin fragments derived from the partial hydrolysis of the plant cell wall pectin; they are elicitors of various defense responses. While their activity is well documented, the detection of OGs produced in planta is still a challenging task.A protocol has been developed for the extraction and analysis of OGs from small samples of Arabidopsis tissues by using fluorescent labelled OGs, which allowed to monitor the efficiency of extraction. An efficient recovery was obtained by using a combination of calcium chelating agents at acidic pH. Off-line coupling of HPAEC with MALDI-TOF-MS or nanoESI-Orbitrap-MS/MS was used for the identification and characterization of oligosaccharides. The protocol was successfully applied to detect OGs by using low amounts (50 mg of Arabidopsis leaves and very low amounts (30 mg of senescent leaves. The protocol was also successfully used to detect OGs in Arabidopsis cell wall material digested with pectinases.The proposed extraction protocol followed by sensitive and high-resolution analysis methods allowed detection of OGs released from the cell wall in Arabidopsis tissues by using minimal sample material. The protocol may be useful to study OG-triggered plant immunity and cell wall remodeling during Arabidopsis growth and development.

  7. Transposed genes in Arabidopsis are often associated with flanking repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Woodhouse

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Much of the eukaryotic genome is known to be mobile, largely due to the movement of transposons and other parasitic elements. Recent work in plants and Drosophila suggests that mobility is also a feature of many nontransposon genes and gene families. Indeed, analysis of the Arabidopsis genome suggested that as many as half of all genes had moved to unlinked positions since Arabidopsis diverged from papaya roughly 72 million years ago, and that these mobile genes tend to fall into distinct gene families. However, the mechanism by which single gene transposition occurred was not deduced. By comparing two closely related species, Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata, we sought to determine the nature of gene transposition in Arabidopsis. We found that certain categories of genes are much more likely to have transposed than others, and that many of these transposed genes are flanked by direct repeat sequence that was homologous to sequence within the orthologous target site in A. lyrata and which was predominantly genic in identity. We suggest that intrachromosomal recombination between tandemly duplicated sequences, and subsequent insertion of the circular product, is the predominant mechanism of gene transposition.

  8. Sensitive detection and measurement of oligogalacturonides in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontiggia, Daniela; Ciarcianelli, Jacopo; Salvi, Gianni; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Mattei, Benedetta

    2015-01-01

    Oligogalacturonides (OGs) are pectin fragments derived from the partial hydrolysis of the plant cell wall pectin; they are elicitors of various defense responses. While their activity is well documented, the detection of OGs produced in planta is still a challenging task. A protocol has been developed for the extraction and analysis of OGs from small samples of Arabidopsis tissues by using fluorescent labeled OGs, which allowed to monitor the efficiency of extraction. An efficient recovery was obtained by using a combination of calcium chelating agents at acidic pH. Off-line coupling of high performance anion exchange chromatography with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization- time of flight-mass spectrometryor nanoESI-Orbitrap-MS/MS was used for the identification and characterization of oligosaccharides. The protocol was successfully applied to detect OGs by using low amounts (50 mg) of Arabidopsis leaves and very low amounts (30 mg) of senescent leaves. The protocol was also successfully used to detect OGs in Arabidopsis cell wall material digested with pectinases. The proposed extraction protocol followed by sensitive and high-resolution analysis methods allowed detection of OGs released from the cell wall in Arabidopsis tissues by using minimal sample material. The protocol may be useful to study OG-triggered plant immunity and cell wall remodeling during Arabidopsis growth and development. PMID:25954288

  9. Metallic nanomesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Sun, Tianyi; Guo, Chuanfei

    2018-02-20

    A transparent flexible nanomesh having at least one conductive element and sheet resistance less than 300.OMEGA./.quadrature. when stretched to a strain of 200% in at least one direction. The nanomesh is formed by depositing a sacrificial film, depositing, etching, and oxidizing a first metal layer on the film, etching the sacrificial film, depositing a second metal layer, and removing the first metal layer to form a nanomesh on the substrate.

  10. G2 Checkpoint Responses in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, Anne [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-03-18

    This project focused on the mechanism and biological significance of the G2 arrest response to replication stress in plants. We employed both forward and reverse genetic approaches to identify genes required for this response. A total of 3 different postdocs, 5 undergraduates, and 2 graduate students participated in the project. We identified several genes required for damage response in plants, including homologs of genes previously identified in animals (ATM and ATR), novel, a plant-specific genes (SOG1) and a gene known in animals but previously thought to be missing from the Arabidopsis genome (ATRIP). We characterized the transcriptome of gamma-irradiated plants, and found that plants, unlike animals, express a robust transcriptional response to damage, involving genes that regulate the cell cycle and DNA metabolism. This response requires both ATM and the transcription factor SOG1. We found that both ATM and ATR play a role in meiosis in plants. We also found that plants have a cell-type-specific programmed cell death response to ionizing radiation and UV light, and that this response requires ATR, ATM, and SOG1. These results were published in a series of 5 papers.

  11. Specification of floral organs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Frank; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Riechmann, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Floral organs are specified by the activities of a small group of transcriptional regulators, the floral organ identity factors. Extensive genetic and molecular analyses have shown that these proteins act as master regulators of flower development, and function not only in organ identity determination but also during organ morphogenesis. Although it is now well established that these transcription factors act in higher order protein complexes in the regulation of transcription, the gene expression programmes controlled by them have remained largely elusive. Only recently, detailed insights into their functions have been obtained through the combination of a wide range of experimental methods, including transcriptomic and proteomic approaches. Here, we review the progress that has been made in the characterization of the floral organ identity factors from the main model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and we discuss what is known about the processes acting downstream of these regulators. We further outline open questions, which we believe need to be addressed to obtain a more complete view of the molecular processes that govern floral organ development and specification.

  12. Gene networks controlling Arabidopsis thaliana flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó'Maoiléidigh, Diarmuid Seosamh; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Wellmer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The formation of flowers is one of the main models for studying the regulatory mechanisms that underlie plant development and evolution. Over the past three decades, extensive genetic and molecular analyses have led to the identification of a large number of key floral regulators and to detailed insights into how they control flower morphogenesis. In recent years, genome-wide approaches have been applied to obtaining a global view of the gene regulatory networks underlying flower formation. Furthermore, mathematical models have been developed that can simulate certain aspects of this process and drive further experimentation. Here, we review some of the main findings made in the field of Arabidopsis thaliana flower development, with an emphasis on recent advances. In particular, we discuss the activities of the floral organ identity factors, which are pivotal for the specification of the different types of floral organs, and explore the experimental avenues that may elucidate the molecular mechanisms and gene expression programs through which these master regulators of flower development act. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Arabidopsis root growth movements and their symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunati, Alessio; Tassone, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years, an increasing number of plant scientists have become interested in the Arabidopsis root growth pattern, that is produced on the surface of an agar plate, inclined from the vertical. In this situation, the roots wave intensely and slant preferentially towards one side, showing torsions in the epidermal cell files alternately right-and left handed. In addition, the pattern switches to the formation of large or strict coils when the plate is set horizontally. After this finding, different hypotheses were advanced attempting to explain the forces that shape these patterns. These basically appear to be gravitropism, circumnutation and negative thigmotropism. With regard to the symmetry, the coils and the slanting in the wild-type are essentially right-handed, but mutants were also reported which show a left-handed symmetry, while some do not show a regular growth pattern at all. This review article discusses the earlier as well as the most recent findings on the topic, and investigates the possibility of describing the different mechanisms shaping the root growth patterns via unifying hypothesis. PMID:19721745

  14. Spiralizations and tropisms in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, F; Piconese, S

    2001-12-01

    When Arabidopsis seedlings are grown on a hard-agar plate, their primary roots show characteristic spiralling movements, apparent as waves, coils and torsions, together with a slanting toward the right-hand side. All these movements are believed to be the result of three different processes acting on the roots: circumnutation, positive gravitropism and negative thigmotropism. The basic movement of the roots is described as that of a growing right-handed helix, which, because of the root tip hitting the agar plate, is continuously switched from the right-hand to the left-hand of the growth direction, and vice versa. This movement also produces a slanting root-growth direction toward the right-hand because of the incomplete waves made by the right-handed root to the left-hand. By contrast, the torsions seen in the coils and waves are interpreted as artefacts that form as an adaptation of the three-dimensional root helix to the flat two-dimensional agar surface.

  15. Epigenetic Regulation of Intronic Transgenes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osabe, Kenji; Harukawa, Yoshiko; Miura, Saori; Saze, Hidetoshi

    2017-03-24

    Defense mechanisms of plant genomes can epigenetically inactivate repetitive sequences and exogenous transgenes. Loss of mutant phenotypes in intronic T-DNA insertion lines by interaction with another T-DNA locus, termed T-DNA suppression, has been observed in Arabidopsis thaliana, although the molecular basis of establishment and maintenance of T-DNA suppression is poorly understood. Here we show that maintenance of T-DNA suppression requires heterochromatinisation of T-DNA sequences and the nuclear proteins, INCREASED IN BONSAI METHYLATION 2 (IBM2) and ENHANCED DOWNY MILDEW 2 (EDM2), which prevent ectopic 3' end processing of mRNA in atypically long introns containing T-DNA sequences. Initiation of T-DNA suppression is mediated by the canonical RdDM pathway after hybridisation of two T-DNA strains, accompanied by DNA hypermethylation of T-DNA sequences in the F1 generation. Our results reveal the presence of a genome surveillance mechanism through genome hybridisation that masks repetitive DNAs intruding into transcription units.

  16. The pattern of polymorphism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We resequenced 876 short fragments in a sample of 96 individuals of Arabidopsis thaliana that included stock center accessions as well as a hierarchical sample from natural populations. Although A. thaliana is a selfing weed, the pattern of polymorphism in general agrees with what is expected for a widely distributed, sexually reproducing species. Linkage disequilibrium decays rapidly, within 50 kb. Variation is shared worldwide, although population structure and isolation by distance are evident. The data fail to fit standard neutral models in several ways. There is a genome-wide excess of rare alleles, at least partially due to selection. There is too much variation between genomic regions in the level of polymorphism. The local level of polymorphism is negatively correlated with gene density and positively correlated with segmental duplications. Because the data do not fit theoretical null distributions, attempts to infer natural selection from polymorphism data will require genome-wide surveys of polymorphism in order to identify anomalous regions. Despite this, our data support the utility of A. thaliana as a model for evolutionary functional genomics.

  17. Salt-avoidance tropism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Zhang, Ws

    2008-05-01

    The orientation of plant root growth is modulated by developmental as well as environmental cues. Among the environmental factors, gravity has been extensively studied because of its overpowering effects in modulating root growth direction. However, our knowledge of the effects of other abiotic signals that influence root growth direction is largely unknown. Recently, we have shown that high salinity can modify root growth direction by inducing rapid amyloplast degradation in root columella cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. By exploiting salt overly sensitive (sos) mutants and PIN2 expression analyses, we have shown that the altered root growth direction in response to salt is mediated by ion disequilibrium and is correlated with PIN2 mRNA abundance and expression and localization of the protein. Our study demonstrates that the SOS pathway may mediate this process. Here we discuss our data from broader perspectives. We propose that salt-induced modification of root growth direction is a salt-avoidance behavior, which is an active adaptive mechanism for plants grown under saline conditions. Furthermore, high salinity also stimulates alteration of gravitropic growth of shoots. These findings illustrate that plants have a fine and sophisticated sensory and communication system that enable plants to dynamically and efficiently cope with rapidly changing environment.

  18. Characterization Of Laccase T-DNA Mutants In Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe R; Asp, Torben; Mansfield, Shawn

    Laccases (P-diphenol:O2 oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.2), also termed laccase-like multicopper oxidases, are blue copper-containing oxidases which comprise multigene families in plants. In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, 17 laccase genes (LAC1 to LAC17) have been annotated. To identify laccases...... involved in cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis primary stems we have developed homozygous T-DNA mutants for 14 individual laccases. Six laccases are highly expressed in the wild type primary stem, four of which (LAC2, LAC4, LAC12, and LAC17) show correlated gene expression with one to several genes (e...... different and distinct biochemical pathways and that laccases might be involved in polymerization of both polysaccharides and monolignols in the Arabidopsis cell wall....

