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Sample records for arabidopsis developing stems

  1. Secondary development in the stem: when Arabidopsis and trees are closer than it seems.

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    Barra-Jiménez, Azahara; Ragni, Laura

    2017-02-01

    Secondary growth, the increase in girth of plant organs, is primarily driven by the vascular and cork cambium. In perennial dicotyledons and gymnosperms, it represents a major source of biomass accumulation in the form of wood. However, the molecular framework underlying secondary growth is largely based on studies in the annual herbaceous plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In this review, we will focus on a selection of major regulators of stem secondary growth, which have recently been shown to play a role in woody species. In particular, we will focus on thermospermine and its bivalent role in controlling xylem differentiation and cell proliferation and we will highlight the contributions of the different LRR-Receptor-Like Kinase signaling hubs.

  2. Single-cell telomere-length quantification couples telomere length to meristem activity and stem cell development in Arabidopsis.

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    González-García, Mary-Paz; Pavelescu, Irina; Canela, Andrés; Sevillano, Xavier; Leehy, Katherine A; Nelson, Andrew D L; Ibañes, Marta; Shippen, Dorothy E; Blasco, Maria A; Caño-Delgado, Ana I

    2015-05-12

    Telomeres are specialized nucleoprotein caps that protect chromosome ends assuring cell division. Single-cell telomere quantification in animals established a critical role for telomerase in stem cells, yet, in plants, telomere-length quantification has been reported only at the organ level. Here, a quantitative analysis of telomere length of single cells in Arabidopsis root apex uncovered a heterogeneous telomere-length distribution of different cell lineages showing the longest telomeres at the stem cells. The defects in meristem and stem cell renewal observed in tert mutants demonstrate that telomere lengthening by TERT sets a replicative limit in the root meristem. Conversely, the long telomeres of the columella cells and the premature stem cell differentiation plt1,2 mutants suggest that differentiation can prevent telomere erosion. Overall, our results indicate that telomere dynamics are coupled to meristem activity and continuous growth, disclosing a critical association between telomere length, stem cell function, and the extended lifespan of plants.

  3. Stem cell organization in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendrich, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of plant tissues and organs depends on continuous production of new cells, by niches of stem cells. Stem cells typically divide to give rise to one differentiating daughter and one non-differentiating daughter. This constant process of self-renewal ensures that the niches of stem cells or mer

  4. Molecule mechanism of stem cells in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Wenjin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants possess the ability to continually produce new tissues and organs throughout their life. Unlike animals, plants are exposed to extreme variations in environmental conditions over the course of their lives. The vitality of plants is so powerful that they can survive several hundreds of years or even more making it an amazing miracle that comes from plant stem cells. The stem cells continue to divide to renew themselves and provide cells for the formation of leaves, stems, and flowers. Stem cells are not only quiescent but also immortal, pluripotent and homeostatic. Stem cells are the magic cells that repair tissues and regenerate organs. During the past decade, scholars around the world have paid more and more attention toward plant stem cells. At present, the major challenge is in relating molecule action mechanism to root apical meristem, shoot apical meristem and vascular system. The coordination between stem cells maintenance and differentiation is critical for normal plant growth and development. Elements such as phytohormones, transcription factors and some other known or unknown genes cooperate to balance this process. In this review, Arabidopsis thaliana as a pioneer system, we highlight recent developments in molecule modulating, illustrating how plant stem cells generate new mechanistic insights into the regulation of plants growth and development.

  5. Hypergravity Stimulus Enhances Primary Xylem Development and Decreases Mechanical Properties of Secondary Cell Walls in Inflorescence Stems of Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    NAKABAYASHI, IZUMI; Karahara, Ichirou; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Masuda, Kyojiro; Wakasugi, Tatsuya; Yamada, Kyoji; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The xylem plays an important role in strengthening plant bodies. Past studies on xylem formation in tension woods in poplar and also in clinorotated Prunus tree stems lead to the suggestion that changes in the gravitational conditions affect morphology and mechanical properties of xylem vessels. The aim of this study was to examine effects of hypergravity stimulus on morphology and development of primary xylem vessels and on mechanical properties of isolated secondary wa...

  6. Chromatin Remodeling in Stem Cell Maintenance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xu; Wen-Hui Shen

    2009-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are able to both self-renew and generate undifferentiated cells for the formation of new tissues and organs.In higher plants,stem cells found in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the root apical meristem (RAM) are origins of organogenesis occurring post-embryonically.It is important to understand how the regulation of stem cell fate is coordinated to enable the meristem to constantly generate different types of lateral organs.Much knowledge has accumulated on specific transcription factors controlling SAM and RAM activity.Here,we review recent evidences for a role of chromatin remodeling in the maintenance of stable expression states of transcription factor genes and the control of stem cell activity in Arabidopsis.

  7. An improved method for the visualization of conductive vessels in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems

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    Radek eJupa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dye perfusion is commonly used for the identification of conductive elements important for the study of xylem development as well as precise hydraulic estimations. The tiny size of inflorescence stems, the small amount of vessels in close arrangement, and high hydraulic resistivity delimit the use of the method for quantification of the water conductivity of Arabidopsis thaliana, one of the recently most extensively used plant models. Here, we present an extensive adjustment to the method in order to reliably identify individual functional (conductive vessels. Segments of inflorescence stems were sealed in silicone tubes to prevent damage and perfused with a dye solution. Our results showed that dyes often used for staining functional xylem elements (safranin, fuchsine, toluidine blue failed with Arabidopsis. In contrast, Fluorescent Brightener 28 dye solution perfused through segments stained secondary cell walls of functional vessels, which were clearly distinguishable in native cross sections. When compared to identification based on the degree of development of secondary cell walls, identification with the help of dye perfusion revealed a significantly lower number of functional vessels and values of theoretical hydraulic conductivity. We found that lignified but not yet functional vessels form a substantial portion of the xylem in apical and basal segments of Arabidopsis and, thus, significantly affect the analyzed functional parameters of xylem. The presented methodology enables reliable identification of individual functional vessels, allowing thus estimations of hydraulic conductivities to be improved, size distributions and vessel diameters to be refined, and data variability generally to be reduced.

  8. Immunoprofiling reveals unique cell-specific patterns of wall epitopes in the expanding Arabidopsis stem.

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    Hall, Hardy C; Cheung, Jingling; Ellis, Brian E

    2013-04-01

    The Arabidopsis inflorescence stem undergoes rapid directional growth, requiring massive axial cell-wall extension in all its tissues, but, at maturity, these tissues are composed of cell types that exhibit markedly different cell-wall structures. It is not clear whether the cell-wall compositions of these cell types diverge rapidly following axial growth cessation, or whether compositional divergence occurs at earlier stages in differentiation, despite the common requirement for cell-wall extensibility. To examine this question, seven cell types were assayed for the abundance and distribution of 18 major cell-wall glycan classes at three developmental stages along the developing inflorescence stem, using a high-throughput immunolabelling strategy. These stages represent a phase of juvenile growth, a phase displaying the maximum rate of stem extension, and a phase in which extension growth is ceasing. The immunolabelling patterns detected demonstrate that the cell-wall composition of most stem tissues undergoes pronounced changes both during and after rapid extension growth. Hierarchical clustering of the immunolabelling signals identified cell-specific binding patterns for some antibodies, including a sub-group of arabinogalactan side chain-directed antibodies whose epitope targets are specifically associated with the inter-fascicular fibre region during the rapid cell expansion phase. The data reveal dynamic, cell type-specific changes in cell-wall chemistry across diverse cell types during cell-wall expansion and maturation in the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem, and highlight the paradox between this structural diversity and the uniform anisotropic cell expansion taking place across all tissues during stem growth.

  9. XYLEM INTERMIXED WITH PHLOEM1, a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase required for stem growth and vascular development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Bryan, Anthony C; Obaidi, Adam; Wierzba, Michael; Tax, Frans E

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of cell specification in plants is particularly important in vascular development. The vascular system is comprised two differentiated tissue types, the xylem and phloem, which form conductive elements for the transport of water, nutrients and signaling molecules. A meristematic layer, the procambium, is located between these two differentiated cell types and divides to initiate vascular growth. We report the identification of a receptor-like kinase (RLK) that is expressed in the vasculature. Histochemical analyses of mutants in this kinase display an aberrant accumulation of highly lignified cells, typical of xylem or fiber cells, within the phloem. In addition, phloem cells are sometimes located adjacent to xylem cells in these mutants. We, therefore, named this RLK XYLEM INTERMIXED WITH PHLOEM 1 (XIP1). Analyses of longitudinal profiles of xip1 mutant stems show malformed cell files, indicating defects in oriented cell divisions or cell morphology. We propose that XIP1 prevents ectopic lignification in phloem cells and is necessary to maintain the organization of cell files or cell morphology in conductive elements.

  10. A dynamic model for stem cell homeostasis and patterning in Arabidopsis meristems.

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    Tim Hohm

    Full Text Available Plants maintain stem cells in their meristems as a source for new undifferentiated cells throughout their life. Meristems are small groups of cells that provide the microenvironment that allows stem cells to prosper. Homeostasis of a stem cell domain within a growing meristem is achieved by signalling between stem cells and surrounding cells. We have here simulated the origin and maintenance of a defined stem cell domain at the tip of Arabidopsis shoot meristems, based on the assumption that meristems are self-organizing systems. The model comprises two coupled feedback regulated genetic systems that control stem cell behaviour. Using a minimal set of spatial parameters, the mathematical model allows to predict the generation, shape and size of the stem cell domain, and the underlying organizing centre. We use the model to explore the parameter space that allows stem cell maintenance, and to simulate the consequences of mutations, gene misexpression and cell ablations.

  11. Curvature in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems is limited to the region of amyloplast displacement

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    Weise, S. E.; Kuznetsov, O. A.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Kiss, J. Z.

    2000-01-01

    Gravitropic sensing in stems and stem-like organs is hypothesized to occur in the endodermis. However, since the endodermis runs the entire length of the stem, the precise site of gravisensing has been difficult to define. In this investigation of gravisensitivity in inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis, we positioned stems in a high gradient magnetic field (HGMF) on a rotating clinostat. Approximately 40% of the young, wild-type (WT) inflorescences, for all positions tested, curved toward the HGMF in the vicinity of the stem exposed to the field. In contrast, when the wedge was placed in the basal region of older inflorescence stems, no curvature was observed. As a control, the HGMF was applied to a starchless mutant, and 5% of the stems curved toward the field. Microscopy of the endodermis in the WT showed amyloplast displacement in the vicinity of the HGMF. Additional structural studies demonstrated that the basal region of WT stems experienced amyloplast displacement and, therefore, suggest this region is capable of gravity perception. However, increased lignification likely prevented curvature in the basal region. The lack of apical curvature after basal amyloplast displacement indicates that gravity perception in the base is not transmitted to the apex. Thus, these results provide evidence that the signal (and thus, response) resulting from perception in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems is spatially restricted.

  12. Isolation and identification of Sclerotinia stem rot causal pathogen in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Ai-rong WANG; Wen-wei LIN; Xiao-ting CHEN; Guo-dong LU; Lie ZHOU; Zong-hua WANG

    2008-01-01

    A new stem rot disease is found to occur naturally on Arabidopsis plants in greenhouses of Fuzhou, China. In order to identify its pathogen, we conducted a series of fimgal isolation and purification, plant reinoculation, and ascus and ascospore induction from the sclerotia. The isolate caused typical water-soaked lesions after reinoeulation and produced sclerotia both on Arabidopsis plants and culture medium plates, and the sclerotia could be induced to produce discal apothecia and 8 binucleate ascospores per ascus. These disease symptom and fungal morphology data revealed that the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary was the pathogen for Arabidopsis stem rot. To confirm this, we further amplified its large subunit ribosomal DNA (LSU rDNA) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and compared the sequence with the known LSU rDNA sequences in GenBank. The results show that the sequence shares the highest identities with the LSU rDNAs of different S. sclerotiorum strains. Taking all these data together, we concluded that the fungus that caused the Arabidopsis stem rot is S. sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary. This is the first report that Arabidopsis is naturally infected by S. sclerotiorum.

  13. Gravity perception and gravitropic response of inflorescence stems in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Fukaki, H.; Tasaka, M.

    1999-01-01

    Shoots of higher plants exhibit negative gravitropism. However, little is known about the site of gravity perception in shoots and the molecular mechanisms of shoot gravitropic responses. Our recent analysis using shoot gravitropism1(sgr1)/scarecrow(scr) and sgr7/short-root (shr) mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana indicated that the endodermis is essential for shoot gravitropism and strongly suggested that the endodermis functions as the gravity-sensing cell layer in dicotyledonous plant shoots. In this paper, we present our recent analysis and model of gravity perception and gravitropic response of inflorescence stems in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  14. Histone Deacetylase Genes in Arabidopsis Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Courtney Hollender; Zhongchi Liu

    2008-01-01

    Histone acetylatlon and deacetylation are directly connected with transcriptional activation and silencing in eukaryotas.Gene families for enzymes that accomplish these histone modifications show surprising complexity in domain organization,tissue-specific expression, and function. This review is focused on the family of histone deacetylases (HDACs) that remove the acetyl group from core histone tails, resulting in a "closed" chromatin and transcriptional repression. In Arabidopsis,18 HDAC genes are divided in to three different types - RPD3-1ike, HD-tuin and sirtuin - with two or more members ineach type. The structural feature of each HDAC class, the expression profile of each HDAC gene during development and functional insights of important family members are summarized here. It is clear that HDACs are an important class of global transcriptional regulators that play crucial roles in plant development, defense, and adaptation.

  15. A quantitative analysis of stem cell homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

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    Hong, Jing Han; Chu, Huangwei; Zhang, Chen; Ghosh, Dipanjana; Gong, Ximing; Xu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The Lugol's staining method has been widely used to detect changes in the maintenance of stem cell fate in the columella root cap of Arabidopsis roots since the late 1990s. However, various limitations of this method demand for additional or complementary new approaches. For instance, it is unable to reveal the division rate of columella root cap stem cells. Here we report that, by labeling dividing stem cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), the number and distribution of their labeled progeny can be studied so that the division rate of stem cells can be measured quantitatively and in addition, that the progression of stem cell progeny differentiation can be assessed in combination with Lugol's staining. EdU staining takes few hours and visualization of the stain characteristics of columella root cap can be performed easily under confocal microscopes. This simple technology, when used together with Lugol's staining, provides a novel quantitative method to study the dynamics of stem cell behavior that govern homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

  16. A Quantitative Analysis of Stem Cell Homeostasis in the Arabidopsis Columella Root Cap

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    Jing Han eHong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Lugol’s staining method has been widely used to detect changes in the maintenance of stem cell fate in the columella root cap of Arabidopsis roots since the late ‘90s. However, various limitations of this method demand for additional or complementary new approaches. For instance, it is unable to reveal the division rate of columella root cap stem cells. Here we report that, by labelling dividing stem cells with 5-ethynyl-2´-deoxyuridine (EdU, the number and distribution of their labeled progeny can be studied so that the division rate of stem cells can be measured quantitatively and in addition, that the progression of stem cell progeny differentiation can be assessed in combination with Lugol’s staining. EdU staining takes few hours and visualization of the stain characteristics of columella root cap can be performed easily under confocal microscopes. This simple technology, when used together with Lugol’s staining, provides a novel quantitative method to study the dynamics of stem cell behaviour that govern homeostasis in the Arabidopsis columella root cap.

  17. Signal transduction regulating meristem development in Arabidopsis. Final report

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    Cark, Steven E.

    2003-09-10

    Research support by DE-FG02-96ER20227 focused on the CLV loci and their regulation of organ formation at the Arabidopsis shoot meristem. Shoot meristem function is central to plant development as all of the above-ground organs and tissues of the plant are derived post-embryonically from the shoot meristem. At the shoot meristem, stem cells are maintained, and progeny cells undergo a switch toward differentiation and organ formation. The CLV loci, represented by three genes CLV1, CLV2 and CLV3 are key regulators of meristem development. Each of the CLV loci encode a putative receptor-mediated signaling component. When this work began, virtually nothing was known about receptor-mediated signaling in plants. Thus, our goal was to both characterize these genes and the proteins they encode as regulators of meristem development, and to investigate how receptor-mediated signaling might function in plants. Our work lead to several major publications that were significant contributions to understanding this system.

  18. GLABROUS INFLORESCENCE STEMS regulates trichome branching by genetically interacting with SIM in Arabidopsis

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    Li-li SUN; Zhong-jing ZHOU; Li-jun AN; Yan AN; Yong-qin ZHAO; Xiao-fang MENG; Clare STEELE-KING

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis trichomes are large branched single cells that protrude from the epidermis.The first morphological indication of trichome development is an increase in nuclear content resulting from an initial cycle of endoreduplication.Our previous study has shown that the C2H2 zinc finger protein GLABROUS INFLORESCENCE STEMS (GIS) is required for trichome initiation in the inflorescence organ and for trichome branching in response to gibberellic acid signaling,although GIS gene does not play a direct role in regulating trichome cell division.Here,we describe a novel role of GIS,controlling trichome cell division indirectly by interacting genetically with a key endoreduplication regulator SIAMESE (SIM).Our molecular and genetic studies have shown that GIS might indireclty control cell division and trichome branching by acting downstream of SIM.A loss of function mutation of SIM signficantly reduced the expression of GIS.Futhermore,the overexpression of GIS rescued the trichome cluster cell phenotypes of sim mutant.The gain or loss of function of GIS had no significant effect on the expression of SIM.These results suggest that GIS may play an indirect role in regulating trichome cell division by genetically interacting with SIM.

  19. Role of chromatin factors in Arabidopsis root stem cell maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kornet, N.G.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells replenish the cells present in an organism throughout its lifetime and sustain growth. They have unique characteristics: the capability to self-renew and the potential to differentiate into several cell types. Recently, it has become clear that chromatin factors support these unique featu

  20. GLABROUS INFLORESCENCE STEMS (GIS) is required for trichome branching through gibberellic acid signaling in Arabidopsis.

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    An, Lijun; Zhou, Zhongjing; Su, Sha; Yan, An; Gan, Yinbo

    2012-02-01

    Cell differentiation generally corresponds to the cell cycle, typically forming a non-dividing cell with a unique differentiated morphology, and Arabidopsis trichome is an excellent model system to study all aspects of cell differentiation. Although gibberellic acid is reported to be involved in trichome branching in Arabidopsis, the mechanism for such signaling is unclear. Here, we demonstrated that GLABROUS INFLORESCENCE STEMS (GIS) is required for the control of trichome branching through gibberellic acid signaling. The phenotypes of a loss-of-function gis mutant and an overexpressor showed that GIS acted as a repressor to control trichome branching. Our results also show that GIS is not required for cell endoreduplication, and our molecular and genetic study results have shown that GIS functions downstream of the key regulator of trichome branching, STICHEL (STI), to control trichome branching through the endoreduplication-independent pathway. Furthermore, our results also suggest that GIS controls trichome branching in Arabidopsis through two different pathways and acts either upstream or downstream of the negative regulator of gibbellic acid signaling SPINDLY (SPY).

  1. Lateral root development in Arabidopsis: fifty shades of auxin.

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    Lavenus, Julien; Goh, Tatsuaki; Roberts, Ianto; Guyomarc'h, Soazig; Lucas, Mikaël; De Smet, Ive; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Beeckman, Tom; Bennett, Malcolm; Laplaze, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    The developmental plasticity of the root system represents a key adaptive trait enabling plants to cope with abiotic stresses such as drought and is therefore important in the current context of global changes. Root branching through lateral root formation is an important component of the adaptability of the root system to its environment. Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling lateral root development has progressed tremendously in recent years through research in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). These studies have revealed that the phytohormone auxin acts as a common integrator to many endogenous and environmental signals regulating lateral root formation. Here, we review what has been learnt about the myriad roles of auxin during lateral root formation in Arabidopsis.

  2. Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins: specialization for stem biomechanics and cell wall architecture in Arabidopsis and Eucalyptus.

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    MacMillan, Colleen P; Mansfield, Shawn D; Stachurski, Zbigniew H; Evans, Rob; Southerton, Simon G

    2010-05-01

    The ancient cell adhesion fasciclin (FAS) domain is found in bacteria, fungi, algae, insects and animals, and occurs in a large family of fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs) in higher plants. Functional roles for FAS-containing proteins have been determined for insects, algae and vertebrates; however, the biological functions of the various higher-plant FLAs are not clear. Expression of some FLAs has been correlated with the onset of secondary-wall cellulose synthesis in Arabidopsis stems, and also with wood formation in the stems and branches of trees, suggesting a biological role in plant stems. We examined whether FLAs contribute to plant stem biomechanics. Using phylogenetic, transcript abundance and promoter-GUS fusion analyses, we identified a conserved subset of single FAS domain FLAs (group A FLAs) in Eucalyptus and Arabidopsis that have specific and high transcript abundance in stems, particularly in stem cells undergoing secondary-wall deposition, and that the phylogenetic conservation appears to extend to other dicots and monocots. Gene-function analyses revealed that Arabidopsis T-DNA knockout double mutant stems had altered stem biomechanics with reduced tensile strength and a reduced tensile modulus of elasticity, as well as altered cell-wall architecture and composition, with increased cellulose microfibril angle and reduced arabinose, galactose and cellulose content. Using materials engineering concepts, we relate the effects of these FLAs on cell-wall composition with stem biomechanics. Our results suggest that a subset of single FAS domain FLAs contributes to plant stem strength by affecting cellulose deposition, and to the stem modulus of elasticity by affecting the integrity of the cell-wall matrix.

  3. Arabidopsis membrane-associated acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP1 is involved in stem cuticle formation.

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    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Shi; Kim, Juyoung; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chen, Liang; Tanner, Julian A; Suh, Mi Chung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-10-01

    The membrane-anchored Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (AtACBP1) plays important roles in embryogenesis and abiotic stress responses, and interacts with long-chain (LC) acyl-CoA esters. Here, AtACBP1 function in stem cuticle formation was investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP1pro::GUS construct revealed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression on the stem (but not leaf) surface, suggesting a specific role in stem cuticle formation. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that (His)6-tagged recombinant AtACBP1 interacts with LC acyl-CoA esters (18:1-, 18:2-, and 18:3-CoAs) and very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters (24:0-, 25:0-, and 26:0-CoAs). VLC fatty acids have been previously demonstrated to act as precursors in wax biosynthesis. Gas chromatography (GC)-flame ionization detector (FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed that an acbp1 mutant showed a reduction in stem and leaf cuticular wax and stem cutin monomer composition in comparison with the wild type (Col-0). Consequently, the acbp1 mutant showed fewer wax crystals on the stem surface in scanning electron microscopy and an irregular stem cuticle layer in transmission electron microscopy in comparison with the wild type. Also, the mutant stems consistently showed a decline in expression of cuticular wax and cutin biosynthetic genes in comparison with the wild type, and the mutant leaves were more susceptible to infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtACBP1 participates in Arabidopsis stem cuticle formation by trafficking VLC acyl-CoAs.

  4. Ubiquitin-related modifiers of Arabidopsis thaliana influence root development.

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    Florian John

    Full Text Available Ubiquitins are small peptides that allow for posttranslational modification of proteins. Ubiquitin-related modifier (URM proteins belong to the class of ubiquitin-like proteins. A primary function of URM proteins has been shown to be the sulfur transfer reaction leading to thiolation of tRNAs, a process that is important for accurate and effective protein translation. Recent analyses revealed that the Arabidopsis genome codes for two URM proteins, URM11 and URM12, which both are active in the tRNA thiolation process. Here, we show that URM11 and URM12 have overlapping expression patterns and are required for tRNA thiolation. The characterization of urm11 and urm12 mutants reveals that the lack of tRNA thiolation induces changes in general root architecture by influencing the rate of lateral root formation. In addition, they synergistically influence root hair cell growth. During the sulfur transfer reaction, URM proteins of different organisms interact with a thiouridylase, a protein-protein interaction that also takes place in Arabidopsis, since URM11 and URM12 interact with the Arabidopsis thiouridylase ROL5. Hence, the sulfur transfer reaction is conserved between distantly related species such as yeast, humans, and plants, and in Arabidopsis has an impact on root development.

  5. PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE SYNTHASE1 is Required for Inflorescence Meristem and Organ Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengwu Liu; Hengfu Yin; Peng Gao; Xiaohe Hu; Jun Yang; Zhongchi Liu; Xiangdong Fu

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS),a quantitatively minor membrane phospholipid,is involved in many biological processes besides its role in membrane structure.One PS synthesis gene,PHOSPHATIDYLSERINE SYNTHASE1 (PSS1),has been discovered to be required for microspore development in Arabidopsis thaliana L.but how PSS1 affects postembryonic development is still largely unknown.Here,we show that PSS1 is also required for inflorescence meristem and organ development in Arabidopsis.Disruption of PSS1 causes severe dwarfism,smaller lateral organs and reduced size of inflorescence meristem.Morphological and molecular studies suggest that both cell division and cell elongation are affected in the pss1-1 mutant.RNA in situ hybridization and promoter GUS analysis show that expression of both WUSCHEL (WUS) and CLAVATA3 (CLV3) depend on PSS1.Moreover,the defect in meristem maintenance is recovered and the expression of WUS and CLV3 are restored in the pss1-1 clv1-1 double mutant.Both SHOOTSTEMLESS (STM) and BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP) are upregulated,and auxin distribution is disrupted in rosette leaves of pss1-1.However,expression of BP,which is also a regulator of internode development,is lost in the pss1-1 inflorescence stem.Our data suggest that PSS1 plays essential roles in inflorescence meristem maintenance through the WUS-CLV pathway,and in leaf and internode development by differentially regulating the class Ⅰ KNOX genes.

  6. Development and application of stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUI Guo-zhen; SHAN Li-dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Stem cells are defined by two important characteristics: the ability to proliferate by a process of self-renewal and the potential to form at least one specialized cell type. Transient population of pluripotent or multipotent stem cells first appear during the development at the first days post coitum. The cells of the inner cell mass (ICM) of the blastocyst, of which embryonic stem cells (ES) are the in vitro counterpart, can give rise to any differentiated cell type in the three primary germ layers of the embryo (endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm).1-3 These cells gradually mature into committed, organ- and tissue-specific stem cells or adult stem cells, such as neural stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, etc. Over the past years, studies have focused on two aspects: molecular level and application, and some new methods and technology have been used.

  7. Polycomb-group (Pc-G) Proteins Control Seed Development in Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Xue Wang; Li-Geng Ma

    2007-01-01

    Polycomb-group (Pc-G) proteins repress their target gene expression by assemble complexes in Drosophila and mammals. Three groups of Pc-G genes, controlling seed development, flower development and vernalization response, have been identified in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.). MEDEA (MEA), FERTIL IZA TION INDEPENDENT SEED2 (FIS2), and FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE) are Pc-G genes in Arabidopsis. Their functions in seed development have been extensively explored. The advanced findings of molecular mechanism on how MEA, FIS2 and FIE control seed development in Arabidopsis are reviewed in this paper.

  8. Stomach development, stem cells and disease.

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    Kim, Tae-Hee; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2016-02-15

    The stomach, an organ derived from foregut endoderm, secretes acid and enzymes and plays a key role in digestion. During development, mesenchymal-epithelial interactions drive stomach specification, patterning, differentiation and growth through selected signaling pathways and transcription factors. After birth, the gastric epithelium is maintained by the activity of stem cells. Developmental signals are aberrantly activated and stem cell functions are disrupted in gastric cancer and other disorders. Therefore, a better understanding of stomach development and stem cells can inform approaches to treating these conditions. This Review highlights the molecular mechanisms of stomach development and discusses recent findings regarding stomach stem cells and organoid cultures, and their roles in investigating disease mechanisms.

  9. Arabidopsis Myosins XI1, XI2, and XIK Are Crucial for Gravity-Induced Bending of Inflorescence Stems

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    Talts, Kristiina; Ilau, Birger; Ojangu, Eve-Ly; Tanner, Krista; Peremyslov, Valera V.; Dolja, Valerian V.; Truve, Erkki; Paves, Heiti

    2016-01-01

    Myosins and actin filaments in the actomyosin system act in concert in regulating cell structure and dynamics and are also assumed to contribute to plant gravitropic response. To investigate the role of the actomyosin system in the inflorescence stem gravitropism, we used single and multiple mutants affecting each of the 17 Arabidopsis myosins of class VIII and XI. We show that class XI but not class VIII myosins are required for stem gravitropism. Simultaneous loss of function of myosins XI1, XI2, and XIK leads to impaired gravitropic bending that is correlated with altered growth, stiffness, and insufficient sedimentation of gravity sensing amyloplasts in stem endodermal cells. The gravitropic defect of the corresponding triple mutant xi1 xi2 xik could be rescued by stable expression of the functional XIK:YFP in the mutant background, indicating a role of class XI myosins in this process. Altogether, our results emphasize the critical contributions of myosins XI in stem gravitropism of Arabidopsis. PMID:28066484

  10. Tissue-wide Mechanical Forces Influence the Polarity of Stomatal Stem Cells in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringmann, Martin; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2017-03-20

    Mechanical information is an important contributor to cell polarity in uni- and multicellular systems [1-3]. In planar tissues like the Drosophila wing, cell polarity reorients during growth as cells divide and reorganize [4]. In another planar tissue, the Arabidopsis leaf epidermis [5], polarized, asymmetric divisions of stomatal stem cells (meristemoid mother cells [MMCs]) are fundamental for the generation and patterning of multiple cell types, including stomata. The activity of key transcription factors, polarizing factors [6], and peptide signals [7] explains some local stomatal patterns emerging from the behavior of a few lineally related cells [6, 8-11]. Here we demonstrate that, in addition to locally acting signals, tissue-wide mechanical forces can act as organizing cues, and that they do so by influencing the polarity of individual MMCs. If the mechanical stress environment in the tissue is altered through stretching or cell ablations, cellular polarity changes in response. In turn, polarity predicts the orientation of cellular and tissue outgrowth, leading to increased mechanical conflicts between neighboring cells. This interplay among growth, oriented divisions, and cell specification could contribute to the characteristic patterning of stomatal guard cells in the context of a growing leaf.

  11. A unique HEAT repeat-containing protein SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 is involved in vacuolar membrane dynamics in gravity-sensing cells of Arabidopsis inflorescence stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, Yasuko; Yano, Daisuke; Nagafusa, Kiyoshi; Kato, Takehide; Saito, Chieko; Uemura, Tomohiro; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Tasaka, Masao; Terao Morita, Miyo

    2014-04-01

    Plant vacuoles play critical roles in development, growth and stress responses. In mature cells, vacuolar membranes (VMs) display several types of structures, which are formed by invagination and folding of VMs into the lumenal side and can gradually move and change shape. Although such VM structures are observed in a broad range of tissue types and plant species, the molecular mechanism underlying their formation and maintenance remains unclear. Here, we report that a novel HEAT-repeat protein, SHOOT GRAVITROPISM6 (SGR6), of Arabidopsis is involved in the control of morphological changes and dynamics of VM structures in endodermal cells, which are the gravity-sensing cells in shoots. SGR6 is a membrane-associated protein that is mainly localized to the VM in stem endodermal cells. The sgr6 mutant stem exhibits a reduced gravitropic response. Higher plants utilize amyloplast sedimentation as a means to sense gravity direction. Amyloplasts are surrounded by VMs in Arabidopsis endodermal cells, and the flexible and dynamic structure of VMs is important for amyloplast sedimentation. We demonstrated that such dynamic features of VMs are gradually lost in sgr6 endodermal cells during a 30 min observation period. Histological analysis revealed that amyloplast sedimentation was impaired in sgr6. Detailed live-cell imaging analyses revealed that the VM structures in sgr6 had severe defects in morphological changes and dynamics. Our results suggest that SGR6 is a novel protein involved in the formation and/or maintenance of invaginated VM structures in gravity-sensing cells.

  12. Cell wall pectic arabinans influence the mechanical properties of Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems and their response to mechanical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhertbruggen, Yves; Marcus, Susan E; Chen, Jianshe; Knox, J Paul

    2013-08-01

    Little is known of the dynamics of plant cell wall matrix polysaccharides in response to the impact of mechanical stress on plant organs. The capacity of the imposition of a mechanical stress (periodic brushing) to reduce the height of the inflorescence stem of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings has been used to study the role of pectic arabinans in the mechanical properties and stress responsiveness of a plant organ. The arabinan-deficient-1 (arad1) mutation that affects arabinan structures in epidermal cell walls of inflorescence stems is demonstrated to reduce the impact on inflorescence stem heights caused by mechanical stress. The arabinan-deficient-2 (arad2) mutation, that does not have detectable impact on arabinan structures, is also shown to reduce the impact on stem heights caused by mechanical stress. The LM13 linear arabinan epitope is specifically detected in epidermal cell walls of the younger, flexible regions of inflorescence stems and increases in abundance at the base of inflorescence stems in response to an imposed mechanical stress. The strain (percentage deformation) of stem epidermal cells in the double mutant arad1 × arad2 is lower in unbrushed plants than in wild-type plants, but rises to wild-type levels in response to brushing. The study demonstrates the complexity of arabinan structures within plant cell walls and also that their contribution to cell wall mechanical properties is a factor influencing responsiveness to mechanical stress.

  13. Regulation of flower development in Arabidopsis by SCF complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Weimin; Xie, Daoxin; Hobbie, Lawrence; Feng, Baomin; Zhao, Dazhong; Akkara, Joseph; Ma, Hong

    2004-04-01

    SCF complexes are the largest and best studied family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases that facilitate the ubiquitylation of proteins targeted for degradation. The SCF core components Skp1, Cul1, and Rbx1 serve in multiple SCF complexes involving different substrate-specific F-box proteins that are involved in diverse processes including cell cycle and development. In Arabidopsis, mutations in the F-box gene UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) result in a number of defects in flower development. However, functions of the core components Cul1 and Rbx1 in flower development are poorly understood. In this study we analyzed floral phenotypes caused by altering function of Cul1 or Rbx1, as well as the effects of mutations in ASK1 and ASK2. Plants homozygous for a point mutation in the AtCUL1 gene showed reduced floral organ number and several defects in each of the four whorls. Similarly, plants with reduced AtRbx1 expression due to RNA interference also exhibited floral morphological defects. In addition, compared to the ask1 mutant, plants homozygous for ask1 and heterozygous for ask2 displayed enhanced reduction of B function, as well as other novel defects of flower development, including carpelloid sepals and an inhibition of petal development. Genetic analyses demonstrate that AGAMOUS (AG) is required for the novel phenotypes observed in the first and second whorls. Furthermore, the genetic interaction between UFO and AtCUL1 supports the idea that UFO regulates multiple aspects of flower development as a part of SCF complexes. These results suggest that SCF complexes regulate several aspects of floral development in Arabidopsis.

  14. Catalytic profile of Arabidopsis peroxidases, AtPrx-2, 25 and 71, contributing to stem lignification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeto, Jun; Nagano, Mariko; Fujita, Koki; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Lignins are aromatic heteropolymers that arise from oxidative coupling of lignin precursors, including lignin monomers (p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols), oligomers, and polymers. Whereas plant peroxidases have been shown to catalyze oxidative coupling of monolignols, the oxidation activity of well-studied plant peroxidases, such as horseradish peroxidase C (HRP-C) and AtPrx53, are quite low for sinapyl alcohol. This characteristic difference has led to controversy regarding the oxidation mechanism of sinapyl alcohol and lignin oligomers and polymers by plant peroxidases. The present study explored the oxidation activities of three plant peroxidases, AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71, which have been already shown to be involved in lignification in the Arabidopsis stem. Recombinant proteins of these peroxidases (rAtPrxs) were produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies and successfully refolded to yield their active forms. rAtPrx2, rAtPrx25, and rAtPrx71 were found to oxidize two syringyl compounds (2,6-dimethoxyphenol and syringaldazine), which were employed here as model monolignol compounds, with higher specific activities than HRP-C and rAtPrx53. Interestingly, rAtPrx2 and rAtPrx71 oxidized syringyl compounds more efficiently than guaiacol. Moreover, assays with ferrocytochrome c as a substrate showed that AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71 possessed the ability to oxidize large molecules. This characteristic may originate in a protein radical. These results suggest that the plant peroxidases responsible for lignin polymerization are able to directly oxidize all lignin precursors.

  15. Catalytic profile of Arabidopsis peroxidases, AtPrx-2, 25 and 71, contributing to stem lignification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shigeto

    Full Text Available Lignins are aromatic heteropolymers that arise from oxidative coupling of lignin precursors, including lignin monomers (p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohols, oligomers, and polymers. Whereas plant peroxidases have been shown to catalyze oxidative coupling of monolignols, the oxidation activity of well-studied plant peroxidases, such as horseradish peroxidase C (HRP-C and AtPrx53, are quite low for sinapyl alcohol. This characteristic difference has led to controversy regarding the oxidation mechanism of sinapyl alcohol and lignin oligomers and polymers by plant peroxidases. The present study explored the oxidation activities of three plant peroxidases, AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71, which have been already shown to be involved in lignification in the Arabidopsis stem. Recombinant proteins of these peroxidases (rAtPrxs were produced in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies and successfully refolded to yield their active forms. rAtPrx2, rAtPrx25, and rAtPrx71 were found to oxidize two syringyl compounds (2,6-dimethoxyphenol and syringaldazine, which were employed here as model monolignol compounds, with higher specific activities than HRP-C and rAtPrx53. Interestingly, rAtPrx2 and rAtPrx71 oxidized syringyl compounds more efficiently than guaiacol. Moreover, assays with ferrocytochrome c as a substrate showed that AtPrx2, AtPrx25, and AtPrx71 possessed the ability to oxidize large molecules. This characteristic may originate in a protein radical. These results suggest that the plant peroxidases responsible for lignin polymerization are able to directly oxidize all lignin precursors.

  16. Metabolomic Characterization of Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis: Development of a Metabolite Profiling Database for Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Kusano, Miyako; Mejia, Ramon Francisco; Iwasa, Mami; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hayashi, Naomi; Watanabe-Takahashi, Akiko; Narisawa, Tomoko; Tohge, Takayuki; Hur, Manhoi; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Nikolau, Basil J; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-05-14

    Despite recent intensive research efforts in functional genomics, the functions of only a limited number of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes have been determined experimentally, and improving gene annotation remains a major challenge in plant science. As metabolite profiling can characterize the metabolomic phenotype of a genetic perturbation in the plant metabolism, it provides clues to the function(s) of genes of interest. We chose 50 Arabidopsis mutants, including a set of characterized and uncharacterized mutants, that resemble wild-type plants. We performed metabolite profiling of the plants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To make the data set available as an efficient public functional genomics tool for hypothesis generation, we developed the Metabolite Profiling Database for Knock-Out Mutants in Arabidopsis (MeKO). It allows the evaluation of whether a mutation affects metabolism during normal plant growth and contains images of mutants, data on differences in metabolite accumulation, and interactive analysis tools. Nonprocessed data, including chromatograms, mass spectra, and experimental metadata, follow the guidelines set by the Metabolomics Standards Initiative and are freely downloadable. Proof-of-concept analysis suggests that MeKO is highly useful for the generation of hypotheses for genes of interest and for improving gene annotation. MeKO is publicly available at http://prime.psc.riken.jp/meko/.

  17. An Atlas of Type I MADS Box Gene Expression during Female Gametophyte and Seed Development in Arabidopsis[W].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, M.; Heijmans, K.; Airoldi, C.A.; Davies, B.; Angenent, G.C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally cha

  18. SUPERKILLER Complex Components Are Required for the RNA Exosome-Mediated Control of Cuticular Wax Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis Inflorescence Stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lifang; Kunst, Ljerka

    2016-06-01

    ECERIFERUM7 (CER7)/AtRRP45B core subunit of the exosome, the main cellular 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, is a positive regulator of cuticular wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inflorescence stems. CER7-dependent exosome activity determines stem wax load by controlling transcript levels of the wax-related gene CER3 Characterization of the second-site suppressors of the cer7 mutant revealed that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are direct effectors of CER3 expression. To explore the relationship between the exosome and posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in regulating CER3 transcript levels, we investigated two additional suppressor mutants, wax restorer1 (war1) and war7. We show that WAR1 and WAR7 encode Arabidopsis SUPERKILLER3 (AtSKI3) and AtSKI2, respectively, components of the SKI complex that associates with the exosome during cytoplasmic 3'-to-5' RNA degradation, and that CER7-dependent regulation of wax biosynthesis also requires participation of AtSKI8. Our study further reveals that it is the impairment of the exosome-mediated 3'-5' decay of CER3 transcript in the cer7 mutant that triggers extensive production of siRNAs and efficient PTGS of CER3. This identifies PTGS as a general mechanism for eliminating highly abundant endogenous transcripts that is activated when 3'-to-5' mRNA turnover by the exosome is disrupted. Diminished efficiency of PTGS in ski mutants compared with cer7, as evidenced by lower accumulation of CER3-related siRNAs, suggests that reduced amounts of CER3 transcript are available for siRNA synthesis, possibly because CER3 mRNA that does not interact with SKI is degraded by 5'-to-3' XRN4 exoribonuclease.

  19. Overexpression of the Novel Arabidopsis Gene At5g02890 Alters Inflorescence Stem Wax Composition and Affects Phytohormone Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liping; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas; Gao, Jie; Hu, Kaining; Wen, Jing; Yi, Bin; Shen, Jinxiong; Ma, Chaozhi; Tu, Jinxing; Fu, Tingdong

    2017-01-01

    The cuticle is composed of cutin and cuticular wax. It covers the surfaces of land plants and protects them against environmental damage. At5g02890 encodes a novel protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the current study, protein sequence analysis showed that At5g02890 is highly conserved in the Brassicaceae. Arabidopsis lines overexpressing At5g02890 (OE-At5g02890 lines) and an At5g02890 orthologous gene from Brassica napus (OE-Bn1 lines) exhibited glossy stems. Chemical analysis revealed that overexpression of At5g02890 caused significant reductions in the levels of wax components longer than 28 carbons (C28) in inflorescence stems, whereas the levels of wax molecules of chain length C28 or shorter were significantly increased. Transcriptome analysis indicated that nine of 11 cuticular wax synthesis-related genes with different expression levels in OE-At5g02890 plants are involved in very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) elongation. At5g02890 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is consistent with its function in cuticular wax biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that the overexpression of At5g02890 alters cuticular wax composition by partially blocking VLCFA elongation of C28 and higher. In addition, detailed analysis of differentially expressed genes associated with plant hormones and endogenous phytohormone levels in wild-type and OE-At5g02890 plants indicated that abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA), and jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) biosynthesis, as well as polar auxin transport, were also affected by overexpression of At5g02890. Taken together, these findings indicate that overexpression of At5g02890 affects both cuticular wax biosynthesis and phytohormone homeostasis in Arabidopsis. PMID:28184233

  20. Dental Stem Cell in Tooth Development and Advances of Adult Dental Stem Cell in Regenerative Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiali; Xu, Xin; Lin, Jiong; Fan, Li; Zheng, Yuting; Kuang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies are considered as a promising treatment for many clinical usage such as tooth regeneration, bone repairation, spinal cord injury, and so on. However, the ideal stem cell for stem cell-based therapy still remains to be elucidated. In the past decades, several types of stem cells have been isolated from teeth, including dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), dental follicle progenitor stem cells (DFPCs) and stem cells from apical papilla (SCAP), which may be a good source for stem cell-based therapy in certain disease, especially when they origin from neural crest is considered. In this review, the specific characteristics and advantages of the adult dental stem cell population will be summarized and the molecular mechanisms of the differentiation of dental stem cell during tooth development will be also discussed.

  1. Expression and Protein Interaction Analyses Reveal Combinatorial Interactions of LBD Transcription Factors During Arabidopsis Pollen Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mirim; Kim, Min-Jung; Pandey, Shashank; Kim, Jungmook

    2016-11-01

    LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) transcription factor gene family members play key roles in diverse aspects of plant development. LBD10 and LBD27 have been shown to be essential for pollen development in Arabidopsis thaliana. From the previous RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data set of Arabidopsis pollen, we identified the mRNAs of LBD22, LBD25 and LBD36 in addition to LBD10 and LBD27 in Arabidopsis pollen. Here we conducted expression and cellular analysis using GFP:GUS (green fluorescent protein:β-glucuronidase) reporter gene and subcellular localization assays using LBD:GFP fusion proteins expressed under the control of their own promoters in Arabidopsis. We found that these LBD proteins display spatially and temporally distinct and overlapping expression patterns during pollen development. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down assays demonstrated that protein-protein interactions occur among the LBDs exhibiting overlapping expression during pollen development. We further showed that LBD10, LBD22, LBD25, LBD27 and LBD36 interact with each other to form heterodimers, which are localized to the nucleus in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Taken together, these results suggest that combinatorial interactions among LBD proteins may be important for their function in pollen development in Arabidopsis.

  2. The Cooperative Activities of CSLD2, CSLD3, and CSLD5 Are Required for Normal Arabidopsis Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Yina; William G.T. Willats; Henrik Vibe Scheller; Yves Verhertbruggen; Ai Oikawa; Chithra Manisseri; Bernhard Knierim; Lina Prak; Jacob Krüger Jensen; J. Paul Knoxi; Manfred Auer

    2011-01-01

    Glycosyltransferases of the Cellulose Synthase Like D (CSLD) subfamily have been reported to be involved in tip growth and stem development in Arabidopsis.The csld2 and csld3 mutants are root hair defective and the csld5 mutant has reduced stem growth.In this study,we produced double and triple knockout mutants of CSLD2,CSLD3,and CSLD5.Unlike the single mutants and the csld2/csld3 double mutant,the csld2/csld5,csld3/csld5,and csld2/csld3/csld5 mutants were dwarfed and showed severely reduced viability.This demonstrates that the cooperative activities of CSLD2,CSLD3,and CSLD5 are required for normal Arabidopsis development,and that they are involved in important processes besides the specialized role in tip growth.The mutant phenotypes indicate that CSLD2 and CSLD3 have overlapping functions with CSLD5 in early plant development,whereas the CSLD2 and CSLD3 proteins are non-redundant.To determine the biochemical function of CSLD proteins,we used transient expression in tobacco leaves.Microsomes containing heterologously expressed CSLD5 transferred mannose from GDP-mannose onto endogenous acceptors.The same activity was detected when CSLD2 and CSLD3 were co-expressed but not when they were expressed separately.With monosaccharides as exogenous acceptors,microsomal preparations from CSLD5-expressing plants mediated the transfer of mannose from GDP-mannose onto mannose.These results were supported by immunodetection studies that showed reduced levels of a mannan epitope in the cell walls of stem interfascicular fibers and xvlem vessels of the csld2/csld3/csld5 mutant.

  3. Auxin polar transport in arabidopsis under simulated microgravity conditions - relevance to growth and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K.; Oka, M.; Yamamoto, R.; Masuda, Y.; Hoson, T.; Kamisaka, S.; Ueda, J.

    1999-01-01

    Activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under simulated microgravity conditions was studied in relation to the growth and development. Seeds were germinated and allowed to grow on an agar medium in test tubes on a horizontal clinostat. Horizontal clinostat rotation substantially reduced the growth of inflorescence axes and the productivity of seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotypes Landsberg erecta and Columbia), although it little affected seed germination, development of rosette leaves and flowering. The activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes decreased when Arabidopsis plants were grown on a horizontal clinostat from germination stage, being ca. 60% of 1 g control. On the other hand, the auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis grown in 1 g conditions was not affected when the segments were exposed to various gravistimuli, including 3-dimensional clinorotation, during transport experiments. Pin-formed mutant of Arabidopsis, having a unique structure of the inflorescence axis with no flower and extremely low levels of the activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes and endogenous auxin, did not continue its vegetative growth under clinostat rotation. These facts suggest that the development of the system of auxin polar transport in Arabidopsis is affected by microgravity, resulting in the inhibition of growth and development, especially during reproductive growth.

  4. Arabinan Metabolism during Seed Development and Germination in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leonardo D. Gomez; Clare G. Steele-King; Louise Jones; Jonathan M. Foster; Supachai Vuttipongchaikij; Simon J. McQueen-Mason

    2009-01-01

    Arabinans are found in the pectic network of many cell walls, where, along with galactan, they are present as side chains of Rhamnogalacturonan I. Whilst arabinans have been reported to be abundant polymers in the cell walls of seeds from a range of plant species, their proposed role as a storage reserve has not been thoroughly investigated. In the cell walls of Arabidopsis seeds, arabinose accounts for approximately 40% of the monosaccharide composition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides of embryos. Arabinose levels decline to ~ 15% during seedling establishment, indicating that cell wall arabinans may be mobilized during germination. Immunolocalization of arabinan in embryos, seeds, and seedlings reveals that arabinans accumulate in developing and mature embryos, but disappear during germination and seedling establishment. Experiments using ~(14)C-arabinose show that it is readily incorporated and metabolized in growing seed-lings, indicating an active catabolic pathway for this sugar. We found that depleting arabinans in seeds using a fungal arabinanase causes delayed seedling growth, lending support to the hypothesis that these polymers may help fuel early seedling growth.

  5. Translational control in germline stem cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaidina, Maija; Lehmann, Ruth

    2014-10-13

    Stem cells give rise to tissues and organs during development and maintain their integrity during adulthood. They have the potential to self-renew or differentiate at each division. To ensure proper organ growth and homeostasis, self-renewal versus differentiation decisions need to be tightly controlled. Systematic genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster are revealing extensive regulatory networks that control the switch between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in the germline. These networks, which are based primarily on mutual translational repression, act via interlocked feedback loops to provide robustness to this important fate decision.

  6. Cell size and growth regulation in the Arabidopsis thaliana apical stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Lisa; Refahi, Yassin; Wightman, Raymond; Landrein, Benoit; Teles, José; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell size and growth kinetics are fundamental cellular properties with important physiological implications. Classical studies on yeast, and recently on bacteria, have identified rules for cell size regulation in single cells, but in the more complex environment of multicellular tissues, data have been lacking. In this study, to characterize cell size and growth regulation in a multicellular context, we developed a 4D imaging pipeline and applied it to track and quantify epidermal cells over 3–4 d in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot apical meristems. We found that a cell size checkpoint is not the trigger for G2/M or cytokinesis, refuting the unexamined assumption that meristematic cells trigger cell cycle phases upon reaching a critical size. Our data also rule out models in which cells undergo G2/M at a fixed time after birth, or by adding a critical size increment between G2/M transitions. Rather, cell size regulation was intermediate between the critical size and critical increment paradigms, meaning that cell size fluctuations decay by ∼75% in one generation compared with 100% (critical size) and 50% (critical increment). Notably, this behavior was independent of local cell–cell contact topologies and of position within the tissue. Cells grew exponentially throughout the first >80% of the cell cycle, but following an asymmetrical division, the small daughter grew at a faster exponential rate than the large daughter, an observation that potentially challenges present models of growth regulation. These growth and division behaviors place strong constraints on quantitative mechanistic descriptions of the cell cycle and growth control. PMID:27930326

  7. Stepwise development of hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The cellular ontogeny of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs remains poorly understood because their isolation from and their identification in early developing small embryos are difficult. We attempted to dissect early developmental stages of HSCs using an in vitro mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation system combined with inducible HOXB4 expression. Here we report the identification of pre-HSCs and an embryonic type of HSCs (embryonic HSCs as intermediate cells between ESCs and HSCs. Both pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs were isolated by their c-Kit(+CD41(+CD45(- phenotype. Pre-HSCs did not engraft in irradiated adult mice. After co-culture with OP9 stromal cells and conditional expression of HOXB4, pre-HSCs gave rise to embryonic HSCs capable of engraftment and long-term reconstitution in irradiated adult mice. Blast colony assays revealed that most hemangioblast activity was detected apart from the pre-HSC population, implying the early divergence of pre-HSCs from hemangioblasts. Gene expression profiling suggests that a particular set of transcripts closely associated with adult HSCs is involved in the transition of pre-HSC to embryonic HSCs. We propose an HSC developmental model in which pre-HSCs and embryonic HSCs sequentially give rise to adult types of HSCs in a stepwise manner.

  8. Single-cell and coupled GRN models of cell patterning in the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Buylla Elena R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental work has uncovered some of the genetic components required to maintain the Arabidopsis thaliana root stem cell niche (SCN and its structure. Two main pathways are involved. One pathway depends on the genes SHORTROOT and SCARECROW and the other depends on the PLETHORA genes, which have been proposed to constitute the auxin readouts. Recent evidence suggests that a regulatory circuit, composed of WOX5 and CLE40, also contributes to the SCN maintenance. Yet, we still do not understand how the niche is dynamically maintained and patterned or if the uncovered molecular components are sufficient to recover the observed gene expression configurations that characterize the cell types within the root SCN. Mathematical and computational tools have proven useful in understanding the dynamics of cell differentiation. Hence, to further explore root SCN patterning, we integrated available experimental data into dynamic Gene Regulatory Network (GRN models and addressed if these are sufficient to attain observed gene expression configurations in the root SCN in a robust and autonomous manner. Results We found that an SCN GRN model based only on experimental data did not reproduce the configurations observed within the root SCN. We developed several alternative GRN models that recover these expected stable gene configurations. Such models incorporate a few additional components and interactions in addition to those that have been uncovered. The recovered configurations are stable to perturbations, and the models are able to recover the observed gene expression profiles of almost all the mutants described so far. However, the robustness of the postulated GRNs is not as high as that of other previously studied networks. Conclusions These models are the first published approximations for a dynamic mechanism of the A. thaliana root SCN cellular pattering. Our model is useful to formally show that the data now available are not

  9. The ASK1 gene regulates development and interacts with the UFO gene to control floral organ identity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D; Yang, M; Solava, J; Ma, H

    1999-09-01

    Normal flower development likely requires both specific and general regulators. We have isolated an Arabidopsis mutant ask1-1 (for -Arabidopsis skp1-like1-1), which exhibits defects in both vegetative and reproductive development. In the ask1-1mutant, rosette leaf growth is reduced, resulting in smaller than normal rosette leaves, and internodes in the floral stem are shorter than normal. Examination of cell sizes in these organs indicates that cell expansion is normal in the mutant, but cell number is reduced. In the mutant, the numbers of petals and stamens are reduced, and many flowers have one or more petals with a reduced size. In addition, all mutant flowers have short stamen filaments. Furthermore, petal/stamen chimeric organs are found in many flowers. These results indicate that the ASK1 gene affects the size of vegetative and floral organs. The ask1 floral phenotype resembles somewhat that of the Arabidopsis ufo mutants in that both genes affect whorls 2 and 3. We therefore tested for possible interactions between ASK1 and UFO by analyzing the phenotypes of ufo-2 ask1-1 double mutant plants. In these plants, vegetative development is similar to that of the ask1-1 single mutant, whereas the floral defects are more severe than those in either single mutant. Interior to the first whorl, the double mutant flowers have more sepals or sepal-like organs than are found in ufo-2, and less petals than ask1-1. Our results suggest that ASK1 interacts with UFO to control floral organ identity in whorls 2 and 3. This is very intriguing because ASK1 is very similar in sequence to the yeast SKP1 protein and UFO contains an F-box, a motif known to interact with SKP1 in yeast. Although the precise mechanism of ASK1 and UFO action is unknown, our results support the hypothesis that these two proteins physically interact in vivo.

  10. The development of Arabidopsis as a plant model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.; Meinke, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Arabidopsis thaliana emerged as the model organism of choice for research in plant biology. A consensus was reached about the need to focus on a single organism to integrate the classical disciplines of plant science with the expanding fields of genetics and molecular biology.

  11. An auxin responsive CLE gene regulates shoot apical meristem development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan eGuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant hormone auxin regulates most, if not all aspects of plant growth and development, including lateral root formation, organ pattering, apical dominance and tropisms. Peptide hormones are peptides with hormone activities. Some of the functions of peptide hormones in regulating plant growth and development are similar to that of auxin, however, the relationship between auxin and peptide hormones remains largely unknown. Here we report the identification of OsCLE48, a rice (Oryza sativa CLE (CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION gene, as an auxin response gene, and the functional characterization of OsCLE48 in Arabidopsis and rice. OsCLE48 encodes a CLE peptide hormone that is similar to Arabidopsis CLEs. RT-PCR analysis showed that OsCLE48 was induced by exogenously application of IAA (indole-3-acetic acid, a naturally occurred auxin. Expression of integrated OsCLE48p:GUS reporter gene in transgenic Arabidopsis plants was also induced by exogenously IAA treatment. These results indicate that OsCLE48 is an auxin responsive gene. Histochemical staining showed that GUS activity was detected in all the tissue and organs of the OsCLE48p:GUS transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the 35S promoter in Arabidopsis inhibited shoot apical meristem development. Expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the CLV3 native regulatory elements almost completely complemented clv3-2 mutant phenotypes, suggesting that OsCLE48 is functionally similar to CLV3. On the other hand, expression of OsCLE48 under the control of the 35S promoter in Arabidopsis has little, if any effects on root apical meristem development, and transgenic rice plants overexpressing OsCLE48 are morphologically indistinguishable from wild type plants, suggesting that the functions of some CLE peptides may not be fully conserved in Arabidopsis and rice.

  12. LIF signaling in stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Kento; Zandstra, Peter W

    2015-07-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is a member of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine family. All members of this family activate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a transcription factor that influences stem and progenitor cell identity, proliferation and cytoprotection. The role of LIF in development was first identified when LIF was demonstrated to support the propagation of mouse embryonic stem cells. Subsequent studies of mice deficient for components of the LIF pathway have revealed important roles for LIF signaling during development and homeostasis. Here and in the accompanying poster, we provide a broad overview of JAK-STAT signaling during development, with a specific focus on LIF-mediated JAK-STAT3 activation.

  13. Transcriptome profiling in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems grown under hypergravity in terms of cell walls and plant hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaoki, D.; Karahara, I.; Nishiuchi, T.; De Oliveira, S.; Schreiber, L.; Wakasugi, T.; Yamada, K.; Yamaguchi, K.; Kamisaka, S.

    2009-07-01

    Land plants rely on lignified secondary cell walls in supporting their body weight on the Earth. Although gravity influences the formation of the secondary cell walls, the regulatory mechanism of their formation by gravity is not yet understood. We carried out a comprehensive analysis of gene expression in inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana L. using microarray (22 K) to identify genes whose expression is modulated under hypergravity condition (300 g). Total RNA was isolated from the basal region of inflorescence stems of plants grown for 24 h at 300 g or 1 g. Microarray analysis showed that hypergravity up-regulated the expression of 403 genes to more than 2-fold. Hypergravity up-regulated the genes responsible for the biosynthesis or modification of cell wall components such as lignin, xyloglucan, pectin and structural proteins. In addition, hypergravity altered the expression of genes related to the biosynthesis of plant hormones such as auxin and ethylene and that of genes encoding hormone-responsive proteins. Our transcriptome profiling indicates that hypergravity influences the formation of secondary cell walls by modulating the pattern of gene expression, and that auxin and/or ethylene play an important role in signaling hypergravity stimulus.

  14. Stem anatomy supports Arabidopsis thaliana as a model for insular woodiness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, F.; Smets, E.; Melzer, S.

    2012-01-01

    The soc1 ful double mutant of A. thaliana produced substantial secondary growth throughout all aboveground stems, whereas in the Col accession only a few cell layers of wood were produced at the base of old stems. This increased wood formation may be linked to inactivation of the flowering time gene

  15. Identification of a homolog of Arabidopsis DSP4 (SEX4) in chestnut: its induction and accumulation in stem amyloplasts during winter or in response to the cold_

    OpenAIRE

    Berrocal Lobo, Marta; Ibáñez, Cristian; Acebo Pais, Paloma; Ramos Aranguren, Alberto; Pérez Solís, Estefanía; Collada Collada, Maria Carmen; Casado García, Rosa; Aragoncillo Ballesteros, Cipriano; Allona Alberich, Isabel Marta

    2011-01-01

    Oligosaccharide synthesis is an important cryoprotection strategy used by woody plants during winter dormancy. At the onset of autumn, starch stored in the stem and buds is broken down in response to the shorter days and lower temperatures resulting in the buildup of oligosaccharides. Given that the enzyme DSP4 is necessary for diurnal starch degradation in Arabidopsis leaves, this study was designed to address the role of DSP4 in this seasonal process in Castanea sativa Mill. The expression ...

  16. Gravity-Induced Modifications to Development in Hypocotyls of Arabidopsis Tubulin Mutants1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shouhei; Kumasaki, Saori; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Takashi; Hoson, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the roles of cortical microtubules in gravity-induced modifications to the development of stem organs by analyzing morphology and orientation of cortical microtubule arrays in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) tubulin mutants, tua3(D205N), tua4(S178Δ), and tua6(A281T), cultivated under 1g and hypergravity (300g) conditions. Hypocotyls of tubulin mutants were shorter and thicker than the wild type even at 1g, and hypergravity further suppressed elongation and stimulated expansion. The degree of such changes was clearly smaller in tubulin mutants, in particular in tua6. Hypocotyls of tubulin mutants also showed either left-handed or right-handed helical growth at 1g, and the degree of twisting phenotype was intensified under hypergravity conditions, especially in tua6. Hypergravity induced reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions in epidermal cells of wild-type hypocotyls. In tubulin mutants, especially in tua6, the percentage of cells with longitudinal microtubules was high even at 1g, and it was further increased by hypergravity. The twisting phenotype was most obvious at cells 10 to 12 from the top, where reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions occurred. Moreover, the left-handed helical growth mutants (tua3 and tua4) had right-handed microtubule arrays, whereas the right-handed mutant (tua6) had left-handed arrays. There was a close correlation between the alignment angle of epidermal cell files and the alignment of cortical microtubules. Gadolinium ions, blockers of mechanosensitive ion channels (mechanoreceptors), suppressed the twisting phenotype in tubulin mutants under both 1g and 300g conditions. Microtubule arrays in tubulin mutants were oriented more transversely by gadolinium treatment, irrespective of gravity conditions. These results support the hypothesis that cortical microtubules play an essential role in maintenance of normal growth

  17. Gravity-induced modifications to development in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis tubulin mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shouhei; Kumasaki, Saori; Soga, Kouichi; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Hashimoto, Takashi; Hoson, Takayuki

    2010-02-01

    We investigated the roles of cortical microtubules in gravity-induced modifications to the development of stem organs by analyzing morphology and orientation of cortical microtubule arrays in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) tubulin mutants, tua3(D205N), tua4(S178Delta), and tua6(A281T), cultivated under 1g and hypergravity (300g) conditions. Hypocotyls of tubulin mutants were shorter and thicker than the wild type even at 1g, and hypergravity further suppressed elongation and stimulated expansion. The degree of such changes was clearly smaller in tubulin mutants, in particular in tua6. Hypocotyls of tubulin mutants also showed either left-handed or right-handed helical growth at 1g, and the degree of twisting phenotype was intensified under hypergravity conditions, especially in tua6. Hypergravity induced reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions in epidermal cells of wild-type hypocotyls. In tubulin mutants, especially in tua6, the percentage of cells with longitudinal microtubules was high even at 1g, and it was further increased by hypergravity. The twisting phenotype was most obvious at cells 10 to 12 from the top, where reorientation of cortical microtubules from transverse to longitudinal directions occurred. Moreover, the left-handed helical growth mutants (tua3 and tua4) had right-handed microtubule arrays, whereas the right-handed mutant (tua6) had left-handed arrays. There was a close correlation between the alignment angle of epidermal cell files and the alignment of cortical microtubules. Gadolinium ions, blockers of mechanosensitive ion channels (mechanoreceptors), suppressed the twisting phenotype in tubulin mutants under both 1g and 300 g conditions. Microtubule arrays in tubulin mutants were oriented more transversely by gadolinium treatment, irrespective of gravity conditions. These results support the hypothesis that cortical microtubules play an essential role in maintenance of normal

  18. The COP9 signalosome interacts with SCF UFO and participates in Arabidopsis flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiping; Feng, Suhua; Nakayama, Naomi; Crosby, W L; Irish, Vivian; Deng, Xing Wang; Wei, Ning

    2003-05-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is involved in multiple developmental processes. It interacts with SCF ubiquitin ligases and deconjugates Nedd8/Rub1 from cullins (deneddylation). CSN is highly expressed in Arabidopsis floral tissues. To investigate the role of CSN in flower development, we examined the expression pattern of CSN in developing flowers. We report here that two csn1 partially deficient Arabidopsis strains exhibit aberrant development of floral organs, decline of APETALA3 (AP3) expression, and low fertility in addition to defects in shoot and inflorescence meristems. We show that UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) forms a SCF(UFO) complex, which is associated with CSN in vivo. Genetic interaction analysis indicates that CSN is necessary for the gain-of-function activity of the F-box protein UFO in AP3 activation and in floral organ transformation. Compared with the previously reported csn5 antisense and csn1 null mutants, partial deficiency of CSN1 causes a reduction in the level of CUL1 in the mutant flowers without an obvious defect in CUL1 deneddylation. We conclude that CSN is an essential regulator of Arabidopsis flower development and suggest that CSN regulates Arabidopsis flower development in part by modulating SCF(UFO)-mediated AP3 activation.

