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Sample records for arabidopsis cold shock

  1. Cold Shock Domain Protein 3 Regulates Freezing Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Sasaki, Kentaro; Imai, Ryozo

    2009-01-01

    In response to cold, Escherichia coli produces cold shock proteins (CSPs) that have essential roles in cold adaptation as RNA chaperones. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis cold shock domain protein 3 (AtCSP3), which shares a cold shock domain with bacterial CSPs, is involved in the acquisition of freezing tolerance in plants. AtCSP3 complemented a cold-sensitive phenotype of the E. coli CSP quadruple mutant and displayed nucleic acid duplex melting activity, suggesting that AtCSP3 also fu...

  2. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (AtNTRC) confers freezing and cold shock tolerance to plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jeong Chan [National Institute of Ecology, 1210 Geumgang-ro, Maseo-myeon, Seocheon-gun 325-813 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangmin [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Su Young [National Institute of Ecology, 1210 Geumgang-ro, Maseo-myeon, Seocheon-gun 325-813 (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Ho Byoung; Jung, Young Jun [Division of Applied Life Science - BK21+ program, PMBBRC, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hyun Suk [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyun Oh [Division of Applied Life Science - BK21+ program, PMBBRC, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Ro, E-mail: leejr73@nie.re.kr [National Institute of Ecology, 1210 Geumgang-ro, Maseo-myeon, Seocheon-gun 325-813 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States); Lee, Sang Yeol, E-mail: sylee@gnu.ac.kr [Division of Applied Life Science - BK21+ program, PMBBRC, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    Overexpression of AtNTRC (AtNTRC{sup OE}) in Arabidopsis thaliana led to a freezing and cold stress tolerance, whereas a knockout mutant (atntrc) showed a stress-sensitive phenotype. Biochemical analyses showed that the recombinant AtNTRC proteins exhibited a cryoprotective activity for malate dehydrogenase and lactic dehydrogenase. Furthermore, conclusive evidence of its interaction with nucleic acids in vitro is provided here on the basis of gel shift and electron microscopy analysis. Recombinant AtNTRC efficiently protected RNA and DNA from RNase A and metal catalyzed oxidation damage, respectively. The C-terminal thioredoxin domain is required for the nucleic acid–protein complex formation. From these results, it can be hypothesized that AtNTRC, which is known to be an electron donor of peroxiredoxin, contributes the stability of macromolecules under cold stress. - Highlights: • AtNTRC has a cryoprotective activity in vitro. • Overexpression of AtNTRC increases tolerance to freezing and cold shock stresses. • Thioredoxin domain of AtNTRC protects nucleic acids in vitro. • AtNTRC inhibits protein aggregation under freezing stress in vitro.

  3. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (AtNTRC) confers freezing and cold shock tolerance to plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overexpression of AtNTRC (AtNTRCOE) in Arabidopsis thaliana led to a freezing and cold stress tolerance, whereas a knockout mutant (atntrc) showed a stress-sensitive phenotype. Biochemical analyses showed that the recombinant AtNTRC proteins exhibited a cryoprotective activity for malate dehydrogenase and lactic dehydrogenase. Furthermore, conclusive evidence of its interaction with nucleic acids in vitro is provided here on the basis of gel shift and electron microscopy analysis. Recombinant AtNTRC efficiently protected RNA and DNA from RNase A and metal catalyzed oxidation damage, respectively. The C-terminal thioredoxin domain is required for the nucleic acid–protein complex formation. From these results, it can be hypothesized that AtNTRC, which is known to be an electron donor of peroxiredoxin, contributes the stability of macromolecules under cold stress. - Highlights: • AtNTRC has a cryoprotective activity in vitro. • Overexpression of AtNTRC increases tolerance to freezing and cold shock stresses. • Thioredoxin domain of AtNTRC protects nucleic acids in vitro. • AtNTRC inhibits protein aggregation under freezing stress in vitro

  4. Rapid habituation of the cold shock response

    OpenAIRE

    Eglin, Clare M.; Butt, George; Howden, Stephen; Nash, Thomas; Costello, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Sudden immersion into cold water initiates a series of cardio-respiratory responses collectively known as the cold shock response (CSR) which may increase an individual's risk of drowning. The CSR is stimulated by a rapid fall in skin temperature and includes tachycardia, a reflex inspiratory gasp followed by uncontrollable hyperventilation. Repeated cold water immersions conducted over several days have been shown to reduce the magnitude of the CSR [1]. This study investigated whether an hab...

  5. Heat shock protection against cold stress of Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, V; Mitchell, H K; Young, P.; Petersen, N S

    1988-01-01

    Heat shock protein synthesis can be induced during recovery from cold treatment of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Survival of larvae after a cold treatment is dramatically improved by a mild heat shock just before the cold shock. The conditions which induce tolerance to cold are similar to those which confer tolerance to heat.

  6. Cold Fronts by Merging of Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Birnboim, Yuval; Keshet, Uri; Hernquist, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Cold fronts (CFs) are found in most galaxy clusters, as well as in some galaxies and groups of galaxies. We propose that some CFs are relics of merging between two shocks propagating in the same direction. Such shock mergers typically result in a quasi-spherical, factor ~1.4-2.7 discontinuity in density and in temperature. These CFs may be found as far out as the virial shock, unlike what is expected in other CF formation models. As a demonstration of this effect, we use one dimensional simul...

  7. Cold Shock Induction of Thermal Sensitivity in Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Arthur J.; Bayles, Darrell O.; Eblen, B. Shawn

    2000-01-01

    Cold shock at 0 to 15°C for 1 to 3 h increased the thermal sensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes. In a model broth system, thermal death time at 60°C was reduced by up to 45% after L. monocytogenes Scott A was cold shocked for 3 h. The duration of the cold shock affected thermal tolerance more than did the magnitude of the temperature downshift. The Z values were 8.8°C for controls and 7.7°C for cold-shocked cells. The D values of cold-shocked cells did not return to control levels after incu...

  8. Chlorophyll fluorescence emission can screen cold tolerance of cold acclimated Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mishra, Anamika; Heyer, A. G.; Mishra, Kumud

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 38 (2014). ISSN 1746-4811 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0246; GA MŠk 7E12047 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : high-throughput screening * chlorophyll a fluorescence transients * cold tolerance * cold acclimation * whole plant * Arabidopsis thaliana Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.102, year: 2014

  9. Pleiotropic Roles of Cold Shock Domain Proteins in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Imai, Ryozo

    2012-01-01

    The cold shock domain (CSD) is a nucleic acid binding domain that is widely conserved from bacteria to higher plants and animals. In Escherichia coli, cold shock proteins (CSPs) are composed solely of a CSD and function as RNA chaperones that destabilize RNA secondary structures. Cellular RNAs tend to be folded into unfavorable structures under low temperature conditions, and RNA chaperones resolve these structures, recovering functionality of the RNAs. CSP functions are associated mainly wit...

  10. Prolonged anxiety on habituation of the cold shock response

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Heather C; Corbett, Jo; Wagstaff, Christopher; Tipton, Michael J; Barwood, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the cold shock response (CSR) can be explained by physiological factors [1], habituation [2]; and possibly "psychological" influences. Acute anxiety on cold-water immersion (CWI) increases the magnitude of the CSR in unhabituated volunteers and eliminates the reduction in the response seen after habituation [3]. Recently it was demonstrated that habituation of the CSR includes a significant perceptual component [4]. When the threat of CWI scenario was reduced, anxiety associated ...

  11. Differential cold-shock resistance among acclimated European mussel populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.; Hummel, H.

    2007-01-01

    To study differential cold-shock resistance of marine mussel populations (Mytilus spp.) from different climatic regions in Europe, we sampled 12 populations, ranging from 43 to 58 degrees N. Minimum critical temperatures for aerobic metabolism (CTmin) were determined before and after 3 months of com

  12. Differential cold-shock resistance among acclimated European mussel populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.; Hummel, H.

    2007-01-01

    To study differential cold-shock resistance of marine mussel populations (Mytilus spp.) from different climatic regions in Europe, we sampled 12 populations, ranging from 43 to 58°N. Minimum critical temperatures for aerobic metabolism (CTmin) were determined before and after 3 months of common accl

  13. Differential cold-shock resistance among acclimated European mussel populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.M.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.; Hummel, H.

    2007-01-01

    To study differential cold-shock resistance of marine mussel populations (Mytilus spp.) from different climatic regions in Europe, we sampled 12 populations, ranging from 43 to 58_N. Minimum critical temperatures for aerobic metabolism (CTmin) were determined before and after 3 months of common accl

  14. Preferential translation of cold-shock mRNAs during cold adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    GIULIODORI, ANNA MARIA; Brandi, Anna; GUALERZI, CLAUDIO O.; Pon, Cynthia L.

    2004-01-01

    Upon temperature downshift below the lower threshold of balanced growth (~20°C), the Escherichia coli translational apparatus undergoes modifications allowing the selective translation of the transcripts of cold shock-induced genes, while bulk protein synthesis is drastically reduced. Here we were able to reproduce this translational bias in E. coli cell-free extracts prepared at various times during cold adaptation which were found to display different capacities to translate different types...

  15. Metabolomic profiling of rapid cold hardening and cold shock in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Malmendal, Anders; Sørensen, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    study used untargeted (1)H NMR metabolomic profiling to examine the metabolomic response in Drosophila melanogaster during the 72 h following RCH and cold shock treatment. These findings are discussed in relation to the costs and benefits of RCH that are measured in terms of survival and reproductive...

  16. Cold shock of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 are involved in cryoprotection and in the production of cold-induced proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, J.A.; Frenkiel, H.; Vos, de W.M.; Kuipers, O.P.; Abee, T.

    2001-01-01

    Members of the group of 7-kDa cold-shock proteins (CSPs) are the proteins with the highest level of induction upon cold shock in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363. By using double-crossover recombination, two L. lactis strains were generated in which genes encoding CSPs are disrupt

  17. Role of Cold Shock Proteins in Growth of Listeria monocytogenes under Cold and Osmotic Stress Conditions▿

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Barbara; Klumpp, Jochen; Raimann, Eveline; Loessner, Martin J; Stephan, Roger; Tasara, Taurai

    2009-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen of both public health and food safety significance. It possesses three small, highly homologous protein members of the cold shock protein (Csp) family. We used gene expression analysis and a set of mutants with single, double, and triple deletions of the csp genes to evaluate the roles of CspA, CspB, and CspD in the cold and osmotic (NaCl) stress adaptation responses of L. monocytogenes. All three Csps are dispensable...

  18. Complementation of Cold Shock Proteins by Translation Initiation Factor IF1 In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Michael H. W.; Beckering, Carsten L.; Marahiel, Mohamed A.

    2001-01-01

    The cold shock response in both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis is induced by an abrupt downshift in growth temperature and leads to a dramatic increase in the production of a homologous class of small, often highly acidic cold shock proteins. This protein family is the prototype of the cold shock domain (CSD) that is conserved from bacteria to humans. For B. subtilis it has been shown that at least one of the three resident cold shock proteins (CspB to D) is essential under optimal gr...

  19. Evaluation of cold shock-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in the house fly Musca domestica

    OpenAIRE

    Nidhi Mishra; Raghav Ram Tewari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Low temperature affects the survival, growth and development of invertebrates, especially insects, based on the severity of cold and the duration of exposure. Although the effects of cold shock or direct chilling were previously analysed in terms of development patterns and defects, morphological changes, cold hardiness, cryopreservation and diapause in insects, very little information is available regarding the effects of cold shock at the chromosomal level. Material and Meth...

  20. Predicting effects of cold shock: modeling the decline of a thermal plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Trent, D.S.; Schneider, M.J.

    1977-10-01

    Predicting direct impact of cold shock on aquatic organisms after termination of power plant thermal discharges requires thermal tests that provide quantitative data on the resistance of acclimated species to lower temperatures. Selected examples from the literature on cold shock resistance of freshwater and marine fishes are illustrated to show predictive use. Abrupt cold shock data may be applied to field situations involving either abrupt or gradual temperature declines but yield conservative estimates under the latter conditions. Gradual cold shock data may be applied where heated plumes gradually dissipate because poikilotherms partially compensate for lowering temperature regimes. A simplified analytical model is presented for estimating thermal declines in terminated plumes originating from offshore, submerged discharges where shear current and boundary effects are minimal. When applied to site-specific conditions, the method provides time-temperature distributions for correlation with cold resistance data and, therefore, aids in assessing cold shock impact on aquatic biota.

  1. Solution structure of the cold-shock-like protein from Rickettsia rickettsii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solution structure of the cold-shock-like protein from R. rickettsii, the causative agent of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, is reported. Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by Rickettsia rickettsii infection. R. rickettsii can be transmitted to mammals, including humans, through the bite of an infected hard-bodied tick of the family Ixodidae. Since the R. rickettsii genome contains only one cold-shock-like protein and given the essential nature of cold-shock proteins in other bacteria, the structure of the cold-shock-like protein from R. rickettsii was investigated. With the exception of a short α-helix found between β-strands 3 and 4, the solution structure of the R. rickettsii cold-shock-like protein has the typical Greek-key five-stranded β-barrel structure found in most cold-shock domains. Additionally, the R. rickettsii cold-shock-like protein, with a ΔG of unfolding of 18.4 kJ mol−1, has a similar stability when compared with other bacterial cold-shock proteins

  2. Genome-scale cold stress response regulatory networks in ten Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barah, Pankaj; Jayavelu, Naresh Doni; Rasmussen, Simon;

    2013-01-01

    available from Arabidopsis thaliana 1001 genome project, we further investigated sequence polymorphisms in the core cold stress regulon genes. Significant numbers of non-synonymous amino acid changes were observed in the coding region of the CBF regulon genes. Considering the limited knowledge about......BACKGROUND: Low temperature leads to major crop losses every year. Although several studies have been conducted focusing on diversity of cold tolerance level in multiple phenotypically divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, genome-scale molecular understanding is still lacking....... RESULTS: In this study, we report genome-scale transcript response diversity of 10 A. thaliana ecotypes originating from different geographical locations to non-freezing cold stress (10°C). To analyze the transcriptional response diversity, we initially compared transcriptome changes in all 10 ecotypes...

  3. Changes in nuclear phenotypes following cold shock in Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone L Garcia

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear phenotypes of Malpighian tubule epithelial cells of 5th instar male nymphs of the blood-sucking insect Panstrongylus megistus were studied immediately after a short (1 h cold shock at 0ºC, and 10 and 30 days later. The objective was to compare the responses to a cold shock with those known to occur after hyperthermia in order to provide insight into the cellular effect of cold in this species. Nuclei which usually exhibited a conspicuous Y chromosome chromocenter were the most frequent phenotype in control and treated specimens. Phenotypes in which the heterochromatin was unravelled, or in which there was nuclear fusion or cell death were more abundant in the shocked specimens. Most of the changes detected have also been found in heat-shocked nymphs, except for nuclear fusion which generates giant nuclei and which appeared to be less effective or necessary than that elicited after heat shock. Since other studies showed that a short cold shock does not affect the survival of more than 14% of 5th instar nymphs of P. megistus with domestic habit and can induce tolerance to a prolonged cold shock, heat shock proteins proteins are probably the best candidates for effective protection of the cells and the insects from drastic damage caused by low temperature shocks.

  4. Chlorophyll fluorescence emission as a reporter on cold tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Anamika; Mishra, Kumud B; Höermiller, Imke I; Heyer, Arnd G; Nedbal, Ladislav

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive, high-throughput screening methods are valuable tools in breeding for abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Optical signals such as chlorophyll fluorescence emission can be instrumental in developing new screening techniques. In order to examine the potential of chlorophyll fluorescence to reveal plant tolerance to low temperatures, we used a collection of nine Arabidopsis thaliana accessions and compared their fluorescence features with cold tolerance quantified by the well establ...

  5. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomic fingerprinting for screening cold tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Václavík, L.; Mishra, Anamika; Mishra, Kumud; Hajslova, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 405, č. 8 (2013), s. 2671-2683. ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŠk OC08055 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : cold tolerance * Arabidopsis thaliana * metabolomic fingerprinting * LC-MS * DART-MS * chemometric analysis Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.578, year: 2013

  6. Experimental Study on Shock Wave Structures in Constant-area Passage of Cold Spray Nozzle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi KATANODA; Takeshi MATSUOKA; Kazuyasu MATSUO

    2007-01-01

    Cold spray is a technique to make a coating on a wide variety of mechanical or electric parts by spraying solid particles accelerated through a high-speed gas flow in a converging-diverging nozzle. In this study, pseudo-shock waves in a modeled cold spray nozzle as well as high-speed gas jets are visualized by schlieren technique. The schlieren photographs reveals the supersonic flow with shock train in the nozzle. Static pressure along the barrel wall is also measured. The location of the head of pseudo-shock wave and its pressure distribution along the nozzle wall are analytically explained by using a formula of pseudo-shock wave. The analytical results show that the supersonic flow accompanying shock wave in the nozzle should be treated as pseudo-shock wave instead of normal shock wave.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of heat shock transcription factor families in rice and Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingkang Guo; Jian Wu; Qian Ji; Chao Wang; Lei Luo; Yi Yuan; Yonghua Wang; Jian Wang

    2008-01-01

    The heat shock transcription factors (HSFs) are the major heat shock factors regulating the heat stress response. They participate in regulating the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are critical in the protection against stress damage and many other impor tant biological processes. Study of the HSF gene family is important for understanding the mechanism by which plants respond to stress. The completed genome sequences of rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) constitute a valuable resource for comparative genomic analysis, as they are representatives of the two major evolutionary lineages within the angiosperms: the monocotyledons and the dicotyledons. The identification of phylogenetic relationships among HSF proteins in these species is a fundamental step to unravel the functionality of new and yet uncharacterized genes belonging to this family.In this study, the full complement of HSF genes in rice and Arabidopsis has probably been identified through the genome-wide scan. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three major clusters of orthologous genes that contain members belonging to both species, which must have been represented in their common ancestor before the taxonomic splitting of the angiosperms. Further analysis of the phylogenetic tree reveals a possible dicot specific gene group. We also identified nine pairs of paralogs, as evidence for studies on the evolution history of rice HSF family and rice genome evolution. Expression data analysis indicates that HSF proteins are widely expressed in plants. These results provide a solid base for future functional genomic studies of the HSF gene family in rice and Arabidopsis.