  19. Hemoglobin is essential for normal growth of Arabidopsis organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim Henrik; Hunt, Peter; Dennis, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the class I hemoglobin AHb1 is transiently expressed in the hydathodes of leaves and in floral buds from young inflorescences. Nitric oxide (NO) accumulates to high levels in these organs when AHb1 is silenced, indicating an important role in metabolizing NO. AHb1-silenced...... lines are viable but show a mutant phenotype affecting the regions where AHb1 is expressed. Arabidopsis lines with an insertional knockout or overexpression of AHb2, a class II 3-on-3 hemoglobin, were generated. Seedlings overexpressing AHb2 show enhanced survival of hypoxic stress. The AHb2 knockout...... lines develop normally. However, when AHb2 knockout is combined with AHb1 silencing, seedlings die at an early vegetative stage suggesting that the two 3-on-3 hemoglobins, AHb1 and AHb2, together play an essential role for normal development of Arabidopsis seedlings. In conclusion, these results...

  20. VLSI metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G; Gildenblat, Gennady Sh

    1987-01-01

    VLSI Electronics Microstructure Science, Volume 15: VLSI Metallization discusses the various issues and problems related to VLSI metallization. It details the available solutions and presents emerging trends.This volume is comprised of 10 chapters. The two introductory chapters, Chapter 1 and 2 serve as general references for the electrical and metallurgical properties of thin conducting films. Subsequent chapters review the various aspects of VLSI metallization. The order of presentation has been chosen to follow the common processing sequence. In Chapter 3, some relevant metal deposition tec

  1. Phosphorylation sites of Arabidopsis MAP Kinase Substrate 1 (MKS1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, M.B.; Qiu, J.-L.; Zhang, X.

    2007-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) substrate MKS1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, full-length, 6x histidine (His)-tagged MKS1 was phosphorylated in vitro by hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged MPK4 immuno-precipitated from plants. MKS1 phosphorylation was initially verified by electrophore......The Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) substrate MKS1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified, full-length, 6x histidine (His)-tagged MKS1 was phosphorylated in vitro by hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged MPK4 immuno-precipitated from plants. MKS1 phosphorylation was initially verified...

  2. ARAMEMNON, a novel database for Arabidopsis integral membrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwacke, Rainer; Schneider, Anja; van der Graaff, Eric

    2003-01-01

    A specialized database (DB) for Arabidopsis membrane proteins, ARAMEMNON, was designed that facilitates the interpretation of gene and protein sequence data by integrating features that are presently only available from individual sources. Using several publicly available prediction programs......, putative integral membrane proteins were identified among the approximately 25,500 proteins in the Arabidopsis genome DBs. By averaging the predictions from seven programs, approximately 6,500 proteins were classified as transmembrane (TM) candidate proteins. Some 1,800 of these contain at least four TM...

  3. Identification of proteins interacting with Arabidopsis ACD11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Joensen, Jan; McKinney, Lea V

    2009-01-01

    The Arabidopsis ACD11 gene encodes a sphingosine transfer protein and was identified by the accelerated cell death phenotype of the loss of function acd11 mutant, which exhibits heightened expression of genes involved in the disease resistance hypersensitive response (HR). We used ACD11 as bait...... in a yeast two-hybrid screen of an Arabidopsis cDNA library to identify ACD11 interacting proteins. One interactor identified is a protein of unknown function with an RNA recognition motif (RRM) designated BPA1 (binding partner of ACD11). Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the ACD11-BPA1...

  4. Proteomic identification of S-nitrosylated proteins in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindermayr, C.; Saalbach, G.; Durner, J.

    2005-01-01

    Although nitric oxide (NO) has grown into a key signaling molecule in plants during the last few years, less is known about how NO regulates different events in plants. Analyses of NO-dependent processes in animal systems have demonstrated protein S-nitrosylation of cysteine (Cys) residues to be ...... to be one of the dominant regulation mechanisms for many animal proteins. For plants, the principle of S-nitrosylation remained to be elucidated. We generated S-nitrosothiols by treating extracts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell suspension cultures with the NO-donor S...

  5. Weeding out the genes: the Arabidopsis genome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martienssen, R A

    2000-05-01

    The Arabidopsis genome sequence is scheduled for completion at the end of this year (December 2000). It will be the first higher plant genome to be sequenced, and will allow a detailed comparison with bacterial, yeast and animal genomes. Already, two of the five chromosomes have been sequenced, and we have had our first glimpse of higher eukaryotic centromeres, and the structure of heterochromatin. The implications for understanding plant gene function, genome structure and genome organization are profound. In this review, the lessons learned for future genome projects are reviewed as well as a summary of the initial findings in Arabidopsis.

  6. The Arabidopsis cytosolic proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ito, Jun; Parsons, Harriet Tempé; Heazlewood, Joshua L.

    2014-01-01

    compartments. However, a detailed study of enriched cytosolic fractions from Arabidopsis cell culture has been performed only recently, with over 1,000 proteins reproducibly identified by mass spectrometry. The number of proteins allocated to the cytosol nearly doubles to 1,802 if a series of targeted...... proteomic characterizations of complexes is included. Despite this, few groups are currently applying advanced proteomic approaches to this important metabolic space. This review will highlight the current state of the Arabidopsis cytosolic proteome since its initial characterization a few years ago....

  7. Regulation of the heavy metal pump AtHMA4 by a metal-binding autoinhibitory domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lone; Roed, Maria Dalgaard; Zhang, Yang

    Heavy metal pumps, or P1B ATPases, are important for heavy metal homeostasis in most cells. In general, these pumps contain extended N- and/or C-termini with one or more metal-binding domains (MBDs), but the role of the extended termini is still not clear. The Arabidopsis thaliana Zn2+-ATPase At......HMA4 contains a very long C-terminus with 13 cysteine pairs and an 11 amino acid residue long histidine stretch at the end. To ascertain the role of the potentially metal-binding domains in the C-terminus of AtHMA4, the C-terminal region alone was expressed in yeast. This resulted in increased Zn...

  8. Heavy metal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of spawning, resistance to diseases and social acceptability (Pillay, 1993). This study aimed at determining the carbohydrate reserves and heavy metal accumulation of the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis miloticus after treatment with heavy metals such as lead, copper and zinc. 2. Materials and Methods. Test organism: Nile tilapia ...

  9. Plasma metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of surface contamination of the films due to plasma treatment was observed but was easily removed by argon ion cleaning. Hydrogen plasma reduction of glass supported silver(l) nitrate and palladium(ll) acetate films reveals that this metallization technique is applicable to a wide variety of metal salts and supports, and has also shown the ability of plasma reduction to retain the complex 'fern-like' structures seen for spin coated silver(l) nitrate layers. Some metal salts are susceptible to decomposition by X-rays. The reduction of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride films by soft X-rays to produce nanoscopic gold particles has been studied. The spontaneous reduction of these X-ray irradiated support gold(lll) chloride films on exposure to the atmosphere to produce gold rich metallic films has also been reported. (author)

  10. Mutation induction by ion beams in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1999-07-01

    An investigation was made on characteristics of ion beams for the biological effects and the induction of mutation using Arabidopsis plant as a model plant for the molecular genetics. Here, the characteristics of mutation at the molecular level as well as new mutants induced by ion beams were described. The ast and sep1 were obtained from the offspring of 1488 carbon ion-irradiated seeds respectively. The uvi1-uvi4 mutants were also induced from 1280 M{sub 1} lines. Thus, ion beams can induce not only known mutants such as tt, gl and hy but also novel mutants with high frequency. Even in the tt phenotype, two new mutant loci other than known loci were found. In chrysanthemum, several kinds of single, complex or stripped flower-color mutants that have been never induced by {gamma}irradiation, indicating that ion beams could produce a variety of mutants with the same phenotype. In conclusion, ion beams for the mutation induction are characterized by 1) to induce mutants with high frequency, 2) to show broad mutation spectrum and 3) to produce novel mutants. For these reasons, chemical mutagens such as EMS and low LET ionizing radiation such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays will predominantly induce many but small modifications or DNA damages on the DNA strands. As the result, several point mutations will be produced on the genome. On the contrary, ion beams as a high LET ionizing radiation will not cause so many but large and irreparable DNA damage locally, resulting in production of limited number of null mutation. (M.N.)

  11. Nitroreductase reactions of Arabidopsis thaliana thioredoxin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskiniene, V; Sarlauskas, J; Jacquot, J P; Cenas, N

    1998-09-07

    Arabidopsis thaliana NADPH:thioredoxin reductase (TR, EC 1.6.4.5) catalyzed redox cycling of aromatic nitrocompounds, including the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and tetryl, and the herbicide 3,5-dinitro-o-cresol. The yield of nitro anion radicals was equal to 70-90%. Redox cycling of tetryl was accompanied by formation of N-methylpicramide. Bimolecular rate constants of nitroaromatic reduction (kcat/Km) and reaction catalytic constants (kcat) increased upon an increase in oxidant single-electron reduction potential (E(1)7). Using compounds with an unknown E(1)7 value, the reactivity of TR increased parallelly to the increase in reactivity of ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase of Anabaena PCC 7119 (EC 1.18.1.2). This indicated that the main factor determining reactivity of nitroaromatics towards TR was their energetics of single-electron reduction. Incubation of reduced TR in the presence of tetryl or 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene resulted in a loss of thioredoxin reductase activity, most probably due to modification of reduced catalytic disulfide, whereas nitroreductase reaction rates were unchanged. This means that on the analogy of quinone reduction by TR (D. Bironaite, Z. Anusevicius, J.-P. Jacquot, N. Cenas, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1383 (1998) 82-92), FAD and not catalytic disulfide of TR was responsible for the reduction of nitroaromatics. Tetryl, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and thioredoxin increased the FAD fluorescence intensity of TR. This finding suggests that nitroaromatics may bind close to the thioredoxin-binding site at the catalytic disulfide domain of TR, and induce a conformational change of enzymes (S.B. Mulrooney, C.H. Williams Jr., Protein Sci. 6 (1997) 2188-2195). Our data indicate that certain nitroaromatic herbicides, explosives and other classes of xenobiotics may interfere with the reduction of thioredoxin by plant TR, and confer prooxidant properties to this antioxidant enzyme.

  12. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Seckin; Meier, Bastian; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Peiter, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Metabolic changes in Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing chalcone synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dao, Thi Thanh Hien

    2010-01-01

    The study has shown that it is possible to introduce the heterologous CHS gene in Arabidopsis thaliana and common multicopies of transgenes containing plants were obtained. Analysis of the change in metabolome of CHS transgenic plants, high expression transgenic lines can be identified by markers

  14. Interplay between cytochrome c and gibberellins during Arabidopsis vegetative development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Racca, S.; Welchen, E.; Gras, D. E.; Tarkowská, Danuše; Turečková, Veronika; Maurino, V. G.; Gonzalez, D. H.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 1 (2018), s. 105-121 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * cytochrome c * DELLA protein * gibberellin * mitochondrion Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 5.901, year: 2016

  15. Cloning of taxadiene synthase gene into Arabidopsis thaliana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-03-22

    Mar 22, 2010 ... construct for further uses in transformation of Agro- bacterium and Arabidopsis. Cloning was confirmed by. PCR reaction and the result showed that all of the selective colonies have an 800 bp band in gel electrophoresis. For transformation of Agro-bacterium, a natural method entitled Triparental mating was ...

  16. Arabidopsis: an adequate model for dicot root systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the search for answers to pressing root developmental genetic issues, plant science has turned to a small genome dicot plant (Arabidopsis) to be used as a model to study and use to develop hypotheses for testing other species. Through out the published research only three classes of root are des...

  17. The development of Arabidopsis as a plant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.; Meinke, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Arabidopsis thaliana emerged as the model organism of choice for research in plant biology. A consensus was reached about the need to focus on a single organism to integrate the classical disciplines of plant science with the expanding fields of genetics and molecular biology.

  18. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiate between O3 and herbicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using published data based on Affymetrix ATH1 Gene-Chips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia to O3 and a few other major environmental stresses including oxidative stress . A set of 101 markers could be extracted which provided a compo...

  19. Gene Discovery and Functional Analyses in the Model Plant Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Cai-ping; Mundy, J.

    2006-01-01

    The present mini-review describes newer methods and strategies, including transposon and T-DNA insertions, TILLING, Deleteagene, and RNA interference, to functionally analyze genes of interest in the model plant Arabidopsis. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the systems are also...