  19. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  20. iSTEM Summer Institute: An Integrated Approach to Teacher Professional Development inSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne Seifert; Louis Nadelson

    2012-04-01

    The importance of STEM education to our national prosperity and global competitiveness was recently reinforced by the Obama administration support for Change the Equation. Change the Equation is a multi-entity initiative formed in response to the rapidly increasing demand for STEM related careers and the potential lack of preparation by many Americans to be employed in these positions. To address the issue many are calling for increased emphasis on K-12 STEM education, as early preparation in STEM provides the foundation essential for further learning and competencies (National Research Council, 2007). Achieving and sustaining depth and breadth of K-12 STEM education is inextricably linked to ongoing professional development of K-12 educators. The need for teacher continuing education in STEM education and the link between teacher effectiveness and student preparation in STEM was the impetus behind our i- STEM professional development summer institute. The i-STEM initiative is a collaborative effort between business, industry, government, K-12, and higher education. Although the organization is working on a number of projects, including policy, research, communication, and collaborations, the i-STEM group has directed significant resources toward K-12 educator professional development opportunities in STEM. Our report focuses on the structure and impact of the intensive four-day i-STEM residential professional development institute which we designed to increase the capacity of grade 4-9 teachers to teach STEM content. We structured the summer institute using the outcome of a survey we conducted of grade 4-9 teachers’ to assess their STEM professional development needs, the extant literature on teacher development, the increasing need for a STEM informed society, and our desire to use evidence based practices to enhance teacher capacity to teach STEM content. We developed this investigation to determine if our summer institute influenced the participating teachers

  1. Florigen is involved in axillary bud development at multiple stages in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Niwa, Masaki; Endo, Motomu; Araki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The wide variety of plant architectures is largely based on diverse and flexible modes of axillary shoot development. In Arabidopsis, floral transition (flowering) stimulates axillary bud development. The mechanism that links flowering and axillary bud development is, however, largely unknown. We recently showed that FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein, which acts as florigen, promotes the phase transition of axillary meristems, whereas BRANCHED1 (BRC1) antagonizes the florigen action in axillary ...

  2. Florigen is involved in axillary bud development at multiple stages in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Masaki; Endo, Motomu; Araki, Takashi

    2013-11-01

    The wide variety of plant architectures is largely based on diverse and flexible modes of axillary shoot development. In Arabidopsis, floral transition (flowering) stimulates axillary bud development. The mechanism that links flowering and axillary bud development is, however, largely unknown. We recently showed that FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) protein, which acts as florigen, promotes the phase transition of axillary meristems, whereas BRANCHED1 (BRC1) antagonizes the florigen action in axillary buds. Here, we present evidences for another possible role of florigen in axillary bud development. Ectopic overexpression of FT or another florigen gene TWIN SISTER OF FT (TSF) with LEAFY (LFY) induces ectopic buds at cotyledonary axils, confirming the previous proposal that these genes are involved in formation of axillary buds. Taken together with our previous report that florigen promotes axillary shoot elongation, we propose that florigen regulates axillary bud development at multiple stages to coordinate it with flowering in Arabidopsis.

  3. Visualization of Uptake of Mineral Elements and the Dynamics of Photosynthates in Arabidopsis by a Newly Developed Real-Time Radioisotope Imaging System (RRIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Ryohei; Kobayashi, Natsuko I; Hirose, Atsushi; Saito, Takayuki; Iwata, Ren; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M

    2016-04-01

    Minerals and photosynthates are essential for many plant processes, but their imaging in live plants is difficult. We have developed a method for their live imaging in Arabidopsis using a real-time radioisotope imaging system. When each radioisotope,(22)Na,(28)Mg,(32)P-phosphate,(35)S-sulfate,(42)K,(45)Ca,(54)Mn and(137)Cs, was employed as an ion tracer, ion movement from root to shoot over 24 h was clearly observed. The movements of(22)Na,(42)K,(32)P,(35)S and(137)Cs were fast so that they spread to the tip of stems. In contrast, high accumulation of(28)Mg,(45)Ca and(54)Mn was found in the basal part of the main stem. Based on this time-course analysis, the velocity of ion movement in the main stem was calculated, and found to be fastest for S and K among the ions we tested in this study. Furthermore, application of a heat-girdling treatment allowed determination of individual ion movement via xylem flow alone, excluding phloem flow, within the main stem of 43-day-old Arabidopsis inflorescences. We also successfully developed a new system for visualizing photosynthates using labeled carbon dioxide,(14)CO2 Using this system, the switching of source/sink organs and phloem flow direction could be monitored in parts of whole shoots and over time. In roots,(14)C photosynthates accumulated intensively in the growing root tip area, 200-800 µm behind the meristem. These results show that this real-time radioisotope imaging system allows visualization of many nuclides over a long time-course and thus constitutes a powerful tool for the analysis of various physiological phenomena.

  4. Adaptive thermal control of stem gravitropism through alternative RNA splicing in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Chung-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Gravitropism is an important growth movement in response to gravity in virtually all higher plants: the roots showing positive gravitropism and the shoots showing negative gravitropism. The gravitropic orientation of plant organs is also influenced by environmental factors, such as light and temperature. It is known that a zinc finger (ZF)-containing transcription factor SHOOT GRAVITROPISM 5/INDETERMINATE DOMAIN 15 (SGR5/IDD15) mediates the early events of gravitropic responses occurring in inflorescence stems. We have recently found that SGR5 gene undergoes alternative splicing to produce 2 protein variants, the full-size SGR5α transcription factor and the truncated SGR5β form lacking functional ZF motifs. The SGR5β form inhibits SGR5α function possibly by forming nonfunctional heterodimers that are excluded from DNA binding. Notably, SGR5 alternative splicing is accelerated at high temperatures, resulting in a high-level accumulation of SGR5β proteins. Accordingly, transgenic plants overexpressing SGR5β exhibit a reduction in the negative gravitropism of inflorescence stems, as observed in the SGR5-defective mutant. It is proposed that the thermos-responsive alternative splicing of SGR5 gene provides an adaptation strategy by which plants protect the shoots from aerial heat frequently occurring in natural habitats.

  5. Overexpression of Arabidopsis VIT1 increases accumulation of iron in cassava roots and stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Narayanan; Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Gaitán-Solis, Eliana; Grusak, Michael A; Taylor, Nigel; Anderson, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Iron is extremely abundant in the soil, but its uptake in plants is limited due to low solubility in neutral or alkaline soils. Plants can rely on rhizosphere acidification to increase iron solubility. AtVIT1 was previously found to be involved in mediating vacuolar sequestration of iron, which indicates a potential application for iron biofortification in crop plants. Here, we have overexpressed AtVIT1 in the starchy root crop cassava using a patatin promoter. Under greenhouse conditions, iron levels in mature cassava storage roots showed 3-4 times higher values when compared with wild-type plants. Significantly, the expression of AtVIT1 showed a positive correlation with the increase in iron concentration of storage roots. Conversely, young leaves of AtVIT1 transgenic plants exhibit characteristics of iron deficiency such as interveinal chlorosis of leaves (yellowing) and lower iron concentration when compared with the wild type plants. Interestingly, the AtVIT1 transgenic plants showed 4 and 16 times higher values of iron concentration in the young stem and stem base tissues, respectively. AtVIT1 transgenic plants also showed 2-4 times higher values of iron content when compared with wild-type plants, with altered partitioning of iron between source and sink tissues. These results demonstrate vacuolar iron sequestration as a viable transgenic strategy to biofortify crops and to help eliminate micronutrient malnutrition in at-risk human populations.

  6. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and fungicides on Botryosphaeria stem blight lesion development on detached blueberry stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botryosphaeria stem blight is a destructive disease of blueberries. Field observations indicate stem blight is more severe on vigorous plants than on slower growing plants. Two studies compared the effect of two types of fertilizers applied at four rates and nine fungicides on lesion development fo...

  7. From thin to thick: major transitions during stem development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Pablo; Nehlin, Lilian; Greb, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    The variability of shoot architecture in plants is striking and one of the most extreme examples of adaptive growth in higher organisms. Mediated by the differential activity of apical and lateral meristems, flexibility in stem growth essentially contributes to this variability. In spite of this importance, the regulation of major events in stem development is largely unexplored. Recently, however, novel approaches exploiting knowledge from root and leaf development are starting to shed light on molecular mechanisms that regulate this essential plant organ. In this review, we summarize our understanding of initial patterning events in stems, discuss prerequisites for the initiation of lateral stem growth and highlight the burning questions in this context.

  8. Development of New Technologies for Stem Cell Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibo Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1960s, the stem cells have been extensively studied including embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells, bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. In the recent years, several stem cells have been initially used in the treatment of diseases, such as in bone marrow transplant. At the same time, isolation and culture experimental technologies for stem cell research have been widely developed in recent years. In addition, molecular imaging technologies including optical molecular imaging, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, and computed tomography have been developed rapidly in recent the 10 years and have also been used in the research on disease mechanism and evaluation of treatment of disease related with stem cells. This paper will focus on recent typical isolation, culture, and observation techniques of stem cells followed by a concise introduction. Finally, the current challenges and the future applications of the new technologies in stem cells are given according to the understanding of the authors, and the paper is then concluded.

  9. TAF13 interacts with PRC2 members and is essential for Arabidopsis seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Matias; Simonini, Sara; Kooiker, Maarten; Gagliardini, Valeria; Somssich, Marc; Hohenstatt, Mareike; Simon, Rüdiger; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Kater, Martin M

    2013-07-01

    TBP-Associated Factors (TAFs) are components of complexes like TFIID, TFTC, SAGA/STAGA and SMAT that are important for the activation of transcription, either by establishing the basic transcription machinery or by facilitating histone acetylation. However, in Drosophila embryos several TAFs were shown to be associated with the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), even though the role of this interaction remains unclear. Here we show that in Arabidopsis TAF13 interacts with MEDEA and SWINGER, both members of a plant variant of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). PRC2 variants play important roles during the plant life cycle, including seed development. The taf13 mutation causes seed defects, showing embryo arrest at the 8-16 cell stage and over-proliferation of the endosperm in the chalazal region, which is typical for Arabidopsis PRC2 mutants. Our data suggest that TAF13 functions together with PRC2 in transcriptional regulation during seed development.

  10. Metabolomic Characterization of Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis: Development of a Metabolite Profiling Database for Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Kusano, Miyako; Mejia, Ramon Francisco; Iwasa, Mami; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hayashi, Naomi; Watanabe-Takahashi, Akiko; Narisawa, Tomoko; Tohge, Takayuki; Hur, Manhoi; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Nikolau, Basil J.; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent intensive research efforts in functional genomics, the functions of only a limited number of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes have been determined experimentally, and improving gene annotation remains a major challenge in plant science. As metabolite profiling can characterize the metabolomic phenotype of a genetic perturbation in the plant metabolism, it provides clues to the function(s) of genes of interest. We chose 50 Arabidopsis mutants, including a set of characterized and uncharacterized mutants, that resemble wild-type plants. We performed metabolite profiling of the plants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To make the data set available as an efficient public functional genomics tool for hypothesis generation, we developed the Metabolite Profiling Database for Knock-Out Mutants in Arabidopsis (MeKO). It allows the evaluation of whether a mutation affects metabolism during normal plant growth and contains images of mutants, data on differences in metabolite accumulation, and interactive analysis tools. Nonprocessed data, including chromatograms, mass spectra, and experimental metadata, follow the guidelines set by the Metabolomics Standards Initiative and are freely downloadable. Proof-of-concept analysis suggests that MeKO is highly useful for the generation of hypotheses for genes of interest and for improving gene annotation. MeKO is publicly available at http://prime.psc.riken.jp/meko/. PMID:24828308

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduce Murine Atherosclerosis Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Duijn, Janine; van Pel, Melissa; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative properties, but recently they were also found to have immunomodulatory capacities. We therefore investigated whether MSCs could reduce atherosclerosis, which is determined by dyslipidaemia and chronic inflammation. We adoptively transferred MSCs into l

  12. Pluripotent stem cells for the study of CNS development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Petros

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian central nervous system is a complex neuronal meshwork consisting of a diverse array of cellular subtypes generated in a precise spatial and temporal pattern throughout development. Achieving a greater understanding of the molecular and genetic mechanisms that direct a relatively uniform population of neuroepithelial progenitors into the diverse neuronal subtypes remains a significant challenge. A firmer knowledge of the fundamental aspects of developmental neuroscience will allow us to better study the vast array of neurodevelopmental diseases. The advent of stem cell technologies has expedited our ability to generate and isolate populations of distinct interneuron subtypes. To date, researchers have successfully developed protocols to derive many types of neural cells from pluripotent stem cells, with varying degrees of efficiencies and reproducibility. The stem cell field is devoted to the potential of stem cell-derived neurons for the treatment of disease, highlighted by the ability to create patient specific induced pluripotent stem cells. However, another application that is often overlooked is the use of stem cell technology for studying normal neural development. This is especially important for human neurodevelopment, since obtaining embryonic tissue presents numerous technical and ethical challenges. In this review, we will explore the use of pluripotent stem cells for the study of neural development. We will review the different classes of pluripotent stem cells and focus on the types of neurodevelopmental questions that stem cell technologies can help address. In addition to covering the different neural cells derived from stem cells to date, we will detail the derivation and characterization of three of the more thoroughly studied cell groups. We hope that this review encourages researchers to develop innovative strategies for using pluripotent stem cells for the study of mammalian, and specifically human

  13. UFO: an Arabidopsis gene involved in both floral meristem and floral organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, J Z; Meyerowitz, E M

    1995-05-01

    We describe the role of the UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene in Arabidopsis floral development based on a genetic and molecular characterization of the phenotypes of nine ufo alleles. UFO is required for the proper identity of the floral meristem and acts in three different aspects of the process that distinguishes flowers from shoots. UFO is involved in establishing the whorled pattern of floral organs, controlling the determinacy of the floral meristem, and activating the APETALA3 and PISTILLATA genes required for petal and stamen identity. In many respects, UFO acts in a manner similar to LEAFY, but the ufo mutant phenotype also suggests an additional role for UFO in defining boundaries within the floral primordia or controlling cell proliferation during floral organ growth. Finally, genetic interactions that prevent flower formation and lead to the generation of filamentous structures implicate UFO as a member of a new, large, and diverse class of genes in Arabidopsis necessary for flower formation.

  14. The Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox gene ATHB12 is involved in symptom development caused by geminivirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungan Park

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Geminiviruses are single-stranded DNA viruses that infect a number of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Arabidopsis is susceptible to infection with the Curtovirus, Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV. Infection of Arabidopsis with BSCTV causes severe symptoms characterized by stunting, leaf curling, and the development of abnormal inflorescence and root structures. BSCTV-induced symptom development requires the virus-encoded C4 protein which is thought to interact with specific plant-host proteins and disrupt signaling pathways important for controlling cell division and development. Very little is known about the specific plant regulatory factors that participate in BSCTV-induced symptom development. This study was conducted to identify specific transcription factors that are induced by BSCTV infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Arabidopsis plants were inoculated with BSCTV and the induction of specific transcription factors was monitored using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. We found that the ATHB12 and ATHB7 genes, members of the homeodomain-leucine zipper family of transcription factors previously shown to be induced by abscisic acid and water stress, are induced in symptomatic tissues of Arabidopsis inoculated with BSCTV. ATHB12 expression is correlated with an array of morphological abnormalities including leaf curling, stunting, and callus-like structures in infected Arabidopsis. Inoculation of plants with a BSCTV mutant with a defective c4 gene failed to induce ATHB12. Transgenic plants expressing the BSCTV C4 gene exhibited increased ATHB12 expression whereas BSCTV-infected ATHB12 knock-down plants developed milder symptoms and had lower ATHB12 expression compared to the wild-type plants. Reporter gene studies demonstrated that the ATHB12 promoter was responsive to BSCTV infection and the highest expression levels were observed in symptomatic tissues where cell cycle genes also were

  15. The Development of the STEM Career Interest Survey (STEM-CIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier, Meredith W.; Blanchard, Margaret R.; Osborne, Jason W.; Albert, Jennifer L.

    2014-06-01

    Internationally, efforts to increase student interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers have been on the rise. It is often the goal of such efforts that increased interest in STEM careers should stimulate economic growth and enhance innovation. Scientific and educational organizations recommend that efforts to interest students in STEM majors and careers begin at the middle school level, a time when students are developing their own interests and recognizing their academic strengths. These factors have led scholars to call for instruments that effectively measure interest in STEM classes and careers, particularly for middle school students. In response, we leveraged the social cognitive career theory to develop a survey with subscales in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. In this manuscript, we detail the six stages of development of the STEM Career Interest Survey. To investigate the instrument's reliability and psychometric properties, we administered this 44-item survey to over 1,000 middle school students (grades 6-8) who primarily were in rural, high-poverty districts in the southeastern USA. Confirmatory factor analyses indicate that the STEM-CIS is a strong, single factor instrument and also has four strong, discipline-specific subscales, which allow for the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics subscales to be administered separately or in combination. This instrument should prove helpful in research, evaluation, and professional development to measure STEM career interest in secondary level students.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide modulates abscisic acid signaling in root growth and development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Ling; ZHOU Yun; ZHANG XiaoRan; SONG ChunPeng; Gao MingQing

    2007-01-01

    Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) can inhibit root growth and promote formation of more root hairs in the root tip of Arabidopsis. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie root ABA signaling are largely unknown. We report here that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reduces the root growth of wild type,and the phenotype of H2O2 on the root growth is similar to ABA response. Meanwhile ABA-induced changes in the morphology of root system can be partly reversed by ascorbic acid in wild type and abolished in NADPH oxidase defective mutant atrbohF and atrbohC. Further, ABA can induce H2O2 accumulation in the root cells and enhance transcription level of OXI1, which is necessary for many more AOS-dependent processes such as root hair growth in Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that H2O2 as an important signal molecule is required for the ABA-regulated root growth and development in Arabidopsis.

  17. Development of bioengineering system for stem cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H. S.; Shah, R.; Shah, C.

    2016-08-01

    From last decades, intensive research in the field of stem cells proliferation had been promoted due to the unique property of stem cells to self-renew themselves into multiples and has potential to replicate into an organ or tissues and so it's highly demanding though challenging. Bioreactor, a mechanical device, works as a womb for stem cell proliferation by providing nutritious environment for the proper growth of stem cells. Various factors affecting stem cells growth are the bioreactor mechanism, feeding of continuous nutrients, healthy environment, etc., but it always remains a challenge for controlling biological parameters. The present paper unveils the design of mechanical device commonly known as bioreactor in tissues engineering and biotech field, use for proliferation of stem cells and imparts the proper growing condition for stem cells. This high functional bioreactor provides automation mixing of cell culture and stem cells. This design operates in conjunction with mechanism of reciprocating motion. Compare to commercial bioreactors, this proposed design is more convenient, easy to operate and less maintenance is required as bioreactor culture bag is made of polyethylene which is single use purpose. Development of this bioengineering system will be beneficial for better growth and expansion of stem cell

  18. Meiotic and Mitotic Cell Cycle Mutants Involved in Gametophyte Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjing Liu; Li-Jia Qu

    2008-01-01

    The alternation between diploid and haploid generations is fundamentalin the life cycles of both animals and plants.The meiotic cell cycle is common to both animals and plants gamete formation, but in animals the products of meiosis are gametes,whereas for most plants,subsequent mitotic cell cycles are needed for their formation. Clarifying the regulatory mechanisms of mitotic cell cycle progression during gametophyte development will help understanding of sexual reproduction in plants.Many mutants defective in gametophyte development and,in particular,many meiotic and mitotic cell cycle mutants in Arabidopsis male and female gametophyte development were identified through both forward and reverse genetics approaches.

  19. Analysis of Gene Expression Patterns during Seed Coat Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gillian Dean; George Haughn; YoncgGuo Cao; DaoQuan Xiang; Nicholas J. Provart; Larissa Ramsay; Abdul Ahada; Rick White; Gopalan Selvaraj; Raju Datla

    2011-01-01

    The seed coat is important for embryo protection,seed hydration,and dispersal.Seed coat composition is also of interest to the agricultural sector,since it impacts the nutritional value for humans and livestock alike.Although some seed coat genes have been identified,the developmental pathways controlling seed coat development are not completely elucidated,and a global genetic program associated with seed coat development has not been reported.This study uses a combination of genetic and genomic approaches in Arabidopsis thaliana to begin to address these knowledge gaps.Seed coat development is a complex process whereby the integuments of the ovule differentiate into specialized cell types.In Arabidopsis,the outermost layer of cells secretes mucilage into the apoplast and develops a secondary cell wall known as a columella.The layer beneath the epidermis,the palisade,synthesizes a secondary cell wall on its inner tangential side.The innermost layer (the pigmented layer or endothelium) produces proanthocyanidins that condense into tannins and oxidize,giving a brown color to mature seeds.Genetic separation of these cell layers was achieved using the ap2-7 and tt16-1 mutants,where the epidermis/palisade and the endothelium do not develop respectively.This genetic ablation was exploited to examine the developmental programs of these cell types by isolating and collecting seed coats at key transitions during development and performing global gene expression analysis.The data indicate that the developmental programs of the epidermis and the pigmented layer proceed relatively independently.Global expression datasets that can be used for identification of new gene candidates for seed coat development were generated.These dataset provide a comprehensive expression profile for developing seed coats in Arabidopsis,and should provide a useful resource and reference for other seed systems.

  20. Genetic analysis of seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Léon-Kloosterziel, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis deals with the genetic aspects of seed development in Arabidopsisthaliana. Mutants affected in several aspects of seed development and, more specifically, in seed maturation have been isolated by various selection procedures. The mutants have been analyzed genetically, physiologically,

  1. Stem Cells in Tooth Development, Growth, Repair, and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tian; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Babb, Rebecca; An, Zhengwen; Sharpe, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    Human teeth contain stem cells in all their mesenchymal-derived tissues, which include the pulp, periodontal ligament, and developing roots, in addition to the support tissues such as the alveolar bone. The precise roles of these cells remain poorly understood and most likely involve tissue repair mechanisms but their relative ease of harvesting makes teeth a valuable potential source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for therapeutic use. These dental MSC populations all appear to have the same developmental origins, being derived from cranial neural crest cells, a population of embryonic stem cells with multipotential properties. In rodents, the incisor teeth grow continuously throughout life, a feature that requires populations of continuously active mesenchymal and epithelial stem cells. The discrete locations of these stem cells in the incisor have rendered them amenable for study and much is being learnt about the general properties of these stem cells for the incisor as a model system. The incisor MSCs appear to be a heterogeneous population consisting of cells from different neural crest-derived tissues. The epithelial stem cells can be traced directly back in development to a Sox10(+) population present at the time of tooth initiation. In this review, we describe the basic biology of dental stem cells, their functions, and potential clinical uses.

  2. A tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein SSR1 located in mitochondria is involved in root development and auxin polar transport in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Cuiping; Lin, Qingfang; Liu, Aihua; Wang, Ting; Feng, Xuanjun; Liu, Jie; Han, Huiling; Ma, Yan; Bonea, Diana; Zhao, Rongmin; Hua, Xuejun

    2015-08-01

    Auxin polar transport mediated by a group of Pin-formed (PIN) transporters plays important roles in plant root development. However, the mechanism underlying the PIN expression and targeting in response to different developmental and environmental stimuli is still not fully understood. Here, we report a previously uncharacterized gene SSR1, which encodes a mitochondrial protein with tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, and show its function in root development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In ssr1-2, a SSR1 knock-out mutant, the primary root growth was dramatically inhibited due to severely impaired cell proliferation and cell elongation. Significantly lowered level of auxin was found in ssr1-2 roots by auxin measurement and was further supported by reduced expression of DR5-driven reporter gene. As a result, the maintenance of the root stem cell niche is compromised in ssr1-2. It is further revealed that the expression level of several PIN proteins, namely, PIN1, PIN2, PIN3, PIN4 and PIN7, were markedly reduced in ssr1-2 roots. In particular, we showed that the reduced protein level of PIN2 on cell membrane in ssr1-2 is due to impaired retrograde trafficking, possibly resulting from a defect in retromer sorting system, which destines PIN2 for degradation in vacuoles. In conclusion, our results indicated that SSR1 is functioning in root development in Arabidopsis, possibly by affecting PIN protein expression and subcellular targeting.

  3. NCP1/AtMOB1A Plays Key Roles in Auxin-Mediated Arabidopsis Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaona; Guo, Zhiai; Song, Lizhen; Wang, Yanli; Cheng, Youfa

    2016-03-01

    MOB1 protein is a core component of the Hippo signaling pathway in animals where it is involved in controlling tissue growth and tumor suppression. Plant MOB1 proteins display high sequence homology to animal MOB1 proteins, but little is known regarding their role in plant growth and development. Herein we report the critical roles of Arabidopsis MOB1 (AtMOB1A) in auxin-mediated development in Arabidopsis. We found that loss-of-function mutations in AtMOB1A completely eliminated the formation of cotyledons when combined with mutations in PINOID (PID), which encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase that participates in auxin signaling and transport. We showed that atmob1a was fully rescued by its Drosophila counterpart, suggesting functional conservation. The atmob1a pid double mutants phenocopied several well-characterized mutant combinations that are defective in auxin biosynthesis or transport. Moreover, we demonstrated that atmob1a greatly enhanced several other known auxin mutants, suggesting that AtMOB1A plays a key role in auxin-mediated plant development. The atmob1a single mutant displayed defects in early embryogenesis and had shorter root and smaller flowers than wild type plants. AtMOB1A is uniformly expressed in embryos and suspensor cells during embryogenesis, consistent with its role in embryo development. AtMOB1A protein is localized to nucleus, cytoplasm, and associated to plasma membrane, suggesting that it plays roles in these subcellular localizations. Furthermore, we showed that disruption of AtMOB1A led to a reduced sensitivity to exogenous auxin. Our results demonstrated that AtMOB1A plays an important role in Arabidopsis development by promoting auxin signaling.

  4. Development of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; Wang, Fen; Wu, Mengyao; Wang, Zack Z

    2015-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), provide a new cell source for regenerative medicine, disease modeling, drug discovery, and preclinical toxicity screening. Understanding of the onset and the sequential process of hematopoietic cells from differentiated hPSCs will enable the achievement of personalized medicine and provide an in vitro platform for studying of human hematopoietic development and disease. During embryogenesis, hemogenic endothelial cells, a specified subset of endothelial cells in embryonic endothelium, are the primary source of multipotent hematopoietic stem cells. In this review, we discuss current status in the generation of multipotent hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from hPSCs via hemogenic endothelial cells. We also review the achievements in direct reprogramming from non-hematopoietic cells to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Further characterization of hematopoietic differentiation in hPSCs will improve our understanding of blood development and expedite the development of hPSC-derived blood products for therapeutic purpose.

  5. Development of gene and stem cell therapy for ocular neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Xue; Zhang; Ning-Li; Wang; Qing-Jun; Lu

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases pose a serious threat to eye health, but there is currently no effective treatment available. Recent years have witnessed rapid development of several cutting-edge technologies, such as gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Due to the special features of ocular structure, some of these technologies have been translated into ophthalmological clinic practice with fruitful achievements, setting a good example for other fields. This paper reviews the development of the gene and stem cell therapies in ophthalmology.

  6. Alterations in seed development gene expression affect size and oil content of Arabidopsis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatihi, Abdelhak; Zbierzak, Anna Maria; Dörmann, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Seed endosperm development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is under control of the polycomb group complex, which includes Fertilization Independent Endosperm (FIE). The polycomb group complex regulates downstream factors, e.g. Pheres1 (PHE1), by genomic imprinting. In heterozygous fie mutants, an endosperm develops in ovules carrying a maternal fie allele without fertilization, finally leading to abortion. Another endosperm development pathway depends on MINISEED3 (a WRKY10 transcription factor) and HAIKU2 (a leucine-rich repeat kinase). While the role of seed development genes in the embryo and endosperm establishment has been studied in detail, their impact on metabolism and oil accumulation remained unclear. Analysis of oil, protein, and sucrose accumulation in mutants and overexpression plants of the four seed development genes revealed that (1) seeds carrying a maternal fie allele accumulate low oil with an altered composition of triacylglycerol molecular species; (2) homozygous mutant seeds of phe1, mini3, and iku2, which are smaller, accumulate less oil and slightly less protein, and starch, which accumulates early during seed development, remains elevated in mutant seeds; (3) embryo-specific overexpression of FIE, PHE1, and MINI3 has no influence on seed size and weight, nor on oil, protein, or sucrose content; and (4) overexpression of IKU2 results in seeds with increased size and weight, and oil content of overexpressed IKU2 seeds is increased by 35%. Thus, IKU2 overexpression represents a novel strategy for the genetic manipulation of the oil content in seeds.

  7. An effective model of developing teacher leaders in STEM education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublette, Heidi

    In the last 5 years, industries have begun to recognize a growing gap in the production of college graduates in areas of STEM. Researchers in various industries believe this gap will create a significant loss of competitive edge in the STEM fields, which will leave the United States pursuing STEM graduates from foreign countries and may ultimately leave the US behind in the industry of science, technology and innovation. This qualitative study analyzes the value and impact of STEM teacher leaders in secondary education. A phenomenological study was conducted with 10 secondary school science and math teacher leaders in order to gain a better understanding of teacher leaders' perceptions, classroom practices and the role of a STEM teacher leader. This study addresses the following research questions: 1) What attributes define effective STEM teacher leaders, according to teacher leaders who have completed the Center for Math and Science Teaching system? 2) What success strategies, among teacher leaders of the Center for Math and Science Teaching program, have enabled further development of teacher leadership? 3) What is the best model in developing teacher leaders, according to literature from 2005 to present? 4) What is an optimal model of developing STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) teacher leaders within secondary education? This research aims to explore teacher leaders' perceptions of their role as a teacher leader based on strategies learned from CMAST and past experiences. Findings from this study provide critical data for making informed decisions on including important elements when implementing an effective STEM teacher leader system or program, and the impact it can create on science and math teaching and learning in secondary education. The investigator concludes this study with the development of a STEM teacher leader model that merges these findings with existing research.

  8. Mammary development and breast cancer: the role of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, C; van Diest, P J; Vooijs, M

    2011-06-01

    The mammary gland is a highly regenerative organ that can undergo multiple cycles of proliferation, lactation and involution, a process controlled by stem cells. The last decade much progress has been made in the identification of signaling pathways that function in these stem cells to control self-renewal, lineage commitment and epithelial differentiation in the normal mammary gland. The same signaling pathways that control physiological mammary development and homeostasis are also often found deregulated in breast cancer. Here we provide an overview on the functional and molecular identification of mammary stem cells in the context of both normal breast development and breast cancer. We discuss the contribution of some key signaling pathways with an emphasis on Notch receptor signaling, a cell fate determination pathway often deregulated in breast cancer. A further understanding of the biological roles of the Notch pathway in mammary stem cell behavior and carcinogenesis might be relevant for the development of future therapies.

  9. Conserved Functions of Arabidopsis and Rice CC-Type Glutaredoxins in Flower Development and Pathogen Response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Wang; Shuping Xing; Rainer P. Birkenbihl; Sabine Zachgo

    2009-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are ubiquitous oxidoreductases that play a crucial role in response to oxidative stress by reducing disulfides in various organisms. In planta, three different GRX classes have been identified according to their active site motifs. CPYC and CGFS classes are found in all organisms, whereas the CC-type class is specific for higher land plants. Recently, two Arabidopsis CC-type GRXs, ROXY1 and ROXY2, were shown to exert crucial functions in petal and anther initiation and differentiation. To analyze the function of CC-type GRXs in the distantly related monocots, we iso-lated and characterized OsROXY1 and OsROXY2-two rice homologs of ROXY1. Both genes are expressed in vegetative and reproductive stages. Although rice flower morphology is distinct from eudicots, OsROXY1/2 floral expression patterns are similar to their Arabidopsis counterparts ROXY1/2. Complementation experiments demonstrate that OsROXY1 and OsROXY2 can fully rescue the roxy1 floral mutant phenotype. Overexpression of OsROXY1, OsROXY2, and ROXY1 in Ara-bidopsis causes similar vegetative and reproductive plant developmental defects. ROXY1 and its rice homologs thus exert a conserved function during eudicot and monocot flower development. Strikingly, overexpression of these CC-type GRXs also leads to an increased accumulation of hydrogen peroxide levels and hyper-susceptibility to infection from the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea, revealing the importance of balanced redox processes in flower organ develop-ment and pathogen defence.

  10. Alternative splicing during Arabidopsis flower development results in constitutive and stage-regulated isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng eWang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS is a process in eukaryotic gene expression, in which the primary transcript of a multi-exon gene is spliced into two or more different mature transcripts, thereby increasing proteome diversity. AS is often regulated differentially between different tissues or developmental stages. Recent studies suggested that up to 60% of intron-containing genes in Arabidopsis thaliana undergo AS. Yet little is known about this complicated and important process during floral development. To investigate the preferential expression of different isoforms of individual alternatively spliced genes, we used high throughput RNA-Seq technology to explore the transcriptomes of three floral development stages of Arabidopsis thaliana and obtained information of various alternative splicing events. We identified approximately 24,000 genes that were expressed at one or more of these stages, and found that nearly 25% of multi-exon genes had two or more spliced variants. This is less frequent than the previously reported 40%~60% for multiple organs and stages of A. thaliana, indicating that many genes expressed in floral development function with a single predominant isoform. On the other hand, 1,716 isoforms were differentially expressed between the three stages, suggesting that AS might still play important roles in stage transition during floral development. Moreover, 337 novel transcribed regions were identified and most of them have a single exon. In addition, our analyses provide a comprehensive survey of alternative splicing in floral development and facilitate further genomic and genetic studies.

  11. Arabidopsis PLC2 is involved in auxin-modulated reproductive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; He, Yuqing; Wang, Yarui; Zhao, Shujuan; Chen, Xi; Ye, Tiantian; Wu, Yuxuan; Wu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is an enzyme that plays crucial roles in various signal transduction pathways in mammalian cells. However, the role of PLC in plant development is poorly understood. Here we report involvement of PLC2 in auxin-mediated reproductive development in Arabidopsis. Disruption of PLC2 led to sterility, indicating a significant role for PLC2 in reproductive development. Development of both male and female gametophytes was severely perturbed in plc2 mutants. Moreover, elevated auxin levels were observed in plc2 floral tissues, suggesting that the infertility of plc2 plants may be associated with increased auxin concentrations in the reproductive organs. We show that expression levels of the auxin reporters DR5:GUS and DR5:GFP were elevated in plc2 anthers and ovules. In addition, we found that expression of the auxin biosynthetic YUCCA genes was increased in plc2 plants. We conclude that PLC2 is involved in auxin biosynthesis and signaling, thus modulating development of both male and female gametophytes in Arabidopsis.

  12. REVOLUTA and WRKY53 connect early and late leaf development in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Yakun; Huhn, Kerstin; Brandt, Ronny;

    2014-01-01

    that class III homeodomain leucine zipper (HD-ZIPIII) transcription factors, which are known to be involved in basic pattern formation, have an additional role in controlling the onset of leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Several potential direct downstream genes of the HD-ZIPIII protein REVOLUTA (REV) have...... of WRKY53 in response to oxidative stress, and mutations in HD-ZIPIII genes strongly delay the onset of senescence. Thus, a crosstalk between early and late stages of leaf development appears to contribute to reproductive success....

  13. Identification of a homolog of Arabidopsis DSP4 (SEX4) in chestnut: its induction and accumulation in stem amyloplasts during winter or in response to the cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrocal-Lobo, Marta; Ibañez, Cristian; Acebo, Paloma; Ramos, Alberto; Perez-Solis, Estefania; Collada, Carmen; Casado, Rosa; Aragoncillo, Cipriano; Allona, Isabel

    2011-10-01

    Oligosaccharide synthesis is an important cryoprotection strategy used by woody plants during winter dormancy. At the onset of autumn, starch stored in the stem and buds is broken down in response to the shorter days and lower temperatures resulting in the buildup of oligosaccharides. Given that the enzyme DSP4 is necessary for diurnal starch degradation in Arabidopsis leaves, this study was designed to address the role of DSP4 in this seasonal process in Castanea sativa Mill. The expression pattern of the CsDSP4 gene in cells of the chestnut stem was found to parallel starch catabolism. In this organ, DSP4 protein levels started to rise at the start of autumn and elevated levels persisted until the onset of spring. In addition, exposure of chestnut plantlets to 4 °C induced the expression of the CsDSP4 gene. In dormant trees or cold-stressed plantlets, the CsDSP4 protein was immunolocalized both in the amyloplast stroma and nucleus of stem cells, whereas in the conditions of vegetative growth, immunofluorescence was only detected in the nucleus. The studies indicate a potential role for DSP4 in starch degradation and cold acclimation following low temperature exposure during activity-dormancy transition.

  14. A P-Loop NTPase Regulates Quiescent Center Cell Division and Distal Stem Cell Identity through the Regulation of ROS Homeostasis in Arabidopsis Root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qianqian; Tian, Huiyu; Liu, Jiajia; Zhang, Bing; Li, Xugang; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as important regulators of cell division and differentiation. The Arabidopsis thaliana P-loop NTPase encoded by APP1 affects root stem cell niche identity through its control of local ROS homeostasis. The disruption of APP1 is accompanied by a reduction in ROS level, a rise in the rate of cell division in the quiescent center (QC) and the promotion of root distal stem cell (DSC) differentiation. Both the higher level of ROS induced in the app1 mutant by exposure to methyl viologen (MV), and treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) rescued the mutant phenotype, implying that both the increased rate of cell division in the QC and the enhancement in root DSC differentiation can be attributed to a low level of ROS. APP1 is expressed in the root apical meristem cell mitochondria, and its product is associated with ATP hydrolase activity. The key transcription factors, which are defining root distal stem niche, such as SCARECROW (SCR) and SHORT ROOT (SHR) are both significantly down-regulated at both the transcriptional and protein level in the app1 mutant, indicating that SHR and SCR are important downstream targets of APP1-regulated ROS signaling to control the identity of root QC and DSCs. PMID:27583367

  15. Inhibition of auxin movement from the shoot into the root inhibits lateral root development in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. C.; Brady, S. R.; Muday, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    In roots two distinct polar movements of auxin have been reported that may control different developmental and growth events. To test the hypothesis that auxin derived from the shoot and transported toward the root controls lateral root development, the two polarities of auxin transport were uncoupled in Arabidopsis. Local application of the auxin-transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) at the root-shoot junction decreased the number and density of lateral roots and reduced the free indoleacetic acid (IAA) levels in the root and [3H]IAA transport into the root. Application of NPA to the basal half of or at several positions along the root only reduced lateral root density in regions that were in contact with NPA or in regions apical to the site of application. Lateral root development was restored by application of IAA apical to NPA application. Lateral root development in Arabidopsis roots was also inhibited by excision of the shoot or dark growth and this inhibition was reversible by IAA. Together, these results are consistent with auxin transport from the shoot into the root controlling lateral root development.

  16. Arabidopsis STERILE APETALA, a multifunctional gene regulating inflorescence, flower, and ovule development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byzova, Marina V.; Franken, John; Aarts, Mark G.M.; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Engler, Gilbert; Mariani, Celestina; Van Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    1999-01-01

    A recessive mutation in the Arabidopsis STERILE APETALA (SAP) causes severe aberrations in inflorescence and flower and ovule development. In sap flowers, sepals are carpelloid, petals are short and narrow or absent, and anthers are degenerated. Megasporogenesis, the process of meiotic divisions preceding the female gametophyte formation, is arrested in sap ovules during or just after the first meiotic division. More severe aberrations were observed in double mutants between sap and mutant alleles of the floral homeotic gene APETALA2 (AP2) suggesting that both genes are involved in the initiation of female gametophyte development. Together with the organ identity gene AGAMOUS (AG) SAP is required for the maintenance of floral identity acting in a manner similar to APETALA1. In contrast to the outer two floral organs in sap mutant flowers, normal sepals and petals develop in ag/sap double mutants, indicating that SAP negatively regulates AG expression in the perianth whorls. This supposed cadastral function of SAP is supported by in situ hybridization experiments showing ectopic expression of AG in the sap mutant. We have cloned the SAP gene by transposon tagging and revealed that it encodes a novel protein with sequence motifs, that are also present in plant and animal transcription regulators. Consistent with the mutant phenotype, SAP is expressed in inflorescence and floral meristems, floral organ primordia, and ovules. Taken together, we propose that SAP belongs to a new class of transcription regulators essential for a number of processes in Arabidopsis flower development. PMID:10215627

  17. Evolutionary insights into postembryonic development of adult intestinal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishizuya-Oka Atsuko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the adult vertebrate intestine, multi-potent stem cells continuously generate all of the epithelial cells throughout the adulthood. While it has long been known that the frog intestine is formed via the development of adult intestinal stem cells during thyroid hormone (TH-dependent metamorphosis, the basic structure of the adult intestine is formed by birth in mammals and it is unclear if the subsequent maturation of the intestine involves any changes in the intestinal stem cells. Two recent papers showing that B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1 regulates postnatal epithelial stem cell reprogramming during mouse intestinal maturation support the model that adult intestinal stem cells are developed during postembryonic development in mammals, in a TH-dependent process similar to intestinal remodeling during amphibian metamorphosis. Since the formation of the adult intestine in both mammals and amphibians is closely associated with the adaptation from aquatic to terrestrial life during the peak of endogenous TH levels, the molecular mechanisms by which the adult stem cells are developed are likely evolutionally conserved.

  18. The ULT1 and ULT2 trxG genes play overlapping roles in Arabidopsis development and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, Mona M; Carles, Cristel C; Rossignol, Pascale; Pires, Helena R; Fletcher, Jennifer C

    2013-09-01

    The epigenetic regulation of gene expression is critical for ensuring the proper deployment and stability of defined genome transcription programs at specific developmental stages. The cellular memory of stable gene expression states during animal and plant development is mediated by the opposing activities of Polycomb group (PcG) factors and trithorax group (trxG) factors. Yet, despite their importance, only a few trxG factors have been characterized in plants and their roles in regulating plant development are poorly defined. In this work, we report that the closely related Arabidopsis trxG genes ULTRAPETALA1 (ULT1) and ULT2 have overlapping functions in regulating shoot and floral stem cell accumulation, with ULT1 playing a major role but ULT2 also making a minor contribution. The two genes also have a novel, redundant activity in establishing the apical–basal polarity axis of the gynoecium, indicating that they function in differentiating tissues. Like ULT1 proteins, ULT2 proteins have a dual nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, and the two proteins physically associate in planta. Finally, we demonstrate that ULT1 and ULT2 have very similar overexpression phenotypes and regulate a common set of key development target genes, including floral MADS-box genes and class I KNOX genes. Our results reveal that chromatin remodeling mediated by the ULT1 and ULT2 proteins is necessary to control the development of meristems and reproductive organs. They also suggest that, like their animal counterparts, plant trxG proteins may function in multi-protein complexes to up-regulate the expression of key stage- and tissue-specific developmental regulatory genes.

  19. Overexpression of Mitochondrial Phosphate Transporter 3 Severely Hampers Plant Development through Regulating Mitochondrial Function in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjuan Jia

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are abundant and important organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells, which maintain metabolic communication with the cytosol through mitochondrial carriers. The mitochondrial membrane localized phosphate transporter (MPT plays vital roles in diverse development and signaling processes, especially the ATP biosynthesis. Among the three MPT genes in Arabidopsis genome, AtMPT3 was proven to be a major member, and its overexpression gave rise to multiple developmental defects including curly leaves with deep color, dwarfed stature, and reduced fertility. Transcript profiles revealed that genes involved in plant metabolism, cellular redox homeostasis, alternative respiration pathway, and leaf and flower development were obviously altered in AtMPT3 overexpression (OEMPT3 plants. Moreover, OEMPT3 plants also accumulated higher ATP content, faster respiration rate and more reactive oxygen species (ROS than wild type plants. Overall, our studies showed that AtMPT3 was indispensable for Arabidopsis normal growth and development, and provided new sights to investigate its possible regulation mechanisms.

  20. Coordination of Plastid and Light Signaling Pathways upon Development of Arabidopsis Leaves under Various Photoperiods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Lepist(o); Eevi Rintam(a)ki

    2012-01-01

    Plants synchronize their cellular and physiological functions according to the photoperiod(the length of the light period)in the cycle of 24 h.Photoperiod adjusts several traits in the plant life cycle,including flowering and senescence in annuals and seasonal growth cessation in perennials.Photoperiodic development is controlled by the coordinated action of photoreceptors and the circadian clock.During the past 10 years,remarkable progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock,especially with regard to the transition of Arabidopsis from the vegetative growth to the reproductive phase.Besides flowering photoperiod also modifies plant photosynthetic structures and traits.Light signals controlling biogenesis of chloroplasts and development of leaf photosynthetic structures are perceived both by photoreceptors and in chloroplasts.In this review,we provide evidence suggesting that the photoperiodic development of Arabidopsis leaves mimics the acclimation of plant to various light intensities.Furthermore,the chloroplast-to-nucleus retrograde signals that adjust acclimation to light intensity are proposed to contribute also to the signaling pathways that control photoperiodic acclimation of leaves.

  1. APUM23, a PUF family protein, functions in leaf development and organ polarity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tengbo; Kerstetter, Randall A; Irish, Vivian F

    2014-03-01

    The normal biological function of leaves, such as intercepting light and exchanging gases, relies on proper differentiation of adaxial and abaxial polarity. KANADI (KAN) genes, members of the GARP family, are key regulators of abaxial identity in leaf morphogenesis. This study identified a mutant allele (apum23-3) of APUM23, which encodes a Pumilio/PUF domain protein and acts as an enhancer of the kan mutant. Arabidopsis APUM23 has been shown to function in pre-rRNA processing and play pleiotropic roles in plant development. The apum23-3 mutant also synergistically interacts with other leaf polarity mutants, affects proliferation of division-competent cells, and alters the expression of important leaf polarity genes. These phenotypes show that APUM23 has critical functions in plant development, particularly in polarity formation. The PUF gene family is conserved across kingdoms yet it has not been well characterized in plants. These results illuminating the functions of APUM23 suggest a novel role for PUF genes in Arabidopsis leaf development.

  2. An atlas of type I MADS box gene expression during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Heijmans, Klaas; Airoldi, Chiara; Davies, Brendan; Angenent, Gerco C

    2010-09-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally characterized, which revealed important roles for these genes during female gametophyte and early seed development. The functions of the other genes are still unknown, despite the fact that the available single T-DNA insertion mutants have been largely investigated. The lack of mutant phenotypes is likely due to a considerable number of recent intrachromosomal duplications in the type I subfamily, resulting in nonfunctional genes in addition to a high level of redundancy. To enable a breakthrough in type I MADS box gene characterization, a framework needs to be established that allows the prediction of the functionality and redundancy of the type I genes. Here, we present a complete atlas of their expression patterns during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis, deduced from reporter lines containing translational fusions of the genes to green fluorescent protein and beta-glucuronidase. All the expressed genes were revealed to be active in the female gametophyte or developing seed, indicating that the entire type I subfamily is involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, expression was predominantly observed in the central cell, antipodal cells, and chalazal endosperm. The combination of our expression results with phylogenetic and protein interaction data allows a better identification of putative redundantly acting genes and provides a useful tool for the functional characterization of the type I MADS box genes in Arabidopsis.

  3. An Atlas of Type I MADS Box Gene Expression during Female Gametophyte and Seed Development in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Heijmans, Klaas; Airoldi, Chiara; Davies, Brendan; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally characterized, which revealed important roles for these genes during female gametophyte and early seed development. The functions of the other genes are still unknown, despite the fact that the available single T-DNA insertion mutants have been largely investigated. The lack of mutant phenotypes is likely due to a considerable number of recent intrachromosomal duplications in the type I subfamily, resulting in nonfunctional genes in addition to a high level of redundancy. To enable a breakthrough in type I MADS box gene characterization, a framework needs to be established that allows the prediction of the functionality and redundancy of the type I genes. Here, we present a complete atlas of their expression patterns during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis, deduced from reporter lines containing translational fusions of the genes to green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase. All the expressed genes were revealed to be active in the female gametophyte or developing seed, indicating that the entire type I subfamily is involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, expression was predominantly observed in the central cell, antipodal cells, and chalazal endosperm. The combination of our expression results with phylogenetic and protein interaction data allows a better identification of putative redundantly acting genes and provides a useful tool for the functional characterization of the type I MADS box genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:20631316

  4. Exportin1 genes are essential for development and function of the gametophytes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanvillain, Robert; Boavida, Leonor C; McCormick, Sheila; Ow, David W

    2008-11-01

    Gametes are produced in plants through mitotic divisions in the haploid gametophytes. We investigated the role of EXPORTIN1 (XPO1) genes during the development of both female and male gametophytes of Arabidopsis. Exportins exclude target proteins from the nucleus and are also part of a complex recruited at the kinetochores during mitosis. Here we show that double mutants in Arabidopsis XPO1A and XPO1B are gametophytic defective. In homozygous-heterozygous plants, 50% of the ovules were arrested at different stages according to the parental genotype. Double-mutant female gametophytes of xpo1a-3/+; xpo1b-1/xpo1b-1 plants failed to undergo all the mitotic divisions or failed to complete embryo sac maturation. Double-mutant female gametophytes of xpo1a-3/xpo1a-3; xpo1b-1/+ plants had normal mitotic divisions and fertilization occurred; in most of these embryo sacs the endosperm started to divide but an embryo failed to develop. Distortions in male transmission correlated with the occurrence of smaller pollen grains, poor pollen germination, and shorter pollen tubes. Our results show that mitotic divisions are possible without XPO1 during the haploid phase, but that XPO1 is crucial for the maternal-to-embryonic transition.

  5. Developing neural stem cell-based treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James A

    2014-05-30

    Owing to the aging of the population, our society now faces an impending wave of age-related neurodegenerative pathologies, the most significant of which is Alzheimer's disease. Currently, no effective therapies for Alzheimer's disease have been developed. However, recent advances in the fields of neural stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells now provide us with the first real hope for a cure. The recent discovery by Blurton-Jones and colleagues that neural stem cells can effectively deliver disease-modifying therapeutic proteins throughout the brains of our best rodent models of Alzheimer's disease, combined with recent advances in human nuclear reprogramming, stem cell research, and highly customized genetic engineering, may represent a potentially revolutionary personalized cellular therapeutic approach capable of effectively curing, ameliorating, and/or slowing the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Cytochemical localization of reserves during seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana under spaceflight conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, A.; Xiao, Y.; Musgrave, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    Successful development of seeds under spaceflight conditions has been an elusive goal of numerous long-duration experiments with plants on orbital spacecraft. Because carbohydrate metabolism undergoes changes when plants are grown in microgravity, developing seed storage reserves might be detrimentally affected during spaceflight. Seed development in Arabidopsis thaliana plants that flowered during 11 d in space on shuttle mission STS-68 has been investigated in this study. Plants were grown to the rosette stage (13 d) on a nutrient agar medium on the ground and loaded into the Plant Growth Unit flight hardware 18 h prior to lift-off. Plants were retrieved 3 h after landing and siliques were immediately removed from plants. Young seeds were fixed and processed for microscopic observation. Seeds in both the ground control and flight plants are similar in their morphology and size. The oldest seeds from these plants contain completely developed embryos and seed coats. These embryos developed radicle, hypocotyl, meristematic apical tissue, and differentiated cotyledons. Protoderm, procambium, and primary ground tissue had differentiated. Reserves such as starch and protein were deposited in the embryos during tissue differentiation. The aleurone layer contains a large quantity of storage protein and starch grains. A seed coat developed from integuments of the ovule with gradual change in cell composition and cell material deposition. Carbohydrates were deposited in outer integument cells especially in the outside cell walls. Starch grains decreased in number per cell in the integument during seed coat development. All these characteristics during seed development represent normal features in the ground control plants and show that the spaceflight environment does not prevent normal development of seeds in Arabidopsis.

  7. Risk factors in the development of stem cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermsen Harm PH

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell therapy holds the promise to treat degenerative diseases, cancer and repair of damaged tissues for which there are currently no or limited therapeutic options. The potential of stem cell therapies has long been recognised and the creation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC has boosted the stem cell field leading to increasing development and scientific knowledge. Despite the clinical potential of stem cell based medicinal products there are also potential and unanticipated risks. These risks deserve a thorough discussion within the perspective of current scientific knowledge and experience. Evaluation of potential risks should be a prerequisite step before clinical use of stem cell based medicinal products. The risk profile of stem cell based medicinal products depends on many risk factors, which include the type of stem cells, their differentiation status and proliferation capacity, the route of administration, the intended location, in vitro culture and/or other manipulation steps, irreversibility of treatment, need/possibility for concurrent tissue regeneration in case of irreversible tissue loss, and long-term survival of engrafted cells. Together these factors determine the risk profile associated with a stem cell based medicinal product. The identified risks (i.e. risks identified in clinical experience or potential/theoretical risks (i.e. risks observed in animal studies include tumour formation, unwanted immune responses and the transmission of adventitious agents. Currently, there is no clinical experience with pluripotent stem cells (i.e. embryonal stem cells and iPSC. Based on their characteristics of unlimited self-renewal and high proliferation rate the risks associated with a product containing these cells (e.g. risk on tumour formation are considered high, if not perceived to be unacceptable. In contrast, the vast majority of small-sized clinical trials conducted with mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC in

  8. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    of the polycomb repressive complexes, PRC1 and PRC2, and the HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes, NuRD, Sin3, and CoREST, in stem cells, development, and cancer, as well as the ongoing efforts to develop therapies targeting these complexes in human cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the role of repressive......The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles...... complexes in modulating thresholds for gene activation and their importance for specification and maintenance of cell fate....

  9. Plastidial NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase is critical for embryo development and heterotrophic metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Seraina; Liu, Hung-Chi; Stadler, Martha; Schreier, Tina; Eicke, Simona; Lue, Wei-Ling; Truernit, Elisabeth; Zeeman, Samuel C; Chen, Jychian; Kötting, Oliver

    2014-03-01

    In illuminated chloroplasts, one mechanism involved in reduction-oxidation (redox) homeostasis is the malate-oxaloacetate (OAA) shuttle. Excess electrons from photosynthetic electron transport in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced are used by NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (MDH) to reduce OAA to malate, thus regenerating the electron acceptor NADP. NADP-MDH is a strictly redox-regulated, light-activated enzyme that is inactive in the dark. In the dark or in nonphotosynthetic tissues, the malate-OAA shuttle was proposed to be mediated by the constitutively active plastidial NAD-specific MDH isoform (pdNAD-MDH), but evidence is scarce. Here, we reveal the critical role of pdNAD-MDH in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. A pdnad-mdh null mutation is embryo lethal. Plants with reduced pdNAD-MDH levels by means of artificial microRNA (miR-mdh-1) are viable, but dark metabolism is altered as reflected by increased nighttime malate, starch, and glutathione levels and a reduced respiration rate. In addition, miR-mdh-1 plants exhibit strong pleiotropic effects, including dwarfism, reductions in chlorophyll levels, photosynthetic rate, and daytime carbohydrate levels, and disordered chloroplast ultrastructure, particularly in developing leaves, compared with the wild type. pdNAD-MDH deficiency in miR-mdh-1 can be functionally complemented by expression of a microRNA-insensitive pdNAD-MDH but not NADP-MDH, confirming distinct roles for NAD- and NADP-linked redox homeostasis.

  10. Deciphering transcriptional and metabolic networks associated with lysine metabolism during Arabidopsis seed development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelovici, Ruthie; Fait, Aaron; Zhu, Xiaohong; Szymanski, Jedrzej; Feldmesser, Ester; Fernie, Alisdair R; Galili, Gad

    2009-12-01

    In order to elucidate transcriptional and metabolic networks associated with lysine (Lys) metabolism, we utilized developing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seeds as a system in which Lys synthesis could be stimulated developmentally without application of chemicals and coupled this to a T-DNA insertion knockout mutation impaired in Lys catabolism. This seed-specific metabolic perturbation stimulated Lys accumulation starting from the initiation of storage reserve accumulation. Our results revealed that the response of seed metabolism to the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was relatively minor; however, that which was observable operated in a modular manner. They also demonstrated that Lys metabolism is strongly associated with the operation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle while largely disconnected from other metabolic networks. In contrast, the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was strongly associated with gene networks, stimulating the expression of hundreds of genes controlling anabolic processes that are associated with plant performance and vigor while suppressing a small number of genes associated with plant stress interactions. The most pronounced effect of the developmentally inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was an induction of expression of a large set of genes encoding ribosomal proteins as well as genes encoding translation initiation and elongation factors, all of which are associated with protein synthesis. With respect to metabolic regulation, the inducible alteration of Lys metabolism was primarily associated with altered expression of genes belonging to networks of amino acids and sugar metabolism. The combined data are discussed within the context of network interactions both between and within metabolic and transcriptional control systems.

  11. Isolation of Promoters and Fragments of Genes Controlling Endosperm Development Without Fertilization in Arabidopsis and Engineering of the Antisense Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigory A. Gerashchenkov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Apomixis is asexual seed reproduction without both meiosis and fertilization based on the complex developmental processes such as apomeiosis, parthenogenesis and specific endosperm development. This investigation is aimed at engineering of apomixis in Arabidopsis thaliana with sexual seed reproduction. The fragments of known genes of endosperm formation MEA, FIE, FIS2 and gene of apomeiosis DYAD (as control were isolated using Q5 high fidelity DNA polymerase. These gene fragments of interest at the antisense orientation were fused with isolated constitutive and meiosis specific promoters of Arabidopsis at NcoI sites. The fused promoter-gene fragment modules were cloned in pCambia1301 at SalI cites. The engineered constructions will be used for the floral dip transformation of Arabidopsis and down regulation of these genes at engineering of apomixis.

  12. Kidney stem cells in development, regeneration and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Klaudyna; Pleniceanu, Oren; Dekel, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    The generation of nephrons during development depends on differentiation via a mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) of self-renewing, tissue-specific stem cells confined to a specific anatomic niche of the nephrogenic cortex. These cells may transform to generate oncogenic stem cells and drive pediatric renal cancer. Once nephron epithelia are formed the view of post-MET tissue renal growth and maintenance by adult tissue-specific epithelial stem cells becomes controversial. Recently, genetic lineage tracing that followed clonal evolution of single kidney cells showed that the need for new cells is constantly driven by fate-restricted unipotent clonal expansions in varying kidney segments arguing against a multipotent adult stem cell model. Lineage-restriction was similarly maintained in kidney organoids grown in culture. Importantly, kidney cells in which Wnt was activated were traced to give significant clonal progeny indicating a clonogenic hierarchy. In vivo nephron epithelia may be endowed with the capacity akin to that of unipotent epithelial stem/progenitor such that under specific stimuli can clonally expand/self renew by local proliferation of mature differentiated cells. Finding ways to ex vivo preserve and expand the observed in vivo kidney-forming capacity inherent to both the fetal and adult kidneys is crucial for taking renal regenerative medicine forward. Some of the strategies used to achieve this are sorting human fetal nephron stem/progenitor cells, growing adult nephrospheres or reprogramming differentiated kidney cells toward expandable renal progenitors.

  13. Development of hematopoietic stem cell activity in the mouse embryo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Müller (Albrecht); A. Medvinsky; J. Strouboulis (John); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe precise time of appearance of the first hematopoietic stem cell activity in the developing mouse embryo is unknown. Recently the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region of the developing mouse embryo has been shown to possess hematopoietic colony-forming activity (CFU-S) in irradiated recipie

  14. Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cells are cells with the potential to develop into many different types of cells in the body. ... the body. There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Stem ...

  15. Cell identity regulators link development and stress responses in the Arabidopsis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S; Jackson, Terry; Cui, Hongchang; Petricka, Jalean J; Busch, Wolfgang; Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Benfey, Philip N

    2011-10-18

    Stress responses in plants are tightly coordinated with developmental processes, but interaction of these pathways is poorly understood. We used genome-wide assays at high spatiotemporal resolution to understand the processes that link development and stress in the Arabidopsis root. Our meta-analysis finds little evidence for a universal stress response. However, common stress responses appear to exist with many showing cell type specificity. Common stress responses may be mediated by cell identity regulators because mutations in these genes resulted in altered responses to stress. Evidence for a direct role for cell identity regulators came from genome-wide binding profiling of the key regulator SCARECROW, which showed binding to regulatory regions of stress-responsive genes. Coexpression in response to stress was used to identify genes involved in specific developmental processes. These results reveal surprising linkages between stress and development at cellular resolution, and show the power of multiple genome-wide data sets to elucidate biological processes.

  16. MADS on the move : a study on MADS domain protein function and movement during floral development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, S.L.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the behaviour of fluorescently-tagged MADS domain proteins during floral development in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and explored the importance of intercellular transport via plasmodesmata for MADS domain transcription factor functioning. The MADS domain tran

  17. Hematopoietic development from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengerke, Claudia; Grauer, Matthias; Niebuhr, Nina I; Riedt, Tamara; Kanz, Lothar; Park, In-Hyun; Daley, George Q

    2009-09-01

    A decade of research on human embryonic stem cells (ESC) has paved the way for the discovery of alternative approaches to generating pluripotent stem cells. Combinatorial overexpression of a limited number of proteins linked to pluripotency in ESC was recently found to reprogram differentiated somatic cells back to a pluripotent state, enabling the derivation of isogenic (patient-specific) pluripotent stem cell lines. Current research is focusing on improving reprogramming protocols (e.g., circumventing the use of retroviral technology and oncoproteins), and on methods for differentiation into transplantable tissues of interest. In mouse ESC, we have previously shown that the embryonic morphogens BMP4 and Wnt3a direct blood formation via activation of Cdx and Hox genes. Ectopic expression of Cdx4 and HoxB4 enables the generation of mouse ESC-derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) capable of multilineage reconstitution of lethally irradiated adult mice. Here, we explore hematopoietic development from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated in our laboratory. Our data show robust differentiation of iPS cells to mesoderm and to blood lineages, as shown by generation of CD34(+)CD45(+) cells, hematopoietic colony activity, and gene expression data, and suggest conservation of blood patterning pathways between mouse and human hematopoietic development.

  18. Photosynthesis of root chloroplasts developed in Arabidopsis lines overexpressing GOLDEN2-LIKE transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Sasaki, Daichi; Noguchi, Ko; Fujinuma, Daiki; Komatsu, Hirohisa; Kobayashi, Masami; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sugimoto, Keiko; Niyogi, Krishna K; Wada, Hajime; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2013-08-01

    In plants, genes involved in photosynthesis are encoded separately in nuclei and plastids, and tight cooperation between these two genomes is therefore required for the development of functional chloroplasts. Golden2-like (GLK) transcription factors are involved in chloroplast development, directly targeting photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes for up-regulation. Although overexpression of GLKs leads to chloroplast development in non-photosynthetic organs, the mechanisms of coordination between the nuclear gene expression influenced by GLKs and the photosynthetic processes inside chloroplasts are largely unknown. To elucidate the impact of GLK-induced expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes on the construction of photosynthetic systems, chloroplast morphology and photosynthetic characteristics in greenish roots of Arabidopsis thaliana lines overexpressing GLKs were compared with those in wild-type roots and leaves. Overexpression of GLKs caused up-regulation of not only their direct targets but also non-target nuclear and plastid genes, leading to global induction of chloroplast biogenesis in the root. Large antennae relative to reaction centers were observed in wild-type roots and were further enhanced by GLK overexpression due to the increased expression of target genes associated with peripheral light-harvesting antennae. Photochemical efficiency was lower in the root chloroplasts than in leaf chloroplasts, suggesting that the imbalance in the photosynthetic machinery decreases the efficiency of light utilization in root chloroplasts. Despite the low photochemical efficiency, root photosynthesis contributed to carbon assimilation in Arabidopsis. Moreover, GLK overexpression increased CO₂ fixation and promoted phototrophic performance of the root, showing the potential of root photosynthesis to improve effective carbon utilization in plants.

  19. The Arabidopsis Golgi-localized GDP-L-fucose transporter is required for plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Liu, Lifeng; Stonebloom, Solomon; Smith-Moritz, Andreia M; Pauly, Markus; Orellana, Ariel; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Heazlewood, Joshua L

    2016-07-06

    Nucleotide sugar transport across Golgi membranes is essential for the luminal biosynthesis of glycan structures. Here we identify GDP-fucose transporter 1 (GFT1), an Arabidopsis nucleotide sugar transporter that translocates GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi lumen. Using proteo-liposome-based transport assays, we show that GFT preferentially transports GDP-L-fucose over other nucleotide sugars in vitro, while GFT1-silenced plants are almost devoid of L-fucose in cell wall-derived xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan II. Furthermore, these lines display reduced L-fucose content in N-glycan structures accompanied by severe developmental growth defects. We conclude that GFT1 is the major nucleotide sugar transporter for import of GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi and is required for proper plant growth and development.

  20. The Arabidopsis Golgi-localized GDP-L-fucose transporter is required for plant development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Liu, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide sugar transport across Golgi membranes is essential for the luminal biosynthesis of glycan structures. Here we identify GDP-fucose transporter 1 (GFT1), an Arabidopsis nucleotide sugar transporter that translocates GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi lumen. Using proteo-liposome-based transport...... assays, we show that GFT preferentially transports GDP-L-fucose over other nucleotide sugars in vitro, while GFT1-silenced plants are almost devoid of L-fucose in cell wall-derived xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan II. Furthermore, these lines display reduced L-fucose content in N-glycan structures...... accompanied by severe developmental growth defects. We conclude that GFT1 is the major nucleotide sugar transporter for import of GDP-L-fucose into the Golgi and is required for proper plant growth and development....

  1. Genomic imprinting in development, growth, behavior and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasschaert, Robert N; Bartolomei, Marisa S

    2014-05-01

    Genes that are subject to genomic imprinting in mammals are preferentially expressed from a single parental allele. This imprinted expression of a small number of genes is crucial for normal development, as these genes often directly regulate fetal growth. Recent work has also demonstrated intricate roles for imprinted genes in the brain, with important consequences on behavior and neuronal function. Finally, new studies have revealed the importance of proper expression of specific imprinted genes in induced pluripotent stem cells and in adult stem cells. As we review here, these findings highlight the complex nature and developmental importance of imprinted genes.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF QUALITY STANDARDS OF BERBERIS ARISTATA STEM BARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Ahamad

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Berberis aristata is an important medicinal plant of family Berberidaceae. It is commonly known as Zarishk and Daruhaldi. It is mainly used for the treatment piles, liver diseases and diabetes. As the herb is used widely in the Indian traditional systems of medicine, it was thought worthwhile to develop the quality standards for its stem bark. The results of Pharmacognostic standardization of stem bark of B. aristata are very helpful in determination of quality and purity of the crude drug and its marketed formulation.