  8. Natural Variation of Cold Deacclimation Correlates with Variation of Cold-Acclimation of the Plastid Antioxidant System in Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczak, Ilona; Cvetkovic, Jelena; Zuther, Ellen; Hincha, Dirk K; Baier, Margarete

    2016-01-01

    Temperature variations impact on the balance between photosynthetic electron transport and electron-consuming assimilation reactions and transiently increase generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies demonstrated that the expression of C-repeat binding factors (CBFs), which activate cold acclimation reactions, respond to chloroplast ROS signals and that cold deacclimation is partly halted for days after the transfer of acclimated plants to optimal growth conditions in four Arabidopsis accessions from cold-continental habitats. We hypothesized that these accessions differ from others in the regulation of the plastid antioxidant system (PAS). In the present study, we compared the expression intensity of the 12 most prominent PAS genes for peroxidases, superoxide dismutase and low molecular weight antioxidant regenerating enzymes in 10 Arabidopsis accessions with regulation of CBF and COR (cold regulated genes) transcript levels and cold-regulated metabolite levels prior to cold, after 2 week long cold acclimation and during the first 3 days of deacclimation. In the accessions with prolonged activation of cold responses, by trend, weaker induction of various cold-inducible PAS genes and stronger decreases in the expression of negatively cold-regulated PAS genes were observed. Low PAS gene expression delayed the post-cold decrease in H2O2 levels after transfer of the plants from cold to optimal growth conditions. We conclude that weaker expression of various PAS genes in the cold is an adapted strategy of the Arabidopsis accessions N14, N13, Ms-0, and Kas-1 to avoid full inactivation of cold-responses in the first days after the end of the cold period. PMID:27014325

  9. Changes in nuclear phenotypes following cold shock in Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister)

    OpenAIRE

    Simone L Garcia; Maria Luiza S Mello; Garcia, Nancy L.; Vera Lúcia CC Rodrigues

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear phenotypes of Malpighian tubule epithelial cells of 5th instar male nymphs of the blood-sucking insect Panstrongylus megistus were studied immediately after a short (1 h) cold shock at 0ºC, and 10 and 30 days later. The objective was to compare the responses to a cold shock with those known to occur after hyperthermia in order to provide insight into the cellular effect of cold in this species. Nuclei which usually exhibited a conspicuous Y chromosome chromocenter were the most fr...

  10. Laser Interferometry Measurements of Cold-Sprayed Copper Thermite Shocked to 30 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neel, Christopher; Lacina, David

    2015-06-01

    Plate impact experiments were conducted on a cold-sprayed Al-CuO thermite at peak stresses varying between 5-30 GPa to determine the Hugoniot and characterize any shock induced energetic reaction. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measurements were used to obtain particle velocity histories and shock speed information for both the shock loading and unloading behavior of the material. Low stress experiments (thermite near 20 GPa, but an analysis of the measured particle velocity histories does not support this assertion. To better characterize any shock-induced thermite reactions, emission spectroscopy measurements were obtained at stresses above and below 20 GPa.

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of (group I Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 cold shock response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Dahlsten

    Full Text Available Profound understanding of the mechanisms foodborne pathogenic bacteria utilize in adaptation to the environmental stress they encounter during food processing and storage is of paramount importance in design of control measures. Chill temperature is a central control measure applied in minimally processed foods; however, data on the mechanisms the foodborne pathogen Clostridium botulinum activates upon cold stress are scarce. Transcriptomic analysis on the C. botulinum ATCC 3502 strain upon temperature downshift from 37°C to 15°C was performed to identify the cold-responsive gene set of this organism. Significant up- or down-regulation of 16 and 11 genes, respectively, was observed 1 h after the cold shock. At 5 h after the temperature downshift, 199 and 210 genes were up- or down-regulated, respectively. Thus, the relatively small gene set affected initially indicated a targeted acute response to cold shock, whereas extensive metabolic remodeling appeared to take place after prolonged exposure to cold. Genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis, oxidative stress response, and iron uptake and storage were induced, in addition to mechanisms previously characterized as cold-tolerance related in bacteria. Furthermore, several uncharacterized DNA-binding transcriptional regulator-encoding genes were induced, suggesting involvement of novel regulatory mechanisms in the cold shock response of C. botulinum. The role of such regulators, CBO0477 and CBO0558A, in cold tolerance of C. botulinum ATCC 3502 was demonstrated by deteriorated growth of related mutants at 17°C.

  12. Cold Shock Proteins of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 Are Involved in Cryoprotection and in the Production of Cold-Induced Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Jeroen A.; Frenkiel, Hélène; Vos, Willem M. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Abee, Tjakko

    2001-01-01

    Members of the group of 7-kDa cold-shock proteins (CSPs) are the proteins with the highest level of induction upon cold shock in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363. By using double-crossover recombination, two L. lactis strains were generated in which genes encoding CSPs are disrupt

  13. Hydrodynamics of a cold one-dimensional fluid: the problem of strong shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Pablo I.

    2005-03-01

    We study a shock wave induced by an infinitely massive piston propagating into a one-dimensional cold gas. The cold gas is modelled as a collection of hard rods which are initially at rest, so the temperature is zero. Most of our results are based on simulations of a gas of rods with binary mass distribution, and we partcularly focus on the case of spatially alternating masses. We find that the properties of the resulting shock wave are in striking contrast with those predicted by hydrodynamic and kinetic approaches, e.g., the flow-field profiles relax algebraically toward their equilibrium values. In addition, most relevant observables characterizing local thermodynamic equilibrium and equipartition decay as a power law of the distance to the shock layer. The exponents of these power laws depend non-monotonously on the mass ratio. Similar interesting dependences on the mass ratio also characterize the shock width, density and temperature overshoots, etc.

  14. Role of cold shock proteins (Csp) for growth of Listeria monocytogenes under cold and osmotic stress conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Barbara Christiane Helene

    2009-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen of both public health and food safety significance. It possesses three small, highly homologous protein members of the cold shock protein (Csp) protein family. We used gene expression analysis and a set of mutants with single, double and triple deletion of the csp genes to evaluate roles of CspA, CspB and CspD in cold and osmotic (NaCl) stress adaptation responses of L. monocytogenes. All three Csps are dispensable fo...

  15. Hsc66, an Hsp70 homolog in Escherichia coli, is induced by cold shock but not by heat shock.

    OpenAIRE

    Lelivelt, M J; Kawula, T H

    1995-01-01

    Hsc66 is the second identified Hsp70 protein in Escherichia coli. Mutations in hscA, the gene encoding Hsc66, compensate for some phenotypic effects of a mutation in hns, a gene encoding the cold-inducible, nucleoid-associated protein H-NS. Expression of hscA was not induced upon heat shock but was induced approximately 11-fold 3 h after a shift from 37 to 10 degrees C. Furthermore, hscA was induced upon chloramphenicol addition, which induces the synthesis of other cold-inducible genes. Mapp...

  16. Changes in nuclear phenotype frequencies following sequential cold shocks in Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera, Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana GP Campos

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear phenotypes of Malpighian tubule cells in fifth instar nymphs of Triatoma infestans, one of the most important vectors of Chagas disease, were studied following sequential shocks at 0ºC, separated by intervals of 8 h and 24 h at 30ºC, under conditions of moderate fasting and full nourishment. The insects pertained to colonies reared in the laboratory and originated from domestic specimens collected in the Brazilian states of São Paulo (north and Minas Gerais (south. Since nuclear phenotypes in this species are affected by single cold shocks, it was expected that these phenotypes could also be changed by sequential shocks. Nuclear phenotypes indicative of mechanisms of cell survival (nuclear fusion and heterochromatin decondensation and cell death (apoptosis and necrosis were observed concomitantly in all the conditions tested. Nuclear fusion and heterochromatin decondensation were not found relevant for the presumed acquisition of the cold-hardening response in T. infestans. The decreased frequency of apoptosis and necrosis following sequential cold shocks including under fasting conditions, indicated that tolerance to sequential cold shocks occurred in T. infestans of the mentioned origin.

  17. The Cold Shock Domain of YB-1 Segregates RNA from DNA by Non-Bonded Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Kljashtorny

    Full Text Available The human YB-1 protein plays multiple cellular roles, of which many are dictated by its binding to RNA and DNA through its Cold Shock Domain (CSD. Using molecular dynamics simulation approaches validated by experimental assays, the YB1 CSD was found to interact with nucleic acids in a sequence-dependent manner and with a higher affinity for RNA than DNA. The binding properties of the YB1 CSD were close to those observed for the related bacterial Cold Shock Proteins (CSP, albeit some differences in sequence specificity. The results provide insights in the molecular mechanisms whereby YB-1 interacts with nucleic acids.

  18. Reliability analysis of two-unit cold standby repairable systems under Poisson shock.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Qingtai; Wu, Shaomin

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the reliability of a cold standby system consisting of two repairable units, a switch and a repairman. At any time, one of the two units is operating while the other is on cold standby. The repairman may not always at the job site, or take vacation. We assume that shocks can attack the operating unit. The arrival times of the shocks follow a homogeneous Poisson process and their magnitude is a random variable following a known distribution. Time on repairing a failed unit ...

  19. Translation suppression promotes stress granule formation and cell survival in response to cold shock

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Sarah; Cherkasova, Valeria; Bankhead, Peter; Bukau, Bernd; Stoecklin, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Cells respond to different types of stress by inhibition of protein synthesis and subsequent assembly of stress granules (SGs), cytoplasmic aggregates that contain stalled translation preinitiation complexes. Global translation is regulated through the translation initiation factor eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) and the mTOR pathway. Here we identify cold shock as a novel trigger of SG assembly in yeast and mammals. Whereas cold shock–induced SGs take hours to form, they dissolve wit...

  20. Evaluation of cold shock-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in the house fly Musca domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Mishra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low temperature affects the survival, growth and development of invertebrates, especially insects, based on the severity of cold and the duration of exposure. Although the effects of cold shock or direct chilling were previously analysed in terms of development patterns and defects, morphological changes, cold hardiness, cryopreservation and diapause in insects, very little information is available regarding the effects of cold shock at the chromosomal level. Material and Methods: Late third instar larvae of the house fly Musca domestica were exposed to low temperatures (10, 4, 0 and -5°C for different durations, in order to assess genotoxicity and cytotoxicity in the present study. The chromosomal aberration assay and micronucleus test were used as genotoxic end points. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by the mitotic index and the extent of tissue damage was observed using the Trypan blue staining method. Results: A significant (P<0.05, P<0.01 and P<0.001 increase in chromosome aberrations and micronucleus frequency was observed in all of the exposed groups compared to the control. The mitotic index showed a dose-dependent increase; however, it was lower in comparison to the control. The developmental patterns in exposed larvae exhibited an increase in larval mortality and a delay in adult emergence. Extensive tissue damage was observed at -5°C by Trypan blue staining. Conclusions: The present work suggests that cold shock induces chromosome aberrations and cytotoxicity and affects the developmental pattern in house fly, M. domestica.

  1. Putrescine is involved in Arabidopsis freezing tolerance and cold acclimation by regulating abscisic acid levels in response to low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Juan C; López-Cobollo, Rosa; Alcázar, Rubén; Zarza, Xavier; Koncz, Csaba; Altabella, Teresa; Salinas, Julio; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Ferrando, Alejandro

    2008-10-01

    The levels of endogenous polyamines have been shown to increase in plant cells challenged with low temperature; however, the functions of polyamines in the regulation of cold stress responses are unknown. Here, we show that the accumulation of putrescine under cold stress is essential for proper cold acclimation and survival at freezing temperatures because Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants defective in putrescine biosynthesis (adc1, adc2) display reduced freezing tolerance compared to wild-type plants. Genes ADC1 and ADC2 show different transcriptional profiles upon cold treatment; however, they show similar and redundant contributions to cold responses in terms of putrescine accumulation kinetics and freezing sensitivity. Our data also demonstrate that detrimental consequences of putrescine depletion during cold stress are due, at least in part, to alterations in the levels of abscisic acid (ABA). Reduced expression of NCED3, a key gene involved in ABA biosynthesis, and down-regulation of ABA-regulated genes are detected in both adc1 and adc2 mutant plants under cold stress. Complementation analysis of adc mutants with ABA and reciprocal complementation tests of the aba2-3 mutant with putrescine support the conclusion that putrescine controls the levels of ABA in response to low temperature by modulating ABA biosynthesis and gene expression. PMID:18701673

  2. Gene expression profiling of a cold-shocked earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H S; Ahn, C H; Park, T S; Park, H D; Koh, K S; Ryoo, Z Y; Park, S C; Lee, S

    2012-01-01

    To identify genes that are modulated under cold-stress conditions in the earthworm Eisenia andrei, we performed a genome-wide analysis of gene expression in cold-shocked earthworms by using Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE). We identified 5,977 and 5,407 unique SAGE tags under normal and cold-stressed conditions, respectively. The majority of the SAGE tags did not match to any known expressed sequences, due to a paucity of expression data in earthworms. We converted the statistically significant SAGE tags for the cold-stressed condition into expressed sequence tags (ESTs), and the results showed that particular genes associated with energy homeostasis, cellular defense mechanisms, and ion balance were up-regulated or down-regulated. We constructed a regulatory network of some of these genes and identified rps-6 as a core gene in the cold-response regulatory-gene network. Our data provide a baseline for gene expression studies of cold shock in the Lumbricidae. PMID:22434117

  3. PpCBF3 from Cold-Tolerant Kentucky Bluegrass Involved in Freezing Tolerance Associated with Up-Regulation of Cold-Related Genes in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Zhuang

    Full Text Available Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding proteins (DREB/C-repeat (CRT Binding Factors (CBF have been identified as transcriptional activators during plant responses to cold stress. The objective of this study was to determine the physiological roles of a CBF gene isolated from a cold-tolerant perennial grass species, Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L., which designated as PpCBF3, in regulating plant tolerance to freezing stress. Transient transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplast with PpCBF3-eGFP fused protein showed that PpCBF3 was localized to the nucleus. RT-PCR analysis showed that PpCBF3 was specifically induced by cold stress (4°C but not by drought stress [induced by 20% polyethylene glycol 6000 solution (PEG-6000] or salt stress (150 mM NaCl. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing PpCBF3 showed significant improvement in freezing (-20°C tolerance demonstrated by a lower percentage of chlorotic leaves, lower cellular electrolyte leakage (EL and H2O2 and O2.- content, and higher chlorophyll content and photochemical efficiency compared to the wild type. Relative mRNA expression level analysis by qRT-PCR indicated that the improved freezing tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing PpCBF3 was conferred by sustained activation of downstream cold responsive (COR genes. Other interesting phenotypic changes in the PpCBF3-transgenic Arabidopsis plants included late flowering and slow growth or 'dwarfism', both of which are desirable phenotypic traits for perennial turfgrasses. Therefore, PpCBF3 has potential to be used in genetic engineering for improvement of turfgrass freezing tolerance and other desirable traits.

  4. Interaction with diurnal and circadian regulation results in dynamic metabolic and transcriptional changes during cold acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Espinoza

    Full Text Available In plants, there is a large overlap between cold and circadian regulated genes and in Arabidopsis, we have shown that cold (4°C affects the expression of clock oscillator genes. However, a broader insight into the significance of diurnal and/or circadian regulation of cold responses, particularly for metabolic pathways, and their physiological relevance is lacking. Here, we performed an integrated analysis of transcripts and primary metabolites using microarrays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. As expected, expression of diurnally regulated genes was massively affected during cold acclimation. Our data indicate that disruption of clock function at the transcriptional level extends to metabolic regulation. About 80% of metabolites that showed diurnal cycles maintained these during cold treatment. In particular, maltose content showed a massive night-specific increase in the cold. However, under free-running conditions, maltose was the only metabolite that maintained any oscillations in the cold. Furthermore, although starch accumulates during cold acclimation we show it is still degraded at night, indicating significance beyond the previously demonstrated role of maltose and starch breakdown in the initial phase of cold acclimation. Levels of some conventional cold induced metabolites, such as γ-aminobutyric acid, galactinol, raffinose and putrescine, exhibited diurnal and circadian oscillations and transcripts encoding their biosynthetic enzymes often also cycled and preceded their cold-induction, in agreement with transcriptional regulation. However, the accumulation of other cold-responsive metabolites, for instance homoserine, methionine and maltose, did not have consistent transcriptional regulation, implying that metabolic reconfiguration involves complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. These data demonstrate the importance of understanding cold acclimation in the correct day-night context, and are further

  5. The influence of developmental stage on cold shock resistance and ability to cold-harden in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorthe; Overgaard, Johannes; Sørensen, Jesper G

    2006-01-01

    cold shocked either directly or after RCH to estimate the effect of RCH. We found large variation in cold tolerance among developmental stages and minor differences between genders. Eggs were most tolerant followed by adults, pupae and larvae. In the light of this and other studies it is suggested that...