  20. Magnetic field effects in Arabidopsis thaliana Cryptochrome-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Chandler, Danielle E.; Schulten, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    of cryptochrome-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana is enhanced by the presence of a weak external magnetic field, confirming the ability of cryptochrome to mediate magnetic field responses. Cryptochrome's signaling is tied to the photoreduction of an internally bound chromophore, flavin adenine dinucleotide. The spin...

  1. Transcriptome Responses to Combinations of Stresses in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon; Barah, Pankaj; Suarez-Rodriguez, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, the response of the majority of the genes cannot be predicted from single stress experiments and only a small fraction of the genes have potential antagonistic responses, indicating that plants have evolved to cope with combinations of stresses and therefore may be bred to endure...

  2. Investigating membrane-bound Argonaute functions in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barghetti, Andrea

    by direct cleavage or by inhibition of their translation. Arabidopsis genome encode for 10 different AGO proteins, of which AGO1 is the main effector of post-transcriptional gene silencing mediated by sRNA. Importantly, a fraction of AGO1 population is associated with endomembranes, in particular...

  3. Highlights of meiotic genes in Arabidopsis thaliana | Consiglio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meiosis is a fascinating and complex phenomenon and, despite its central role in sexual plant reproduction, little is known on the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. We review the progress made in recent years using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for isolating meiotic genes. In particular, emphasis is given on ...

  4. Reduction of mineral nutrient availability accelerates flowering of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Jan; Seňková, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 165, č. 15 (2008), s. 1601-1609 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600380510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Flowering * Landsberg erecta Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.437, year: 2008

  5. Proteomic analysis of the Arabidopsis thaliana-Botrytis cinerea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D LC) system, ProteomeLab PF 2D, was employed to study the defence proteome of Arabidopsis following infection with the necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. This system demonstrated differential protein expression in control and treated samples in some fractions.

  6. Differential effects of carbohydrates on arabidopsis pollen germination

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirsche, J.; Fernández, J. M. G.; Stabentheiner, E.; Großkinsky, D.K.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2017), s. 691-701 ISSN 0032-0781 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * Carbohydrates * Metabolic regulation * Pollen germination * Signaling * Structure-function relationship Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 4.760, year: 2016

  7. Terpenoid Metabolism in Wild-Type and Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aharoni, A.; Giri, A.P.; Deuerlein, S.; Griepink, F.C.; Kogel, de W.J.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Verhoeven, H.A.; Jongsma, M.A.; Schwab, W.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Volatile components, such as terpenoids, are emitted from aerial parts of plants and play a major role in the interaction between plants and their environment. Analysis of the composition and emission pattern of volatiles in the model plant Arabidopsis showed that a range of volatile components are

  8. Adaptation response of Arabidopsis thaliana to random positioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kittang, A.I.; Winge, P.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Bones, A.M.; Iversen, T.H.

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were exposed on a Random Positioning Machine (RPM) under light conditions for 16 h and the samples were analysed using microarray techniques as part of a preparation for a space experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). The results demonstrated a moderate to

  9. Mahalanobis distance screening of Arabidopsis mutants with chlorophyll fluorescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Codrea, C. C.; Hakala-Yatkin, M.; Karlund-Marttila, A.; Nedbal, Ladislav; Aittokallio, T.; Nevalainen, O. S.; Tyystjärvi, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2010), s. 273-283 ISSN 0166-8595 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : arabidopsis thaliana * chlorophyll fluorescence * fluorescence imaging * mutant detection * outlier detection Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.410, year: 2010 http://www.springerlink.com/content/x3586512462pn006/

  10. Sugar signalling during germination and early seedling establishment in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, S.J.W.

    2006-01-01

    Sugars have pronounced effects on many plant processes like gene expression, germination and early seedling development. Several screens for sugar insensitive mutants were performed to identify genes involved in sugar response pathways using the model plant Arabidopsis. These include sun, gin and

  11. A role for seed storage proteins in Arabidopsis seed longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.P.; Cueff, G.; Hegedus, D.D.; Rajjou, L.; Bentsink, L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics approaches have been a useful tool for determining the biological roles and functions of individual proteins and identifying the molecular mechanisms that govern seed germination, vigour and viability in response to ageing. In this work the dry seed proteome of four Arabidopsis thaliana

  12. Use of ultrasonication to increase germination rates of Arabidopsis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ribera, Ignacio; Vicient, Carlos M

    2017-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is widely used as model organism in plant biology. Although not of agronomic significance, it offers important advantages for basic research in genetics and molecular biology including the availability of a large number of mutants and genetically modified lines. However, Arabidopsis seed longevity is limited and seeds stored for more than 10 years usually show a very low capacity for germination. The influence of ultrasonic stimulation was investigated on the germination of A. thaliana L. seeds. All experiments have been performed using a frequency of 45 kHz at constant temperature (24 °C). No germination rate differences were observed when using freshly collected seeds. However, using artificially deteriorated seeds, our results show that short ultrasonic stimulation (seeds after ultrasonic stimulation. Scanning electron microscopy observations showed an increase in the presence of pores in the seed coat after sonication that may be the cause, at least in part, of the increase in germination. The ultrasound treated seeds developed normally to mature fertile plants. Ultrasound technology can be used to enhance the germination process of old Arabidopsis seeds without negatively affecting seedling development. This effect seems to be, at least in part, due to the opening of pores in the seed coat. The use of ultrasonic stimulation in Arabidopsis seeds may contribute to the recovering of long time stored lines.

  13. The influences of Hygromycin B on growth of Arabidopsis thaliana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling cotyledon and leaf were evidently affected by Hygromycin B. As compared to the control, cotyledon of seedling on Murashige and Skoog (MS) with Hygromycin B was very small and its leaf was not formed. Along with increase in culture time, cells in the ...

  14. Ion channels in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana (L) Heynh

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfsema, MRG; Prins, HBA

    Despite the availability of many mutants for signal transduction, Arabidopsis thaliana guard cells have so far not been used in electrophysiological research. Problems with the isolation of epidermal strips and the small size of A. thaliana guard cells were often prohibiting. In the present study

  15. ATM regulates the length of individual telomere tracts in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vespa, L.; Warrington, R.T.; Mokroš, Petr; Široký, Jiří; Shippen, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 46 (2007), s. 18145-18150 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/06/0380 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : telomerase * telomere rapid deletion * Arabidopsis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.598, year: 2007

  16. Identification of a root-specific glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCH U

    helper. Transformation of Arabidopsis in planta was carried out using the method of Bechtold et al (1993). Transformants were selected by plating seeds on MS plates containing. 2% sucrose and 50 mg/l kanamycin. GUS expression was analysed as described in Sundaresan et al (1995). 2.4 cDNA isolation and expression ...

  17. Computational analyses and annotations of the Arabidopsis peroxidasegene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Lars; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Jespersen, Hans M.

    1998-01-01

    lack of peroxidase substrate specificity. Computational analysis was performed on 30 near full-length Arabidopsis peroxidase cDNAs for annotation of start codons and signal peptide cleavage sites. A compositional analysis revealed that 23 of the 30 peroxidase cDNAs have 5' untranslated regions...

  18. Changes in leaf proteome profile of Arabidopsis thaliana in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-04-25

    Apr 25, 2013 ... soluble proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves by proteomic analysis. An initial study at transcript level has been performed on temporal landscape, which revealed that induction of most of the SA-responsive genes occurs within 3 to 6 h post treatment (HPT) and the expression peaked within 24 HPT.

  19. Identification of a root-specific glycosyltransferase from Arabidopsis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCH U

    2.3 Plant transformation and analysis of GUS expression. Promoter::GUS constructs in the binary vector pBI101 ... helper. Transformation of Arabidopsis in planta was carried out using the method of Bechtold et al (1993). ..... on the digital northern data of the Genevestigator database. (Zimmermann et al 2004), At4g19460 is ...

  20. Arabidopsis MYB68 in development and responses to environmental cues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Caiping; Andreasson, E.; Maslak, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MYB68 gene encodes a MYB family protein with N-terminal R2R3 DNA-binding domains. Analyses of MYB68 expression by RNA blot and a transposant gene-trap MYB68::GUS reporter indicated that MYB68 is expressed specifically in root pericycle cells. Root cultures of the myb68 mutant, cau...

  1. Differentiation of mucilage secretory cells of the Arabidopsis seed coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western, T L; Skinner, D J; Haughn, G W

    2000-02-01

    In some plant species, including Arabidopsis, fertilization induces the epidermal cells of the outer ovule integument to differentiate into a specialized seed coat cell type with a unique morphology and containing large quantities of polysaccharide mucilage (pectin). Such seed coat mucilage cells are necessary for neither viability nor germination under normal laboratory conditions. Thus, the Arabidopsis seed coat offers a unique system with which to use genetics to identify genes controlling cell morphogenesis and complex polysaccharide biosynthesis and secretion. As a first step in the application of this system, we have used microscopy to investigate the structure and differentiation of Arabidopsis seed coat mucilage cells, including cell morphogenesis and the synthesis, secretion, and extrusion of mucilage. During seed coat development in Arabidopsis, the epidermal cells of the outer ovule integument grow and differentiate into cells that produce large quantities of mucilage between the primary cell wall and plasma membrane. Concurrent with mucilage production, the cytoplasm is shaped into a column in the center of the cell. Following mucilage secretion the cytoplasmic column is surrounded by a secondary cell wall to form a structure known as the columella. Thus, differentiation of the seed coat mucilage cells involves a highly regulated series of events including growth, morphogenesis, mucilage biosynthesis and secretion, and secondary cell wall synthesis.

  2. Mining the plant-herbivore interface with a leafmining Drosophila of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, Noah K.; Groen, Simon C.; Chevasco, Daniela; Bear, Ashley; Beckwith, Noor; Gregory, T. Ryan; Denoux, Carine; Mammarella, Nicole; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental infections of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) with genomically characterized plant pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae have facilitated dissection of canonical eukaryotic defense pathways and parasite virulence factors. Plants are also attacked by herbivorous insects, and the development of an ecologically relevant genetic model herbivore that feeds on Arabidopsis will enable the parallel dissection of host defense and reciprocal resistance pathways such as those involved in xenobiotic metabolism. An ideal candidate is Scaptomyza flava, a drosophilid fly whose leafmining larvae are true herbivores that can be found in nature feeding on Arabidopsis and other crucifers. Here we describe the eukaryotic life cycle of S. flava on Arabidopsis, and use multiple approaches to characterize the response of Arabidopsis to S. flava attack. Oviposition choice tests and growth performance assays on different Arabidopsis ecotypes, defense-related mutants, and hormone and chitin-treated plants revealed significant differences in host preference and variation in larval performance across Arabidopsis accessions. The jasmonate (JA) and glucosinolate pathways in Arabidopsis are important in mediating quantitative resistance against S. flava, and priming with JA or chitin resulted in increased resistance. Expression of xenobiotic detoxification genes was reduced in S. flava larvae reared on Arabidopsis JA signaling mutants, and increased in plants pre-treated with chitin. These results and future research directions are discussed in the context of developing a genetic model system to analyze insect/plant interactions. PMID:21073583

  3. Metals 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, S.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Slaughter, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Boensch, F.D. [6025 Oak Hill Lane, Centerville, OH (United States); Claus, R.O.; de Vries, M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This strategic planning exercise identified and characterized new and emerging advanced metallic technologies in the context of the drastic changes in global politics and decreasing fiscal resources. In consideration of a hierarchy of technology thrusts stated by various Department of Defense (DOD) spokesmen, and the need to find new and creative ways to acquire and organize programs within an evolving Wright Laboratory, five major candidate programs identified are: C-17 Flap, Transport Fuselage, Mach 5 Aircraft, 4.Fighter Structures, and 5. Missile Structures. These results were formed by extensive discussion with selected major contractors and other experts, and a survey of advanced metallic structure materials. Candidate structural applications with detailed metal structure descriptions bracket a wide variety of uses which warrant consideration for the suggested programs. An analysis on implementing smart skins and structures concepts is given from a metal structures perspective.