  3. Relational Reasoning in STEM Domains: A Foundation for Academic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patricia A.

    2017-01-01

    What is relational reasoning? Why is it critical to consider the role of relational reasoning in students learning and development in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)? Moreover, how do the particular contributions populating this special issue address the pressing societal needs and offer guidance to researchers and…

  4. A drug target that stimulates development of healthy stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have overcome a major impediment to the development of effective stem cell therapies by studying mice that lack CD47, a protein found on the surface of both healthy and cancer cells. They discovered that cells obtained from the lungs of CD47-de

  5. Distinct stem cells contribute to mammary gland development and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Rocha, Ana Sofia; Ousset, Marielle; Beck, Benjamin; Bouvencourt, Gaëlle; Rock, Jason; Sharma, Neha; Dekoninck, Sophie; Blanpain, Cédric

    2011-10-09

    The mammary epithelium is composed of several cell lineages including luminal, alveolar and myoepithelial cells. Transplantation studies have suggested that the mammary epithelium is maintained by the presence of multipotent mammary stem cells. To define the cellular hierarchy of the mammary gland during physiological conditions, we performed genetic lineage-tracing experiments and clonal analysis of the mouse mammary gland during development, adulthood and pregnancy. We found that in postnatal unperturbed mammary gland, both luminal and myoepithelial lineages contain long-lived unipotent stem cells that display extensive renewing capacities, as demonstrated by their ability to clonally expand during morphogenesis and adult life as well as undergo massive expansion during several cycles of pregnancy. The demonstration that the mammary gland contains different types of long-lived stem cells has profound implications for our understanding of mammary gland physiology and will be instrumental in unravelling the cells at the origin of breast cancers.

  6. Monkey hybrid stem cells develop cellular features of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorthongpanich Chanchao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pluripotent stem cells that are capable of differentiating into different cell types and develop robust hallmark cellular features are useful tools for clarifying the impact of developmental events on neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease. Additionally, a Huntington's cell model that develops robust pathological features of Huntington's disease would be valuable for drug discovery research. Results To test this hypothesis, a pluripotent Huntington's disease monkey hybrid cell line (TrES1 was established from a tetraploid Huntington's disease monkey blastocyst generated by the fusion of transgenic Huntington's monkey skin fibroblast and a wild-type non-transgenic monkey oocyte. The TrES1 developed key Huntington's disease cellular pathological features that paralleled neural development. It expressed mutant huntingtin and stem cell markers, was capable of differentiating to neural cells, and developed teratoma in severely compromised immune deficient (SCID mice. Interestingly, the expression of mutant htt, the accumulation of oligomeric mutant htt and the formation of intranuclear inclusions paralleled neural development in vitro , and even mutant htt was ubiquitously expressed. This suggests the development of Huntington's disease cellular features is influenced by neural developmental events. Conclusions Huntington's disease cellular features is influenced by neural developmental events. These results are the first to demonstrate that a pluripotent stem cell line is able to mimic Huntington's disease progression that parallels neural development, which could be a useful cell model for investigating the developmental impact on Huntington's disease pathogenesis.

  7. Auxin and ethylene response interactions during Arabidopsis root hair development dissected by auxin influx modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Abidur; Hosokawa, Satoko; Oono, Yutaka; Amakawa, Taisaku; Goto, Nobuharu; Tsurumi, Seiji

    2002-12-01

    The plant hormones auxin and ethylene have been shown to play important roles during root hair development. However, cross talk between auxin and ethylene makes it difficult to understand the independent role of either hormone. To dissect their respective roles, we examined the effects of two compounds, chromosaponin I (CSI) and 1-naphthoxyacetic acid (1-NOA), on the root hair developmental process in wild-type Arabidopsis, ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-1, and auxin influx mutants aux1-7, aux1-22, and double mutant aux1-7 ein2. Beta-glucuronidase (GUS) expression analysis in the BA-GUS transgenic line, consisting of auxin-responsive domains of PS-IAA4/5 promoter and GUS reporter, revealed that 1-NOA and CSI act as auxin uptake inhibitors in Arabidopsis roots. The frequency of root hairs in ein2-1 roots was greatly reduced in the presence of CSI or 1-NOA, suggesting that endogenous auxin plays a critical role for the root hair initiation in the absence of an ethylene response. All of these mutants showed a reduction in root hair length, however, the root hair length could be restored with a variable concentration of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). NAA (10 nM) restored the root hair length of aux1 mutants to wild-type level, whereas 100 nM NAA was needed for ein2-1 and aux1-7 ein2 mutants. Our results suggest that insensitivity in ethylene response affects the auxin-driven root hair elongation. CSI exhibited a similar effect to 1-NOA, reducing root hair growth and the number of root hair-bearing cells in wild-type and ein2-1 roots, while stimulating these traits in aux1-7and aux1-7ein2 roots, confirming that CSI is a unique modulator of AUX1.

  8. Dynamics of male meiotic recombination frequency during plant development using Fluorescent Tagged Lines in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; De Storme, Nico; Geelen, Danny

    2017-02-13

    Meiotic homologous recombination plays a central role in creating genetic variability, making it an essential biological process relevant to evolution and crop breeding. In this study, we used pollen-specific fluorescent tagged lines (FTLs) to measure male meiotic recombination frequency during the development of Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, a subset of pollen grains consistently shows loss of fluorescence expression in tested lines. Using nine independent FTL intervals, the spatio-temporal dynamics of male recombination frequency was assessed during plant development, considering both shoot type and plant age as independent parameters. In most genomic intervals assayed, male meiotic recombination frequency is highly consistent during plant development, showing no significant change between different shoot types and during plant aging. However, in some genomic regions, such as I1a and I5a, a small but significant effect of either developmental position or plant age were observed, indicating that the meiotic CO frequency in those intervals varies during plant development. Furthermore, from an overall view of all nine genomic intervals assayed, both primary and tertiary shoots show a similar dynamics of increasing recombination frequency during development, while secondary and lateral shoots remain highly stable. Our results provide new insights in the dynamics of male meiotic recombination frequency during plant development.

  9. Violates stem wood burning sustainable development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    With reference to the paradigme shift regarding the formation of dioxins in municiplan solid waste incinerators experimental results are taken into account which lead to the suspicion that the same mechanism of de-novo-synthesis also applies to fireplace chimneys. This can explain the dioxin...... burning are characterised together with particle and PAH emissions. The positive treatment of wood stove-technology in the Danish strategy for sustainable development (draft 2007) is critically evaluated and approaches to better regulation are identified....

  10. Comparison of Leaf Plastochron Index and Allometric Analyses of Tooth Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot; Meicenheimer

    2000-03-01

    Two methods of analyses were used to investigate tooth development in serrate (se) mutant and wild-type Columbia-1 (Col-1) Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. There were almost twice as many teeth with deeper sinuses and two orders of toothing on the margins of serrate compared with Columbia-1 leaves. The main objective of this study was to test three hypotheses relative to the source of polymorphism in tooth development: (i) Teeth share similar growth rates and initial sizes, but the deeper teeth are initiated earlier in leaf development. (ii) Teeth share similar timing of initiation and growth rates, but the deeper teeth have a larger initial size. (iii) Teeth share similar timing of initiation and initial sizes, but the deeper teeth have a faster growth rate. Leaf plastochron index (LPI) was used as the time variable for leaf development. Results showed teeth in se were initiated at -27 LPI, 15 plastochrons earlier than those of Col-1. Serrate leaf expansion was biphasic, with the early phase expanding at half the relative plastochron rate of the later phase, which equaled the constant relative expansion rate of Col-1 leaves. Allometric analyses of tooth development obscured the interactions between time of tooth and leaf initiation and the early phase of leaf expansion characteristic of serrate leaves and teeth. Timing of developmental events that allometric analysis obscured can be readily detected with the LPI as a developmental index.

  11. Genes of the most conserved WOX clade in plants affect root and flower development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Hervé

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Wuschel related homeobox (WOX family proteins are key regulators implicated in the determination of cell fate in plants by preventing cell differentiation. A recent WOX phylogeny, based on WOX homeodomains, showed that all of the Physcomitrella patens and Selaginella moellendorffii WOX proteins clustered into a single orthologous group. We hypothesized that members of this group might preferentially share a significant part of their function in phylogenetically distant organisms. Hence, we first validated the limits of the WOX13 orthologous group (WOX13 OG using the occurrence of other clade specific signatures and conserved intron insertion sites. Secondly, a functional analysis using expression data and mutants was undertaken. Results The WOX13 OG contained the most conserved plant WOX proteins including the only WOX detected in the highly proliferating basal unicellular and photosynthetic organism Ostreococcus tauri. A large expansion of the WOX family was observed after the separation of mosses from other land plants and before monocots and dicots have arisen. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtWOX13 was dynamically expressed during primary and lateral root initiation and development, in gynoecium and during embryo development. AtWOX13 appeared to affect the floral transition. An intriguing clade, represented by the functional AtWOX14 gene inside the WOX13 OG, was only found in the Brassicaceae. Compared to AtWOX13, the gene expression profile of AtWOX14 was restricted to the early stages of lateral root formation and specific to developing anthers. A mutational insertion upstream of the AtWOX14 homeodomain sequence led to abnormal root development, a delay in the floral transition and premature anther differentiation. Conclusion Our data provide evidence in favor of the WOX13 OG as the clade containing the most conserved WOX genes and established a functional link to organ initiation and development in Arabidopsis, most

  12. Arabidopsis RAV1 is down-regulated by brassinosteroid and may act as a negative regulator during plant development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Xin HU; Yong Hong WANG; Xin Fang LIU; Jia Yang LI

    2004-01-01

    RAV1 is a novel DNA-binding protein with two distinct DNA-binding domains unique in higher plants,but its role in plant growth and development remains unknown. Using cDNA array,we found that transcription of RAV1 is downregulated by epibrassinolide (epiBL) in Arabidopsis suspension cells. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that epiBL-regulated RAV1 transcription involves neither protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation nor newly synthesized protein,and does not require the functional BRI1,suggesting that this regulation might be through a new BR signaling pathway.Overexpressing RAV1 in Arabidopsis results in a retardation of lateral root and rosette leaf development,and the underexpression causes an earlier flowering phenotype,implying that RAV1 may function as a negative regulatory component of growth and development.

  13. Regulation of Arabidopsis Early Anther Development by Putative Cell-Cell Signaling Molecules and Transcriptional Regulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Jin Sun; Carey LH Hord; Chang-Bin Chen; Hong Ma

    2007-01-01

    Anther development in flowering plants involves the formation of several cell types, including the tapetal and pollen mother cells. The use of genetic and molecular tools has led to the identification and characterization of genes that are critical for normal cell division and differentiation in Arabidopsis early anther development. We review here several recent studies on these genes, including the demonstration that the putative receptor protein kinases BAM1 and BAM2 together play essential roles in the control of early cell division and differentiation. In addition, we discuss the hypothesis that BAM1/2 may form a positive-negative feedback regulatory loop with a previously identified key regulator, SPOROCYTELESS (also called NOZZLE),to control the balance between sporogenous and somatic cell types in the anther. Furthermore, we summarize the isolation and functional analysis of the DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM1 (DYT1) gene in promoting proper tapetal cell differentiation. Our finding that DYT1 encodes a putative transcription factor of the bHLH family, as well as relevant expression analyses, strongly supports a model that DYT1 serves as a critical link between upstream factors and downstream target genes that are critical for normal tapetum development and function. These studies, together with other recently published works, indicate that cell-cell communication and transcriptional control are key processes essential for cell fate specification in anther development.

  14. Cancer stem cells: a new approach to tumor development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Cristina Ciufa Kobayashi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many theories have been proposed to explain the origins of cancer. Currently, evidences show that not every tumor cell is capable of initiating a tumor. Only a small part of the cancer cells, called cancer stem cells (CSCs, can generate a tumor identical to the original one, when removed from human tumors and transplanted into immunosuppressed mice. The name given to these cells comes from the resemblance to normal stem cells, except for the fact that their ability to divide is infinite. These cells are also affected by their microenvironment. Many of the signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog, are altered in this tumoral subpopulation, which also contributes to abnormal proliferation. Researchers have found several markers for CSCs; however, much remains to be studied, or perhaps a universal marker does not even exist, since they vary among tumor types and even from patient to patient. It was also found that cancer stem cells are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This may explain the re-emergence of the disease, since they are not completely eliminated and minimal amounts of CSCs can repopulate a tumor. Once the diagnosis in the early stages greatly increases the chances of curing cancer, identifying CSCs in tumors is a goal for the development of more effective treatments. The objective of this article is to discuss the origin of cancer according to the theory of stem cell cancer, as well as its markers and therapies used for treatment.

  15. A novel chloroplast-localized protein EMB1303 is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaozhen Huang; Xiaoyan Zhang; Shuhua Yang

    2009-01-01

    @@ The corresponding author is sorry for the following errors. 1. The first sentence of the Results section is corrected to read: The albino mutant (SALK_016097) was obtained from Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC).

  16. Stem cell antigen 2 expression in adult and developing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antica, M; Wu, L; Scollay, R

    1997-01-01

    Stem cell antigen 2 (Sca-2) expression can distinguish the most immature T-lymphocyte precursors in the thymus from the hemopoietic stem cells. Sequence analysis of the Sca-2 protein showed that Sca-2 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored molecule that shares some characteristics with the members of the Ly-6 multigene family, and that it is the same as the thymic shared antigen-1 (TSA-1). Here we extend these studies and critically reassess the expression of the Sca-2/TSA-1 antigen in hematopoietic tissues of adult and developing mice. With more sensitive methods we show that the distribution of Sca-2/TSA-1 differs from existing reports. We find especially high expression of Sca-2/TSA1 at day 14 of fetal development.

  17. Identification and genetic mapping of four novel genes that regulate leaf development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and genetic characterizations of mutants have led to a better understanding of many developmental processes in the model system Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the leaf development that is specific to plants has been little studied. With the aim of contributing to the genetic dissection of leaf development, we have performed a large-scare screening for mutants with abnormal leaves. Among a great number of leaf mutants we have generated by T-DNA and transposon tagging and ethylmethae sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis, four independent mutant lines have been identified and studied genetically. Phenotypes of these mutant lines represent the defects of four novel nuclear genes designated LL1 (LOTUS LEAF 1), LL2 (LOTUS LEAF 2), URO (UPRIGHT ROSETTE), and EIL (ENVIRONMENTCONDITION INDUCED LESION). The phenotypic analysis indicates that these genes play important roles during leaf development. For the further genetic analysis of these genes and the map-based cloning of LL1 and LL2, we have mapped these genes to chromosome regions with an efficient and rapid mapping method.

  18. Identification and genetic mapping of four novel genes that regulate leaf development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNYUE; YingLiGuo; 等

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and genetic characterizations of mutants have led to a better understanding of many developmental processes in the model system Arabidopsis thaliana.However,the leaf development that is specific to plants has been little studies.With the aim of contributing to the genetic dissection of leaf development,we have performed a large-scare screening for mutants with abnormal leaves.Among a great number of leaf mutants we have generated by T-DNA and transposon tagging and ethylmethae sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis,four independent mutant lines have been identified and studied genetically.Phenotypes of these mutant lines represent the defects of four novel muclear genes designated LL1(LOTUS LEAF 1),LL2(LOTUS LEAF2),URO(UPRIGHT ROSETTE),and EIL(ENVIRONMENT CONDITION INDUCED LESION).The phenotypic analysis indicates that these genes play important roles during leaf development.For the further genetic analysis of these genes and the map-based cloning of LL1 and LL2,we have mapped these genes to chromosome regions with an efficient and rapid mapping method.

  19. A novel chloroplast-localized protein EMB1303 is required for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaozhen Huang; Xiaoyan Zhang; Shuhua Yang

    2009-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized the albino mutant emb1303-1 in Arabidopsis. The mutant displayed a severe dwarf phenotype with small albino rosette leaves and short roots on a synthetic medium containing sucrose. It is pigment-deficient and seedling lethal when grown in soil. Embryo development was delayed in the mutant, although seed germination was not significantly im-paired. The plastids of emb1303-1 were arrested in early developmental stages without the classical stack of thylakoid membrane. Genetic and molecular analyses uncovered that the EMB1303 gene encodes a novel chloroplast-localized protein. Mieroarray and RT-PCR analyses revealed that a number of nuclear-and plastid-encoded genes involved in photosynthesis and chloroplast biogenesis were substantially downregulated in the mutant. Moreover, the accu-mulation of several major chloroplast proteins was severely compromised in emb1303-1. These results suggest that EMBI303 is essential for chloroplast development.

  20. An auxin-responsive endogenous peptide regulates root development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fengxi; Song, Yu; Yang, Hao; Liu, Zhibin; Zhu, Genfa; Yang, Yi

    2014-07-01

    Auxin plays critical roles in root formation and development. The components involved in this process, however, are not well understood. Here, we newly identified a peptide encoding gene, auxin-responsive endogenous polypeptide 1 (AREP1), which is induced by auxin, and mediates root development in Arabidopsis. Expression of AREP1 was specific to the cotyledon and to root and shoot meristem tissues. Amounts of AREP1 transcripts and AREP1-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins were elevated in response to indoleacetic acid treatment. Suppression of AREP1 through RNAi silencing resulted in reduction of primary root length, increase of lateral root number, and expansion of adventitious roots, compared to the observations in wild-type plants in the presence of auxin. By contrast, transgenic plants overexpressing AREP1 showed enhanced growth of the primary root under auxin treatment. Additionally, root morphology, including lateral root number and adventitious roots, differed greatly between transgenic and wild-type plants. Further analysis indicated that the expression of auxin-responsive genes, such as IAA3, IAA7, IAA17, GH3.2, GH3.3, and SAUR-AC1, was significantly higher in AREP1 RNAi plants, and was slightly lower in AREP1 overexpressing plants than in wild-type plants. These results suggest that the novel endogenous peptide AREP1 plays an important role in the process of auxin-mediated root development.

  1. An auxin-responsive endogenous peptide regulates root development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengxi Yang; Yu Song; Hao Yang; Zhibin Liu; Genfa Zhu; Yi Yang

    2014-01-01

    Auxin plays critical roles in root formation and development. The components involved in this process, however, are not well understood. Here, we newly identified a peptide encoding gene, auxin-responsive endogenous polypeptide 1 (AREP1), which is induced by auxin, and mediates root development in Arabidopsis. Expression of AREP1 was specific to the cotyledon and to root and shoot meristem tissues. Amounts of AREP1 transcripts and AREP1-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins were elevated in response to indoleacetic acid treatment. Suppression of AREP1 through RNAi silencing resulted in reduction of primary root length, increase of lateral root number, and expansion of adventitious roots, compared to the observations in wild-type plants in the presence of auxin. By contrast, transgenic plants overexpressing AREP1 showed enhanced growth of the primary root under auxin treatment. Additionally, rootmorphology, including lateral root number and adventitious roots, differed greatly between transgenic and wildtype plants. Further analysis indicated that the expression of auxin-responsive genes, such as IAA3, IAA7, IAA17, GH3.2, GH3.3, and SAUR-AC1, was significantly higher in AREP1 RNAi plants, and was slightly lower in AREP1 overexpressing plants than in wildtype plants. These results suggest that the novel endogenous peptide AREP1 plays an important role in the process of auxinmediated root development.

  2. Role of the Arabidopsis PIN6 Auxin Transporter in Auxin Homeostasis and Auxin-Mediated Development

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Plant-specific PIN-formed (PIN) efflux transporters for the plant hormone auxin are required for tissue-specific directional auxin transport and cellular auxin homeostasis. The Arabidopsis PIN protein family has been shown to play important roles in developmental processes such as embryogenesis, organogenesis, vascular tissue differentiation, root meristem patterning and tropic growth. Here we analyzed roles of the less characterised Arabidopsis PIN6 auxin transporter. PIN6 is auxin-inducible...

  3. Partially redundant functions of two SET-domain polycomb-group proteins in controlling initiation of seed development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongfang; Tyson, Mark D; Jackson, Shawn S; Yadegari, Ramin

    2006-08-29

    In Arabidopsis, a complex of Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins functions in the female gametophyte to control the initiation of seed development. Mutations in the PcG genes, including MEDEA (MEA) and FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT SEED 2 (FIS2), produce autonomous seeds where endosperm proliferation occurs in the absence of fertilization. By using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified MEA and a related protein, SWINGER (SWN), as SET-domain partners of FIS2. Localization data indicated that all three proteins are present in the female gametophyte. Although single-mutant swn plants did not show any defects, swn mutations enhanced the mea mutant phenotype in producing autonomous seeds. Thus, MEA and SWN perform partially redundant functions in controlling the initiation of endosperm development before fertilization in Arabidopsis.

  4. An overview of the gene regulatory network controlling trichome development in the model plant, Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitakanta ePattanaik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Trichomes are specialized epidermal cells located on aerial parts of plants and are associated with a wide array of biological processes. Trichomes protect plants from adverse conditions including UV light and herbivore attack and are also an important source of a number of phytochemicals. The simple unicellular trichomes of Arabidopsis serve as an excellent model to study molecular mechanism of cell differentiation and pattern formation in plants. The emerging picture suggests that the developmental process is controlled by a transcriptional network involving three major groups of transcription factors: the R2R3 MYB, basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH and WD40 repeat (WDR protein. These regulatory proteins form a trimeric activator complex that positively regulates trichome development. The single repeat R3 MYBs act as negative regulators of trichome development. They compete with the R2R3 MYBs to bind the bHLH factor and form a repressor complex. In addition to activator-repressor mechanism, a depletion mechanism may operate in parallel during trichome development. In this mechanism, the bHLH factor traps the WDR protein which results in depletion of WDR protein in neighboring cells. Consequently, the cells with high levels of bHLH and WDR proteins are developed into trichomes. A group of C2H2 zinc finger TFs has also been implicated in trichome development. Phytohormones, including gibberellins and jasmonic acid, play significant roles in this developmental process. Recently, microRNAs have been shown to be involved in trichome development. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that the activities of the key regulatory proteins involved in trichome development are controlled by the 26S/ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS, highlighting the complexity of the regulatory network controlling this developmental process. To complement several excellent recent relevant reviews, this review focuses on the transcriptional network and hormonal interplay

  5. Simultaneous silencing of two arginine decarboxylase genes alters development in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eSánchez-Rangel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines (PAs are small aliphatic polycations that are found ubiquitously in all organisms. In plants, PAs are involved in diverse biological processes such as growth, development, and stress responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the arginine decarboxylase enzymes (ADC1 and 2 catalyze the first step of PA biosynthesis. For a better understanding of PA biological functions, mutants in PA biosynthesis have been generated; however, the double adc1/adc2 mutant is not viable in A. thaliana. In this study, we generated non-lethal A. thaliana lines through an artificial microRNA that simultaneously silenced the two ADC genes (amiR:ADC. The generated transgenic lines (amiR:ADC-L1 and -L2 showed reduced AtADC1 and AtADC2 transcript levels. For further analyses the amiR:ADC-L2 line was selected. We found that the amiR:ADC-L2 line showed a significant decrease of their PA levels. The co-silencing revealed a stunted growth in A. thaliana seedlings, plantlets and delay in its flowering rate; these phenotypes were reverted with PA treatment. In addition, amiR:ADC-L2 plants displayed two seed phenotypes, such as yellow and brownish seeds. The yellow mutant seeds were smaller than adc1, adc2 mutants and wild type seeds; however, the brownish were the smallest seeds with arrested embryos at the torpedo stage. These data reinforce the importance of PA homeostasis in the plant development processes.

  6. β-amylase-like proteins function as transcription factors in Arabidopsis, controlling shoot growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, Heike; Soyk, Sebastian; Simková, Klára; Hostettler, Carmen; Marafino, John; Mainiero, Samantha; Vaughan, Cara K; Monroe, Jonathan D; Zeeman, Samuel C

    2011-04-01

    Plants contain β-amylase-like proteins (BAMs; enzymes usually associated with starch breakdown) present in the nucleus rather than targeted to the chloroplast. They possess BRASSINAZOLE RESISTANT1 (BZR1)-type DNA binding domains--also found in transcription factors mediating brassinosteroid (BR) responses. The two Arabidopsis thaliana BZR1-BAM proteins (BAM7 and BAM8) bind a cis-regulatory element that both contains a G box and resembles a BR-responsive element. In protoplast transactivation assays, these BZR1-BAMs activate gene expression. Structural modeling suggests that the BAM domain's glucan binding cleft is intact, but the recombinant proteins are at least 1000 times less active than chloroplastic β-amylases. Deregulation of BZR1-BAMs (the bam7bam8 double mutant and BAM8-overexpressing plants) causes altered leaf growth and development. Of the genes upregulated in plants overexpressing BAM8 and downregulated in bam7bam8 plants, many carry the cis-regulatory element in their promoters. Many genes that respond to BRs are inversely regulated by BZR1-BAMs. We propose a role for BZR1-BAMs in controlling plant growth and development through crosstalk with BR signaling. Furthermore, we speculate that BZR1-BAMs may transmit metabolic signals by binding a ligand in their BAM domain, although diurnal changes in the concentration of maltose, a candidate ligand produced by chloroplastic β-amylases, do not influence their transcription factor function.

  7. CUTIN SYNTHASE2 maintains progressively developing cuticular ridges in Arabidopsis sepals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Lilan; Brown, Joel; Segerson, Nicholas A; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Roeder, Adrienne H K

    2017-01-18

    The cuticle is a crucial barrier on the aerial surfaces of land plants. In many plants, including Arabidopsis, the sepals and petals form distinctive nanoridges in their cuticles. Yet little is known about how the formation and maintenance of these nanostructures is coordinated with the growth and development of the underlying cells. Here we characterize the cutin synthase 2 (cus2) mutant, which causes a great reduction in cuticular ridges on the mature sepal epidermis, but only a moderate effect on petal cone cell ridges. Using scanning electron microscopy and confocal live imaging combined with quantification of cellular growth, we find that cuticular ridge formation progresses down the sepal from tip to base as the sepal grows. pCUS2::GFP-GUS reporter expression coincides with cuticular ridge formation, descending the sepal from tip to base. Ridge formation also coincides with the reduction in growth rate and termination of cell division of the underlying epidermal cells. Surprisingly, cuticular ridges at first form normally in the cus2 mutant, but are lost progressively at later stages of sepal development, indicating that CUS2 is crucial for maintenance of cuticular ridges after they are formed. Our results reveal the dynamics of both ridge formation and maintenance as the sepal grows.

  8. Arabidopsis MALE STERILITY1 encodes a PHD-type transcription factor and regulates pollen and tapetum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takuya; Nagata, Noriko; Yoshiba, Yoshu; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Ma, Hong; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2007-11-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana MALE STERILITY1 (MS1) gene encodes a nuclear protein with Leu zipper-like and PHD-finger motifs and is important for postmeiotic pollen development. Here, we examined MS1 function using both cell biological and molecular biological approaches. We introduced a fusion construct of MS1 and a transcriptional repression domain (MS1-SRDX) into wild-type Arabidopsis, and the transgenic plants showed a semisterile phenotype similar to that of ms1. Since the repression domain can convert various kinds of transcriptional activators to dominant repressors, this suggested that MS1 functioned as a transcriptional activator. The Leu zipper-like region and the PHD motif were required for the MS1 function. Phenotypic analysis of the ms1 mutant and the MS1-SRDX transgenic Arabidopsis indicated that MS1 was involved in formation of pollen exine and pollen cytosolic components as well as tapetum development. Next, we searched for MS1 downstream genes by analyzing publicly available microarray data and identified 95 genes affected by MS1. Using a transgenic ms1 plant showing dexamethasone-inducible recovery of fertility, we further examined whether these genes were immediately downstream of MS1. From these results, we discuss a role of MS1 in pollen and tapetum development and the conservation of MS1 function in flowering plants.

  9. Growth and development in Arabidopsis thaliana through an entire life cycle under simulated microgravity conditions on a clinostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Yamamoto, R; Fujii, S; Soga, K; Hoson, T; Shimazu, T; Masuda, Y; Kamisaka, S; Ueda, J

    1999-12-01

    The effects of simulated microgravity conditions produced by a horizontal clinostat on the entire life cycle of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia and Landsberg erecta were studied. Horizontal clinorotation affected little germination of seeds, growth and development of rosette leaves and roots during early vegetative growth stage, and the onset of the bolting of inflorescence axis and flower formation in reproductive growth stage, although it suppressed elongation of inflorescence axes. The clinorotation substantially reduced the numbers of siliques and seeds in Landsberg erecta, and completely inhibited seed production in Columbia. Seeds produced in Landsberg erecta on the clinostat were capable of germinating and developing rosette leaves normally on the ground. On the other hand, growth of pin formed mutant (pin/pin) of Arabidopsis ecotype Enkheim, which has a unique structure of inflorescence axis with no flower and extremely low levels of auxin polar transport activity, was inhibited and the seedlings frequently died during vegetative stage on the clinostat. Seed formation and inflorescence growth of the seedlings with normal shape (pin/+ or +/+) were also suppressed on the clinostat. These results suggest that the growth and development of Arabidopsis, especially in reproductive growth stage, is suppressed under simulated microgravity conditions on a clinostat. To complete the life cycle probably seems to be quite difficult, although it is possible in some ecotypes.

  10. Transcriptomic characterization of a synergistic genetic interaction during carpel margin meristem development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April N Wynn

    Full Text Available In flowering plants the gynoecium is the female reproductive structure. In Arabidopsis thaliana ovules initiate within the developing gynoecium from meristematic tissue located along the margins of the floral carpels. When fertilized the ovules will develop into seeds. SEUSS (SEU and AINTEGUMENTA (ANT encode transcriptional regulators that are critical for the proper formation of ovules from the carpel margin meristem (CMM. The synergistic loss of ovule initiation observed in the seu ant double mutant suggests that SEU and ANT share overlapping functions during CMM development. However the molecular mechanism underlying this synergistic interaction is unknown. Using the ATH1 transcriptomics platform we identified transcripts that were differentially expressed in seu ant double mutant relative to wild type and single mutant gynoecia. In particular we sought to identify transcripts whose expression was dependent on the coordinated activities of the SEU and ANT gene products. Our analysis identifies a diverse set of transcripts that display altered expression in the seu ant double mutant tissues. The analysis of overrepresented Gene Ontology classifications suggests a preponderance of transcriptional regulators including multiple members of the REPRODUCTIVE MERISTEMS (REM and GROWTH-REGULATING FACTOR (GRF families are mis-regulated in the seu ant gynoecia. Our in situ hybridization analyses indicate that many of these genes are preferentially expressed within the developing CMM. This study is the first step toward a detailed description of the transcriptional regulatory hierarchies that control the development of the CMM and ovule initiation. Understanding the regulatory hierarchy controlled by SEU and ANT will clarify the molecular mechanism of the functional redundancy of these two genes and illuminate the developmental and molecular events required for CMM development and ovule initiation.

  11. TCP15 modulates cytokinin and auxin responses during gynoecium development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Leandro E; Uberti-Manassero, Nora G; Arce, Agustín L; Colombatti, Francisco; Alemano, Sergio G; Gonzalez, Daniel H

    2015-10-01

    We studied the role of Arabidopsis thaliana TCP15, a member of the TEOSINTE BRANCHED1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF (TCP) transcription factor family, in gynoecium development. Plants that express TCP15 from the 35S CaMV promoter (35S:TCP15) develop flowers with defects in carpel fusion and a reduced number of stigmatic papillae. In contrast, the expression of TCP15 fused to a repressor domain from its own promoter causes the development of outgrowths topped with stigmatic papillae from the replum. 35S:TCP15 plants show lower levels of the auxin indoleacetic acid and reduced expression of the auxin reporter DR5 and the auxin biosynthesis genes YUCCA1 and YUCCA4, suggesting that TCP15 is a repressor of auxin biosynthesis. Treatment of plants with cytokinin enhances the developmental effects of expressing TCP15 or its repressor form. In addition, treatment of a knock-out double mutant in TCP15 and the related gene TCP14 with cytokinin causes replum enlargement, increased development of outgrowths, and the induction of the auxin biosynthesis genes YUCCA1 and YUCCA4. A comparison of the phenotypes observed after cytokinin treatment of plants with altered expression levels of TCP15 and auxin biosynthesis genes suggests that TCP15 modulates gynoecium development by influencing auxin homeostasis. We propose that the correct development of the different tissues of the gynoecium requires a balance between auxin levels and cytokinin responses, and that TCP15 participates in a feedback loop that helps to adjust this balance.

  12. Growth hormone (GH), brain development and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, M J; Blackmore, D G

    2011-12-01

    A range of observations support a role for GH in development and function of the brain. These include altered brain structure in GH receptor null mice, and impaired cognition in GH deficient rodents and in a subgroup of GH receptor defective patients (Laron dwarfs). GH has been shown to alter neurogenesis, myelin synthesis and dendritic branching, and both the GH receptor and GH itself are expressed widely in the brain. We have found a population of neural stem cells which are activated by GH infusion, and which give rise to neurons in mice. These stem cells are activated by voluntary exercise in a GH-dependent manner. Given the findings that local synthesis of GH occurs in the hippocampus in response to a memory task, and that GH replacement improves memory and cognition in rodents and humans, these new observations warrant a reappraisal of the clinical importance of GH replacement in GH deficient states.

  13. A genetic screen for modifiers of UFO meristem activity identifies three novel FUSED FLORAL ORGANS genes required for early flower development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, J Z; Fletcher, J C; Chen, X; Meyerowitz, E M

    1998-06-01

    In a screen to identify novel genes required for early Arabidopsis flower development, we isolated four independent mutations that enhance the Ufo phenotype toward the production of filamentous structures in place of flowers. The mutants fall into three complementation groups, which we have termed FUSED FLORAL ORGANS (FFO) loci. ffo mutants have specific defects in floral organ separation and/or positioning; thus, the FFO genes identify components of a boundary formation mechanism(s) acting between developing floral organ primordia. FFO1 and FFO3 have specific functions in cauline leaf/stem separation and in first- and third-whorl floral organ separation, with FFO3 likely acting to establish and FFO1 to maintain floral organ boundaries. FFO2 acts at early floral stages to regulate floral organ number and positioning and to control organ separation within and between whorls. Plants doubly mutant for two ffo alleles display additive phenotypes, indicating that the FFO genes may act in separate pathways. Plants doubly mutant for an ffo gene and for ufo, lfy, or clv3 reveal that the FFO genes play roles related to those of UFO and LFY in floral meristem initiation and that FFO2 and FFO3 may act to control cell proliferation late in inflorescence development.

  14. Secondary cell wall composition and candidate gene expression in developing willow (Salix purpurea) stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yongfang; Gritsch, Cristina; Tryfona, Theodora; Ray, Mike J; Andongabo, Ambrose; Hassani-Pak, Keywan; Jones, Huw D; Dupree, Paul; Karp, Angela; Shewry, Peter R; Mitchell, Rowan A C

    2014-05-01

    The properties of the secondary cell wall (SCW) in willow largely determine the suitability of willow biomass feedstock for potential bioenergy and biofuel applications. SCW development has been little studied in willow and it is not known how willow compares with model species, particularly the closely related genus Populus. To address this and relate SCW synthesis to candidate genes in willow, a tractable bud culture-derived system was developed in Salix purpurea, and cell wall composition and RNA-Seq transcriptome were followed in stems during early development. A large increase in SCW deposition in the period 0-2 weeks after transfer to soil was characterised by a big increase in xylan content, but no change in the frequency of substitution of xylan with glucuronic acid, and increased abundance of putative transcripts for synthesis of SCW cellulose, xylan and lignin. Histochemical staining and immunolabeling revealed that increased deposition of lignin and xylan was associated with xylem, xylem fibre cells and phloem fibre cells. Transcripts orthologous to those encoding xylan synthase components IRX9 and IRX10 and xylan glucuronyl transferase GUX1 in Arabidopsis were co-expressed, and showed the same spatial pattern of expression revealed by in situ hybridisation at four developmental stages, with abundant expression in proto-xylem, xylem fibre and ray parenchyma cells and some expression in phloem fibre cells. The results show a close similarity with SCW development in Populus species, but also give novel information on the relationship between spatial and temporal variation in xylan-related transcripts and xylan composition.

  15. Arabidopsis COMPASS-like complexes mediate histone H3 lysine-4 trimethylation to control floral transition and plant development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danhua Jiang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4 methylation is associated with transcribed genes in eukaryotes. In Drosophila and mammals, both di- and tri-methylation of H3K4 are associated with gene activation. In contrast to animals, in Arabidopsis H3K4 trimethylation, but not mono- or di-methylation of H3K4, has been implicated in transcriptional activation. H3K4 methylation is catalyzed by the H3K4 methyltransferase complexes known as COMPASS or COMPASS-like in yeast and mammals. Here, we report that Arabidopsis homologs of the COMPASS and COMPASS-like complex core components known as Ash2, RbBP5, and WDR5 in humans form a nuclear subcomplex during vegetative and reproductive development, which can associate with multiple putative H3K4 methyltransferases. Loss of function of ARABIDOPSIS Ash2 RELATIVE (ASH2R causes a great decrease in genome-wide H3K4 trimethylation, but not in di- or mono-methylation. Knockdown of ASH2R or the RbBP5 homolog suppresses the expression of a crucial Arabidopsis floral repressor, FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC, and FLC homologs resulting in accelerated floral transition. ASH2R binds to the chromatin of FLC and FLC homologs in vivo and is required for H3K4 trimethylation, but not for H3K4 dimethylation in these loci; overexpression of ASH2R causes elevated H3K4 trimethylation, but not H3K4 dimethylation, in its target genes FLC and FLC homologs, resulting in activation of these gene expression and consequent late flowering. These results strongly suggest that H3K4 trimethylation in FLC and its homologs can activate their expression, providing concrete evidence that H3K4 trimethylation accumulation can activate eukaryotic gene expression. Furthermore, our findings suggest that there are multiple COMPASS-like complexes in Arabidopsis and that these complexes deposit trimethyl but not di- or mono-methyl H3K4 in target genes to promote their expression, providing a molecular explanation for the observed coupling of H3K4 trimethylation (but not H3

  16. Reference: 798 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iption factors, control the delicately tuned reorientation and timing of cell div...EZ and SOMBRERO control the orientation of cell division plane in Arabidopsis root stem cells. 6 913-22 1908

  17. Coordinated regulation of apical hook development by gibberellins and ethylene in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fengying; Zhang, Xing; Zhu, Ziqiang; Ji, Yusi; He, Wenrong; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Li, Mingzhe; Guo, Hongwei

    2012-05-01

    Dark-grown Arabidopsis seedlings develop an apical hook when germinating in soil, which protects the cotyledons and apical meristematic tissues when protruding through the soil. Several hormones are reported to distinctly modulate this process. Previous studies have shown that ethylene and gibberellins (GAs) coordinately regulate the hook development, although the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we showed that GA(3) enhanced while paclobutrazol repressed ethylene- and EIN3-overexpression (EIN3ox)-induced hook curvature, and della mutant exhibited exaggerated hook curvature, which required an intact ethylene signaling pathway. Genetic study revealed that GA-enhanced hook development was dependent on HOOKLESS 1 (HLS1), a central regulator mediating the input of the multiple signaling pathways during apical hook development. We further found that GA(3) induced (and DELLA proteins repressed) HLS1 expression in an ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3/EIN3-LIKE 1 (EIN3/EIL1)-dependent manner, whereby EIN3/EIL1 activated HLS1 transcription by directly binding to its promoter. Additionally, DELLA proteins were found to interact with the DNA-binding domains of EIN3/EIL1 and repress EIN3/EIL1-regulated HLS1 expression. Treatment with naphthylphthalamic acid, a polar auxin transport inhibitor, repressed the constitutively exaggerated hook curvature of EIN3ox line and della mutant, supporting that auxin functions downstream of the ethylene and GA pathways in hook development. Taken together, our results identify EIN3/EIL1 as a new class of DELLA-associated transcription factors and demonstrate that GA promotes apical hook formation in cooperation with ethylene partly by inducing the expression of HLS1 via derepression of EIN3/EIL1 functions.

  18. Coordinated regulation of apical hook development by gibberellins and ethylene in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengying An; Xing Zhang; Ziqiang Zhu; Yusi Ji; Wenrong He; Zhiqiang Jiang; Mingzhe Li; Hongwei Guo

    2012-01-01

    Dark-grown Arabidopsis seedlings develop an apical hook when germinating in soil,which protects the cotyledons and apical meristematic tissues when protruding through the soil.Several hormones are reported to distinctly modulate this process.Previous studies have shown that ethylene and gibberellins (GAs) coordinately regulate the hook development,although the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown.Here we showed that GA3 enhanced while paclobutrazol repressed ethylene- and EIN3-overexpression (EIN3ox)-induced hook curvature,and della mutant exhibited exaggerated hook curvature,which required an intact ethylene signaling pathway.Genetic study revealed that GA-enhanced hook development was dependent on HOOKLESS 1 (HLS1),a central regulator mediating the input of the multiple signaling pathways during apical hook development.We further found that GA3 induced (and DELLA proteins repressed) HLS1 expression in an ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE 3/EIN3-LIKE 1 (EIN3/EIL1)-dependent manner,whereby EIN3/EIL1 activated HLS1 transcription by directly binding to its promoter.Additionally,DELLA proteins were found to interact with the DNA-binding domains of EIN3/EIL1 and repress EIN3/EIL1-regulated HLS1 expression.Treatment with naphthylphthalamic acid,a polar auxin transport inhibitor,repressed the constitutively exaggerated hook curvature of EIN3ox line and della mutant,supporting that auxin functions downstream of the ethylene and GA pathways in hook development.Taken together,our results identify EIN3/EIL1 as a new class of DELLA-associated transcription factors and demonstrate that GA promotes apical hook formation in cooperation with ethylene partly by inducing the expression of HLS1 via derepression of EIN3/EIL1 functions.

  19. Glucose and auxin signaling interaction in controlling Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings root growth and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhuwaneshwar S Mishra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plant root growth and development is highly plastic and can adapt to many environmental conditions. Sugar signaling has been shown to affect root growth and development by interacting with phytohormones such as gibberellins, cytokinin and abscisic acid. Auxin signaling and transport has been earlier shown to be controlling plant root length, number of lateral roots, root hair and root growth direction. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Increasing concentration of glucose not only controls root length, root hair and number of lateral roots but can also modulate root growth direction. Since root growth and development is also controlled by auxin, whole genome transcript profiling was done to find out the extent of interaction between glucose and auxin response pathways. Glucose alone could transcriptionally regulate 376 (62% genes out of 604 genes affected by IAA. Presence of glucose could also modulate the extent of regulation 2 fold or more of almost 63% genes induced or repressed by IAA. Interestingly, glucose could affect induction or repression of IAA affected genes (35% even if glucose alone had no significant effect on the transcription of these genes itself. Glucose could affect auxin biosynthetic YUCCA genes family members, auxin transporter PIN proteins, receptor TIR1 and members of a number of gene families including AUX/IAA, GH3 and SAUR involved in auxin signaling. Arabidopsis auxin receptor tir1 and response mutants, axr2, axr3 and slr1 not only display a defect in glucose induced change in root length, root hair elongation and lateral root production but also accentuate glucose induced increase in root growth randomization from vertical suggesting glucose effects on plant root growth and development are mediated by auxin signaling components. CONCLUSION: Our findings implicate an important role of the glucose interacting with auxin signaling and transport machinery to control seedling root growth and development in changing nutrient

  20. Lgr5(+ve) stem/progenitor cells contribute to nephron formation during kidney development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Rookmaaker, M.B.; Kujala, P.; Ng, A.; Leushacke, M.; Snippert, H.; van de Wetering, M.; Tan, S.; van Es, J.H.; Huch, M.; Poulsom, R.; Verhaar, M.C.; Peters, P.J.; Clevers, H.

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells and their lineage-restricted progeny drive nephron formation within the developing kidney. Here, we document expression of the adult stem cell marker Lgr5 in the developing kidney and assess the stem/progenitor identity of Lgr5(+ve) cells via in vivo lineage tracing. The appea

  1. Lgr5(+ve) Stem/Progenitor Cells Contribute to Nephron Formation during Kidney Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, Nick; Rookmaaker, Maarten B.; Kujala, Pekka; Ng, Annie; Leushacke, Marc; Snippert, Hugo; van de Wetering, Marc; Tan, Shawna; Van Es, Johan H.; Huch, Meritxell; Poulsom, Richard; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Peters, Peter J.; Clevers, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells and their lineage-restricted progeny drive nephron formation within the developing kidney. Here, we document expression of the adult stem cell marker Lgr5 in the developing kidney and assess the stem/progenitor identity of Lgr5(+ve) cells via in vivo lineage tracing. The appea

  2. A Cold-Inducible DEAD-Box RNA Helicase from Arabidopsis thaliana Regulates Plant Growth and Development under Low Temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuelin Liu

    Full Text Available DEAD-box RNA helicases comprise a large family and are involved in a range of RNA processing events. Here, we identified one of the Arabidopsis thaliana DEAD-box RNA helicases, AtRH7, as an interactor of Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN 3 (AtCSP3, which is an RNA chaperone involved in cold adaptation. Promoter:GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtRH7 is expressed ubiquitously and that its levels of the expression are higher in rapidly growing tissues. Knockout mutant lines displayed several morphological alterations such as disturbed vein pattern, pointed first true leaves, and short roots, which resemble ribosome-related mutants of Arabidopsis. In addition, aberrant floral development was also observed in rh7 mutants. When the mutants were germinated at low temperature (12°C, both radicle and first leaf emergence were severely delayed; after exposure of seedlings to a long period of cold, the mutants developed aberrant, fewer, and smaller leaves. RNA blots and circular RT-PCR revealed that 35S and 18S rRNA precursors accumulated to higher levels in the mutants than in WT under both normal and cold conditions, suggesting the mutants are partially impaired in pre-rRNA processing. Taken together, the results suggest that AtRH7 affects rRNA biogenesis and plays an important role in plant growth under cold.

  3. Reduction of the cytosolic phosphoglucomutase in Arabidopsis reveals impact on plant growth, seed and root development, and carbohydrate partitioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Malinova

    Full Text Available Phosphoglucomutase (PGM catalyses the interconversion of glucose 1-phosphate (G1P and glucose 6-phosphate (G6P and exists as plastidial (pPGM and cytosolic (cPGM isoforms. The plastidial isoform is essential for transitory starch synthesis in chloroplasts of leaves, whereas the cytosolic counterpart is essential for glucose phosphate partitioning and, therefore, for syntheses of sucrose and cell wall components. In Arabidopsis two cytosolic isoforms (PGM2 and PGM3 exist. Both PGM2 and PGM3 are redundant in function as single mutants reveal only small or no alterations compared to wild type with respect to plant primary metabolism. So far, there are no reports of Arabidopsis plants lacking the entire cPGM or total PGM activity, respectively. Therefore, amiRNA transgenic plants were generated and used for analyses of various parameters such as growth, development, and starch metabolism. The lack of the entire cPGM activity resulted in a strongly reduced growth revealed by decreased rosette fresh weight, shorter roots, and reduced seed production compared to wild type. By contrast content of starch, sucrose, maltose and cell wall components were significantly increased. The lack of both cPGM and pPGM activities in Arabidopsis resulted in dwarf growth, prematurely die off, and inability to develop a functional inflorescence. The combined results are discussed in comparison to potato, the only described mutant with lack of total PGM activity.

  4. TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA 1 ubiquitously regulates plant growth and development from Arabidopsis to foxtail millet (Setaria italica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaige; Qi, Shuanghui; Li, Dong; Jin, Changyu; Gao, Chenhao; Duan, Shaowei; Feng, Baili; Chen, Mingxun

    2017-01-01

    TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA 1 of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtTTG1) is a WD40 repeat transcription factor that plays multiple roles in plant growth and development, particularly in seed metabolite production. In the present study, to determine whether SiTTG1 of the phylogenetically distant monocot foxtail millet (Setaria italica) has similar functions, we used transgenic Arabidopsis and Nicotiana systems to explore its activities. We found that SiTTG1 functions as a transcription factor. Overexpression of the SiTTG1 gene rescued many of the mutant phenotypes in Arabidopsis ttg1-13 plants. Additionally, SiTTG1 overexpression fully corrected the reduced expression of mucilage biosynthetic genes, and the induced expression of genes involved in accumulation of seed fatty acids and storage proteins in developing seeds of ttg1-13 plants. Ectopic expression of SiTTG1 restored the sensitivity of the ttg1-13 mutant to salinity and high glucose stresses during germination and seedling establishment, and restored altered expression levels of some stress-responsive genes in ttg1-13 seedlings to the wild type level under salinity and glucose stresses. Our results provide information that will be valuable for understanding the function of TTG1 from monocot to dicot species and identifying a promising target for genetic manipulation of foxtail millet to improve the amount of seed metabolites.

  5. A Cold-Inducible DEAD-Box RNA Helicase from Arabidopsis thaliana Regulates Plant Growth and Development under Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuelin; Tabata, Daisuke; Imai, Ryozo

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases comprise a large family and are involved in a range of RNA processing events. Here, we identified one of the Arabidopsis thaliana DEAD-box RNA helicases, AtRH7, as an interactor of Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN 3 (AtCSP3), which is an RNA chaperone involved in cold adaptation. Promoter:GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtRH7 is expressed ubiquitously and that its levels of the expression are higher in rapidly growing tissues. Knockout mutant lines displayed several morphological alterations such as disturbed vein pattern, pointed first true leaves, and short roots, which resemble ribosome-related mutants of Arabidopsis. In addition, aberrant floral development was also observed in rh7 mutants. When the mutants were germinated at low temperature (12°C), both radicle and first leaf emergence were severely delayed; after exposure of seedlings to a long period of cold, the mutants developed aberrant, fewer, and smaller leaves. RNA blots and circular RT-PCR revealed that 35S and 18S rRNA precursors accumulated to higher levels in the mutants than in WT under both normal and cold conditions, suggesting the mutants are partially impaired in pre-rRNA processing. Taken together, the results suggest that AtRH7 affects rRNA biogenesis and plays an important role in plant growth under cold.

  6. Comparative expression profiling reveals gene functions in female meiosis and gametophyte development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lihua; He, Jiangman; Cai, Hanyang; Lin, Haiyan; Li, Yanqiang; Liu, Renyi; Yang, Zhenbiao; Qin, Yuan

    2014-11-01

    Megasporogenesis is essential for female fertility, and requires the accomplishment of meiosis and the formation of functional megaspores. The inaccessibility and low abundance of female meiocytes make it particularly difficult to elucidate the molecular basis underlying megasporogenesis. We used high-throughput tag-sequencing analysis to identify genes expressed in female meiocytes (FMs) by comparing gene expression profiles from wild-type ovules undergoing megasporogenesis with those from the spl mutant ovules, which lack megasporogenesis. A total of 862 genes were identified as FMs, with levels that are consistently reduced in spl ovules in two biological replicates. Fluorescence-assisted cell sorting followed by RNA-seq analysis of DMC1:GFP-labeled female meiocytes confirmed that 90% of the FMs are indeed detected in the female meiocyte protoplast profiling. We performed reverse genetic analysis of 120 candidate genes and identified four FM genes with a function in female meiosis progression in Arabidopsis. We further revealed that KLU, a putative cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, is involved in chromosome pairing during female meiosis, most likely by affecting the normal expression pattern of DMC1 in ovules during female meiosis. Our studies provide valuable information for functional genomic analyses of plant germline development as well as insights into meiosis.

  7. SUPERMAN attenuates positive INNER NO OUTER autoregulation to maintain polar development of Arabidopsis ovule outer integuments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Robert J; Kotow, Louren M; Gasser, Charles S

    2002-09-01

    The outer integument of Arabidopsis ovules exhibits marked polarity in its development, growing extensively from the abaxial side, but only to a very limited extent from the adaxial side of the ovule. Mutations in two genes affect this asymmetric growth. In strong inner no outer (ino) mutants outer integument growth is eliminated, whereas in superman (sup) mutants integument growth on the adaxial side is nearly equal to wild-type growth on the abaxial side. Through complementation and reporter gene analysis, a region of INO 5'-flanking sequences was identified that contains sufficient information for appropriate expression of INO. Using this INO promoter (P-INO) we show that INO acts as a positive regulator of transcription from P-INO, but is not sufficient for de novo initiation of transcription in other plant parts. Protein fusions demonstrate nuclear localization of INO, consistent with a proposed role as a transcription factor for this member of the YABBY protein family. Through its ability to inhibit expression of the endogenous INO gene and transgenes driven by P-INO, SUP is shown to be a negative regulator of INO transcription. Substitution of another YABBY protein coding region (CRABS CLAW) for INO overcomes this negative regulation, indicating that SUP suppresses INO transcription through attenuation of the INO positive autoregulatory loop.

  8. Effect of nitrogen fertilization and fungicides on Botryosphaeria stem blight lesion development on detached stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Botryosphaeria stem blight is a destructive disease of blueberries that has not been well managed with fungicides. Field observations showed that stem blight is more severe on vigorously growing plants than on slower growing plants. Detached stem assays were used to compare the effect of fertil...

  9. Calpain-Mediated Positional Information Directs Cell Wall Orientation to Sustain Plant Stem Cell Activity, Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhe; Brown, Roy C; Fletcher, Jennifer C; Opsahl-Sorteberg, Hilde-Gunn

    2015-09-01

    Eukaryotic development and stem cell control depend on the integration of cell positional sensing with cell cycle control and cell wall positioning, yet few factors that directly link these events are known. The DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 (DEK1) gene encoding the unique plant calpain protein is fundamental for development and growth, being essential to confer and maintain epidermal cell identity that allows development beyond the globular embryo stage. We show that DEK1 expression is highest in the actively dividing cells of seeds, meristems and vasculature. We further show that eliminating Arabidopsis DEK1 function leads to changes in developmental cues from the first zygotic division onward, altered microtubule patterns and misshapen cells, resulting in early embryo abortion. Expression of the embryonic marker genes WOX2, ATML1, PIN4, WUS and STM, related to axis organization, cell identity and meristem functions, is also altered in dek1 embryos. By monitoring cell layer-specific DEK1 down-regulation, we show that L1- and 35S-induced down-regulation mainly affects stem cell functions, causing severe shoot apical meristem phenotypes. These results are consistent with a requirement for DEK1 to direct layer-specific cellular activities and set downstream developmental cues. Our data suggest that DEK1 may anchor cell wall positions and control cell division and differentiation, thereby balancing the plant's requirement to maintain totipotent stem cell reservoirs while simultaneously directing growth and organ formation. A role for DEK1 in regulating microtubule-orchestrated cell wall orientation during cell division can explain its effects on embryonic development, and suggests a more general function for calpains in microtubule organization in eukaryotic cells.

  10. SEEDSTICK is a master regulator of development and metabolism in the Arabidopsis seed coat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Mizzotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of secondary metabolites in the determination of cell identity has been an area of particular interest over recent years, and studies strongly indicate a connection between cell fate and the regulation of enzymes involved in secondary metabolism. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the maternally derived seed coat plays pivotal roles in both the protection of the developing embryo and the first steps of germination. In this regard, a characteristic feature of seed coat development is the accumulation of proanthocyanidins (PAs - a class of phenylpropanoid metabolites in the innermost layer of the seed coat. Our genome-wide transcriptomic analysis suggests that the ovule identity factor SEEDSTICK (STK is involved in the regulation of several metabolic processes, providing a strong basis for a connection between cell fate determination, development and metabolism. Using phenotypic, genetic, biochemical and transcriptomic approaches, we have focused specifically on the role of STK in PA biosynthesis. Our results indicate that STK exerts its effect by direct regulation of the gene encoding BANYULS/ANTHOCYANIDIN REDUCTASE (BAN/ANR, which converts anthocyanidins into their corresponding 2,3-cis-flavan-3-ols. Our study also demonstrates that the levels of H3K9ac chromatin modification directly correlate with the active state of BAN in an STK-dependent way. This is consistent with the idea that MADS-domain proteins control the expression of their target genes through the modification of chromatin states. STK might thus recruit or regulate histone modifying factors to control their activity. In addition, we show that STK is able to regulate other BAN regulators. Our study demonstrates for the first time how a floral homeotic gene controls tissue identity through the regulation of a wide range of processes including the accumulation of secondary metabolites.

  11. SEEDSTICK is a master regulator of development and metabolism in the Arabidopsis seed coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizzotti, Chiara; Ezquer, Ignacio; Paolo, Dario; Rueda-Romero, Paloma; Guerra, Rosalinda Fiorella; Battaglia, Raffaella; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kater, Martin M; Caporali, Elisabetta; Colombo, Lucia

    2014-12-01

    The role of secondary metabolites in the determination of cell identity has been an area of particular interest over recent years, and studies strongly indicate a connection between cell fate and the regulation of enzymes involved in secondary metabolism. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the maternally derived seed coat plays pivotal roles in both the protection of the developing embryo and the first steps of germination. In this regard, a characteristic feature of seed coat development is the accumulation of proanthocyanidins (PAs - a class of phenylpropanoid metabolites) in the innermost layer of the seed coat. Our genome-wide transcriptomic analysis suggests that the ovule identity factor SEEDSTICK (STK) is involved in the regulation of several metabolic processes, providing a strong basis for a connection between cell fate determination, development and metabolism. Using phenotypic, genetic, biochemical and transcriptomic approaches, we have focused specifically on the role of STK in PA biosynthesis. Our results indicate that STK exerts its effect by direct regulation of the gene encoding BANYULS/ANTHOCYANIDIN REDUCTASE (BAN/ANR), which converts anthocyanidins into their corresponding 2,3-cis-flavan-3-ols. Our study also demonstrates that the levels of H3K9ac chromatin modification directly correlate with the active state of BAN in an STK-dependent way. This is consistent with the idea that MADS-domain proteins control the expression of their target genes through the modification of chromatin states. STK might thus recruit or regulate histone modifying factors to control their activity. In addition, we show that STK is able to regulate other BAN regulators. Our study demonstrates for the first time how a floral homeotic gene controls tissue identity through the regulation of a wide range of processes including the accumulation of secondary metabolites.

  12. DELAYED FLOWERING, an Arabidopsis Gene That Acts in the Autonomous Flowering Promotion Pathway and Is Required for Normal Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Jie Chen; Zheng Yuan; Hai Huang

    2006-01-01

    The control of flowering time in higher plants is one of the most important physiological processes and is critical for their reproductive success. To investigate the mechanisms controlling flowering time, we screened for Arabidopsis mutants with late-flowering phenotypes. One mutant, designated delayed flowering (dfr) in the Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype, was identified with delayed flowering time. Genetic analysis revealed that dfr is a single gene recessive nuclear mutant and the mutation was mapped to a locus tightly linked to UFO on chromosome 1. To our knowledge, no gene regulating flowering time has been reported yet in this region. The dfr mutant plant showed a delayed flowering time under the different growth conditions examined,including long- and short-day photoperiods and gibberellic acid GA3 treatments, suggesting that DFR is a gene involved in the autonomous flowering promotion pathway. The Arabidopsis gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) plays a central role in repressing flowering and its transcripts are undetectable in wild-type Ler.However, FLCexpression was upregulated in the dfrmutant, suggesting that DFR is a negative regulator of FLC. In addition, the dfr mutant plant displayed altered valve shapes of the silique and the number of trichomes and branches of each trichome were both reduced, indicating that the DRFgene is also required for normal plant development. Moreover, dfr leafy-5 (Ify-5) double mutant plants showed a much later flowering time than either dfr or Ify-5 single mutants, indicating that DFR and LFYact synergistically to promote flowering in Arabidopsis.

  13. ETS transcription factors in hematopoietic stem cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciau-Uitz, Aldo; Wang, Lu; Patient, Roger; Liu, Feng

    2013-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essential for the maintenance of the hematopoietic system. However, these cells cannot be maintained or created in vitro, and very little is known about their generation during embryogenesis. Many transcription factors and signaling pathways play essential roles at various stages of HSC development. Members of the ETS ('E twenty-six') family of transcription factors are recognized as key regulators within the gene regulatory networks governing hematopoiesis, including the ontogeny of HSCs. Remarkably, although all ETS transcription factors bind the same DNA consensus sequence and overlapping tissue expression is observed, individual ETS transcription factors play unique roles in the development of HSCs. Also, these transcription factors are recurrently used throughout development and their functions are context-dependent, increasing the challenge of studying their mechanism of action. Critically, ETS factors also play roles under pathological conditions, such as leukemia and, therefore, deciphering their mechanism of action will not only enhance our knowledge of normal hematopoiesis, but also inform protocols for their creation in vitro from pluripotent stem cells and the design of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of malignant blood cell diseases. In this review, we summarize the key findings on the roles of ETS transcription factors in HSC development and discuss novel mechanisms by which they could control hematopoiesis.

  14. Development of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; PENG Li-pan; WU Nan; LI Le-ping

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the in vitro development of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells culture (BM-MSC).Data sources The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed.The search terms were “bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell" and "cell culture".Study selection Articles regarding the in vitro development of BM-MSCs culture,as well as the challenge of optimizing cell culture environment in two-dimensional (2D) vs.3D.Results Improving the culture conditions increases the proliferation and reduces the differentiation.Optimal values for many culture parameters remain to be identified.Expansion of BM-MSCs under defined conditions remains challenging,including the development of optimal culture conditions for BMSC and large-volume production systems.Conclusions Expansion of BM-MSCs under defined conditions remains challenges,including the development of optimal culture conditions for BMSC and scale-up to large-volume production systems.Optimal values for many culture parameters remain to be identified.

  15. The Prdm family: expanding roles in stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenauer, Tobias; Moore, Adrian W

    2012-07-01

    Members of the Prdm family are characterized by an N-terminal PR domain that is related to the SET methyltransferase domain, and multiple zinc fingers that mediate sequence-specific DNA binding and protein-protein interactions. Prdm factors either act as direct histone methyltransferases or recruit a suite of histone-modifying enzymes to target promoters. In this way, they function in many developmental contexts to drive and maintain cell state transitions and to modify the activity of developmental signalling pathways. Here, we provide an overview of the structure and function of Prdm family members and discuss the roles played by these proteins in stem cells and throughout development.

  16. Temporal and Spatial Requirement of EMF1 Activity for Arabidopsis Vegetative and Reproductive Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rosario Sánchez; Minjung Y.Kim; Myriam Calonje; Yong-Hwan Moon; Z.Renee Sung

    2009-01-01

    EMBRYONIC FLOWER (EMF) genes are required to maintain vegetative development via repression of flower homeotic genes in Arabidopsis.Removal of EMF gene function caused plants to flower upon germination,producing abnormal and sterile flowers.The pleiotropic effect of emf1 mutation suggests its requirement for gene programs involved in diverse developmental processes.Transgenic plants harboring EMF1 promoter::glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were generated to investigate the temporal and spatial expression pattern of EMF1.These plants displayed differential GUS activity in vegetative and flower tissues,consistent with the role of EMF1 in regulating multiple gene programs.EMF1::GUS expression pattern in emf mutants suggests organ-specific auto-regulation.Sense- and antisense (as) EMF1 cDNA were expressed under the control of stage- and tissue-specific promoters in transgenic plants.Characterization of these transgenic plants showed that EMF1 activity is required in meristematic as well as differentiating tissues to rescue emf mutant phenotype.Temporal removal or reduction of EMF1 activity in the embryo or shoot apex of wild-type seedlings was sufficient to cause early flowering and terminal flower formation in adult plants.Such reproductive cell memory is reflected in the flower MADS-box gene activity expressed prior to flowering in these early flowering plants.However,temporal removal of EMF1 activity in flower meristem did not affect flower development.Our results are consistent with EMF1's primary role in repressing flowering in order to allow for vegetative growth.

  17. Magnesium transporter AtMGT9 is essential for pollen development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Chen; Dong-ping Li; Le-gong Li; Zhen-hua Liu; Yu-ju Yuan; Li-lin Guo; Dan-dan Mao; Lian-fu Tian; Liang-bi Chen; Sheng Luan

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg2+) is abundant in plant cells and plays a critical role in many physiological processes. A 10-mem-ber gene family AtMGT (also known as AtMRS2) was identified in Arabidopsis, which belongs to a eukaryote subset of the CorA superfamily, functioning as Mg2+ transporters. Some family members (AtMGTI and AtMGT10) function as high-affinity Mg2+ transporter and could complement bacterial mutant or yeast mutant lacking Mg2+ transport capa-bility. Here we report an AtMGT family member, AtMGT9, that functions as a low-affinity Mg2+ transporter, and is essential for pollen development. The functional complementation assay in Salmonella mutant strain MM281 showed that AtMGT9 is capable of mediating Mg2+ uptake in the sub-miilimolar range of Mg2+. The AtMGT9 gene was ex-pressed most strongly in mature anthers and was also detectable in vascular tissues of the leaves, and in young roots. Disruption of AtMGT9 gene expression resulted in abortion of half of the mature pollen grains in heterozygous mu-tant +/mgtg, and no homozygous mutant plant was obtained in the progeny of selfed +/mgt9 plants. Transgenic plants expressing AtMGT9 in these heterozygous plants can recover the pollen phenotype to the wild type. In addition, At-MGT9 RNAi transgenic plants also showed similar abortive pollen phenotype to mutant +/mgtg. Together, our results demonstrate that AtMGT9 functions as a low-affinity Mg2+ transporter that plays a crucial role in male gametophyte development and male fertility.