  6. Stress-responsive expression patterns and functional characterization of cold shock domain proteins in cabbage (Brassica rapa) under abiotic stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Min Ji; Park, Ye Rin; Park, Su Jung; Kang, Hunseung

    2015-11-01

    Although the functional roles of cold shock domain proteins (CSDPs) have been demonstrated during the growth, development, and stress adaptation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and wheat (Triticum aestivum), the functions of CSDPs in other plants species, including cabbage (Brassica rapa), are largely unknown. To gain insight into the roles of CSDPs in cabbage under stress conditions, the genes encoding CSDPs in cabbage were isolated, and the functional roles of CSDPs in response to environmental stresses were analyzed. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that the levels of BrCSDP transcripts increased during cold, salt, or drought stress, as well as upon ABA treatment. Among the five BrCSDP genes found in the cabbage genome, one CSDP (BRU12051), named BrCSDP3, was unique in that it is localized to the chloroplast as well as to the nucleus. Ectopic expression of BrCSDP3 in Arabidopsis resulted in accelerated seed germination and better seedling growth compared to the wild-type plants under high salt or dehydration stress conditions, and in response to ABA treatment. BrCSDP3 did not affect the splicing of intron-containing genes and processing of rRNAs in the chloroplast. BrCSDP3 had the ability to complement RNA chaperone-deficient Escherichia coli mutant cells under low temperatures as well as DNA- and RNA-melting abilities, suggesting that it possesses RNA chaperone activity. Taken together, these results suggest that BrCSDP3, harboring RNA chaperone activity, plays a role as a positive regulator in seed germination and seedling growth under stress conditions. PMID:26263516

  7. Shear strength developments during shock loading in tantalum alloys: Effects of cold work and alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of shear strength behind the shock front in tantalum alloys of 2.5 and 10 wt% tungsten has been monitored by the use of laterally mounted stress gauges. Results show that in common with pure tantalum, shear strength decreases behind the shock front. At 2.5 wt%, we believe that tungsten modifies the mechanical response by mitigating the effects of interstitial solute atoms, thus easing dislocation motion, as evidenced by the smaller reduction in shear strength compared to pure tantalum. At higher tungsten levels, it would appear that this is overcome by an overall increase in Peierls stress, which renders dislocation motion more difficult, thus giving the alloy a response more in common with that of the pure metal. Cold rolling of the 2.5% W alloy also appears to increase shear strength reduction behind the shock front (compared to the annealed alloy), although at present the reasons for this are unclear.

  8. Enhanced levels of cold shock proteins in Listeria monocytogenes LO28 upon exposure to low temperature and high hydrostatic pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.; Karatzas, A.K.; Wouters, J.A.; Abee, T

    2002-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a psychrotrophic food-borne pathogen that is problematic for the food industry because of its ubiquitous distribution in nature and its ability to grow at low temperatures and in the presence of high salt concentrations. Here we demonstrate that the process of adaptation to low temperature after cold shock includes elevated levels of cold shock proteins (CSPs) and that the levels of CSPs are also elevated after treatment with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Two-dime...

  9. Comparison of effectiveness of heat and cold shocks applied in the induction of gynogenesis in Clarias gariepinus (Burchell)

    OpenAIRE

    Marx, K.K.; Sukumaran, N.

    2007-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to optimize the procedure of gynogenesis in African catfish, Clarias gariepinus by suppressing meiotic and mitotic cell divisions in fertilized eggs. Gynogensis was conducted by fertilizing normal eggs with UV-irradiated sperm followed by either heat or cold shocking Irradiation of spermatozoa was given for a duration of 1 min and the eggs were fertilized in vitro. Cold shock at a temperature of 3± 1°C for a duration of 30 and 60 min and heat shock at a temperat...

  10. Supermassive black hole formation by the cold accretion shocks in the first galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Inayoshi, Kohei

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new scenario for supermassive star (SMS;>10^5Msun) formation in shocked regions of colliding cold accretion flows near the centers of first galaxies. Recent numerical simulations indicate that assembly of a typical first galaxy with virial temperature (~10^4K) proceeds via cold and dense flows penetrating deep to the center, where the supersonic streams collide each other to develop a hot and dense (~10^4K, ~10^3/cc) shocked gas. The post-shock layer first cools by efficient Ly alpha emission and contracts isobarically until 8000K. Whether the layer continues the isobaric contraction depends on the density at this moment: if the density is high enough for collisionally exciting H2 rovibrational levels (>10^4/cc), enhanced H2 collisional dissociation suppresses the gas to cool further. In this case, the layer fragments into massive (>10^5Msun) clouds, which collapse isothermally (~8000K) by the Ly alpha cooling without subsequent fragmentation. As an outcome, SMSs are expected to form and evolve e...

  11. Cold-stress-induced de novo expression of infC and role of IF3 in cold-shock translational bias

    OpenAIRE

    GIULIODORI, ANNA MARIA; Brandi, Anna; Giangrossi, Mara; GUALERZI, CLAUDIO O.; Pon, Cynthia L.

    2007-01-01

    Expression of Escherichia coli infC, which encodes translation initiation factor IF3 and belongs to a transcriptional unit containing several promoters and terminators, is enhanced after cold shock, causing a transient increase of the IF3/ribosomes ratio. Here we show that after cold shock the two less used promoters (PT and PI1) remain active and/or are activated, resulting in de novo infC transcription and IF3 synthesis. These two events are partly responsible for the stoichiometric imbalan...

  12. Cold shock domain proteins repress transcription from the GM-CSF promoter.

    OpenAIRE

    Coles, L S; P. Diamond; Occhiodoro, F; Vadas, M A; Shannon, M F

    1996-01-01

    The human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene promoter binds a sequence-specific single-strand DNA binding protein termed NF-GMb. We previously demonstrated that the NF-GMb binding sites were required for repression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induction of the proximal GM-CSF promoter sequences in fibroblasts. We now describe the isolation of two different cDNA clones that encode cold shock domain (CSD) proteins with NF-GMb binding characteristics. On...

  13. Protective effect of doxorubicin induced heat shock protein 72 on cold preservation injury of rat livers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Chen; Ying-Yan Yu; Ming-Jun Zhang; Xia-Xing Deng; Wei-Ping Yang; Jun Ji; Cheng-Hong Peng; Hong-Wei Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe the protective effect of heat shock protein 72 (HSP 72) induced by pretreatment of doxorubicin (DXR)on long-term cold preservation injury of rat livers.METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were administered intravenously DXR at a dose of 1 mg/kg body mass in DXR group and saline in control group. After 48 h, the rat liver was perfused with cold Linger′s and University of Wisconsin (UW) solutions and then was preserved in UW solution at 4 ℃ for 24, 36 and 48 h. AST, ALT, LDH and hyaluronic acid in preservative solution were determined. Routine HE,immunohistochemical staining for HSP 72 and electron microscopic examination of hepatic tissues were performed.RESULTS: After 24, 36 and 48 h, the levels of AST, ALT and hyaluronic acid in preservative solution were significantly higher in control group than in DXR group (P<0.05), while LDH level was not significantly different between the 2 groups (P>0.05). Hepatic tissues in DXR group were morphologically normal and significantly injured in control group. HSP 72was expressed in hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells in DXR group but not in control group.CONCLUSION: Pretreatment of DXR may extend the time of rat liver cold preservation and keep liver alive. The expression of HSP 72 in liver can prevent hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells from long-term cold preservation injury.

  14. Induction of Gynogenesis of Silurus astus Using Cold Shock%冷休克诱导黄河鲇(Silurus asotus)二倍体雌核发育

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程果; 李学军; 乔志刚; 石灵; 彭新亮

    2008-01-01

    [Objective] The cold shock method was used to induce diploid gynngenesis of Silurus astus. [Mthod] The Silurus astus sperms were irradia-ted by ultraviolet, then conducted for fertilization. The different cold shock starting time and duration were set to observe diploid gynogenesis of Silurus as-tus. [Result] Under such inducing condition that ultraviolet irradiated 15 min,cold shock started 5 min after fertilization, and cold shock duartion was 40 min,the survival rate of diploid Silurus astus reached the highest(8.5% ). [Conclusion] The experiment laid foundation for culturing new excellent Silu- rus astus variety and accumulated original files for further study of gynogenesis development mechanism.

  15. Numerical Studies of the Application of Shock Tube Technology for Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, R.; Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Parkot, D.; Varava, W.; Olivier, H.; Luo, X.

    2007-12-01

    A new method for a combustion-free spraying is studied fundamentally by modeling and simulation in comparison with first experiments. The article focuses on the numerical simulation of the gas-particle nozzle flow, which is generated by the shock reflection at the end wall section of a shock tube. To study the physical fundamentals of this process, at present only a single shot operation is considered. The particles are injected downstream of the nozzle throat into a supersonic nozzle flow. The measurements of the particle velocity made by a laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) set up show that the maximum velocity amounts to 1220 m/s for stainless steel particles of 15 μm diameter. The CFD-Code (Fluent) is first verified by a comparison with available numerical and experimental data for gas and gas-particle flow fields in a long Laval-nozzle. The good agreement implied the great potential of the new dynamic process concept for cold-gas coating applications. Then the flow fields in the short Laval nozzle designed and realized by the Shock Wave Laboratory (SWL) are investigated. The gas flow for experimentally obtained stagnation conditions is simulated. The gas-particle flow without and with the influence of the particles on the gas flow is calculated by the Surface Engineering Institute (IOT) and compared with experiments. The influence of the injection parameters on the particle velocities is investigated, as well.

  16. RNA-Seq-based analysis of the physiologic cold shock-induced changes in Moraxella catarrhalis gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Spaniol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Moraxella catarrhalis, a major nasopharyngeal pathogen of the human respiratory tract, is exposed to rapid downshifts of environmental temperature when humans breathe cold air. The prevalence of pharyngeal colonization and respiratory tract infections caused by M. catarrhalis is greatest in winter. We investigated how M. catarrhalis uses the physiologic exposure to cold air to regulate pivotal survival systems that may contribute to M. catarrhalis virulence. RESULTS: In this study we used the RNA-seq techniques to quantitatively catalogue the transcriptome of M. catarrhalis exposed to a 26 °C cold shock or to continuous growth at 37 °C. Validation of RNA-seq data using quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated the RNA-seq results to be highly reliable. We observed that a 26 °C cold shock induces the expression of genes that in other bacteria have been related to virulence a strong induction was observed for genes involved in high affinity phosphate transport and iron acquisition, indicating that M. catarrhalis makes a better use of both phosphate and iron resources after exposure to cold shock. We detected the induction of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, as well as several outer membrane proteins, including ompA, m35-like porin and multidrug efflux pump (acrAB indicating that M. catarrhalis remodels its membrane components in response to downshift of temperature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a 26 °C cold shock enhances the induction of genes encoding the type IV pili that are essential for natural transformation, and increases the genetic competence of M. catarrhalis, which may facilitate the rapid spread and acquisition of novel virulence-associated genes. CONCLUSION: Cold shock at a physiologically relevant temperature of 26 °C induces in M. catarrhalis a complex of adaptive mechanisms that could convey novel pathogenic functions and may contribute to enhanced colonization and virulence.

  17. Identification of a cold shock transcriptional enhancer of the Escherichia coli gene encoding nucleoid protein H-NS.

    OpenAIRE

    La Teana, A; Brandi, A; M. Falconi; Spurio, R; Pon, C. L.; Gualerzi, C O

    1991-01-01

    The hns (27 min) gene encoding the 15.4-kDa nucleoid protein H-NS was shown to belong to the cold shock regulon of Escherichia coli, its expression being enhanced 3- to 4-fold during the growth lag that follows a shift from 37 degrees C to 10 degrees C. A 110-base-pair (bp) DNA fragment containing the promoter of hns fused to a promoterless cat gene (hns-cat fusion) conferred a similar cold shock response to the expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in vivo and in cou...

  18. Hsp60 expression profiles in the reef-building coral Seriatopora caliendrum subjected to heat and cold shock regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seveso, Davide; Montano, Simone; Strona, Giovanni; Orlandi, Ivan; Galli, Paolo; Vai, Marina

    2016-08-01

    Climate changes have increased the intensity/frequency of extreme thermal events, which represent serious threats to the health of reef-building corals. Since the vulnerability of corals exposed to thermal stresses are related to their ability to regulate Heat shock proteins (Hsps), we have analyzed together the time related expression profiles of the mitochondrial Hsp60 and the associated changes in tissue pigmentation in Seriatopora caliendrum subjected to 48 h of heat and cold treatments characterized by moderate (±2 °C) and severe (±6 °C) shocks. For the first time, an Hsp60 response was observed in a scleractinian coral exposed to cold stresses. Furthermore, the Hsp60 modulations and the changes in the tissue coloration were found to be specific for each treatment. A strong down-regulation at the end of the treatments was observed following both the severe shocks, but only the severe heat stress led to bleaching in concert with the lowest levels of Hsp60, suggesting that a severe heat shock can be more deleterious than an exposure to a severe cold temperature. On the contrary, a moderate cold stress seems to be more harmful than a moderate temperature increase, which could allow coral acclimation. Our results can provide a potential framework for understanding the physiological tolerance of corals under possible future climate changes. PMID:27183199

  19. Cold shock induces apoptosis of dorsal root ganglion neurons plated on infrared windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboualizadeh, Ebrahim; Mattson, Eric C; O'Hara, Crystal L; Smith, Amanda K; Stucky, Cheryl L; Hirschmugl, Carol J

    2015-06-21

    The chemical status of live sensory neurons is accessible with infrared microspectroscopy of appropriately prepared cells. In this paper, individual dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons have been prepared with two different protocols, and plated on glass cover slips, BaF2 and CaF2 substrates. The first protocol exposes the intact DRGs to 4 °C for between 20-30 minutes before dissociating individual neurons and plating 2 hours later. The second protocol maintains the neurons at 23 °C for the entire duration of the sample preparation. The visual appearance of the neurons is similar. The viability was assessed by means of trypan blue exclusion method to determine the viability of the neurons. The neurons prepared under the first protocol (cold exposure) and plated on BaF2 reveal a distinct chemical signature and chemical distribution that is different from the other sample preparations described in the paper. Importantly, results for other sample preparation methods, using various substrates and temperature protocols, when compared across the overlapping spectral bandwidth, present normal chemical distribution within the neurons. The unusual chemically specific spatial variation is dominated by a lack of protein and carbohydrates in the center of the neurons and signatures of unraveling DNA are detected. We suggest that cold shock leads to apoptosis of DRGs, followed by osmotic stress originating from ion gradients across the cell membrane leading to cell lysis. PMID:26000346

  20. CAROTENOID INVOLVEMENT IN THE REGULATION OF Spirodela polyrhiza (L. Schleid RESISTANCE TO COLD SHOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofronova V.E.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect of short-time (15 sec, 5, 15, 30 min cold stress (0,1-0,2oC at 0,1 μmol photons м-2 s-1 over the Spirodela polyrhiza (L. Schleid carotenoid composition cultivated under the laboratory conditions has been studied. It is found that the sum of carotenoid pigments of Spirodela polyrhiza (L. does not change and averages 206,9 ± 11,5 mkg/g in fresh weight. Pool increase of lutein+zeaxanthin (by 5-8% has been observed in response to a short-time Spirodela polyrhiza cooling with simultaneous decrease of violaxanthin content (by 16%. Violaxanthin de-epoxidation occurs in the minute time spans and the depth of conversion does not depend on the cold shock duration. The data obtained indicate that pigments of the violaxanthin cyclemay participate in realization of transitory emergency protection systems of photosynthetic apparatus by increasing the share of thermal energy dissipation of the absorbed light and preventing singlet oxygenformation.

  1. Overexpression of Heat Shock Factor Gene HsfA3 Increases Galactinol Levels and Oxidative Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chieun; Chung, Woo Sik; Lim, Chae Oh

    2016-06-30

    Heat shock factors (Hsfs) are central regulators of abiotic stress responses, especially heat stress responses, in plants. In the current study, we characterized the activity of the Hsf gene HsfA3 in Arabidopsis under oxidative stress conditions. HsfA3 transcription in seedlings was induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS), exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and an endogenous H2O2 propagator, 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB). HsfA3-overexpressing transgenic plants exhibited increased oxidative stress tolerance compared to untransformed wild-type plants (WT), as revealed by changes in fresh weight, chlorophyll fluorescence, and ion leakage under light conditions. The expression of several genes encoding galactinol synthase (GolS), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs), which function as antioxidants in plant cells, was induced in HsfA3 overexpressors. In addition, galactinol levels were higher in HsfA3 overexpressors than in WT under unstressed conditions. In transient transactivation assays using Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts, HsfA3 activated the transcription of a reporter gene driven by the GolS1 or GolS2 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that GolS1 and GolS2 are directly regulated by HsfA3. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that GolS1 and GolS2 are directly regulated by HsfA3 and that GolS enzymes play an important role in improving oxidative stress tolerance by increasing galactinol biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:27109422

  2. Gene Expression, Protein Function and Pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana Responding to Silver Nanoparticles in Comparison to Silver Ions, Cold, Salt, Drought, and Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisa Kohan-Baghkheirati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs have been widely used in industry due to their unique physical and chemical properties. However, AgNPs have caused environmental concerns. To understand the risks of AgNPs, Arabidopsis microarray data for AgNP, Ag+, cold, salt, heat and drought stresses were analyzed. Up- and down-regulated genes of more than two-fold expression change were compared, while the encoded proteins of shared and unique genes between stresses were subjected to differential enrichment analyses. AgNPs affected the fewest genes (575 in the Arabidopsis genome, followed by Ag+ (1010, heat (1374, drought (1435, salt (4133 and cold (6536. More genes were up-regulated than down-regulated in AgNPs and Ag+ (438 and 780, respectively while cold down-regulated the most genes (4022. Responses to AgNPs were more similar to those of Ag+ (464 shared genes, cold (202, and salt (163 than to drought (50 or heat (30; the genes in the first four stresses were enriched with 32 PFAM domains and 44 InterPro protein classes. Moreover, 111 genes were unique in AgNPs and they were enriched in three biological functions: response to fungal infection, anion transport, and cell wall/plasma membrane related. Despite shared similarity to Ag+, cold and salt stresses, AgNPs are a new stressor to Arabidopsis.