  4. Metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    From the viewpoint of general crystal chemistry principles and on the base of modern data the structural chemistry of metal carbides is presented. The classification deviding metal carbides into 4 groups depending on chemical and physical properties is presented. The features of the crystal structure of carbides of alkali alkaline earth, transition, 4 f- and 5f-elements and their effect on physical and chemical properties are considered

  5. Mode of action of the Arabidopsis thaliana phytoalexin camalexin and its role in Arabidopsis-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, E E; Glazebrook, J; Ausubel, F M

    1996-11-01

    The virulent Arabidopsis thaliana pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola strain ES4326 (Psm ES4326) and other gram-negative bacteria are sensitive to camalexin (3-thiazol-2'-yl-indole), the Arabidopsis phytoalexin. Furthermore, Psm ES4326 is unable to degrade camalexin or to become tolerant to it. Apparently, Psm ES4326 is a successful pathogen even though it elicits synthesis of a host phytoalexin to which it is sensitive. Assays of membrane integrity revealed that, like other phytoalexins, camalexin disrupts bacterial membranes, suggesting that camalexin toxicity is a consequence of membrane disruption. A screen for camalexin-resistant mutants of Psm ES4326 yielded only partially resistant mutants, which displayed partial resistance in both killing and membrane integrity assays. These mutants were also resistant to low concentrations of tetracycline and nalidixic acid, suggesting that they were affected in components of the outer membrane. The mutants were not distinguishable from Psm ES4326 in virulence assays. Camalexin was toxic to Arabidopsis cells growing in tissue culture. However, comparison of the extent of cell death associated with disease symptoms in infected leaves of wild-type Arabidopsis and a camalexin-deficient mutant suggested that camalexin does not contribute significantly to cell death in infected tissue.

  6. Two ancient bacterial-like PPP family phosphatases from Arabidopsis are highly conserved plant proteins that possess unique properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases, is a cornerstone of cellular signaling and regulation. Since their discovery, protein phosphatases have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with specificity that rivals their counteracting kinase partners. However, despite years of focused characterization in mammalian and yeast systems, many protein phosphatases in plants remain poorly or incompletely characterized. Here, we describe a bioinformatic, biochemical, and cellular examination of an ancient, Bacterial-like subclass of the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family designated the Shewanella-like protein phosphatases (SLP phosphatases). The SLP phosphatase subcluster is highly conserved in all plants, mosses, and green algae, with members also found in select fungi, protists, and bacteria. As in other plant species, the nucleus-encoded Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SLP phosphatases (AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) lack genetic redundancy and phylogenetically cluster into two distinct groups that maintain different subcellular localizations, with SLP1 being chloroplastic and SLP2 being cytosolic. Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, the enzymatic properties of both AtSLP1 and AtSLP2 were examined, revealing unique metal cation preferences in addition to a complete insensitivity to the classic serine/threonine PPP protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin. The unique properties and high conservation of the plant SLP phosphatases, coupled to their exclusion from animals, red algae, cyanobacteria, archaea, and most bacteria, render understanding the function(s) of this new subclass of PPP family protein phosphatases of particular interest.

  7. Distinct lytic vacuolar compartments are embedded inside the protein storage vacuole of dry and germinating Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Susanne; Lanquar, Viviane; Soler, Marie-Noëlle; Beebo, Azeez; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Bouhidel, Karim; Thomine, Sébastien

    2011-07-01

    Plant cell vacuoles are diverse and dynamic structures. In particular, during seed germination, the protein storage vacuoles are rapidly replaced by a central lytic vacuole enabling rapid elongation of embryo cells. In this study, we investigate the dynamic remodeling of vacuolar compartments during Arabidopsis seed germination using immunocytochemistry with antibodies against tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) isoforms as well as proteins involved in nutrient mobilization and vacuolar acidification. Our results confirm the existence of a lytic compartment embedded in the protein storage vacuole of dry seeds, decorated by γ-TIP, the vacuolar proton pumping pyrophosphatase (V-PPase) and the metal transporter NRAMP4. They further indicate that this compartment disappears after stratification. It is then replaced by a newly formed lytic compartment, labeled by γ-TIP and V-PPase but not AtNRAMP4, which occupies a larger volume as germination progresses. Altogether, our results indicate the successive occurrence of two different lytic compartments in the protein storage vacuoles of germinating Arabidopsis cells. We propose that the first one corresponds to globoids specialized in mineral storage and the second one is at the origin of the central lytic vacuole in these cells.

  8. Expression profiling of the Arabidopsis ferric chelate reductase (FRO) gene family reveals differential regulation by iron and copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Indrani; Campbell, Nathan H; Ash, Joshua S; Connolly, Erin L

    2006-05-01

    The Arabidopsis FRO2 gene encodes the iron deficiency-inducible ferric chelate reductase responsible for reduction of iron at the root surface; subsequent transport of iron across the plasma membrane is carried out by a ferrous iron transporter (IRT1). Genome annotation has identified seven additional FRO family members in the Arabidopsis genome. We used real-time RT-PCR to examine the expression of each FRO gene in different tissues and in response to iron and copper limitation. FRO2 and FRO5 are primarily expressed in roots while FRO8 is primarily expressed in shoots. FRO6 and FRO7 show high expression in all the green parts of the plant. FRO3 is expressed at high levels in roots and shoots, and expression of FRO3 is elevated in roots and shoots of iron-deficient plants. Interestingly, when plants are Cu-limited, the expression of FRO6 in shoot tissues is reduced. Expression of FRO3 is induced in roots and shoots by Cu-limitation. While it is known that FRO2 is expressed at high levels in the outer layers of iron-deficient roots, histochemical staining of FRO3-GUS plants revealed that FRO3 is predominantly expressed in the vascular cylinder of roots. Together our results suggest that FRO family members function in metal ion homeostasis in a variety of locations in the plant.

  9. Differential sulphur assimilation mechanism regulates response of Arabidopsis thaliana natural variation towards arsenic stress under limiting sulphur condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ria; Kumar, Smita; Shukla, Tapsi; Ranjan, Avriti; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2017-09-05

    Arsenic (As) is a ubiquitous element, which imposes threat to crops productivity and human health through contaminated food chain. As a part of detoxification mechanism, As is chelated and sequestered into the vacuoles via sulphur containing compounds glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PCs). Under limiting sulphur (LS) conditions, exposure of As leads to enhanced toxic effects in plants. Therefore, it is a prerequisite to understand molecular mechanisms involved in As stress response under sulphur deficiency conditions in plants. In recent years, natural variation has been utilized to explore the genetic determinants linked to plant development and stress response. In this study, natural variation in Arabidopsis has been utilized to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying LS and As(III) stress response. Analysis of different accession of Arabidopsis led to the identification of Koz2-2 and Ri-0 as the most tolerant and sensitive accessions, respectively, towards As(III) and LS+As(III) stress. Biochemical analysis and expression profiling of the genes responsible for sulphur transport and assimilation as well as metal detoxification and accumulation revealed significantly enhanced sulphur assimilation mechanism in Koz2-2 as compared to Ri-0. Analyses suggest that genetic variation regulates differential response of accessions towards As(III) under LS condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Inventory and comparative analysis of rice and Arabidopsis ATP-binding cassette (ABC) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Olivier; Bouige, Philippe; Forestier, Cyrille; Dassa, Elie

    2004-10-08

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins constitute a large superfamily found in all kingdoms of living organisms. The recent completion of two draft sequences of the rice (Oryza sativa) genome allowed us to analyze and classify its ABC proteins and to compare to those in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified a similar number of ABC proteins in rice and Arabidopsis (121 versus 120), despite the rice genome being more than three times the size of Arabidopsis. Both Arabidopsis and rice have representative members in all seven major subfamilies of ABC ATPases (A to G) commonly found in eukaryotes. This comparative analysis allowed the detection of 29 potential orthologous sequences in Arabidopsis and rice. However, plant share with prokaryotes a specific set of ABC systems that is not detected in animals. These ABC systems might be inherited from the cyanobacterial ancestor of chloroplasts. The present work provides the first complete inventory of rice ABC proteins and an updated inventory of those proteins in Arabidopsis.

  11. Evolutionary origins of Brassicaceae specific genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshavaiah Channa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All sequenced genomes contain a proportion of lineage-specific genes, which exhibit no sequence similarity to any genes outside the lineage. Despite their prevalence, the origins and functions of most lineage-specific genes remain largely unknown. As more genomes are sequenced opportunities for understanding evolutionary origins and functions of lineage-specific genes are increasing. Results This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the origins of lineage-specific genes (LSGs in Arabidopsis thaliana that are restricted to the Brassicaceae family. In this study, lineage-specific genes within the nuclear (1761 genes and mitochondrial (28 genes genomes are identified. The evolutionary origins of two thirds of the lineage-specific genes within the Arabidopsis thaliana genome are also identified. Almost a quarter of lineage-specific genes originate from non-lineage-specific paralogs, while the origins of ~10% of lineage-specific genes are partly derived from DNA exapted from transposable elements (twice the proportion observed for non-lineage-specific genes. Lineage-specific genes are also enriched in genes that have overlapping CDS, which is consistent with such novel genes arising from overprinting. Over half of the subset of the 958 lineage-specific genes found only in Arabidopsis thaliana have alignments to intergenic regions in Arabidopsis lyrata, consistent with either de novo origination or differential gene loss and retention, with both evolutionary scenarios explaining the lineage-specific status of these genes. A smaller number of lineage-specific genes with an incomplete open reading frame across different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions are further identified as accession-specific genes, most likely of recent origin in Arabidopsis thaliana. Putative de novo origination for two of the Arabidopsis thaliana-only genes is identified via additional sequencing across accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana and closely

  12. Evolutionary origins of Brassicaceae specific genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background All sequenced genomes contain a proportion of lineage-specific genes, which exhibit no sequence similarity to any genes outside the lineage. Despite their prevalence, the origins and functions of most lineage-specific genes remain largely unknown. As more genomes are sequenced opportunities for understanding evolutionary origins and functions of lineage-specific genes are increasing. Results This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the origins of lineage-specific genes (LSGs) in Arabidopsis thaliana that are restricted to the Brassicaceae family. In this study, lineage-specific genes within the nuclear (1761 genes) and mitochondrial (28 genes) genomes are identified. The evolutionary origins of two thirds of the lineage-specific genes within the Arabidopsis thaliana genome are also identified. Almost a quarter of lineage-specific genes originate from non-lineage-specific paralogs, while the origins of ~10% of lineage-specific genes are partly derived from DNA exapted from transposable elements (twice the proportion observed for non-lineage-specific genes). Lineage-specific genes are also enriched in genes that have overlapping CDS, which is consistent with such novel genes arising from overprinting. Over half of the subset of the 958 lineage-specific genes found only in Arabidopsis thaliana have alignments to intergenic regions in Arabidopsis lyrata, consistent with either de novo origination or differential gene loss and retention, with both evolutionary scenarios explaining the lineage-specific status of these genes. A smaller number of lineage-specific genes with an incomplete open reading frame across different Arabidopsis thaliana accessions are further identified as accession-specific genes, most likely of recent origin in Arabidopsis thaliana. Putative de novo origination for two of the Arabidopsis thaliana-only genes is identified via additional sequencing across accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana and closely related sister species

  13. Synteny conservation between the Prunus genome and both the present and ancestral Arabidopsis genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhebentyayeva Tatyana

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the lack of availability of large genomic sequences for peach or other Prunus species, the degree of synteny conservation between the Prunus species and Arabidopsis has not been systematically assessed. Using the recently available peach EST sequences that are anchored to Prunus genetic maps and to peach physical map, we analyzed the extent of conserved synteny between the Prunus and the Arabidopsis genomes. The reconstructed pseudo-ancestral Arabidopsis genome, existed prior to the proposed recent polyploidy event, was also utilized in our analysis to further elucidate the evolutionary relationship. Results We analyzed the synteny conservation between the Prunus and the Arabidopsis genomes by comparing 475 peach ESTs that are anchored to Prunus genetic maps and their Arabidopsis homologs detected by sequence similarity. Microsyntenic regions were detected between all five Arabidopsis chromosomes and seven of the eight linkage groups of the Prunus reference map. An additional 1097 peach ESTs that are anchored to 431 BAC contigs of the peach physical map and their Arabidopsis homologs were also analyzed. Microsyntenic regions were detected in 77 BAC contigs. The syntenic regions from both data sets were short and contained only a couple of conserved gene pairs. The synteny between peach and Arabidopsis was fragmentary; all the Prunus linkage groups containing syntenic regions matched to more than two different Arabidopsis chromosomes, and most BAC contigs with multiple conserved syntenic regions corresponded to multiple Arabidopsis chromosomes. Using the same peach EST datasets and their Arabidopsis homologs, we also detected conserved syntenic regions in the pseudo-ancestral Arabidopsis genome. In many cases, the gene order and content of peach regions was more conserved in the ancestral genome than in the present Arabidopsis region. Statistical significance of each syntenic group was calculated using simulated