  18. Three-dimensional patterns of cell division and expansion throughout the development of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalve, Shweta; Fotschki, Joanna; Beeckman, Tom; Vissenberg, Kris; Beemster, Gerrit T S

    2014-12-01

    Variations in size and shape of multicellular organs depend on spatio-temporal regulation of cell division and expansion. Here, cell division and expansion rates were quantified relative to the three spatial axes in the first leaf pair of Arabidopsis thaliana. The results show striking differences in expansion rates: the expansion rate in the petiole is higher than in the leaf blade; expansion rates in the lateral direction are higher than longitudinal rates between 5 and 10 days after stratification, but become equal at later stages of leaf blade development; and anticlinal expansion co-occurs with, but is an order of magnitude slower than periclinal expansion. Anticlinal expansion rates also differed greatly between tissues: the highest rates occurred in the spongy mesophyll and the lowest in the epidermis. Cell division rates were higher and continued for longer in the epidermis compared with the palisade mesophyll, causing a larger increase of palisade than epidermal cell area over the course of leaf development. The cellular dynamics underlying the effect of shading on petiole length and leaf thickness were then investigated. Low light reduced leaf expansion rates, which was partly compensated by increased duration of the growth phase. Inversely, shading enhanced expansion rates in the petiole, so that the blade to petiole ratio was reduced by 50%. Low light reduced leaf thickness by inhibiting anticlinal cell expansion rates. This effect on cell expansion was preceded by an effect on cell division, leading to one less layer of palisade cells. The two effects could be uncoupled by shifting plants to contrasting light conditions immediately after germination. This extended kinematic analysis maps the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of cell division and expansion, providing a framework for further research to understand the molecular regulatory mechanisms involved.

  19. Arabidopsis CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 Functions Independently of the SOS Pathway during Reproductive Development in Saline Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monihan, Shea M; Magness, Courtney A; Yadegari, Ramin; Smith, Steven E; Schumaker, Karen S

    2016-05-01

    The accumulation of sodium in soil (saline conditions) negatively affects plant growth and development. The Salt Overly Sensitive (SOS) pathway in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) functions to remove sodium from the cytosol during vegetative development preventing its accumulation to toxic levels. In this pathway, the SOS3 and CALCINEURIN B-LIKE10 (CBL10) calcium sensors interact with the SOS2 protein kinase to activate sodium/proton exchange at the plasma membrane (SOS1) or vacuolar membrane. To determine if the same pathway functions during reproductive development in response to salt, fertility was analyzed in wild type and the SOS pathway mutants grown in saline conditions. In response to salt, CBL10 functions early in reproductive development before fertilization, while SOS1 functions mostly after fertilization when seed development begins. Neither SOS2 nor SOS3 function in reproductive development in response to salt. Loss of CBL10 function resulted in reduced anther dehiscence, shortened stamen filaments, and aborted pollen development. In addition, cbl10 mutant pistils could not sustain the growth of wild-type pollen tubes. These results suggest that CBL10 is critical for reproductive development in the presence of salt and that it functions in different pathways during vegetative and reproductive development.

  20. Arabidopsis MYB68 in development and responses to environmental cues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Caiping; Andreasson, E.; Maslak, A.;

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MYB68 gene encodes a MYB family protein with N-terminal R2R3 DNA-binding domains. Analyses of MYB68 expression by RNA blot and a transposant gene-trap MYB68::GUS reporter indicated that MYB68 is expressed specifically in root pericycle cells. Root cultures of the myb68 mutant, cau...

  1. Impact of elevated CO2 on growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana L

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, T.A W; De Kok, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    After germination, Arabidopsis thaliana L (cv. Landsberg) was grown at 350 mu l l(-1) (control) or 700 mu l l(-1) (elevated) CO2. Total shoot biomass at the end of the vegetative growth period was increased by 56% due to a short transient stimulation of the relative growth rate by elevated CO2 at th

  2. Functionally Similar WRKY Proteins Regulate Vacuolar Acidification in Petunia and Hair Development in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, W.; Spelt, C.E.; Bliek, M.; de Vries, M.; Wit, N.; Faraco, M.; Koes, R.; Quattrocchio, F.

    2016-01-01

    The WD40 proteins ANTHOCYANIN11 (AN11) from petunia (Petunia hybrida) and TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1) fromArabidopsis thalianaand associated basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) and MYB transcription factors activate a variety of differentiation processes. In petunia petals, AN11 and the bHLH protein

  3. Human finger-prick induced pluripotent stem cells facilitate the development of stem cell banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hong-Kee; Toh, Cheng-Xu Delon; Ma, Dongrui; Yang, Binxia; Liu, Tong Ming; Lu, Jun; Wong, Chee-Wai; Tan, Tze-Kai; Li, Hu; Syn, Christopher; Tan, Eng-Lee; Lim, Bing; Lim, Yoon-Pin; Cook, Stuart A; Loh, Yuin-Han

    2014-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients can be a good model for studying human diseases and for future therapeutic regenerative medicine. Current initiatives to establish human iPSC (hiPSC) banking face challenges in recruiting large numbers of donors with diverse diseased, genetic, and phenotypic representations. In this study, we describe the efficient derivation of transgene-free hiPSCs from human finger-prick blood. Finger-prick sample collection can be performed on a "do-it-yourself" basis by donors and sent to the hiPSC facility for reprogramming. We show that single-drop volumes of finger-prick samples are sufficient for performing cellular reprogramming, DNA sequencing, and blood serotyping in parallel. Our novel strategy has the potential to facilitate the development of large-scale hiPSC banking worldwide.

  4. Nucleoporin MOS7/Nup88 is required for mitosis in gametogenesis and seed development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Guen Tae; Frost, Jennifer M; Park, Jin-Sup; Kim, Tae Ho; Lee, Jong Seob; Oh, Sung Aeong; Twell, David; Brooks, Janie Sue; Fischer, Robert L; Choi, Yeonhee

    2014-12-23

    Angiosperm reproduction is characterized by alternate diploid sporophytic and haploid gametophytic generations. Gametogenesis shares similarities with that of animals except for the formation of the gametophyte, whereby haploid cells undergo several rounds of postmeiotic mitosis to form gametes and the accessory cells required for successful reproduction. The mechanisms regulating gametophyte development in angiosperms are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the nucleoporin Nup88-homolog MOS7 (Modifier of Snc1,7) plays a crucial role in mitosis during both male and female gametophyte formation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using a mutagenesis screen, we identify the mos7-5 mutant allele, which causes ovule and pollen abortion in MOS7/mos7-5 heterozygous plants, and preglobular stage embryonic lethality in homozygous mos7-5 seeds. During interphase, we show that MOS7 is localized to the nuclear membrane but, like many nucleoporins, is associated with the spindle apparatus during mitosis. We detect interactions between MOS7 and several nucleoporins known to control spindle dynamics, and find that in pollen from MOS7/mos7-5 heterozygotes, abortion is accompanied by a failure of spindle formation, cell fate specification, and phragmoplast activity. Most intriguingly, we show that following gamete formation by MOS7/mos7-5 heterozygous spores, inheritance of either the MOS7 or the mos7-5 allele by a given gamete does not correlate with its respective survival or abortion. Instead, we suggest a model whereby MOS7, which is highly expressed in the Pollen- and Megaspore Mother Cells, enacts a dosage-limiting effect on the gametes to enable their progression through subsequent mitoses.

  5. Alterations in Seed Development Gene Expression Affect Size and Oil Content of Arabidopsis Seeds1[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatihi, Abdelhak; Zbierzak, Anna Maria; Dörmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Seed endosperm development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is under control of the polycomb group complex, which includes Fertilization Independent Endosperm (FIE). The polycomb group complex regulates downstream factors, e.g. Pheres1 (PHE1), by genomic imprinting. In heterozygous fie mutants, an endosperm develops in ovules carrying a maternal fie allele without fertilization, finally leading to abortion. Another endosperm development pathway depends on MINISEED3 (a WRKY10 transcription factor) and HAIKU2 (a leucine-rich repeat kinase). While the role of seed development genes in the embryo and endosperm establishment has been studied in detail, their impact on metabolism and oil accumulation remained unclear. Analysis of oil, protein, and sucrose accumulation in mutants and overexpression plants of the four seed development genes revealed that (1) seeds carrying a maternal fie allele accumulate low oil with an altered composition of triacylglycerol molecular species; (2) homozygous mutant seeds of phe1, mini3, and iku2, which are smaller, accumulate less oil and slightly less protein, and starch, which accumulates early during seed development, remains elevated in mutant seeds; (3) embryo-specific overexpression of FIE, PHE1, and MINI3 has no influence on seed size and weight, nor on oil, protein, or sucrose content; and (4) overexpression of IKU2 results in seeds with increased size and weight, and oil content of overexpressed IKU2 seeds is increased by 35%. Thus, IKU2 overexpression represents a novel strategy for the genetic manipulation of the oil content in seeds. PMID:24014578

  6. [Development of human embryonic stem cell model for toxicity evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guang-yan; Cao, Tong; Ouyang, Hong-wei; Peng, Shuang-qing; Deng, Xu-liang; Li, Sheng-lin; Liu, He; Zou, Xiao-hui; Fu, Xin; Peng, Hui; Wang, Xiao-ying; Zhan, Yuan

    2013-02-18

    The current international standard for toxicity screening of biomedical devices and materials recommend the use of immortalized cell lines because of their homogeneous morphologies and infinite proliferation which provide good reproducibility for in vitro cytotoxicity screening. However, most of the widely used immortalized cell lines are derived from animals and may not be representative of normal human cell behavior in vivo, in particular in terms of the cytotoxic and genotoxic response. Therefore, It is vital to develop a model for toxicity evaluation. In our studies, two Chinese human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines as toxicity model were established. hESC derived tissue/organ cell model for tissue/organ specific toxicity evaluation were developed. The efficiency and accuracy of using hESC model for cytoxicity, embryotoxicity and genotoxicity evaluation were confirmed. The results indicated that hESCs might be good tools for toxicity testing and biosafety evaluation in vitro.

  7. Vertebrate Neural Stem Cells: Development, Plasticity, and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    Natural recovery from disease and damage in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is limited compared with that in lower vertebrate species, including fish and salamanders. Species-specific differences in the plasticity of the CNS reflect these differences in regenerative capacity. Despite numerous extensive studies in the field of CNS regeneration, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms determining the regenerative capacity of the CNS is still relatively poor. The discovery of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) in mammals, including humans, in the early 1990s has opened up new possibilities for the treatment of CNS disorders via self-regeneration through the mobilization of these cells. However, we now know that aNSCs in mammals are not plastic enough to induce significant regeneration. In contrast, aNSCs in some regenerative species have been found to be as highly plastic as early embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs). We must expand our knowledge of NSCs and of regenerative processes in lower vertebrates in an effort to develop effective regenerative treatments for damaged CNS in humans.

  8. Ecologically Different Fungi Affect Arabidopsis Development: Contribution of Soluble and Volatile Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casarrubia, Salvatore; Sapienza, Sara; Fritz, Héma; Daghino, Stefania; Rosenkranz, Maaria; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Martin, Francis; Perotto, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and development can be influenced by mutualistic and non-mutualistic microorganisms. We investigated the ability of the ericoid endomycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius to influence growth and development of the non-host plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Different experimental setups (non-compartmented and compartmented co-culture plates) were used to investigate the influence of both soluble and volatile fungal molecules on the plant phenotype. O. maius promoted growth of A. thaliana in all experimental setups. In addition, a peculiar clumped root phenotype, characterized by shortening of the primary root and by an increase of lateral root length and number, was observed in A. thaliana only in the non-compartmented plates, suggesting that soluble diffusible molecules are responsible for this root morphology. Fungal auxin does not seem to be involved in plant growth promotion and in the clumped root phenotype because co-cultivation with O. maius did not change auxin accumulation in plant tissues, as assessed in plants carrying the DR5::GUS reporter construct. In addition, no correlation between the amount of fungal auxin produced and the plant root phenotype was observed in an O. maius mutant unable to induce the clumped root phenotype in A. thaliana. Addition of active charcoal, a VOC absorbant, in the compartmented plates did not modify plant growth promotion, suggesting that VOCs are not involved in this phenomenon. The low VOCs emission measured for O. maius further corroborated this hypothesis. By contrast, the addition of CO2 traps in the compartmented plates drastically reduced plant growth, suggesting involvement of fungal CO2 in plant growth promotion. Other mycorrhizal fungi, as well as a saprotrophic and a pathogenic fungus, were also tested with the same experimental setups. In the non-compartmented plates, most fungi promoted A. thaliana growth and some could induce the clumped root phenotype. In the compartmented plate experiments, a general

  9. The future of induced pluripotent stem cells for cardiac therapy and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorrez, Lieven; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2011-10-01

    The field of stem cell research was revolutionized with the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells. By reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells, most ethical concerns associated with the use of embryonic stem cells are overcome, such that many hopes from the stem cell field now seem a step closer to reality. Several methods and cell sources have been described to create induced pluripotent stem cells and we discuss their characteristics in terms of feasibility and efficiency. From these cells, cardiac progenitors and cardiomyocytes can be derived by several protocols and most recent advances as well as remaining limitations are being discussed. However, in the short time period this technology has been around, evidence emerges that induced pluripotent stem cells may be more prone to genetic defects and maintain an epigenetic memory and thus may not be entirely the same as embryonic stem cells. Despite the lack of a complete fundamental understanding of stem cell biology, and even more of ways how to coax them into defined cell types, the technology is quickly adopted by industry. This paper gives an overview of the current applications of induced pluripotent stem cells in cardiovascular drug development and highlights active areas of research towards functional repair of the damaged heart. Adult stem cells have already been taken to clinical trials and we discuss these results in light of potential and hurdles to be taken to move induced pluripotent stem cells to the clinic.

  10. Functional interconnection of MYC2 and SPA1 in the photomorphogenic seedling development of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangappa, Sreeramaiah N; Prasad, V Babu Rajendra; Chattopadhyay, Sudip

    2010-11-01

    MYC2 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that cross talks with light, abscisic acid (ABA), and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways. Here, we have shown that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MYC2 directly binds to the G-box present in the SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME A1 (SPA1) promoter and that it controls the expression of SPA1 in a COP1-dependent manner. Analyses of atmyc2 spa1 double mutants suggest that whereas MYC2 and SPA1 act redundantly to suppress photomorphogenic growth in the dark, they function synergistically for the suppression of photomorphogenic growth in the light. Our studies have also revealed that MYC2-mediated ABA and JA responses are further modulated by SPA1. Taken together, this study demonstrates the molecular and physiological interrelations of MYC2 and SPA1 in light, ABA, and JA signaling pathways.

  11. MIXTA-like transcription factors and WAX INDUCER1/SHINE1 coordinately regulate cuticle development in Arabidopsis and Torenia fournieri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yoshimi; Shikata, Masahito; Koyama, Tomotsugu; Ohtsubo, Norihiro; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2013-05-01

    The waxy plant cuticle protects cells from dehydration, repels pathogen attack, and prevents organ fusion during development. The transcription factor WAX INDUCER1/SHINE1 (WIN1/SHN1) regulates the biosynthesis of waxy substances in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we show that the MIXTA-like MYB transcription factors MYB106 and MYB16, which regulate epidermal cell morphology, also regulate cuticle development coordinately with WIN1/SHN1 in Arabidopsis and Torenia fournieri. Expression of a MYB106 chimeric repressor fusion (35S:MYB106-SRDX) and knockout/down of MYB106 and MYB16 induced cuticle deficiencies characterized by organ adhesion and reduction of epicuticular wax crystals and cutin nanoridges. A similar organ fusion phenotype was produced by expression of a WIN1/SHN1 chimeric repressor. Conversely, the dominant active form of MYB106 (35S:MYB106-VP16) induced ectopic production of cutin nanoridges and increased expression of WIN1/SHN1 and wax biosynthetic genes. Microarray experiments revealed that MYB106 and WIN1/SHN1 regulate similar sets of genes, predominantly those involved in wax and cutin biosynthesis. Furthermore, WIN1/SHN1 expression was induced by MYB106-VP16 and repressed by MYB106-SRDX. These results indicate that the regulatory cascade of MIXTA-like proteins and WIN1/SHN1 coordinately regulate cutin biosynthesis and wax accumulation. This study reveals an additional key aspect of MIXTA-like protein function and suggests a unique relationship between cuticle development and epidermal cell differentiation.

  12. Hematopoietic Development from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A decade of research on human embryonic stem cells (ESC) has paved the way for the discovery of alternative approaches to generating pluripotent stem cells.Combinatorial overexpression of a limited number of proteins linked to pluripotency in ESC was recently found to reprogram differentiated somatic cells back to a pluripotent state, enabling the derivation of isogenic (patient-specific) pluripotent stem cell lines. Current research is focusing on improving reprogramming protocols (e.g. circ...

  13. DETORQUEO, QUIRKY, and ZERZAUST represent novel components involved in organ development mediated by the receptor-like kinase STRUBBELIG in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Fulton

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intercellular signaling plays an important role in controlling cellular behavior in apical meristems and developing organs in plants. One prominent example in Arabidopsis is the regulation of floral organ shape, ovule integument morphogenesis, the cell division plane, and root hair patterning by the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase STRUBBELIG (SUB. Interestingly, kinase activity of SUB is not essential for its in vivo function, indicating that SUB may be an atypical or inactive receptor-like kinase. Since little is known about signaling by atypical receptor-like kinases, we used forward genetics to identify genes that potentially function in SUB-dependent processes and found recessive mutations in three genes that result in a sub-like phenotype. Plants with a defect in DETORQEO (DOQ, QUIRKY (QKY, and ZERZAUST (ZET show corresponding defects in outer integument development, floral organ shape, and stem twisting. The mutants also show sub-like cellular defects in the floral meristem and in root hair patterning. Thus, SUB, DOQ, QKY, and ZET define the STRUBBELIG-LIKE MUTANT (SLM class of genes. Molecular cloning of QKY identified a putative transmembrane protein carrying four C(2 domains, suggesting that QKY may function in membrane trafficking in a Ca(2+-dependent fashion. Morphological analysis of single and all pair-wise double-mutant combinations indicated that SLM genes have overlapping, but also distinct, functions in plant organogenesis. This notion was supported by a systematic comparison of whole-genome transcript profiles during floral development, which molecularly defined common and distinct sets of affected processes in slm mutants. Further analysis indicated that many SLM-responsive genes have functions in cell wall biology, hormone signaling, and various stress responses. Taken together, our data suggest that DOQ, QKY, and ZET contribute to SUB-dependent organogenesis and shed light on the mechanisms, which are dependent on

  14. Global Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles in Brassica napus Developing Seeds Reveals a Conserved Lipid Metabolism Regulation with Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya Niu; Guo-Zhang Wu; Rui Ye; Wen-Hui Lin; Qiu-Ming Shi; Liang-Jiao Xue; Xiao-Dong Xu; Yao Li; Yu-Guang; Hong-Wei Xue

    2009-01-01

    In order to study Brassica napus fatty acid (FA) metabolism and relevant regulatory networks, a systematic identification of fatty acid (FA) biosynthesis-related genes was conducted. Following gene identification, gene expression profiles during B. napus seed development and FA metabolism were performed by cDNA chip hybridization (>8000 EST clones from seed). The results showed that FA biosynthesis and regulation, and carbon flux, were conserved between B. napus and Arabidopsis. However, a more critical role of starch metabolism was detected for B. napus seed FA metabolism and storage-component accumulation when compared with Arabidopsis. In addition, a crucial stage for the transition of seed-to-sink tissue was 17-21 d after flowering (DAF), whereas FA biosynthesis-related genes were highly expressed pri-marily at 21 DAF. Hormone (auxin and jasmonate) signaling is found to be important for FA metabolism. This study helps to reveal the global regulatory network of FA metabolism in developing B. napus seeds.

  15. Extension of oil biosynthesis during the mid-phase of seed development enhances oil content in Arabidopsis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Masatake; Mano, Shoji; Kondo, Maki; Hayashi, Makoto; Nishimura, Mikio

    2016-05-01

    Regulation of oil biosynthesis in plant seeds has been extensively studied, and biotechnological approaches have been designed to increase seed oil content. Oil and protein synthesis is negatively correlated in seeds, but the mechanisms controlling interactions between these two pathways are unknown. Here, we identify the molecular mechanism controlling oil and protein content in seeds. We utilized transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing WRINKLED1 (WRI1), a master transcription factor regulating seed oil biosynthesis, and knockout mutants of major seed storage proteins. Oil and protein biosynthesis in wild-type plants was sequentially activated during early and late seed development, respectively. The negative correlation between oil and protein contents in seeds arises from competition between the pathways. Extension of WRI1 expression during mid-phase of seed development significantly enhanced seed oil content. This study demonstrates that temporal activation of genes involved in oil or storage protein biosynthesis determines the oil/protein ratio in Arabidopsis seeds. These results provide novel insights into potential breeding strategies to generate crops with high oil contents in seeds.

  16. The ABCG transporter PEC1/ABCG32 is required for the formation of the developing leaf cuticle in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Guillaume; Garroum, Imène; Mazurek, Sylwester; Daraspe, Jean; Mucciolo, Antonio; Sankar, Martial; Humbel, Bruno M; Nawrath, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The cuticle is an essential diffusion barrier on aerial surfaces of land plants whose structural component is the polyester cutin. The PERMEABLE CUTICLE1/ABCG32 (PEC1) transporter is involved in plant cuticle formation in Arabidopsis. The gpat6 pec1 and gpat4 gapt8 pec1 double and triple mutants are characterized. Their PEC1-specific contributions to aliphatic cutin composition and cuticle formation during plant development are revealed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The composition of cutin changes during rosette leaf expansion in Arabidopsis. C16:0 monomers are in higher abundance in expanding than in fully expanded leaves. The atypical cutin monomer C18:2 dicarboxylic acid is more prominent in fully expanded leaves. Findings point to differences in the regulation of several pathways of cutin precursor synthesis. PEC1 plays an essential role during expansion of the rosette leaf cuticle. The reduction of C16 monomers in the pec1 mutant during leaf expansion is unlikely to cause permeability of the leaf cuticle because the gpat6 mutant with even fewer C16:0 monomers forms a functional rosette leaf cuticle at all stages of development. PEC1/ABCG32 transport activity affects cutin composition and cuticle structure in a specific and non-redundant fashion.

  17. The petunia ortholog of Arabidopsis SUPERMAN plays a distinct role in floral organ morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Ferrario, Silvia; Angenent, Gerco C; Kobayashi, Akira; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SUPERMAN (SUP) plays a role in establishing a boundary between whorls 3 and 4 of flowers and in ovule development. We characterized a Petunia hybrida (petunia) homolog of SUP, designated PhSUP1, to compare with SUP. Genomic DNA of the PhSUP1 partially restored the stamen number and ovule development phenotypes of the Arabidopsis sup mutant. Two P. hybrida lines of transposon (dTph1) insertion mutants of PhSUP1 exhibited increased stamen number at the cost of normal carpel development, and ovule development was defective owing to aberrant growth of the integument. Unlike Arabidopsis sup mutants, phsup1 mutants also showed extra tissues connecting stamens, a petal tube and an ovary, and aberrancies in the development of anther and placenta. PhSUP1 transcripts occurred in the basal region of wild-type flowers around developing organ primordia in whorls 2 and 3 as well as in the funiculus of the ovule, concave regions of the placenta, and interthecal regions of developing anthers. Overexpression of PhSUP1 in P. hybrida resulted in size reduction of petals, leaves, and inflorescence stems. The shortening of inflorescence stems and petal tubes was primarily attributable to suppression of cell elongation, whereas a decrease in cell number was mainly responsible for the size reduction of petal limbs.

  18. Key developments in stem cell therapy in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Ivonne H; Hare, Joshua M

    2012-11-01

    A novel therapeutic strategy to prevent or reverse ventricular remodeling, the substrate for heart failure and arrhythmias following a myocardial infarction, is the use of cell-based therapy. Successful cell-based tissue regeneration involves a complex orchestration of cellular and molecular events that include stem cell engraftment and differentiation, secretion of anti-inflammatory and angiogenic mediators, and proliferation of endogenous cardiac stem cells. Recent therapeutic approaches involve bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stem cells, adipose tissue-derived stem cells, cardiac-derived stem cells and cell combinations. Clinical trials employing mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac- derived stem cells have demonstrated efficacy in infarct size reduction and regional wall contractility improvement. Regarding delivery methods, the safety of catheter-based, transendocardial stem cell injection has been established. These proof-of-concept studies have paved the way for ongoing pivotal trials. Future studies will focus on determining the most efficacious cell type(s) and/or cell combinations and the mechanisms underlying their therapeutic effects.

  19. Beyond the Pipeline: STEM Pathways for Youth Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Gabrielle H.; Jafri, Jameela; St. Louis, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    As framed by national education policy priorities, the dominant metaphor describing participation and achievement in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) is a "pipeline." The STEM workforce requires a "pipeline" of future scientists, engineers, and mathematicians. This pipeline begins in childhood and carries students through…

  20. The Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi eYagi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cancer development is still controversial. MSCs may promote tumor progression through immune modulation, but other tumor suppressive effects of MSCs have also been described. The discrepancy between these results may arise from issues related to different tissue sources, individual donor variability, and injection timing of MSCs. The expression of critical receptors such as Toll-like receptor (TLR is variable at each time point of treatment, which may also determine the effects of MSCs on tumor progression. However, factors released from malignant cells, as well as surrounding tissues and the vasculature, are still regarded as a black box. Thus, it is still difficult to clarify the specific role of MSCs in cancer development. Whether MSCs support or suppress tumor progression is currently unclear, but it is clear that systemically administered MSCs can be recruited and migrate toward tumors. These findings are important because they can be used as a basis for initiating studies to explore the incorporation of engineered MSCs as novel anti-tumor carriers, for the development of tumor-targeted therapies.

  1. LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD)10 interacts with SIDECAR POLLEN/LBD27 to control pollen development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Mirim; Lee, Mi Rha; Park, Soon Ki; Kim, Jungmook

    2015-03-01

    During male gametophyte development in Arabidopsis thaliana, the microspores undergo an asymmetric division to produce a vegetative cell and a generative cell, which undergoes a second division to give rise to two sperm cells. SIDECAR POLLEN/LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) 27 plays a key role in the asymmetric division of microspores. Here we provide molecular genetic evidence that a combinatorial role of LBD10 with LBD27 is crucial for male gametophyte development in Arabidopsis. Expression analysis, genetic transmission and pollen viability assays, and pollen development analysis demonstrated that LBD10 plays a role in the male gametophyte function primarily at germ cell mitosis. In the mature pollen of lbd10 and lbd10 expressing a dominant negative version of LBD10, LBD10:SRDX, aberrant microspores such as bicellular and smaller tricellular pollen appeared at a ratio of 10-15% with a correspondingly decreased ratio of normal tricellular pollen, whereas in lbd27 mutants, 70% of the pollen was aborted. All pollen in the lbd10 lbd27 double mutants was aborted and severely shrivelled compared with that of the single mutants, indicating that LBD10 and LBD27 are essential for pollen development. Gene expression and subcellular localization analyses of LBD10:GFP and LBD27:RFP during pollen development indicated that posttranscriptional and/or posttranslational controls are involved in differential accumulation and subcellular localization of LBD10 and LBD27 during pollen development, which may contribute in part to combinatorial and distinct roles of LBD10 with LBD27 in microspore development. In addition, we showed that LBD10 and LBD27 interact to form a heterodimer for nuclear localization.

  2. Plant stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Ernst; Kornet, Noortje; Friedrich, Thomas; Laux, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Multicellular organisms possess pluripotent stem cells to form new organs, replenish the daily loss of cells, or regenerate organs after injury. Stem cells are maintained in specific environments, the stem cell niches, that provide signals to block differentiation. In plants, stem cell niches are situated in the shoot, root, and vascular meristems-self-perpetuating units of organ formation. Plants' lifelong activity-which, as in the case of trees, can extend over more than a thousand years-requires that a robust regulatory network keep the balance between pluripotent stem cells and differentiating descendants. In this review, we focus on current models in plant stem cell research elaborated during the past two decades, mainly in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We address the roles of mobile signals on transcriptional modules involved in balancing cell fates. In addition, we discuss shared features of and differences between the distinct stem cell niches of Arabidopsis.

  3. STEM professional development: What's going on from the presenters' and participants' perspectives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Randi

    This study was designed to explore elementary STEM professional development viewed from the presenters' and participants' perspectives. Numerous committees and educational organizations recommend investing in STEM professional development at the local, state, and national level. This investment must begin with research that inquires how STEM professional development is structured and what is needed for teacher and student success. Since there is a recent STEM education push in schools, elementary teachers need effective professional development in order to gain the necessary content, skills, confidence, and pedagogy required for those changing demands. This qualitative study embraced. Yin's case study methodology by observing short-duration STEM professional development for elementary teachers within a large metropolitan school system and an educational professional development agency. The study discussed the analysis and findings in the context of Bandura's sources of efficacy and Desimone's critical features of professional development. Data were gathered form professional development observations, presenter interviews, and participant interviews. The research questions for this study included: (a) based on Desimone's (2009) framework for professional development, what does content focused, active learning, coherence, duration, and collective participation look like in initial STEM professional development for elementary teachers? (b) are Bandura's (1997) four sources of self- efficacy: mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, social persuasion, and affective states evidenced within the short duration professional development? and (c) how do these two frameworks align between presenter and participant thoughts and actions? This study uncovered additional sources of efficacy are present in short-duration STEM professional development. These found sources include coherence, content, and active learning delivered in a definitive order. The findings of this study

  4. Development of bioartificial myocardium using stem cells and nanobiotechnology templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachques, Juan Carlos

    2010-12-29

    Cell-based regenerative therapy is undergoing experimental and clinical trials in cardiology, in order to limit the consequences of decreased contractile function and compliance of damaged ventricles following myocardial infarction. Over 1000 patients have been treated worldwide with cell-based procedures for myocardial regeneration. Cellular cardiomyoplasty seems to reduce the size and fibrosis of infarct scars, limit adverse postischemic remodelling, and improve diastolic function. The development of a bioartificial myocardium is a new challenge; in this approach, tissue-engineered procedures are associated with cell therapy. Organ decellularization for bioscaffolds fabrication is a new investigated concept. Nanomaterials are emerging as the main candidates to ensure the achievement of a proper instructive cellular niche with good drug release/administration properties. Investigating the electrophysiological properties of bioartificial myocardium is the challenging objective of future research, associating a multielectrode network to provide electrical stimulation could improve the coupling of grafted cells and scaffolds with host cardiomyocytes. In summary, until now stem cell transplantation has not achieved clear hemodynamic benefits for myocardial diseases. Supported by relevant scientific background, the development of myocardial tissue engineering may constitute a new avenue and hope for the treatment of myocardial diseases.

  5. Development of Bioartificial Myocardium Using Stem Cells and Nanobiotechnology Templates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Chachques

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based regenerative therapy is undergoing experimental and clinical trials in cardiology, in order to limit the consequences of decreased contractile function and compliance of damaged ventricles following myocardial infarction. Over 1000 patients have been treated worldwide with cell-based procedures for myocardial regeneration. Cellular cardiomyoplasty seems to reduce the size and fibrosis of infarct scars, limit adverse postischemic remodelling, and improve diastolic function. The development of a bioartificial myocardium is a new challenge; in this approach, tissue-engineered procedures are associated with cell therapy. Organ decellularization for bioscaffolds fabrication is a new investigated concept. Nanomaterials are emerging as the main candidates to ensure the achievement of a proper instructive cellular niche with good drug release/administration properties. Investigating the electrophysiological properties of bioartificial myocardium is the challenging objective of future research, associating a multielectrode network to provide electrical stimulation could improve the coupling of grafted cells and scaffolds with host cardiomyocytes. In summary, until now stem cell transplantation has not achieved clear hemodynamic benefits for myocardial diseases. Supported by relevant scientific background, the development of myocardial tissue engineering may constitute a new avenue and hope for the treatment of myocardial diseases.

  6. Cell wall glucomannan in Arabidopsis is synthesised by CSLA glycosyltransferases, and influences the progression of embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubet, Florence; Barton, Christopher J; Mortimer, Jennifer C; Yu, Xiaolan; Zhang, Zhinong; Miles, Godfrey P; Richens, Jenny; Liepman, Aaron H; Seffen, Keith; Dupree, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Mannans are hemicellulosic polysaccharides that have previously been implicated as structural constituents of cell walls and as storage reserves but which may serve other functions during plant growth and development. Several members of the Arabidopsis cellulose synthase-like A (CSLA) family have previously been shown to synthesise mannan polysaccharides in vitro when heterologously expressed. It has also been found that CSLA7 is essential for embryogenesis, suggesting a role for the CSLA7 product in development. To determine whether the CSLA proteins are responsible for glucomannan synthesis in vivo, we characterised insertion mutants in each of the nine Arabidopsis CSLA genes and several double and triple mutant combinations. csla9 mutants showed substantially reduced glucomannan, and triple csla2csla3csla9 mutants lacked detectable glucomannan in stems. Nevertheless, these mutants showed no alteration in stem development or strength. Overexpression of CSLA2, CSLA7 and CSLA9 increased the glucomannan content in stems. Increased glucomannan synthesis also caused defective embryogenesis, leading to delayed development and occasional embryo death. The embryo lethality of csla7 was complemented by overexpression of CSLA9, suggesting that the glucomannan products are similar. We conclude that CSLA2, CSLA3 and CSLA9 are responsible for the synthesis of all detectable glucomannan in Arabidopsis stems, and that CSLA7 synthesises glucomannan in embryos. These results are inconsistent with a substantial role for glucomannan in wall strength in Arabidopsis stems, but indicate that glucomannan levels affect embryogenesis. Together with earlier heterologous expression studies, the glucomannan deficiency observed in csla mutant plants demonstrates that the CSLA family encodes glucomannan synthases.

  7. Auxin modulates the enhanced development of root hairs in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. under elevated CO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yaofang; Jin, Chongwei; Jin, Gulei; Zhou, Qingyan; Lin, Xianyong; Tang, Caixian; Zhang, Yongsong

    2011-08-01

    Root hairs may play a critical role in nutrient acquisition of plants grown under elevated CO(2) . This study investigated how elevated CO(2) enhanced the development of root hairs in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. The plants under elevated CO(2) (800 µL L(-1)) had denser and longer root hairs, and more H-positioned cells in root epidermis than those under ambient CO(2) (350 µL L(-1)). The elevated CO(2) increased auxin production in roots. Under elevated CO(2) , application of either 1-naphthoxyacetic acid (1-NOA) or N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) blocked the enhanced development of root hairs. The opposite was true when the plants under ambient CO(2) were treated with 1-naphthylacetic acid (NAA), an auxin analogue. Furthermore, the elevated CO(2) did not enhance the development of root hairs in auxin-response mutants, axr1-3, and auxin-transporter mutants, axr4-1, aux1-7 and pin1-1. Both elevated CO(2) and NAA application increased expressions of caprice, triptychon and rho-related protein from plants 2, and decreased expressions of werewolf, GLABRA2, GLABRA3 and the transparent testa glabra 1, genes related to root-hair development, while 1-NOA and NPA application had an opposite effect. Our study suggests that elevated CO(2) enhanced the development of root hairs in Arabidopsis via the well-characterized auxin signalling and transport that modulate the initiation of root hairs and the expression of its specific genes.

  8. Mutations in a plastid-localized elongation factor G alter early stages of plastid development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangarter Roger P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper development of plastids in embryo and seedling tissues is critical for plant development. During germination, plastids develop to perform many critical functions that are necessary to establish the seedling for further growth. A growing body of work has demonstrated that components of the plastid transcription and translation machinery must be present and functional to establish the organelle upon germination. Results We have identified Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in a gene that encodes a plastid-targeted elongation factor G (SCO1 that is essential for plastid development during embryogenesis since two T-DNA insertion mutations in the coding sequence (sco1-2 and sco1-3 result in an embryo-lethal phenotype. In addition, a point mutation allele (sco1-1 and an allele with a T-DNA insertion in the promoter (sco1-4 of SCO1 display conditional seedling-lethal phenotypes. Seedlings of these alleles exhibit cotyledon and hypocotyl albinism due to improper chloroplast development, and normally die shortly after germination. However, when germinated on media supplemented with sucrose, the mutant plants can produce photosynthetically-active green leaves from the apical meristem. Conclusion The developmental stage-specific phenotype of the conditional-lethal sco1 alleles reveals differences in chloroplast formation during seedling germination compared to chloroplast differentiation in cells derived from the shoot apical meristem. Our identification of embryo-lethal mutant alleles in the Arabidopsis elongation factor G indicates that SCO1 is essential for plant growth, consistent with its predicted role in chloroplast protein translation.

  9. Parallels between UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS and FIMBRIATA, genes controlling flower development in Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, G C; Goodrich, J; Wilkinson, M D; Simon, R; Haughn, G W; Coen, E S

    1995-09-01

    The unusual floral organs (ufo) mutant of Arabidopsis has flowers with variable homeotic organ transformations and inflorescence-like characteristics. To determine the relationship between UFO and previously characterized meristem and organ identity genes, we cloned UFO and determined its expression pattern. The UFO gene shows extensive homology with FIMBRIATA (FIM), a gene mediating between meristem and organ identity genes in Antirrhinum. All three UFO mutant alleles that we sequenced are predicted to produce truncated proteins. UFO transcripts were first detected in early floral meristems, before organ identity genes had been activated. At later developmental stages, UFO expression is restricted to the junction between sepal and petal primordia. Phenotypic, genetic, and expression pattern comparisons between UFO and FIM suggest that they are cognate homologs and play a similar role in mediating between meristem and organ identity genes. However, some differences in the functions and genetic interactions of UFO and FIM were apparent, indicating that changes in partially redundant pathways have occurred during the evolutionary divergence of Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum.

  10. 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid accumulation during seed development represses seed germination in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Anuja; Hernández, M Luisa; He, Zhesi; Andriotis, Vasilios M E; Vaistij, Fabián E; Larson, Tony R; Graham, Ian A

    2011-02-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana COMATOSE (CTS) encodes an ABC transporter involved in peroxisomal import of substrates for β-oxidation. Various cts alleles and mutants disrupted in steps of peroxisomal β-oxidation have previously been reported to exhibit a severe block on seed germination. Oxylipin analysis on cts, acyl CoA oxidase1 acyl CoA oxidase2 (acx1 acx2), and keto acyl thiolase2 dry seeds revealed that they contain elevated levels of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA), jasmonic acid (JA), and JA-Ile. Oxylipin and transcriptomic analysis showed that accumulation of these oxylipins occurs during late seed maturation in cts. Analysis of double mutants generated by crossing cts with mutants in the JA biosynthesis pathway indicate that OPDA, rather than JA or JA-Ile, contributes to the block on germination in cts seeds. We found that OPDA was more effective at inhibiting wild-type germination than was JA and that this effect was independent of CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 but was synergistic with abscisic acid (ABA). Consistent with this, OPDA treatment increased ABA INSENSITIVE5 protein abundance in a manner that parallels the inhibitory effect of OPDA and OPDA+ABA on seed germination. These results demonstrate that OPDA acts along with ABA to regulate seed germination in Arabidopsis.

  11. Learn About Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Handbook Stem Cell Glossary Search Toggle Nav Stem Cell Basics Stem cells are the foundation from which ... original cell’s DNA, cytoplasm and cell membrane. About stem cells Stem cells are the foundation of development in ...

  12. Drosophila neural stem cells in brain development and tumor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanrui; Reichert, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblasts, the neural stem cells in Drosophila, generate the complex neural structure of the central nervous system. Significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms regulating the self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation in Drosophila neuroblast lineages. Deregulation of these mechanisms can lead to severe developmental defects and the formation of malignant brain tumors. Here, the authors review the molecular genetics of Drosophila neuroblasts and discuss some recent advances in stem cell and cancer biology using this model system.

  13. Toward the design and implementation of stem professional development for middle school teachers: An interdisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil-Burke, Merah Bell

    The aim of this qualitative study was to determine how professional development might be designed to meet the needs of teachers delivering interdisciplinary STEM instruction in an urban middle school. This study was framed and guided by three bodies of literature: literature in support of the theory of change, adult learning theory, and effective STEM professional development. The study, designed to be collaborative in nature, employed an action research variation of participatory classroom action research, (CAR) to find out how STEM professional development could be designed to meet the needs of teachers delivering interdisciplinary STEM instruction. A sample of five middle school teachers from grades six through eight was interviewed using semi-structured, in-depth interview technique to identify their perceived needs. Observational techniques were utilized to determine how STEM teachers' instructional practices change as a result of exposure to STEM professional development for interdisciplinary instruction. Data from these interviews were used to design the professional development. Planning and implementation of the professional development were accomplished using the CAR model with data being collected in all phases of the CAR cycle for teaching interdisciplinary STEM. The findings suggest that interdisciplinary STEM professional development that is collaborative, along with a curriculum that supports the process of discipline integration, is an effective approach to meeting teachers' needs for the teaching of interdisciplinary STEM instruction. Lastly, the findings imply that certain barriers such as limited time to collaborate, plan, reflect, and practice could impede teachers' ability to use an interdisciplinary approach to classroom instructional practices. However, these barriers may become diminished when teachers, support each other through communication and collaboration. Thus, the essential elements included in the design and implementations of this

  14. Expansion of intestinal epithelial stem cells during murine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Dehmer

    Full Text Available Murine small intestinal crypt development is initiated during the first postnatal week. Soon after formation, overall increases in the number of crypts occurs through a bifurcating process called crypt fission, which is believed to be driven by developmental increases in the number of intestinal stem cells (ISCs. Recent evidence suggests that a heterogeneous population of ISCs exists within the adult intestine. Actively cycling ISCs are labeled by Lgr5, Ascl2 and Olfm4; whereas slowly cycling or quiescent ISC are marked by Bmi1 and mTert. The goal of this study was to correlate the expression of these markers with indirect measures of ISC expansion during development, including quantification of crypt fission and side population (SP sorting. Significant changes were observed in the percent of crypt fission and SP cells consistent with ISC expansion between postnatal day 14 and 21. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for the various ISC marker mRNAs demonstrated divergent patterns of expression. mTert surged earliest, during the first week of life as crypts are initially being formed, whereas Lgr5 and Bmi1 peaked on day 14. Olfm4 and Ascl2 had variable expression patterns. To assess the number and location of Lgr5-expressing cells during this period, histologic sections from intestines of Lgr5-EGFP mice were subjected to quantitative analysis. There was attenuated Lgr5-EGFP expression at birth and through the first week of life. Once crypts were formed, the overall number and percent of Lgr5-EGFP positive cells per crypt remain stable throughout development and into adulthood. These data were supported by Lgr5 in situ hybridization in wild-type mice. We conclude that heterogeneous populations of ISCs are expanding as measured by SP sorting and mRNA expression at distinct developmental time points.

  15. Epidermal development in mammals: key regulators, signals from beneath, and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Huishan; Duan, Enkui

    2013-05-24

    Epidermis is one of the best-studied tissues in mammals that contain types of stem cells. Outstanding works in recent years have shed great light on behaviors of different epidermal stem cell populations in the homeostasis and regeneration of the epidermis as well as hair follicles. Also, the molecular mechanisms governing these stem cells are being elucidated, from genetic to epigenetic levels. Compared with the explicit knowledge about adult skin, embryonic development of the epidermis, especially the early period, still needs exploration. Furthermore, stem cells in the embryonic epidermis are largely unstudied or ambiguously depicted. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the process of embryonic epidermal development, with focuses on some key molecular regulators and the role of the sub-epidermal mesenchyme. We will also try to trace adult epidermal stem cell populations back to embryonic development. In addition, we will comment on in vitro derivation of epidermal lineages from ES cells and iPS cells.

  16. Development and application of human adult stem or progenitor cell organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rookmaaker, Maarten B; Schutgens, Frans; Verhaar, Marianne C; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem or progenitor cell organoids are 3D adult-organ-derived epithelial structures that contain self-renewing and organ-specific stem or progenitor cells as well as differentiated cells. This organoid culture system was first established in murine intestine and subsequently developed for sever

  17. A Model for Professional Development to Promote Engineering Design as an Integrative Pedagogy within STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donna, Joel D.

    2012-01-01

    Engineering design activities can help educators to apply concepts and processes from within and across STEM domains. To facilitate these connections, there is a need for sustained, job-embedded, and collegial professional development that brings together teachers from across STEM domains to engage in design-based activities. These activities can…

  18. Motivating Children to Develop Their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Talent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lori

    2013-01-01

    Motivation in mathematics and science appears to be more important to STEM occupational choice than ability. Using the expectancy value model, parents may be able to recognize potential barriers to children's selection of a STEM occupation and take actions to help facilitate talent development. These are especially important for parents of…

  19. The Role of Identity Development, Values, and Costs in College STEM Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Tony; Cromley, Jennifer G.; Kaplan, Avi

    2014-01-01

    The current short-term longitudinal study investigated the role of college students' identity development and motivational beliefs in predicting their chemistry achievement and intentions to leave science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) majors. We collected 4 waves of data over 1 semester from 363 diverse undergraduate STEM students…

  20. Investigating the Molecular Mechanism of TSO1 Function in Arabidopsis cell division and meristem development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongchi Liu

    2004-10-01

    Unlike animals, plants are constantly exposed to environmental mutagens including ultraviolet light and reactive oxygen species. Further, plant cells are totipotent with highly plastic developmental programs. An understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of plants to monitor and repair its DNA and to eliminate damaged cells are of great importance. Previously we have identified two genes, TSO1 and TSO2, from a flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutations in these two genes cause callus-like flowers, fasciated shoot apical meristems, and abnormal cell division, indicating that TSO1 and TSO2 may encode important cell cycle regulators. Previous funding from DOE led to the molecular cloning of TSO1, which was shown to encode a novel nuclear protein with two CXC domains suspected to bind DNA. This DOE grant has allowed us to characterize and isolate TSO2 that encodes the small subunit of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). RNR comprises two large subunits (R1) an d two small subunits (R2), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA replication and repair. Previous studies in yeast and mammals indicated that defective RNR often led to cell cycle arrest, growth retardation and p53-dependent apoptosis while abnormally elevated RNR activities led to higher mutation rates. Subsequently, we identified two additional R2 genes, R2A and R2B in the Arabidopsis genome. Using reverse genetics, mutations in R2A and R2B were isolated, and double and triple mutants among the three R2 genes (TSO2, R2A and R2B) were constructed and analyzed. We showed that Arabidopsis tso2 mutants, with reduced dNTP levels, were more sensitive to UV-C. While r2a or r2b single mutants did not exhibit any phenotypes, tso2 r2b double mutants were embryonic lethal and tso2 r2a double mutants were seedling lethal indicating redundant functions among the three R2 genes. Furthermore, tso2 r2a double mutants exhibited increased DNA dam age

  1. Arabidopsis CPR5 independently regulates seed germination and postgermination arrest of development through LOX pathway and ABA signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilan Gao

    Full Text Available The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA and the lipoxygenases (LOXs pathway play important roles in seed germination and seedling growth and development. Here, we reported on the functional characterization of Arabidopsis CPR5 in the ABA signaling and LOX pathways. The cpr5 mutant was hypersensitive to ABA in the seed germination, cotyledon greening and root growth, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing CPR5 were insensitive. Genetic analysis demonstrated that CPR5 gene may be located downstream of the ABI1 in the ABA signaling pathway. However, the cpr5 mutant showed an ABA independent drought-resistant phenotype. It was also found that the cpr5 mutant was hypersensitive to NDGA and NDGA treatment aggravated the ABA-induced delay in the seed germination and cotyledon greening. Taken together, these results suggest that the CPR5 plays a regulatory role in the regulation of seed germination and early seedling growth through ABA and LOX pathways independently.

  2. Arabidopsis NITRILASE 1 Contributes to the Regulation of Root Growth and Development through Modulation of Auxin Biosynthesis in Seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Thomas; Janowitz, Tim; Sánchez-Parra, Beatriz; Alonso, Marta-Marina Pérez; Trompetter, Inga; Piotrowski, Markus; Pollmann, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Nitrilases consist of a group of enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of organic cyanides. They are found ubiquitously distributed in the plant kingdom. Plant nitrilases are mainly involved in the detoxification of ß-cyanoalanine, a side-product of ethylene biosynthesis. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana a second group of Brassicaceae-specific nitrilases (NIT1-3) has been found. This so-called NIT1-subfamily has been associated with the conversion of indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) into the major plant growth hormone, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). However, apart of reported functions in defense responses to pathogens and in responses to sulfur depletion, conclusive insight into the general physiological function of the NIT-subfamily nitrilases remains elusive. In this report, we test both the contribution of the indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx) pathway to general auxin biosynthesis and the influence of altered nitrilase expression on plant development. Apart of a comprehensive transcriptomics approach to explore the role of the IAOx route in auxin formation, we took a genetic approach to disclose the function of NITRILASE 1 (NIT1) of A. thaliana. We show that NIT1 over-expression (NIT1ox) results in seedlings with shorter primary roots, and an increased number of lateral roots. In addition, NIT1ox plants exhibit drastic changes of both free IAA and IAN levels, which are suggested to be the reason for the observed phenotype. On the other hand, NIT2RNAi knockdown lines, capable of suppressing the expression of all members of the NIT1-subfamily, were generated and characterized to substantiate the above-mentioned findings. Our results demonstrate for the first time that Arabidopsis NIT1 has profound effects on root morphogenesis in early seedling development.

  3. Development of a new therapeutic technique to direct stem cells to the infarcted heart using targeted microbubbles: StemBells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Woudstra; P.A.J. Krijnen (Paul); S.J.P. Bogaards; E. Meinster; R.W. Emmens; T.J.A. Kokhuis (Tom); I.A.E. Bollen; H. Baltzer; S.M.T. Baart; R. Parbhudayal; K. Helder MScN (Onno); V.W.M. van Hinsbergh (Victor); R.J.P. Musters (René); N. de Jong (Nico); O. Kamp (Otto); H.W.M. Niessen (Hans ); A. van Dijk (Annemieke); L.J.M. Juffermans (Lynda)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSuccessful stem cell therapy after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is hindered by lack of engraftment of sufficient stem cells at the site of injury. We designed a novel technique to overcome this problem by assembling stem cell-microbubble complexes, named 'StemBells'.StemBells were a

  4. Restoration of stamen development and production of functional pollen in an alloplasmic CMS tobacco line by ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana SUPERMAN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereterbide, Agnès; Hernould, Michel; Farbos, Isabelle; Glimelius, Kristina; Mouras, Armand

    2002-03-01

    The alloplasmic male-sterile tobacco line Nta(rep)S, combining the nucleus of Nicotiana tabacum with the cytoplasm of Nicotiana repanda, exhibits cadastral-type anomalies due to a fusion of several stamens with the pistil. These anomalies share similarities with Arabidopsis superman mutants. SUPERMAN (SUP) is a cadastral gene controlling the boundary between whorls 3 (androecium) and 4 (gynoecium). Thus we hypothesized that the expression of the tobacco SUP orthologue might be impaired in the alloplasmic Nta(rep)S line, and that the deficiency could be complemented by the Arabidopsis SUP gene. Here we show that the ectopic expression of SUP in the alloplasmic male-sterile tobacco line Nta(rep)S significantly increases the frequency of flowers possessing free stamens, inducing the recovery of a proper structure for whorls 3 and 4. Furthermore, flowers of transgenic plants show a significant improvement of the morphology of stamens, and more particularly of the anthers, which are able to produce few but functional pollen. The data show that ectopic expression of Arabidopsis SUP reactivates the regulatory cascade of anther development. The plausible causes of the developmental defects of anthers in the alloplasmic male-sterile tobacco line are discussed in relation to the model of regulation of the Arabidopsis SUP gene.

  5. Human pluripotent stem cells:Towards therapeutic development for the treatment of lifestyle diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miwako; Nishio; Masako; Nakahara; Akira; Yuo; Kumiko; Saeki

    2016-01-01

    There are two types of human pluripotent stem cells: Embryonic stem cells(ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells(iPSCs),both of which launched themselves on clinical trials after having taken measures to overcome problems: Blocking rejections by immunosuppressants regarding ESCs and minimizing the risk of tumorigenicity by depleting exogenous gene components regarding iP SCs.It is generally assumed that clinical applications of human pluripotent stem cells should be limited to those cases where there are no alternative measures for treatments because of the risk in transplanting those cells to living bodies.Regarding lifestyle diseases,we have already several therapeutic options,and thus,development of human pluripotent stem cell-based therapeutics tends to be avoided.Nevertheless,human pluripotent stem cells can contribute to the development of new therapeutics in this field.As we will show,there is a case where only a short-term presence of human pluripotent stem-derived cells can exert long-term therapeutic effects even after they are rejected.In those cases,immunologically rejections of ESC-or allogenic iP SC-derived cells may produce beneficial outcomes by nullifying the risk of tumorigenesis without deterioration of therapeutic effects.Another utility of human pluripotent stem cells is the provision of an innovative tool for drug discovery that are otherwise unavailable.For example,clinical specimens of human classical brown adipocytes(BAs),which has been attracting a great deal of attention as a new target of drug discovery for the treatment of metabolic disorders,are unobtainable from living individuals due to scarcity,fragility and ethical problems.However,BA can easily be produced from human pluripotent stem cells.In this review,we will contemplate potential contribution of human pluripotent stem cells to therapeutic development for lifestyle diseases.

  6. STEM CELL RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ITS PROTECTION IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Suryo Utomo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This research discusses the possibility of patenting stem cells under the Indonesian patent law by focusing on two essential issues: (a what approaches should be chosen by the Indonesian government to protect stem cell research under the Indonesian Patent Act and non-patent regulations? and (b what types of stem cells can be protected under the Indonesian Patent Act? In order to provide comparative perspectives, this paper discusses the experience and policies of the US, German and South Korean governments in protecting stem cell research under their patent acts. Penelitian ini mendiskusikan kemungkinan mematenkan sel punca dalam hukum paten di Indonesia dengan memfokuskan pada dua isu pokok: (a Pendekatan apa yang sebaiknya dipilih oleh pemerintahan Indonesia untuk melindungi penelitian sel punca dalam hukum paten Indonesia dan peraturan non paten? (b Tipe sel punca apa yang dapat dilindungi dalam hukum paten Indonesia? Untuk mencakupi pendekatan melalui perbandingan dengan luar negeri, penelitian ini membahas pengalaman dan kebijakan di pemerintahan AS, Jerman, dan Korea Selatan dalam melindungi penelitan sel punca dalam hukum paten masing-masing negara.

  7. Promising Practices for Strengthening the Regional STEM Workforce Development Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2016

    2016-01-01

    U.S. strength in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines has formed the basis of innovations, technologies, and industries that have spurred the nation's economic growth throughout the last 150 years. Universities are essential to the creation and transfer of new knowledge that drives innovation. This knowledge moves…

  8. Stem cells of the suture mesenchyme in craniofacial bone development, repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Takamitsu; Jeong, Jaeim; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Hsu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The suture mesenchyme serves as a growth centre for calvarial morphogenesis and has been postulated to act as the niche for skeletal stem cells. Aberrant gene regulation causes suture dysmorphogenesis resulting in craniosynostosis, one of the most common craniofacial deformities. Owing to various limitations, especially the lack of suture stem cell isolation, reconstruction of large craniofacial bone defects remains highly challenging. Here we provide the first evidence for an Axin2-expressing stem cell population with long-term self-renewing, clonal expanding and differentiating abilities during calvarial development and homeostastic maintenance. These cells, which reside in the suture midline, contribute directly to injury repair and skeletal regeneration in a cell autonomous fashion. Our findings demonstrate their true identity as skeletal stem cells with innate capacities to replace the damaged skeleton in cell-based therapy, and permit further elucidation of the stem cell-mediated craniofacial skeletogenesis, leading to revealing the complex nature of congenital disease and regenerative medicine.

  9. Arabidopsis Ovate Family Proteins, a Novel Transcriptional Repressor Family, Control Multiple Aspects of Plant Growth and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shucai [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Chang, Ying [Northeast Agricultural University; Guo, Jianjun [Harvard University; Zeng, Qingning [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Ellis, Brian [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Arabidopsis genome contains 18 genes that are predicted to encode Ovate Family Proteins (AtOFPs), a protein family characterized by a conserved OVATE domain, an approximately 70-amino acid domain that was originally found in tomato OVATE protein. Among AtOFP family members, AtOFP1 has been shown to suppress cell elongation, in part, by suppressing the expression of AtGA20ox1, AtOFP4 has been shown to regulate secondary cell wall formation by interact with KNOTTED1-LIKE HOMEODOMAIN PROTEIN 7 (KNAT7), and AtOFP5 has been shown to regulate the activity of a BEL1-LIKEHOMEODOMAIN 1(BLH1)-KNAT3 complex during early embryo sac development, but little is known about the function of other AtOFPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated here that AtOFP proteins could function as effective transcriptional repressors in the Arabidopsis protoplast transient expression system. The analysis of loss-of-function alleles of AtOFPs suggested AtOFP genes may have overlapping function in regulating plant growth and development, because none of the single mutants identified, including T-DNA insertion mutants in AtOFP1, AtOFP4, AtOFP8, AtOFP10, AtOFP15 and AtOFP16, displayed any apparent morphological defects. Further, Atofp1 Atofp4 and Atofp15 Atofp16 double mutants still did not differ significantly from wild-type. On the other hand, plants overexpressing AtOFP genes displayed a number of abnormal phenotypes, which could be categorized into three distinct classes, suggesting that AtOFP genes may also have diverse functions in regulating plant growth and development. Further analysis suggested that AtOFP1 regulates cotyledon development in a postembryonic manner, and global transcript profiling revealed that it suppress the expression of many other genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results showed that AtOFPs function as transcriptional repressors and they regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. These results provided the first overview of a

  10. Distinct palisade tissue development processes promoted by leaf autonomous signalling and long-distance signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munekage, Yuri Nakajima; Inoue, Shio; Yoneda, Yuki; Yokota, Akiho

    2015-06-01

    Plants develop palisade tissue consisting of cylindrical mesophyll cells located at the adaxial side of leaves in response to high light. To understand high light signalling in palisade tissue development, we investigated leaf autonomous and long-distance signal responses of palisade tissue development using Arabidopsis thaliana. Illumination of a developing leaf with high light induced cell height elongation, whereas illumination of mature leaves with high light increased cell density and suppressed cell width expansion in palisade tissue of new leaves. Examination using phototropin1 phototropin2 showed that blue light signalling mediated by phototropins was involved in cell height elongation of the leaf autonomous response rather than the cell density increase induced by long-distance signalling. Hydrogen peroxide treatment induced cylindrical palisade tissue cell formation in both a leaf autonomous and long-distance manner, suggesting involvement of oxidative signals. Although constitutive expression of transcription factors involved in systemic-acquired acclimation to excess light, ZAT10 and ZAT12, induced cylindrical palisade tissue cell formation, knockout of these genes did not affect cylindrical palisade tissue cell formation. We conclude that two distinct signalling pathways - leaf autonomous signalling mostly dependent on blue light signalling and long-distance signalling from mature leaves that sense high light and oxidative stress - control palisade tissue development in A. thaliana.

  11. Early embryonic development, assisted reproductive technologies, and pluripotent stem cell biology in domestic mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Hinrichs, K.; Lazzari, G.;

    2013-01-01

    Over many decades assisted reproductive technologies, including artificial insemination, embryo transfer, in vitro production (IVP) of embryos, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and stem cell culture, have been developed with the aim of refining breeding strategies for improved...... of pre-implantation development in cattle, pigs, horses, and dogs. Biological aspects and impact of assisted reproductive technologies including IVP, SCNT, and culture of pluripotent stem cells are also addressed. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd....

  12. Stem cells are differentially regulated during development, regeneration and homeostasis in flatworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mulder, Katrien; Pfister, Daniela; Kuales, Georg; Egger, Bernhard; Salvenmoser, Willi; Willems, Maxime; Steger, Jessica; Fauster, Katja; Micura, Ronald; Borgonie, Gaetan; Ladurner, Peter

    2009-10-01

    The flatworm stem cell system is exceptional within the animal kingdom, as totipotent stem cells (neoblasts) are the only dividing cells within the organism. In contrast to most organisms, piwi-like gene expression in flatworms is extended from germ cells to somatic stem cells. We describe the isolation and characterization of the piwi homologue macpiwi in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano. We use in situ hybridization, antibody staining and RNA interference to study macpiwi expression and function in adults, during postembryonic development, regeneration and upon starvation. We found novelties regarding piwi function and observed differences to current piwi functions in flatworms. First, macpiwi was essential for the maintenance of somatic stem cells in adult animals. A knock-down of macpiwi led to a complete elimination of stem cells and death of the animals. Second, the regulation of stem cells was different in adults and regenerates compared to postembryonic development. Third, sexual reproduction of M. lignano allowed to follow germline formation during postembryonic development, regeneration, and starvation. Fourth, piwi expression in hatchlings further supports an embryonic formation of the germline in M. lignano. Our findings address new questions in flatworm stem cell research and provide a basis for comparison with higher organisms.

  13. Investigation of the effect of phosphogypsum amendment on two Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, Amal; Chorriba, Amal; Fourati, Amine; Gargouri-Bouzid, Radhia

    2015-01-01

    The production of phosphoric acid from natural phosphate rock leads to an industrial waste called phosphogypsum (PG). About 5 tons of PG are generated per ton of phosphoric acid produced. This acidic waste (pH 2.2) is mostly disposed of by dumping into large stockpiles close to fertilizer production units, where they occupy large land areas that can cause serious environmental damages. Several attempts were made to test PG valorization via soil amendment because of its phosphate, sulphate and calcium content. The aim of the this study was to evaluate the potential use of PG as phosphate amendment in soil using two wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes (Wassilewskija and Colombia) as model plants. Plants were grown in a greenhouse for 30 days, on substrates containing various PG concentrations (0%, 15%, 25%, 40% and 50%). The growth rate and physiological parameters (fresh weight, phosphate and chlorophyll content) were determined. The data revealed that 15% PG did not alter plant survival and leaf's dry weight, and the inorganic phosphate (Pi) uptake by plant seemed to be efficient. However, some alterations in Chlorophyll a/Chlorophyll b ratio were noticed. Higher PG concentrations (40 and 50% PG) exhibited an enhanced negative effect on plant growth, survival and Pi uptake. These inhibitory effects of the substrates may be related to the acidity of the medium in addition to its Cd content.

  14. The Problem about Technology in STEM Education: Some Findings from Action Research on the Professional Development & Integrated STEM Lessons in Informal Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Saito

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Since 2013, the authors’ Japanese team in the Department of Science Education at Shizuoka University has held trials of STEM Education in informal fields as participatory action research (e.g., Science museum in Shizuoka, Lifelong Learning Center in Fujieda City, and STEM Summer camp for the preparation for implementing STEM education in public schools and for proposing science education reform in a Japanese context. Problems in preparing STEM lessons include numerous new instructional materials and programs and emerging specialized schools. In addition, while most of these initiatives address one or more of the STEM subjects separately, there are increasing calls for emphasizing connections between and among the subjects (Honey, Pearson and Schweingruber, 2014. Unfamiliar problems for Japanese teachers are, What is Engineering? What is Design? and How can they be implemented in lessons? While gathering STEM learning materials to implement in their STEM Summer Camp, the authors noticed a pattern with which to develop a STEM lesson and developed a template “T-SM-E” in reference to prior STEM studies. After the STEM Summer Camp, the authors introduced the model in the pre-service teacher preparation program. As a result, the authors received suggestions about how teachers can develop integrated STEM lessons, how undergraduate (UG teachers can implement it in their lessons, and how teachers can assess student learning in their STEM lessons. From standard based student assessments and reflections written by the UG teachers, the authors found that it was difficult for the UG teachers to include technology in their lessons, and their assessment also indicated that the students did not show performance proficiency in technology. The authors discuss this existing problem in the Japanese education system.

  15. Biphasic regulation of the transcription factor ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS) is essential for tapetum and pollen development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Alison C; Pearce, Simon; Band, Leah R; Yang, Caiyun; Ferjentsikova, Ivana; King, John; Yuan, Zheng; Zhang, Dabing; Wilson, Zoe A

    2017-01-01

    Viable pollen is essential for plant reproduction and crop yield. Its production requires coordinated expression at specific stages during anther development, involving early meiosis-associated events and late pollen wall formation. The ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS) transcription factor is a master regulator of sporopollenin biosynthesis, secretion and pollen wall formation in Arabidopsis. Here we show that it has complex regulation and additional essential roles earlier in pollen formation. An inducible-AMS reporter was created for functional rescue, protein expression pattern analysis, and to distinguish between direct and indirect targets. Mathematical modelling was used to create regulatory networks based on wild-type RNA and protein expression. Dual activity of AMS was defined by biphasic protein expression in anther tapetal cells, with an initial peak around pollen meiosis and then later during pollen wall development. Direct AMS-regulated targets exhibit temporal regulation, indicating that additional factors are associated with their regulation. We demonstrate that AMS biphasic expression is essential for pollen development, and defines distinct functional activities during early and late pollen development. Mathematical modelling suggests that AMS may competitively form a protein complex with other tapetum-expressed transcription factors, and that biphasic regulation is due to repression of upstream regulators and promotion of AMS protein degradation.