  3. Desaturase mutants reveal that membrane rigidification acts as a cold perception mechanism upstream of the diacylglycerol kinase pathway in Arabidopsis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaultier, Marie-Noëlle; Cantrel, Catherine; Vergnolle, Chantal; Justin, Anne-Marie; Demandre, Chantal; Benhassaine-Kesri, Ghouziel; Ciçek, Dominique; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2006-07-24

    Membrane rigidification could be the first step of cold perception in poikilotherms. We have investigated its implication in diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) activation by cold stress in suspension cells from Arabidopsis mutants altered in desaturase activities. By lateral diffusion assay, we showed that plasma membrane rigidification with temperature decrease was steeper in cells deficient in oleate desaturase than in wild type cells and in cells overexpressing linoleate desaturase. The threshold for the activation of the DAGK pathway in each type of cells correlated with this order of rigidification rate, suggesting that cold induced-membrane rigidification is upstream of DAGK pathway activation. PMID:16839551

  4. Effect of sequential heat and cold shocks on nuclear phenotypes of the blood-sucking insect, Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister (Hemiptera, Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Simone L

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal shocks induce changes in the nuclear phenotypes that correspond to survival (heterochromatin decondensation, nuclear fusion or death (apoptosis, necrosis responses in the Malpighian tubules of Panstrongylus megistus. Since thermal tolerance increased survival and molting rate in this species following sequential shocks, we investigated whether changes in nuclear phenotypes accompanied the insect survival response to sequential thermal shocks. Fifth instar nymphs were subjected to a single heat (35 or 40°C, 1 h or cold (5 or 0°C, 1 h shock and then subjected to a second shock for 12 h at 40 or 0°C, respectively, after 8, 18, 24 and 72 h at 28°C (control temperature. As with specimen survival, sequential heat and cold shocks induced changes in frequency of the mentioned nuclear phenotypes although their patterns differed. The heat shock tolerance involved decrease in apoptosis simultaneous to increase in cell survival responses. Sequential cold shocks did not involve cell/nuclear fusion and even elicited increase in necrosis with advancing time after shocks. The temperatures of 40 and 0ºC were more effective than the temperatures of 35 and 5ºC in eliciting the heat and cold shock tolerances, respectively, as shown by cytological analysis of the nuclear phenotypes. It is concluded that different sequential thermal shocks can trigger different mechanisms of cellular protection against stress in P. megistus, favoring the insect to adapt to various ecotopes.

  5. Putrescine Is Involved in Arabidopsis Freezing Tolerance and Cold Acclimation by Regulating Abscisic Acid Levels in Response to Low Temperature1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Juan C.; López-Cobollo, Rosa; Alcázar, Rubén; Zarza, Xavier; Koncz, Csaba; Altabella, Teresa; Salinas, Julio; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Ferrando, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The levels of endogenous polyamines have been shown to increase in plant cells challenged with low temperature; however, the functions of polyamines in the regulation of cold stress responses are unknown. Here, we show that the accumulation of putrescine under cold stress is essential for proper cold acclimation and survival at freezing temperatures because Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants defective in putrescine biosynthesis (adc1, adc2) display reduced freezing tolerance compared to wild-type plants. Genes ADC1 and ADC2 show different transcriptional profiles upon cold treatment; however, they show similar and redundant contributions to cold responses in terms of putrescine accumulation kinetics and freezing sensitivity. Our data also demonstrate that detrimental consequences of putrescine depletion during cold stress are due, at least in part, to alterations in the levels of abscisic acid (ABA). Reduced expression of NCED3, a key gene involved in ABA biosynthesis, and down-regulation of ABA-regulated genes are detected in both adc1 and adc2 mutant plants under cold stress. Complementation analysis of adc mutants with ABA and reciprocal complementation tests of the aba2-3 mutant with putrescine support the conclusion that putrescine controls the levels of ABA in response to low temperature by modulating ABA biosynthesis and gene expression. PMID:18701673

  6. Isolation of two strong poly (U binding proteins from moderate halophile Halomonas eurihalina and their identification as cold shock proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Kumari Garapati

    Full Text Available Cold shock proteins (Csp are known to be expressed in response to sudden decrease in temperature. They are thought to be involved in a number of cellular processes viz., RNA chaperone activity, translation, transcription, nucleoid condensation. During our studies on ribosomal protein S1 in moderate halophile Halomonas eurihalina, we observed the presence of two strong poly (U binding proteins in abundance in cell extracts from cells grown under normal growth conditions. The proteins can be isolated in a single step using Poly (U cellulose chromatography. The proteins were identified as major cold shock proteins belonging to Csp A family by MALDI-TOF and bioinformatic analysis. Csp 12 kDa was found in both exponential and stationary phases whereas Csp 8 kDa is found only in exponential phase.

  7. Cold-shock eliminates female nucleus in fertilized eggs to induce androgenesis in the loach (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, a teleost fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morishima Kagayaki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgenesis (all-male inheritance is generally induced by means of irradiating the eggs to inactivate the maternal genome, followed by fertilization with normal sperm. In fish, the conventional technique for induced androgenesis has been applied for rapid fixation to traits, recovery of cryopreserved genotypes, sex-control, etc. A new method of androgenesis that eliminates the need to irradiate the egg was proposed using the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (a teleost fish. Results When the eggs of wild-type females were fertilized with sperm of albino or orange phenotype males and cold-shocked at 0 to 3°C for 60 min duration just after fertilization, generally more than 30% (with a peak of 100% of the hatched progeny were androgenotes. While a few of them were the normal diploid, most of them turned out to be abnormal haploid. All-male inheritance was verified by the expression of the recessive color trait (albino or orange and microsatellite genotypes comprising only paternally derived alleles. Nuclear behavior after the cold-shock treatment was traced by microscopic observation of DAPI (4'6-diamidino-2-phenylindole-stained samples and hematoxylin-eosin stained histological sections, and the extrusion of egg (maternal nucleus was observed in eggs treated in the optimum timing. Conclusion In this paper, we demonstrate that cold-shock treatment (at 0 and 3°C of loach eggs for 60 min just after fertilization successfully induces androgenetic haploid development. The most likely mechanism of cold-shock induced androgenesis is an elimination of the egg nucleus together along with the second polar body and subsequent development of a decondensed sperm nucleus or male pronucleus.

  8. Isolation of Two Strong Poly (U) Binding Proteins from Moderate Halophile Halomonas eurihalina and Their Identification as Cold Shock Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Usha Kumari Garapati; Tangirala Suryanarayana

    2012-01-01

    Cold shock proteins (Csp) are known to be expressed in response to sudden decrease in temperature. They are thought to be involved in a number of cellular processes viz., RNA chaperone activity, translation, transcription, nucleoid condensation. During our studies on ribosomal protein S1 in moderate halophile Halomonas eurihalina, we observed the presence of two strong poly (U) binding proteins in abundance in cell extracts from cells grown under normal growth conditions. The proteins can be ...

  9. Cold acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana results in incomplete recovery of photosynthetic capacity, associated with an increased reduction of the chloroplast stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitch, L V; Barker-Astrom, J; Ivanov, A G; Hurry, V; Oquist, G; Huner, N P; Gardeström, P

    2001-12-01

    The effects of short-term cold stress and long-term cold acclimation on the light reactions of photosynthesis were examined in vivo to assess their contributions to photosynthetic acclimation to low temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.. All photosynthetic measurements were made at the temperature of exposure: 23 degrees C for non-acclimated plants and 5 degrees C for cold-stressed and cold-acclimated plants. Three-day cold-stress treatments at 5 degrees C inhibited light-saturated rates of CO2 assimilation and O2 evolution by approximately 75%. The 3-day exposure to 5 degrees C also increased the proportion of reduced QA by 50%, decreased the yield of PSII electron transport by 65% and decreased PSI activity by 31%. In contrast, long-term cold acclimation resulted in a strong but incomplete recovery of light-saturated photosynthesis at 5 degrees C. The rates of light-saturated CO2 and O2 gas exchange and the in vivo yield of PSII activity under light-saturating conditions were only 35-40% lower, and the relative redox state of QA only 20% lower, at 5 degrees C after cold acclimation than in controls at 23 degrees C. PSI activity showed full recovery during long-term cold acclimation. Neither short-term cold stress nor long-term cold acclimation of Arabidopsis was associated with a limitation in ATP, and both treatments resulted in an increase in the ATP/NADPH ratio. This increase in ATP/NADPH was associated with an inhibition of PSI cyclic electron transport but there was no apparent change in the Mehler reaction activity in either cold-stressed or cold-acclimated leaves. Cold acclimation also resulted in an increase in the reduction state of the stroma, as indicated by an increased total activity and activation state of NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase, and increased light-dependent activities of the major regulatory enzymes of the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway. We suggest that the photosynthetic capacity during cold stress as well as cold

  10. Simultaneous Over-Expression of PaSOD and RaAPX in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana Confers Cold Stress Tolerance through Increase in Vascular Lignifications

    OpenAIRE

    Shafi, Amrina; Dogra, Vivek; Gill, Tejpal; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant enzymes play a significant role in eliminating toxic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated during stress from living cells. In the present study, two different antioxidant enzymes namely copper-zinc superoxide dismutase derived from Potentilla astrisanguinea (PaSOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (RaAPX) from Rheum austral both of which are high altitude cold niche area plants of Himalaya were cloned and simultaneously over-expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana to alleviate col...

  11. A Temperature-Independent Cold-Shock Protein Homolog Acts as a Virulence Factor in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Stenger, Drake C

    2016-05-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevine, is a fastidious organism that requires very specific conditions for replication and plant colonization. Cold temperatures reduce growth and survival of X. fastidiosa both in vitro and in planta. However, little is known regarding physiological responses of X. fastidiosa to temperature changes. Cold-shock proteins (CSP), a family of nucleic acid-binding proteins, act as chaperones facilitating translation at low temperatures. Bacterial genomes often encode multiple CSP, some of which are strongly induced following exposure to cold. Additionally, CSP contribute to the general stress response through mRNA stabilization and posttranscriptional regulation. A putative CSP homolog (Csp1) with RNA-binding activity was identified in X. fastidiosa Stag's Leap. The csp1 gene lacked the long 5' untranslated region characteristic of cold-inducible genes and was expressed in a temperature-independent manner. As compared with the wild type, a deletion mutant of csp1 (∆csp1) had decreased survival rates following cold exposure and salt stress in vitro. The deletion mutant also was significantly less virulent in grapevine, as compared with the wild type, in the absence of cold stress. These results suggest an important function of X. fastidiosa Csp1 in response to cellular stress and during plant colonization. PMID:26808446

  12. Engineering carpel-specific cold stress tolerance: a case study in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freezing temperatures during winter generally do not injure floral buds of horticulturally important crops. Entry into dormancy coupled with cold acclimation provides adequate protection unless the temperatures are exceptionally low. This measure of protection is lost in spring when the floral bud...

  13. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M. J., E-mail: josim.phys2007@gmail.com; Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-06-15

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  14. Cold shock proteins of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 are involved in cryoprotection and in the production of cold-induced proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, J A; Frenkiel, H; de Vos, W M; Kuipers, O P; Abee, T

    2001-11-01

    Members of the group of 7-kDa cold-shock proteins (CSPs) are the proteins with the highest level of induction upon cold shock in the lactic acid bacterium Lactococcus lactis MG1363. By using double-crossover recombination, two L. lactis strains were generated in which genes encoding CSPs are disrupted: L. lactis NZ9000 Delta AB lacks the tandemly orientated cspA and cspB genes, and NZ9000 Delta ABE lacks cspA, cspB, and cspE. Both strains showed no differences in growth at normal and at low temperatures compared to that of the wild-type strain, L. lactis NZ9000. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that upon disruption of the cspAB genes, the production of remaining CspE at low temperature increased, and upon disruption of cspA, cspB, and cspE, the production of CspD at normal growth temperatures increased. Northern blot analysis showed that control is most likely at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, it was established by a proteomics approach that some (non-7-kDa) cold-induced proteins (CIPs) are not cold induced in the csp-lacking strains, among others the histon-like protein HslA and the signal transduction protein LlrC. This supports earlier observations (J. A. Wouters, M. Mailhes, F. M. Rombouts, W. M. De Vos, O. P. Kuipers, and T. Abee, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 66:3756-3763, 2000). that the CSPs of L. lactis might be directly involved in the production of some CIPs upon low-temperature exposure. Remarkably, the adaptive response to freezing by prior exposure to 10 degrees C was significantly reduced in strain NZ9000 Delta ABE but not in strain NZ9000 Delta AB compared to results with wild-type strain NZ9000, indicating a notable involvement of CspE in cryoprotection. PMID:11679342

  15. A Sequence Downstream of the Initiation Codon Is Essential for Cold Shock Induction of cspB of Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Etchegaray, Jean-Pierre; Inouye, Masayori

    1999-01-01

    Cold shock induction of cspB has been shown to be primarily regulated at the mRNA level. Here, we demonstrate that the induction of cspB at low temperature also requires the translational cis-acting element called the downstream box (DB). Full induction of cspB at low temperature is achieved in the presence of both the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and DB. We propose that the DB sequence functions as a translational enhancer for the biosynthesis of CspB to bypass the inhibitory effect in translatio...

  16. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced. PMID:24415770

  17. The role of Xylella fastidiosa cold shock proteins in Pierce’s disease of grapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce’s disease of grapevine, caused by the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) is limited to warmer climates, and plant infection can be eliminated by cold winter conditions. Milder winters can increase the likelihood of pathogen persistence from one growing season to the next. Cold adaptat...

  18. Physiologic cold shock of Moraxella catarrhalis affects the expression of genes involved in the iron acquisition, serum resistance and immune evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaller André

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Moraxella catarrhalis, a major nasopharyngeal pathogen of the human respiratory tract, is exposed to rapid downshifts of environmental temperature when humans breathe cold air. It was previously shown that the prevalence of pharyngeal colonization and respiratory tract infections caused by M. catarrhalis are greatest in winter. The aim of this study was to investigate how M. catarrhalis uses the physiologic exposure to cold air to upregulate pivotal survival systems in the pharynx that may contribute to M. catarrhalis virulence. Results A 26°C cold shock induces the expression of genes involved in transferrin and lactoferrin acquisition, and enhances binding of these proteins on the surface of M. catarrhalis. Exposure of M. catarrhalis to 26°C upregulates the expression of UspA2, a major outer membrane protein involved in serum resistance, leading to improved binding of vitronectin which neutralizes the lethal effect of human complement. In contrast, cold shock decreases the expression of Hemagglutinin, a major adhesin, which mediates B cell response, and reduces immunoglobulin D-binding on the surface of M. catarrhalis. Conclusion Cold shock of M. catarrhalis induces the expression of genes involved in iron acquisition, serum resistance and immune evasion. Thus, cold shock at a physiologically relevant temperature of 26°C induces in M. catarrhalis a complex of adaptive mechanisms that enables the bacterium to target their host cellular receptors or soluble effectors and may contribute to enhanced growth, colonization and virulence.

  19. Universal Stress Protein exhibits a redox-dependent chaperone function in Arabidopsis and enhances plant tolerance to heat shock and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung eYoung Jun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although a wide range of physiological information on Universal Stress Proteins (USPs is available from many organisms, their biochemical and molecular functions remain unidentified. The biochemical function of AtUSP (At3g53990 from Arabidopsis thaliana was therefore investigated. Plants over-expressing AtUSP showed a strong resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress, compared with wild-type and Atusp knock-out plants, confirming the crucial role of AtUSP in stress tolerance. AtUSP was present in a variety of structures including monomers, dimers, trimers, and oligomeric complexes, and switched in response to external stresses from low molecular weight (LMW species to high molecular weight (HMW complexes. AtUSP exhibited a strong chaperone function under stress conditions in particular, and this activity was significantly increased by heat treatment. Chaperone activity of AtUSP was critically regulated by the redox status of cells and accompanied by structural changes to the protein. Over-expression of AtUSP conferred a strong tolerance to heat shock and oxidative stress upon Arabidopsis, primarily via its chaperone function.

  20. A seed preferential heat shock transcription factor from wheat provides abiotic stress tolerance and yield enhancement in transgenic Arabidopsis under heat stress environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Chauhan

    Full Text Available Reduction in crop yield and quality due to various abiotic stresses is a worldwide phenomenon. In the present investigation, a heat shock factor (HSF gene expressing preferentially in developing seed tissues of wheat grown under high temperatures was cloned. This newly identified heat shock factor possesses the characteristic domains of class A type plant HSFs and shows high similarity to rice OsHsfA2d, hence named as TaHsfA2d. The transcription factor activity of TaHsfA2d was confirmed through transactivation assay in yeast. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaHsfA2d not only possess higher tolerance towards high temperature but also showed considerable tolerance to salinity and drought stresses, they also showed higher yield and biomass accumulation under constant heat stress conditions. Analysis of putative target genes of AtHSFA2 through quantitative RT-PCR showed higher and constitutive expression of several abiotic stress responsive genes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants over-expressing TaHsfA2d. Under stress conditions, TaHsfA2d can also functionally complement the T-DNA insertion mutants of AtHsfA2, although partially. These observations suggest that TaHsfA2d may be useful in molecular breeding of crop plants, especially wheat, to improve yield under abiotic stress conditions.