  14. Overexpression of ZmIRT1 and ZmZIP3 Enhances Iron and Zinc Accumulation in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzhen Li

    Full Text Available Iron and zinc are important micronutrients for both the growth and nutrient availability of crop plants, and their absorption is tightly controlled by a metal uptake system. Zinc-regulated transporters, iron-regulated transporter-like proteins (ZIP, is considered an essential metal transporter for the acquisition of Fe and Zn in graminaceous plants. Several ZIPs have been identified in maize, although their physiological function remains unclear. In this report, ZmIRT1 was shown to be specifically expressed in silk and embryo, whereas ZmZIP3 was a leaf-specific gene. Both ZmIRT1 and ZmZIP3 were shown to be localized to the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing ZmIRT1 or ZmZIP3 were generated, and the metal contents in various tissues of transgenic and wild-type plants were examined based on ICP-OES and Zinpyr-1 staining. The Fe and Zn concentration increased in roots and seeds of ZmIRT1-overexpressing plants, while the Fe content in shoots decreased. Overexpressing ZmZIP3 enhanced Zn accumulation in the roots of transgenic plants, while that in shoots was repressed. In addition, the transgenic plants showed altered tolerance to various Fe and Zn conditions compared with wild-type plants. Furthermore, the genes associated with metal uptake were stimulated in ZmIRT1 transgenic plants, while those involved in intra- and inter- cellular translocation were suppressed. In conclusion, ZmIRT1 and ZmZIP3 are functional metal transporters with different ion selectivities. Ectopic overexpression of ZmIRT1 may stimulate endogenous Fe uptake mechanisms, which may facilitate metal uptake and homeostasis. Our results increase our understanding of the functions of ZIP family transporters in maize.

  15. Plant architecture, auxin homeostasis and phenol content in Arabidopsis thaliana grown in cadmium- and zinc-enriched media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofo, Adriano; Bochicchio, Rocco; Amato, Mariana; Rendina, Nunzia; Vitti, Antonella; Nuzzaci, Maria; Altamura, Maria Maddalena; Falasca, Giuseppina; Rovere, Federica Della; Scopa, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    A screening strategy using micropropagation glass tubes with a gradient of distances between germinating seeds and a metal-contaminated medium was used for studying alterations in root architecture and morphology of Arabidopsis thaliana treated with cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) at the concentration of 10-20μM and 100-200μM, respectively. Metal concentrations in plant shoots and roots were measured by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. After 21days from germination, all plants in the tubes were scanned at high resolution and the root systems analyzed. The localization of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in the primary root and lateral root apices was monitored using DR5:GUS, LAX3:GUS and AUX1:GUS Arabidopsis transgenic lines. Total phenol content in leaves was measured spectrophotometrically. Shoot and root dry weight and leaf area did not change in Zn-exposed plants and significantly decreased in Cd-exposed plants, compared to control plants. Cadmium induced a reduction of root length, of mean number of roots and of total root surface. Both Cd- and Zn-exposed plants showed a reduced specific root length. This morphological behavior, together with an observed increase in root diameter in metal-exposed plants could be interpreted as compensatory growth, and the observed thicker roots could act as a barrier to protect root from the metals. In comparison with the apical localization of the IAA signal in the control plants, Zn generally reinforced the intensity of IAA signal, without affecting its localization. In Cd-exposed plants, IAA localization remained apical but weaker compared to control plants. Total phenols decreased in plants exposed to Zn and Cd. Therefore, we propose that the remodelling of the root architecture and the production of some secondary metabolites, such as IAA and phenols could be two responses of plants subjected to metal stress. This knowledge can open the way to future phytoremediation strategies of contaminated sites

  16. Effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis by heavy ion beam-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.Y.; Saito, H.; Ryuto, H.; Fukunishi, N.; Yoshida, S.; Abe, T.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Arabidopsis researches frequently include the genetic approach, so efficient, convenient, and safe methods for mutagenesis are required. Currently, the most popular method for in house mutagenesis is application of EMS. Although this method is very effective, its base substitution-type mutations often gives leaky mutants with residual gene functions, leading some difficulty in understanding the corresponding gene functions. Heavy ion beam generated by accelerators gives highest energy transfer rates among known radiation-based mutagenesis methods including X ray, gamma ray, fast neutron, electron and proton irradiation. This feature is thought to give high frequency of the double strand break of genomic DNA and resultant short deletions, resulting frame shift-type mutations. At RIKEN Accelerator Research Facility (RARF, http://www.rarf.riken.go.jp/index-e.html), we have optimized conditions for effective mutagenesis of Arabidopsis regarding to ion species and irradiation dose, and achieved comparable mutation rates to the method with EMS. (author)

  17. Composition and function of P bodies in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis David Maldonado-Bonilla

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available mRNA accumulation is tightly regulated by diverse molecular pathways. The identification and characterization of enzymes and regulatory proteins involved in controlling the fate of mRNA offers the possibility to broaden our understanding of posttranscriptional gene regulation. Processing bodies (P bodies, PB are cytoplasmic protein complexes involved in degradation and translational arrest of mRNA. Composition and dynamics of these subcellular structures have been studied in animal systems, yeasts and in the model plant Arabidopsis. Their assembly implies the aggregation of specific factors related to decapping, deadenylation and exoribonucleases that operate synchronously to regulate certain mRNA targets during development and adaptation to stress. Although the general function of PB along with the flow of genetic information is understood, several questions still remain open. This review summarizes data on the composition, potential molecular roles, and biological significance of PB and potentially related proteins in Arabidopsis.

  18. Molecular analysis of the arabidopsis-Phytophthora pathosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Si-Ammour, Azeddine; Mauch, Felix; Métraux, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    Afin de mieux comprendre l´interaction Phytophthora-plante, nous avons développé un nouveau pathosystème: Arabidopsis thaliana-Phytophthora porri. Jusqu´à présent, Phytophthora infestans, qui a causé famine et désolation en Irlande voilà 150 ans, a été le mieux étudié. Etudier le pathosystème Pomme de terre-Phytophthora infestans a, sans aucun doute, des avantages surtout parce que la pomme de terre est très cultivée de par le monde. Toutefois, utiliser Arabidopsis comme plante modèle pour de...

  19. FRIENDLY regulates mitochondrial distribution, fusion, and quality control in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zawily, Amr M; Schwarzländer, Markus; Finkemeier, Iris; Johnston, Iain G; Benamar, Abdelilah; Cao, Yongguo; Gissot, Clémence; Meyer, Andreas J; Wilson, Ken; Datla, Raju; Macherel, David; Jones, Nick S; Logan, David C

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria are defining components of most eukaryotes. However, higher plant mitochondria differ biochemically, morphologically, and dynamically from those in other eukaryotes. FRIENDLY, a member of the CLUSTERED MITOCHONDRIA superfamily, is conserved among eukaryotes and is required for correct distribution of mitochondria within the cell. We sought to understand how disruption of FRIENDLY function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leads to mitochondrial clustering and the effects of this aberrant chondriome on cell and whole-plant physiology. We present evidence for a role of FRIENDLY in mediating intermitochondrial association, which is a necessary prelude to mitochondrial fusion. We demonstrate that disruption of mitochondrial association, motility, and chondriome structure in friendly affects mitochondrial quality control and leads to mitochondrial stress, cell death, and strong growth phenotypes. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. The Arabidopsis NPF3 protein is a GA transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tal, Iris; Zhang, Yi; Jørgensen, Morten Egevang

    2016-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones that promote a wide range of developmental processes. While GA signalling is well understood, little is known about how GA is transported or how GA distribution is regulated. Here we utilize fluorescently labelled GAs (GA-Fl) to screen for Arabidopsis mutants...... deficient in GA transport. We show that the NPF3 transporter efficiently transports GA across cell membranes in vitro and GA-Fl in vivo. NPF3 is expressed in root endodermis and repressed by GA. NPF3 is targeted to the plasma membrane and subject to rapid BFA-dependent recycling. We show that abscisic acid...... (ABA), an antagonist of GA, is also transported by NPF3 in vitro. ABA promotes NPF3 expression and GA-Fl uptake in plants. On the basis of these results, we propose that GA distribution and activity in Arabidopsis is partly regulated by NPF3 acting as an influx carrier and that GA-ABA interaction may...

  1. Beta galactosidases in Arabidopsis and tomato - a mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-02-01

    Beta galactosidases (BGALs) are glycosyl hydrolases that remove terminal β-D-galactosyl residues from β-D-galactosides. There are 17 predicted BGAL genes in the genomes of both Arabidopsis (BGAL1-17) and tomato (TBG1-17). All tested BGALs have BGAL activity but their distinct expression profiles and ancient phylogenetic separation indicates that these enzymes fulfil diverse, non-redundant roles in plant biology. The majority of these BGALs are predicted to have signal peptide and thought to act during cell wall-related biological processes. Interestingly, deletion of BGAL6 and BGAL10 in Arabidopsis causes reduced mucilage release during seed imbibition and shorter siliques respectively, whereas TBG4 depletion by RNAi decreases in fruit softening in tomato. The majority of plant BGALs remain to be characterized. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  2. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dongjin

    2016-06-06

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Involvement of nitric oxide and auxin in signal transduction of copper-induced morphological responses in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pető, Andrea; Lehotai, Nóra; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; León, José; Tari, Irma; Erdei, László; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants are able to adapt to the environment dynamically through regulation of their growth and development. Excess copper (Cu2+), a toxic heavy metal, induces morphological alterations in plant organs; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. With this in mind, the multiple signalling functions of nitric oxide (NO) in plant cells and its possible regulatory role and relationship with auxin were examined during Cu2+-induced morphological responses. Methods Endogenous auxin distribution was determined by microscopic observation of X-Gluc-stained DR5::GUS arabidopsis, and the levels of NO, superoxide and peroxynitrite were detected by fluorescence microscopy. As well as wild-type, NO-overproducer (nox1) and -deficient (nia1nia2 and nia1nia2noa1-2) arabidopsis plants were used. Key Results Cu2+ at a concentration of 50 µm resulted in a large reduction in cotyledon area and hypocotyl and primary root lengths, accompanied by an increase in auxin levels. In cotyledons, a low Cu2+ concentration promoted NO accumulation, which was arrested by nitric oxide synthase or nitrate reductase inhibitors. The 5-μm Cu2+-induced NO synthesis was not detectable in nia1nia2 or nia1nia2noa1-2 plants. In roots, Cu2+ caused a decrease of the NO level which was not associated with superoxide and peroxynitrite formation. Inhibition of auxin transport resulted in an increase in NO levels, while exogenous application of an NO donor reduced DR5::GUS expression. The elongation processes of nox1 were not sensitive to Cu2+, but NO-deficient plants showed diverse growth responses. Conclusions In plant organs, Cu2+ excess results in severe morphological responses during which the endogenous hormonal balance and signal transduction are affected. Auxin and NO negatively regulate each other's level and NO intensifies the metal-induced cotyledon expansion, but mitigates elongation processes under Cu2+ exposure. PMID:21856638

  4. Control of Arabidopsis lateral root primordium boundaries by MYB36

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Marcos, María; Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Manzano, Concepción; Liberman, Louisa M.; Benfey, Philip N.; del Pozo, Juan C.; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2016-01-01

    Root branching in plants relies on the de novo formation of lateral roots (LRs). These are initiated from founder cells, triggering new formative divisions that generate lateral root primordia (LRP). The LRP size and shape depends on the balance between positive and negative signals that control cell proliferation.The mechanisms controlling proliferation potential of LRP cells remains poorly understood. We found that Arabidopsis thaliana MYB36, which have been previously shown to regulate gen...