  16. The F-box-containing protein UFO and AGAMOUS participate in antagonistic pathways governing early petal development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durfee, Tim; Roe, Judith L; Sessions, R Allen; Inouye, Carla; Serikawa, Kyle; Feldmann, Kenneth A; Weigel, Detlef; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2003-07-08

    The UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO) gene is required for multiple processes in the developing Arabidopsis flower, including the proper patterning and identity of both petals and stamens. The gene encodes an F-box-containing protein, UFO, which interacts physically and genetically with the Skp1 homolog, ASK1. In this report, we describe four ufo alleles characterized by the absence of petals, which uncover another role for UFO in promoting second whorl development. This UFO-dependent pathway is required regardless of the second whorl organ to be formed, arguing that it affects a basic process acting in parallel with those establishing organ identity. However, the pathway is dispensable in the absence of AGAMOUS (AG), a known inhibitor of petal development. In situ hybridization results argue that AG is not transcribed in the petal region, suggesting that it acts non-cell-autonomously to inhibit second whorl development in ufo mutants. These results are combined into a genetic model explaining early second whorl initiation/proliferation, in which UFO functions to inhibit an AG-dependent activity.

  17. The ASH1 HOMOLOG 2 (ASHH2 histone H3 methyltransferase is required for ovule and anther development in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Grini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SET-domain proteins are histone lysine (K methyltransferases (HMTase implicated in defining transcriptionally permissive or repressive chromatin. The Arabidopsis ASH1 HOMOLOG 2 (ASHH2 protein (also called SDG8, EFS and CCR1 has been suggested to methylate H3K4 and/or H3K36 and is similar to Drosophila ASH1, a positive maintainer of gene expression, and yeast Set2, a H3K36 HMTase. Mutation of the ASHH2 gene has pleiotropic developmental effects. Here we focus on the role of ASHH2 in plant reproduction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A slightly reduced transmission of the ashh2 allele in reciprocal crosses implied involvement in gametogenesis or gamete function. However, the main requirement of ASHH2 is sporophytic. On the female side, close to 80% of mature ovules lack embryo sac. On the male side, anthers frequently develop without pollen sacs or with specific defects in the tapetum layer, resulting in reduction in the number of functional pollen per anther by up to approximately 90%. In consistence with the phenotypic findings, an ASHH2 promoter-reporter gene was expressed at the site of megaspore mother cell formation as well as tapetum layers and pollen. ashh2 mutations also result in homeotic changes in floral organ identity. Transcriptional profiling identified more than 300 up-regulated and 600 down-regulated genes in ashh2 mutant inflorescences, whereof the latter included genes involved in determination of floral organ identity, embryo sac and anther/pollen development. This was confirmed by real-time PCR. In the chromatin of such genes (AP1, AtDMC1 and MYB99 we observed a reduction of H3K36 trimethylation (me3, but not H3K4me3 or H3K36me2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The severe distortion of reproductive organ development in ashh2 mutants, argues that ASHH2 is required for the correct expression of genes essential to reproductive development. The reduction in the ashh2 mutant of H3K36me3 on down-regulated genes relevant to

  18. Insights into kidney stem cell development and regeneration using zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bridgette; E; Drummond; Rebecca; A; Wingert

    2016-01-01

    Kidney disease is an escalating global health problem,for which the formulation of therapeutic approaches using stem cells has received increasing research attention.The complexity of kidney anatomy and function,which includes the diversity of renal cell types,poses formidable challenges in the identification of methods to generate replacement structures.Recent work using the zebrafish has revealed their high capacity to regenerate the integral working units of the kidney,known as nephrons,following acute injury.Here,we discuss these findings and explore the ways that zebrafish can be further utilized to gain a deeper molecular appreciation of renal stem cell biology,which may uncover important clues for regenerative medicine.

  19. Transcript profiling of crown rootless1 mutant stem base reveals new elements associated with crown root development in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Anh Le Thi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In rice, the major part of the post-embryonic root system is made of stem-derived roots named crown roots (CR. Among the few characterized rice mutants affected in root development, crown rootless1 mutant is unable to initiate crown root primordia. CROWN ROOTLESS1 (CRL1 is induced by auxin and encodes an AS2/LOB-domain transcription factor that acts upstream of the gene regulatory network controlling CR development. Results To identify genes involved in CR development, we compared global gene expression profile in stem bases of crl1 mutant and wild-type (WT plants. Our analysis revealed that 250 and 236 genes are down- and up-regulated respectively in the crl1 mutant. Auxin induces CRL1 expression and consequently it is expected that auxin also alters the expression of genes that are early regulated by CRL1. To identify genes under the early control of CRL1, we monitored the expression kinetics of a selected subset of genes, mainly chosen among those exhibiting differential expression, in crl1 and WT following exogenous auxin treatment. This analysis revealed that most of these genes, mainly related to hormone, water and nutrient, development and homeostasis, were likely not regulated directly by CRL1. We hypothesized that the differential expression for these genes observed in the crl1 mutant is likely a consequence of the absence of CR formation. Otherwise, three CRL1-dependent auxin-responsive genes: FSM (FLATENNED SHOOT MERISTEM/FAS1 (FASCIATA1, GTE4 (GENERAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR GROUP E4 and MAP (MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN were identified. FSM/FAS1 and GTE4 are known in rice and Arabidopsis to be involved in the maintenance of root meristem through chromatin remodelling and cell cycle regulation respectively. Conclusion Our data showed that the differential regulation of most genes in crl1 versus WT may be an indirect consequence of CRL1 inactivation resulting from the absence of CR in the crl1 mutant. Nevertheless

  20. Arabidopsis inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate 5/6 kinase 2 is required for seed coat development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Tang; Shutang Tan; Hongwei Xue

    2013-01-01

    Inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate 5/6 kinase (ITPK) phosphorylates inositol 1,3,4-trisphosphate to form inositol 1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate and inositol 1,3,4,6-tetrakisphosphate which can be finally transferred to inositoi hexaphosphate (IP6) and play important roles during plant growth and development.There are 4 putative ITPK members in Arabidopsis.Expression pattern analysis showed that ITPK2 is constitutively expressed in various tissues.A TDNA knockout mutant of ITPK2 was identified and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the epidermis structure of seed coat was irregularly formed in seeds of itpk2-1 mutant,resulting in the increased permeability of seed coat to tetrazolium salts.Further analysis by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of lipid polyester monomers in cell wall confirmed a dramatic decrease in composition of suberin and cutin,which relate to the permeability of seed coat and the formation of which is accompanied with seed coat development.These results indicate that ITPK2 plays an essential role in seed coat development and lipid polyester barrier formation.

  1. The plastid-localized NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase is crucial for energy homeostasis in developing Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinski, Jennifer; König, Nicolas; Wellmeyer, Benedikt; Hanke, Guy T; Linke, Vera; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Scheibe, Renate

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of photosynthesis, ATP is imported into chloroplasts and non-green plastids by ATP/ADP transporters or formed during glycolysis, the latter requiring continuous regeneration of NAD(+), supplied by the plastidial isoform of NAD-MDH. During screening for T-DNA insertion mutants in the plNAD-MDH gene of Arabidopsis, only heterozygous plants could be isolated and homozygous knockout mutants grew only after complementation. These heterozygous plants show higher transcript levels of an alternative NAD(+)-regenerating enzyme, NADH-GOGAT, and, remarkably, improved growth when ammonium is the sole N-source. In situ hybridization and GUS-histochemical staining revealed that plNAD-MDH was particularly abundant in male and female gametophytes. Knockout plNAD-MDH pollen exhibit impaired tube growth in vitro, which can be overcome by adding the substrates of NADH-GOGAT. In vivo, knockout pollen is able to fertilize the egg cell. Young siliques of selfed heterozygous plants contain both green and white seeds corresponding to wild-type/heterozygous (green) and homozygous knockout mutants (white) in a (1:2):1 ratio. Embryos of the homozygous knockout seeds only reached the globular stage, did not green, and developed to tiny wrinkled seeds. Complementation with the gene under the native promoter rescued this defect, and all seeds developed as wild-type. This suggests that a blocked major physiological process in plNAD-MDH mutants stops both embryo and endosperm development, thus avoiding assimilate investment in compromised offspring.

  2. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 is involved in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junxiang; Yuan, Hui; Yang, Yong; Fish, Tara; Lyi, Sangbom M; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Zhang, Lugang; Li, Li

    2016-04-01

    Plastid ribosomal proteins are essential components of protein synthesis machinery and have diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid ribosomal proteins lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood, and the functions of some individual plastid ribosomal proteins remain unknown. To identify genes responsible for chloroplast development, we isolated and characterized a mutant that exhibited pale yellow inner leaves with a reduced growth rate in Arabidopsis. The mutant (rps5) contained a missense mutation of plastid ribosomal protein S5 (RPS5), which caused a dramatically reduced abundance of chloroplast 16S rRNA and seriously impaired 16S rRNA processing to affect ribosome function and plastid translation. Comparative proteomic analysis revealed that the rps5 mutation suppressed the expression of a large number of core components involved in photosystems I and II as well as many plastid ribosomal proteins. Unexpectedly, a number of proteins associated with cold stress responses were greatly decreased in rps5, and overexpression of the plastid RPS5 improved plant cold stress tolerance. Our results indicate that RPS5 is an important constituent of the plastid 30S subunit and affects proteins involved in photosynthesis and cold stress responses to mediate plant growth and development.

  3. DELLA-induced early transcriptional changes during etiolated development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Gallego-Bartolomé

    Full Text Available The hormones gibberellins (GAs control a wide variety of processes in plants, including stress and developmental responses. This task largely relies on the activity of the DELLA proteins, nuclear-localized transcriptional regulators that do not seem to have DNA binding capacity. The identification of early target genes of DELLA action is key not only to understand how GAs regulate physiological responses, but also to get clues about the molecular mechanisms by which DELLAs regulate gene expression. Here, we have investigated the global, early transcriptional response triggered by the Arabidopsis DELLA protein GAI during skotomorphogenesis, a developmental program tightly regulated by GAs. Our results show that the induction of GAI activity has an almost immediate effect on gene expression. Although this transcriptional regulation is largely mediated by the PIFs and HY5 transcription factors based on target meta-analysis, additional evidence points to other transcription factors that would be directly involved in DELLA regulation of gene expression. First, we have identified cis elements recognized by Dofs and type-B ARRs among the sequences enriched in the promoters of GAI targets; and second, an enrichment in additional cis elements appeared when this analysis was extended to a dataset of early targets of the DELLA protein RGA: CArG boxes, bound by MADS-box proteins, and the E-box CACATG that links the activity of DELLAs to circadian transcriptional regulation. Finally, Gene Ontology analysis highlights the impact of DELLA regulation upon the homeostasis of the GA, auxin, and ethylene pathways, as well as upon pre-existing transcriptional networks.

  4. Current perspectives on the hormonal control of seed development in Arabidopsis and maize: a focus on auxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locascio, Antonella; Roig-Villanova, Irma; Bernardi, Jamila; Varotto, Serena

    2014-01-01

    The seed represents the unit of reproduction of flowering plants, capable of developing into another plant, and to ensure the survival of the species under unfavorable environmental conditions. It is composed of three compartments: seed coat, endosperm and embryo. Proper seed development depends on the coordination of the processes that lead to seed compartments differentiation, development and maturation. The coordination of these processes is based on the constant transmission/perception of signals by the three compartments. Phytohormones constitute one of these signals; gradients of hormones are generated in the different seed compartments, and their ratios comprise the signals that induce/inhibit particular processes in seed development. Among the hormones, auxin seems to exert a central role, as it is the only one in maintaining high levels of accumulation from fertilization to seed maturation. The gradient of auxin generated by its PIN carriers affects several processes of seed development, including pattern formation, cell division and expansion. Despite the high degree of conservation in the regulatory mechanisms that lead to seed development within the Spermatophytes, remarkable differences exist during seed maturation between Monocots and Eudicots species. For instance, in Monocots the endosperm persists until maturation, and constitutes an important compartment for nutrients storage, while in Eudicots it is reduced to a single cell layer, as the expanding embryo gradually replaces it during the maturation. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge on hormonal control of seed development, by considering the data available in two model plants: Arabidopsis thaliana, for Eudicots and Zea mays L., for Monocots. We will emphasize the control exerted by auxin on the correct progress of seed development comparing, when possible, the two species.

  5. Current perspectives on the hormonal control of seed development in Arabidopsis and maize: a focus on auxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella eLocascio

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The seed represents the unit of reproduction of flowering plants, capable of developing into another plant, and to ensure the survival of the species under unfavorable environmental conditions. It is composed of three compartments: seed coat, endosperm and embryo. Proper seed development depends on the coordination of the processes that lead to seed compartments differentiation, development and maturation. The coordination of these processes is based on the constant transmission/perception of signals by the three compartments. Phytohormones constitute one of these signals, gradients of hormones are generated in the different seed compartments, and the ratios of which constitute the signals that induce/inhibit a particular process in seed development. Among the hormones, auxin seems to exert a pivotal role; since it is the unique hormone that maintains high level of accumulation from fertilization to seed maturation. The gradient of auxin generated by its PIN carriers, affects several processes of seed development, including pattern formation, cell division and expansion. Despite the high degree of conservation in the regulatory mechanisms that lead to seed development within the Spermatophytes, remarkable differences exists during seed maturation between Monocots and Eudicots species. For instance, in Monocots, the endosperm persists until maturation, and constitutes an important compartment for nutrients storage; while in Eudicots it is reduced to a single cell layer, as the expanding embryo gradually replaces it during the maturation.This review will provide an overview of the current knowledge on hormonal control of seed development, by considering the data available in two model plants: Arabidopsis thaliana,for Eudicots, and Zea mays, for Monocots. We will emphasize the control exerted by auxin on the correct progress of seed development comparing, when possible, the two species.

  6. Stem cell and lung cancer development: blaming the Wnt, Hh and Notch signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Campelo, María Rosario; Alonso Curbera, Guillermo; Aparicio Gallego, Guadalupe; Grande Pulido, Enrique; Antón Aparicio, Luis Miguel

    2011-02-01

    Primary lung cancer may arise from the central (bronchial) or peripheral (bronchiolo-alveolar) compartments. However the origins of the different histological types of primary lung cancer are not well understood. Stem cells are believed to be crucial players in tumour development and there is much interest in identifying those compartments that harbour stem cells involved in lung cancer. Although the role of stem cells in carcinogenesis is not well characterised, emerging evidence is providing new insights into this process. Numerous studies have indicated that lung cancer is not a result of a sudden transforming event but a multistep process in which a sequence of molecular changes result in genetic and morphological aberrations. The exact sequence of molecular events involved in lung carcinogenesis is not yet well understood, therefore deeper knowledge of the aberrant stem cell fate signalling pathway could be crucial in the development of new drugs against the advanced setting.

  7. β-Amyloid precursor protein: function in stem cell development and Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David H; Hu, Yanling; Bolós, Marta; Dawkins, Edgar; Foa, Lisa; Young, Kaylene M

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy may be a suitable approach for the treatment of many neurodegenerative diseases. However, one major impediment to the development of successful cell-based therapies is our limited understanding of the mechanisms that instruct neural stem cell behaviour, such as proliferation and cell fate specification. The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) may play an important role in neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Our recent work shows that in vitro, APP stimulates neural stem or progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation. The effect on proliferation is mediated by an autocrine factor that we have identified as cystatin C. As cystatin C expression is also reported to inhibit the development of amyloid pathology in APP transgenic mice, our finding has implications for the possible use of cystatin C for the therapy of AD.

  8. Development and specification of cerebellar stem and progenitor cells in zebrafish: from embryo to adult

    OpenAIRE

    Kaslin, Jan; Kroehne, Volker; Benato, Francesca; Argenton, Francesco; Brand, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Teleost fish display widespread post-embryonic neurogenesis originating from many different proliferative niches that are distributed along the brain axis. During the development of the central nervous system (CNS) different cell types are produced in a strict temporal order from increasingly committed progenitors. However, it is not known whether diverse neural stem and progenitor cell types with restricted potential or stem cells with broad potential are maintained in the teleost...

  9. Early embryonic development, assisted reproductive technologies, and pluripotent stem cell biology in domestic mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, V.; Hinrichs, K.; Lazzari, G.; Betts, D.H.; Hyttel, P.

    2013-01-01

    Over many decades assisted reproductive technologies, including artificial insemination, embryo transfer, in vitro production (IVP) of embryos, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and stem cell culture, have been developed with the aim of refining breeding strategies for improved production and health in animal husbandry. More recently, biomedical applications of these technologies, in particular, SCNT and stem cell culture, have been pursued in domestic mammals in order to creat...

  10. The DnaJ-like zinc finger domain protein PSA2 affects light acclimation and chloroplast development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Wen eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis of chlorophylls and carotenoids and the assembly of thylakoid membranes are critical for the photoautotrophic growth of plants. Different factors are involved in these two processes. In recent years, members of the DnaJ-like zinc finger domain proteins have been found to take part in the biogenesis and/or the maintenance of plastids. One member of this family of proteins, PSA2, was recently found to localize to the thylakoid lumen and regulate the accumulation of photosystem I. In this study, we report that the silencing of PSA2 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in variegated leaves and retarded growth. Although both chlorophylls and total carotenoids decreased in the psa2 mutant, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin accumulated in the mutant seedlings grown under growth condition. Lower levels of non-photochemical quenching and electron transport rate were also found in the psa2 mutant seedlings under growth condition compared with those of the wild-type plants, indicating an impaired capability to acclimate to normal light irradiance when PSA2 was silenced. Moreover, we also observed an abnormal assembly of grana thylakoids and poorly developed stroma thylakoids in psa2 chloroplasts. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PSA2 is a member of the DnaJ-like zinc finger domain protein family that affects light acclimation and chloroplast development.

  11. Stem cells: shibboleths of development, part II: Toward a functional definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Graham C; Anastassova-Kristeva, Marlene; Eisenberg, Leonard M; Rao, Mahendra S; Williams, Marc A; Sanberg, Paul R; English, Denis

    2005-10-01

    Our previous discourse on stem cell characteristics led to the conclusion that the qualities deemed essential for a cell to be considered a "stem cell" are neither firmly established nor universally accepted, and this we accept as editorial policy. In that study, self-renewal, asymmetric division, phenotypic markers, and other attributes touted as being indicative of cells being stem cells were critically questioned as fundamental to the definition of a stem cell, leading us to seek a functional definition instead. Here, we offer further considerations, and elaborate on the characteristics that diverse investigators feel are essential for a cell to function as a stem cell, either in development or body maintenance. We hope that this discourse will promote further reflection, culminating with a definition that is widely accepted and universally applicable. We confess this goal has not been reached, neither here nor elsewhere. The outstanding goal of understanding what stem cells are, a prerequisite of characterizing what stem cells do and how they do it, is still outstanding.

  12. The Solanum lycopersicum Zinc Finger2 cysteine-2/histidine-2 repressor-like transcription factor regulates development and tolerance to salinity in tomato and Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hichri, Imène; Muhovski, Yordan; Žižkova, Eva; Dobrev, Petre I; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Solano, Roberto; Lopez-Vidriero, Irene; Motyka, Vaclav; Lutts, Stanley

    2014-04-01

    The zinc finger superfamily includes transcription factors that regulate multiple aspects of plant development and were recently shown to regulate abiotic stress tolerance. Cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Zinc Finger2 [SIZF2]) is a cysteine-2/histidine-2-type zinc finger transcription factor bearing an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression domain and binding to the ACGTCAGTG sequence containing two AGT core motifs. SlZF2 is ubiquitously expressed during plant development, and is rapidly induced by sodium chloride, drought, and potassium chloride treatments. Its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tomato impaired development and influenced leaf and flower shape, while causing a general stress visible by anthocyanin and malonyldialdehyde accumulation. SlZF2 enhanced salt sensitivity in Arabidopsis, whereas SlZF2 delayed senescence and improved tomato salt tolerance, particularly by maintaining photosynthesis and increasing polyamine biosynthesis, in salt-treated hydroponic cultures (125 mm sodium chloride, 20 d). SlZF2 may be involved in abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis/signaling, because SlZF2 is rapidly induced by ABA treatment and 35S::SlZF2 tomatoes accumulate more ABA than wild-type plants. Transcriptome analysis of 35S::SlZF2 revealed that SlZF2 both increased and reduced expression of a comparable number of genes involved in various physiological processes such as photosynthesis, polyamine biosynthesis, and hormone (notably ABA) biosynthesis/signaling. Involvement of these different metabolic pathways in salt stress tolerance is discussed.

  13. Parallel gateways to pluripotency: open chromatin in stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Fong Ming; Sachs, Michael; Guzman-Ayala, Marcela; Ramalho-Santos, Miguel

    2010-10-01

    Open chromatin is a hallmark of pluripotent stem cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are only beginning to be unraveled. In this review we highlight recent studies that employ embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate the regulation of open chromatin and its role in the maintenance and acquisition of pluripotency in vitro. We suggest that findings from in vitro studies using pluripotent stem cells are predictive of in vivo processes of epigenetic regulation of pluripotency, specifically in the development of the zygote and primordial germ cells. The combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches is expected to provide a comprehensive understanding of the epigenetic regulation of pluripotency and reprograming.

  14. The mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 is required for amino acid catabolism during carbohydrate starvation and embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüßel, Lena; Junemann, Johannes; Wirtz, Markus; Birke, Hannah; Thornton, Jeremy D; Browning, Luke W; Poschet, Gernot; Hell, Rüdiger; Balk, Janneke; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M

    2014-05-01

    The sulfur dioxygenase ETHYLMALONIC ENCEPHALOPATHY PROTEIN1 (ETHE1) catalyzes the oxidation of persulfides in the mitochondrial matrix and is essential for early embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We investigated the biochemical and physiological functions of ETHE1 in plant metabolism using recombinant Arabidopsis ETHE1 and three transfer DNA insertion lines with 50% to 99% decreased sulfur dioxygenase activity. Our results identified a new mitochondrial pathway catalyzing the detoxification of reduced sulfur species derived from cysteine catabolism by oxidation to thiosulfate. Knockdown of the sulfur dioxygenase impaired embryo development and produced phenotypes of starvation-induced chlorosis during short-day growth conditions and extended darkness, indicating that ETHE1 has a key function in situations of high protein turnover, such as seed production and the use of amino acids as alternative respiratory substrates during carbohydrate starvation. The amino acid profile of mutant plants was similar to that caused by defects in the electron-transfer flavoprotein/electron-transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex and associated dehydrogenases. Thus, in addition to sulfur amino acid catabolism, ETHE1 also affects the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids and lysine.

  15. Amino acid substitution converts WEREWOLF function from an activator to a repressor of Arabidopsis non-hair cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga-Wada, Rumi; Nukumizu, Yuka; Wada, Takuji

    2012-02-01

    Root hair cell or non-hair cell fate determination in Arabidopsis thaliana root epidermis is model system for plant cell development. Two types of MYB transcription factors, the R2R3-type MYB, WEREWOLF (WER), and an R3-type MYB, CAPRICE (CPC), are involved in this cell fate determination process. To study the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship of WER and CPC. WER-CPC chimeric constructs were made from WER where all or parts of the MYB R3 region were replaced with the corresponding regions from CPC R3, and the constructs were introduced into the cpc-2 mutant. Although, the WER gene did not rescue the cpc-2 mutant 'small number of root hairs' phenotype, the WER-CPC chimera with two amino acids substitution (WC6) completely rescued the cpc-2 mutant phenotype. Furthermore, the WER-CPC chimera with 37 amino acids substitution (WC5) excessively rescued the cpc-2 mutant and induced 2.5 times more root hairs than wild-type. Consistent with this phenotype, GL2 gene expression was strongly reduced in WC5 in a cpc-2 background. Our results suggest that swapping at least two amino acids is sufficient to convert WER to CPC function. Therefore, these key residues may have strongly contributed to the selection of these important functions over evolution.

  16. Arabidopsis phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase1 of the phosphoserine pathway is essential for development and required for ammonium assimilation and tryptophan biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benstein, Ruben Maximilian; Ludewig, Katja; Wulfert, Sabine; Wittek, Sebastian; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Frerigmann, Henning; Gierth, Markus; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Krueger, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    In plants, two independent serine biosynthetic pathways, the photorespiratory and glycolytic phosphoserine (PS) pathways, have been postulated. Although the photorespiratory pathway is well characterized, little information is available on the function of the PS pathway in plants. Here, we present a detailed characterization of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenases (PGDHs) as components of the PS pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. All PGDHs localize to plastids and possess similar kinetic properties, but they differ with respect to their sensitivity to serine feedback inhibition. Furthermore, analysis of pgdh1 and phosphoserine phosphatase mutants revealed an embryo-lethal phenotype and PGDH1-silenced lines were inhibited in growth. Metabolic analyses of PGDH1-silenced lines grown under ambient and high CO2 conditions indicate a direct link between PS biosynthesis and ammonium assimilation. In addition, we obtained several lines of evidence for an interconnection between PS and tryptophan biosynthesis, because the expression of PGDH1 and phosphoserine aminotransferase1 is regulated by MYB51 and MYB34, two activators of tryptophan biosynthesis. Moreover, the concentration of tryptophan-derived glucosinolates and auxin were reduced in PGDH1-silenced plants. In essence, our results provide evidence for a vital function of PS biosynthesis for plant development and metabolism.

  17. An Arabidopsis F-box protein acts as a transcriptional co-factor to regulate floral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Eunyoung; Tan, Queenie K-G; Hill, Theresa A; Irish, Vivian F

    2008-04-01

    Plants flower in response to both environmental and endogenous signals. The Arabidopsis LEAFY (LFY) transcription factor is crucial in integrating these signals, and acts in part by activating the expression of multiple floral homeotic genes. LFY-dependent activation of the homeotic APETALA3 (AP3) gene requires the activity of UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS (UFO), an F-box component of an SCF ubiquitin ligase, yet how this regulation is effected has remained unclear. Here, we show that UFO physically interacts with LFY both in vitro and in vivo, and this interaction is necessary to recruit UFO to the AP3 promoter. Furthermore, a transcriptional repressor domain fused to UFO reduces endogenous LFY activity in plants, supporting the idea that UFO acts as part of a transcriptional complex at the AP3 promoter. Moreover, chemical or genetic disruption of proteasome activity compromises LFY-dependent AP3 activation, indicating that protein degradation is required to promote LFY activity. These results define an unexpected role for an F-box protein in functioning as a DNA-associated transcriptional co-factor in regulating floral homeotic gene expression. These results suggest a novel mechanism for promoting flower development via protein degradation and concomitant activation of the LFY transcription factor. This mechanism may be widely conserved, as homologs of UFO and LFY have been identified in a wide array of plant species.

  18. Stem cell fate determination during development and regeneration of ectodermal organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia eJimenez-Rojo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of ectoderm-derived appendages results in a large variety of highly specialized organs such as hair follicles, mammary glands, salivary glands and teeth. Despite varying in number, shape and function, all these ectodermal organs develop through continuous and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, sharing common morphological and molecular features especially during their embryonic development. Diseases such as ectodermal dysplasias can affect simultaneously these organs, suggesting that they may arise from common multipotent precursors residing in the embryonic ectoderm. During embryogenesis, these putative ectodermal stem cells may adopt different fates and consequently be able to generate a variety of tissue-specific stem cells, which are the sources for the various cell lineages that form the diverse organs. The specification of those common epithelial precursors, as well as their further lineage commitment to tissue-specific stem cells, might be controlled by specific signals. It has been well documented that Notch, Wnt, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP and fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling pathways regulate cell fate decisions during the various stages of ectodermal organ development. However, the in vivo spatial and temporal dynamics of these signaling pathways are not yet well understood. Improving the current knowledge on the mechanisms involved in stem cell fate determination during organogenesis and homeostasis of ectodermal organs is crucial to develop effective stem cell-based therapies in order to regenerate or replace pathological and damaged tissues.

  19. Development of a Direct Headspace Collection Method from Arabidopsis Seedlings Using HS-SPME-GC-TOF-MS Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Saito

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants produce various volatile organic compounds (VOCs, which are thought to be a crucial factor in their interactions with harmful insects, plants and animals. Composition of VOCs may differ when plants are grown under different nutrient conditions, i.e., macronutrient-deficient conditions. However, in plants, relationships between macronutrient assimilation and VOC composition remain unclear. In order to identify the kinds of VOCs that can be emitted when plants are grown under various environmental conditions, we established a conventional method for VOC profiling in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis involving headspace-solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-TOF-MS. We grew Arabidopsis seedlings in an HS vial to directly perform HS analysis. To maximize the analytical performance of VOCs, we optimized the extraction method and the analytical conditions of HP-SPME-GC-TOF-MS. Using the optimized method, we conducted VOC profiling of Arabidopsis seedlings, which were grown under two different nutrition conditions, nutrition-rich and nutrition-deficient conditions. The VOC profiles clearly showed a distinct pattern with respect to each condition. This study suggests that HS-SPME-GC-TOF-MS analysis has immense potential to detect changes in the levels of VOCs in not only Arabidopsis, but other plants grown under various environmental conditions.

  20. Development of neural precursor cells from mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xuan; LI Hai-di; Li Shu-nong; XU Hai-wei; XU Ling

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the serum-free culture conditions for differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells)into neural precursor cells (NPC) and compare the effects of human embryonic fibroblasts (HEF) as the feeder layer of ES with that of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF)in vitro. Methods: Mouse ES cells were cultured in or not in feeder layer cells medium containing or not leukemia inhibitory factor to suppress their differentiation. Immunocytochemical method was used to identify NPC by detecting nestin antigen and alkaline phosphatase. Results: The ES cells cultured in HEF were positive to alkaline phosphatase. Serum-free medium allowed the differentiation of ES cells into NPC. Conclusion:HEF could replace MEF and keep the undifferentiated condition of ES cells with more benefits. NPC of high purity could be cultured from ES cells by serum-free culture method.

  1. Lgr5+ve Stem/Progenitor Cells Contribute to Nephron Formation during Kidney Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Barker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent stem cells and their lineage-restricted progeny drive nephron formation within the developing kidney. Here, we document expression of the adult stem cell marker Lgr5 in the developing kidney and assess the stem/progenitor identity of Lgr5+ve cells via in vivo lineage tracing. The appearance and localization of Lgr5+ve cells coincided with that of the S-shaped body around embryonic day 14. Lgr5 expression remained restricted to cell clusters within developing nephrons in the cortex until postnatal day 7, when expression was permanently silenced. In vivo lineage tracing identified Lgr5 as a marker of a stem/progenitor population within nascent nephrons dedicated to generating the thick ascending limb of Henle’s loop and distal convoluted tubule. The Lgr5 surface marker and experimental models described here will be invaluable for deciphering the contribution of early nephron stem cells to developmental defects and for isolating human nephron progenitors as a prerequisite to evaluating their therapeutic potential.

  2. Microscopy and Bioinformatic Analyses of Lipid Metabolism Implicate a Sporophytic Signaling Network Supporting Pollen Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yixing Wang; Hong Wu; Ming Yang

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis sporophytic tapetum undergoes a programmed degeneration process to secrete lipid and other materials to support pollen development.However,the molecular mechanism regulating the degeneration process is unknown.To gain insight into this molecular mechanism,we first determined that the most critical period for tapetal secretion to support pollen development iS from the vacuolate microspore stage to the early binucleate pollen stage.We then analyzed the expression of enzymes responsible for lipid biosynthesis and degradation with available in-silico data.The genes for these enzymes that are expressed in the stamen but not in the concurrent uninucleate microspore and binucleate pollen are of particular interest,as they presumably hold the clues to unique molecular processes in the sporophytic tissues compared to the gametophytic tissue.No gene for lipid biosynthesis but a single gene encoding a patatin-like protein likely for lipid mobilization was identified based on the selection criterion.A search for genes co-expressed with this gene identified additional genes encoding typical signal transduction components such as a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase,an extra-large G-protein,other protein kinases,and transcription factors.In addition,proteases,cell wall degradation enzymes,and other proteins were also identified.These proteins thus may be components of a signaling network leading to degradation of a broad range of cellular components.Since a broad range of degradation activities is expected to occur only in the tapetal degeneration process at this stage in the stamen,it iS further hypothesized that the signaling network acts in the tapetal degeneration process.

  3. The Arabidopsis AtOPT3 protein functions in metal homeostasis and movement of iron to developing seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Minviluz G; Patel, Ami; McClain, William E; Mathieu, Melanie; Remley, Melissa; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Gassmann, Walter; Blevins, Dale G; Stacey, Gary

    2008-02-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana AtOPT3 belongs to the oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family, a relatively poorly characterized family of peptide/modified peptide transporters found in archebacteria, bacteria, fungi, and plants. A null mutation in AtOPT3 resulted in embryo lethality, indicating an essential role for AtOPT3 in embryo development. In this article, we report on the isolation and phenotypic characterization of a second AtOPT3 mutant line, opt3-2, harboring a T-DNA insertion in the 5' untranslated region of AtOPT3. The T-DNA insertion in the AtOPT3 promoter resulted in reduced but sufficient AtOPT3 expression to allow embryo formation in opt3-2 homozygous seeds. Phenotypic analyses of opt3-2 plants revealed three interesting loss-of-function phenotypes associated with iron metabolism. First, reduced AtOPT3 expression in opt3-2 plants resulted in the constitutive expression of root iron deficiency responses regardless of exogenous iron supply. Second, deregulation of root iron uptake processes in opt3-2 roots resulted in the accumulation of very high levels of iron in opt3-2 tissues. Hyperaccumulation of iron in opt3-2 resulted in the formation of brown necrotic areas in opt3-2 leaves and was more pronounced during the seed-filling stage. Third, reduced AtOPT3 expression resulted in decreased accumulation of iron in opt3-2 seeds. The reduced accumulation of iron in opt3-2 seeds is especially noteworthy considering the excessively high levels of accumulated iron in other opt3-2 tissues. AtOPT3, therefore, plays a critical role in two important aspects of iron metabolism, namely, maintenance of whole-plant iron homeostasis and iron nutrition of developing seeds.

  4. Early embryonic development, assisted reproductive technologies, and pluripotent stem cell biology in domestic mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Hinrichs, K.; Lazzari, G.

    2013-01-01

    production and health in animal husbandry. More recently, biomedical applications of these technologies, in particular, SCNT and stem cell culture, have been pursued in domestic mammals in order to create models for human disease and therapy. The following review focuses on presenting important aspects......Over many decades assisted reproductive technologies, including artificial insemination, embryo transfer, in vitro production (IVP) of embryos, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and stem cell culture, have been developed with the aim of refining breeding strategies for improved...... of pre-implantation development in cattle, pigs, horses, and dogs. Biological aspects and impact of assisted reproductive technologies including IVP, SCNT, and culture of pluripotent stem cells are also addressed. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd....

  5. Early embryonic development, assisted reproductive technologies, and pluripotent stem cell biology in domestic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, V; Hinrichs, K; Lazzari, G; Betts, D H; Hyttel, P

    2013-08-01

    Over many decades assisted reproductive technologies, including artificial insemination, embryo transfer, in vitro production (IVP) of embryos, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and stem cell culture, have been developed with the aim of refining breeding strategies for improved production and health in animal husbandry. More recently, biomedical applications of these technologies, in particular, SCNT and stem cell culture, have been pursued in domestic mammals in order to create models for human disease and therapy. The following review focuses on presenting important aspects of pre-implantation development in cattle, pigs, horses, and dogs. Biological aspects and impact of assisted reproductive technologies including IVP, SCNT, and culture of pluripotent stem cells are also addressed.

  6. Gibberellins inhibit adventitious rooting in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis by affecting auxin transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Petterle, Anna; Bellini, Catherine; Moritz, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of processes involved in adventitious rooting is important to improve both fundamental understanding of plant physiology and the propagation of numerous plants. Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloïdes) plants overexpressing a key gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis gene (AtGA20ox1) grow rapidly but have poor rooting efficiency, which restricts their clonal propagation. Therefore, we investigated the molecular basis of adventitious rooting in Populus and the model plant Arabidopsis. The production of adventitious roots (ARs) in tree cuttings is initiated from the basal stem region, and involves the interplay of several endogenous and exogenous factors. The roles of several hormones in this process have been characterized, but the effects of GAs have not been fully investigated. Here, we show that a GA treatment negatively affects the numbers of ARs produced by wild-type hybrid aspen cuttings. Furthermore, both hybrid aspen plants and intact Arabidopsis seedlings overexpressing AtGA20ox1, PttGID1.1 or PttGID1.3 genes (with a 35S promoter) produce few ARs, although ARs develop from the basal stem region of hybrid aspen and the hypocotyl of Arabidopsis. In Arabidopsis, auxin and strigolactones are known to affect AR formation. Our data show that the inhibitory effect of GA treatment on adventitious rooting is not mediated by perturbation of the auxin signalling pathway, or of the strigolactone biosynthetic and signalling pathways. Instead, GAs appear to act by perturbing polar auxin transport, in particular auxin efflux in hybrid aspen, and both efflux and influx in Arabidopsis.

  7. SHORT-ROOT and SCARECROW regulate leaf growth in Arabidopsis by stimulating S-phase progression of the cell cycle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, S.; Coppens, F.; Winter, F. de; Swarup, K.; Merks, R.M.H.; Inze, D.; Bennett, M.J.; Beemster, G.T.S.

    2010-01-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) are required for stem cell maintenance in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root meristem, ensuring its indeterminate growth. Mutation of SHR and SCR genes results in disorganization of the quiescent center and loss of stem cell activity, resulting in the ce

  8. Liver Development and In vitro Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells to Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behshad Pournasr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells are characterized with two specific properties: self renewal and differentiationpotential. Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells that can be differentiatedinto three kind of germ layers; ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm. These properties makethem ideal for developmental research, toxicology and transplantation in animal model ofhuman diseases. These cells can be differentiated spontaneously into three germ layercells, but in direct differentiation, molecules and growth factors involved in natural developmentof desired cells must well characterized to gain a proper differentiation in vitro.There are increasing numbers of death because of liver disease and failure of organtransplantation in our country and the world. This made stem cell scientists to work onembryonic stem cell differentiation to hepatocyte like cells to create an accessible cellsource in regenerative medicine of liver disease in the future, and also to establish stemcell derived hepatocyte for in vitro screening of drugs.In this review we will summarize the process of liver development including moleculesand growth factors incorporate in the liver development as a template for in vitro differentiationof mouse and human embryonic stem cells and then we will discuss the relatedstudies and techniques for analyzing functionality of differentiated cells.

  9. A review of the role of stem cells in the development and treatment of glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Richard M; Marcus, Hani J; Ryan, David J; Piccirillo, Sara G M; Al-Mayhani, Talal M Fael; Watts, Colin

    2012-06-01

    The neurosurgical management of patients with intrinsic glial cancers is one of the most rapidly evolving areas of practice. This has been fuelled by advances in surgical technique not only in cytoreduction but also in drug delivery. Further innovation will depend on a deeper understanding of the biology of the disease and an appreciation of the limitations of current knowledge. Here we review the controversial topic of cancer stem cells applied to glioma to provide neurosurgeons with a working overview. It is now recognised that the adult human brain contains regionally specified cell populations capable of self-renewal that may contribute to tumour growth and maintenance following accumulated mutational change. Tumour cells adapted to maintain growth demonstrate some stem-like characteristics and as such constitute a legitimate therapeutic target. Cellular reprogramming technologies raise the potential of developing stem cells as novel surgical tools to target disease and possibly ameliorate some of the consequences of treatment. Achieving these goals remains a significant challenge to neurosurgical oncologists, not least in challenging how we think about treating brain cancer. This review will briefly examine our understanding of adult stem cells within the brain, the evidence that they contribute to the development of brain tumours as tumour-initiating cells, and the potential implications for therapy. It will also look at the role stem cells may play in the future management of glioma.

  10. The role of the Wnt signaling pathway in cancer stem cells: prospects for drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Mi Kim,1 Michael Kahn2,3 1Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics and Pathology, 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, 3Norris Comprehensive Cancer Research Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs, also known as tumor initiating cells are now considered to be the root cause of most if not all cancers, evading treatment and giving rise to disease relapse. They have become a central focus in new drug development. Prospective identification, understanding the key pathways that maintain CSCs, and being able to target CSCs, particularly if the normal stem cell population could be spared, could offer an incredible therapeutic advantage. The Wnt signaling cascade is critically important in stem cell biology, both in homeostatic maintenance of tissues and organs through their respective somatic stem cells and in the CSC/tumor initiating cell population. Aberrant Wnt signaling is associated with a wide array of tumor types. Therefore, the ability to safely target the Wnt signaling pathway offers enormous promise to target CSCs. However, just like the sword of Damocles, significant risks and concerns regarding targeting such a critical pathway in normal stem cell maintenance and tissue homeostasis remain ever present. With this in mind, we review recent efforts in modulating the Wnt signaling cascade and critically analyze therapeutic approaches at various stages of development. Keywords: beta-catenin, CBP, p300, wnt inhibition

  11. The interconversion of UDP-arabinopyranose and UDP-arabinofuranose is indispensable for plant development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautengarten, Carsten; Ebert, Berit; Herter, Thomas; Petzold, Christopher J; Ishii, Tadashi; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Usadel, Björn; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2011-04-01

    L-Ara, an important constituent of plant cell walls, is found predominantly in the furanose rather than in the thermodynamically more stable pyranose form. Nucleotide sugar mutases have been demonstrated to interconvert UDP-Larabinopyranose (UDP-Arap) and UDP-L-arabinofuranose (UDP-Araf) in rice (Oryza sativa). These enzymes belong to a small gene family encoding the previously named Reversibly Glycosylated Proteins (RGPs). RGPs are plant-specific cytosolic proteins that tend to associate with the endomembrane system. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the RGP protein family consists of five closely related members. We characterized all five RGPs regarding their expression pattern and subcellular localizations in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Enzymatic activity assays of recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli identified three of the Arabidopsis RGP protein family members as UDP-L-Ara mutases that catalyze the formation of UDP-Araf from UDP-Arap. Coimmunoprecipitation and subsequent liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed a distinct interaction network between RGPs in different Arabidopsis organs. Examination of cell wall polysaccharide preparations from RGP1 and RGP2 knockout mutants showed a significant reduction in total L-Ara content (12–31%) compared with wild-type plants. Concomitant downregulation of RGP1 and RGP2 expression results in plants almost completely deficient in cell wall–derived L-Ara and exhibiting severe developmental defects.

  12. Characterization of a small auxin-up RNA (SAUR-like gene involved in Arabidopsis thaliana development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Nektarios Markakis

    Full Text Available The root of Arabidopsis thaliana is used as a model system to unravel the molecular nature of cell elongation and its arrest. From a micro-array performed on roots that were treated with aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, the precursor of ethylene, a Small auxin-up RNA (SAUR-like gene was found to be up regulated. As it appeared as the 76th gene in the family, it was named SAUR76. Root and leaf growth of overexpression lines ectopically expressing SAUR76 indicated the possible involvement of the gene in the division process. Using promoter::GUS and GFP lines strong expression was seen in endodermal and pericycle cells at the end of the elongation zone and during several stages of lateral root primordia development. ACC and IAA/NAA were able to induce a strong up regulation of the gene and changed the expression towards cortical and even epidermal cells at the beginning of the elongation zone. Confirmation of this up regulation of expression was delivered using qPCR, which also indicated that the expression quickly returned to normal levels when the inducing IAA-stimulus was removed, a behaviour also seen in other SAUR genes. Furthermore, confocal analysis of protein-GFP fusions localized the protein in the nucleus, cytoplasm and plasma membrane. SAUR76 expression was quantified in several mutants in ethylene and auxin-related pathways, which led to the conclusion that the expression of SAUR76 is mainly regulated by the increase in auxin that results from the addition of ACC, rather than by ACC itself.

  13. Pancreas development and beta-cell differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Carrillo, Jorge David; Okitsu, Teru; Tanaka, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Naoya

    2007-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells may offer an unlimited cell source for the treatment of diabetes. However, a successful derivation of ES cells into islet-cells has proven to be more difficult than it was initially expected. Considering that the pancreas coordinates the global use of energy in the organism by secreting digestive enzymes and hormones, it is understandable that a sophisticated and tight regulation that lies on the pancreas itself to orchestrate its own tissue development and maturation. The complex process of endocrine cell differentiation can be better understood by analyzing the normal development of the pancreas. The proper detection of the signals provided in the pancreatic environment gives us a clue as to how the stem cells give rise to the whole pancreas. Careful and extensive screening of the natural or synthetic cytokines and growth factors and biochemical compounds that are essential in pancreatic development is required to properly mimic the process in vitro. Such a study would allow the researchers to achieve selective control of the differentiation and proliferation of the stem cells. The development and identification of the key molecules can provide us new insights into the pancreatic differentiation of the stem cells. We herein discuss the role of the microenvironment and transcriptional factors and cytokines, which have been recognized as important molecules during the major steps of the development of the pancreas. Finally, a more complete comprehension of the mechanisms that drive the pancreatic regeneration will provide us with new perspectives for future prophylactic and therapeutic interventions.

  14. Stem cell transplantation for treating stroke:status, trends and development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenxin Huo; Xiaoyang Liu; Cheng Tan; Yingying Han; Chunyang Kang; Wei Quan; Jiajun Chen

    2014-01-01

    The developing approaches of thrombolytic therapy, endovascular treatment, neuroprotective therapy, and stem cell therapy have enabled breakthroughs in stroke treatment. In this study, we summarize and analyze trends and progress in stem cell transplantation for stroke treatment by retrieval of literature from Thomson Reuters Web of Science database, the NIH Clinical Trial Planning Grant Program, and Clinical Trials Registration Center in North America. In the last 10 years, there has been an increasing number of published articles on stem cell transplantation for stroke treatment. In particular, research from the USA and China has focused on stem cell transplantation. A total of 2,167 articles addressing stem cell transplantation for stroke treatment from 2004 to 2013 were retrieved from the Thomson Reuters Web of Science database. The ma-jority of these articles were from the USA (854, 39.4%), with the journal Stroke publishing the most articles (145, 6.7%). Of the published articles, 143 were funded by the National Institutes of Health (accounting for 6.6%of total publications), and 91 by the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Between 2013 and 2014, the National Institutes of Health provided ifnan-cial support ($130 million subsidy) for 329 research projects on stroke therapy using stem cell transplantation. In 2014, 215 new projects were approved, receiving grants of up to$70,440,000. Ninety clinical trials focusing on stem cell transplantation for stroke were registered in the Clin-ical Trial Registration Center in North America, with 40 trials registered in the USA (ranked ifrst place). China had the maximum number of registered research or clinical trials (10 projects).

  15. Development of a Xeno-Free Feeder-Layer System from Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Prolonged Expansion of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Qing; Wu, Mingjun; Zhong, Liwu; Fan, Zhaoxin; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Qiang; Ma, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Various feeder layers have been extensively applied to support the prolonged growth of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) for in vitro cultures. Among them, mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) and mouse fibroblast cell line (SNL) are most commonly used feeder cells for hPSCs culture. However, these feeder layers from animal usually cause immunogenic contaminations, which compromises the potential of hPSCs in clinical applications. In the present study, we tested human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) as a potent xeno-free feeder system for maintaining human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). The hUC-MSCs showed characteristics of MSCs in xeno-free culture condition. On the mitomycin-treated hUC-MSCs feeder, hiPSCs maintained the features of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), such as low efficiency of spontaneous differentiation, stable expression of stemness markers, maintenance of normal karyotypes, in vitro pluripotency and in vivo ability to form teratomas, even after a prolonged culture of more than 30 passages. Our study indicates that the xeno-free culture system may be a good candidate for growth and expansion of hiPSCs as the stepping stone for stem cell research to further develop better and safer stem cells.

  16. DNA methylation in mouse embryonic stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Tom; Gilbert, Nick; Ramsahoye, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian development is associated with considerable changes in global DNA methylation levels at times of genomic reprogramming. Normal DNA methylation is essential for development but, despite considerable advances in our understanding of the DNA methyltransferases, the reason that development fails when DNA methylation is deficient remains unclear. Furthermore, although much is known about the enzymes that cause DNA methylation, comparatively little is known about the mechanisms or significance of active demethylation in early development. In this review, we discuss the roles of the various DNA methyltransferases and their likely functions in development.

  17. Transforming growth factor-β superfamily, implications in development and differentiation of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibanez, Juan F; Kocic, Jelena

    2012-10-01

    Abstract Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family members, including TGF-βs and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), play important roles in directing the fate of stem cells. In embryonic stem cells, the TGF-β superfamily participates in almost all stages of cell development, such as cell maintenance, lineage selection, and progression of differentiation. In adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), TGF-βs can provide competence for early stages of chondroblastic and osteoblastic differentiation, but they inhibit myogenesis, adipogenesis, and late-stage osteoblast differentiation. BMPs also inhibit adipogenesis and myogenesis, but they strongly promote osteoblast differentiation. The TGF-β superfamily members signal via specific serine/threonine kinase receptors and their nuclear effectors termed Smad proteins as well as through non-Smad pathways, which explain their pleiotropic effects in self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the pleiotropic effects of the TGF-β superfamily of growth factors on the fate of stem cells and also discusses the mechanisms by which the TGF-β superfamily members control embryonic and MSCs differentiation.

  18. Adaptive and Pathogenic Responses to Stress by Stem Cells during Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Rappolee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular stress is the basis of a dose-dependent continuum of responses leading to adaptive health or pathogenesis. For all cells, stress leads to reduction in macromolecular synthesis by shared pathways and tissue and stress-specific homeostatic mechanisms. For stem cells during embryonic, fetal, and placental development, higher exposures of stress lead to decreased anabolism, macromolecular synthesis and cell proliferation. Coupled with diminished stem cell proliferation is a stress-induced differentiation which generates minimal necessary function by producing more differentiated product/cell. This compensatory differentiation is accompanied by a second strategy to insure organismal survival as multipotent and pluripotent stem cells differentiate into the lineages in their repertoire. During stressed differentiation, the first lineage in the repertoire is increased and later lineages are suppressed, thus prioritized differentiation occurs. Compensatory and prioritized differentiation is regulated by at least two types of stress enzymes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK which mediates loss of nuclear potency factors and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK that does not. SAPK mediates an increase in the first essential lineage and decreases in later lineages in placental stem cells. The clinical significance of compensatory and prioritized differentiation is that stem cell pools are depleted and imbalanced differentiation leads to gestational diseases and long term postnatal pathologies.

  19. Adaptive and Pathogenic Responses to Stress by Stem Cells during Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Ladan; Xie, Yufen; Rappolee, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stress is the basis of a dose-dependent continuum of responses leading to adaptive health or pathogenesis. For all cells, stress leads to reduction in macromolecular synthesis by shared pathways and tissue and stress-specific homeostatic mechanisms. For stem cells during embryonic, fetal, and placental development, higher exposures of stress lead to decreased anabolism, macromolecular synthesis and cell proliferation. Coupled with diminished stem cell proliferation is a stress-induced differentiation which generates minimal necessary function by producing more differentiated product/cell. This compensatory differentiation is accompanied by a second strategy to insure organismal survival as multipotent and pluripotent stem cells differentiate into the lineages in their repertoire. During stressed differentiation, the first lineage in the repertoire is increased and later lineages are suppressed, thus prioritized differentiation occurs. Compensatory and prioritized differentiation is regulated by at least two types of stress enzymes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) which mediates loss of nuclear potency factors and stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) that does not. SAPK mediates an increase in the first essential lineage and decreases in later lineages in placental stem cells. The clinical significance of compensatory and prioritized differentiation is that stem cell pools are depleted and imbalanced differentiation leads to gestational diseases and long term postnatal pathologies.

  20. Human Placenta Is a Potent Hematopoietic Niche Containing Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells throughout Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Robin (Catherine); K. Bollerot (Karine); S.C. Mendes (Sandra); E. Haak (Esther); M. Crisan (Mihaela); F. Cerisoli (Francesco); I. Lauw (Ivoune); P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); R.J.J. Jorna (Ruud); M. Vermeulen (Mark); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); R. van der Linden (Reinier); P. Imanirad (Parisa); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); H. Nawaz-Yousaf (Humaira); N. Papazian (Natalie); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); T. Cupedo (Tom); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the life-long production of the blood system and are pivotal cells in hematologic transplantation therapies. During mouse and human development, the first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region. Subsequent to this emerg

  1. Reference: 185 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available organisms, we suggest that AtARP4 is likely to exert its effects on plant develop...nuclear actin-related protein AtARP4 in Arabidopsis has multiple effects on plant development, including ear

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241712 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241712 J065197H24 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6e-27 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242957 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242957 J090089I15 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-28 ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287726 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287726 J065138E17 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-88 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242387 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242387 J080051E14 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-45 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK106306 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106306 002-101-C10 At4g37750.1 ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) ident...ical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-89 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241272 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241272 J065132I19 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-88 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240892 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240892 J065030K10 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-88 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK109848 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109848 002-148-F05 At4g37750.1 ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) ident...ical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-73 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287673 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287673 J065121E18 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6e-17 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287621 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287621 J065066I09 At4g37750.1 68417.m05344 ovule development protein aintegumenta... (ANT) identical to ovule development protein aintegumenta (ANT) (GI:1244708) ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-85 ...

  12. Reference: 734 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available umi et al. 2008 Apr. Development 135(7):1335-45. CAPRICE (CPC) encodes a small protein with an R3 MYB motif ...doreduplication. Arabidopsis CAPRICE-LIKE MYB 3 (CPL3) controls endoreduplication and flowering development

  13. Tissue-autonomous promotion of palisade cell development by phototropin 2 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuka, Toshiaki; Kong, Sam-Geun; Doi, Michio; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro; Nagatani, Akira

    2011-10-01

    Light is an important environmental information source that plants use to modify their growth and development. Palisade parenchyma cells in leaves develop cylindrical shapes in response to blue light; however, the photosensory mechanism for this response has not been elucidated. In this study, we analyzed the palisade cell response in phototropin-deficient mutants. First, we found that two different light-sensing mechanisms contributed to the response in different proportions depending on the light intensity. One response observed under lower intensities of blue light was mediated exclusively by a blue light photoreceptor, phototropin 2 (PHOT2). Another response was elicited under higher intensities of light in a phototropin-independent manner. To determine the tissue in which PHOT2 perceives the light stimulus to regulate the response, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged PHOT2 (P2G) was expressed under the control of tissue-specific promoters in the phot1 phot2 mutant background. The results revealed that the expression of P2G in the mesophyll, but not in the epidermis, promoted palisade cell development. Furthermore, a constitutively active C-terminal kinase fragment of PHOT2 fused to GFP (P2CG) promoted the development of cylindrical palisade cells in the proper direction without the directional cue provided by light. Hence, in response to blue light, PHOT2 promotes the development of cylindrical palisade cells along a predetermined axis in a tissue-autonomous manner.

  14. Development of Synthetic and Natural Materials for Tissue Engineering Applications Using Adipose Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfan He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose stem cells have prominent implications in tissue regeneration due to their abundance and relative ease of harvest from adipose tissue and their abilities to differentiate into mature cells of various tissue lineages and secrete various growth cytokines. Development of tissue engineering techniques in combination with various carrier scaffolds and adipose stem cells offers great potential in overcoming the existing limitations constraining classical approaches used in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, as most tissue engineering techniques are new and highly experimental, there are still many practical challenges that must be overcome before laboratory research can lead to large-scale clinical applications. Tissue engineering is currently a growing field of medical research; in this review, we will discuss the progress in research on biomaterials and scaffolds for tissue engineering applications using adipose stem cells.

  15. Development of Synthetic and Natural Materials for Tissue Engineering Applications Using Adipose Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunfan; Lu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Adipose stem cells have prominent implications in tissue regeneration due to their abundance and relative ease of harvest from adipose tissue and their abilities to differentiate into mature cells of various tissue lineages and secrete various growth cytokines. Development of tissue engineering techniques in combination with various carrier scaffolds and adipose stem cells offers great potential in overcoming the existing limitations constraining classical approaches used in plastic and reconstructive surgery. However, as most tissue engineering techniques are new and highly experimental, there are still many practical challenges that must be overcome before laboratory research can lead to large-scale clinical applications. Tissue engineering is currently a growing field of medical research; in this review, we will discuss the progress in research on biomaterials and scaffolds for tissue engineering applications using adipose stem cells.

  16. Epigenetic choreography of stem cells: the DNA demethylation episode of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Parbin, Sabnam; Deb, Moonmoon; Shilpi, Arunima; Sengupta, Dipta; Rath, Sandip Kumar; Rakshit, Madhumita; Patra, Aditi; Patra, Samir Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Reversible DNA methylation is a fundamental epigenetic manipulator of the genomic information in eukaryotes. DNA demethylation plays a very significant role during embryonic development and stands out for its contribution in molecular reconfiguration during cellular differentiation for determining stem cell fate. DNA demethylation arbitrated extensive make-over of the genome via reprogramming in the early embryo results in stem cell plasticity followed by commitment to the principal cell lineages. This article attempts to highlight the sequential phases and hierarchical mode of DNA demethylation events during enactment of the molecular strategy for developmental transition. A comprehensive knowledge regarding the pattern of DNA demethylation during embryogenesis and organogenesis and study of the related lacunae will offer exciting avenues for future biomedical research and stem cell-based regenerative therapy.

  17. Development of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis embryonic stem cell lines from somatic cell nuclear transferred blastocysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mohmad Shah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We developed buffalo embryonic stem cell lines from somatic cell nuclear transfer derived blastocysts, produced by hand-guided cloning technique. The inner cell mass of the blastocyst was cut mechanically using a Microblade and cultured onto feeder cells in buffalo embryonic stem (ES cell culture medium at 38 °C in a 5% CO2 incubator. The stem cell colonies were characterized for alkaline phosphatase activity, karyotype, pluripotency and self-renewal markers like OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, c-Myc, FOXD3, SSEA-1, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81 and CD90. The cell lines also possessed the capability to differentiate across all the three germ layers under spontaneous differentiation conditions.

  18. Mechanical factors in embryonic tendon development: potential cues for stem cell tenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiele, Nathan R; Marturano, Joseph E; Kuo, Catherine K

    2013-10-01

    Tendons are connective tissues required for motion and are frequently injured. Poor healing and inadequate return to normal tissue structure and mechanical function make tendon a prime candidate for tissue engineering; however functional tendons have yet to be engineered. The physical environment, from substrate stiffness to dynamic mechanical loading, may regulate tenogenic stem cell differentiation. Tissue stiffness and loading parameters derived from embryonic development may enhance tenogenic stem cell differentiation and tendon tissue formation. We highlight the current understanding of the mechanical environment experienced by embryonic tendons and how progenitor cells may sense and respond to physical inputs. We further discuss how mechanical factors have only recently been used to induce tenogenic fate in stem cells.

  19. LifeMap Discovery™: the embryonic development, stem cells, and regenerative medicine research portal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Edgar

    Full Text Available LifeMap Discovery™ provides investigators with an integrated database of embryonic development, stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. The hand-curated reconstruction of cell ontology with stem cell biology; including molecular, cellular, anatomical and disease-related information, provides efficient and easy-to-use, searchable research tools. The database collates in vivo and in vitro gene expression and guides translation from in vitro data to the clinical utility, and thus can be utilized as a powerful tool for research and discovery in stem cell biology, developmental biology, disease mechanisms and therapeutic discovery. LifeMap Discovery is freely available to academic nonprofit institutions at http://discovery.lifemapsc.com.

  20. The Arabidopsis SET-domain protein ASHR3 is involved in stamen development and interacts with the bHLH transcription factor ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstensen, Tage; Grini, Paul E; Mercy, Inderjit S; Alm, Vibeke; Erdal, Sigrid; Aasland, Rein; Aalen, Reidunn B

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains more than 30 genes encoding SET-domain proteins that are thought to be epigenetic regulators of gene expression and chromatin structure. SET-domain proteins can be divided into subgroups, and members of the Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) have been shown to be important regulators of development. Both in animals and plants some of these proteins are components of multimeric protein complexes. Here, we have analyzed the Arabidopsis trxG protein ASHR3 which has a SET domain and pre- and post-SET domains similar to that of Ash1 in Drosophila. In addition to the SET domain, a divergent PHD finger is found in the N-terminus of the ASHR3 protein. As expected from SET-domain proteins involved in transcriptional activation, ASHR3 (coupled to GFP) localizes to euchromatin. A yeast two-hybrid screening revealed that the ASHR3 protein interacts with the putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor ABORTED MICROSPORES (AMS), which is involved in anther and stamen development in Arabidopsis. Deletion mapping indicated that both the PHD finger and the SET domain mediate the interaction between the two proteins. Overexpression of ASHR3 led in general to growth arrest, and specifically to degenerated anthers and male sterility. Expression analyses demonstrated that ASHR3 like AMS is expressed in the anther and in stamen filaments. We therefore propose that AMS can target ASHR3 to chromatin and regulate genes involved in stamen development and function.

  1. Sox2 in Embryonic Stem Cells and Lung Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.G. Pardo (Cristina Gontan)

    2009-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Sox2 is a fascinating transcription factor with multiple roles during embryonic development. In early embryonic development, Sox2 is one of the key transcription factors in the maintenance of the pluripotent status of the cells of the inner cell mass (ICM). Sox2 is also

  2. Development of patient-specific hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell grafts from pluripotent stem cells, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, H; Teichweyde, N; Meyer, C; Horn, P A

    2013-06-01

    Pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for future applications in many areas of regenerative medicine. Their defining property of differentiation towards any of the three germ layers and all derivatives thereof, including somatic stem cells, explains the special interest of the biomedical community in this cell type. In this review, we focus on the current state of directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells towards hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are especially interesting because they are the longest known and, thus, most intensively investigated somatic stem cells. They were the first stem cells successfully used for regenerative purposes in clinical human medicine, namely in bone marrow transplantation, and also the first stem cells to be genetically altered for the first successful gene therapy trial in humans. However, because of the technical difficulties associated with this rare type of cell, such as the current incapability of prospective isolation, in vitro expansion and gene repair by homologous recombination, there is great interest in using pluripotent stem cells, such as Embryonic Stem (ES-) cells, as a source for generating and genetically altering HSCs, ex vivo. This has been hampered by ethical concerns associated with the use of human ES-cells. However, since Shinya Yamanaka´s successful attempts to reprogram somatic cells of mice and men to an ES-cell like state, so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, this field of research has experienced a huge boost. In this brief review, we will reflect on the status quo of directed hematopoietic differentiation of human and mouse pluripotent stem cells.

  3. RABBIT EARS, encoding a SUPERMAN-like zinc finger protein, regulates petal development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Seiji; Matsumoto, Noritaka; Okada, Kiyotaka

    2004-01-01

    Floral organs usually initiate at fixed positions in concentric whorls within a flower. Although it is understood that floral homeotic genes determine the identity of floral organs, the mechanisms of position determination and the development of each organ have not been clearly explained. We isolated a novel mutant, rabbit ears (rbe), with defects in petal development. In rbe, under-developed petals are formed at the correct position in a flower, and the initiation of petal primordia is altered. The rbe mutation affects the second whorl organ shapes independently of the organ identity. RBE encodes a SUPERMAN-like protein and is located in the nucleus, and thus may be a transcription factor. RBE transcripts are expressed in petal primordia and their precursor cells, and disappeared at later stages. When cells that express RBE are ablated genetically, no petal primordia arise. RBE is not expressed in ap1-1 and ptl-1 mutants, indicating that RBE acts downstream of AP1 and PTL genes. These characteristics suggest that RBE is required for the early development of the organ primordia of the second whorl.

  4. Ankfy1 is dispensable for neural stem/precursor cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Chao; Ding, Man; Chang, Lian-Sheng; Ren, Ming-Xin; Zhang, Hong-Feng; Lu, Zu-Neng; Fu, Hui

    2016-11-01

    There are few studies on the membrane protein Ankfy1. We have found Ankfy1 is specifically expressed in neural stem/precursor cells during early development in mice (murine). To further explore Ankfy1 function in neural development, we developed a gene knockout mouse with a mixed Balb/C and C57/BL6 genetic background. Using immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization, neural defects were absent in mixed genetic Ankfy1 null mice during development and in adults up to 2 months old. However, Ankfy1 gene knockout mice with a pure genetic background were found to be lethal in the C57/BL6 inbred mice embryos, even after seven generations of backcrossing. Polymerase chain reaction confirmed homozygotes were unattainable as early as embryonic day 11.5. We conclude that Ankfy1 protein is dispensable in neural stem/precursor cells, but could be critical for early embryonic murine development, depending on the genetic background.

  5. Arabidopsis NAC1 transduces auxin signal downstream of TIR1 to promote lateral root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Q; Frugis, G; Colgan, D; Chua, N H

    2000-12-01

    Auxin plays a key role in lateral root formation, but the signaling pathway for this process is poorly understood. We show here that NAC1, a new member of the NAC family, is induced by auxin and mediates auxin signaling to promote lateral root development. NAC1 is a transcription activator consisting of an N-terminal conserved NAC-domain that binds to DNA and a C-terminal activation domain. This factor activates the expression of two downstream auxin-responsive genes, DBP and AIR3. Transgenic plants expressing sense or antisense NAC1 cDNA show an increase or reduction of lateral roots, respectively. Finally, TIR1-induced lateral root development is blocked by expression of antisense NAC1 cDNA, and NAC1 overexpression can restore lateral root formation in the auxin-response mutant tir1, indicating that NAC1 acts downstream of TIR1.