  1. Overexpression of SpCBL6, a calcineurin B-like protein of Stipa purpurea, enhanced cold tolerance and reduced drought tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanli; Cheng, Ying; Yang, Yunqiang; Li, Xiong; Supriyo, Basak; Sun, Xudong; Yang, Yongping

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to characterize SpCBL6 (GenBank accession number: KT780442) from Stipa purpurea and elucidate the function of this protein in abiotic stress. The full-length cDNA of SpCBL6 was isolated from S. purpurea by rapid amplification of cDNA ends methods. Laser confocal microscopy was used to analyze the subcellular localization of SpCBL6. The constructs of 35S:GFP-SpCBL6 was used to transform wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis plants (ecotype Columbia-0) with the floral dip method. Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), water potential, photosynthetic efficiency (F v/F m), and ion leakage was performed to investigate the role of SpCBL6 in abiotic stress. The open reading frame of SpCBL6 contains 681 bp nucleotides and encodes a 227-amino acid polypeptide. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that SpCBL6 showed the highest similarity with rice OsCBL6. SpCBL6 transcripts were induced by freezing and drought treatments. Subcellular localization analysis showed that SpCBL6 was located in membrane of protoplast. Overexpression of SpCBL6 in Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrated that the transgenic plants were more tolerant to cold treatment, but less tolerant to drought, compared with the plants. qRT-PCR analysis showed that the drought stress marker genes were inhibited in transgenic plants, whereas the cold stress marker genes were enhanced. Further analysis showed that SpCBL6-overexpressing plants showed enhanced water potential, photosynthetic efficiency (F v/F m), and reduced ion leakage compared with the wild-type after cold treatment. Collectively, these results indicate that SpCBL6, a new member of the CBL gene family isolated from S. purpurea, enhances cold tolerance and reduces drought tolerance in plants. PMID:27393148

  2. Improvement of Arabidopsis Biomass and Cold, Drought and Salinity Stress Tolerance by Modified Circadian Clock-Associated PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATORs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Norihito; Takao, Saori; Kudo, Toru; Kiba, Takatoshi; Wang, Yin; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2016-05-01

    Plant circadian clocks control the timing of a variety of genetic, metabolic and physiological processes. Recent studies revealed a possible molecular mechanism for circadian clock regulation. Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) genes, including TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1), encode clock-associated transcriptional repressors that act redundantly. Disruption of multiple PRR genes results in drastic phenotypes, including increased biomass and abiotic stress tolerance, whereas PRR single mutants show subtle phenotypic differences due to genetic redundancy. In this study, we demonstrate that constitutive expression of engineered PRR5 (PRR5-VP), which functions as a transcriptional activator, can increase biomass and abiotic stress tolerance, similar to prr multiple mutants. Concomitant analyses of relative growth rate, flowering time and photosynthetic activity suggested that increased biomass of PRR5-VP plants is mostly due to late flowering, rather than to alterations in photosynthetic activity or growth rate. In addition, genome-wide gene expression profiling revealed that genes related to cold stress and water deprivation responses were up-regulated in PRR5-VP plants. PRR5-VP plants were more resistant to cold, drought and salinity stress than the wild type, whereas ft tsf and gi, well-known late flowering and increased biomass mutants, were not. These findings suggest that attenuation of PRR function by a single transformation of PRR-VP is a valuable method for increasing biomass as well as abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. Because the PRR gene family is conserved in vascular plants, PRR-VP may regulate biomass and stress responses in many plants, but especially in long-day annual plants. PMID:27012548

  3. Molecular characterization of a family of cold-shock proteins of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used as starter cultures in fermentation processes. The stress response of LAB during different industrial processes, and during low-temperature conditions in particular, requires a better understanding. For that reason a research project on the cold adaptation

  4. Insect cold tolerance and repair of chill-injury at fluctuating thermal regimes: Role of 70kDa heat shock protein expression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tollarová-Borovanská, Michaela; Lalouette, L.; Košťál, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 5 (2009), s. 312-319. ISSN 0143-2044 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/07/0269 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : insect * cold tolerance * heat shock proteins Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.074, year: 2009

  5. Changes in nuclear phenotype frequencies following sequential cold shocks in Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera, Reduviidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Campos Silvana GP; Rodrigues Vera Lúcia CC; Mello Maria Luiza S

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear phenotypes of Malpighian tubule cells in fifth instar nymphs of Triatoma infestans, one of the most important vectors of Chagas disease, were studied following sequential shocks at 0ºC, separated by intervals of 8 h and 24 h at 30ºC, under conditions of moderate fasting and full nourishment. The insects pertained to colonies reared in the laboratory and originated from domestic specimens collected in the Brazilian states of São Paulo (north) and Minas Gerais (south). Since nuclear...

  6. Arabidopsis Cys2/His2-type zinc-finger proteins function as transcription repressors under drought, cold, and high-salinity stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Hideki; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Sakuma, Yoh; Meshi, Tetsuo; Iwabuchi, Masaki; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2004-09-01

    ZPT2-related proteins that have two canonical Cys-2/His-2-type zinc-finger motifs in their molecules are members of a family of plant transcription factors. To characterize the role of this type of protein, we analyzed the function of Arabidopsis L. Heynh. genes encoding four different ZPT2-related proteins (AZF1, AZF2, AZF3, and STZ). Gel-shift analysis showed that the AZFs and STZ bind to A(G/C)T repeats within an EP2 sequence, known as a target sequence of some petunia (Petunia hybrida) ZPT2 proteins. Transient expression analysis using synthetic green fluorescent protein fusion genes indicated that the AZFs and STZ are preferentially localized to the nucleus. These four ZPT2-related proteins were shown to act as transcriptional repressors that down-regulate the transactivation activity of other transcription factors. RNA gel-blot analysis showed that expression of AZF2 and STZ was strongly induced by dehydration, high-salt and cold stresses, and abscisic acid treatment. Histochemical analysis of beta-glucuronidase activities driven by the AZF2 or STZ promoters revealed that both genes are induced in leaves rather than roots of rosette plants by the stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing STZ showed growth retardation and tolerance to drought stress. These results suggest that AZF2 and STZ function as transcriptional repressors to increase stress tolerance following growth retardation. PMID:15333755

  7. Heat Shock Factors HsfB 1 and HsfB2b Are Involved in the Regulation of Pdfl.2 Expression and Pathogen Resistance in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mukesh Kumar; Wolfgang Busch; Hannah Birke; Birgit Kemmerling; Thorsten N(U)rnberger; Friedrich Sch(o)ffl

    2009-01-01

    In order to assess the functional roles of heat stress-induced class B-heat shock factors in Arabidopsis, we investigated T-DNA knockout mutants of AtHsfB1 and AtHsfB2b. Micorarray analysis of double knockout hsfBl/hsfB2b plants revealed as strong an up-regulation of the basal mRNA-levels of the defensin genes Pdfl.2a/b in mutant plants.The Pdfexpression was further enhanced by jasmonic acid treatment or infection with the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. The single mutant hsfB2b and the double mutant hsfB1/B2b were significantly improved in disease resistance after A. brassicicola infection. There was no indication for a direct interaction of Hsf with the promoter of Pdfl.2, which is devoid of perfect HSE consensus Hsf-binding sequences. However, changes in the formation of late HsfA2-dependent HSE binding were detected in hsfB1/B2b plants. This suggests that HsfB1/B2b may interact with class A-Hsf in regulating the shut-off of the heat shock response. The identification of Pdfgenes as targets of Hsf-dependent negative regulation is the first evidence for an interconnection of Hsf in the regulation of biotic and abiotic responses.

  8. Use of spin labels to evaluate effects of cold shock and osmolality on sperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerstedt, R.H.; Keith, A.D.; Snipes, W.; Amann, R.P.; Arruda, D.; Griel, L.C. Jr.

    1978-05-01

    Spin labels were used to evaluate the effects of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), rapid cooling to 0/sup 0/C and osmolality on the integrity of sperm membranes. In vitro incubation of rabbit sperm with 0.5 mM BHT prior to artificial insemination did not alter the fertilizing ability of the sperm. Sperm from 6 species were ranked in terms of susceptibility to membrane damage caused by rapid cooling to 0/sup 0/C. The integrity of bull and ram sperm membranes was destroyed by the rapid cooling; BHT protected membranes of these spermatozoa from cold-induced lysis. Boar sperm membranes were porous after rapid cooling and BHT did not prevent this membrane damage. Membranes of rabbit and rooster sperm were not damaged by rapid cooling to 0/sup 0/C. Stallion sperm could not be analyzed because their membranes were altered by addition of reagents necessary to use the technique. The responses of bull, ram and rabbit sperm membranes to hyper- and hypo-osmotic conditions were determined. Hypotonic treatment (less than 200 mOsm) resulted in a 50 percent expansion of the volume of the aqueous compartment of sperm while hypertonic (700 mOsm) conditions compressed the volume of the aqueous compartment to 25 to 30 percent of the volume measured at 300 mOsm. Bull sperm, but not rabbit or ram sperm, responded as ''perfect osmometers'' between 300 and 700 mOsm.

  9. Cold-shock based method to induce the discharge of extrusomes in ciliated protists and its efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, Federico; Ortenzi, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Extrusomes are ejectable organelles in protists, which are able to discharge their contents to the outside of the cell in response to external stimuli. It is known that a large number of extrusomes functions as organelles for offense or defense in predator-prey interactions among protists and/or microinvertebrates. To date, the main approach to study these interactions was to compare artificially-induced extrusome-deficient cells with normal cells as prey for predators. Commonly applied methods to obtain extrusome-deficient cells use external chemicals, which could alter the viability of cells and/or interfere with the subsequent analysis of the substances (secondary metabolites) contained in the extrusomes. The cold-shock based method here presented has proven to be effective to remove different kinds of extrusomes from several protist species without harming the treated cells and without adding external reagents. This method could be also useful to simplify the related analysis of the chemical nature of the secreted secondary metabolites. PMID:26375274

  10. Prokaryotic Expression and Purification of Heat Shock Factor HSF1 in Arabidopsis thaliana%拟南芥热激因子HSF1的表达与纯化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭丽红; 王定康; 袁燕; 刘开庆; 陈雪; 陈善娜

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] This study was to express and purify Arabidopsis thaliana heat shock factor HSF1. [Method] Using Escherichia coli M15 harboring HSF1 (pQE32/His6-HSF1, pREP4) as experimental materials, HSF1 was induced to express with isopropy1-β-D-galactoside (IPTG); then the expression product was purified using Ni-NTA-agarose affinity chromatography and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. [Result] HSF1 of Arabidopsis thaliana was successfully expressed and purified. [Conclusion] This study provides materials for understanding the blinding site of HSF1 on Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome, further laying a good foundation for revealing the regulatory mechanism and physiological function of HSF1.

  11. Overexpression of WsSGTL1 gene of Withania somnifera enhances salt tolerance, heat tolerance and cold acclimation ability in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Mishra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sterol glycosyltrnasferases (SGT are enzymes that glycosylate sterols which play important role in plant adaptation to stress and are medicinally important in plants like Withania somnifera. The present study aims to find the role of WsSGTL1 which is a sterol glycosyltransferase from W. somnifera, in plant's adaptation to abiotic stress. METHODOLOGY: The WsSGTL1 gene was transformed in Arabidopsis thaliana through Agrobacterium mediated transformation, using the binary vector pBI121, by floral dip method. The phenotypic and physiological parameters like germination, root length, shoot weight, relative electrolyte conductivity, MDA content, SOD levels, relative electrolyte leakage and chlorophyll measurements were compared between transgenic and wild type Arabidopsis plants under different abiotic stresses--salt, heat and cold. Biochemical analysis was done by HPLC-TLC and radiolabelled enzyme assay. The promoter of the WsSGTL1 gene was cloned by using Genome Walker kit (Clontech, USA and the 3D structures were predicted by using Discovery Studio Ver. 2.5. RESULTS: The WsSGTL1 transgenic plants were confirmed to be single copy by Southern and homozygous by segregation analysis. As compared to WT, the transgenic plants showed better germination, salt tolerance, heat and cold tolerance. The level of the transgene WsSGTL1 was elevated in heat, cold and salt stress along with other marker genes such as HSP70, HSP90, RD29, SOS3 and LEA4-5. Biochemical analysis showed the formation of sterol glycosides and increase in enzyme activity. When the promoter of WsSGTL1 gene was cloned from W. somnifera and sequenced, it contained stress responsive elements. Bioinformatics analysis of the 3D structure of the WsSGTL1 protein showed functional similarity with sterol glycosyltransferase AtSGT of A. thaliana. CONCLUSIONS: Transformation of WsSGTL1 gene in A. thaliana conferred abiotic stress tolerance. The promoter of the gene in W.somnifera was found

  12. Overexpression of GmHsp90s, a heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 gene family cloning from soybean, decrease damage of abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyan Xu

    Full Text Available Hsp90 is one of the most conserved and abundant molecular chaperones and is an essential component of the protective stress response; however, its roles in abiotic stress responses in soybean (Glycine max remain obscure. Here, 12 GmHsp90 genes from soybean were identified and found to be expressed and to function differentially under abiotic stresses. The 12 GmHsp90 genes were isolated and named GmHsp90A1-GmHsp90A6, GmHsp90B1, GmHsp90B2, GmHsp90C1.1, GmHsp90C1.2, GmHsp90C2.1 and GmHsp90C2.2 based on their characteristics and high homology to other Hsp90s according to a new nomenclature system. Quantitative real-time PCR expression data revealed that all the genes exhibited higher transcript levels in leaves and could be strongly induced under heat, osmotic and salt stress but not cold stress. Overexpression of five typical genes (GmHsp90A2, GmHsp90A4, GmHsp90B1, GmHsp90C1.1 and GmHsp90C2.1 in Arabidopsis thaliana provided useful evidences that GmHsp90 genes can decrease damage of abiotic stresses. In addition, an abnormal accumulation of proline was detected in some transgenic Arabidopsis plants suggested overexpressing GmHsp90s may affect the synthesis and response system of proline. Our work represents a systematic determination of soybean genes encoding Hsp90s, and provides useful evidence that GmHsp90 genes function differently in response to abiotic stresses and may affect the synthesis and response system of proline.

  13. Ribosomal P3 protein AtP3B of Arabidopsis acts as both protein and RNA chaperone to increase tolerance of heat and cold stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Young Mee; Park, Joung Hun; Nawkar, Ganesh M; Oh, Hun Taek; Kim, Min Gab; Lee, Soo In; Kim, Woe Yeon; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2016-07-01

    The P3 proteins are plant-specific ribosomal P-proteins; however, their molecular functions have not been characterized. In a screen for components of heat-stable high-molecular weight (HMW) complexes, we isolated the P3 protein AtP3B from heat-treated Arabidopsis suspension cultures. By size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), SDS-PAGE and native PAGE followed by immunoblotting with anti-AtP3B antibody, we showed that AtP3B was stably retained in HMW complexes following heat shock. The level of AtP3B mRNA increased in response to both high- and low-temperature stresses. Bacterially expressed recombinant AtP3B protein exhibited both protein and RNA chaperone activities. Knockdown of AtP3B by RNAi made plants sensitive to both high- and low-temperature stresses, whereas overexpression of AtP3B increased tolerance of both conditions. Together, our results suggest that AtP3B protects cells against both high- and low-temperature stresses. These findings provide novel insight into the molecular functions and in vivo roles of acidic ribosomal P-proteins, thereby expanding our knowledge of the protein production machinery. PMID:27004478

  14. Stimulation of translation by human Unr requires cold shock domains 2 and 4, and correlates with poly(A) binding protein interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Swagat Ray; Anderson, Emma C.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA binding protein Unr, which contains five cold shock domains, has several specific roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. It can act as an activator or inhibitor of translation initiation, promote mRNA turnover, or stabilise mRNA. Its role depends on the mRNA and other proteins to which it binds, which includes cytoplasmic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1). Since PABP1 binds to all polyadenylated mRNAs, and is involved in translation initiation by interaction with eu...

  15. Stimulation of translation by human Unr requires cold shock domains 2 and 4, and correlates with poly(A) binding protein interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Swagat; Anderson, Emma C.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA binding protein Unr, which contains five cold shock domains, has several specific roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. It can act as an activator or inhibitor of translation initiation, promote mRNA turnover, or stabilise mRNA. Its role depends on the mRNA and other proteins to which it binds, which includes cytoplasmic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1). Since PABP1 binds to all polyadenylated mRNAs, and is involved in translation initiation by interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), we investigated whether Unr has a general role in translational control. We found that Unr strongly stimulates translation in vitro, and mutation of cold shock domains 2 or 4 inhibited its translation activity. The ability of Unr and its mutants to stimulate translation correlated with its ability to bind RNA, and to interact with PABP1. We found that Unr stimulated the binding of PABP1 to mRNA, and that Unr was required for the stable interaction of PABP1 and eIF4G in cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Unr reduced the overall level of cellular translation in cells, as well as that of cap-dependent and IRES-dependent reporters. These data describe a novel role for Unr in regulating cellular gene expression. PMID:26936655

  16. Stimulation of translation by human Unr requires cold shock domains 2 and 4, and correlates with poly(A) binding protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Swagat; Anderson, Emma C

    2016-01-01

    The RNA binding protein Unr, which contains five cold shock domains, has several specific roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. It can act as an activator or inhibitor of translation initiation, promote mRNA turnover, or stabilise mRNA. Its role depends on the mRNA and other proteins to which it binds, which includes cytoplasmic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1). Since PABP1 binds to all polyadenylated mRNAs, and is involved in translation initiation by interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), we investigated whether Unr has a general role in translational control. We found that Unr strongly stimulates translation in vitro, and mutation of cold shock domains 2 or 4 inhibited its translation activity. The ability of Unr and its mutants to stimulate translation correlated with its ability to bind RNA, and to interact with PABP1. We found that Unr stimulated the binding of PABP1 to mRNA, and that Unr was required for the stable interaction of PABP1 and eIF4G in cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Unr reduced the overall level of cellular translation in cells, as well as that of cap-dependent and IRES-dependent reporters. These data describe a novel role for Unr in regulating cellular gene expression. PMID:26936655

  17. Results of molten salt panel and component experiments for solar central receivers: Cold fill, freeze/thaw, thermal cycling and shock, and instrumentation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, J.E.; Ralph, M.E.; Chavez, J.M.; Dunkin, S.R.; Rush, E.E.; Ghanbari, C.M.; Matthews, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted with a molten salt loop at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM to resolve issues associated with the operation of the 10MW{sub e} Solar Two Central Receiver Power Plant located near Barstow, CA. The salt loop contained two receiver panels, components such as flanges and a check valve, vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters, and an impedance pressure transducer. Tests were conducted on procedures for filling and thawing a panel, and assessing components and instrumentation in a molten salt environment. Four categories of experiments were conducted: (1) cold filling procedures, (2) freeze/thaw procedures, (3) component tests, and (4) instrumentation tests. Cold-panel and -piping fill experiments are described, in which the panels and piping were preheated to temperatures below the salt freezing point prior to initiating flow, to determine the feasibility of cold filling the receiver and piping. The transient thermal response was measured, and heat transfer coefficients and transient stresses were calculated from the data. Freeze/thaw experiments were conducted with the panels, in which the salt was intentionally allowed to freeze in the receiver tubes, then thawed with heliostat beams. Slow thermal cycling tests were conducted to measure both how well various designs of flanges (e.g., tapered flanges or clamp type flanges) hold a seal under thermal conditions typical of nightly shut down, and the practicality of using these flanges on high maintenance components. In addition, the flanges were thermally shocked to simulate cold starting the system. Instrumentation such as vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters were tested alongside each other, and compared with flow measurements from calibration tanks in the flow loop.