  5. Collection of apoplastic fluids from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Svend Roesen; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    The leaf apoplast comprises the extracellular continuum outside cell membranes. A broad range of processes take place in the apoplast, including intercellular signaling, metabolite transport, and plant-microbe interactions. To study these processes, it is essential to analyze the metabolite conte...... in apoplastic fluids. Due to the fragile nature of leaf tissues, it is a challenge to obtain apoplastic fluids from leaves. Here, methods to collect apoplastic washing fluid and guttation fluid from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves are described....

  6. SUPERMAN, a regulator of floral homeotic genes in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, John L.; Sakai, Hajime; Jack, Thomas; Weigel, Detlef; Mayer, Ulrike; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a locus, SUPERMAN, mutations in which result in extra stamens developing at the expense of the central carpels in the Arabidopsis thaliana flower. The development of superman flowers, from initial primordium to mature flower, is described by scanning electron microscopy. The development of doubly and triply mutant strains, constructed with superman alleles and previously identified homeotic mutations that cause alterations in floral organ identity, is also described. Essentially a...

  7. Functional genetics of intraspecific ecological interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Jason B.; Mutic, Joshua J.; Kover, Paula X.

    2011-01-01

    Studying the genetic basis of traits involved in ecological interactions is a fundamental part of elucidating the connections between evolutionary and ecological processes. Such knowledge allows one to link genetic models of trait evolution with ecological models describing interactions within and between species. Previous work has shown that connections between genetic and ecological processes in Arabidopsis thaliana may be mediated by the fact that quantitative trait loci (QTL) with ‘direct...

  8. Quantitative trait loci for floral morphology in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    OpenAIRE

    Juenger, T; Purugganan, M; Mackay, T F

    2000-01-01

    A central question in biology is how genes control the expression of quantitative variation. We used statistical methods to estimate genetic variation in eight Arabidopsis thaliana floral characters (fresh flower mass, petal length, petal width, sepal length, sepal width, long stamen length, short stamen length, and pistil length) in a cosmopolitan sample of 15 ecotypes. In addition, we used genome-wide quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping to evaluate the genetic basis of variation in these...

  9. New cytokinin metabolites in IPT transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Werner, Tomáš; Hanuš, Jan; Holub, Jan; Schmülling, T.; Onckelen, H. V.; Strnad, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 1 (2003), s. 127-137 ISSN 0031-9317 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/02/0475 Grant - others: Volkswagen Stiftung(DE) I/76 86:153100008; - - -(BE) IUAP P5/13 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana * cytokinin * zeatin-O-glucoside Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2003

  10. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  11. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyuha; Reinhard, Carsten; Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Underwood, Charles J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Yelina, Nataliya E; Griffin, Catherine; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  12. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 negatively regulates systemic acquired resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, M.; Brodersen, P.; Naested, H.

    2000-01-01

    Transposon inactivation of Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 produced the mpk4 mutant exhibiting constitutive systemic acquired resistance (SAR) including elevated salicylic acid (SA) revels, increased resistance to virulent pathogens, and constitutive pathogenesis-related gene expression shown by Northern...... of NPR1. PDF1.2 and THI2.1 gene induction by jasmonate was blocked in mpk4 expressing NahG, suggesting that MPK4 is required for jasmonic acid-responsive gene expression....

  13. Phosphoproteomic studies in Arabidopsis and tobacco male gametophytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fíla, Jan; Čapková, Věra; Honys, David

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 2 (2014), s. 383-387 ISSN 0300-5127 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/1462; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/12/2611; GA ČR GA13-06943S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13049 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * male gametophyte * mature pollen Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.194, year: 2014

  14. Does Arabidopsis thaliana DREAM of cell cycle control?

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Martin; DeCaprio, James A

    2015-01-01

    Strict temporal control of cell cycle gene expression is essential for all eukaryotes including animals and plants. DREAM complexes have been identified in worm, fly, and mammals, linking several distinct transcription factors to coordinate gene expression throughout the cell cycle. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Kobayashi et al (2015) identify distinct activator and repressor complexes for genes expressed during the G2 and M phases in Arabidopsis that can be temporarily separated during ...

  15. The structure of the major anthocyanin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloor, Stephen J; Abrahams, Sharon

    2002-02-01

    The major anthocyanin in the leaves and stems of Arabidopsis thaliana has been isolated and shown to be cyanidin 3-O-[2-O(2-O-(sinapoyl)-beta-D-xylopyranosyl)-6-O-(4-O-(beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-p-coumaroyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside] 5-O-[6-O-(malonyl) beta-D-glucopyranoside]. This anthocyanin is a glucosylated version of one of the anthocyanins found in the flowers of the closely related Matthiola incana.

  16. Mass spectrometry imaging of glucosinolates in arabidopsis flowers and siliques

    OpenAIRE

    Sarsby, J.; Towers, M. W.; Stain, Chris; Cramer, Rainer; Koroleva, O. A.

    2012-01-01

    Glucosinolates are multi-functional plant secondary metabolites which play a vital role in plant defence and are, as dietary compounds, important to human health and livestock well-being. Knowledge of the tissue-specific regulation of their biosynthesis and accumulation is essential for plant breeding programs. Here, we report that in Arabidopsis thaliana, glucosinolates are accumulated differentially in specific cells of reproductive organs. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization ...

  17. metal alkoxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    substituent effects in the head-to-tail double insertion reactions observed ... an internal standard. The yield of diphenyl carbodii- mide was further verified by isolating it as diphenyl urea after hydrolysis. The organic fraction obtained in the catalytic metathesis .... insertion of PhNCO into metal alkoxide 1a to generate. Table 1.

  18. Metallic glasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Arjen Sybren

    1981-01-01

    It is shown in section 7.1. that the influence of topological disorder on the range of magnetic interactions in ferromagnetic transition metal-metalloid (TM-M) glasses, is much less than often assumed. This is demonstrated via a study of the temperature dependence of the average iron hyperfine field

  19. A Polyamine Metabolon Involving Aminopropyl Transferase Complexes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicot, Mireia; Minguet, Eugenio G.; Ferrando, Alejandro; Alcázar, Rubén; Blázquez, Miguel A.; Carbonell, Juan; Altabella, Teresa; Koncz, Csaba; Tiburcio, Antonio F.

    2002-01-01

    The conversion of putrescine to spermidine in the biosynthetic pathway of plant polyamines is catalyzed by two closely related spermidine synthases, SPDS1 and SPDS2, in Arabidopsis. In the yeast two-hybrid system, SPDS2 was found to interact with SPDS1 and a novel protein, SPMS (spermine synthase), which is homologous with SPDS2 and SPDS1. SPMS interacts with both SPDS1 and SPDS2 in yeast and in vitro. Unlike SPDS1 and SPDS2, SPMS failed to suppress the speΔ3 deficiency of spermidine synthase in yeast. However, SPMS was able to complement the speΔ4 spermine deficiency in yeast, indicating that SPMS is a novel spermine synthase. The SPDS and SPMS proteins showed no homodimerization but formed heterodimers in vitro. Pairwise coexpression of hemagglutinin- and c-Myc epitope–labeled proteins in Arabidopsis cells confirmed the existence of coimmunoprecipitating SPDS1-SPDS2 and SDPS2-SPMS heterodimers in vivo. The epitope-labeled SPDS and SPMS proteins copurified with protein complexes ranging in size from 650 to 750 kD. Our data demonstrate the existence of a metabolon involving at least the last two steps of polyamine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:12368503

  20. A Novel Family of Magnesium Transport Genes in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Legong; Tutone, Ana F.; Drummond, Revel S. M.; Gardner, Richard C.; Luan, Sheng

    2001-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+) is the most abundant divalent cation in plant cells and plays a critical role in many physiological processes. We describe the identification of a 10-member Arabidopsis gene family (AtMGT) encoding putative Mg2+ transport proteins. Most members of the AtMGT family are expressed in a range of Arabidopsis tissues. One member of this family, AtMGT1, functionally complemented a bacterial mutant lacking Mg2+ transport capability. A second member, AtMGT10, complemented a yeast mutant defective in Mg2+ uptake and increased the cellular Mg2+ content of starved cells threefold during a 60-min uptake period. 63Ni tracer studies in bacteria showed that AtMGT1 has highest affinity for Mg2+ but may also be capable of transporting several other divalent cations, including Ni2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Mn2+, and Cu2+. However, the concentrations required for transport of these other cations are beyond normal physiological ranges. Both AtMGT1 and AtMGT10 are highly sensitive to Al3+ inhibition, providing potential molecular targets for Al3+ toxicity in plants. Using green fluorescence protein as a reporter, we localized AtMGT1 protein to the plasma membrane in Arabidopsis plants. We suggest that the AtMGT gene family encodes a Mg2+ transport system in higher plants. PMID:11752386

  1. Small Glycosylated Lignin Oligomers Are Stored in Arabidopsis Leaf Vacuoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Oana; Morreel, Kris; Vanholme, Bartel; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Boerjan, Wout

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is an aromatic polymer derived from the combinatorial coupling of monolignol radicals in the cell wall. Recently, various glycosylated lignin oligomers have been revealed in Arabidopsis thaliana. Given that monolignol oxidation and monolignol radical coupling are known to occur in the apoplast, and glycosylation in the cytoplasm, it raises questions about the subcellular localization of glycosylated lignin oligomer biosynthesis and their storage. By metabolite profiling of Arabidopsis leaf vacuoles, we show that the leaf vacuole stores a large number of these small glycosylated lignin oligomers. Their structural variety and the incorporation of alternative monomers, as observed in Arabidopsis mutants with altered monolignol biosynthesis, indicate that they are all formed by combinatorial radical coupling. In contrast to the common believe that combinatorial coupling is restricted to the apoplast, we hypothesized that the aglycones of these compounds are made within the cell. To investigate this, leaf protoplast cultures were cofed with 13C6-labeled coniferyl alcohol and a 13C4-labeled dimer of coniferyl alcohol. Metabolite profiling of the cofed protoplasts provided strong support for the occurrence of intracellular monolignol coupling. We therefore propose a metabolic pathway involving intracellular combinatorial coupling of monolignol radicals, followed by oligomer glycosylation and vacuolar import, which shares characteristics with both lignin and lignan biosynthesis. PMID:25700483

  2. Thermal energy dissipation and xanthophyll cycles beyond the Arabidopsis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Plazaola, José Ignacio; Esteban, Raquel; Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Kranner, Ilse; Porcar-Castell, Albert

    2012-09-01

    Thermal dissipation of excitation energy is a fundamental photoprotection mechanism in plants. Thermal energy dissipation is frequently estimated using the quenching of the chlorophyll fluorescence signal, termed non-photochemical quenching. Over the last two decades, great progress has been made in the understanding of the mechanism of thermal energy dissipation through the use of a few model plants, mainly Arabidopsis. Nonetheless, an emerging number of studies suggest that this model represents only one strategy among several different solutions for the environmental adjustment of thermal energy dissipation that have evolved among photosynthetic organisms in the course of evolution. In this review, a detailed analysis of three examples highlights the need to use models other than Arabidopsis: first, overwintering evergreens that develop a sustained form of thermal energy dissipation; second, desiccation tolerant plants that induce rapid thermal energy dissipation; and third, understorey plants in which a complementary lutein epoxide cycle modulates thermal energy dissipation. The three examples have in common a shift from a photosynthetically efficient state to a dissipative conformation, a strategy widely distributed among stress-tolerant evergreen perennials. Likewise, they show a distinct operation of the xanthophyll cycle. Expanding the list of model species beyond Arabidopsis will enhance our knowledge of these mechanisms and increase the synergy of the current studies now dispersed over a wide number of species.