  6. Glycerol-3-Phosphate Acyltransferase 6 (GPAT6) Is Important for Tapetum Development in Arabidopsis and Plays Multiple Roles in Plant Fertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Chuan Li; Jun Zhu; Jun Yang; Guo-RuiZhang; Wei-Feng Xing; Sen Zhang; Zhong-NanYang

    2012-01-01

    Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) mediates the initial synthetic step for the formation of glycerolipids,which act as the major components of biological membranes and the principal stored forms of energy.GPAT6 is a member of the Arabidopsis GPAT family,which is crucial for cutin biosynthesis in sepals and petals.In this work,a functional analysis of GPAT6 in anther development and plant fertility was performed.GPAT6 was highly expressed in the tapetum and microspores during anther development.The knockout mutant,gpat6,caused a massive reduction in seed production.This report shows that the ablation of GPAT6 caused defective tapetum development with reduced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) profiles in the tapetum,which largely led to the abortion of pollen grains and defective pollen wall formation.In addition,pollen germination and pollen tube elongation were affected in the mutant plants.Furthermore,the double mutant analysis showed that GPAT6 and GPAT1 make joint effects on the release of microspores from tetrads and stamen filament elongation.This work shows that GPAT6 plays multiple roles in stamen development and fertility in Arabidopsis.

  7. The Arabidopsis thaliana TCP transcription factors: A broadening horizon beyond development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shutian

    2015-01-01

    The TCP family of transcription factors is named after the first 4 characterized members, namely TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 (TB1) from maize (Zea mays), CYCLOIDEA (CYC) from snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus), as well as PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN FACTOR1 (PCF1) and PCF2 from rice (Oryza sativa). Phylogenic analysis of this plant-specific protein family unveils a conserved bHLH-containing DNA-binding motif known as the TCP domain. In accordance with the structure of this shared domain, TCP proteins are grouped into class I (TCP-P) and class II (TCP-C), which are suggested to antagonistically modulate plant growth and development via competitively binding similar cis-regulatory modules called site II elements. Over the last decades, TCPs across the plant kingdom have been demonstrated to control a plethora of plant processes. Notably, TCPs also regulate plant development and defense responses via stimulating the biosynthetic pathways of bioactive metabolites, such as brassinosteroid (BR), jasmonic acid (JA) and flavonoids. Besides, mutagenesis analysis coupled with biochemical experiments identifies several crucial amino acids located within the TCP domain, which confer the redox sensitivity of class I TCPs and determine the distinct DNA-binding properties of TCPs. In this review, developmental functions of TCPs in various biological pathways are briefly described with an emphasis on their involvement in the synthesis of bioactive substances. Furthermore, novel biochemical aspects of TCPs with respect to redox regulation and DNA-binding preferences are elaborated. In addition, the unexpected participation of TCPs in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) and defense against insects indicates that the widely recognized developmental regulators are capable of fine-tuning defense signaling and thereby enable plants to evade deleterious developmental phenotypes. Altogether, these recent impressive breakthroughs remarkably advance our understanding as to how TCPs integrate

  8. High temperature promotes auxin-mediated hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, William M; Östin, Anders; Sandberg, Göran; Romano, Charles P.; Estelle, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Physiological studies with excised stem segments have implicated the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA or auxin) in the regulation of cell elongation. Supporting evidence from intact plants has been somewhat more difficult to obtain, however. Here, we report the identification and characterization of an auxin-mediated cell elongation growth response in Arabidopsis thaliana. When grown in the light at high temperature (29°C), Arabidopsis seedlings exhibit dramatic hypocotyl elongation co...

  9. Pluripotent stem cell-derived somatic stem cells as tool to study the role of microRNAs in early human neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roese-Koerner, B; Stappert, L; Koch, P; Brüstle, O; Borghese, L

    2013-06-01

    The in vitro differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells represents a convenient approach to generate large numbers of neural cells for basic and translational research. We recently described the derivation of homogeneous populations of long-term self-renewing neuroepithelial-like stem cells from human pluripotent stem cells (lt-NES® cells). These cells constitute a suitable source of neural stem cells for in vitro modelling of early human neural development. Recent evidence demonstrates that microRNAs are important regulators of stem cells and nervous system development. Studies in several model organisms suggest that microRNAs contribute to different stages of neurogenesis - from progenitor self-renewal to survival and function of differentiated neurons. However, the understanding of the impact of microRNA-based regulation in human neural development is still at its dawn. Here, we give an overview on the current state of microRNA biology in stem cells and neural development and examine the role of the neural-associated miR-124, miR- 125b and miR-9/9* in human lt-NES® cells. We show that overexpression of miR-124, as well as overexpression of miR-125b, impair lt-NES® cell self-renewal and induce differentiation into neurons. Overexpression of the miR-9/9* locus also impairs self-renewal of lt-NES® cells and supports their commitment to neuronal differentiation. A detailed examination revealed that overexpression of miR-9 promotes differentiation, while overexpression of miR-9* affects both proliferation and differentiation of lt-NES® cells. This work provides insights into the regulation of early human neuroepithelial cells by microRNAs and highlights the potential of controlling differentiation of human stem cells by modulating the expression of selected microRNAs.

  10. WOX5-1AA17 Feedback Circuit-Mediated CellularAuxin Response Is Crucial for the Patterning ofRoot Stem Cell Niches in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    In plants, the patterning of stem cell-enriched meristems requires a graded auxin response maximum thatemerges from the concerted action of polar auxin transport, auxin biosynthesis, auxin metabolism, and cellular auxinresponse machinery. However, mechanisms underlying this auxin response maximum-mediated root stem cell mainte-nance are not fully understood. Here, we present unexpected evidence that WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX 5 (WOX5)transcription factor modulates expression of auxin biosynthetic genes in the quiescent center (QC) of the root and thusprovides a robust mechanism for the maintenance of auxin response maximum in the root tip. This WOX5 action is bal-anced through the activity of indole-3-acetic acid 17 (IAA17) auxin response repressor. Our combined genetic, cell biol-ogy, and computational modeling studies revealed a previously uncharacterized feedback loop linking WOX5-mediatedauxin production to IAA17-dependent repression of auxin responses. This WOX5-1AA17 feedback circuit further assuresthe maintenance of auxin response maximum in the root tip and thereby contributes to the maintenance of distal stemcell (DSC) populations. Our experimental studies and in silico computer simulations both demonstrate that the WOX5-iAA17 feedback circuit is essential for the maintenance of auxin gradient in the root tip and the auxin-mediated root DSCdifferentiation.

  11. STEM development: A study of 6th--12th grade girls' interest and confidence in mathematics and science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaverlo, Carol Ann

    Researchers, policymakers, business, and industry have indicated that the United States will experience a shortage of professionals in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields. Several strategies have been suggested to address this shortage, one of which includes increasing the representation of girls and women in the STEM fields. In order to increase the representation of women in the STEM fields, it is important to understand the developmental factors that impact girls' interest and confidence in STEM academics and extracurricular programs. Research indicates that greater confidence leads to greater interest and vice versa (Denissen et al., 2007). This study identifies factors that impact girls' interest and confidence in mathematics and science, defined as girls' STEM development. Using Bronfenbrenner's (2005) bioecological model of human development, several factors were hypothesized as having an impact on girls' STEM development; specifically, the macrosystems of region of residence and race/ethnicity, and the microsystems of extracurricular STEM activities, family STEM influence, and math/science teacher influence. Hierarchical regression analysis results indicated that extracurricular STEM involvement and math teacher influence were statistically significant predictors for 6--12th grade girls' interest and confidence in mathematics. Furthermore, hierarchical regression analysis results indicated that the only significant predictor for 6--12th grade girls' interest and confidence in science was science teacher influence. This study provides new knowledge about the factors that impact girls' STEM development. Results can be used to inform and guide educators, administrators, and policy makers in developing programs and policy that support and encourage the STEM development of 6--12th grade girls.

  12. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cells during mouse development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe hematopoietic system is comprised of many different cell types that fulfill important physiological functions throughout embryonic and adult stages of mouse development. As the mature blood cells have a limited life-span, the pool of blood cells needs constant replenishing. At the ba

  13. Correlation between membrane fluidity cellular development and stem cell differentiation

    KAUST Repository

    Noutsi, Pakiza

    2016-12-01

    Cell membranes are made up of a complex structure of lipids and proteins that diffuse laterally giving rise to what we call membrane fluidity. During cellular development, such as neuronal differentiation, cell membranes undergo dramatic structural changes induced by proteins such as ARC and Cofilin among others in the case of synaptic modification. In this study we used the generalized polarization (GP) property of fluorescent probe Laurdan using two-photon microscopy to determine membrane fluidity as a function of time and for various cell lines. A low GP value corresponds to a higher fluidity and a higher GP value is associated with a more rigid membrane. Four different cell lines were monitored such as hN2, NIH3T3, HEK293 and L6 cells. As expected, NIH3T3 cells have more rigid membrane at earlier stages of their development. On the other hand neurons tend to have the highest membrane fluidity early in their development emphasizing its correlation with plasticity and the need for this malleability during differentiation. This study sheds light on the involvement of membrane fluidity during neuronal differentiation and development of other cell lines.

  14. Ecdysone signalling and ovarian development in insects: from stem cells to ovarian follicle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belles, Xavier; Piulachs, Maria-Dolors

    2015-02-01

    Although a great deal of information is available concerning the role of ecdysone in insect oogenesis, research has tended to focus on vitellogenesis and choriogenesis. As such, the study of oogenesis in a strict sense has received much less attention. This situation changed recently when a number of observations carried out in the meroistic polytrophic ovarioles of Drosophila melanogaster started to unravel the key roles played by ecdysone in different steps of oogenesis. Thus, in larval stages, a non-autonomous role of ecdysone, first in repression and later in activation, of stem cell niche and primordial germ cell differentiation has been reported. In the adult, ecdysone stimulates the proliferation of germline stem cells, plays a role in stem cell niche maintenance and is needed non-cell-autonomously for correct differentiation of germline stem cells. Moreover, in somatic cells ecdysone is required for 16-cell cyst formation and for ovarian follicle development. In the transition from stages 8 to 9 of oogenesis, ecdysone signalling is fundamental when deciding whether or not to go ahead with vitellogenesis depending on the nutritional status, as well as to start border cell migration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development.

  15. Induced pluripotent stem cells: opportunities as research and development tools in 21st century drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowntree, Rebecca K; McNeish, John D

    2010-07-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs), when compared with transformed, primary or engineered cells, have unique characteristics and advantages that have resulted in the development of important cell-based tools in modern drug discovery. However, a key limitation has been the availability of human ESCs from patients with specific medical needs and the broad range of genetic variation represented worldwide. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are derived from somatic cells that are reprogrammed to a pluripotent stem cell state and have functional characteristics similar to ESCs. The demonstration that human iPS cells can be derived, with relative ease, through the introduction of transcription factor combinations has allowed the generation of disease-specific iPS cell lines. Therefore, iPS cell technology may deliver robust, human pluripotent cell lines from a wide range of clinical phenotypes and genotypes. Although human iPS cell technology is still a new tool in drug discovery, the promise that this technology will impact the discovery of new therapies can be projected based on the uptake of stem cell applications in biopharmaceutical sciences. Here, the near-term opportunities that iPS cells may deliver to drug discoverers to generate and test hypotheses will be discussed, with a focus on the specific strengths and weaknesses of iPS cell technology. Finally, the future perspective will address novel opportunities iPS cells could uniquely deliver to the preclinical development of new drug therapies.

  16. Basic Pentacysteine Proteins Repress Abscisic Acid Insensitive4 Expression via Direct Recruitment of the Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 in Arabidopsis Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ying; Zou, Meijuan; Sun, Xuwu; He, Baoye; Xu, Xiumei; Liu, Yini; Zhang, Lixin; Chi, Wei

    2017-01-30

    Plant transcription factors generally act in complex regulatory networks that function at multiple levels to govern plant developmental programs. Dissection of the interconnections among different classes of transcription factors can elucidate these regulatory networks and thus improve our understanding of plant development. Here, we investigated the molecular and functional relationships of the transcription factors ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4) and members of the BASIC PENTACYSTEINE (BPC) family in lateral root (LR) development of Arabidopsis thaliana Genetic analysis showed that BPCs promote LR development by repressing ABI4 expression. Molecular analysis showed that BPCs bind to the ABI4 promoter and repress ABI4 transcription in roots. BPCs directly recruit the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) to the ABI4 locus and epigenetically repress ABI4 expression by catalyzing the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27. In addition, BPCs and ABI4 coordinate their activities to fine-tune the levels of PIN-FORMED1, a component of the auxin signaling pathway, and thus modulate LR formation. These results establish a functional relationship between two universal and multiple-role transcription factors and provide insight into the mechanisms of the transcriptional regulatory networks that affect Arabidopsis organogenesis.

  17. The Arabidopsis Plant Intracellular Ras-group LRR (PIRL Family and the Value of Reverse Genetic Analysis for Identifying Genes that Function in Gametophyte Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy R. Forsthoefel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana has proven a powerful system for developmental genetics, but identification of gametophytic genes with developmental mutants can be complicated by factors such as gametophyte-lethality, functional redundancy, or poor penetrance. These issues are exemplified by the Plant Intracellular Ras-group LRR (PIRL genes, a family of nine genes encoding a class of leucine-rich repeat proteins structurally related to animal and fungal LRR proteins involved in developmental signaling. Previous analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants showed that two of these genes, PIRL1 and PIRL9, have an essential function in pollen formation but are functionally redundant. Here, we present evidence implicating three more PIRLs in gametophyte development. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that disruption of either PIRL2 or PIRL3 results in a low frequency of pollen morphological abnormalities. In addition, molecular analysis of putative pirl6 insertion mutants indicated that knockout alleles of this gene are not represented in current Arabidopsis mutant populations, suggesting gametophyte lethality may hinder mutant recovery. Consistent with this, available microarray and RNA-seq data have documented strongest PIRL6 expression in developing pollen. Taken together, these results now implicate five PIRLs in gametophyte development. Systematic reverse genetic analysis of this novel LRR family has therefore identified gametophytically active genes that otherwise would likely be missed by forward genetic screens.

  18. Arabidopsis WRKY6 Transcription Factor Acts as a Positive Regulator of Abscisic Acid Signaling during Seed Germination and Early Seedling Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun; Feng, Cui-Zhu; Ye, Qing; Wu, Wei-Hua; Chen, Yi-Fang

    2016-02-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles during seed germination and early seedling development. Here, we characterized the function of the Arabidopsis WRKY6 transcription factor in ABA signaling. The transcript of WRKY6 was repressed during seed germination and early seedling development, and induced by exogenous ABA. The wrky6-1 and wrky6-2 mutants were ABA insensitive, whereas WRKY6-overexpressing lines showed ABA-hypersensitive phenotypes during seed germination and early seedling development. The expression of RAV1 was suppressed in the WRKY6-overexpressing lines and elevated in the wrky6 mutants, and the expression of ABI3, ABI4, and ABI5, which was directly down-regulated by RAV1, was enhanced in the WRKY6-overexpressing lines and repressed in the wrky6 mutants. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that WRKY6 could bind to the RAV1 promoter in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of RAV1 in WRKY6-overexpressing lines abolished their ABA-hypersensitive phenotypes, and the rav1 wrky6-2 double mutant showed an ABA-hypersensitive phenotype, similar to rav1 mutant. Together, the results demonstrated that the Arabidopsis WRKY6 transcription factor played important roles in ABA signaling by directly down-regulating RAV1 expression.

  19. Growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under single-wavelength red and blue laser light

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Amanda Siok Lee

    2016-09-23

    Indoor horticulture offers a sensible solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available horticultural lighting is suboptimal, and therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. They are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Furthermore, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plant species. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that plants grown under laser illumination can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs reported previously. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteome data show that the single-wavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture.

  20. Growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under single-wavelength red and blue laser light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Ng, Tien Khee; Marondedze, Claudius; Gehring, Christoph; Ooi, Boon S

    2016-09-23

    Indoor horticulture offers a sensible solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available horticultural lighting is suboptimal, and therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. They are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Furthermore, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plant species. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that plants grown under laser illumination can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs reported previously. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteome data show that the single-wavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture.

  1. Growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under single-wavelength red and blue laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Ng, Tien Khee; Marondedze, Claudius; Gehring, Christoph; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-01-01

    Indoor horticulture offers a sensible solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available horticultural lighting is suboptimal, and therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. They are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Furthermore, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plant species. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that plants grown under laser illumination can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs reported previously. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteome data show that the single-wavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture. PMID:27659906

  2. The development and geometry of shape change in Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledon pavement cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halsey Leah E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The leaf epidermis is an important architectural control element that influences the growth properties of underlying tissues and the overall form of the organ. In dicots, interdigitated pavement cells are the building blocks of the tissue, and their morphogenesis includes the assembly of specialized cell walls that surround the apical, basal, and lateral (anticlinal cell surfaces. The microtubule and actin cytoskeletons are highly polarized along the cortex of the anticlinal wall; however, the relationships between these arrays and cell morphogenesis are unclear. Results We developed new quantitative tools to compare population-level growth statistics with time-lapse imaging of cotyledon pavement cells in an intact tissue. The analysis revealed alternating waves of lobe initiation and a phase of lateral isotropic expansion that persisted for days. During lateral isotropic diffuse growth, microtubule organization varied greatly between cell surfaces. Parallel microtubule bundles were distributed unevenly along the anticlinal surface, with subsets marking stable cortical domains at cell indentations and others clearly populating the cortex within convex cell protrusions. Conclusions Pavement cell morphogenesis is discontinuous, and includes punctuated phases of lobe initiation and lateral isotropic expansion. In the epidermis, lateral isotropic growth is independent of pavement cell size and shape. Cortical microtubules along the upper cell surface and stable cortical patches of anticlinal microtubules may coordinate the growth behaviors of orthogonal cell walls. This work illustrates the importance of directly linking protein localization data to the growth behavior of leaf epidermal cells.

  3. Arabidopsis ANGULATA10 is required for thylakoid biogenesis and mesophyll development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova-Sáez, Rubén; Mateo-Bonmatí, Eduardo; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Candela, Héctor; Micol, José Luis

    2014-06-01

    The chloroplasts of land plants contain internal membrane systems, the thylakoids, which are arranged in stacks called grana. Because grana have not been found in Cyanobacteria, the evolutionary origin of genes controlling the structural and functional diversification of thylakoidal membranes in land plants remains unclear. The angulata10-1 (anu10-1) mutant, which exhibits pale-green rosettes, reduced growth, and deficient leaf lateral expansion, resulting in the presence of prominent marginal teeth, was isolated. Palisade cells in anu10-1 are larger and less packed than in the wild type, giving rise to large intercellular spaces. The ANU10 gene encodes a protein of unknown function that localizes to both chloroplasts and amyloplasts. In chloroplasts, ANU10 associates with thylakoidal membranes. Mutant anu10-1 chloroplasts accumulate H2O2, and have reduced levels of chlorophyll and carotenoids. Moreover, these chloroplasts are small and abnormally shaped, thylakoidal membranes are less abundant, and their grana are absent due to impaired thylakoid stacking in the anu10-1 mutant. Because the trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) has been reported to be required for thylakoid stacking, its levels were determined in anu10-1 thylakoids and they were found to be reduced. Together, the data point to a requirement for ANU10 for chloroplast and mesophyll development.

  4. Hematopoietic and nature killer cell development from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Zhenya; Knorr, David A; Kaufman, Dan S

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key effectors of the innate immune system, protecting the host from a variety of infections, as well as malignant cells. Recent advances in the field of NK cell biology have led to a better understanding of how NK cells develop. This progress has directly translated to improved outcomes in patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplants to treat potentially lethal malignancies. However, key differences between mouse and human NK cell development and biology limits the use of rodents to attain a more in depth understanding of NK cell development. Therefore, a readily accessible and genetically tractable cell source to study human NK cell development is warranted. Our lab has pioneered the development of lymphocytes, specifically NK cells, from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and more recently induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This chapter describes a reliable method to generate NK cells from hESCs and iPSCs using murine stromal cell lines. Additionally, we include an updated approach using a spin-embryoid body (spin-EB) differentiation system that allows for human NK cell development completely defined in vitro conditions.

  5. EGFR-ras-raf signaling in epidermal stem cells: roles in hair follicle development, regeneration, tissue remodeling and epidermal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doma, Eszter; Rupp, Christian; Baccarini, Manuela

    2013-09-25

    The mammalian skin is the largest organ of the body and its outermost layer, the epidermis, undergoes dynamic lifetime renewal through the activity of somatic stem cell populations. The EGFR-Ras-Raf pathway has a well-described role in skin development and tumor formation. While research mainly focuses on its role in cutaneous tumor initiation and maintenance, much less is known about Ras signaling in the epidermal stem cells, which are the main targets of skin carcinogenesis. In this review, we briefly discuss the properties of the epidermal stem cells and review the role of EGFR-Ras-Raf signaling in keratinocyte stem cells during homeostatic and pathological conditions.

  6. Emerging roles of neural stem cells in cerebral cortex development and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Víctor; Reillo, Isabel

    2012-07-01

    Expansion and folding of the cerebral cortex are landmark features of mammalian brain evolution, which are recapitulated during embryonic development. Neural stem cells and their derived germinal cells are coordinated during cerebral cortex development to produce the appropriate amounts and types of neurons. This process is further complicated in gyrencephalic species, where newborn neurons must disperse in the tangential axis to expand the cerebral cortex in surface area. Here, we review advances that have been made over the last decade in understanding the nature and diversity of telencephalic neural stem cells and their roles in cortical development, and we discuss recent progress on how newly identified types of cortical progenitor cell populations may have evolved to drive the expansion and folding of the mammalian cerebral cortex.

  7. Expression Analysis of the Hippo Cascade Indicates a Role in Pituitary Stem Cell Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Lodge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The pituitary gland is a primary endocrine organ that controls major physiological processes. Abnormal development or homeostatic disruptions can lead to human disorders such as hypopituitarism or tumours. Multiple signalling pathways, including WNT, BMP, FGF and SHH regulate pituitary development but the role of the Hippo-YAP1/TAZ cascade is currently unknown. In multiple tissues, the Hippo kinase cascade underlies neoplasias; it influences organ size through the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis, and has roles in determining stem cell potential. We have used a sensitive mRNA in situ hybridisation method (RNAscope to determine the expression patterns of the Hippo pathway components during mouse pituitary development. We have also carried out immunolocalisation studies to determine when YAP1 and TAZ, the transcriptional effectors of the Hippo pathway, are active. We find that YAP1/TAZ are active in the stem/progenitor cell population throughout development and at postnatal stages, consistent with their role in promoting the stem cell state. Our results demonstrate for the first time the collective expression of major components of the Hippo pathway during normal embryonic and postnatal development of the pituitary gland.

  8. A novel chloroplast localized Rab GTPase protein CPRabA5e is involved in stress, development, thylakoid biogenesis and vesicle transport in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Sazzad; Alezzawi, Mohamed; Garcia-Petit, Christel; Solymosi, Katalin; Khan, Nadir Zaman; Lindquist, Emelie; Dahl, Peter; Hohmann, Stefan; Aronsson, Henrik

    2014-04-01

    A novel Rab GTPase protein in Arabidopsis thaliana, CPRabA5e (CP = chloroplast localized) is located in chloroplasts and has a role in transport. Transient expression of CPRabA5e:EGFP fusion protein in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves, and immunoblotting using Arabidopsis showed localization of CPRabA5e in chloroplasts (stroma and thylakoids). Ypt31/32 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are involved in regulating vesicle transport, and CPRabA5e a close homolog of Ypt31/32, restores the growth of the ypt31Δ ypt32(ts) mutant at 37 °C in yeast complementation. Knockout mutants of CPRabA5e displayed delayed seed germination and growth arrest during oxidative stress. Ultrastructural studies revealed that after preincubation at 4 °C mutant chloroplasts contained larger plastoglobules, lower grana, and more vesicles close to the envelopes compared to wild type, and vesicle formation being enhanced under oxidative stress. This indicated altered thylakoid development and organization of the mutants. A yeast-two-hybrid screen with CPRabA5e as bait revealed 13 interacting partner proteins, mainly located in thylakoids and plastoglobules. These proteins are known or predicted to be involved in development, stress responses, and photosynthesis related processes, consistent with the stress phenotypes observed. The results observed suggest a role of CPRabA5e in transport to and from thylakoids, similar to cytosolic Rab proteins involved in vesicle transport.

  9. Isolation of a Mutant of Fer1 Gene, Acting Synergistically with the ARF8 Gene to Control Development of the Anther and Filament in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-En TIAN; Yu-Ping ZHOU; Shun-Zhi LIU; Kotaro YAMAMOTO

    2005-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) play a central role in plants as transcriptional factors in response to auxin. The Arabidopsis ARF8 gene is a light-inducible gene and ARF8 protein might control auxin homeostasis in a negative feed-back fashion through regulation of GH3 gene expression. In a double mutant designated infertile line including arf8-1 (a T-DNA insertion mutant of ARF8), we isolatedfertility1-1 (fer1-1), a mutant of Fer1, which acts synergistically with ARF8 to control the development of the anther and filament in Arabidopsis. Genetics analysis has demonstrated thatfer1-1 is a T-DNA insertion line,indicating that Fer1 might be cloned by inverse polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or the TAIL-PCR approach.Phenotypic identification and molecular analysis offer1-1 and the infertile line will be helpful to characterize the function of Fer1, to further study the function of ARF8, and to reveal the molecular mechanism underlying the interaction of Fer1 and ARF8 in controlling development of the anther and filament.

  10. Exploiting Natural Variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, J.A.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana . This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of

  11. Exploiting natural variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Molenaar; J.J.B. Keurentjes

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana. This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of g

  12. Rapid Selection and Proliferation of Cancer Stem Cells in a NASA Developed Microgravity Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S. E.; Di Benedetto, A.; Valluri, J. V.; Claudio, P. P.

    2008-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered a subset of the bulk tumor responsible for initiating and maintaining the disease. Saos-2 is a human sarcoma cell line that is used as a model for osteoblastic cells, which contains 10% of CD133(+) cells. CD133 is a transmembrane pentameric glycoprotein. It is a cell surface marker expressed by hematopoietic stem cells but not mature blood cells. It has also been found to be a marker for other stem and progenitor cells including neural and embryonic stem cells, and it is expressed in cancers, including some leukemias and brain tumors. We isolated CD133(+) CSCs from the Saos-2 cell line by using a MACsorting system which consists of magnetic beads conjugated to an antibody against CD133 (Miltenyi, Auburn, CA). Saos-2 positivity to CD133 was assessed by Facs analysis using the BD FacsAria (Franklin Lakes, NJ). The Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB) (Celdyne, Houston, TX) which was developed by NASA at the Johnson Space Center selected and proliferated CD133(+).

  13. Amplification of neural stem cell proliferation by intermediate progenitor cells in Drosophila brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello Bruno C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mammalian brain, neural stem cells divide asymmetrically and often amplify the number of progeny they generate via symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Here we investigate whether specific neural stem cell-like neuroblasts in the brain of Drosophila might also amplify neuronal proliferation by generating symmetrically dividing intermediate progenitors. Results Cell lineage-tracing and genetic marker analysis show that remarkably large neuroblast lineages exist in the dorsomedial larval brain of Drosophila. These lineages are generated by brain neuroblasts that divide asymmetrically to self renew but, unlike other brain neuroblasts, do not segregate the differentiating cell fate determinant Prospero to their smaller daughter cells. These daughter cells continue to express neuroblast-specific molecular markers and divide repeatedly to produce neural progeny, demonstrating that they are proliferating intermediate progenitors. The proliferative divisions of these intermediate progenitors have novel cellular and molecular features; they are morphologically symmetrical, but molecularly asymmetrical in that key differentiating cell fate determinants are segregated into only one of the two daughter cells. Conclusion Our findings provide cellular and molecular evidence for a new mode of neurogenesis in the larval brain of Drosophila that involves the amplification of neuroblast proliferation through intermediate progenitors. This type of neurogenesis bears remarkable similarities to neurogenesis in the mammalian brain, where neural stem cells as primary progenitors amplify the number of progeny they generate through generation of secondary progenitors. This suggests that key aspects of neural stem cell biology might be conserved in brain development of insects and mammals.

  14. Reference: 488 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Inactivation of ATAB2 strongly affects Arabidopsis development and thylakoid mem...n center subunits is decreased and the association of their mRNAs with polysomes is affected. ATAB2 is a chl

  15. Reference: 278 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available functional ERA1 gene, which encodes the beta-subunit of protein farnesyltransferase (PFT), exhibit pleiotropic effects...gnaling and meristem development. Here, we report the effects of T-DNA insertion mutations in the Arabidopsi

  16. Reference: 420 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available are found in various compartments in plant cells. The cytosolic and chloroplast APXs appear to play important...d development, suggesting that APX3 may not be an important antioxidant enzyme in Arabidopsis, at least unde

  17. Reference: 789 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ylakoid membranes. Microarray analysis of the chl27-t mutant showed repression of numerous nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis...d CHL27 proteins. Role of Arabidopsis CHL27 protein for photosynthesis, chloroplast development and gene exp

  18. Reference: 413 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ollination and fertilization, and, in the absence of fertilization, flowers senesce. In the Arabidopsis thal...ARF8 acts as an inhibitor to stop further carpel development in the absence of fertilization and the generat

  19. Reference: 147 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available the region-specific control of trichome development of Arabidopsis. 3 389-98 15604688 2004 May Plant molecular biology Hulskamp Mart...in|Kirik Victor|Schiefelbein John|Simon Marissa|Wester Katja

  20. Pluripotent Stem Cell Studies Elucidate the Underlying Mechanisms of Early Embryonic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingyu Li

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Early embryonic development is a multi-step process that is intensively regulated by various signaling pathways. Because of the complexity of the embryo and the interactions between the germ layers, it is very difficult to fully understand how these signals regulate embryo patterning. Recently, pluripotent stem cell lines derived from different developmental stages have provided an in vitro system for investigating molecular mechanisms regulating cell fate decisions. In this review, we summarize the major functions of the BMP, FGF, Nodal and Wnt signaling pathways, which have well-established roles in vertebrate embryogenesis. Then, we highlight recent studies in pluripotent stem cells that have revealed the stage-specific roles of BMP,FGF and Nodal pathways during neural differentiation. These findings enhance our understanding of the stepwise regulation of embryo patterning by particular signaling pathways and provide new insight into the mechanisms underlying early embryonic development.

  1. Developments in techniques for the isolation, enrichment, main culture conditions and identification of spermatogonial stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yanan; Chen, Xiaoli; Zhu, Huabin; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro culture system of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) provides a basis for studies on spermatogenesis, and also contributes to the development of new methods for the preservation of livestock and animal genetic modification. In vitro culture systems have mainly been established for mouse SSCs, but are lacking for farm animals. We reviewed and analyzed the current progress in SSC techniques such as isolation, purification, cultivation and identification. Based on the published studie...

  2. Reference: 446 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rk E et al. 2006 Nov. Plant Physiol. 142(3):1004-13. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) QUARTET (QRT) genes are require...d for pollen separation during normal floral development. In qrt mutants, the four products of microsporogenesis re...main fused and pollen grains are released as tetrads. In Arabid...opsis, tetrad analysis in qrt mutants has been used to map all five centromeres, easily distinguish sporophy...tic from gametophytic mutations, and accurately assess crossover interference. Using a combination of forward and re

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Different Mutant Genotypes of Arabidopsis Led to the Identification of 11 Proteins Correlating with Adventitious Root Development1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorin, Céline; Negroni, Luc; Balliau, Thierry; Corti, Hélène; Jacquemot, Marie-Pierre; Davanture, Marlène; Sandberg, Göran; Zivy, Michel; Bellini, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    A lack of competence to form adventitious roots by cuttings or explants in vitro occurs routinely and is an obstacle for the clonal propagation and rapid fixation of elite genotypes. Adventitious rooting is known to be a quantitative genetic trait. We performed a proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants affected in their ability to develop adventitious roots in order to identify associated molecular markers that could be used to select genotypes for their rooting ability and/or to get further insight into the molecular mechanisms controlling adventitious rooting. Comparison of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis protein profiles resulted in the identification of 11 proteins whose abundance could be either positively or negatively correlated with endogenous auxin content, the number of adventitious root primordia, and/or the number of mature adventitious roots. One protein was negatively correlated only to the number of root primordia and two were negatively correlated to the number of mature adventitious roots. Two putative chaperone proteins were positively correlated only to the number of primordia, and, interestingly, three auxin-inducible GH3-like proteins were positively correlated with the number of mature adventitious roots. The others were correlated with more than one parameter. The 11 proteins are predicted to be involved in different biological processes, including the regulation of auxin homeostasis and light-associated metabolic pathways. The results identify regulatory pathways associated with adventitious root formation and represent valuable markers that might be used for the future identification of genotypes with better rooting abilities. PMID:16377752

  4. The Development of Protein Microarrays and Their Applications in DNA-Protein and Protein-Protein Interaction Analyses of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Gong; Kun He; Mike Covington; S.R Dinesh-Kumar; Michael Snyder; Stacey L.Harmer; Yu-Xian Zhu; Xing Wang Deng

    2008-01-01

    We used our collection of Arabidopsis transcription factor (TF) ORFeome clones to constructprotein microarrays containing as many as 802 TF proteins. These protein microarrays were used for both protein-DNA and proteinprotein interaction analyses. For protein-DNA interaction studies, we examined AP2/ERF family TFs and their cognate cis-elements. By careful comparison of the DNA-binding specificity of 13 TFs on the protein microarray with previous non-microarray data, we showed that protein microarrays provide an efficient and high throughput tool for genome-wide analysis of TF-DNA interactions. This microarray protein-DNA interaction analysis allowed us to derive a comprehensive view of DNA-binding profiles of AP2/ERF family proteins in Arabidopsis. It also revealed four TFs that bound the EE (evening element) and had the expected phased gene expression under clock-regulation, thus providing a basis for further functional analysis of their roles in clock regulation of gene expression. We also developed procedures for detecting protein interactions using this TF protein microarray and discovered four novel partners that interact with HY5, which can be validated by yeast two-hybrid assays. Thus, plant TF protein microarrays offer an attractive high-throughput alternative to traditional techniques for TF functional characterization on a global scale.

  5. The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii modulates the expression of WRKY transcription factors in syncytia to favour its development in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Amjad; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Kreil, David P; Bohlmann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Cyst nematodes invade the roots of their host plants as second stage juveniles and induce a syncytium which is the only source of nutrients throughout their life. A recent transcriptome analysis of syncytia induced by the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots has shown that thousands of genes are up-regulated or down-regulated in syncytia as compared to root segments from uninfected plants. Among the down-regulated genes are many which code for WRKY transcription factors. Arabidopsis contains 66 WRKY genes with 59 represented by the ATH1 GeneChip. Of these, 28 were significantly down-regulated and 6 up-regulated in syncytia as compared to control root segments. We have studied here the down-regulated genes WRKY6, WRKY11, WRKY17 and WRKY33 in detail. We confirmed the down-regulation in syncytia with promoter::GUS lines. Using various overexpression lines and mutants it was shown that the down-regulation of these WRKY genes is important for nematode development, probably through interfering with plant defense reactions. In case of WRKY33, this might involve the production of the phytoalexin camalexin.

  6. The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii modulates the expression of WRKY transcription factors in syncytia to favour its development in Arabidopsis roots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Amjad Ali

    Full Text Available Cyst nematodes invade the roots of their host plants as second stage juveniles and induce a syncytium which is the only source of nutrients throughout their life. A recent transcriptome analysis of syncytia induced by the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots has shown that thousands of genes are up-regulated or down-regulated in syncytia as compared to root segments from uninfected plants. Among the down-regulated genes are many which code for WRKY transcription factors. Arabidopsis contains 66 WRKY genes with 59 represented by the ATH1 GeneChip. Of these, 28 were significantly down-regulated and 6 up-regulated in syncytia as compared to control root segments. We have studied here the down-regulated genes WRKY6, WRKY11, WRKY17 and WRKY33 in detail. We confirmed the down-regulation in syncytia with promoter::GUS lines. Using various overexpression lines and mutants it was shown that the down-regulation of these WRKY genes is important for nematode development, probably through interfering with plant defense reactions. In case of WRKY33, this might involve the production of the phytoalexin camalexin.

  7. NUCLEAR FUSION DEFECTIVE1 encodes the Arabidopsis RPL21M protein and is required for karyogamy during female gametophyte development and fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portereiko, Michael F; Sandaklie-Nikolova, Linda; Lloyd, Alan; Dever, Chad A; Otsuga, Denichiro; Drews, Gary N

    2006-07-01

    Karyogamy, or nuclear fusion, is essential for sexual reproduction. In angiosperms, karyogamy occurs three times: twice during double fertilization of the egg cell and the central cell and once during female gametophyte development when the two polar nuclei fuse to form the diploid central cell nucleus. The molecular mechanisms controlling karyogamy are poorly understood. We have identified nine female gametophyte mutants in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), nuclear fusion defective1 (nfd1) to nfd9, that are defective in fusion of the polar nuclei. In the nfd1 to nfd6 mutants, failure of fusion of the polar nuclei is the only defect detected during megagametogenesis. nfd1 is also affected in karyogamy during double fertilization. Using transmission electron microscopy, we showed that nfd1 nuclei fail to undergo fusion of the outer nuclear membranes. nfd1 contains a T-DNA insertion in RPL21M that is predicted to encode the mitochondrial 50S ribosomal subunit L21, and a wild-type copy of this gene rescues the mutant phenotype. Consistent with the predicted function of this gene, an NFD1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localizes to mitochondria and the NFD1/RPL21M gene is expressed throughout the plant. The nfd3, nfd4, nfd5, and nfd6 mutants also contain T-DNA insertions in genes predicted to encode proteins that localize to mitochondria, suggesting a role for this organelle in nuclear fusion.

  8. Over-expression of the Arabidopsis proton-pyrophosphatase AVP1 enhances transplant survival, root mass, and fruit development under limiting phosphorus conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haibing; Zhang, Xiao; Gaxiola, Roberto A; Xu, Guohua; Peer, Wendy Ann; Murphy, Angus S

    2014-07-01

    Phosphorus (P), an element required for plant growth, fruit set, fruit development, and fruit ripening, can be deficient or unavailable in agricultural soils. Previously, it was shown that over-expression of a proton-pyrophosphatase gene AVP1/AVP1D (AVP1DOX) in Arabidopsis, rice, and tomato resulted in the enhancement of root branching and overall mass with the result of increased mineral P acquisition. However, although AVP1 over-expression also increased shoot biomass in Arabidopsis, this effect was not observed in tomato under phosphate-sufficient conditions. AVP1DOX tomato plants exhibited increased rootward auxin transport and root acidification compared with control plants. AVP1DOX tomato plants were analysed in detail under limiting P conditions in greenhouse and field trials. AVP1DOX plants produced 25% (P=0.001) more marketable ripened fruit per plant under P-deficient conditions compared with the controls. Further, under low phosphate conditions, AVP1DOX plants displayed increased phosphate transport from leaf (source) to fruit (sink) compared to controls. AVP1DOX plants also showed an 11% increase in transplant survival (Ptomato cultivars for increased proton pyrophosphatase gene expression could be useful when selecting for cultivars to be grown on marginal soils.

  9. The development of protein microarrays and their applications in DNA-protein and protein-protein interaction analyses of Arabidopsis transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei; He, Kun; Covington, Mike; Dinesh-Kumar, S P; Snyder, Michael; Harmer, Stacey L; Zhu, Yu-Xian; Deng, Xing Wang

    2008-01-01

    We used our collection of Arabidopsis transcription factor (TF) ORFeome clones to construct protein microarrays containing as many as 802 TF proteins. These protein microarrays were used for both protein-DNA and protein-protein interaction analyses. For protein-DNA interaction studies, we examined AP2/ERF family TFs and their cognate cis-elements. By careful comparison of the DNA-binding specificity of 13 TFs on the protein microarray with previous non-microarray data, we showed that protein microarrays provide an efficient and high throughput tool for genome-wide analysis of TF-DNA interactions. This microarray protein-DNA interaction analysis allowed us to derive a comprehensive view of DNA-binding profiles of AP2/ERF family proteins in Arabidopsis. It also revealed four TFs that bound the EE (evening element) and had the expected phased gene expression under clock-regulation, thus providing a basis for further functional analysis of their roles in clock regulation of gene expression. We also developed procedures for detecting protein interactions using this TF protein microarray and discovered four novel partners that interact with HY5, which can be validated by yeast two-hybrid assays. Thus, plant TF protein microarrays offer an attractive high-throughput alternative to traditional techniques for TF functional characterization on a global scale.

  10. Carbonylation and Loss-of-Function Analyses of SBPase Reveal Its Metabolic Interface Role in Oxidative Stress, Carbon Assimilation, and Multiple Aspects of Growth and Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun-Liang Liu; Hai-Dong Yu; Yuan Guan; Ji-Kai Li; Fang-Qing Guo

    2012-01-01

    Sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SBPase) is a Calvin cycle enzyme and functions in photosynthetic carbon fixation.We found that SBPase was rapidly carbonylated in response to methyl viologen (MV) treatments in detached leaves of Arabidopsis plants.In vitro activity analysis of the purified recombinant SBPase showed that SBPase was carbonylated by hydroxyl radicals,which led to enzyme inactivation in an H2O2 dose-dependent manner.To determine the conformity with carbonylation-caused loss in enzymatic activity in response to stresses,we isolated a loss-of-function mutant sbp,which is deficient in SBPase-dependent carbon assimilation and starch biosynthesis,sbp mutant exhibited a severe growth retardation phenotype,especially for the developmental defects in leaves and flowers where SBPASE is highly expressed.The mutation of SBPASE caused growth retardation mainly through inhibition of cell division and expansion,which can be partially rescued by exogenous application of sucrose.Our findings demonstrate that ROS-induced oxidative damage to SBPase affects growth,development,and chloroplast biogenesis in Arabidopsis through inhibiting carbon assimilation efficiency.The data presented here provide a case study that such inactivation of SBPase caused by carbonyl modification may be a kind of adaptation for plants to restrict the operation of the reductive pentose phosphate pathway under stress conditions.

  11. A membrane microdomain-associated protein, Arabidopsis Flot1, is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and is required for seedling development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruili; Liu, Peng; Wan, Yinglang; Chen, Tong; Wang, Qinli; Mettbach, Ursula; Baluska, Frantisek; Samaj, Jozef; Fang, Xiaohong; Lucas, William J; Lin, Jinxing

    2012-05-01

    Endocytosis is essential for the maintenance of protein and lipid compositions in the plasma membrane and for the acquisition of materials from the extracellular space. Clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytic processes are well established in yeast and animals; however, endocytic pathways involved in cargo internalization and intracellular trafficking remain to be fully elucidated for plants. Here, we used transgenic green fluorescent protein-flotillin1 (GFP-Flot1) Arabidopsis thaliana plants in combination with confocal microscopy analysis and transmission electron microscopy immunogold labeling to study the spatial and dynamic aspects of GFP-Flot1-positive vesicle formation. Vesicle size, as outlined by the gold particles, was ∼100 nm, which is larger than the 30-nm size of clathrin-coated vesicles. GFP-Flot1 also did not colocalize with clathrin light chain-mOrange. Variable-angle total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy also revealed that the dynamic behavior of GFP-Flot1-positive puncta was different from that of clathrin light chain-mOrange puncta. Furthermore, disruption of membrane microdomains caused a significant alteration in the dynamics of Flot1-positive puncta. Analysis of artificial microRNA Flot1 transgenic Arabidopsis lines established that a reduction in Flot1 transcript levels gave rise to a reduction in shoot and root meristem size plus retardation in seedling growth. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that, in plant cells, Flot1 is involved in a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway and functions in seedling development.

  12. The future of induced pluripotent stem cells for cardiac therapy and drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Thorrez, Lieven

    2011-01-01

    The field of stem cell research was revolutionized with the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells. By reprogramming somatic cells to pluripotent stem cells, most ethical concerns associated with the use of embryonic stem cells are overcome, such that many hopes from the stem cell field now seem a step closer to reality. Several methods and cell sources have been described to create induced pluripotent stem cells and we discuss their characteristics in terms of feasibility and efficiency. F...

  13. Adult neurogenesis, neural stem cells and Alzheimer's disease: developments, limitations, problems and promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, Philippe

    2009-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease, leading to severe incapacity and death. It is the most common form of dementia among older people. AD is characterized in the brain by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal degeneration, aneuploidy and enhanced neurogenesis and by cognitive, behavioral and physical impairments. Inherited mutations in several genes and genetic, acquired and environmental risk factors have been reported as causes for developing the disease, for which there is currently no cure. Current treatments for AD involve drugs and occupational therapies, and future developments involve early diagnosis and stem cell therapy. In this manuscript, we will review and discuss the recent developments, limitations, problems and promises on AD, particularly related to aneuploidy, adult neurogenesis, neural stem cells (NSCs) and cellular therapy. Though adult neurogenesis may be beneficial for regeneration of the nervous system, it may underly the pathogenesis of AD. Cellular therapy is a promising strategy for AD. Limitations in protocols to establish homogeneous populations of neural progenitor and stem cells and niches for neurogenesis need to be resolved and unlocked, for the full potential of adult NSCs to be realized for therapy.

  14. The versatile functions of Sox9 in development, stem cells, and human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Alice; Denduluri, Sahitya; Zhang, Bosi; Wang, Zhongliang; Yin, Liangjun; Yan, Zhengjian; Kang, Richard; Shi, Lewis L.; Mok, James; Lee, Michael J.; Haydon, Rex C.

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Sox9 was first discovered in patients with campomelic dysplasia, a haploinsufficiency disorder with skeletal deformities caused by dysregulation of Sox9 expression during chondrogenesis. Since then, its role as a cell fate determiner during embryonic development has been well characterized; Sox9 expression differentiates cells derived from all three germ layers into a large variety of specialized tissues and organs. However, recent data has shown that ectoderm- and endoderm-derived tissues continue to express Sox9 in mature organs and stem cell pools, suggesting its role in cell maintenance and specification during adult life. The versatility of Sox9 may be explained by a combination of post-transcriptional modifications, binding partners, and the tissue type in which it is expressed. Considering its importance during both development and adult life, it follows that dysregulation of Sox9 has been implicated in various congenital and acquired diseases, including fibrosis and cancer. This review provides a summary of the various roles of Sox9 in cell fate specification, stem cell biology, and related human diseases. Ultimately, understanding the mechanisms that regulate Sox9 will be crucial for developing effective therapies to treat disease caused by stem cell dysregulation or even reverse organ damage. PMID:25685828

  15. Reference: 584 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ing in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot and root stem cell organizers. 7137 811-4 17429400 2007 Apr Nature Hashimo...nda K et al. 2007 Apr. Nature 446(7137):811-4. Throughout the lifespan of a plant, which in some cases can l... 584 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u17429400i Sarkar Ana

  16. Reference: 494 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hn C et al. 2007 Jan. Plant J. 49(2):194-207. Green-leaf volatiles are commonly emitted from mechanically an...ngi, and induce several important plant defense pathways. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the major volatile released upon mechanical...ighest expression of CHAT occurs in the leaves and stems. Upon mechanical damage, the (Z)-3-hexen-1-yl aceta

  17. Mammary gland development: cell fate specification, stem cells and the microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jamie L; Robertson, Claire; Mott, Joni D; Bissell, Mina J

    2015-03-15

    The development of the mammary gland is unique: the final stages of development occur postnatally at puberty under the influence of hormonal cues. Furthermore, during the life of the female, the mammary gland can undergo many rounds of expansion and proliferation. The mammary gland thus provides an excellent model for studying the 'stem/progenitor' cells that allow this repeated expansion and renewal. In this Review, we provide an overview of the different cell types that constitute the mammary gland, and discuss how these cell types arise and differentiate. As cellular differentiation cannot occur without proper signals, we also describe how the tissue microenvironment influences mammary gland development.

  18. Immunologically related lectins from stems and roots of developing seedlings of Cucurbita ficifolia: purification and some properties of root and stem lectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Lorenc-Kubis

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hemagglutinating activity has been found in acetate extracts from roots and stems of squash seedlings (Cucurbita ficifolia. The hemaglutinating activity changes during seeds germination and seedling development. Dot blot and Western blot techniques have shown that proteins from these vegetative tissues cross-reacted with antibodies raised against endogenous cotyledons lectin CLBa and Con A.Lectins were isolated from stems and roots of 6-day old seedlings by precipitation with ethanol, affinity chromatography on Con A-Sepharose, gel filtration on Bio-gel P100 and separated by electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel. Three purified lectins (RLA1, RLA2, RLA3 were obtained from roots and four from stems (SLA1, SLA2, SLA3, SLA4. The purified lectins from roots and stems agglutinated all human red blood cells, but sheep erythrocytes were most sensitive to agglutination. The hemagglutination of the root lectins RLA2 and RLA3 was inhibited by a very low concentration of arabinose, while RLA1, of xylose and Ga1NAc. Arabinose and Xylose were also found to be the most effective inhibitors of all stem lectins.

  19. Roles of Aquaporins in Setaria viridis Stem Development and Sugar Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Alison McGaughey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Setaria viridis is a C4 grass used as a model for bioenergy feedstocks. The elongating internodes in developing S. viridis stems grow from an intercalary meristem at the base, and progress acropetally towards fully expanded cells that store sugar. During stem development and maturation, water flow is a driver of cell expansion and sugar delivery. As aquaporin proteins are implicated in regulating water flow we analysed elongating and mature internode transcriptomes to identify putative aquaporin encoding genes that had particularly high transcript levels during the distinct stages of internode cell expansion and maturation. We observed that SvPIP2;1 was highly expressed in internode regions undergoing cell expansion, and SvNIP2;2 was highly expressed in mature sugar accumulating regions. Gene co-expression analysis revealed SvNIP2;2 expression was highly correlated with the expression of five putative sugar transporters expressed in the S. viridis internode. To explore the function of the proteins encoded by SvPIP2;1 and SvNIP2;2 we expressed them in Xenopus laevis oocytes and tested their permeability to water. SvPIP2;1 and SvNIP2;2 functioned as water channels in X. laevis oocytes and their permeability was gated by pH. Our results indicate that SvPIP2;1 may function as a water channel in developing stems undergoing cell expansion and SvNIP2;2 is a candidate for retrieving water and possibly a yet to be determined solute from mature internodes. Future research will investigate whether changing the function of these proteins influences stem growth and sugar yield in S. viridis.

  20. Generation of functional thymic epithelium from human embryonic stem cells that supports host T cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Audrey V; Russ, Holger A; Khan, Imran S; LaFlam, Taylor N; Metzger, Todd C; Anderson, Mark S; Hebrok, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Inducing immune tolerance to prevent rejection is a key step toward successful engraftment of stem-cell-derived tissue in a clinical setting. Using human pluripotent stem cells to generate thymic epithelial cells (TECs) capable of supporting T cell development represents a promising approach to reach this goal; however, progress toward generating functional TECs has been limited. Here, we describe a robust in vitro method to direct differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into thymic epithelial progenitors (TEPs) by precise regulation of TGFβ, BMP4, RA, Wnt, Shh, and FGF signaling. The hESC-derived TEPs further mature into functional TECs that support T cell development upon transplantation into thymus-deficient mice. Importantly, the engrafted TEPs produce T cells capable of in vitro proliferation as well as in vivo immune responses. Thus, hESC-derived TEP grafts may have broad applications for enhancing engraftment in cell-based therapies as well as restoring age- and stress-related thymic decline.

  1. TAp63 is important for cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells and heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Matthieu; Medawar, Alain; Hamon, Laurent; Shivtiel, Shoham; Wolchinsky, Zohar; Zhou, Huiqing; De Rosa, Laura; Candi, Eleonora; de la Forest Divonne, Stéphanie; Mikkola, Marja L; van Bokhoven, Hans; Missero, Caterina; Melino, Gerry; Pucéat, Michel; Aberdam, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    p63, a member of the p53 family, is essential for skin morphogenesis and epithelial stem cell maintenance. Here, we report an unexpected role of TAp63 in cardiogenesis. p63 null mice exhibit severe defects in embryonic cardiac development, including dilation of both ventricles, a defect in trabeculation and abnormal septation. This was accompanied by myofibrillar disarray, mitochondrial disorganization, and reduction in spontaneous calcium spikes. By the use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we show that TAp63 deficiency prevents expression of pivotal cardiac genes and production of cardiomyocytes. TAp63 is expressed by endodermal cells. Coculture of p63-knockdown ESCs with wild-type ESCs, supplementation with Activin A, or overexpression of GATA-6 rescue cardiogenesis. Therefore, TAp63 acts in a non-cell-autonomous manner by modulating expression of endodermal factors. Our findings uncover a critical role for p63 in cardiogenesis that could be related to human heart disease.

  2. Making skeletal muscle from progenitor and stem cells: development versus regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chen-Ming; Li, Lydia; Rozo, Michelle E; Lepper, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    For locomotion, vertebrate animals use the force generated by contractile skeletal muscles. These muscles form an actin/myosin-based biomachinery that is attached to skeletal elements to affect body movement and maintain posture. The mechanics, physiology, and homeostasis of skeletal muscles in normal and disease states are of significant clinical interest. How muscles originate from progenitors during embryogenesis has attracted considerable attention from developmental biologists. How skeletal muscles regenerate and repair themselves after injury by the use of stem cells is an important process to maintain muscle homeostasis throughout lifetime. In recent years, much progress has been made toward uncovering the origins of myogenic progenitors and stem cells as well as the regulation of these cells during development and regeneration.

  3. The effects of the phospholipase D-antagonist 1-butanol on seedling development and microtubule organisation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, John; Collings, David A; Harper, John D I; Marc, Jan

    2003-07-01

    The organisation of plant microtubules into distinct arrays during the cell cycle requires interactions with partner proteins. Having recently identified a 90-kDa phospholipase D (PLD) that associates with microtubules and the plasma membrane [Gardiner et al. (2001) Plant Cell 13: 2143], we exposed seeds and young seedlings of Arabidopsis to 1-butanol, a specific inhibitor of PLD-dependent production of the signalling molecule phosphatidic acid (PA). When added to agar growth media, 0.2% 1-butanol strongly inhibited the emergence of the radicle and cotyledons, while 0.4% 1-butanol effectively blocked germination. When normal seedlings were transferred onto media containing 0.2% and 0.4% 1-butanol, the inhibitor retarded root growth by about 40% and 90%, respectively, by reducing cell elongation. Inhibited plants showed significant swelling in the root elongation zone, bulbous or branched root hairs, and modified cotyledon morphology. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of root tips revealed that 1-butanol disrupted the organisation of interphase cortical microtubules. Butanol isomers that do not inhibit PLD-dependent PA production, 2- and 3-butanol, had no effect on seed germination, seedling growth, or microtubule organisation. We propose that production of PA by PLD may be required for normal microtubule organisation and hence normal growth in Arabidopsis.

  4. Prominin-1 (CD133 defines both stem and non-stem cell populations in CNS development and gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Holmberg Olausson

    Full Text Available Prominin-1 (CD133 is a commonly used cancer stem cell marker in central nervous system (CNS tumors including glioblastoma (GBM. Expression of Prom1 in cancer is thought to parallel expression and function in normal stem cells. Using RNA in situ hybridization and antibody tools capable of detecting multiple isoforms of Prom1, we find evidence for two distinct Prom1 cell populations in mouse brain. Prom1 RNA is first expressed in stem/progenitor cells of the ventricular zone in embryonic brain. Conversely, in adult mouse brain Prom1 RNA is low in SVZ/SGZ stem cell zones but high in a rare but widely distributed cell population (Prom1(hi. Lineage marker analysis reveals Prom1(hi cells are Olig2+Sox2+ glia but Olig1/2 knockout mice lacking oligodendroglia retain Prom1(hi cells. Bromodeoxyuridine labeling identifies Prom1(hi as slow-dividing distributed progenitors distinct from NG2+Olig2+ oligodendrocyte progenitors. In adult human brain, PROM1 cells are rarely positive for OLIG2, but express astroglial markers GFAP and SOX2. Variability of PROM1 expression levels in human GBM and patient-derived xenografts (PDX - from no expression to strong, uniform expression--highlights that PROM1 may not always be associated with or restricted to cancer stem cells. TCGA and PDX data show that high expression of PROM1 correlates with poor overall survival. Within proneural subclass tumors, high PROM1 expression correlates inversely with IDH1 (R132H mutation. These findings support PROM1 as a tumor cell-intrinsic marker related to GBM survival, independent of its stem cell properties, and highlight potentially divergent roles for this protein in normal mouse and human glia.

  5. Differential expression of members of the annexin multigene family in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G. B.; Sessions, A.; Eastburn, D. J.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    Although in most plant species no more than two annexin genes have been reported to date, seven annexin homologs have been identified in Arabidopsis, Annexin Arabidopsis 1-7 (AnnAt1--AnnAt7). This establishes that annexins can be a diverse, multigene protein family in a single plant species. Here we compare and analyze these seven annexin gene sequences and present the in situ RNA localization patterns of two of these genes, AnnAt1 and AnnAt2, during different stages of Arabidopsis development. Sequence analysis of AnnAt1--AnnAt7 reveals that they contain the characteristic four structural repeats including the more highly conserved 17-amino acid endonexin fold region found in vertebrate annexins. Alignment comparisons show that there are differences within the repeat regions that may have functional importance. To assess the relative level of expression in various tissues, reverse transcription-PCR was carried out using gene-specific primers for each of the Arabidopsis annexin genes. In addition, northern blot analysis using gene-specific probes indicates differences in AnnAt1 and AnnAt2 expression levels in different tissues. AnnAt1 is expressed in all tissues examined and is most abundant in stems, whereas AnnAt2 is expressed mainly in root tissue and to a lesser extent in stems and flowers. In situ RNA localization demonstrates that these two annexin genes display developmentally regulated tissue-specific and cell-specific expression patterns. These patterns are both distinct and overlapping. The developmental expression patterns for both annexins provide further support for the hypothesis that annexins are involved in the Golgi-mediated secretion of polysaccharides.

  6. The First AACR special conference on stem cells, development, and cancer: some of these cells are not like the others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, David G; Lin, Jennifer C; Aubert, Geraldine

    2011-09-01

    The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) held an exciting conference on Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (March 3-6, 2011). The meeting was cochaired by Geoffrey Wahl, Connie Eaves, and Hans Clevers and was attended by 250 international researchers, 40% of whom were young investigators. Three key themes emerged: (i) heterogeneity in stem cells and cancer, (ii) solid tissue cancer stem cells, and (iii) lessons from development. The interdisciplinary foundation of this meeting was central to its success and appeal, underscoring the value of juxtaposing and interrelating work from the three topics addressed.

  7. Functional analyses of Populus euphratica brassinosteroid biosynthesis enzyme genes DWF4 (PeDWF4) and CPD (PeCPD) in the regulation of growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JIANPING SI; YAN SUN; LU WANG; YING QIN; CHONGYING WANG; XINYU WANG

    2016-12-01

    DWF4 and CPD are key brassinosteroids (BRs) biosynthesis enzyme genes. To explore the function of Populuseuphratica DWF4 (PeDWF4) and CPD (PeCPD), Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines (TLs) expressing PeDWF4,PeCPD or PeDWF4 plus PeCPD, namely PeDWF4-TL, PeCPD-TL and PeCP/DW-TL, were characterized. Comparedwith wild type (WT), the changes of both PeDWF4-TL and PeCPD-TL in plant heights, silique and hypocotylslengths and seed yields were similar, but in bolting time and stem diameters, they were opposite. PeCP/DW-TL wasmore in plant heights and the lengths of primary root, silique, and fruit stalk, but less in silique numbers and seedyields than either PeDWF4-TL or PeCPD-TL. PeDWF4 and PeCPD specially expressed in PeDWF4-TL or PeCPDTL,and the transcription level of PeDWF4 was higher than that of PeCPD. In PeCP/DW-TL, their expressions wereall relatively reduced. Additionally, the expression of PeDWF4 and PeCPD differentially made the expression levelsof AtDWF4, AtCPD, AtBR6OX2, AtFLC, AtTCP1 and AtGA5 change in the TLs. The total BRs contents werePeDWF4-TL > PeCP/DW-TL > WT > PeCPD-TL. These results imply that PeDWF4 is functionally not exactly thesame as PeCPD and there may be a synergistic and antagonistic effects in physiology between both of them in theregulation of plant growth and development.

  8. Cyclin-like F-box protein plays a role in growth and development of the three model species Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boycheva I

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Irina Boycheva,1 Valya Vassileva,2 Miglena Revalska,1 Grigor Zehirov,2 Anelia Iantcheva1 1Department of Functional Genetics Legumes, 2AgroBioInstitute, Department of Plant Stress Molecular Biology, Institute of Plant Physiology and Genetics, Sofia, Bulgaria Abstract: In eukaryotes, F-box proteins are one of the main components of the SCF complex that belongs to the family of ubiquitin E3 ligases, which catalyze protein ubiquitination and maintain the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. In the present study, we clarified the role and function of the gene encoding cyclin-like F-box protein from Medicago truncatula using transgenic plants of the model species M. truncatula, Lotus japonicas, and Arabidopsis thaliana generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Morphological and transcriptional analyses combined with flow cytometry and histochemistry demonstrated the participation of this protein in many aspects of plant growth and development, including processes of indirect somatic embryogenesis and symbiotic nodulation. The cyclin-like F-box gene showed expression in all plant organs and tissues comprised of actively dividing cells. The observed variations in root and hypocotyl growth, leaf and silique development, ploidy levels, and leaf parameters in the obtained transgenic lines demonstrated the effects of this gene on organ development. Furthermore, knockdown of cyclin-like F-box led to accumulation of higher levels of the G2/M transition-specific gene cyclin B1:1 (CYCB1:1, suggesting its possible role in cell cycle control. Together, the collected data suggest a similar role of the cyclin-like F-box protein in the three model species, providing evidence for the functional conservation of the studied gene. Keywords: cyclin-like F-box, model legumes, Arabidopsis thaliana, plant growth, plant development, cell cycle

  9. The CIRTL Network: A Professional Development Network for Future STEM Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL) is an NSF Center for Learning and Teaching in higher education using the professional development of graduate students and post-doctoral scholars as the leverage point to develop a national STEM faculty committed to implementing and advancing effective teaching practices for diverse student audiences as part of successful professional careers. The goal of CIRTL is to improve the STEM learning of all students at every college and university, and thereby to increase the diversity in STEM fields and the STEM literacy of the nation. The CIRTL network seeks to support change at a number of levels to support its goals: individual, classroom, institutional, and national. To bring about change, which is never easy, the CIRTL network has developed a conceptual model or change model that is thought to support the program objectives. Three central concepts, Teaching-as-Research, Learning Communities, and Learning-through-Diversity, underlie the design of all CIRTL activities. STEM faculty use research methods to systematically and reflectively improve learning outcomes. This work is done within a community of shared learning and discovery, and explicitly recognizes that effective teaching capitalizes on the rich array of experiences, backgrounds, and skills among the students and instructors to enhance the learning of all. This model is being refined and tested through a networked-design experiment, where the model is tested in diverse settings. Established in fall 2006, the CIRTL Network comprises the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU), Howard University, Michigan State University, Texas A&M University, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The diversity of these institutions is by design: private/public; large/moderate size; majority-/minority-serving; geographic location. This talk will describe the theoretical constructs and efficacy of Teaching-as Research as a

  10. Gene expression in response to cryoprotectant and liquid nitrogen exposure in Arabidopsis shoot tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabidopsis thaliana serves as an ideal model system to study cryopreservation at the molecular level. We have developed reliable cryopreservation methods for Arabidopsis shoot tips using Plant Vitrification Solution 2, Plant Vitrification Solution 3 and polyethylene glycol-glucose-dimethylsulfoxid...

  11. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine-mediated DNA demethylation in stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjia; Guan, Minxin; Li, Xuekun

    2014-05-01

    The pursuit of DNA demethylation has a colorful history, but it was not until 2009 that the stars of this story, the Ten-eleven-translocation (Tet) family of proteins, were really identified. Tet proteins convert 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which can be further oxidized to 5-formylcytosine and 5-cyboxycytosine by Tet proteins to achieve DNA demethylation. Recent studies have revealed that 5hmC-mediated DNA demethylation can play essential roles in diverse biological processes, including development and diseases. Here, we review recent discoveries in 5hmC-mediated DNA demethylation in the context of stem cells and development.

  12. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 Signalling in Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells during Development and after Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair E. Cole

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Substantial progress has been made in identifying the extracellular signalling pathways that regulate neural stem and precursor cell biology in the central nervous system (CNS. The bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs, in particular BMP4, are key players regulating neuronal and glial cell development from neural precursor cells in the embryonic, postnatal, and injured CNS. Here we review recent studies on BMP4 signalling in the generation of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendroglial cells in the CNS. We also discuss putative mechanisms that BMP4 may utilise to influence glial cell development following CNS injury and highlight some questions for further research.

  13. Human Embryonic Stem Cells: A Model for the Study of Neural Development and Neurological Diseases

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    Piya Prajumwongs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the mechanism of neurogenesis has been well documented in other organisms, there might be fundamental differences between human and those species referring to species-specific context. Based on principles learned from other systems, it is found that the signaling pathways required for neural induction and specification of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs recapitulated those in the early embryo development in vivo at certain degree. This underscores the usefulness of hESCs in understanding early human neural development and reinforces the need to integrate the principles of developmental biology and hESC biology for an efficient neural differentiation.