  18. Induction of water deficit tolerance by cold shock and salicylic acid during germination in the common bean - doi: 10.4025/actasciagron.v35i2.15967

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Antônia Torquato Agostini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of short-term stresses or elicitors in seedlings or embryos with high metabolic activity might increase multi-adversity tolerance. Beans seeds cv. IAC-Carioca were exposed to cold shock temperatures (S - 7°C 24h-1 and salicylic acid (SA - 0.01 mM 48h-1 during imbibition to study physiological responses to osmotic stress physiological responses. The seeds were soaked in paper towel imbibed in water or salicylic acid at 25°C for 24h. The seed were subsequently submitted to temperatures of 7ºC and 25ºC for another 24h in water or salicylic acid. Following each treatment, the seeds were transferred to mannitol solutions (0, -0.3, -0.6, and -1.2 MPa and evaluated after seven days for germination, vigour, shoot and root length, dry mass, proline accumulation and protein electrophoretic profile. Treatments with salicylic acid and cold shock did not affect germination, but germination was reduced through the mannitol-induced progression of water deficit. However, both salicylic acid and cold shock treatments affected seed vigour. The application of salicylic acid increased root and total seedling length and dry weight, especially at intermediate water stress levels. Both salicylic acid and cold shock treatments changed the protein pattern of the treated seeds, but only SA showed promise as a technology for seed treatment.

  19. A new member of the LIR family from perennial ryegrass is cold-responsive, and promotes vegetative growth in ¤Arabidopsis¤

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciannamea, S.; Jensen, Christian Sig; Agerskov, Henrik;

    2007-01-01

    dusk and declined during the night. Heterologous expression of LpLIR1 in Arabidopsis led to a significant increase in leaf formation under short days (SD) conditions but only when plants had received a preceding vernalization treatment. Furthermore, dissection of plant development under SD revealed a...

  20. Expression of Selected Ginkgo biloba Heat Shock Protein Genes After Cold Treatment Could Be Induced by Other Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs play various stress-protective roles in plants. In this study, three HSP genes were isolated from a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library of Ginkgo biloba leaves treated with cold stress. Based on the molecular weight, the three genes were designated GbHSP16.8, GbHSP17 and GbHSP70. The full length of the three genes were predicted to encode three polypeptide chains containing 149 amino acids (Aa, 152 Aa, and 657 Aa, and their corresponding molecular weights were predicted as follows: 16.67 kDa, 17.39 kDa, and 71.81 kDa respectively. The three genes exhibited distinctive expression patterns in different organs or development stages. GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70 showed high expression levels in leaves and a low level in gynoecia, GbHSP17 showed a higher transcription in stamens and lower level in fruit. This result indicates that GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70 may play important roles in Ginkgo leaf development and photosynthesis, and GbHSP17 may play a positive role in pollen maturation. All three GbHSPs were up-regulated under cold stress, whereas extreme heat stress only caused up-regulation of GbHSP70, UV-B treatment resulted in up-regulation of GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP17, wounding treatment resulted in up-regulation of GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70, and abscisic acid (ABA treatment caused up-regulation of GbHSP70 primarily.

  1. Septic Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Achong, Michael R.

    1980-01-01

    Septic shock is a dynamic syndrome of inadequate tissue perfusion caused by invasion of the blood by micro-organisms. Gram-negative rod bacteremia accounts for about two-thirds of patients with this syndrome. The fully developed syndrome of high fever, chills, cold, moist extremities, hypotension and oliguria is easy to recognize. However, the initial features of the syndrome may be quite non-specific and subtle, particularly in elderly patients. Treatment is aimed at eliminating the infectio...

  2. Cost effective purification of intein based syntetic cationic antimicrobial peptide expressed in cold shock expression system using salt inducible E. coli GJ1158

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetha Ram Kotra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide (SC-AMP is an important and upcoming therapeutic molecule against onventional antibiotics. In this study, an attempt was made to purify the SC-AMP without the enzymatic cleavage of the affinity tag, by using an intein-based system. Methods:The intein sequence was amplified from pTYB11 vector using PCR methodologies and the N-terminal of intein was ligated with SC-AMP. The designed construct, intein-SC-AMP was cloned into MCS region of cold shock expression vector, pCOLDI and the recombinant peptide was purified on a chitin affinity column by cleaving intein with 50 mM DTT without applying enzymatic cleavage. Later the peptide was quantified and its antibacterial activity of the purified peptide was studied using well diffusion method. Results: Initially, intein-SC-AMP was expressed as a fusion protein in both IPTG inducible E. coli BL21(DE3 and salt inducible E. coli GJ1158. Single step purification using CBD (chitin binding domain - intein tag in salt inducible E. coli GJ1158, yields the SC-AMP in the soluble form at a oncentration of 208 mg/L. The antibacterial activity and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the purified SC-AMP was studied against both Gram positive and Gram negative microorganisms. Conclusion: For the first time, single step purification of soluble SC-AMP was carried out using chitin-binding domain affinity tag in salt inducible E. coli GJ1158 without an application of enzymatic cleavage. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014;4(1:13-19

  3. Comparison of Noise Source Localization Data with Flow Field Data Obtained in Cold Supersonic Jets and Implications Regarding Broadband Shock Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podboy, Gary; Wernet, Mark; Clem, Michelle; Fagan, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Phased array noise source localization have been compared with 2 types of flow field data (BOS and PIV). The data show that: 1) the higher frequency noise in a BBSN hump is generated further downstream than the lower frequency noise. This is due to a) the shock spacing decreasing and b) the turbulent structure size increasing with distance downstream. 2) BBSN can be created by very weak shocks. 3) BBSN is not created by the strong shocks just downstream of the nozzle because the turbulent structures have not grown large enough to match the shock spacing. 4) The point in the flow where the shock spacing equals the average size of the turbulent structures is a hot spot for shock noise. 5) Some of the shocks responsible for producing the first hump also produce the second hump.

  4. Effect of sequential heat and cold shocks on nuclear phenotypes of the blood-sucking insect, Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister) (Hemiptera, Reduviidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Simone L; Pacheco Raquel M; Rodrigues Vera LCC; Mello Maria Luiza S.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal shocks induce changes in the nuclear phenotypes that correspond to survival (heterochromatin decondensation, nuclear fusion) or death (apoptosis, necrosis) responses in the Malpighian tubules of Panstrongylus megistus. Since thermal tolerance increased survival and molting rate in this species following sequential shocks, we investigated whether changes in nuclear phenotypes accompanied the insect survival response to sequential thermal shocks. Fifth instar nymphs were subjected to a ...

  5. 结缕草CBF基因的同源克隆及其转基因拟南芥的抗寒性验证%Cloning of Zoysiagrass CBF Gene and Validation of Cold Tolerance in Trans-genic Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯勋伟; 才宏伟

    2014-01-01

    结缕草是优良的暖季型草坪草之一,主要用于亚热带和热带地区的草坪种植。抗冷性是结缕草栽培范围的限制因子。本研究以日本最北部原产的结缕草品系为材料,根据其他植物的已知的抗寒基因 CBF 序列,通过同源克隆的方法获得结缕草中相对应的同源基因ZjCBF;根据和其他已报告的CBF序列的比对结果,确定ZjCBF基因属于CBF转录因子家族基因中CBF1型基因。利用半定量PCR和实时定量PCR分析该基因在寒冷条件下的表达情况,发现ZjCBF基因受冷胁迫的诱导,在4℃处理6 h时表达量最高。在此基础上,本研究构建了该基因的过表达载体,并将其转化到拟南芥中,通过低温冷处理实验发现,不论是否经过冷驯化,转 ZjCBF 基因植株由于 ZjCBF 的过量表达均比野生型植株抗寒性强。%Zoysiagrass is recognized as an excellent warm-season turfgrass and mainly used in subtropical and tropical regions. Cold stress is a major constraint factor for the cultivation of zoysiagrass. In this study, according to the sequences of cold tolerance gene CBF had been reported in other plant species, we cloned the corresponding homologous of the ZjCBF gene by homology cloning method in Zoysia japonica using a material originated from the most northern area of Japan. Based on the alignment re-sults compared with other reported CBF genes, we found the ZjCBF gene belongs to the CBF1 familiy. By semi-quantitative PCR and real-time quantitative PCR, we analyzed the expression level of the ZjCBF gene in the cold condition and found that ZjCBF was induced by cold stress, and the ZjCBF expression reached peak at six hours post 4°C treatment. In addition, we also con-structed ZjCBF over expression vector and generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants, with better cold tolerance than the wild-type, whether through cold acclimation or not.

  6. Cold Fronts in Cold Dark Matter Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters. These features, called cold fronts, are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >~2 over 10-50 kpc accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM) if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging subcluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the amplitude of gas density and temperature gradients across the front. Our results indicate that cold fronts are nonequilibrium transient phenomena and can be observed for a period of less than a billion years. We show that the velocity and density fields of gas surrounding the cold front can be very irregular, which would complicate analyses aiming to put constraints on the physical conditions of the ICM in the vicinity of the front.

  7. Molecular Cloning and Identification of a Heat Shock Cognate Protein 70 Gene, Thhsc70, in Thellungiella halophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGXia; GUOShan-Li; YINHai-Bo; XIONGDong-Jin; ZHANGHui; ZHAOYan-Xiu

    2004-01-01

    Heat shock cognate proteins 70 (hsp70s) act as molecular chaperones. Some hsp70s are also expressed in unstressed plants, known as hsc70. To gain further knowledge about the hsc70, the Thellungiella halophila hsc70 (Thhsc70) gene that encoded the cytosolic hsc70 in salt cress (T.halophila (C.A.Mey.) O.E.Schulz) was identified. In unstressed plants the expression of Thhsc70was shown to be tissue-specific. The Thhsc70 gene was induced by heat and cold stresses, but almost not by salt and drought stresses. Overexpression of Thhsc7Ocould increase thermctolerance and chilling tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

  8. 冷应激及包埋对乳酸菌冻干发酵剂的影响%Effect of cold shock and embedding on the freezing dried lactic acid bacteria culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈贺佳; 牟光庆

    2012-01-01

    Freezing dried lactic acid bacteria culture was prepared by strains matching ratios of Streptococcus thermophils, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, Lactobacillus acidophilus are 3:2:1. Effects of cold shock treatment with different temperatures on survival rate of freezing dried bacteria were studied. The results show that survival rate of lactic acid bacteria after freeze drying was 96.3% under cold shock of 20℃, deal with 4h. The immobilization conditions for fermentation were as follows: sodium alginate 2.25g/L, CaCl2 4.0g/L, and the survival rate of lactic acid bacteria after embedding was 95.6%.%将嗜热链球菌、保加利亚乳杆菌、嗜酸乳杆菌按3∶2∶1比例制备乳酸菌冻干发酵剂.比较不同温度冷应激处理对乳酸菌冻干存活率的影响,结果表明,20℃,处理4h时,冻干存活率为96.3%.选择发酵的固定化细胞制作条件:海藻酸钠2.25g/L、CaCl2 4.0g/L.包埋后乳酸菌冻干存活率为95.6%.

  9. Cold Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  10. 双温冷激处理对黄瓜品质和生理的影响及传热特性分析%Effect of two-temperature cold shock treatment on quality and physiology of cucumber and its heat transfer characteristic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娜; 杨昭; 陈爱强; 尹海蛟

    2013-01-01

      为探究果蔬冷激过程中传热特性对保鲜效果的影响,分别对黄瓜进行常规冷激处理(0℃冰水混合物处理42 min)及双温冷激处理(0℃冰水混合物处理14 min 后放到6℃冷水中处理14 min,最后返回0℃冰水混合物处理14 min).测定了处理过程中黄瓜组织温度分布及贮藏期间失重率、硬度、过氧化物酶(peroxidase, POD)活性等品质和生理变化,分析了黄瓜贮藏品质与传热特性的内在关系.结果表明:双温冷激处理在延缓细胞膜降解、提高 POD 活性方面显著优于常规冷激处理(P<0.05),在10℃冷库贮藏15 d 后,其相对电导率、POD 活性分别是常规冷激组的92%及1.24倍;双温冷激黄瓜内部组织温度梯度在处理第29 min 时的阶跃式升高,以及从处理第29 min 到处理结束过程中,黄瓜内部组织温度梯度高于常规冷激黄瓜,或许是双温冷激处理黄瓜保鲜效果较好的内在因素.所得结论可为双温冷激处理的应用提供参考.%Cold shock treatment, as a safe, effective physical pretreatment method, had gained growing interest. Part of this interest relates to the growing pressure from consumers to reduce the quantities of postharvest chemicals used for keeping fresh. To investigate the effects of heat transfer characteristics on fruits and vegetables during storage, the concept of two-temperature cold shock treatment was introduced to obtain the different heat transfer characteristics during the process of cold shock treatment. Cucumbers were treated with a common cold shock treatment (42 min at mixture of ice and water) and a two-temperature cold shock treatment (14 min at mixture of ice and water, followed by 14 min at 6 cold water. and 14 min at mixture of ice and water again),℃respectively. The temperature distribution of cucumber was measured. The storage quality such as weight loss rate, firmness, and peroxidase (POD) activity were evaluated. Then the internal relationships

  11. Molecular cloning and cold shock induced overexpression of the DNA encoding phor sensor domain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a target molecule for novel anti-tubercular drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langi, Gladys Emmanuella Putri; Moeis, Maelita R.; Ihsanawati, Giri-Rachman, Ernawati Arifin

    2014-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the sole cause of Tuberculosis (TB), is still a major global problem. The discovery of new anti-tubercular drugs is needed to face the increasing TB cases, especially to prevent the increase of cases with resistant Mtb. A potential novel drug target is the Mtb PhoR sensor domain protein which is the histidine kinase extracellular domain for receiving environmental signals. This protein is the initial part of the two-component system PhoR-PhoP regulating 114 genes related to the virulence of Mtb. In this study, the gene encoding PhoR sensor domain (SensPhoR) was subcloned from pGEM-T SensPhoR from the previous study (Suwanto, 2012) to pColdII. The construct pColdII SensPhoR was confirmed through restriction analysis and sequencing. Using the construct, SensPhoR was overexpressed at 15°C using Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Low temperature was chosen because according to the solubility prediction program of recombinant proteins from The University of Oklahama, the PhoR sensor domain has a chance of 79.8% to be expressed as insoluble proteins in Escherichia coli's (E. coli) cytoplasm. This prediction is also supported by other similar programs: PROSO and PROSO II. The SDS PAGE result indicated that the PhoR sensor domain recombinant protein was overexpressed. For future studies, this protein will be purified and used for structure analysis which can be used to find potential drugs through rational drug design.

  12. Shock waves in crystalline dielectrics at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to study shock wave propagation in dielectric undeformable isotropic crystals at very low temperature (T<20 K). Starting from a model based on extended irreversible thermodynamics and using the Lax and entropy growth selection rules, it is shown that not only the classical (hot) shocks but also so-called cold shocks are physically admissible. Cold shocks are characterized by the property that the body is cooled after the passage of the wavefront. (author)

  13. Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... people in the United States suffer 1 billion colds. You can get a cold by touching your ...

  14. The cold equation of state of tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greeff, Carl W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rudin, Sven P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Corckett, Scott D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wills, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In high-pressure isentropic compression experiments (ICE), the pressure is dominated by the cold curve. In order to obtain an accurate semi-empirical cold curve for Ta, we calculate the thermal pressure from ab initio phonon and electronic excitation spectra. The cold curve is then inferred from ultrasonic and shock data. Our empirical cold pressure is compared to density functional calculations and found to be closer to GGA results at low pressure and to approach LDA at high pressure.