  3. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  4. The Significance of Hydrogen Sulfide for Arabidopsis Seed Germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudouin, Emmanuel; Poilevey, Aurélie; Hewage, Nishodi Indiketi; Cochet, Françoise; Puyaubert, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently emerged as an important gaseous signaling molecule in plants. In this study, we investigated the possible functions of H2S in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination. NaHS treatments delayed seed germination in a dose-dependent manner and were ineffective in releasing seed dormancy. Interestingly, endogenous H2S content was enhanced in germinating seeds. This increase was correlated with higher activity of three enzymes (L-cysteine desulfhydrase, D-cysteine desulfhydrase, and β-cyanoalanine synthase) known as sources of H2S in plants. The H2S scavenger hypotaurine and the D/L cysteine desulfhydrase inhibitor propargylglycine significantly delayed seed germination. We analyzed the germinative capacity of des1 seeds mutated in Arabidopsis cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase. Although the mutant seeds do not exhibit germination-evoked H2S formation, they retained similar germination capacity as the wild-type seeds. In addition, des1 seeds responded similarly to temperature and were as sensitive to ABA as wild type seeds. Taken together, these data suggest that, although its metabolism is stimulated upon seed imbibition, H2S plays, if any, a marginal role in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination under standard conditions. PMID:27446159

  5. Proteomics investigation of endogenous S-nitrosylation in Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fares, Abasse; Rossignol, Michel; Peltier, Jean-Benoît

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Identification and quantification of nitrosothiols. ► A first dataset of endogenously nitrosylated cysteines in Arabidopsis cells. ► Nitrosothiols display apolar motifs not located in close vicinity of cysteines. ► Salt stress alters the endogenous nitrosylation of specific cysteines in Arabidopsis. -- Abstract: S-Nitrosylation emerges as an important protein modification in many processes. However, most data were obtained at the protein level after addition of a NO donor, particularly in plants where information about the cysteines nitrosylated in these proteins is scarce. An adapted work-flow, combining the classical biotin switch method and labeling with isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT), is proposed. Without addition of NO donor, a total of 53 endogenous nitrosocysteines was identified in Arabidopsis cells, in proteins belonging to all cell territories, including membranes, and covering a large panel of functions. This first repertoire of nitrosothiols in plants enabled also preliminary structural description. Three apolar motifs, not located in close vicinity of cysteines and accounting for half the dataset, were detected and are proposed to complement nitrosylation prediction algorithms, poorly trained with plant data to date. Analysis of changes induced by a brief salt stress showed that NaCl modified the nitrosylation level of a small proportion of endogenously nitrosylated proteins and did not concern all nitrosothiols in these proteins. The possible role of some NO targets in the response to salt stress was discussed.

  6. Building a hair: tip growth in Arabidopsis thaliana root hairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol, Rachel J; Dolan, Liam

    2002-06-29

    The Arabidopsis thaliana root hair is used as a model for studying tip growth in plants. We review recent advances, made using physiological and genetic approaches, which give rise to different, yet compatible, current views of the establishment and maintenance of tip growth in epidermal cells. For example, an active calcium influx channel localized at the tip of Arabidopsis root hairs has been identified by patch-clamp measurements. Actin has been visualized in vivo in Arabidopsis root hairs by using a green-fluorescent-protein-talin reporter and shown to form a dense mesh in the apex of the growing tip. The kojak gene, which encodes a protein similar to the catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase, is needed in the first stages of hair growth. A role for LRX1, a leucine-rich repeat extensin, in determining the morphology of the cell wall of root hairs has been established using reverse genetics. The new information can be integrated into a general and more advanced view of how these specialized plant cells grow.

  7. Epigenetic variation in the FWA gene within the genus Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Ryo; Sasaki, Taku; Kudoh, Hiroshi; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kakutani, Tetsuji; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2011-06-01

    fwa is a late flowering epi-mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana. FWA is silenced by DNA methylation in vegetative tissue but is demethylated in the central cell of the female ovule and continues to be expressed in the endosperm from the maternal copy. FWA is stably silenced in A. thaliana, but in related Arabidopsis species, FWA expression and DNA methylation levels vary in vegetative tissue. In this study, we show that variation in FWA expression in field isolates having identical DNA sequences is associated with changes in DNA methylation and may change over time. Vegetative FWA expression is correlated with decreased methylation at non-CG sites in the region upstream of the transcription start site in species related to A. thaliana and we conclude that methylation of this region is critical for FWA silencing in these species. In A. thaliana, FWA expression is affected by methylation in regions both upstream and downstream of the transcription start site. Ectopic A. thaliana FWA expression causes a late flowering phenotype, but over-expression of Arabidopsis lyrata FWA does not. In A. thaliana, stable silencing of FWA to prevent late flowering may have evolved through the selection of large tandem repeats and spread of the critical methylated region to include these repeats. © 2011 CSIRO. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Variation of presence/absence genes among Arabidopsis populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Shengjun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene presence/absence (P/A polymorphisms are commonly observed in plants and are important in individual adaptation and species differentiation. Detecting their abundance, distribution and variation among individuals would help to understand the role played by these polymorphisms in a given species. The recently sequenced 80 Arabidopsis genomes provide an opportunity to address these questions. Results By systematically investigating these accessions, we identified 2,407 P/A genes (or 8.9% absent in one or more genomes, averaging 444 absent genes per accession. 50.6% of P/A genes belonged to multi-copy gene families, or 31.0% to clustered genes. However, the highest proportion of P/A genes, outnumbered in singleton genes, was observed in the regions near centromeres. In addition, a significant correlation was observed between the P/A gene frequency among the 80 accessions and the diversity level at P/A loci. Furthermore, the proportion of P/A genes was different among functional gene categories. Finally, a P/A gene tree showed a diversified population structure in the worldwide Arabidopsis accessions. Conclusions An estimate of P/A genes and their frequency distribution in the worldwide Arabidopsis accessions was obtained. Our results suggest that there are diverse mechanisms to generate or maintain P/A genes, by which individuals and functionally different genes can selectively maintain P/A polymorphisms for a specific adaptation.

  9. Differential Effects of Carbohydrates on Arabidopsis Pollen Germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsche, Jörg; García Fernández, José M; Stabentheiner, Edith; Großkinsky, Dominik K; Roitsch, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Pollen germination as a crucial process in plant development strongly depends on the accessibility of carbon as energy source. Carbohydrates, however, function not only as a primary energy source, but also as important signaling components. In a comprehensive study, we analyzed various aspects of the impact of 32 different sugars on in vitro germination of Arabidopsis pollen comprising about 150 variations of individual sugars and combinations. Twenty-six structurally different mono-, di- and oligosaccharides, and sugar analogs were initially tested for their ability to support pollen germination. Whereas several di- and oligosaccharides supported pollen germination, hexoses such as glucose, fructose and mannose did not support and even considerably inhibited pollen germination when added to germination-supporting medium. Complementary experiments using glucose analogs with varying functional features, the hexokinase inhibitor mannoheptulose and the glucose-insensitive hexokinase-deficient Arabidopsis mutant gin2-1 suggested that mannose- and glucose-mediated inhibition of sucrose-supported pollen germination depends partially on hexokinase signaling. The results suggest that, in addition to their role as energy source, sugars act as signaling molecules differentially regulating the complex process of pollen germination depending on their structural properties. Thus, a sugar-dependent multilayer regulation of Arabidopsis pollen germination is supported, which makes this approach a valuable experimental system for future studies addressing sugar sensing and signaling. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. An Atlas of Type I MADS Box Gene Expression during Female Gametophyte and Seed Development in Arabidopsis[W].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, M.; Heijmans, K.; Airoldi, C.A.; Davies, B.; Angenent, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally

  11. The Arabidopsis KS-type dehydrin recovers lactate dehydrogenase activity inhibited by copper with the contribution of His residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masakazu; Monna, Shuhei; Murata, Takae; Nakano, Taiyo; Amano, Shono; Nachbar, Markus; Wätzig, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    Dehydrin, which is one of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, is involved in the ability of plants to tolerate the lack of water. Although many reports have indicated that dehydrins bind heavy metals, the physiological role of this metal binding has not been well understood. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis KS-type dehydrin (AtHIRD11) recovered the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity denatured by Cu(2+). The LDH activity was partially inhibited by 0.93 μM Cu(2+) but totally inactivated by 9.3 μM Cu(2+). AtHIRD11 recovered the activity of LDH treated with 9.3 μM Cu(2+) in a dose-dependent manner. The recovery activity of AtHIRD11 was significantly higher than those of serum albumin and lysozyme. The conversion of His residues to Ala in AtHIRD11 resulted in the loss of the Cu(2+) binding of the protein as well as the disappearance of the conformational change induced by Cu(2+) that is observed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The mutant protein showed lower recovery activity than the original AtHIRD11. These results indicate that AtHIRD11 can reactivate LDH inhibited by Cu(2+) via the His residues. This function may prevent physiological damage to plants due to heavy-metal stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Autophagy induction upon reactive oxygen species in Cd-stressed Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WeiNa; Chen, WenLi

    2010-02-01

    Autophagy is a protein degradation process in which cells recycle cytoplasmic contents when subjected to environmental stress conditions or during certain stages of development. Upon the induction of autophagy, a double membrane autophagosome forms around cytoplasmic components and delivers them to the vacuole for degradation. In plants, autophagy has been shown previously to be induced during abiotic stresses including oxidative stress. Cd, as a toxicity heavy metal, resulted in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this paper, we demonstrated that ROS contributed to the induction of autophagy in Cd-stressed Arabidopsis thaliana. However, pre-incubation with ascorbic acid (AsA, antioxidant molecule) and catalase (CAT, a H2O2-specific scavenger) decreased the ROS production and the number of autolysosomal-like structures. Together our results indicated that the oxidative condition was essential for autophagy, as treatment with AsA and CAT abolished the formation of autophagosomes, and ROS may function as signal molecules to induce autophagy in abiotic stress.

  13. Peroxynitrite (ONOO−) is endogenously produced in arabidopsis peroxisomes and is overproduced under cadmium stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Peroxisomes are subcellular compartments involved in multiple cellular metabolic pathways. Peroxynitrite (ONOO−) is a nitric oxide-derived molecule which is a nitrating species that causes nitration of proteins. This study used cell biology techniques to explore the potential presence of peroxynitrite in peroxisomes and evaluated its content under stress conditions (excess cadmium). Methods Peroxynitrite, nitric oxide and superoxide anion were studied using cell-permeable specific fluorescent probes by confocal laser scanning microscopy in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic plants expressing cyan fluorescent protein through the addition of peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1), which enables peroxisomes to be visualized in vivo. Key Results When no stress was applied, peroxynitrite was clearly localized in the peroxisomes of roots and stomatal guard cells. Under cadmium (150 μm) stress, the generation of peroxynitrite, nitric oxide and the superoxide anion (O2·–) increased and was localized in peroxisomes and the cytosol, participating in the generation of nitro-oxidative stress. Conclusions The results show that peroxisomes are an endogenous source of peroxynitrite, which is over-produced under cadmium stress, suggesting that the metabolism of reactive nitrogen species in peroxisomes could participate in the mechanism of the response to this heavy metal. PMID:24232384

  14. Transcriptome analysis by GeneTrail revealed regulation of functional categories in response to alterations of iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenhof Hans-Peter

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput technologies have opened new avenues to study biological processes and pathways. The interpretation of the immense amount of data sets generated nowadays needs to be facilitated in order to enable biologists to identify complex gene networks and functional pathways. To cope with this task multiple computer-based programs have been developed. GeneTrail is a freely available online tool that screens comparative transcriptomic data for differentially regulated functional categories and biological pathways extracted from common data bases like KEGG, Gene Ontology (GO, TRANSPATH and TRANSFAC. Additionally, GeneTrail offers a feature that allows screening of individually defined biological categories that are relevant for the respective research topic. Results We have set up GeneTrail for the use of Arabidopsis thaliana. To test the functionality of this tool for plant analysis, we generated transcriptome data of root and leaf responses to Fe deficiency and the Arabidopsis metal homeostasis mutant nas4x-1. We performed Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA with eight meaningful pairwise comparisons of transcriptome data sets. We were able to uncover several functional pathways including metal homeostasis that were affected in our experimental situations. Representation of the differentially regulated functional categories in Venn diagrams uncovered regulatory networks at the level of whole functional pathways. Over-Representation Analysis (ORA of differentially regulated genes identified in pairwise comparisons revealed specific functional plant physiological categories as major targets upon Fe deficiency and in nas4x-1. Conclusion Here, we obtained supporting evidence, that the nas4x-1 mutant was defective in metal homeostasis. It was confirmed that nas4x-1 showed Fe deficiency in roots and signs of Fe deficiency and Fe sufficiency in leaves. Besides metal homeostasis, biotic stress, root carbohydrate, leaf

  15. Hawaiian skirt: an F-box gene that regulates organ fusion and growth in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Carranza, Z.H.; Rompa, U.; Peters, J.L.; Bhatt, A.M.; Wagstaff, C.; Stead, A.D.; Roberts, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    A fast neutron-mutagenized population of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Columbia-0 wild-type plants was screened for floral phenotypes and a novel mutant, termed hawaiian skirt (hws), was identified that failed to shed its reproductive organs. The mutation is the consequence of a 28 bp deletion

  16. The Petunia ortholog of Arabidopsis SUPERMAN plays a distinct role in floral morphogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakagawa, H.; Ferrario, S.I.T.; Angenent, G.C.; Kobayashi, A.; Takatsuji, H.