  14. Stem Cells

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    Madhukar Thakur

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this presentation is to create awareness of stem cell applications in the ISORBE community and to foster a strategy of how the ISORBE community can disseminate information and promote the use of radiolabeled stem cells in biomedical applications. Methods: The continued excitement in Stem Cells, in many branches of basic and applied biomedical science, stems from the remarkable ability of stem cells to divide and develop into different types of cells in the body. Often called as Magic Seeds, stem cells are produced in bone marrow and circulate in blood, albeit at a relatively low concentration. These virtues together with the ability of stem cells to grow in tissue culture have paved the way for their applications to generate new and healthy tissues and to replace diseased or injured human organs. Although possibilities of stem cell applications are many, much remains yet to be understood of these remarkable magic seeds. Conclusion: This presentation shall briefly cover the origin of stem cells, the pros and cons of their growth and division, their potential application, and shall outline some examples of the contributions of radiolabeled stem cells, in this rapidly growing branch of biomedical science

  15. The plastid-localized pfkB-type carbohydrate kinases FRUCTOKINASE-LIKE 1 and 2 are essential for growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Gilkerson Jonathan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription of plastid-encoded genes requires two different DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, a nuclear-encoded polymerase (NEP and plastid-encoded polymerase (PEP. Recent studies identified two related pfkB-type carbohydrate kinases, named FRUCTOKINASE-LIKE PROTEIN (FLN1 and FLN2, as components of the thylakoid bound PEP complex in both Arabidopsis thaliana and Sinapis alba (mustard. Additional work demonstrated that RNAi-mediated reduction in FLN expression specifically diminished transcription of PEP-dependent genes. Results Here, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis FLN knockout alleles to examine the contribution of each gene in plant growth, chloroplast development, and in mediating PEP-dependent transcription. We show that fln plants have severe phenotypes with fln1 resulting in an albino phenotype that is seedling lethal without a source of exogenous carbon. In contrast, fln2 plants display chlorosis prior to leaf expansion, but exhibit slow greening, remain autotrophic, can grow to maturity, and set viable seed. fln1 fln2 double mutant analysis reveals haplo-insufficiency, and fln1 fln2 plants have a similar, but more severe phenotype than either single mutant. Normal plastid development in both light and dark requires the FLNs, but surprisingly skotomorphogenesis is unaffected in fln seedlings. Seedlings genetically fln1-1 with dexamethasone-inducible FLN1-HA expression at germination are phenotypically indistinguishable from wild-type. Induction of FLN-HA after 24 hours of germination cannot rescue the mutant phenotype, indicating that the effects of loss of FLN are not always reversible. Examination of chloroplast gene expression in fln1-1 and fln2-1 by qRT-PCR reveals that transcripts of PEP-dependent genes were specifically reduced compared to NEP-dependent genes in both single mutants. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that each FLN protein contributes to wild type growth, and acting additively are

  16. The Arabidopsis SWI2/SNF2 chromatin Remodeler BRAHMA regulates polycomb function during vegetative development and directly activates the flowering repressor gene SVP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenlong; Chen, Chen; Gao, Lei; Yang, Songguang; Nguyen, Vi; Shi, Xuejiang; Siminovitch, Katherine; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Huang, Shangzhi; Wu, Keqiang; Chen, Xuemei; Cui, Yuhai

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin remodeler BRAHMA (BRM) is a Trithorax Group (TrxG) protein that antagonizes the functions of Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins in fly and mammals. Recent studies also implicate such a role for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) BRM but the molecular mechanisms underlying the antagonism are unclear. To understand the interplay between BRM and PcG during plant development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in brm mutant seedlings by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq). Increased H3K27me3 deposition at several hundred genes was observed in brm mutants and this increase was partially supressed by removal of the H3K27 methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF) or SWINGER (SWN). ChIP experiments demonstrated that BRM directly binds to a subset of the genes and prevents the inappropriate association and/or activity of PcG proteins at these loci. Together, these results indicate a crucial role of BRM in restricting the inappropriate activity of PcG during plant development. The key flowering repressor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) is such a BRM target. In brm mutants, elevated PcG occupancy at SVP accompanies a dramatic increase in H3K27me3 levels at this locus and a concomitant reduction of SVP expression. Further, our gain- and loss-of-function genetic evidence establishes that BRM controls flowering time by directly activating SVP expression. This work reveals a genome-wide functional interplay between BRM and PcG and provides new insights into the impacts of these proteins in plant growth and development.

  17. The Arabidopsis SWI2/SNF2 chromatin Remodeler BRAHMA regulates polycomb function during vegetative development and directly activates the flowering repressor gene SVP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenlong Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chromatin remodeler BRAHMA (BRM is a Trithorax Group (TrxG protein that antagonizes the functions of Polycomb Group (PcG proteins in fly and mammals. Recent studies also implicate such a role for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana BRM but the molecular mechanisms underlying the antagonism are unclear. To understand the interplay between BRM and PcG during plant development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of trimethylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3 in brm mutant seedlings by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq. Increased H3K27me3 deposition at several hundred genes was observed in brm mutants and this increase was partially supressed by removal of the H3K27 methyltransferase CURLY LEAF (CLF or SWINGER (SWN. ChIP experiments demonstrated that BRM directly binds to a subset of the genes and prevents the inappropriate association and/or activity of PcG proteins at these loci. Together, these results indicate a crucial role of BRM in restricting the inappropriate activity of PcG during plant development. The key flowering repressor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP is such a BRM target. In brm mutants, elevated PcG occupancy at SVP accompanies a dramatic increase in H3K27me3 levels at this locus and a concomitant reduction of SVP expression. Further, our gain- and loss-of-function genetic evidence establishes that BRM controls flowering time by directly activating SVP expression. This work reveals a genome-wide functional interplay between BRM and PcG and provides new insights into the impacts of these proteins in plant growth and development.

  18. Development of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Secreting Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Carina Lund

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons regulate human puberty and reproduction. Modeling their development and function in vitro would be of interest for both basic research and clinical translation. Here, we report a three-step protocol to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs into GnRH-secreting neurons. Firstly, hPSCs were differentiated to FOXG1, EMX2, and PAX6 expressing anterior neural progenitor cells (NPCs by dual SMAD inhibition. Secondly, NPCs were treated for 10 days with FGF8, which is a key ligand implicated in GnRH neuron ontogeny, and finally, the cells were matured with Notch inhibitor to bipolar TUJ1-positive neurons that robustly expressed GNRH1 and secreted GnRH decapeptide into the culture medium. The protocol was reproducible both in human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, and thus provides a translational tool for investigating the mechanisms of human puberty and its disorders.

  19. Alveolar progenitor and stem cells in lung development, renewal and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Tushar J; Brownfield, Douglas G; Krasnow, Mark A

    2014-03-13

    Alveoli are gas-exchange sacs lined by squamous alveolar type (AT) 1 cells and cuboidal, surfactant-secreting AT2 cells. Classical studies suggested that AT1 arise from AT2 cells, but recent studies propose other sources. Here we use molecular markers, lineage tracing and clonal analysis to map alveolar progenitors throughout the mouse lifespan. We show that, during development, AT1 and AT2 cells arise directly from a bipotent progenitor, whereas after birth new AT1 cells derive from rare, self-renewing, long-lived, mature AT2 cells that produce slowly expanding clonal foci of alveolar renewal. This stem-cell function is broadly activated by AT1 injury, and AT2 self-renewal is selectively induced by EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) ligands in vitro and oncogenic Kras(G12D) in vivo, efficiently generating multifocal, clonal adenomas. Thus, there is a switch after birth, when AT2 cells function as stem cells that contribute to alveolar renewal, repair and cancer. We propose that local signals regulate AT2 stem-cell activity: a signal transduced by EGFR-KRAS controls self-renewal and is hijacked during oncogenesis, whereas another signal controls reprogramming to AT1 fate.

  20. E-cadherin promotes incorporation of mouse epiblast stem cells into normal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Nishikawa-Torikai, Satomi; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos. Their pluripotency is distinct from that of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) in several cell biological criteria. One of the distinctions is that mEpiSCs contribute either not at all or at much lower efficiency to chimeric embryos after blastocyst injection compared to mESCs. However, here we showed that mEpiSCs can be incorporated into normal development after blastocyst injection by forced expression of the E-cadherin transgene for 2 days in culture. Using this strategy, mEpiSCs gave rise to live-born chimeras from 5% of the manipulated blastocysts. There were no obvious signs of reprogramming of mEpiSCs toward the mESC-like state during the 2 days after induction of the E-cadherin transgene, suggesting that mEpiSCs possess latent ability to integrate into the normal developmental process as its origin, epiblasts.

  1. Development of Paper Products from Dried Sweetpotato Stems and Peanut Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, R.; Smith, R.; Jones, G.; Lu, J. Y.

    1998-01-01

    One of the goals of NASA's Advanced Life Support Program (ALS) for sustaining human life in space is to achieve a closed system in plant production and usage. That all inedible plant parts should be recycled or used in some way. A Tuskegee University team researching sweetpotato and peanut for ALS has developed paper products from dried sweet-potato stems and peanut shells. In this study, the sweet-potato stems and peanut shells were soaked separately in water for 48 hours. After 48 hours, researchers manually separated the pulp and the unusable parts. To form the paper, 160 g of pulp and water mixture was poured through a 15.1 cm (diameter) filtration funnel and the pulp was trapped on 15 cm (diameter) filter paper. The filter paper and pulp were dried in an air oven, and the filter paper was removed, An examination under a scanning electron microscope showed that the sweet-potato paper was composed of "fibers", whereas the peanut shell paper was composed of "blocks". Results of physical testing showed that the sweet-potato stem paper was stronger than the peanut shell paper. It is anticipated that there may be other uses of these products such as writing paper, bags and packaging material. Because of its biodegradability, it can be incorporated into the resource recycling system at the end of its use.

  2. E-cadherin promotes incorporation of mouse epiblast stem cells into normal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Ohtsuka

    Full Text Available Mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos. Their pluripotency is distinct from that of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs in several cell biological criteria. One of the distinctions is that mEpiSCs contribute either not at all or at much lower efficiency to chimeric embryos after blastocyst injection compared to mESCs. However, here we showed that mEpiSCs can be incorporated into normal development after blastocyst injection by forced expression of the E-cadherin transgene for 2 days in culture. Using this strategy, mEpiSCs gave rise to live-born chimeras from 5% of the manipulated blastocysts. There were no obvious signs of reprogramming of mEpiSCs toward the mESC-like state during the 2 days after induction of the E-cadherin transgene, suggesting that mEpiSCs possess latent ability to integrate into the normal developmental process as its origin, epiblasts.

  3. Use of Adult Stem Cells for Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Current Status and Future Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Baugé

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their low self-repair ability, cartilage defects that result from joint injury, aging, or osteoarthritis, are the most often irreversible and are a major cause of joint pain and chronic disability. So, in recent years, researchers and surgeons have been working hard to elaborate cartilage repair interventions for patients who suffer from cartilage damage. However, current methods do not perfectly restore hyaline cartilage and may lead to the apparition of fibro- or hypertrophic cartilage. In the next years, the development of new strategies using adult stem cells, in scaffolds, with supplementation of culture medium and/or culture in low oxygen tension should improve the quality of neoformed cartilage. Through these solutions, some of the latest technologies start to bring very promising results in repairing cartilage from traumatic injury or chondropathies. This review discusses the current knowledge about the use of adult stem cells in the context of cartilage tissue engineering and presents clinical trials in progress, as well as in the future, especially in the field of bioprinting stem cells.

  4. Pruning-induced tylose development in stems of current-year shoots of Vitis vinifera (Vitaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiang; Rost, Thomas L; Matthews, Mark A

    2006-11-01

    Tyloses form in xylem vessels in response to various environmental stimuli, but little is known of the kinetics or regulation of their development. Preliminary investigations indicated that wounds seal quickly with tyloses after pruning of grapevine shoots. In this study, tylose development was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively at different depths and times from pruning cuts along current-year shoots of grapevines at basal, middle, and apical stem regions. Tyloses developed simultaneously within a single vessel but much separated in time among vessels. Pruning caused prodigious tylosis in vessels of grape stems, extending to approximately 1 cm deep and to 7 d after wounding, but about half of the vessels did not become completely occluded. The fraction of vessels forming tyloses was greatest in basal (85%) and least in apical (50%) regions. The depth of maximum density of tyloses was 4 mm from the cut in the basal region and 2 mm from the cut in the middle and apical regions. Tylose development was faster in the basal and middle than in the apical region. The pattern of tylose development is discussed in the context of wound repair and pathogen movement in grapevines.

  5. Porcine Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from IVF Embryos Contribute to Chimeric Development In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Binghua; Li, Yan; He, Yilong; Wei, Renyue; Sun, Ruizhen; Yin, Zhi; Bou, Gerelchimeg; Liu, Zhonghua

    2016-01-01

    Although the pig is considered an important model of human disease and an ideal animal for the preclinical testing of cell transplantation, the utility of this model has been hampered by a lack of genuine porcine embryonic stem cells. Here, we derived a porcine pluripotent stem cell (pPSC) line from day 5.5 blastocysts in a newly developed culture system based on MXV medium and a 5% oxygen atmosphere. The pPSCs had been passaged more than 75 times over two years, and the morphology of the colony was similar to that of human embryonic stem cells. Characterization and assessment showed that the pPSCs were alkaline phosphatase (AKP) positive, possessed normal karyotypes and expressed classic pluripotent markers, including OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG. In vitro differentiation through embryonic body formation and in vivo differentiation via teratoma formation in nude mice demonstrated that the pPSCs could differentiate into cells of the three germ layers. The pPSCs transfected with fuw-DsRed (pPSC-FDs) could be passaged with a stable expression of both DsRed and pluripotent markers. Notably, when pPSC-FDs were used as donor cells for somatic nuclear transfer, 11.52% of the reconstructed embryos developed into blastocysts, which was not significantly different from that of the reconstructed embryos derived from porcine embryonic fibroblasts. When pPSC-FDs were injected into day 4.5 blastocysts, they became involved in the in vitro embryonic development and contributed to the viscera of foetuses at day 50 of pregnancy as well as the developed placenta after the chimeric blastocysts were transferred into recipients. These findings indicated that the pPSCs were porcine pluripotent cells; that this would be a useful cell line for porcine genetic engineering and a valuable cell line for clarifying the molecular mechanism of pluripotency regulation in pigs. PMID:26991423

  6. Porcine Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from IVF Embryos Contribute to Chimeric Development In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binghua Xue

    Full Text Available Although the pig is considered an important model of human disease and an ideal animal for the preclinical testing of cell transplantation, the utility of this model has been hampered by a lack of genuine porcine embryonic stem cells. Here, we derived a porcine pluripotent stem cell (pPSC line from day 5.5 blastocysts in a newly developed culture system based on MXV medium and a 5% oxygen atmosphere. The pPSCs had been passaged more than 75 times over two years, and the morphology of the colony was similar to that of human embryonic stem cells. Characterization and assessment showed that the pPSCs were alkaline phosphatase (AKP positive, possessed normal karyotypes and expressed classic pluripotent markers, including OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG. In vitro differentiation through embryonic body formation and in vivo differentiation via teratoma formation in nude mice demonstrated that the pPSCs could differentiate into cells of the three germ layers. The pPSCs transfected with fuw-DsRed (pPSC-FDs could be passaged with a stable expression of both DsRed and pluripotent markers. Notably, when pPSC-FDs were used as donor cells for somatic nuclear transfer, 11.52% of the reconstructed embryos developed into blastocysts, which was not significantly different from that of the reconstructed embryos derived from porcine embryonic fibroblasts. When pPSC-FDs were injected into day 4.5 blastocysts, they became involved in the in vitro embryonic development and contributed to the viscera of foetuses at day 50 of pregnancy as well as the developed placenta after the chimeric blastocysts were transferred into recipients. These findings indicated that the pPSCs were porcine pluripotent cells; that this would be a useful cell line for porcine genetic engineering and a valuable cell line for clarifying the molecular mechanism of pluripotency regulation in pigs.

  7. The impact of PEPC phosphorylation on growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana: molecular and physiological characterization of PEPC kinase mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimoun, Patrice; Gousset-Dupont, Aurélie; Lebouteiller, Bénédicte; Ambard-Bretteville, Françoise; Besin, Evelyne; Lelarge, Caroline; Mauve, Caroline; Hodges, Michael; Vidal, Jean

    2009-05-19

    Two phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) kinase genes (PPCk1 and PPCk2) are present in the Arabidopsis genome; only PPCk1 is expressed in rosette leaves. Homozygous lines of two independent PPCk1 T-DNA-insertional mutants showed very little (dln1), or no (csi8) light-induced PEPC phosphorylation and a clear retard in growth under our greenhouse conditions. A mass-spectrometry-based analysis revealed significant changes in metabolite profiles. However, the anaplerotic pathway initiated by PEPC was only moderately altered. These data establish the PPCk1 gene product as responsible for leaf PEPC phosphorylation in planta and show that the absence of PEPC phosphorylation has pleiotropic consequences on plant metabolism.

  8. ECHIDNA protein impacts on male fertility in Arabidopsis by mediating trans-Golgi network secretory trafficking during anther and pollen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xinping; Yang, Caiyun; Klisch, Doris; Ferguson, Alison; Bhaellero, Rishi P; Niu, Xiwu; Wilson, Zoe A

    2014-03-01

    The trans-Golgi network (TGN) plays a central role in cellular secretion and has been implicated in sorting cargo destined for the plasma membrane. Previously, the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) echidna (ech) mutant was shown to exhibit a dwarf phenotype due to impaired cell expansion. However, ech also has a previously uncharacterized phenotype of reduced male fertility. This semisterility is due to decreased anther size and reduced amounts of pollen but also to decreased pollen viability, impaired anther opening, and pollen tube growth. An ECH translational fusion (ECHPro:ECH-yellow fluorescent protein) revealed developmentally regulated tissue-specific expression, with expression in the tapetum during early anther development and microspore release and subsequent expression in the pollen, pollen tube, and stylar tissues. Pollen viability and production, along with germination and pollen tube growth, were all impaired. The ech anther endothecium secondary wall thickening also appeared reduced and disorganized, resulting in incomplete anther opening. This did not appear to be due to anther secondary thickening regulatory genes but perhaps to altered secretion of wall materials through the TGN as a consequence of the absence of the ECH protein. ECH expression is critical for a variety of aspects of male reproduction, including the production of functional pollen grains, their effective release, germination, and tube formation. These stages of pollen development are fundamentally influenced by TGN trafficking of hormones and wall components. Overall, this suggests that the fertility defect is multifaceted, with the TGN trafficking playing a significant role in the process of both pollen formation and subsequent fertilization.

  9. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A

    2011-08-23

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation.

  10. Embryonic stem cell as nuclear donor could promote in vitro development of the heterogeneous reconstructed embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The nucleus of a somatic cell could be dedifferentiated and reprogrammed in an enucleated heterogeneous oocyte. Some reconstructed oocytes could develop into blastocysts in vitro, and a few could develop into term normally after transferred into foster mothers, but most of cloning embryos fail to develop to term. In order to evaluate the efficacy of embryonic stem cell as nucleus donor in interspecific animal cloning, we reconstructed enucleated rabbit oocytes with nuclei from mouse ES cells, and analyzed the developmental ability of reconstructed embryos in vitro. Two kinds of fibroblast cells were used as donor control, one derived from ear skin of an adult Kunming albino mouse, and the other derived from a mouse fetus. Three types of cells were transferred into perivitelline space under zona pellucida of rabbit oocytes respectively. The reconstructed oocytes were fused and activated by electric pulses, and cultured in vitro. The developmental rate of reconstructed oocytes derived from embryonic stem cells was 16.1%, which was significantly higher than that of both the adult mouse fibroblast cells (0%-3.1%, P < 0.05) and fetus mouse fibroblast cells (2.1%-3.7%, P < 0.05). Chromosome analysis confirmed that blastocyst cells were derived from ES donor cell. These observations show that reprogramming is easier in interspecific embryos reconstructed with ES cells than that reconstructed with somatic cells, and that ES cells have the higher ability to direct the reconstructed embryos development normally than fibroblast cells.

  11. Reverse genetic characterization of two paralogous acetoacetyl CoA thiolase genes in Arabidopsis reveals their importance in plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huanan; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J

    2012-06-01

    Acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT, EC 2.3.1.9) catalyzes the condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules to form acetoacetyl CoA. Two AACT-encoding genes, At5g47720 (AACT1) and At5g48230 (AACT2), were functionally identified in the Arabidopsis genome by direct enzymological assays and functional expression in yeast. Promoter::GUS fusion experiments indicated that AACT1 is primarily expressed in the vascular system and AACT2 is highly expressed in root tips, young leaves, top stems and anthers. Characterization of T-DNA insertion mutant alleles at each AACT locus established that AACT2 function is required for embryogenesis and for normal male gamete transmission. In contrast, plants lacking AACT1 function are completely viable and show no apparent growth phenotypes, indicating that AACT1 is functionally redundant with respect to AACT2 function. RNAi lines that express reduced levels of AACT2 show pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduced apical dominance, elongated life span and flowering duration, sterility, dwarfing, reduced seed yield and shorter root length. Microscopic analysis reveals that the reduced stature is caused by a reduction in cell size and fewer cells, and male sterility is caused by loss of the pollen coat and premature degeneration of the tapetal cells. Biochemical analyses established that the roots of AACT2 RNAi plants show quantitative and qualitative alterations in phytosterol profiles. These phenotypes and biochemical alterations are reversed when AACT2 RNAi plants are grown in the presence of mevalonate, which is consistent with the role of AACT2 in generating the bulk of the acetoacetyl CoA precursor required for the cytosol-localized, mevalonate-derived isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

  12. Human pluripotent stem cells as a model of trophoblast differentiation in both normal development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Mariko; Li, Yingchun; Wakeland, Anna K; Pizzo, Donald P; Nelson, Katharine K; Sabatini, Karen; Laurent, Louise Chang; Liu, Ying; Parast, Mana M

    2016-07-05

    Trophoblast is the primary epithelial cell type in the placenta, a transient organ required for proper fetal growth and development. Different trophoblast subtypes are responsible for gas/nutrient exchange (syncytiotrophoblasts, STBs) and invasion and maternal vascular remodeling (extravillous trophoblasts, EVTs). Studies of early human placental development are severely hampered by the lack of a representative trophoblast stem cell (TSC) model with the capacity for self-renewal and the ability to differentiate into both STBs and EVTs. Primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) isolated from early-gestation (6-8 wk) human placentas are bipotential, a phenotype that is lost with increasing gestational age. We have identified a CDX2(+)/p63(+) CTB subpopulation in the early postimplantation human placenta that is significantly reduced later in gestation. We describe a reproducible protocol, using defined medium containing bone morphogenetic protein 4 by which human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can be differentiated into CDX2(+)/p63(+) CTB stem-like cells. These cells can be replated and further differentiated into STB- and EVT-like cells, based on marker expression, hormone secretion, and invasive ability. As in primary CTBs, differentiation of hPSC-derived CTBs in low oxygen leads to reduced human chorionic gonadotropin secretion and STB-associated gene expression, instead promoting differentiation into HLA-G(+) EVTs in an hypoxia-inducible, factor-dependent manner. To validate further the utility of hPSC-derived CTBs, we demonstrated that differentiation of trisomy 21 (T21) hPSCs recapitulates the delayed CTB maturation and blunted STB differentiation seen in T21 placentae. Collectively, our data suggest that hPSCs are a valuable model of human placental development, enabling us to recapitulate processes that result in both normal and diseased pregnancies.

  13. MicroRNA directs mRNA cleavage of the transcription factor NAC1 to downregulate auxin signals for arabidopsis lateral root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hui-Shan; Xie, Qi; Fei, Ji-Feng; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2005-05-01

    Although several plant microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to play a role in plant development, no phenotype has yet been associated with a reduction or loss of expression of any plant miRNA. Arabidopsis thaliana miR164 was predicted to target five NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC) domain-encoding mRNAs, including NAC1, which transduces auxin signals for lateral root emergence. Here, we show that miR164 guides the cleavage of endogenous and transgenic NAC1 mRNA, producing 3'-specific fragments. Cleavage was blocked by NAC1 mutations that disrupt base pairing with miR164. Compared with wild-type plants, Arabidopsis mir164a and mir164b mutant plants expressed less miR164 and more NAC1 mRNA and produced more lateral roots. These mutant phenotypes can be complemented by expression of the appropriate MIR164a and MIR164b genomic sequences. By contrast, inducible expression of miR164 in wild-type plants led to decreased NAC1 mRNA levels and reduced lateral root emergence. Auxin induction of miR164 was mirrored by an increase in the NAC1 mRNA 3' fragment, which was not observed in the auxin-insensitive mutants auxin resistant1 (axr1-12), axr2-1, and transport inhibitor response1. Moreover, the cleavage-resistant form of NAC1 mRNA was unaffected by auxin treatment. Our results indicate that auxin induction of miR164 provides a homeostatic mechanism to clear NAC1 mRNA to downregulate auxin signals.

  14. The seed composition of Arabidopsis mutants for the group 3 sulfate transporters indicates a role in sulfate translocation within developing seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Hélène; Davidian, Jean-Claude; Aubert, Grégoire; Aimé, Delphine; Belghazi, Maya; Lugan, Raphaël; Heintz, Dimitri; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Thompson, Richard; Gallardo, Karine

    2010-10-01

    Sulfate is required for the synthesis of sulfur-containing amino acids and numerous other compounds essential for the plant life cycle. The delivery of sulfate to seeds and its translocation between seed tissues is likely to require specific transporters. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the group 3 plasmalemma-predicted sulfate transporters (SULTR3) comprise five genes, all expressed in developing seeds, especially in the tissues surrounding the embryo. Here, we show that sulfur supply to seeds is unaffected by T-DNA insertions in the SULTR3 genes. However, remarkably, an increased accumulation of sulfate was found in mature seeds of four mutants out of five. In these mutant seeds, the ratio of sulfur in sulfate form versus total sulfur was significantly increased, accompanied by a reduction in free cysteine content, which varied depending on the gene inactivated. These results demonstrate a reduced capacity of the mutant seeds to metabolize sulfate and suggest that these transporters may be involved in sulfate translocation between seed compartments. This was further supported by sulfate measurements of the envelopes separated from the embryo of the sultr3;2 mutant seeds, which showed differences in sulfate partitioning compared with the wild type. A dissection of the seed proteome of the sultr3 mutants revealed protein changes characteristic of a sulfur-stress response, supporting a role for these transporters in providing sulfate to the embryo. The mutants were affected in 12S globulin accumulation, demonstrating the importance of intraseed sulfate transport for the synthesis and maturation of embryo proteins. Metabolic adjustments were also revealed, some of which could release sulfur from glucosinolates.

  15. Sequence and expression analyses of KIX domain proteins suggest their importance in seed development and determination of seed size in rice, and genome stability in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Jitendra Kumar; Agarwal, Pinky; Parida, Swarup; Bajaj, Deepak; Pasrija, Richa

    2013-08-01

    The KIX domain, which mediates protein-protein interactions, was first discovered as a motif in the large multidomain transcriptional activator histone acetyltransferase p300/CBP. Later, the domain was also found in Mediator subunit MED15, where it interacts with many transcription factors. In both proteins, the KIX domain is a target of activation domains of diverse transcription activators. It was found to be an essential component of several specific gene-activation pathways in fungi and metazoans. Not much is known about KIX domain proteins in plants. This study aims to characterize all the KIX domain proteins encoded by the genomes of Arabidopsis and rice. All identified KIX domain proteins are presented, together with their chromosomal locations, phylogenetic analysis, expression and SNP analyses. KIX domains were found not only in p300/CBP- and MED15-like plant proteins, but also in F-box proteins in rice and DNA helicase in Arabidopsis, suggesting roles of KIX domains in ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation and genome stability. Expression analysis revealed overlapping expression of OsKIX_3, OsKIX_5 and OsKIX_7 in different stages of rice seeds development. Moreover, an association analysis of 136 in silico mined SNP loci in 23 different rice genotypes with grain-length information identified three non-synonymous SNP loci in these three rice genes showing strong association with long- and short-grain differentiation. Interestingly, these SNPs were located within KIX domain encoding sequences. Overall, this study lays a foundation for functional analysis of KIX domain proteins in plants.

  16. Regeneration of the lung: Lung stem cells and the development of lung mimicking devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilders, Kim A A; Eenjes, Evelien; van Riet, Sander; Poot, André A; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Truckenmüller, Roman; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Rottier, Robbert J

    2016-04-23

    Inspired by the increasing burden of lung associated diseases in society and an growing demand to accommodate patients, great efforts by the scientific community produce an increasing stream of data that are focused on delineating the basic principles of lung development and growth, as well as understanding the biomechanical properties to build artificial lung devices. In addition, the continuing efforts to better define the disease origin, progression and pathology by basic scientists and clinicians contributes to insights in the basic principles of lung biology. However, the use of different model systems, experimental approaches and readout systems may generate somewhat conflicting or contradictory results. In an effort to summarize the latest developments in the lung epithelial stem cell biology, we provide an overview of the current status of the field. We first describe the different stem cells, or progenitor cells, residing in the homeostatic lung. Next, we focus on the plasticity of the different cell types upon several injury-induced activation or repair models, and highlight the regenerative capacity of lung cells. Lastly, we summarize the generation of lung mimics, such as air-liquid interface cultures, organoids and lung on a chip, that are required to test emerging hypotheses. Moreover, the increasing collaboration between distinct specializations will contribute to the eventual development of an artificial lung device capable of assisting reduced lung function and capacity in human patients.

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF TRACTOR FRONT MOUNTED PIGEON PEA STEM CUTTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul R. Dange

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Pigeon pea or tur (Cajanus cajan L. Mills. is one of the important pulse crops of India and ranks second to chickpea in area and production. Traditionally the harvesting of pigeon pea is done manually by sickle, which demands considerable amount of labour, drudgery, time and cost to harvest, which reflects on total production cost of the crop. In view of this a tractor operated front mounted pigeon pea stem cutter was developed and being front mounted implement it facilitated better visibility and control to operator. The power was transmitted from pto to gear box. Arrangement of hydraulic cylinder and hydraulic motor was provided on the equipment to facilitate the height of cut and to rotate the conveyer belt. During comparative performance evaluation of developed equipment, the average cutting efficiency and field capacity was found 96.30 % and 0.176 ha/hr respectively. There was increase in fuel consumption and plant damage with increase in speed of operation. The average operation cost of newly developed tractor operated front mounted pigeon pea stem cutter was 64.71% less as compared with manual harvesting of pigeon pea crop. The time saved was almost 1/3rd to that of manual harvesting.

  18. Documentation on the development of the Swiss TIMES Electricity Model (STEM-E)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannan, R.; Turton, H.

    2011-10-15

    This comprehensive report by the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI in Switzerland documents the development of the Swiss TIMES Electricity Model (STEM-E). This is a flexible model which explicitly depicts plausible pathways for the development of the Swiss electricity sector, while dealing with inter-temporal variations in demand and supply. TIMES is quoted as having the capability to portray the entire energy system from resource supply, through fuel processing, representation of infrastructures, conversion to secondary energy carriers, end-use technologies and energy service demands at end-use sectors. The background of the model's development and a reference energy system are described. Also, electricity end-use sectors and generating systems are examined, including hydropower, nuclear power, thermal generation and renewables. Environmental factors and the calibration of the model are discussed, as is the application of the model. The document is completed with an outlook, references and six appendices

  19. Immunodeficient mouse model for human hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and immune system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Shultz, Leonard D; Brehm, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human immune systems provide an exciting model to study human immunobiology in an in vivo setting without placing patients at risk. The essential parameter for creation of these "humanized models" is engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that will allow for optimal development of human immune systems. However, there are a number of strategies to generate humanized mice and specific protocols can vary significantly among different laboratories. Here we describe a protocol for the co-implantation of human HSC with autologous fetal liver and thymic tissues into immunodeficient mice to create a humanized model with optimal human T cell development. This model, often referred to as the Thy/Liv or BLT (bone marrow, liver, thymus) mouse, develops a functional human immune system, including HLA-restricted human T cells, B cells, and innate immune cells.

  20. Epigenetic modifications of embryonic stem cells: current trends and relevance in developing regenerative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Chung; Kuldip S Sidhu

    2008-01-01

    Henry Chung, Kuldip S SidhuStem Cell Lab, Faculty of Medicine, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Epigenetics is a growing field not only in the area of cancer research but recently in stem cells including human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research. The hallmark of profiling epigenetic changes in stem cells lies in maintaining pluripotency or multipotency and in attaining lineage specifications that are relevant for regenerative medicine. Epige...

  1. The lysine acetyltransferase activator Brpf1 governs dentate gyrus development through neural stem cells and progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Linya; Yan, Kezhi; Zou, Jinfeng; Zhou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-03-01

    Lysine acetylation has recently emerged as an important post-translational modification in diverse organisms, but relatively little is known about its roles in mammalian development and stem cells. Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) is a multidomain histone binder and a master activator of three lysine acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF and HBO1, which are also known as KAT6A, KAT6B and KAT7, respectively. While the MOZ and MORF genes are rearranged in leukemia, the MORF gene is also mutated in prostate and other cancers and in four genetic disorders with intellectual disability. Here we show that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes hypoplasia in the dentate gyrus, including underdevelopment of the suprapyramidal blade and complete loss of the infrapyramidal blade. We trace the developmental origin to compromised Sox2+ neural stem cells and Tbr2+ intermediate neuronal progenitors. We further demonstrate that Brpf1 loss deregulates neuronal migration, cell cycle progression and transcriptional control, thereby causing abnormal morphogenesis of the hippocampus. These results link histone binding and acetylation control to hippocampus development and identify an important epigenetic regulator for patterning the dentate gyrus, a brain structure critical for learning, memory and adult neurogenesis.

  2. Evolution and development of budding by stem cells: ascidian coloniality as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Federico D; Swalla, Billie J

    2012-09-15

    The evolution of budding in metazoans is not well understood on a mechanistic level, but is an important developmental process. We examine the evolution of coloniality in ascidians, contrasting the life histories of solitary and colonial forms with a focus on the cellular and developmental basis of the evolution of budding. Tunicates are an excellent group to study colonial transitions, as all solitary larvae develop with determinant and invariant cleavage patterns, but colonial species show robust developmental flexibility during larval development. We propose that acquiring new stem cell lineages in the larvae may be a preadaptation necessary for the evolution of budding. Brooding in colonial ascidians allows increased egg size, which in turn allows greater flexibility in the specification of cells and cell numbers in late embryonic and pre-metamorphic larval stages. We review hypotheses for changes in stem cell lineages in colonial species, describe what the current data suggest about the evolution of budding, and discuss where we believe further studies will be most fruitful.

  3. Development and modulation of intrinsic membrane properties control the temporal precision of auditory brain stem neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Delwen L; Gleiss, Sarah A; Berger, Christina; Kümpfbeck, Franziska S; Ammer, Julian J; Felmy, Felix

    2015-01-15

    Passive and active membrane properties determine the voltage responses of neurons. Within the auditory brain stem, refinements in these intrinsic properties during late postnatal development usually generate short integration times and precise action-potential generation. This developmentally acquired temporal precision is crucial for auditory signal processing. How the interactions of these intrinsic properties develop in concert to enable auditory neurons to transfer information with high temporal precision has not yet been elucidated in detail. Here, we show how the developmental interaction of intrinsic membrane parameters generates high firing precision. We performed in vitro recordings from neurons of postnatal days 9-28 in the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of Mongolian gerbils, an auditory brain stem structure that converts excitatory to inhibitory information with high temporal precision. During this developmental period, the input resistance and capacitance decrease, and action potentials acquire faster kinetics and enhanced precision. Depending on the stimulation time course, the input resistance and capacitance contribute differentially to action-potential thresholds. The decrease in input resistance, however, is sufficient to explain the enhanced action-potential precision. Alterations in passive membrane properties also interact with a developmental change in potassium currents to generate the emergence of the mature firing pattern, characteristic of coincidence-detector neurons. Cholinergic receptor-mediated depolarizations further modulate this intrinsic excitability profile by eliciting changes in the threshold and firing pattern, irrespective of the developmental stage. Thus our findings reveal how intrinsic membrane properties interact developmentally to promote temporally precise information processing.

  4. The lysine acetyltransferase activator Brpf1 governs dentate gyrus development through neural stem cells and progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linya You

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation has recently emerged as an important post-translational modification in diverse organisms, but relatively little is known about its roles in mammalian development and stem cells. Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1 is a multidomain histone binder and a master activator of three lysine acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF and HBO1, which are also known as KAT6A, KAT6B and KAT7, respectively. While the MOZ and MORF genes are rearranged in leukemia, the MORF gene is also mutated in prostate and other cancers and in four genetic disorders with intellectual disability. Here we show that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes hypoplasia in the dentate gyrus, including underdevelopment of the suprapyramidal blade and complete loss of the infrapyramidal blade. We trace the developmental origin to compromised Sox2+ neural stem cells and Tbr2+ intermediate neuronal progenitors. We further demonstrate that Brpf1 loss deregulates neuronal migration, cell cycle progression and transcriptional control, thereby causing abnormal morphogenesis of the hippocampus. These results link histone binding and acetylation control to hippocampus development and identify an important epigenetic regulator for patterning the dentate gyrus, a brain structure critical for learning, memory and adult neurogenesis.

  5. Study choice and career development in STEM fields: an overview and integration of the research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijl, van Cathy; Walma van der Molen, Juliette H.

    2015-01-01

    Although science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) study paths and STEM work fields may be relatively difficult and therefore not appropriate for everyone, too many children prematurely exclude STEM-related study and work options, based on negative images of the field or negative abili

  6. How to Support Learners in Developing Usable and Lasting Knowledge of STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcik, Joseph; Delen, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    All students need to experience the joy of discovery and innovation. In this study we discussed how STEM education that focuses on design can provide students with these opportunities. Learning environments that focus on STEM questions and engage students in design have the potential help students learn core ideas related to STEM as well as engage…

  7. Development of an Instrument to Assess Attitudes toward Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzey, S. Selcen; Harwell, Michael; Moore, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for more students to be interested in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers to advance U.S. competitiveness and economic growth. A consensus exists that improving STEM education is necessary for motivating more students to pursue STEM careers. In this study, a survey to measure student (grades 4-6)…

  8. Neural crest stem cell population in craniomaxillofacial development and tissue repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M La Noce

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells, delaminating from the neural tube during migration, undergo an epithelial-mesenchymal transition and differentiate into several cell types strongly reinforcing the mesoderm of the craniofacial body area – giving rise to bone, cartilage and other tissues and cells of this human body area. Recent studies on craniomaxillofacial neural crest-derived cells have provided evidence for the tremendous plasticity of these cells. Actually, neural crest cells can respond and adapt to the environment in which they migrate and the cranial mesoderm plays an important role toward patterning the identity of the migrating neural crest cells. In our experience, neural crest-derived stem cells, such as dental pulp stem cells, can actively proliferate, repair bone and give rise to other tissues and cytotypes, including blood vessels, smooth muscle, adipocytes and melanocytes, highlighting that their use in tissue engineering is successful. In this review, we provide an overview of the main pathways involved in neural crest formation, delamination, migration and differentiation; and, in particular, we concentrate our attention on the translatability of the latest scientific progress. Here we try to suggest new ideas and strategies that are needed to fully develop the clinical use of these cells. This effort should involve both researchers/clinicians and improvements in good manufacturing practice procedures. It is important to address studies towards clinical application or take into consideration that studies must have an effective therapeutic prospect for humans. New approaches and ideas must be concentrated also toward stem cell recruitment and activation within the human body, overcoming the classical grafting.

  9. The Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein FBL17 is essential for progression through the second mitosis during pollen development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Gusti

    Full Text Available In fungi and metazoans, the SCF-type Ubiquitin protein ligases (E3s play a critical role in cell cycle regulation by degrading negative regulators, such as cell cycle-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs at the G1-to-S-phase checkpoint. Here we report that FBL17, an Arabidopsis thaliana F-box protein, is involved in cell cycle regulation during male gametogenesis. FBL17 expression is strongly enhanced in plants co-expressing E2Fa and DPa, transcription factors that promote S-phase entry. FBL17 loss-of-function mutants fail to undergo pollen mitosis II, which generates the two sperm cells in mature A. thaliana pollen. Nonetheless, the single sperm cell-like cell in fbl17 mutants is functional but will exclusively fertilize the egg cell of the female gametophyte, giving rise to an embryo that will later abort, most likely due to the lack of functional endosperm. Seed abortion can, however, be overcome by mutations in FIE, a component of the Polycomb group complex, overall resembling loss-of-function mutations in the A. thaliana cyclin-dependent kinase CDKA;1. Finally we identified ASK11, as an SKP1-like partner protein of FBL17 and discuss a possible mechanism how SCF(FBL17 may regulate cell division during male gametogenesis.

  10. Genetic analyses of the interaction between abscisic acid and gibberellins in the control of leaf development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ming-Hau; Shen, Hwei-Ling; Cheng, Wan-Hsing

    2015-07-01

    Although abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs) play pivotal roles in many physiological processes in plants, their interaction in the control of leaf growth remains elusive. In this study, genetic analyses of ABA and GA interplay in leaf growth were performed in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results indicate that for the ABA and GA interaction, leaf growth of both the aba2/ga20ox1 and aba2/GA20ox1 plants, which were derived from the crosses of aba2×ga20ox1 and aba2×GA20ox1 overexpressor, respectively, exhibits partially additive effects but is similar to the aba2 mutant. Consistently, the transcriptome analysis suggests that a substantial proportion (45-65%) of the gene expression profile of aba2/ga20ox1 and aba2/GA20ox1 plants overlap and share a pattern similar to the aba2 mutant. Thus, these data suggest that ABA deficiency dominates leaf growth regardless of GA levels. Moreover, the gene ontology (GO) analysis indicates gene enrichment in the categories of hormone response, developmental and metabolic processes, and cell wall organization in these three genotypes. Leaf developmental genes are also involved in the ABA-GA interaction. Collectively, these data support that the genetic relationship of ABA and GA interaction involves multiple coordinated pathways rather than a simple linear pathway for the regulation of leaf growth.

  11. Investigating the interaction between hematopoietic stem cells and their niche during embryonic development: optimizing the isolation of fetal and newborn stem cells from liver, spleen, and bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huimin; Williams, Brenda; Nilsson, Susan K

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in a particular microenvironment termed a "niche." Within the niche, a number of critical molecules and supportive cell types have been identified to play key roles in modulating adult HSC quiescence, proliferation, differentiation, and reconstitution. However, unlike in the adult bone marrow (BM), the components of stem cell niches, as well as their interactions with fetal HSC during different stages of embryonic development, are poorly understood. During embryogenesis, hematopoietic development migrates through multiple organs, each with different cellular and molecular components and hence each with a potentially unique HSC niche. As a consequence, isolating fetal HSC from each organ at the time of hematopoietic colonization is fundamental for assessing and understanding both HSC function and their interactions with specific microenvironments. Herein, we describe methodologies for harvesting cells as well as the purification of stem and progenitors from fetal and newborn liver, spleen, and BM at various developmental stages following the expansion of hematopoiesis in the fetal liver at E14.5.

  12. Development of iPS (induced pluripotent stem cells) using natural product from extract of fish oocyte to provide stem cell for regenerative therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilany, Sofy; Firdausiyah, Qonitha S.; Naroeni, Aroem

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we developed a method to induce pluripotency of adult cells (fibroblast) into stem cells using a natural product, extract of fish oocyte, by comparing the extract concentration, 1 mg/ml and 2 mg/ml. The analyses were done by measuring the Nanog gene expression in cells using qPCR and detecting fibroblast marker anti H2-KK. The results revealed existence of a colony of stem cells in the cell that was induced with 2mg/ml concentration of oocytes. Nanoggene expression was analyzed by qPCR and the results showed expression of Nanog gene compared to the control. Analysis of result of fibroblast using Tali Cytometer and anti H2KK antibody showed loss of expression of Anti H2KK meaning there was transformation from fibroblast type cell to pluripotent cell type.

  13. Activin and TGF-β effects on brain development and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Griselda; Velasco, Iván

    2012-11-01

    Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) family members are ubiquitously expressed, participating in the regulation of many processes in different cell types both in embryonic and adult stages. Several members of this family, including Activins, TGF-β1-3 and Nodal, have been implicated in the development and maintenance of various organs, in which stem cells play important roles. Although TGF-β was initially considered an injury-related cytokine, it became clear that not only TGF-β, but other members of this family, play critical roles in morphogenesis and cell lineage specification. During brain development, Activin and TGF-βs as well as their cognate receptors, are expressed in different patterns. The roles of Activin and TGF-β during CNS development are sometimes contradictory, because these proteins present different actions depending on the cell type and the context. The aim of this review is to summarize current information on the actions of TGF-β members during developing brain, and also on Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells (NSPC). We focus on the TGF-β subgroup, specifically on the effects of TGF-β1 and Activin A. In the first section we describe the main characteristics of the ligands, its receptors as well as the proteins and mechanisms involved in signaling. Next, we discuss the main advances concerning TGF-β1 and Activin actions during brain development and their roles in NSPC fate decision and neuroprotection both in vitro and in vivo. The emerging picture from these studies suggests that these growth factors can be used to manipulate neurogenesis and might help to achieve restoration after brain deterioration.

  14. Gene Networks Involved in Hormonal Control of Root Development in Arabidopsis thaliana: A Framework for Studying Its Disturbance by Metal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie De Smet

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant survival under abiotic stress conditions requires morphological and physiological adaptations. Adverse soil conditions directly affect root development, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be discovered. Plant hormones regulate normal root growth and mediate root morphological responses to abiotic stress. Hormone synthesis, signal transduction, perception and cross-talk create a complex network in which metal stress can interfere, resulting in root growth alterations. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, for which gene networks in root development have been intensively studied, and supply essential terminology of anatomy and growth of roots. Knowledge of gene networks, mechanisms and interactions related to the role of plant hormones is reviewed. Most knowledge has been generated for auxin, the best-studied hormone with a pronounced primary role in root development. Furthermore, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, strigolactones, brassinosteroids and salicylic acid are discussed. Interactions between hormones that are of potential importance for root growth are described. This creates a framework that can be used for investigating the impact of abiotic stress factors on molecular mechanisms related to plant hormones, with the limited knowledge of the effects of the metals cadmium, copper and zinc on plant hormones and root development included as case example.

  15. Gene Networks Involved in Hormonal Control of Root Development in Arabidopsis thaliana: A Framework for Studying Its Disturbance by Metal Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Stefanie; Cuypers, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Remans, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Plant survival under abiotic stress conditions requires morphological and physiological adaptations. Adverse soil conditions directly affect root development, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely to be discovered. Plant hormones regulate normal root growth and mediate root morphological responses to abiotic stress. Hormone synthesis, signal transduction, perception and cross-talk create a complex network in which metal stress can interfere, resulting in root growth alterations. We focus on Arabidopsis thaliana, for which gene networks in root development have been intensively studied, and supply essential terminology of anatomy and growth of roots. Knowledge of gene networks, mechanisms and interactions related to the role of plant hormones is reviewed. Most knowledge has been generated for auxin, the best-studied hormone with a pronounced primary role in root development. Furthermore, cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, strigolactones, brassinosteroids and salicylic acid are discussed. Interactions between hormones that are of potential importance for root growth are described. This creates a framework that can be used for investigating the impact of abiotic stress factors on molecular mechanisms related to plant hormones, with the limited knowledge of the effects of the metals cadmium, copper and zinc on plant hormones and root development included as case example.

  16. Exploring Your Universe at UCLA: Steps to Developing and Sustaining a Large STEM Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curren, I. S.; Vican, L.; Sitarski, B.; Jewitt, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    Public STEM events are an excellent method to implement informal education and for scientists and educators to interact with their community. The benefits of such events are twofold. First and foremost, science enthusiasts and students both young and old, in particular, are exposed to STEM in a way that is accessible, fun, and not as stringent as may be presented in classrooms where testing is an underlying goal. Second, scientists and educators are given the opportunity to engage with the public and share their science to an audience who may not have a scientific background, thereby encouraging scientists to develop good communication practices and skills. In 2009 graduate student members of Astronomy Live!, an outreach organization in the UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, started a free and public event on the campus that featured a dozen hands-on outreach activities. The event, though small at the time, was a success and it was decided to make it an annual occurrence. Thus, Exploring Your Universe (EYU) was born. Primarily through word of mouth, the event has grown every year, both in number of attendees and number of volunteers. In 2009, approximately 1000 people attended and 20 students volunteered over the course of an eight-hour day. In 2014, participation was at an all-time high with close to 6000 attendees and over 400 volunteers from all departments in the Division of Physical Sciences (plus many non-divisional departments and institutes, as well as non-UCLA organizations). The event, which is the largest STEM event at UCLA and one of the largest in Los Angeles, now features near 100 hands-on activities that span many STEM fields. EYU has been featured by the UCLA news outlets, Daily Bruin and UCLA Today, and is often lauded as their favorite event of the year by attendees and volunteers alike. The event is entirely student-run, though volunteers include faculty, staff, researchers and students alike. As the event has grown, new systems for

  17. From milk to malignancy: the role of mammary stem cells in development, pregnancy and breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, Benjamin; Kang, Yibin

    2011-02-01

    Adult stem cells of the mammary gland (MaSCs) are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for the generation of the gland during puberty and its expansion during pregnancy. In recent years significant advances have been made in understanding how these cells are regulated during these developmentally important processes both in humans and in mice. Understanding how MaSCs are regulated is becoming a particularly important area of research, given that they may be particularly susceptible targets for transformation in breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, how they are regulated and the evidence for their serving as the origins of breast cancer. In particular, we focus on how changes in MaSC populations may explain both the increased risk of developing aggressive ER/PR(-) breast cancer shortly after pregnancy and the long-term decreased risk of developing ER/PR(+) tumors.

  18. From milk to malignancy: the role of mammary stem cells in development, pregnancy and breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benjamin Tiede; Yibin Kang

    2011-01-01

    Adult stem cells of the mammary gland (MaSCs) are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for the generation of the gland during puberty and its expansion during pregnancy, in recent years significant advances have been made in understanding how these cells are regulated during these developmentally important processes both in humans and in mice. Understanding how MaSCs are regulated is becoming a particularly important area of research, given that they may be particularly susceptible targets for transformation in breast cancer. Here, we summarize the identification of MaSCs, how they are regulated and the evidence for their serving as the origins of breast cancer, in particular, we focus on how changes in MaSC populations may explain both the increased risk of developing aggressive ERJPR(-) breast cancer shortly after pregnancy and the long-term decreased risk of developing ER/ PR(+) tumors.

  19. A quantitative framework to evaluate modeling of cortical development by neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Jason L.; de la Torre-Ubieta, Luis; Tian, Yuan; Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Hernandez, Israel A.; Marchetto, Maria C.; Baker, Dylan K.; Lu, Daning; Hinman, Cassidy R.; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Wexler, Eric M.; Muotri, Alysson R.; Gage, Fred H.; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neural stem cells have been adopted to model a wide range of neuropsychiatric conditions in vitro. However, how well such models correspond to in vivo brain has not been evaluated in an unbiased, comprehensive manner. We used transcriptomic analyses to compare in vitro systems to developing human fetal brain and observed strong conservation of in vivo gene expression and network architecture in differentiating primary human neural progenitor cells (phNPCs). Conserved modules are enriched in genes associated with ASD, supporting the utility of phNPCs for studying neuropsychiatric disease. We also developed and validated a machine learning approach called CoNTExT that identifies the developmental maturity and regional identity of in vitro models. We observed strong differences between in vitro models, including hiPSC-derived neural progenitors from multiple laboratories. This work provides a systems biology framework for evaluating in vitro systems and supports their value in studying the molecular mechanisms of human neurodevelopmental disease. PMID:24991955

  20. The origin and development of the immune system with a view to stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassova-Kristeva, Marlene

    2003-04-01

    Careful study of the phylogeny and ontogeny of the three components of the immune system reveals that the macrophage, lymphatic, and hematopoietic systems originate independently of each other. Chronologically, the most ancient is the macrophage system, which arises in the coelomic cavity as mesenchymal ameboid cells having the properties to recognize self from non-self and to ingest foreign particles. The lymphatic system later develops from the endoderm of pharyngeal pouches, where the thymic anlage differentiates. The lymphocytes that originate here seed all lymphatic organs and retain the ability to divide and thereby form multiple colonies (lymphatic nodules) in the respiratory and digestive tract; further diversification of lymphocytes follows after confrontation with antigens. The last component of the immune system to appear is the hematopoietic system, which originates from the splanchnic mesoderm of the yolk sac as hematogenic tissue, containing hemangioblasts. The hematogenic tissue remains attached to the outer wall of the vitelline vessels, which provides an efficient mechanism for introducing the hematogenic tissue into the embryo. In an appropriate microenvironment, the hemangioblasts give rise to sinusoidal endothelium and to hemocytoblasts - the bone marrow stem cells for erythrocytes, myeloid cells, and megakaryocytes. The facts and opinions presented in this article are not in agreement with the currently accepted dogma that a common "hematolymphatic stem cell" localized in the marrow generates all of the cellular components of blood and the immune system.

  1. Human fetal liver stromal cells expressing erythropoietin promote hematopoietic development from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Ji, Lei; Yue, Wen; Shi, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Ruo-Yong; Li, Yan-Hua; Xie, Xiao-Yan; Xi, Jia-Fei; He, Li-Juan; Nan, Xue; Pei, Xue-Tao

    2012-02-01

    Blood cells transfusion and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation are important methods for cell therapy. They are widely used in the treatment of incurable hematological disorder, infectious diseases, genetic diseases, and immunologic deficiency. However, their availability is limited by quantity, capacity of proliferation and the risk of blood transfusion complications. Recently, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been shown to be an alternative resource for the generation of hematopoietic cells. In the current study, we describe a novel method for the efficient production of hematopoietic cells from hESCs. The stable human fetal liver stromal cell lines (hFLSCs) expressing erythropoietin (EPO) were established using the lentiviral system. We observed that the supernatant from the EPO transfected hFLSCs could induce the hESCs differentiation into hematopoietic cells, especially erythroid cells. They not only expressed fetal and embryonic globins but also expressed the adult-globin chain on further maturation. In addition, these hESCs-derived erythroid cells possess oxygen-transporting capacity, which indicated hESCs could generate terminally mature progenies. This should be useful for ultimately developing an animal-free culture system to generate large numbers of erythroid cells from hESCs and provide an experimental model to study early human erythropoiesis.

  2. Reticular dysgenesis–associated AK2 protects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development from oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissone, Alberto; Weinacht, Katja Gabriele; la Marca, Giancarlo; Bishop, Kevin; Giocaliere, Elisa; Jagadeesh, Jayashree; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Dobbs, Kerry; Al-Herz, Waleed; Jones, Marypat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Kirby, Martha; Wincovitch, Stephen; Simon, Karen Lyn; Itan, Yuval; DeVine, Alex; Schlaeger, Thorsten; Schambach, Axel; Sood, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Adenylate kinases (AKs) are phosphotransferases that regulate the cellular adenine nucleotide composition and play a critical role in the energy homeostasis of all tissues. The AK2 isoenzyme is expressed in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is mutated in reticular dysgenesis (RD), a rare form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in humans. RD is characterized by a maturation arrest in the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, leading to early onset, recurrent, and overwhelming infections. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of RD, we studied the effects of AK2 deficiency using the zebrafish model and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from fibroblasts of an RD patient. In zebrafish, Ak2 deficiency affected hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. AK2-deficient iPSCs recapitulated the characteristic myeloid maturation arrest at the promyelocyte stage and demonstrated an increased AMP/ADP ratio, indicative of an energy-depleted adenine nucleotide profile. Antioxidant treatment rescued the hematopoietic phenotypes in vivo in ak2 mutant zebrafish and restored differentiation of AK2-deficient iPSCs into mature granulocytes. Our results link hematopoietic cell fate in AK2 deficiency to cellular energy depletion and increased oxidative stress. This points to the potential use of antioxidants as a supportive therapeutic modality for patients with RD. PMID:26150473

  3. Development of stem borer resistant transgenic parental lines involved in the production of hybrid rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, S; Nagadhara, D; Pasalu, I C; Kumari, A Padma; Sarma, N P; Reddy, V D; Rao, K V

    2004-07-15

    Stem borer resistant transgenic parental lines, involved in hybrid rice, were produced by Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer method. Two pSB111 super-binary vectors containing modified cry1Ab/cry1Ac genes driven by maize ubiquitin promoter, and herbicide resistance gene bar driven by cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were, used in this study. Embryogenic calli after co-cultivation with Agrobacterium were selected on the medium containing phosphinothricin. Southern blot analyses of primary transformants revealed the stable integration of bar, cry1Ab and cry1Ac coding sequences into the genomes of three parental lines with a predominant single copy integration and without any rearrangement of T-DNA. T1 progeny plants disclosed a monogenic pattern (3:1) of transgene segregation as confirmed by molecular analyses. Furthermore, the co-segregation of bar and cry genes in T1 progenies suggested that the transgenes are integrated at a single site in the rice genome. In different primary transformants with alien inbuilt resistance, the levels of cry proteins varied between 0.03 and 0.13% of total soluble proteins. These transgenic lines expressing insecticidal proteins afforded substantial resistance against stem borers. This is the first report of its kind dealing with the introduction of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cry genes into the elite parental lines involved in the development of hybrid rice.

  4. Arabidopsis monothiol glutaredoxin, AtGRXS17, is critical for temperature-dependent postembryonic growth and development via modulating auxin response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global environmental temperature changes threaten innumerable plant species. Although various signaling networks regulate plant responses to temperature fluctuations, the mechanisms unifying these diverse processes are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that an Arabidopsis monothiol glutaredoxin,...

  5. Comparative Study on Effects of Low Energy N+ Implantation and γ-ray Radiation on Heredity and Development of Arabidopsis Thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Genfa; Li Ke; Shi Xiaoming; Nie Yanli; Zhang Jun; Zhou Hongyu; Lu Ting

    2005-01-01

    In order to compare the contemporary and genetic variation effect on Arabidopsis thaliana treated with N+ implantation and γ-ray radiation, the authors did some statistical comparison on the germinating rate and the development period, and analyzed the content of soluble proteins, the activity of some enzymes, isoenzymes profile, and along with the variation in genome DNA of two generations by RAPD. With N+ implantation there was an analogical "saddle model" relationship between doses and the plant development, soluble proteins, the activity of some enzymes and isoenzymes profile. A certain connection might exist between the similar dose-effect relations among enzymes activity, isoenzymes profile and content of soluble proteins.Maybe, there also exists a certain connection between the mutants of development period and that of DNA variations, between the hereditability of the effect of N+ implantation on the isoenzymes,the activities of enzymes and the hereditability of DNA variations. So it is presumed that the implanted ions, maybe, have participated in metabolism process of organism including that of genome DNA, to consequently affect vital process, such as the changes of gene structure, gene expression manner and gene repair mechanism, and finally result in mutation on phenotype and molecular level. Furthermore, the results definitely showed that mutagenic mechanism induced by N+ implantation is very complicated and is much different from that induced by traditional γ-ray radiation.

  6. Spatiotemporal Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by NADPH Oxidase Is Critical for Tapetal Programmed Cell Death and Pollen Development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-Tao; Wan, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Sha; Zhang, Yan

    2014-05-01

    Male sterility in angiosperms has wide applications in agriculture, particularly in hybrid crop breeding and gene flow control. Microspores develop adjacent to the tapetum, a layer of cells that provides nutrients for pollen development and materials for pollen wall formation. Proper pollen development requires programmed cell death (PCD) of the tapetum, which requires transcriptional cascades and proteolytic enzymes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) also affect tapetal PCD, and failures in ROS scavenging cause male sterility. However, many aspects of tapetal PCD remain unclear, including what sources generate ROS, whether ROS production has a temporal pattern, and how the ROS-producing system interacts with the tapetal transcriptional network. We report here that stage-specific expression of NADPH oxidases in the Arabidopsis thaliana tapetum contributes to a temporal peak of ROS production. Genetic interference with the temporal ROS pattern, by manipulating RESPIRATORY-BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOG (RBOH) genes, affected the timing of tapetal PCD and resulted in aborted male gametophytes. We further show that the tapetal transcriptional network regulates RBOH expression, indicating that the temporal pattern of ROS production intimately connects to other signaling pathways regulated by the tapetal transcriptional network to ensure the proper timing of tapetal PCD.

  7. Transcriptional and signaling regulation in neural crest stem cell-derived melanocyte development:do all roads lead to Mitf?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Hou; William J Pavan

    2008-01-01

    Human neurocristopathies include a number of syndromes,tumors,and dysmorphologies of neural crest (NC) stem cell derivatives.In recent years,many white spotting genes have been associated with hypopigmentary disorders and deafness in neurocristopathies resulting from NC stem cell-derived melanocyte deficiency during development.These include PAX3,SOX10,MITF,SNAI2,EDNRB,EDN3,KIT,and KITL.Recent studies have revealed surprising new insights into a central role of MITF in the complex network of interacting genes in melanocyte development.In this perspective,we provide an overview of some of the current findings and explore complex functional roles of these genes during NC stem cell-derived melanocyte development.

  8. High levels of jasmonic acid antagonize the biosynthesis of gibberellins and inhibit the growth of Nicotiana attenuata stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Maria; Hettenhausen, Christian; Lange, Theo; Wünsche, Hendrik; Fang, Jingjing; Baldwin, Ian T; Wu, Jianqiang

    2013-02-01

    Hormones play pivotal roles in regulating plant development, growth, and stress responses, and cross-talk among different hormones fine-tunes various aspects of plant physiology. Jasmonic acid (JA) is important for plant defense against herbivores and necrotic fungi and also regulates flower development; in addition, Arabidopsis mutants over-producing JA usually have stunted stems and wound-induced jasmonates suppress Arabidopsis growth, suggesting that JA is also involved in stem elongation. Gibberellins (GAs) promote stem and leaf growth and modulate seed germination, flowering time, and the development of flowers, fruits, and seeds. However, little is known about the interaction between the JA and GA pathways. Two calcium-dependent protein kinases, CDPK4 and CDPK5, are important suppressors of JA accumulation in a wild tobacco species, Nicotiana attenuata. The stems of N. attenuata silenced in CDPK4 and CDPK5 (irCDPK4/5 plants) had dramatically increased levels of JA and exhibited stunted elongation and had very high contents of secondary metabolites. Genetic analysis indicated that the high JA levels in irCDPK4/5 stems accounted for the suppressed stem elongation and the accumulation of secondary metabolites. Supplementation of GA(3) to irCDPK4/5 plants largely restored normal stem growth to wild-type levels. Measures of GA levels indicated that over-accumulation of JA in irCDPK4/5 stems inhibited the biosynthesis of GAs. Finally, we show that JA antagonizes GA biosynthesis by strongly inhibiting the transcript accumulation of GA20ox and possibly GA13ox, the key genes in GA production, demonstrating that high JA levels antagonize GA biosynthesis in stems.

  9. MicroRNA network changes in the brain stem underlie the development of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCicco, Danielle; Zhu, Haisun; Brureau, Anthony; Schwaber, James S; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension is a major chronic disease whose molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We compared neuroanatomical patterns of microRNAs in the brain stem of the spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR) to the Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY, control). We quantified 419 well-annotated microRNAs in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), from SHR and WKY rats, during three main stages of hypertension development. Changes in microRNA expression were stage- and region-dependent, with a majority of SHR vs. WKY differential expression occurring at the hypertension onset stage in NTS versus at the prehypertension stage in RVLM. Our analysis identified 24 microRNAs showing time-dependent differential expression in SHR compared with WKY in at least one brain region. We predicted potential gene regulatory targets corresponding to catecholaminergic processes, neuroinflammation, and neuromodulation using the miRWALK and RNA22 databases, and we tested those bioinformatics predictions using high-throughput quantitative PCR to evaluate correlations of differential expression between the microRNAs and their predicted gene targets. We found a novel regulatory network motif consisting of microRNAs likely downregulating a negative regulator of prohypertensive processes such as angiotensin II signaling and leukotriene-based inflammation. Our results provide new evidence on the dynamics of microRNA expression in the development of hypertension and predictions of microRNA-mediated regulatory networks playing a region-dependent role in potentially altering brain-stem cardiovascular control circuit function leading to the development of hypertension.

  10. Involvement of plant stem cells or stem cell-like cells in dedifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangwei eJiang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Dedifferentiation is the transformation of cells from a given differentiated state to a less differentiated or stem cell-like state. Stem cell-related genes play important roles in dedifferentiation, which exhibits similar histone modification and DNA methylation features to stem cell maintenance. Hence, stem cell-related factors possibly synergistically function to provide a specific niche beneficial to dedifferentiation. During callus formation in Arabidopsis petioles, cells adjacent to procambium cells (stem cell-like cells are dedifferentiated and survive more easily than other cell types. This finding indicates that stem cells or stem cell-like cells may influence the dedifferentiating niche. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of stem cell maintenance and dedifferentiation regulation. We also summarize current knowledge of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the balance between differentiation and dedifferentiation. Furthermore, we discuss the correlation of stem cells or stem cell-like cells with dedifferentiation.

  11. "It's worth our time": a model of culturally and linguistically supportive professional development for K-12 STEM educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charity Hudley, Anne H.; Mallinson, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Professional development on issues of language and culture is often separate from professional development on issues related to STEM education, resulting in linguistic and cultural gaps in K-12 STEM pedagogy and practice. To address this issue, we have designed a model of professional development in which we work with educators to build cultural and linguistic competence and to disseminate information about how educators view the relevance of language, communication, and culture to STEM teaching and learning. We describe the design and facilitation of our model of culturally and linguistically responsive professional development, grounded in theories of multicultural education and culturally supportive teaching, through professional development workshops to 60 K-12 STEM educators from schools in Maryland and Virginia that serve African American students. Participants noted that culturally and linguistically responsive approaches had yet to permeate their K-12 STEM settings, which they identified as a critical challenge to effectively teaching and engaging African-American students. Based on pre-surveys, workshops were tailored to participants' stated needs for information on literacy (e.g., disciplinary literacies and discipline-specific jargon), cultural conflict and mismatch (e.g., student-teacher miscommunication), and linguistic bias in student assessment (e.g., test design). Educators shared feedback via post-workshop surveys, and a subset of 28 participants completed in-depth interviews and a focus group. Results indicate the need for further implementation of professional development such as ours that address linguistic and cultural issues, tailored for K-12 STEM educators. Although participants in this study enumerated several challenges to meeting this need, they also identified opportunities for collaborative solutions that draw upon teacher expertise and are integrated with curricula across content areas.