  15. The relationship between codon usage bias and cold resistant genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research is based on synonymous codon usage which has been well-known as a feature that affects typical expression level of protein in an organism. Different organisms prefer different codons for same amino acid and this is called Codon Usage Bias (CUB). The codon usage directly affects the level or even direction of changes in protein expression in responses to environmental stimuli. Cold stress is a major abiotic factor that limits the agricultural productivity of plants. In the recent study CUB has been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana cold resistant and housekeeping genes and their homologs in rice (Oryza sativa) to understand the cold stress and housekeeping genes relation with CUB. Six cold resistant and three housekeeping genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and their homologs in rice, were subjected to CUB analysis. The three cold resistant genes (DREB1B, RCI and MYB15) showed more than 50% (52%, 61% and 66% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. On the other hand three cold resistant genes (MPK3, ICE1 and ZAT12) showed less than 50% (38%, 38% and 47% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. The three housekeeping genes (Actin, Tubulin and Ubiquitin) showed 76% similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. This study will help to manage the plant gene expression through codon optimization under the cold stress. (author)

  16. Relativistic shocks and particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we investigate the fluid dynamics of relativistic shock waves, and use the results to calculate the spectral index of particles accelerated by the Fermi process in such shocks. We have calculated the distributions of Fermi-accelerated particles at shocks propagating into cold proton-electron plasma and also cold electron-positron plasma. We have considered two different power spectra for the scattering waves, and find, in contrast to the non-relativistic case, that the spectral index of the accelerated particles depends on the wave power spectrum. On the assumption of thermal equilibrium both upstream and downstream, we present some useful fits for the compression ratio of shocks propagating at arbitrary speeds into gas of any temperature. (author)

  17. Mesophyll-localized phytochromes gate stress- and light-inducible anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Sookyung; Warnasooriya, Sankalpi N.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stress and light induce anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis. Here, we demonstrate that mesophyll-localized phytochromes regulate nitrogen-, phosphate- and cold-induced anthocyanin accumulation in shoots of Arabidopsis. Whereas ecotype-dependent differences result in distinct total levels of anthocyanin accumulation in response to light, cold, or nutrient-deficient treatments, phytochromes generally gate light- and/or stress-induced anthocyanin accumulation in shoots, as plants dep...

  18. Particle acceleration in modified shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient particle acceleration in shocks must modify the shock structure with consequent changes in the particle acceleration. This effect is studied and analytic solutions are found describing the diffusive acceleration of particles with momentum independent diffusion coefficients in hyperbolic tangent type velocity transitions. If the input particle spectrum is a delta function, the shock smoothing replaces the truncated power-law downstream particle spectrum by a more complicated form, but one which has a power-law tail at high momenta. For a cold plasma this solution can be made completely self-consistent. Some problems associated with momentum dependent diffusion coefficients are discussed. (author)

  19. Optimized coating removal by cold shock treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of removing coatings from nuclear power plant components, especially such with residual contamination, makes use of the self-contained stress developing during heat extraction. In this connection the nitrogen application process without and with preheating by means of hot air, infrared and microwave radiation was tested. The problem of auxiliary coatings was examined, and model coatings were developed. (DG)

  20. Functional analysis of the Hikeshi-like protein and its interaction with HSP70 in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizumi, Shinya; Ohama, Naohiko; Mizoi, Junya [Laboratory of Plant Molecular Physiology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Shinozaki, Kazuo [RIKEN Plant Science Center, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045 (Japan); Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko, E-mail: akys@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Plant Molecular Physiology, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • HKL, a Hikeshi homologous gene is identified in Arabidopsis. • HKL interacts with two HSP70 isoforms and regulates the subcellular localization of HSC70-1. • The two HSP70 translocate into nucleus in response to heat stress. • Overexpression of HKL confers thermotolerance in transgenic plants. - Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) refold damaged proteins and are an essential component of the heat shock response. Previously, the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) has been reported to translocate into the nucleus in a heat-dependent manner in many organisms. In humans, the heat-induced translocation of HSP70 requires the nuclear carrier protein Hikeshi. In the Arabidopsis genome, only one gene encodes a protein with high homology to Hikeshi, and we named this homolog Hikeshi-like (HKL) protein. In this study, we show that two Arabidopsis HSP70 isoforms accumulate in the nucleus in response to heat shock and that HKL interacts with these HSP70s. Our histochemical analysis revealed that HKL is predominantly expressed in meristematic tissues, suggesting the potential importance of HKL during cell division in Arabidopsis. In addition, we show that HKL regulates HSP70 localization, and HKL overexpression conferred thermotolerance to transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Our results suggest that HKL plays a positive role in the thermotolerance of Arabidopsis plants and cooperatively interacts with HSP70.

  1. Identification and expression analysis of heat shock transcription factors in the wild Chinese grapevine (Vitis pseudoreticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Han, Yong-Tao; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Feng-Li; Li, Ya-Juan; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Yue-Jin; Wen, Ying-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs) are known to play pivotal roles in the adaptation of plants to heat stress and other stress stimuli. While grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is one of the most important fruit crops worldwide, little is known about the Hsf family in Vitis spp. Here, we identified nineteen putative Hsf genes (VviHsfs) in Vitis spp based on the 12 × grape genome (V. vinifera L.). Phylogenetic analysis revealed three classes of grape Hsf genes (classes A, B, and C). Additional comparisons between grape and Arabidopsis thaliana demonstrated that several VviHsfs genes occurred in corresponding syntenic blocks of Arabidopsis. Moreover, we examined the expression profiles of the homologs of the VviHsfs genes (VpHsfs) in the wild Chinese Vitis pseudoreticulata accession Baihe-35-1, which is tolerant to various environmental stresses. Among the nineteen VpHsfs, ten VpHsfs displayed lower transcript levels under non-stress conditions and marked up-regulation during heat stress treatment; several VpHsfs also displayed altered expression levels in response to cold, salt, and hormone treatments, suggesting their versatile roles in response to stress stimuli. In addition, eight VpHsf-GFP fusion proteins showed differential subcellular localization in V. pseudoreticulata mesophyll protoplasts. Taken together, our data may provide an important reference for further studies of Hsf genes in Vitis spp. PMID:26689772

  2. Overexpression of MuHSP70 gene from Macrotyloma uniflorum confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masand, Shikha; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2016-02-01

    A 70-KD heat shock protein (HSP70) is one of the most conserved chaperones. It is involved in de novo protein folding and prevents the aggregation of unfolded proteins under lethal environmental factors. The purpose of this study is to characterise a MuHSP70 from horsegram (Macrotyloma uniflorum) and elucidating its role in stress tolerance of plants. A MuHSP70 was cloned and characterised from a natural drought stress tolerant HPK4 variety of horsegram (M. uniflorum). For functional characterization, MuHSP70 was overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. Overexpression of MuHSP70 was found to provide tolerance to the transgenic Arabidopsis against various stresses such as heat, cold, drought, salinity and oxidative stress. MuHSP70 transgenics were observed to maintain the shoot biomass, root length, relative water content, and chlorophyll content during exposure to multi-stresses relative to non-transgenic control. Transgenic lines have further shown the reduced levels of MDA, H2O2, and proteolytic activity. Together, these findings suggest that overexpression of MuHSP70 plays an important role in improving abiotic stress tolerance and could be a crucial candidate gene for exploration in crop improvement program. PMID:26694324

  3. Reentry Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorine; Houston

    1998-01-01

    Dear Xiao Lan, You remember the pain of culture and reentry shock; humor me please; let mereview the facts for the sake of the students you are sending here in greater numbers.Culture shock is the emotional pain that people experience when they visit a newcountry and find customs, experiences, smells, and non-verbal communication stylesto be different from their own country.

  4. Cold Fronts in CDM clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Nagai, D; Nagai, Daisuke; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, high-resolution Chandra observations revealed the existence of very sharp features in the X-ray surface brightness and temperature maps of several clusters (Vikhlinin et. al., 2001). These features, called ``cold fronts'', are characterized by an increase in surface brightness by a factor >2 over 10-50 kpc, accompanied by a drop in temperature of a similar magnitude. The existence of such sharp gradients can be used to put interesting constraints on the physics of the intracluster medium (ICM), if their mechanism and longevity are well understood. Here, we present results of a search for cold fronts in high-resolution simulations of galaxy clusters in cold dark matter (CDM) models. We show that sharp gradients with properties similar to those of observed cold fronts naturally arise in cluster mergers when the shocks heat gas surrounding the merging sub-cluster, while its dense core remains relatively cold. The compression induced by supersonic motions and shock heating during the merger enhance the ...

  5. Common cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... infections in children, even years after you stop breastfeeding. Drink plenty of fluids to help your immune system work properly. Eat yogurt that contains "active cultures." These may help prevent colds. Probiotics may help ...

  6. Cold turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Coombes, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Highly popular cold remedies could be banned from sale because of their link to a dangerous drug epidemic that has yet to surface in the UK. Rebecca Coombes asks whether the authorities are over-reacting

  7. Habitat-Associated Life History and Stress-Tolerance Variation in Arabidopsis arenosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baduel, Pierre; Arnold, Brian; Weisman, Cara M; Hunter, Ben; Bomblies, Kirsten

    2016-05-01

    Weediness in ephemeral plants is commonly characterized by rapid cycling, prolific all-in flowering, and loss of perenniality. Many species made transitions to weediness of this sort, which can be advantageous in high-disturbance or human-associated habitats. The molecular basis of this shift, however, remains mostly mysterious. Here, we use transcriptome sequencing, genome resequencing scans for selection, and stress tolerance assays to study a weedy population of the otherwise nonweedy Arabidopsis arenosa, an obligately outbreeding relative of Arabidopsis thaliana Although weedy A. arenosa is widespread, a single genetic lineage colonized railways throughout central and northern Europe. We show that railway plants, in contrast to plants from sheltered outcrops in hill/mountain regions, are rapid cycling, have lost the vernalization requirement, show prolific flowering, and do not return to vegetative growth. Comparing transcriptomes of railway and mountain plants across time courses with and without vernalization, we found that railway plants have sharply abrogated vernalization responsiveness and high constitutive expression of heat- and cold-responsive genes. Railway plants also have strong constitutive heat shock and freezing tolerance compared with mountain plants, where tolerance must be induced. We found 20 genes with good evidence of selection in the railway population. One of these, LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL, is known in A. thaliana to regulate many stress-response genes that we found to be differentially regulated among the distinct habitats. Our data suggest that, beyond life history regulation, other traits like basal stress tolerance also are associated with the evolution of weediness in A. arenosa. PMID:26941193

  8. Water deficits and heat shock effects on photosynthesis of a transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana constitutively expressing ABP9, a bZIP transcription factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xia; Wollenweber, Bernd; Jiang, Dong;

    2008-01-01

    The effects of water deficits (WD), heat shock (HS), and both (HSWD) on photosynthetic carbon- and light-use efficiencies together with leaf ABA content, pigment composition and expressions of stress- and light harvesting-responsive genes were investigated in ABP9 [ABA-responsive-element (ABRE...... plants in response to WD and/or HS stresses suggest that declines in A and gs might have been due to ABA-induced stomatal closure. Moreover, compared with WT, 5P2 plants exhibited higher ABA content, instantaneous water use efficiency (IWUE), Chl a/b, NPQ, and lower Chl/carotenoid ratios. Finally......, altered expression of stress-regulated or light harvesting-responsive genes was observed. Collectively, our results indicate that constitutive expression of ABP9 improves the photosynthetic capacity of plants under stress by adjusting photosynthetic pigment composition, dissipating excess light energy...

  9. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    CERN Document Server

    Dasadia, Sarthak; Sarazin, Craig; Morandi, Andrea; Markevitch, Maxim; Wik, Daniel; Feretti, Luigina; Giovannini, Gabriele; Govoni, Federica; Vacca, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Deep (103 ks) \\chandra\\ observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of $M$ = 3.0 $\\pm$ 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell~665 the second cluster where a strong merger shock of $M \\approx$ 3 has been detected, after the Bullet cluster. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 $\\pm$ 0.7) $\\times$ 10$^3$ km sec$^{-1}$. The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front, with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the re-acceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  10. Culture shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Furham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the popular concept of culture shock. From the academic perspective co-researchers from different disciplines (anthropology, education, psychiatry, psychology, sociology have attempted to operationalise the concept and understand the process behind it. It represents fifty years of research using different methodologies and trying to answer different questions about the experience of travel for many reasons. This paper also considers issues concerned with the “overseas” student, of which there are ever more, travelling abroad to study. They can have serious culture shock difficulties. Implications of this research are considered

  11. Biodiversity and cold adaptive mechanisms of psychrophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhua Xin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold-adapted bacteria and archaea are widely distributed in cold environments on Earth, such as permafrost, cold soils and deserts, glaciers, lakes, sea ice in the Arctic, Antarctic and high mountains, as well as the deep sea, ice caves and the atmospheric stratosphere etc. Cold-adapted organisms inhabiting these environments exhibit rich diversity. Studies on the biogeography of psychrophiles will enable us to understand their biodiversity, distribution and origins. Due to long-term living in cold regions, cold-adapted bacteria and archeae have developed specific physiological mechanisms of adaptation to cold environments. These mechanisms include: regulating the fluidity of the cytoplasmic membrane through adjusting the composition of membrane lipids; achieving low-temperature protection through compatibility solute, antifreeze proteins, ice-binding proteins, ice-nucleation proteins and anti-nucleating proteins; production of heat-shock and coldshock proteins, cold acclimation protein and DEAD-box RNA helicase at low temperatures; production of cold-active enzymes; increasing energy generation and conservation. With the rapid development of sequencing technology, various omics-based approaches have been used to reveal cold-adaptive mechanisms of psychrophiles at the genomic level.

  12. Why Being Cold Might Foster a Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159805.html Why Being Cold Might Foster a Cold Healthy body temperature boosts ability of immune system ... proving Mom right: Your odds of avoiding a cold get better if you bundle up and stay ...

  13. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  14. Culture Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋文玲

    2004-01-01

    Specialists say that it is not easy to get used to life in a new culture.“Culture shock”is the term these specialists use when talking about the feelings that people have in a new environment.There are three stages of culture shock,say the specialists.In the first stage,the newcomers like their new environment,Then when the fresh experience

  15. Cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So called 'cold fusion phenomena' are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording 4He, 3He, 3H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of 4He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author)

  16. Cold fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Suk Yong; Sung, Ki Woong; Kang, Joo Sang; Lee, Jong Jik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    So called `cold fusion phenomena` are not confirmed yet. Excess heat generation is very delicate one. Neutron generation is most reliable results, however, the records are erratic and the same results could not be repeated. So there is no reason to exclude the malfunction of testing instruments. The same arguments arise in recording {sup 4}He, {sup 3}He, {sup 3}H, which are not rich in quantity basically. An experiment where plenty of {sup 4}He were recorded is attached in appendix. The problem is that we are trying to search cold fusion which is permitted by nature or not. The famous tunneling effect in quantum mechanics will answer it, however, the most fusion rate is known to be negligible. The focus of this project is on the theme that how to increase that negligible fusion rate. 6 figs, 4 tabs, 1512 refs. (Author).

  17. Coping with Cold Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Coping With Cold Sores KidsHealth > For Kids > Coping With Cold Sores ... sore." What's that? Adam wondered. What Is a Cold Sore? Cold sores are small blisters that is ...

  18. AtHSPR may function in salt-induced cell death and ER stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chongying

    2016-07-01

    Salt stress is a harmful and global abiotic stress to plants and has an adverse effect on all physiological processes of plants. Recently, we cloned and identified a novel AtHSPR (Arabidopsis thaliana Heat Shock Protein Related), which encodes a nuclear-localized protein with ATPase activity, participates in salt and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis. Transcript profiling analysis revealed a differential expression of genes involved in accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, stress response and photosynthesis between athspr mutant and WT under salt stress. Here, we provide further analysis of the data showing the regulation of salt-induced cell death and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in Arabidopsis and propose a hypothetical model for the role of AtHSPR in the regulation of the salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:27302034

  19. THERMAL SHOCK RESISTANCE OF A SODA LIME GLASS

    OpenAIRE

    Z. MALOU; Hamidouche, M.; N. BOUAOUADJA; Chevalier, J; FANTOZZI, G

    2013-01-01

    We studied the thermal shock of a three millimeters thickness soda lime glass using the hot-cold thermal shock technique. The cooling was made by ambient air jet on previously warmed samples. The heat transfer coefficient was about 600 W/°C.m2 (Biot number β = 0.3). The thermal shock duration was fixed at 6 seconds. The hot temperature was taken between 100°C and 550°C while the cold temperature of the air flux was kept constant at 20°C. The acoustic emission technique was used for determinin...

  20. A merger shock in A2034

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Hopkins, Andrew M. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; David, Laurence P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Van Weeren, Reinout J., E-mail: matthew.owers@aao.gov.au [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    We present a 250 ks Chandra observation of the cluster merger A2034 with the aim of understanding the nature of a sharp edge previously characterized as a cold front. The new data reveal that the edge is coherent over a larger opening angle and is significantly more bow-shock-shaped than previously thought. Within ∼27° about the axis of symmetry of the edge, the density, temperature, and pressure drop abruptly by factors of 1.83{sub −0.08}{sup +0.09}, 1.85{sub −0.41}{sup +0.41}, and 3.4{sub −0.7}{sup +0.8}, respectively. This is inconsistent with the pressure equilibrium expected of a cold front and we conclude that the edge is a shock front. We measure a Mach number M=1.59{sub −0.07}{sup +0.06} and corresponding shock velocity v {sub shock} ≅ 2057 km s{sup –1}. Using spectra collected at the MMT with the Hectospec multi-object spectrograph, we identify 328 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. Significantly, we find a local peak in the projected galaxy density associated with a bright cluster galaxy that is located just ahead of the nose of the shock. The data are consistent with a merger viewed within ∼23° of the plane of the sky. The merging subclusters are now moving apart along a north-south axis approximately 0.3 Gyr after a small impact parameter core passage. The gas core of the secondary subcluster, which was driving the shock, appears to have been disrupted by the merger. Without a driving 'piston,' we speculate that the shock is dying. Finally, we propose that the diffuse radio emission near the shock is due to the revival of pre-existing radio plasma that has been overrun by the shock.