    2004-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SUPERMAN (SUP) plays a role in establishing a boundary between whorls 3 and 4 of flowers and in ovule development. We characterized a Petunia hybrida (petunia) homolog of SUP, designated PhSUP1, to compare with SUP. Genomic DNA of the PhSUP1 partially restored the

  17. The petunia ortholog of Arabidopsis SUPERMAN plays a distinct role in floral organ morphogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakagawa, H.; Ferrario, S.I.T.; Angenent, G.C.; Kobayashi, A.; Takatsuji, H.

    2004-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SUPERMAN (SUP) plays a role in establishing a boundary between whorls 3 and 4 of flowers and in ovule development. We characterized a Petunia hybrida (petunia) homolog of SUP, designated PhSUP1, to compare with SUP. Genomic DNA of the PhSUP1 partially restored the

  18. Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis for responsiveness to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintermans, P.C.A.; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r stimulates lateral root formation and increases shoot growth in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). These plant growth-stimulating effects are partly caused by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the bacterium.

  19. Sucrose-specific induction of anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis requires the MYB75/PAP1 gene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teng, S.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.; Bentsink, L.; Koornneef, M.; Smeekens, S.

    2005-01-01

    Sugar-induced anthocyanin accumulation has been observed in many plant species. We observed that sucrose (Suc) is the most effective inducer of anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. Other sugars and osmotic controls are either less effective or ineffective.

  20. Structure and organ specificity of an anionic peroxidase from Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Abelskov, A K; Mattsson, O

    1996-01-01

    The predominant peroxidase (pI 3.5) (E.C. 1.11.1.7) of an Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was purified and partially sequenced. Oligonucleotides were designed and a specific probe was obtained. A cDNA clone was isolated from an Arabidopsis cell suspension cDNA library and completely...

  1. FYVE zinc-finger proteins in the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, R B; La Cour, T; Albrethsen, J

    2001-01-01

    Classic FYVE zinc-finger domains recognize the phosphoinositide signal PtdIns3P and share the basic (R/K)(1)(R/K)HHCR(6) (single-letter amino acid codes) consensus sequence. This domain is present in predicted PtdIns3P 5-kinases and lipases from Arabidopsis thaliana. Other Arabidopsis proteins...

  2. Comparison of arabidopsis stomatal density mutants indicates variation in water stress responses and potential epistatic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaneka S. Lawson; Paula M. Pijut; Charles H. Michler

    2014-01-01

    Recent physiological analysis of Arabidopsis stomatal density (SD) mutants indicated that SD was not the major factor controlling aboveground biomass accumulation. Despite the general theory that plants with fewer stomata have limited biomass acquisition capabilities, epf1 and several other Arabidopsis mutants varied significantly in leaf fresh...

  3. Genomewide analysis of intronic microRNAs in rice and Arabidopsis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here we report a comprehensive computational analysis to characterize intronic miRNAs in rice and Arabidopsis. RT-PCR analysis confirmed that the identified intronic miRNAs were derived from the real introns of host genes. Interestingly, 13 intronic miRNAs in rice and two in Arabidopsis were located within seven clusters ...

  4. Identification of a novel group of putative Arabidopsis thaliana beta-(1,3)-galactosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Yongmei; Egelund, Jack; Gilson, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    -(1,3)-Gal linkage from CAZy GT-family-31 from Arabidopsis thaliana. These analyses confirmed that 20 members of the GT-31 family contained domains/motifs typical of biochemically characterised beta-(1,3)-GTs from mammalian systems. Microarray data confirm that members of this family are expressed......-glycans in Arabidopsis thaliana....

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the Arabidopsis leaf transcriptome reveals interaction of phosphate and sugar metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Renate; Morant, Marc; Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard

    2007-01-01

    Global gene expression was analyzed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) by microarrays comprising 21,500 genes. Leaf segments derived from phosphorus (P)-starved and P-replenished plants were incubated with or without sucrose (Suc) to obtain tissues with contrasting combinations of P and carboh...

  6. Multi-element bioimaging of Arabidopsis thaliana roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Daniel Olof; Chen, Anle; Aarts, Mark G.M.

    2016-01-01

    Better understanding of root function is central for the development of plants with more efficient nutrient uptake and translocation. We here present a method for multielement bioimaging at the cellular level in roots of the genetic model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using conventio...

  7. Heterodimerization and endocytosis of Arabidopsis brassinosteroid receptors BRI1 and AtSERK3 (BAK1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russinova, E.T.; Borst, J.W.; Kwaaitaal, M.A.C.J.; Yanhai Yin, Y.; Caño-Delgrado, A.; Chory, J.; Vries, de S.C.

    2004-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana brassinosteroid (BR), perception is mediated by two Leu-rich repeat receptor-like kinases, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) and BRI1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE1 (BAK1) (Arabidopsis SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR-like KINASE3 [AtSERK3]). Genetic, biochemical, and yeast

  8. A single arabidopsis gene encodes two differentially targeted geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Águila Ruiz-Sola, M.; Barja, M.V.; Manzano, David; Llorente, Briardo; Schipper, Bert; Beekwilder, Jules; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A wide diversity of isoprenoids is produced in different plant compartments. Most groups of isoprenoids synthesized in plastids, and some produced elsewhere in the plant cell derive from geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) synthesized by GGPP synthase (GGPPS) enzymes. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis

  9. Arabidopsis phospholipase Dδ is involved in basal defense and nonhost resistance to powdery mildew fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinosa, Francesco; Buhot, Nathalie; Kwaaitaal, Mark Adrianus Cornelis J

    2013-01-01

    and biotic stress signaling. In this study, the involvement of PLD in the interaction between Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the barley powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh) was investigated. This nonadapted pathogen is normally resisted by a cell wall-based defense, which stops...

  10. Analysis of natural allelic variation in Arabidopsis using a multiparent recombinant inbred line population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, X.; Caldas Paulo, M.J.; Boer, M.P.; Effgen, S.; Keizer, P.; Koornneef, M.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.

    2011-01-01

    To exploit the diversity in Arabidopsis thaliana, eight founder accessions were crossed to produce six recombinant inbred line (RIL) subpopulations, together called an Arabidopsis multiparent RIL (AMPRIL) population. Founders were crossed pairwise to produce four F1 hybrids. These F1s were crossed

  11. Structure and biochemical function of a prototypical Arabidopsis U-box domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pernille; Kragelund, Birthe B; Olsen, Addie N

    2004-01-01

    U-box proteins, as well as other proteins involved in regulated protein degradation, are apparently over-represented in Arabidopsis compared with other model eukaryotes. The Arabidopsis protein AtPUB14 contains a typical U-box domain followed by an Armadillo repeat region, a domain organization t...

  12. Expression pattern of the Arabidopsis thaliana AtEP3/AtchitIV endocitinase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passarinho, P.A.; Hengel, van A.J.; Fransz, P.F.; Vries, de S.C.

    2001-01-01

    The carrot (Daucus carota L.) EP3 chitinase was shown to be essential for somatic embryo formation in a carrot mutant cell line. We identified the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. ortholog of the carrot EP3-3 chitinase gene, designated as AtEP3/AtchitIV and analyzed its expression in Arabidopsis by

  13. Heterodimerization and endocytosis of Arabidopsis brassinosteroid receptors BRI1 and AtSERK3 (BAK1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russinova, Eugenia; Borst, Jan-Willem; Kwaaitaal, Mark Adrianus Cornelis J

    2004-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana brassinosteroid (BR), perception is mediated by two Leu-rich repeat receptor-like kinases, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) and BRI1-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR KINASE1 (BAK1) (Arabidopsis SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS RECEPTOR-like KINASE3 [AtSERK3]). Genetic, biochemical, and yeast...

  14. The next generation of training for Arabidopsis researchers: bioinformatics and quantitative biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been more than 50 years since Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was first introduced as a model organism to understand basic processes in plant biology. A well-organized scientific community has used this small reference plant species to make numerous fundamental plant biology discoveries (P...

  15. Nucleotide variation in ATHK1 region of Arabidopsis thaliana and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ATHK1 gene in Arabidopsis encodes a putative histidine kinase that is transcriptionally upregulated in response to changes in external osmolarity. In this work, we investigated the nucleotide variability of the ATHK1 gene in a sample of 32 core Arabidopsis accessions originating from different ecoclimatic regions and ...

  16. Specific Arabidopsis thaliana malic enzyme isoforms can provide anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badia, Mariana Beatriz; Mans, R.; Lis, A.V.; Tronconi, Marcos Ariel; Arias, Cintia Lucía; Maurino, Verónica Graciela; Andreo, Carlos Santiago; Drincovich, María Fabiana; van Maris, A.J.A.; Gerrard Wheeler, Mariel Claudia

    2017-01-01

    NAD(P)-malic enzyme (NAD(P)-ME) catalyzes the reversible oxidative decarboxylation of malate to pyruvate, CO2, and NAD(P)H and is present as a multigene family in Arabidopsis thaliana. The carboxylation reaction catalyzed by purified recombinant Arabidopsis NADP-ME proteins is faster

  17. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  18. Metal phosphides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehlls, A.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of phosphides of the most of elements: alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth, transition metals, actinides, indium, beryllium, cadmium forming the variety of formulae and types of structures, is considered. The ways of P atom combination in phosphides vary from single atoms (ions P 3- in compounds of electropositive elements) through one-, two-dimensional complexes P n up to three-dimensional (charged) grids. In all phosphides, containing the systems of bound atoms of phosphorus, certain or all from these atoms form less than three bonds P-P. The formation of one bond P-P by every atom leads to group P 2 found as P 2 4- ion in diphosphides of transition metals with the structure of the pyrite or marcasite type (RuP 2 ). LaP, SmP, ThP, UP, ZrP form structural type NaCl

  19. Chromium-Induced Ultrastructural Changes and Oxidative Stress in Roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftherios P. Eleftheriou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (Cr is an abundant heavy metal in nature, toxic to living organisms. As it is widely used in industry and leather tanning, it may accumulate locally at high concentrations, raising concerns for human health hazards. Though Cr effects have extensively been investigated in animals and mammals, in plants they are poorly understood. The present study was then undertaken to determine the ultrastructural malformations induced by hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI], the most toxic form provided as 100 μM potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7, in the root tip cells of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. A concentration-dependent decrease of root growth and a time-dependent increase of dead cells, callose deposition, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production and peroxidase activity were found in Cr(VI-treated seedlings, mostly at the transition root zone. In the same zone, nuclei remained ultrastructurally unaffected, but in the meristematic zone some nuclei displayed bulbous outgrowths or contained tubular structures. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER was less affected under Cr(VI stress, but Golgi bodies appeared severely disintegrated. Moreover, mitochondria and plastids became spherical and displayed translucent stroma with diminished internal membranes, but noteworthy is that their double-membrane envelopes remained structurally intact. Starch grains and electron dense deposits occurred in the plastids. Amorphous material was also deposited in the cell walls, the middle lamella and the vacuoles. Some vacuoles were collapsed, but the tonoplast appeared integral. The plasma membrane was structurally unaffected and the cytoplasm contained opaque lipid droplets and dense electron deposits. All electron dense deposits presumably consisted of Cr that is sequestered from sensitive sites, thus contributing to metal tolerance. It is concluded that the ultrastructural changes are reactive oxygen species (ROS-correlated and the malformations observed are organelle specific.

  20. Glassy metals

    CERN Document Server

    Russew, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    The topics discussed in this book focus on fundamental problems concerning the structural relaxation of amorphous metallic alloys, above all the possibility of studying it on the basis of viscous flow behavior and its relation to rheological anomalies, such as bend stress relaxation, thermal expansion, specific heat, density changes, and crystallization. Most relaxation studies deal with the relaxation changes of a single definite material property, and not with a wider spectrum of physical properties integrated into a common framework. This book shows that it is possible to describe these property changes on the basis of a more comprehensive theoretical understanding of their mechanism.