  12. Molecular Diversity of Midbrain Development in Mouse, Human, and Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Manno, Gioele; Gyllborg, Daniel; Codeluppi, Simone; Nishimura, Kaneyasu; Salto, Carmen; Zeisel, Amit; Borm, Lars E; Stott, Simon R W; Toledo, Enrique M; Villaescusa, J Carlos; Lönnerberg, Peter; Ryge, Jesper; Barker, Roger A; Arenas, Ernest; Linnarsson, Sten

    2016-10-06

    Understanding human embryonic ventral midbrain is of major interest for Parkinson's disease. However, the cell types, their gene expression dynamics, and their relationship to commonly used rodent models remain to be defined. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing to examine ventral midbrain development in human and mouse. We found 25 molecularly defined human cell types, including five subtypes of radial glia-like cells and four progenitors. In the mouse, two mature fetal dopaminergic neuron subtypes diversified into five adult classes during postnatal development. Cell types and gene expression were generally conserved across species, but with clear differences in cell proliferation, developmental timing, and dopaminergic neuron development. Additionally, we developed a method to quantitatively assess the fidelity of dopaminergic neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells, at a single-cell level. Thus, our study provides insight into the molecular programs controlling human midbrain development and provides a foundation for the development of cell replacement therapies.

  13. Teacher Characteristics and School-Based Professional Development in Inclusive STEM-focused High Schools: A Cross-case Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Nancy Kay

    Within successful Inclusive Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)-focused High Schools (ISHSs), it is not only the students who are learning. Teachers, with diverse backgrounds, training, and experience, share and develop their knowledge through rich, embedded professional development to continuously shape their craft, improve their teaching, and support student success. This study of four exemplars of ISHSs (identified by experts in STEM education as highly successful in preparing students underrepresented in STEM for STEM majors in college and future STEM careers) provides a rich description of the relationships among the characteristics of STEM teachers, their professional development, and the school cultures that allow teachers to develop professionally and serve the needs of students. By providing a framework for the development of teaching staffs in ISHSs and contributing to the better understanding of STEM teaching in any school, this study offers valuable insight, implications, and information for states and school districts as they begin planning improvements to STEM education programs. A thorough examination of an existing data set that included site visits to four ISHSs along with pre- and post-visit data, provided the resource for this multiple case study with cross-case analysis of the teachers and their teacher professional development experiences. Administrators in these ISHSs had the autonomy to hire teachers with strong content backgrounds, philosophical alignment with the school missions, and a willingness to work collaboratively toward achieving the schools' goals. Ongoing teacher professional development began before school started and continued throughout the school day and year through intense and sustained, formal and informal, active learning experiences. Flexible professional development systems varied, but aligned with targeted school reforms and teacher and student needs. Importantly, collaborative teacher learning

  14. Post-Translational Regulation of AtFER2 Ferritin in Response to Intracellular Iron Trafficking during Fruit Development in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karl Ravet; Brigitte Touraine; Sun A. Kim; Francoise Cellier; Sébastien Thomine; Mary Lou Guerinot; Jean-Francois Briat; Frédéric Gaymard

    2009-01-01

    Ferritins are major players in plant iron homeostasis. Surprisingly, their overexpression in transgenic plants led only to a moderate increase in seed iron content, suggesting the existence of control checkpoints for iron loading and storage in seeds. This work reports the identification of two of these checkpoints. First, measurement of seed metal con-tent during fruit development in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals a similar dynamic of loading for Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn. The step controlling metal loading into the seed occurs by the regulation of transport from the hull to the seed. Second, metal loading and ferritin abundance were monitored in different genetic backgrounds affected in vacuolar iron transport (AtVIT1, AtNRAMP3, AtNRAMP4) or plastid iron storage (AtFER1 to 4). This approach revealed (1) a post-translational reg-ulation of ferritin accumulation in seeds, and (2) that ferritin stability depends on the balance of iron allocation between vacuoles and plastids. Thus, the success of ferritin overexpression strategies for iron biofortification, a promising approach to reduce iron-deficiency anemia in developing countries, would strongly benefit from the identification and engineering of mechanisms enabling the translocation of high amounts of iron into seed plastids.

  15. Characterization of temperature-sensitive mutants reveals a role for receptor-like kinase SCRAMBLED/STRUBBELIG in coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation during Arabidopsis leaf development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Zhong, Si-Hui; Cui, Xiao-Feng; Li, Jianming; He, Zu-Hua

    2012-12-01

    The balance between cell proliferation and cell differentiation is essential for leaf patterning. However, identification of the factors coordinating leaf patterning and cell growth behavior is challenging. Here, we characterized a temperature-sensitive Arabidopsis mutant with leaf blade and venation defects. We mapped the mutation to the sub-2 allele of the SCRAMBLED/STRUBBELIG (SCM/SUB) receptor-like kinase gene whose functions in leaf development have not been demonstrated. The sub-2 mutant displayed impaired blade development, asymmetric leaf shape and altered venation patterning under high ambient temperature (30°C), but these defects were less pronounced at normal growth temperature (22°C). Loss of SCM/SUB function results in reduced cell proliferation and abnormal cell expansion, as well as altered auxin patterning. SCM/SUB is initially expressed throughout leaf primordia and becomes restricted to the vascular cells, coinciding with its roles in early leaf patterning and venation formation. Furthermore, constitutive expression of the SCM/SUB gene also restricts organ growth by inhibiting the transition from cell proliferation to expansion. We propose the existence of a SCM/SUB-mediated developmental stage-specific signal for leaf patterning, and highlight the importance of the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation for leaf morphogenesis.

  16. Conservation and Diversification of the SHR-SCR-SCL23 Regulatory Network in the Development of the Functional Endodermis in Arabidopsis Shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Eun Kyung; Dhar, Souvik; Lee, Mi-Hyun; Song, Jae Hyo; Lee, Shin Ae; Kim, Gyuree; Jang, Sejeong; Choi, Ji Won; Choe, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Jeong Hoe; Lee, Myeong Min; Lim, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Development of the functional endodermis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots is controlled, in part, by GRAS transcription factors, namely SHORT-ROOT (SHR), SCARECROW (SCR), and SCARECROW-LIKE 23 (SCL23). Recently, it has been shown that the SHR-SCR-SCL23 regulatory module is also essential for specification of the endodermis (known as the bundle sheath) in leaves. Nevertheless, compared with what is known about the role of the SHR-SCR-SCL23 regulatory network in roots, the molecular interactions of SHR, SCR, and SCL23 are much less understood in shoots. Here, we show that SHR forms protein complexes with SCL23 to regulate transcription of SCL23 in shoots, similar to the regulation mode of SCR expression. Our results indicate that SHR acts as master regulator to directly activate the expression of SCR and SCL23. In the SHR-SCR-SCL23 network, we found a previously uncharacterized negative feedback loop whereby SCL23 modulates SHR levels. Through molecular, genetic, physiological, and morphological analyses, we also reveal that the SHR-SCR-SCL23 module plays a key role in the formation of the endodermis (known as the starch sheath) in hypocotyls. Taken together, our results provide new insights into the regulatory role of the SHR-SCR-SCL23 network in the endodermis development in both roots and shoots.

  17. Chloroplast small heat shock protein HSP21 interacts with plastid nucleoid protein pTAC5 and is essential for chloroplast development in Arabidopsis under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Linlin; Zhou, Wen; Wang, Haijun; Ding, Shunhua; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Peng, Lianwei; Zhang, Lixin; Lu, Congming

    2013-08-01

    Compared with small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) in other organisms, those in plants are the most abundant and diverse. However, the molecular mechanisms by which sHSPs are involved in cell protection remain unknown. Here, we characterized the role of HSP21, a plastid nucleoid-localized sHSP, in chloroplast development under heat stress. We show that an Arabidopsis thaliana knockout mutant of HSP21 had an ivory phenotype under heat stress. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR, run-on transcription, RNA gel blot, and polysome association analyses demonstrated that HSP21 is involved in plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP)-dependent transcription. We found that the plastid nucleoid protein pTAC5 was an HSP21 target. pTAC5 has a C4-type zinc finger similar to that of Escherichia coli DnaJ and zinc-dependent disulfide isomerase activity. Reduction of pTAC5 expression by RNA interference led to similar phenotypic effects as observed in hsp21. HSP21 and pTAC5 formed a complex that was associated mainly with the PEP complex. HSP21 and pTAC5 were associated with the PEP complex not only during transcription initiation, but also during elongation and termination. Our results suggest that HSP21 and pTAC5 are required for chloroplast development under heat stress by maintaining PEP function.

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Arabidopsis Wild-Type and g13-sst sim Trichomes Identifies Four Additional Genes Required for Trichome Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.David Marks; Jonathan R Wenger; Edward Gilding; Ross Jilk; Richard A.Dixon

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptome analyses have been performed on mature trichomes isolated from wild-type Arabidopsis leaves and on leaf trichomes isolated from the g13-sst sire double mutant,which exhibit many attributes of immature trichomes.The mature trichome profile contained many highly expressed genes involved in cell wall synthesis,protein turnover,and abiotic stress response.The most highly expressed genes in the g13-sst sim profile encoded ribosomal proteins and other proteins involved in translation.Comparative analyses showed that all but one of the genes encoding transcription factors previously found to be important for trichome formation,and many other trichome-important genes,were preferentially expressed in g13-sstsim trichomes.The analysis of genes preferentially expressed in g13-sstsim led to the identification of four additional genes required for normal trichome development.One of these was the HDG2 gene,which is a member of the HD-ZIP IV transcription factor gene family.Mutations in this gene did not alter trichome expansion,but did alter mature trichome cell walls.Mutations in BLT resulted in a loss of trichome branch formation.The relationship between bit and the phenotypically identical mutant,sti,was explored.Mutations in PEL3,which was previously shown to be required for development of the leaf cuticle,resulted in the occasional tangling of expanding trichomes.Mutations in another gene encoding a protein with an unknown function altered trichome branch formation.

  19. Systems biology approach to developing S(2)RM-based "systems therapeutics" and naturally induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Greg; Friedman, Peter

    2015-05-26

    The degree to, and the mechanisms through, which stem cells are able to build, maintain, and heal the body have only recently begun to be understood. Much of the stem cell's power resides in the release of a multitude of molecules, called stem cell released molecules (SRM). A fundamentally new type of therapeutic, namely "systems therapeutic", can be realized by reverse engineering the mechanisms of the SRM processes. Recent data demonstrates that the composition of the SRM is different for each type of stem cell, as well as for different states of each cell type. Although systems biology has been successfully used to analyze multiple pathways, the approach is often used to develop a small molecule interacting at only one pathway in the system. A new model is emerging in biology where systems biology is used to develop a new technology acting at multiple pathways called "systems therapeutics". A natural set of healing pathways in the human that uses SRM is instructive and of practical use in developing systems therapeutics. Endogenous SRM processes in the human body use a combination of SRM from two or more stem cell types, designated as S(2)RM, doing so under various state dependent conditions for each cell type. Here we describe our approach in using state-dependent SRM from two or more stem cell types, S(2)RM technology, to develop a new class of therapeutics called "systems therapeutics." Given the ubiquitous and powerful nature of innate S(2)RM-based healing in the human body, this "systems therapeutic" approach using S(2)RM technology will be important for the development of anti-cancer therapeutics, antimicrobials, wound care products and procedures, and a number of other therapeutics for many indications.

  20. MYST family histone acetyltransferases take center stage in stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Anne K; Thomas, Tim

    2009-10-01

    Acetylation of histones is an essential element regulating chromatin structure and transcription. MYST (Moz, Ybf2/Sas3, Sas2, Tip60) proteins form the largest family of histone acetyltransferases and are present in all eukaryotes. Surprisingly, until recently this protein family was poorly studied. However, in the last few years there has been a substantial increase in interest in the MYST proteins and a number of key studies have shown that these chromatin modifiers are required for a diverse range of cellular processes, both in health and disease. Translocations affecting MYST histone acetyltransferases can lead to leukemia and solid tumors. Some members of the MYST family are required for the development and self-renewal of stem cell populations; other members are essential for the prevention of inappropriate heterochromatin spreading and for the maintenance of adequate levels of gene expression. In this review we discuss the function of MYST proteins in vivo.

  1. In vivo imaging of hematopoietic stem cell development in the zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Panpan Zhang; Feng Liu

    2011-01-01

    In vivo imaging is crucial for developmental biology and can further help to follow cell development/differentiation in normal and pathological conditions.Recent advances in optical imaging techniques has facilitated tracing of the developmental dynamics of a specific organ,tissue,or even a single cell.The zebrafish is an excellent model for imaging of hematopoiesis due to its transparent embryo at early stage; moreover,different zebrafish hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transgenic lines have been demonstrated as very useful tools for illustrating the details of the HSC developmental process.In this review,we summarize recent studies related to the non-invasive in vivo imaging of HSC transgenics,to show that zebrafish transgenic lines are powerful tools for developmental biology and disease.At the end of the review,the perspective and some open questions in this field will be discussed.

  2. Lentiviral Transduction of Mammary Stem Cells for Analysis of Gene Function during Development and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welm, Bryan E.; Dijkgraaf, Gerrit J. P.; Bledau, Anita S.; Welm, Alana L.; Werb, Zena

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The mouse mammary gland is the only epithelial organ capable of complete regeneration upon orthotopic transplantation, making it ideally suited for in vivo gene function studies through viral mediated gene delivery. A hurdle that has challenged the widespread adoption of this technique has been the inability to transduce mammary stem cells effectively. We have overcome this limitation by infecting total primary mammary epithelial cells in suspension with high titer lentiviruses. Transduced cells gave rise to all major cell types of the mammary gland, and were capable of clonal outgrowth and functional differentiation in serial transplants. To demonstrate that this method is a valuable alternative to developing transgenic animals, we used lentiviral-mediated Wnt-1 overexpression to replicate MMTV-Wnt-1 mammary phenotypes and used a dominant-negative Xenopus Suppressor of Hairless to reveal a requirement for Notch signaling during ductal morphogenesis. Importantly, this method is also applicable to transduction of cells from other tissues. PMID:18371425

  3. Identification of Multipotent Progenitors that Emerge Prior to Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Embryonic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Inlay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis in the embryo proceeds in a series of waves, with primitive erythroid-biased waves succeeded by definitive waves, within which the properties of hematopoietic stem cells (multilineage potential, self-renewal, and engraftability gradually arise. Whereas self-renewal and engraftability have previously been examined in the embryo, multipotency has not been thoroughly addressed, especially at the single-cell level or within well-defined populations. To identify when and where clonal multilineage potential arises during embryogenesis, we developed a single-cell multipotency assay. We find that, during the initiation of definitive hematopoiesis in the embryo, a defined population of multipotent, engraftable progenitors emerges that is much more abundant within the yolk sac (YS than the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM or fetal liver. These experiments indicate that multipotent cells appear in concert within both the YS and AGM and strongly implicate YS-derived progenitors as contributors to definitive hematopoiesis.

  4. Microfluidic-based patterning of embryonic stem cells for in vitro development studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Shalu; Singh, Ankur; Nguyen, Anh H; Bratt-Leal, Andres M; McDevitt, Todd C; Lu, Hang

    2013-12-07

    In vitro recapitulation of mammalian embryogenesis and examination of the emerging behaviours of embryonic structures require both the means to engineer complexity and accurately assess phenotypes of multicellular aggregates. Current approaches to study multicellular populations in 3D configurations are limited by the inability to create complex (i.e. spatially heterogeneous) environments in a reproducible manner with high fidelity thus impeding the ability to engineer microenvironments and combinations of cells with similar complexity to that found during morphogenic processes such as development, remodelling and wound healing. Here, we develop a multicellular embryoid body (EB) fusion technique as a higher-throughput in vitro tool, compared to a manual assembly, to generate developmentally relevant embryonic patterns. We describe the physical principles of the EB fusion microfluidic device design; we demonstrate that >60 conjoined EBs can be generated overnight and emulate a development process analogous to mouse gastrulation during early embryogenesis. Using temporal delivery of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) to embryoid bodies, we recapitulate embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5) during mouse embryo development with induced mesoderm differentiation in murine embryonic stem cells leading to expression of Brachyury-T-green fluorescent protein (T-GFP), an indicator of primitive streak development and mesoderm differentiation during gastrulation. The proposed microfluidic approach could be used to manipulate hundreds or more of individual embryonic cell aggregates in a rapid fashion, thereby allowing controlled differentiation patterns in fused multicellular assemblies to generate complex yet spatially controlled microenvironments.

  5. Development and function of human cerebral cortex neural networks from pluripotent stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Peter; Turner-Bridger, Benita; Peter, Manuel; Momoh, Ayiba; Arambepola, Devika; Robinson, Hugh P C; Livesey, Frederick J

    2015-09-15

    A key aspect of nervous system development, including that of the cerebral cortex, is the formation of higher-order neural networks. Developing neural networks undergo several phases with distinct activity patterns in vivo, which are thought to prune and fine-tune network connectivity. We report here that human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cerebral cortex neurons form large-scale networks that reflect those found in the developing cerebral cortex in vivo. Synchronised oscillatory networks develop in a highly stereotyped pattern over several weeks in culture. An initial phase of increasing frequency of oscillations is followed by a phase of decreasing frequency, before giving rise to non-synchronous, ordered activity patterns. hPSC-derived cortical neural networks are excitatory, driven by activation of AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors, and can undergo NMDA-receptor-mediated plasticity. Investigating single neuron connectivity within PSC-derived cultures, using rabies-based trans-synaptic tracing, we found two broad classes of neuronal connectivity: most neurons have small numbers (40). These data demonstrate that the formation of hPSC-derived cortical networks mimics in vivo cortical network development and function, demonstrating the utility of in vitro systems for mechanistic studies of human forebrain neural network biology.

  6. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  7. A transcriptional analysis of carotenoid, chlorophyll and plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis genes during development and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Vallabhaneni Ratnakar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The carotenoids are pure isoprenoids that are essential components of the photosynthetic apparatus and are coordinately synthesized with chlorophylls in chloroplasts. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate carotenoid biosynthesis or the mechanisms that coordinate this synthesis with that of chlorophylls and other plastidial synthesized isoprenoid-derived compounds, including quinones, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid. Here, a comprehensive transcriptional analysis of individual carotenoid and isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes was performed in order to elucidate the role of transcriptional regulation in the coordinated synthesis of these compounds and to identify regulatory components that may mediate this process in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results A global microarray expression correlation analysis revealed that the phytoene synthase gene, which encodes the first dedicated and rate-limiting enzyme of carotenogenesis, is highly co-expressed with many photosynthesis-related genes including many isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes. Chemical and mutant analysis revealed that induction of the co-expressed genes following germination was dependent on gibberellic acid and brassinosteroids (BR but was inhibited by abscisic acid (ABA. Mutant analyses further revealed that expression of many of the genes is suppressed in dark grown plants by Phytochrome Interacting transcription Factors (PIFs and activated by photoactivated phytochromes, which in turn degrade PIFs and mediate a coordinated induction of the genes. The promoters of PSY and the co-expressed genes were found to contain an enrichment in putative BR-auxin response elements and G-boxes, which bind PIFs, further supporting a role for BRs and PIFs in regulating expression of the genes. In osmotically stressed root tissue, transcription of Calvin cycle, methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and carotenoid biosynthesis genes is induced

  8. A transcriptional analysis of carotenoid, chlorophyll and plastidial isoprenoid biosynthesis genes during development and osmotic stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Meier, Stuart

    2011-05-19

    Background: The carotenoids are pure isoprenoids that are essential components of the photosynthetic apparatus and are coordinately synthesized with chlorophylls in chloroplasts. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate carotenoid biosynthesis or the mechanisms that coordinate this synthesis with that of chlorophylls and other plastidial synthesized isoprenoid-derived compounds, including quinones, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid. Here, a comprehensive transcriptional analysis of individual carotenoid and isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes was performed in order to elucidate the role of transcriptional regulation in the coordinated synthesis of these compounds and to identify regulatory components that may mediate this process in Arabidopsis thaliana.Results: A global microarray expression correlation analysis revealed that the phytoene synthase gene, which encodes the first dedicated and rate-limiting enzyme of carotenogenesis, is highly co-expressed with many photosynthesis-related genes including many isoprenoid-related biosynthesis pathway genes. Chemical and mutant analysis revealed that induction of the co-expressed genes following germination was dependent on gibberellic acid and brassinosteroids (BR) but was inhibited by abscisic acid (ABA). Mutant analyses further revealed that expression of many of the genes is suppressed in dark grown plants by Phytochrome Interacting transcription Factors (PIFs) and activated by photoactivated phytochromes, which in turn degrade PIFs and mediate a coordinated induction of the genes. The promoters of PSY and the co-expressed genes were found to contain an enrichment in putative BR-auxin response elements and G-boxes, which bind PIFs, further supporting a role for BRs and PIFs in regulating expression of the genes. In osmotically stressed root tissue, transcription of Calvin cycle, methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and carotenoid biosynthesis genes is induced and uncoupled from that of

  9. Immunohistochemical characterization of hepatic stem cell-related cells in developing human liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; HU Yong; WANG Jian; ZHOU Ji; ZHANG Taiping; YU Hongyu

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the expression characteristics of the various kinds of possible markers in hepatic stem cells(HSCs)and other HSC-related cells in human fetal liver in various developmental stages.It is significant to investigate the immunohistochemical expression for better understanding of the origin,difierentiation and migration of HSCs in the developing human liver.H-E staining and immunohistochemical methods were used to observe the expression of hepatic/cholangiocellular differentiation markers(AFF,GST-π,CK7,CK19)and hematopoietic stem cell markers(CD34 and c-kit)in several kinds of HSC-related cells in thirty cases of fetal liver samples (4-35 weeks after pregnancy).AFP expression appears in fetal hepatocytes at four weeks'gestation.It Deaks at 16-24 weeks'gestation and decreases gradually afterwards.Finally,weak signals were only found in some ductal plate cells and a few limiting plate cells.GST-π was detected in hepatic cord cells from the sixth week and in the ductal plate cells from the eighth week.Twenty-six weeks later,only some ductal plate cells and a few limiting plate cells show positive signals.CK19 expression peaks during the 6th-11th weeks in hepatic cord cells and decreases gradually afterwards,except for the ductal plates.CK7 expression was limited in the ductal plate cells and bile ducts cells from the 14th week.CD34 and c-kit were detected at the eighth week in some ductal plate cells and a few mononuclear cells in the hepatic cords/mesenchymal tissue of portal areas.After 21 weeks.CD34 and c-kit were found only in ductal plate cells and a few mononuclear cells in the hepatic mesenchymal tissue of portal areas.Fetal hepatocytes at 4-16 weeks'gestation are mainly constituted by HSCs characterized with bi-potential differentiation capacity.At 16 weeks'gestation,most hepatic cord cells begin to differentiate into hepatocytes and abundant HSCs remain in ductal plate(the origin site of Hering canals).It is also indicated mat the

  10. Directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells allows exploration of novel transcription factor genes for pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jing; Mehta, Munish; Shi, Bingyin; Morahan, Grant; Jiang, Fang-Xu

    2012-09-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been promised as a renewable source for regenerative medicine, including providing a replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes. However, they have not yet been differentiated into functional insulin-secreting β cells. This is due partially to the knowledge gap regarding the transcription factors (TFs) required for pancreas development. We hypothesize that, if directed differentiation in vitro recapitulates the developmental process in vivo, ESCs provide a powerful model to discover novel pancreatic TF genes. Guided by knowledge of their normal development and using RT-PCR and immunochemical analyses, we have established protocols for directed differentiation of mouse ESCs into pancreatic progenitors. Microarray analyses of these differentiating ESC cells at days 0, 4, 8 and 15 confirmed their sequential differentiation. By day 15, we found up-regulation of a group of pancreatic progenitor marker genes including Pdx1, Ptf1a, Nkx6.1, Pax4 and Pax6. Consistently, Pdx1-immunoreactive cells were detected on day 15. Most of these Pdx1(+) cells also expressed Nkx6.1. Bioinformatic analyses of sequential datasets allowed identification of over 20 novel TF genes potentially important for pancreas development. The dynamic expression of representative known and novel genes was confirmed by quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis. This strategy may be modified to study novel regulatory molecules for development of other tissue and organ systems.

  11. CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 Are Two bHLH Transcription Factors Participating in Synergistic Regulation of AtCFL1-Mediated Cuticle Development in Arabidopsis.

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    Shibai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cuticle is a hydrophobic lipid layer covering the epidermal cells of terrestrial plants. Although many genes involved in Arabidopsis cuticle development have been identified, the transcriptional regulation of these genes is largely unknown. Previously, we demonstrated that AtCFL1 negatively regulates cuticle development by interacting with the HD-ZIP IV transcription factor HDG1. Here, we report that two bHLH transcription factors, AtCFL1 associated protein 1 (CFLAP1 and CFLAP2, are also involved in AtCFL1-mediated regulation of cuticle development. CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 interact with AtCFL1 both in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of either CFLAP1 or CFLAP2 led to expressional changes of genes involved in fatty acids, cutin and wax biosynthesis pathways and caused multiple cuticle defective phenotypes such as organ fusion, breakage of the cuticle layer and decreased epicuticular wax crystal loading. Functional inactivation of CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 by chimeric repression technology caused opposite phenotypes to the CFLAP1 overexpressor plants. Interestingly, we find that, similar to the transcription factor HDG1, the function of CFLAP1 in cuticle development is dependent on the presence of AtCFL1. Furthermore, both HDG1 and CFLAP1/2 interact with the same C-terminal C4 zinc finger domain of AtCFL1, a domain that is essential for AtCFL1 function. These results suggest that AtCFL1 may serve as a master regulator in the transcriptional regulation of cuticle development, and that CFLAP1 and CFLAP2 are involved in the AtCFL1-mediated regulation pathway, probably through competing with HDG1 to bind to AtCFL1.

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100613 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100613 J023107M18 At4g10180.1 light-mediated development protein 1 / deetiolated1... (DET1) identical to Light-mediated development protein DET1 (Deetiolated1) (Swiss-Prot:P48732) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK058683 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058683 001-019-A06 At4g10180.1 light-mediated development protein 1 / deetiolated...1 (DET1) identical to Light-mediated development protein DET1 (Deetiolated1) (Swiss-Prot:P48732) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 0.0 ...

  14. Reference: 143 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available of AtMYB32 and AtMYB4 expression may influence pollen development by changing the flux along the phenylpropanoid pathways, affe...for normal pollen development in Arabidopsis thaliana. 6 979-95 15584962 2004 Dec The Plant journal Heazlewood Joshua|Li Song Feng|Parish Roger W|Preston Jeremy|Wheeler Janet

  15. Arabidopsis Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase1 of the Phosphoserine Pathway Is Essential for Development and Required for Ammonium Assimilation and Tryptophan Biosynthesis[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benstein, Ruben Maximilian; Ludewig, Katja; Wulfert, Sabine; Wittek, Sebastian; Gigolashvili, Tamara; Frerigmann, Henning; Gierth, Markus; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Krueger, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    In plants, two independent serine biosynthetic pathways, the photorespiratory and glycolytic phosphoserine (PS) pathways, have been postulated. Although the photorespiratory pathway is well characterized, little information is available on the function of the PS pathway in plants. Here, we present a detailed characterization of phosphoglycerate dehydrogenases (PGDHs) as components of the PS pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. All PGDHs localize to plastids and possess similar kinetic properties, but they differ with respect to their sensitivity to serine feedback inhibition. Furthermore, analysis of pgdh1 and phosphoserine phosphatase mutants revealed an embryo-lethal phenotype and PGDH1-silenced lines were inhibited in growth. Metabolic analyses of PGDH1-silenced lines grown under ambient and high CO2 conditions indicate a direct link between PS biosynthesis and ammonium assimilation. In addition, we obtained several lines of evidence for an interconnection between PS and tryptophan biosynthesis, because the expression of PGDH1 and PHOSPHOSERINE AMINOTRANSFERASE1 is regulated by MYB51 and MYB34, two activators of tryptophan biosynthesis. Moreover, the concentration of tryptophan-derived glucosinolates and auxin were reduced in PGDH1-silenced plants. In essence, our results provide evidence for a vital function of PS biosynthesis for plant development and metabolism. PMID:24368794

  16. RNA Binding Proteins RZ-1B and RZ-1C Play Critical Roles in Regulating Pre-mRNA Splicing and Gene Expression during Development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhe; Zhu, Danling; Lin, Xiaoya; Miao, Jin; Gu, Lianfeng; Deng, Xian; Yang, Qian; Sun, Kangtai; Zhu, Danmeng; Cao, Xiaofeng; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Dean, Caroline; Aoyama, Takashi; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear-localized RNA binding proteins are involved in various aspects of RNA metabolism, which in turn modulates gene expression. However, the functions of nuclear-localized RNA binding proteins in plants are poorly understood. Here, we report the functions of two proteins containing RNA recognition motifs, RZ-1B and RZ-1C, in Arabidopsis thaliana. RZ-1B and RZ-1C were localized to nuclear speckles and interacted with a spectrum of serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins through their C termini. RZ-1C preferentially bound to purine-rich RNA sequences in vitro through its N-terminal RNA recognition motif. Disrupting the RNA binding activity of RZ-1C with SR proteins through overexpression of the C terminus of RZ-1C conferred defective phenotypes similar to those observed in rz-1b rz-1c double mutants, including delayed seed germination, reduced stature, and serrated leaves. Loss of function of RZ-1B and RZ-1C was accompanied by defective splicing of many genes and global perturbation of gene expression. In addition, we found that RZ-1C directly targeted FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), promoting efficient splicing of FLC introns and likely also repressing FLC transcription. Our findings highlight the critical role of RZ-1B/1C in regulating RNA splicing, gene expression, and many key aspects of plant development via interaction with proteins including SR proteins.

  17. Loss of the Arabidopsis thaliana P₄-ATPase ALA3 reduces adaptability to temperature stresses and impairs vegetative, pollen, and ovule development.

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    Stephen C McDowell

    Full Text Available Members of the P4 subfamily of P-type ATPases are thought to help create asymmetry in lipid bilayers by flipping specific lipids between the leaflets of a membrane. This asymmetry is believed to be central to the formation of vesicles in the secretory and endocytic pathways. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a P4-ATPase associated with the trans-Golgi network (ALA3 was previously reported to be important for vegetative growth and reproductive success. Here we show that multiple phenotypes for ala3 knockouts are sensitive to growth conditions. For example, ala3 rosette size was observed to be dependent upon both temperature and soil, and varied between 40% and 80% that of wild-type under different conditions. We also demonstrate that ala3 mutants have reduced fecundity resulting from a combination of decreased ovule production and pollen tube growth defects. In-vitro pollen tube growth assays showed that ala3 pollen germinated ∼2 h slower than wild-type and had approximately 2-fold reductions in both maximal growth rate and overall length. In genetic crosses under conditions of hot days and cold nights, pollen fitness was reduced by at least 90-fold; from ∼18% transmission efficiency (unstressed to less than 0.2% (stressed. Together, these results support a model in which ALA3 functions to modify endomembranes in multiple cell types, enabling structural changes, or signaling functions that are critical in plants for normal development and adaptation to varied growth environments.

  18. Mentor preparation: A qualitative study of STEM master teacher professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Click-Cuellar, Heather Lynn

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 has required districts to staff all classrooms with highly qualified teachers. Yet, retaining certified teachers in the profession has been a national concern, especially among new teachers who leave at alarming rates within their first three years. This comes at a heavy cost to districts financially and in trying to maintain highly qualified status, but also to the continuity and effective education of students. Mentoring has been identified by many researchers as a plausible solution to reducing attrition rates for beginning teachers. In this dissertation, I conducted qualitative research to explore and understand the perceptions of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Master Teachers' mentoring professional development in the context of the Master Teacher Academies program situated at Desert State University (pseudonym), a large institution located on the Texas-Mexico border. Additionally, I examined the reported teaching self-efficacy of STEM Master Teachers (mentors), as well as that of their novice teachers (mentees). Another purpose of the study was to investigate the forms and elements of interactions between these mentors and their mentees. Participants of this study were Texas certified Master Mathematics or Master Science Teachers, and their novice mathematics or science teacher mentees; all of whom teach in a high need U.S. Mexico border city school district serving a student population that is over 93% Hispanic. A grounded theory approach was used in examining and analyzing mentor and mentee perceptions and experiences through case studies. A constructivist framework was utilized to derive findings from interviews and the review of documents and contribute a diverse context and population to the literature. The study reveals conclusions and recommendations that will benefit educators, universities, school districts, and policy makers in regard to teacher mentor preparation.

  19. Genetic analysis of the Arabidopsis protein kinases MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 indicates roles in cell expansion and embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiwongsar, Suraphon; Strohm, Allison K; Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are a pair of Arabidopsis thaliana genes that encode protein kinases related to cdc7p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have previously shown that the map3kε1;map3kε2 double-mutant combination causes pollen lethality. In this study, we have used an ethanol-inducible promoter construct to rescue this lethal phenotype and create map3kε1(-/-);map3kε2(-/-) double-mutant plants in order to examine the function of these genes in the sporophyte. These rescued double-mutant plants carry a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-MAP3Kε1 transgene under the control of the alcohol-inducible AlcA promoter from Aspergillus nidulans. The double-mutant plants were significantly smaller and had shorter roots than wild-type when grown in the absence of ethanol treatment. Microscopic analysis indicated that cell elongation was reduced in the roots of the double-mutant plants and cell expansion was reduced in rosette leaves. Treatment with ethanol to induce expression of YFP-MAP3Kε1 largely rescued the leaf phenotypes. The double-mutant combination also caused embryos to arrest in the early stages of development. Through the use of YFP reporter constructs we determined that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 are expressed during embryo development, and also in root tissue. Our results indicate that MAP3Kε1 and MAP3Kε2 have roles outside of pollen development and that these genes affect several aspects of sporophyte development.

  20. Many facets of stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiarui Wu

    2011-01-01

    @@ Research area on stem cells is one of frontiers in biology.The collection of five research articles in this issue aims to cover timely developments in stem cell biology, ranging from generating and identifying stem cell line to manipulating stem cells, and from basic mechanism analysis to applied medical potential.These papers reflect the various research tasks in stem cell biology.

  1. The effects of a STEM professional development intervention on elementary teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Deborah D.

    To improve and sustain science teaching and learning in the elementary grades, experts recommended school districts afford time in the day for science instruction, secure the necessary resources for an investigative classroom, and provide teachers with increased professional development opportunities that target content knowledge, pedagogical skills, and confidence in teaching science (e.g. Buczynski & Hansen, 2010; Brand & Moore, 2011; NSB, 2010). In particular, researchers recommended teachers receive quality professional development that is sustained over time and embedded in the real world of the classroom (e.g. Buczynski & Hansen, 2010; Cotabish & Robinson, 2012). The purpose of this dissertation was to examine changes in elementary teachers' science teaching perceptions, concerns, and science process skills during and after participation in a STEM-focused professional development intervention involving embedded support using peer coaching. The positive effects of sustained, embedded professional development programs on science instruction have been documented by multiple research studies (e.g. Buczynski & Hansen, 2010; Cotabish, Dailey, Hughes, & Robinson, 2011; Duran & Duran, 2005; Levitt, 2011); however, few studies have investigated the effects after removal of the professional development support (Johnson, Kahle, & Fargo, 2007; Shymansky, Yore, & Anderson, 2004). By examining the changes across three years (including one year after the conclusion of the professional development intervention), the researcher in the present study considered the dosage of intervention needed to bring about and preserve significant changes in the participant teachers. To measure the impact of the intervention on teachers, the researcher used quantitative data supported by qualitative interviews. Results indicated that changes in science teaching perceptions were realized after one year or 60 hours of intervention; however, it took two years or 120 hours of intervention to see

  2. Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells S. Hunter, M. Rosen, M. Hoopes, H. Nichols, S. Jeffay, K. Chandler1, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Labor...

  3. Development, characterization and use of a porcine epiblast-derived liver stem cell line: ARS-PICM-19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totipotent embryonic stem cell lines have not been established from ungulates, however, we have developed several somatic cell lines from the in vitro culture of pig epiblast cells. One such cell line, PICM-19, was isolated via colony-cloning and was found to spontaneously differentiate into hepati...

  4. Silencing of CYP6 and APN genes affects the growth and development of rice yellow stem borer, Scirpophaga incertulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Sudhakara Rao eKola

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available RNAi is a powerful tool to target the insect genes involved in host-pest interactions. Key insect genes are the choice for silencing to achieve pest derived resistance where resistance genes are not available in gene pool of host plant. In this study, an attempt was made to determine the effect of dsRNA designed from two genes Cytochrome P450 derivative (CYP6 and Aminopeptidase N (APN of rice yellow stem borer (YSB on growth and development of insect. The bioassays involved injection of chemically synthesized 5ꞌ FAM labeled 21-nt dsRNA into rice cut stems and allowing the larvae to feed on these stems which resulted in increased mortality and observed growth and development changes in larval length and weight compared with its untreated control at 12-15 days after treatment. These results were further supported by observing the reduction in transcripts expression of these genes in treated larvae. Fluorescence detection in treated larvae also proved that dsRNA was readily taken by larvae when fed on dsRNA treated stems. These results from the present study clearly show that YSB larvae fed on dsRNA designed from Cytochrome P450 and Aminopeptidase N has detrimental effect on larval growth and development. These genes can be deployed to develop YSB resistance in rice using RNAi approach.

  5. Silencing of CYP6 and APN Genes Affects the Growth and Development of Rice Yellow Stem Borer, Scirpophaga incertulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kola, Vijaya Sudhakara Rao; Renuka, P; Padmakumari, Ayyagari Phani; Mangrauthia, Satendra K; Balachandran, Sena M; Ravindra Babu, V; Madhav, Maganti S

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a powerful tool to target the insect genes involved in host-pest interactions. Key insect genes are the choice for silencing to achieve pest derived resistance where resistance genes are not available in gene pool of host plant. In this study, an attempt was made to determine the effect of dsRNA designed from two genes Cytochrome P450 derivative (CYP6) and Aminopeptidase N (APN) of rice yellow stem borer (YSB) on growth and development of insect. The bioassays involved injection of chemically synthesized 5' FAM labeled 21-nt dsRNA into rice cut stems and allowing the larvae to feed on these stems which resulted in increased mortality and observed growth and development changes in larval length and weight compared with its untreated control at 12-15 days after treatment. These results were further supported by observing the reduction in transcripts expression of these genes in treated larvae. Fluorescence detection in treated larvae also proved that dsRNA was readily taken by larvae when fed on dsRNA treated stems. These results from the present study clearly show that YSB larvae fed on dsRNA designed from Cytochrome P450 and Aminopeptidase N has detrimental effect on larval growth and development. These genes can be deployed to develop YSB resistance in rice using RNAi approach.

  6. Oviposition and larval development of a stem borer, Eoreuma loftini, on rice and non-crop grass hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    A greenhouse study compared oviposition preference and larval development duration of a stem borer, Eoreuma loftini (Dyar) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), on rice, Oryza sativa L. (cv. Cocodrie), and four primary non-crop hosts of Gulf Coast Texas rice agroecosystems. Rice and two perennials, johnsongrass...

  7. Why STEM Learning Communities Work: The Development of Psychosocial Learning Factors through Social Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrino, Stephanie Sedberry; Gerace, William J.

    2016-01-01

    STEM learning communities facilitate student academic success and persistence in science disciplines. This prompted us to explore the underlying factors that make learning communities successful. In this paper, we report findings from an illustrative case study of a 2-year STEM-based learning community designed to identify and describe these…

  8. Facilitating Collaboration across Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) Fields in Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejiwale, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration plays a major role in interdisciplinary activities among Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) disciplines or fields. It also affects the relationships among cluster members on the management team. Although effective collaboration does not guarantee success among STEM disciplines, its absence usually assures…

  9. Development of Antiviral Innate Immunity During In Vitro Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, William; Acharya, Dhiraj; Wang, Ruoxing; Wang, Jundi; Gurung, Chandan; Chen, Bohan; Bai, Fengwei; Guo, Yan-Lin

    2016-04-15

    The innate immunity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has recently emerged as an important issue in ESC biology and in ESC-based regenerative medicine. We have recently reported that mouse ESCs (mESCs) do not have a functional type I interferon (IFN)-based antiviral innate immunity. They are deficient in expressing IFN in response to viral infection and have limited ability to respond to IFN. Using fibroblasts (FBs) as a cell model, the current study investigated the development of antiviral mechanisms during in vitro differentiation of mESCs. We demonstrate that mESC-differentiated FBs (mESC-FBs) share extensive similarities with naturally differentiated FBs in morphology, marker expression, and growth pattern, but their development of antiviral mechanisms lags behind. Nonetheless, the antiviral mechanisms are inducible during mESC differentiation as demonstrated by the transition of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), a key transcription factor for IFN expression, from its inactive state in mESCs to its active state in mESC-FBs and by increased responses of mESC-FBs to viral stimuli and IFN during their continued in vitro propagation. Together with our previously published study, the current data provide important insights into molecular basis for the deficiency of IFN expression in mESCs and the development of antiviral innate immunity during mESC differentiation.

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Facilitate In Vitro Development of Human Preantral Follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xi; Wang, Tianren; Yin, Tailang; Yan, Liying; Yan, Jie; Lu, Cuilin; Zhao, Liang; Li, Min; Zhang, Yan; Jin, Hongyan; Zhu, Xiaohui; Liu, Ping; Li, Rong; Qiao, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Biological folliculogenesis is a lengthy and complicated process, and follicle growth microenvironment is poorly understood. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to establish a supportive microenvironment for wound repair, autoimmune diseases amelioration, and tumor development. Therefore, this study is aimed to investigate whether MSCs could help to reconstruct a microenvironment to facilitate the in vitro follicle development. Here we show human MSCs significantly promote the survival rates, increase the growth velocity, and improve the viability of preantral follicles in a dose-dependent manner. Further analyses reveal that growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 in oocytes and inhibin βA and transforming growth factor β1 in granulose cells within the follicles cocultured with MSCs express notably higher than those in the follicles cultured without MSCs. In summary, our findings demonstrate a previously unrecognized function of MSCs in promoting preantral follicle development and provide a useful strategy to optimize fertility preservation and restoration by facilitating in vitro follicle growth.

  11. Overlapping Requirements for Tet2 and Tet3 in Normal Development and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Li

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Tet family of methylcytosine dioxygenases (Tet1, Tet2, and Tet3 convert 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. To date, functional overlap among Tet family members has not been examined systematically in the context of embryonic development. To clarify the potential for overlap among Tet enzymes during development, we mutated the zebrafish orthologs of Tet1, Tet2, and Tet3 and examined single-, double-, and triple-mutant genotypes. Here, we identify Tet2 and Tet3 as the major 5-methylcytosine dioxygenases in the zebrafish embryo and uncover a combined requirement for Tet2 and Tet3 in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC emergence. We demonstrate that Notch signaling in the hemogenic endothelium is regulated by Tet2/3 prior to HSC emergence and show that restoring expression of the downstream gata2b/scl/runx1 transcriptional network can rescue HSCs in tet2/3 double mutant larvae. Our results reveal essential, overlapping functions for tet genes during embryonic development and uncover a requirement for 5hmC in regulating HSC production.

  12. Amniotic fluid may act as a transporting pathway for signaling molecules and stem cells during the embryonic development of amniotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xinglong

    2013-11-01

    Amniotic fluid (AF) is formed at the very early stages of pregnancy, and is present throughout embryonic development of amniotes. It is well-known that AF provides a protective sac around the fetus that allows fetal movement and growth, and prevents mechanical and thermal shock. However, a growing body of evidence has shown that AF contains a number of proteins and peptides, including growth factors and cytokines, which potently affect cellular growth and proliferation. In addition, pluripotent stem cells have recently been identified in AF. Herein, this article reviews the biological properties of AF during embryonic development and speculates that AF may act as a transporting pathway for signaling molecules and stem cells during amniote embryonic development. Defining this novel function of AF is potentially significant for further understanding embryonic development and regenerative medicine, preventing genetic diseases, and developing therapeutic options for human malignancies.

  13. A Glycine soja 14-3-3 protein GsGF14o participates in stomatal and root hair development and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Luo, Xiao; Sun, Mingzhe; Chen, Chao; Ding, Xiaodong; Wang, Xuedong; Yang, Shanshan; Yu, Qingyue; Jia, Bowei; Ji, Wei; Cai, Hua; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that 14-3-3 proteins are key regulators of multiple stress signal transduction cascades. However, the biological functions of soybean 14-3-3 proteins, especially in plant drought response, are not yet known. In this study, we characterized a Glycine soja 14-3-3 gene, GsGF14o, which is involved in plant development and drought response. GsGF14o expression was greatly induced by drought stress, as evidenced by the quantitative real-time PCR and β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity analysis. GsGF14o overexpression in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in decreased drought tolerance during seed germination and seedling growth. Furthermore, silencing of AtGF14µ, the most homologous 14-3-3 gene of GsGF14o, led to enhanced drought tolerance at both the seed germination and seedling stage. Unexpectedly, GsGF14o transgenic lines showed reduced water loss and transpiration rates compared with wild-type plants, which was demonstrated to be the consequence of the decreased stomatal size. At the same time, the smaller stomata due to GsGF14o overexpression led to a relatively slow net photosynthesis rate, which led to a growth penalty under drought stress. We further demonstrated that GsGF14o overexpression caused deficits in root hair formation and development, and thereby reduced the water intake capacity of the transgenic root system. In addition, GsGF14o overexpression down-regulated the transcript levels of drought-responsive marker genes. Finally, we also investigated the tissue-specific accumulation of GsGF14o by using a GUS activity assay. Collectively, the results presented here confirm that GsGF14o plays a dual role in drought stress responses through its involvement in the regulation of stomatal size and root hair development.

  14. A Cyclin Dependent Kinase Regulatory Subunit (CKS) Gene of Pigeonpea Imparts Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Regulates Plant Growth and Development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha R; Khareedu, Venkateswara R

    2017-01-01

    Frequent climatic changes in conjunction with other extreme environmental factors are known to affect growth, development and productivity of diverse crop plants. Pigeonpea, a major grain legume of the semiarid tropics, endowed with an excellent deep-root system, is known as one of the important drought tolerant crop plants. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are core cell cycle regulators and play important role in different aspects of plant growth and development. The cyclin-dependent kinase regulatory subunit gene (CKS) was isolated from the cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. Pigeonpea CKS (CcCKS) gene expression was detected in both the root and leaf tissues of pigeonpea and was upregulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), mannitol, NaCl and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. The overexpression of CcCKS gene in Arabidopsis significantly enhanced tolerance of transgenics to drought and salt stresses as evidenced by different physiological parameters. Under stress conditions, transgenics showed higher biomass, decreased rate of water loss, decreased MDA levels, higher free proline contents, and glutathione levels. Moreover, under stress conditions transgenics exhibited lower stomatal conductance, lower transpiration, and higher photosynthetic rates. However, under normal conditions, CcCKS-transgenics displayed decreased plant growth rate, increased cell size and decreased stomatal number compared to those of wild-type plants. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that CcCKS could regulate the expression of both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent genes associated with abiotic stress tolerance as well as plant growth and development. As such, the CcCKS seems promising and might serve as a potential candidate gene for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants.

  15. Development of a distance education program by a Land-Grant University augments the 2-year to 4-year STEM pipeline and increases diversity in STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Jennifer C; Oli, Monika W; Rice, Kelly C; Ardissone, Alexandria N; Galindo-Gonzalez, Sebastian; Sacasa, Pablo R; Belmont, Heather J; Wysocki, Allen F; Rieger, Mark; Triplett, Eric W

    2015-01-01

    Although initial interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) is high, recruitment and retention remains a challenge, and some populations are disproportionately underrepresented in STEM fields. To address these challenges, the Microbiology and Cell Science Department in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Florida has developed an innovative 2+2 degree program. Typical 2+2 programs begin with a student earning an associate's degree at a local community college and then transferring to a 4-year institution to complete a bachelor's degree. However, many universities in the United States, particularly land-grant universities, are located in rural regions that are distantly located from their respective states' highly populated urban centers. This geographical and cultural distance could be an impediment to recruiting otherwise highly qualified and diverse students. Here, a new model of a 2+2 program is described that uses distance education as the vehicle to bring a research-intensive university's life sciences curriculum to students rather than the oft-tried model of a university attempting to recruit underrepresented minority students to its location. In this paradigm, community college graduates transfer into the Microbiology and Cell Science program as distance education students to complete their Bachelor of Science degree. The distance education students' experiences are similar to the on-campus students' experiences in that both groups of students take the same department courses taught by the same instructors, take required laboratory courses in a face-to-face format, take only proctored exams, and have the same availability to instructors. Data suggests that a hybrid online transfer program may be a viable approach to increasing STEM participation (as defined by enrollment) and diversity. This approach is particularly compelling as the distance education cohort has comparable grade point averages and

  16. Development of a distance education program by a Land-Grant University augments the 2-year to 4-year STEM pipeline and increases diversity in STEM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Drew

    Full Text Available Although initial interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM is high, recruitment and retention remains a challenge, and some populations are disproportionately underrepresented in STEM fields. To address these challenges, the Microbiology and Cell Science Department in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Florida has developed an innovative 2+2 degree program. Typical 2+2 programs begin with a student earning an associate's degree at a local community college and then transferring to a 4-year institution to complete a bachelor's degree. However, many universities in the United States, particularly land-grant universities, are located in rural regions that are distantly located from their respective states' highly populated urban centers. This geographical and cultural distance could be an impediment to recruiting otherwise highly qualified and diverse students. Here, a new model of a 2+2 program is described that uses distance education as the vehicle to bring a research-intensive university's life sciences curriculum to students rather than the oft-tried model of a university attempting to recruit underrepresented minority students to its location. In this paradigm, community college graduates transfer into the Microbiology and Cell Science program as distance education students to complete their Bachelor of Science degree. The distance education students' experiences are similar to the on-campus students' experiences in that both groups of students take the same department courses taught by the same instructors, take required laboratory courses in a face-to-face format, take only proctored exams, and have the same availability to instructors. Data suggests that a hybrid online transfer program may be a viable approach to increasing STEM participation (as defined by enrollment and diversity. This approach is particularly compelling as the distance education cohort has comparable grade point

  17. Partial functional conservation of IRX10 homologs in physcomitrella patens and Arabidopsis thaliana indicates an evolutionary step contributing to vascular formation in land plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hörnblad Emma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant cell walls are complex multicomponent structures that have evolved to fulfil an essential function in providing strength and protection to cells. Hemicelluloses constitute a key component of the cell wall and recently a number of the genes thought to encode the enzymes required for its synthesis have been identified in Arabidopsis. The acquisition of hemicellulose synthesis capability is hypothesised to have been an important step in the evolution of higher plants. Results Analysis of the Physcomitrella patens genome has revealed the presence of homologs for all of the Arabidopsis glycosyltransferases including IRX9, IRX10 and IRX14 required for the synthesis of the glucuronoxylan backbone. The Physcomitrella IRX10 homolog is expressed in a variety of moss tissues which were newly formed or undergoing expansion. There is a high degree of sequence conservation between the Physcomitrella IRX10 and Arabidopsis IRX10 and IRX10-L. Despite this sequence similarity, the Physcomitrella IRX10 gene is only able to partially rescue the Arabidopsis irx10 irx10-L double mutant indicating that there has been a neo- or sub-functionalisation during the evolution of higher plants. Analysis of the monosaccharide composition of stems from the partially rescued Arabidopsis plants does not show any significant change in xylose content compared to the irx10 irx10-L double mutant. Likewise, knockout mutants of the Physcomitrella IRX10 gene do not result in any visible phenotype and there is no significant change in monosaccharide composition of the cell walls. Conclusions The fact that the Physcomitrella IRX10 (PpGT47A protein can partially complement an Arabidopsis irx10 irx10-L double mutant suggests that it shares some function with the Arabidopsis proteins, but the lack of a phenotype in knockout lines shows that the function is not required for growth or development under normal conditions in Physcomitrella. In contrast, the Arabidopsis

  18. Genome-wide Expression Profiling in Seedlings of the Arabidopsis Mutant uro that is Defective in the Secondary Cell Wall Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Yuan; Xuan Yao; Dabing Zhang; Yue Sun; Hai Huang

    2007-01-01

    Plant secondary growth is of tremendous importance, not only for plant growth and development but also for economic usefulness.Secondary tissues such as xylem and phloem are the conducting tissues in plant vascular systems, essentially for water and nutrient transport, respectively.On the other hand, products of plant secondary growth are important raw materials and renewable sources of energy.Although advances have been recently made towards describing molecular mechanisms that regulate secondary growth, the genetic control for this process is not yet fully understood.Secondary cell wall formation in plants shares some common mechanisms with other plant secondary growth processes.Thus, studies on the secondary cell wall formation using Arabidopsis may help to understand the regulatory mechanisms for plant secondary growth.We previously reported phenotypic characterizations of an Arabidopsis semi-dominant mutant,upright rosette (uro), which is defective in secondary cell wall growth and has an unusually soft stem.Here, we show that lignification in the secondary cell wall in uro is aberrant by analyzing hypocotyl and stem.We also show genome-wide expression profiles of uro seedlings, using the Affymetrix GeneChip that contains approximately 24 000 Arabidopsis genes.Genes identified with altered expression levels include those that function in plant hormone biosynthesis and signaling,cell division and plant secondary tissue growth.These results provide useful information for further characterizations of the regulatory network in plant secondary cell wall formation.

  19. Murine cytomegalovirus infection of neural stem cells alters neurogenesis in the developing brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manohar B Mutnal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV brain infection causes serious neuro-developmental sequelae including: mental retardation, cerebral palsy, and sensorineural hearing loss. But, the mechanisms of injury and pathogenesis to the fetal brain are not completely understood. The present study addresses potential pathogenic mechanisms by which this virus injures the CNS using a neonatal mouse model that mirrors congenital brain infection. This investigation focused on, analysis of cell types infected with mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV and the pattern of injury to the developing brain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used our MCMV infection model and a multi-color flow cytometry approach to quantify the effect of viral infection on the developing brain, identifying specific target cells and the consequent effect on neurogenesis. In this study, we show that neural stem cells (NSCs and neuronal precursor cells are the principal target cells for MCMV in the developing brain. In addition, viral infection was demonstrated to cause a loss of NSCs expressing CD133 and nestin. We also showed that infection of neonates leads to subsequent abnormal brain development as indicated by loss of CD24(hi cells that incorporated BrdU. This neonatal brain infection was also associated with altered expression of Oct4, a multipotency marker; as well as down regulation of the neurotrophins BDNF and NT3, which are essential to regulate the birth and differentiation of neurons during normal brain development. Finally, we report decreased expression of doublecortin, a marker to identify young neurons, following viral brain infection. CONCLUSIONS: MCMV brain infection of newborn mice causes significant loss of NSCs, decreased proliferation of neuronal precursor cells, and marked loss of young neurons.

  20. Development of human nervous tissue upon differentiation of embryonic stem cells in three-dimensional culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preynat-Seauve, Olivier; Suter, David M; Tirefort, Diderik; Turchi, Laurent; Virolle, Thierry; Chneiweiss, Herve; Foti, Michelangelo; Lobrinus, Johannes-Alexander; Stoppini, Luc; Feki, Anis; Dubois-Dauphin, Michel; Krause, Karl Heinz

    2009-03-01

    Researches on neural differentiation using embryonic stem cells (ESC) require analysis of neurogenesis in conditions mimicking physiological cellular interactions as closely as possible. In this study, we report an air-liquid interface-based culture of human ESC. This culture system allows three-dimensional cell expansion and neural differentiation in the absence of added growth factors. Over a 3-month period, a macroscopically visible, compact tissue developed. Histological coloration revealed a dense neural-like neural tissue including immature tubular structures. Electron microscopy, immunochemistry, and electrophysiological recordings demonstrated a dense network of neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes able to propagate signals. Within this tissue, tubular structures were niches of cells resembling germinal layers of human fetal brain. Indeed, the tissue contained abundant proliferating cells expressing markers of neural progenitors. Finally, the capacity to generate neural tissues on air-liquid interface differed for different ESC lines, confirming variations of their neurogenic potential. In conclusion, this study demonstrates in vitro engineering of a human neural-like tissue with an organization that bears resemblance to early developing brain. As opposed to previously described methods, this differentiation (a) allows three-dimensional organization, (b) yields dense interconnected neural tissue with structurally and functionally distinct areas, and (c) is spontaneously guided by endogenous developmental cues.

  1. Prostate Cancer Stem-like Cells Contribute to the Development of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Ojo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been the standard care for patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC since the 1940s. Although ADT shows clear benefits for many patients, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC inevitably occurs. In fact, with the two recent FDA-approved second-generation anti-androgens abiraterone and enzalutamide, resistance develops rapidly in patients with CRPC, despite their initial effectiveness. The lack of effective therapeutic solutions towards CRPC largely reflects our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for CRPC development. While persistent androgen receptor (AR signaling under castration levels of serum testosterone (<50 ng/mL contributes to resistance to ADT, it is also clear that CRPC evolves via complex mechanisms. Nevertheless, the physiological impact of individual mechanisms and whether these mechanisms function in a cohesive manner in promoting CRPC are elusive. In spite of these uncertainties, emerging evidence supports a critical role of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSLCs in stimulating CRPC evolution and resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. In this review, we will discuss the recent evidence supporting the involvement of PCSLC in CRPC acquisition as well as the pathways and factors contributing to PCSLC expansion in response to ADT.

  2. Pollen-Specific Aquaporins NIP4;1 and NIP4;2 Are Required for Pollen Development and Pollination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giorgio, Juliana Andrea Pérez; Bienert, Gerd Patrick; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel; Yaneff, Agustín; Barberini, María Laura; Mecchia, Martín Alejandro; Amodeo, Gabriela; Soto, Gabriela Cynthia; Muschietti, Jorge Prometeo

    2016-05-01

    In flowers with dry stigmas, pollen development, pollination, and pollen tube growth require spatial and temporal regulation of water and nutrient transport. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in reproductive processes, we characterized NIP4;1 and NIP4;2, two pollen-specific aquaporins of Arabidopsis thaliana. NIP4;1 and NIP4;2 are paralogs found exclusively in the angiosperm lineage. Although they have 84% amino acid identity, they displayed different expression patterns. NIP4;1 has low expression levels in mature pollen, while NIP4;2 expression peaks during pollen tube growth. Additionally, NIP4;1pro:GUS flowers showed GUS activity in mature pollen and pollen tubes, whereas NIP4;2pro:GUS flowers only in pollen tubes. Single T-DNA mutants and double artificial microRNA knockdowns had fewer seeds per silique and reduced pollen germination and pollen tube length. Transport assays in oocytes showed NIP4;1 and NIP4;2 function as water and nonionic channels. We also found that NIP4;1 and NIP4;2 C termini are phosphorylated by a pollen-specific CPK that modifies their water permeability. Survival assays in yeast indicated that NIP4;1 also transports ammonia, urea, boric acid, and H2O2 Thus, we propose that aquaporins NIP4;1 and NIP4;2 are exclusive components of the reproductive apparatus of angiosperms with partially redundant roles in pollen development and pollination.

  3. Role of nanotopography in the development of tissue engineered 3D organs and tissues using mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmasi, Shima; Kalaskar, Deepak M; Yoon, Wai-Weng; Blunn, Gordon W; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-03-26

    Recent regenerative medicine and tissue engineering strategies (using cells, scaffolds, medical devices and gene therapy) have led to fascinating progress of translation of basic research towards clinical applications. In the past decade, great deal of research has focused on developing various three dimensional (3D) organs, such as bone, skin, liver, kidney and ear, using such strategies in order to replace or regenerate damaged organs for the purpose of maintaining or restoring organs' functions that may have been lost due to aging, accident or disease. The surface properties of a material or a device are key aspects in determining the success of the implant in biomedicine, as the majority of biological reactions in human body occur on surfaces or interfaces. Furthermore, it has been established in the literature that cell adhesion and proliferation are, to a great extent, influenced by the micro- and nano-surface characteristics of biomaterials and devices. In addition, it has been shown that the functions of stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells in particular, could be regulated through physical interaction with specific nanotopographical cues. Therefore, guided stem cell proliferation, differentiation and function are of great importance in the regeneration of 3D tissues and organs using tissue engineering strategies. This review will provide an update on the impact of nanotopography on mesenchymal stem cells for the purpose of developing laboratory-based 3D organs and tissues, as well as the most recent research and case studies on this topic.

  4. Employment of the Triple Helix concept for development of regenerative medicine applications based on human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartipy, Peter; Björquist, Petter

    2014-01-01

    Using human pluripotent stem cells as a source to generate differentiated progenies for regenerative medicine applications has attracted substantial interest during recent years. Having the capability to produce large quantities of human cells that can replace damaged tissue due to disease or injury opens novel avenues for relieving symptoms and also potentially offers cures for many severe human diseases. Although tremendous advancements have been made, there is still much research and development left before human pluripotent stem cell derived products can be made available for cell therapy applications. In order to speed up the development processes, we argue strongly in favor of cross-disciplinary collaborative efforts which have many advantages, especially in a relatively new field such as regenerative medicine based on human pluripotent stem cells. In this review, we aim to illustrate how some of the hurdles for bringing human pluripotent stem cell derivatives from bench-to-bed can be effectively addressed through the establishment of collaborative programs involving academic institutions, biotech industries, and pharmaceutical companies. By taking advantage of the strengths from each organization, innovation and productivity can be maximized from a resource perspective and thus, the chances of successfully bringing novel regenerative medicine treatment options to patients increase.

  5. Trace concentrations of imazethapyr (IM) affect floral organs development and reproduction in Arabidopsis thaliana: IM-induced inhibition of key genes regulating anther and pollen biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Haifeng; Li, Yali; Sun, Chongchong; Lavoie, Michel; Xie, Jun; Bai, Xiaocui; Fu, Zhengwei

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how herbicides affect plant reproduction and growth is critical to develop herbicide toxicity model and refine herbicide risk assessment. Although our knowledge of herbicides toxicity mechanisms at the physiological and molecular level in plant vegetative phase has increased substantially in the last decades, few studies have addressed the herbicide toxicity problematic on plant reproduction. Here, we determined the long-term (4-8 weeks) effect of a chiral herbicide, imazethapyr (IM), which has been increasingly used in plant crops, on floral organ development and reproduction in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. More specifically, we followed the effect of two IM enantiomers (R- and S-IM) on floral organ structure, seed production, pollen viability and the transcription of key genes involved in anther and pollen development. The results showed that IM strongly inhibited the transcripts of genes regulating A. thaliana tapetum development (DYT1: DYSFUNCTIONAL TAPETUM 1), tapetal differentiation and function (TDF1: TAPETAL DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION1), and pollen wall formation and developments (AMS: ABORTED MICROSPORES, MYB103: MYB DOMAIN PROTEIN 103, MS1: MALE STERILITY 1, MS2: MALE STERILITY 2). Since DYT1 positively regulates 33 genes involved in cell-wall modification (such as, TDF1, AMS, MYB103, MS1, MS2) that can catalyze the breakdown of polysaccharides to facilitate anther dehiscence, the consistent decrease in the transcription of these genes after IM exposure should hamper anther opening as observed under scanning electron microscopy. The toxicity of IM on anther opening further lead to a decrease in pollen production and pollen viability. Furthermore, long-term IM exposure increased the number of apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) in the DNA of A. thaliana and also altered the DNA of A. thaliana offspring grown in IM-free soils. Toxicity of IM on floral organs development and reproduction was generally higher in the presence of the R

  6. Reference: 567 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ith findings that noxy2 and mutants with defective 9-LOX activity showed increased numbers of lateral roots,...or of lateral root formation. Histochemical and molecular analyses revealed that 9-HOT activated events comm...in Arabidopsis regulate lateral root development and defense responses through a specific signaling cascade.

  7. Proteomics of Arabidopsis seed germination and priming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallardo, K.; Job, C.; Groot, S.P.C.; Puype, M.; Demol, H.; Vandekerckhove, J.; Job, D.

    2003-01-01

    To better understand seed germination, a complex developmental process, we developed a proteome analysis of the model plant Arabidopsis for which complete genome sequence is now available. Among about 1,300 total seed proteins resolved in two-dimensional gels, changes in the abundance (up- and down-

  8. Reference: 239 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 239 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u16015335i Bundock Paul et al. 2005 Jul. Natur...functions. An Arabidopsis hAT-like transposase is essential for plant development. 7048 282-4 16015335 2005 Jul Nature Bundock Paul|Hooykaas Paul

  9. Evaluation of Proliferation and Development of Mesenchymal Stem Cell on Nanoporous PLLA Membrane Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Porghara

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Due to the biodegradable and non-toxic properties of nano PLLA membrane, it could increase the adhesion and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells and these effects will exacerbated over time.

  10. The transcriptome of rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, B.W.M.; Glazebrook, J.; Zhu, T.; Chang, H.-S.; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Plants develop an enhanced defensive capacity against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens after colonization of the roots by selected strains of nonpathogenic, fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. In Arabidopsis thaliana, this rhizobacteria-induced systemic resistance (ISR) functions independently of salicy

  11. Development of an Interdisciplinary STEM Classroom Activity for Radio Receiver Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Introdu