  1. Putrescine accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines enhances tolerance to dehydration and freezing stress

    OpenAIRE

    Alet, Analía I; Sanchez, Diego H; Cuevas, Juan C.; del Valle, Secundino; Altabella, Teresa; Tiburcio, Antonio F; Marco, Francisco; Ferrando, Alejandro; Espasandín, Fabiana D; González, María E; Carrasco, Pedro; Ruiz, Oscar A.

    2011-01-01

    Polyamines have been globally associated to plant responses to abiotic stress. Particularly, putrescine has been related to a better response to cold and dehydration stresses. It is known that this polyamine is involved in cold tolerance, since Arabidopsis thaliana plants mutated in the key enzyme responsible for putrescine synthesis (arginine decarboxilase, ADC; EC 4.1.1.19) are more sensitive than the wild type to this stress. Although it is speculated that the overexpression of ADC genes m...

  2. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock? Immediate Causes Cardiogenic shock occurs if the heart suddenly can' ... reason why emergency treatment is so important. Underlying Causes The underlying causes of cardiogenic shock are conditions ...

  3. Isolation and functional characterization of cold-regulated promoters, by digitally identifying peach fruit cold-induced genes from a large EST dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Margarita

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cold acclimation is the process by which plants adapt to the low, non freezing temperatures that naturally occur during late autumn or early winter. This process enables the plants to resist the freezing temperatures of winter. Temperatures similar to those associated with cold acclimation are also used by the fruit industry to delay fruit ripening in peaches. However, peaches that are subjected to long periods of cold storage may develop chilling injury symptoms (woolliness and internal breakdown. In order to better understand the relationship between cold acclimation and chilling injury in peaches, we isolated and functionally characterized cold-regulated promoters from cold-inducible genes identified by digitally analyzing a large EST dataset. Results Digital expression analyses of EST datasets, revealed 164 cold-induced peach genes, several of which show similarities to genes associated with cold acclimation and cold stress responses. The promoters of three of these cold-inducible genes (Ppbec1, Ppxero2 and Pptha1 were fused to the GUS reporter gene and characterized for cold-inducibility using both transient transformation assays in peach fruits (in fruta and stable transformation in Arabidopsis thaliana. These assays demonstrate that the promoter Pptha1 is not cold-inducible, whereas the Ppbec1 and Ppxero2 promoter constructs are cold-inducible. Conclusion This work demonstrates that during cold storage, peach fruits differentially express genes that are associated with cold acclimation. Functional characterization of these promoters in transient transformation assays in fruta as well as stable transformation in Arabidopsis, demonstrate that the isolated Ppbec1 and Ppxero2 promoters are cold-inducible promoters, whereas the isolated Pptha1 promoter is not cold-inducible. Additionally, the cold-inducible activity of the Ppbec1 and Ppxero2 promoters suggest that there is a conserved heterologous cold-inducible regulation

  4. Arabidopsis in Wageningen

    OpenAIRE

    Koornneef, M

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the plant species that in the past 25 years has developed into the major model species in plant biology research. This was due to its properties such as short generation time, its small genome and its easiness to be transformed. Wageningen University has played an important role in the development of this model, based on interdisciplinary collaborations using genetics as a major tool to investigate aspects of physiology, development, plant-microbe interactions and evol...

  5. Radiation from Shock-Accelerated Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle acceleration, generation of magnetic fields , and associated radiation. We have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet propagating into an unmagnetized plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. The shock structure depends on the composition of the jet and ambient plasma (electron-positron or electron-ions). Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the reverse , jet shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. The detailed properties of the radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jet shocks, and supernova remnants

  6. Cosmological shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, A M; Durret, F

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale structure formation, accretion and merging processes, AGN activity produce cosmological gas shocks. The shocks convert a fraction of the energy of gravitationally accelerated flows to internal energy of the gas. Being the main gas-heating agent, cosmological shocks could amplify magnetic fields and accelerate energetic particles via the multi-fluid plasma relaxation processes. We first discuss the basic properties of standard single-fluid shocks. Cosmological plasma shocks are expected to be collisionless. We then review the plasma processes responsible for the microscopic structure of collisionless shocks. A tiny fraction of the particles crossing the shock is injected into the non-thermal energetic component that could get a substantial part of the ram pressure power dissipated at the shock. The energetic particles penetrate deep into the shock upstream producing an extended shock precursor. Scaling relations for postshock ion temperature and entropy as functions of shock velocity in strong coll...

  7. Cold Mode Accretion in Galaxy Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Benson, Andrew J.; Bower, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A generic expectation for gas accreted by high mass haloes is that it is shock heated to the virial temperature of the halo. In low mass haloes, or at high redshift, however, the gas cooling rate is sufficiently rapid that an accretion shock is unlikely to form. Instead, gas can accrete directly into the centre of the halo in a `cold mode' of accretion. Although semi-analytic models have always made a clear distinction between hydrostatic and rapid cooling they have not made a distinction bet...

  8. Wheat Chloroplast Targeted sHSP26 Promoter Confers Heat and Abiotic Stress Inducible Expression in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Khurana, Neetika; Chauhan, Harsh; Khurana, Paramjit

    2013-01-01

    The small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) have been found to play a critical role in physiological stress conditions in protecting proteins from irreversible aggregation. To characterize the hloroplast targeted sHSP26 promoter in detail, deletion analysis of the promoter is carried out and analysed via transgenics in Arabidopsis. In the present study, complete assessment of the importance of CCAAT-box elements along with Heat shock elements (HSEs) in the promoter of sHSP26 was performed. Moreover...

  9. Cold symptoms (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and ... symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts about 7 days, with perhaps a ...

  10. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  11. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla;

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  12. Cold energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime

  13. Cold energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, John P., E-mail: jpw@castinganalysis.com [Casting Analysis Corp., PO Box 52, Weyers Cave, VA 24486 (United States)

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  14. An Arabidopsis callose synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Lars; Petersen, Morten; Mattsson, Ole;

    2002-01-01

    unclear whether callose synthases can also produce cellulose and whether plant cellulose synthases may also produce beta-1,3-glucans. We describe here an Arabidopsis gene, AtGsl5, encoding a plasma membrane-localized protein homologous to yeast beta-1,3-glucan synthase whose expression partially......Beta-1,3-glucan polymers are major structural components of fungal cell walls, while cellulosic beta-1,4-glucan is the predominant polysaccharide in plant cell walls. Plant beta-1,3-glucan, called callose, is produced in pollen and in response to pathogen attack and wounding, but it has been...

  15. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  16. Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Cosmological Shock Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2012-01-01

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large scale structure of the Universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfv'enic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfv'enic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and a...

  17. GREENPATCH® - Cold Mix Asphalt

    OpenAIRE

    ECT Team, Purdue

    2013-01-01

    GreenPatch® is environmentally friendly cold asphalt that is a direct replacement for traditional cold patch in repairing asphalt pavements. This revolutionary breakthrough in the cold asphalt industry contains no petroleum based softeners such as diesel, toluene, kerosene, and naphthalene found in conventional cold asphalt that pose serious threats to human health and the environment.

  18. Comparison of freezing tolerance, compatible solutes and polyamines in geographically diverse collections of Thellungiella sp. and Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Yang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thellungiella has been proposed as an extremophile alternative to Arabidopsis to investigate environmental stress tolerance. However, Arabidopsis accessions show large natural variation in their freezing tolerance and here the tolerance ranges of collections of accessions in the two species were compared. Results Leaf freezing tolerance of 16 Thellungiella accessions was assessed with an electrolyte leakage assay before and after 14 days of cold acclimation at 4°C. Soluble sugars (glucose, fructose, sucrose, raffinose and free polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, spermine were quantified by HPLC, proline photometrically. The ranges in nonacclimated freezing tolerance completely overlapped between Arabidopsis and Thellungiella. After cold acclimation, some Thellungiella accessions were more freezing tolerant than any Arabidopsis accessions. Acclimated freezing tolerance was correlated with sucrose levels in both species, but raffinose accumulation was lower in Thellungiella and only correlated with freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis. The reverse was true for leaf proline contents. Polyamine levels were generally similar between the species. Only spermine content was higher in nonacclimated Thellungiella plants, but decreased during acclimation and was negatively correlated with freezing tolerance. Conclusion Thellungiella is not an extremophile with regard to freezing tolerance, but some accessions significantly expand the range present in Arabidopsis. The metabolite data indicate different metabolic adaptation strategies between the species.

  19. Photorepair mutants of Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV radiation induces two major DNA damage products, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and, at a lower frequency, the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidinone dimer (6-4 product). Although Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce a CPD-specific photolyase that eliminates only this class of dimer, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Crotalus atrox, and Xenopus laevis have recently been shown to photoreactivate both CPDs and 6-4 products. We describe the isolation and characterization of two new classes of mutants of Arabidopsis, termed uvr2 and uvr3, that are defective in the photoreactivation of CPDs and 6-4 products, respectively. We demonstrate that the CPD photolyase mutation is genetically linked to a DNA sequence encoding a type II (metazoan) CPD photolyase. In addition, we are able to generate plants in which only CPDs or 6-4 products are photoreactivated in the nuclear genome by exposing these mutants to UV light and then allowing them to repair one or the other class of dimers. This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the biological consequences of each of these two major UV-induced photoproducts in an intact living system

  20. Dynamic compositional changes of detergent-resistant plasma membrane microdomains during plant cold acclimation

    OpenAIRE

    Minami, Anzu; Furuto, Akari; Uemura, Matsuo

    2010-01-01

    Plants increase their freezing tolerance upon exposure to low, non-freezing temperatures, which is known as cold acclimation. Cold acclimation results in a decrease in the proportion of sphingolipids in the plasma membrane in many plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. The decrease in sphingolipids has been considered to contribute to the increase in the cryostability of the plasma membrane through regulating membrane fluidity. Recently we have proposed a possibility of another important sphi...

  1. A Merger Shock in Abell 2034

    CERN Document Server

    Owers, Matt S; Couch, Warrick J; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; David, Laurence P; Forman, William R; Hopkins, Andrew M; Jones, Christine; van Weeren, Reinout J

    2013-01-01

    We present a $250\\,$ks Chandra observation of the cluster merger A2034 with the aim of understanding the nature of a sharp edge previously characterized as a cold front. The new data reveal that the edge is coherent over a larger opening angle and is significantly more bow-shock-shaped than previously thought. Within $\\sim 27\\,$degrees about the axis of symmetry of the edge the density, temperature and pressure drop abruptly by factors of $1.83^{+0.09}_{-0.08}$, $1.85^{+0.41}_{-0.41}$ and $3.4^{+0.8}_{-0.7}$, respectively. This is inconsistent with the pressure equilibrium expected of a cold front and we conclude that the edge is a shock front. We measure a Mach number $M = 1.59^{+0.06}_{-0.07}$ and corresponding shock velocity $v_{\\rm shock}\\simeq 2057\\,$km/s. Using spectra collected at the MMT with the Hectospec multi-object spectrograph we identify 328 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. Significantly, we find a local peak in the projected galaxy density associated with a bright cluster galaxy whi...

  2. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  3. Are Credit Shocks Supply or Demand Shocks?

    OpenAIRE

    Bijapur, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides new insights into the relationship between the supply of credit and the macroeconomy. We present evidence that credit shocks constitute shocks to aggregate supply in that they have a permanent effect on output and cause inflation to rise in the short term. Our results also suggest that the effects on aggregate supply have grown stronger in recent decades.

  4. Asymptotic Steady State Solution to a Bow Shock with an Infinite Mach Number

    CERN Document Server

    Yalinewich, Almog

    2015-01-01

    The problem of a cold gas flowing past a stationary object is considered. It is shown that at large distances from the obstacle the shock front forms a parabolic solid of revolution. The interior of the shock front is obtained by solution of the hydrodynamic equations in parabolic coordinates. The results are verified with a hydrodynamic simulation. The drag force and expected spectra are calculated for such shock, both in case of an optically thin and thick media. Finally, relations to astrophysical bow shocks and other analytic works on oblique shocks are discussed.

  5. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  6. New Developments in the Physical Chemistry of Shock Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlott, Dana D.

    2011-05-01

    This review discusses new developments in shock compression science with a focus on molecular media. Some basic features of shock and detonation waves, nonlinear excitations that can produce extreme states of high temperature and high pressure, are described. Methods of generating and detecting shock waves are reviewed, especially those using tabletop lasers that can be interfaced with advanced molecular diagnostics. Newer compression methods such as shockless compression and precompression shock that generate states of cold dense molecular matter are discussed. Shock compression creates a metallic form of hydrogen, melts diamond, and makes water a superionic liquid with unique catalytic properties. Our understanding of detonations at the molecular level has improved a great deal as a result of advanced nonequilibrium molecular simulations. Experimental measurements of detailed molecular behavior behind a detonation front might be available soon using femtosecond lasers to produce nanoscale simulated detonation fronts.

  7. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  8. Pressurized thermal shock (PTS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, a description of Thermal Shock in Pressurized conditions (PTS), and its influence in the treatment of the integrity of the pressure vessel (RPV) of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and/or of a Heavy water Pressurized water Reactor (PHWR) is made. Generally, the analysis of PTS involves a process of three stages: a-) Modeling with a System Code of relevant thermohydraulics transients in reference with the thermal shock; b-) The local distribution of temperatures in the downcomer and the heat transference coefficients from the RPV wall to the fluid, are determined; c-) The fracture mechanical analysis. These three stages are included in this work: Results with the thermohydraulics code Relap5/mod.3, are obtained, for a LOCA scenario in the hot leg of the cooling System of the Primary System of the CAN-I reactor. The method used in obtaining results is described. A study on the basis of lumped parameters of the local evolutions of the temperature of the flow is made, in the downcomer of the reactor pressure vessel. The purpose of this study is to determine how the intensification of the stress coefficient, varies in function of the emergency injected water during the thermohydraulic transients that take place under the imposed conditions in the postulated scene. Specially, it is considered a 50 cm2 break, located in the neighborhoods of the pressurized with the corresponding hot leg connection. This size is considered like the most critical. The method used to obtain the results is described. The fracture mechanical analysis is made. From the obtained results we confirmed that we have a simple tool of easy application in order to analyze phenomena of the type PTS in the postulated scenes by break in the cold and hot legs of the primary system. This methodology of calculus is completely independent of the used ones by the Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (NASA) in the analysis of the PTS phenomena in the CAN-I. The results obtained with the adopted

  9. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I V; Daldorff, L K S; Powell, K G; Drake, R P

    2011-01-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1ns. The later times are calculated with the CRASH code. This code solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties a...

  10. Spatial Structure and Collisionless Electron Heating in Balmer-dominated Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    van Adelsberg, Matthew; Heng, Kevin; McCray, Richard; Raymond, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Balmer-dominated shocks in supernova remnants (SNRs) produce strong hydrogen lines with a two-component profile composed of a narrow contribution from cold upstream hydrogen atoms, and a broad contribution from hydrogen atoms that have undergone charge transfer reactions with hot protons. Observations of emission lines from edge-wise shocks in SNRs can constrain the gas velocity and collisionless electron heating at the shock front. Downstream hydrogen atoms engage in charge transfer, excitat...

  11. The heliospheric neutral hydrogen density profile in the presence of a solar wind shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, P.; Judge, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of a postulated nearby solar wind shock on the radial density profile of the cold inflowing neutral hydrogen atoms is studied. It is found that a nearby solar wind shock strongly affects the neutral hydrogen breeze. Model calculation reveals that the strongly perturbed hydrogen atom distribution beyond a solar wind shock can be remotely detected by observation of the radial dependence of the backscattered UV glow from the deep space probes Pioneer 10/11 and Voyager 1/2.

  12. Cold and Cough Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  13. Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Cold Sores (Orofacial Herpes) Information for adults A A ... face, known as orofacial herpes simplex, herpes labialis, cold sores, or fever blisters, is a common, recurrent ...

  14. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002693.htm Cold wave lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cold wave lotion is a hair care product used ...

  15. Cold Weather Pet Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Cold Weather Pet Safety Client Handout Available for download ... in hot cars , but did you know that cold weather also poses serious threats to your pets’ ...

  16. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000557.htm Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) is a rare blood disorder in ...

  17. Cold knife cone biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003910.htm Cold knife cone biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove ...

  18. Cold and Cough Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking plenty of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  19. When Shock Waves Collide

    CERN Document Server

    Hartigan, P; Frank, A; Hansen, E; Yirak, K; Liao, A S; Graham, P; Wilde, B; Blue, B; Martinez, D; Rosen, P; Farley, D; Paguio, R

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than an oblique one does. In this paper we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and ...

  20. Complementation Analysis of the Cold-Sensitive Phenotype of the Escherichia coli csdA Deletion Strain▿

    OpenAIRE

    Awano, Naoki; Xu, Chunying; Ke, Haiping; Inoue, Koichi; Inouye, Masayori; Phadtare, Sangita

    2007-01-01

    The cold shock response of Escherichia coli is elicited by downshift of temperature from 37°C to 15°C and is characterized by induction of several cold shock proteins, including CsdA, during the acclimation phase. CsdA, a DEAD-box protein, has been proposed to participate in a variety of processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, mRNA decay, translation initiation, and gene regulation. It is not clear which of the functions of CsdA play a role in its essential cold shock function or whether all ...

  1. Arabidopsis eIF2α kinase GCN2 is essential for growth in stress conditions and is activated by wounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robaglia Christophe

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorylation of eIF2α provides a key mechanism for down-regulating protein synthesis in response to nutrient starvation or stresses in mammalian and yeast cells. However, this process has not been well characterized in plants Results We show here that in response to amino acid and purine starvations, UV, cold shock and wounding, the Arabidopsis GCN2 kinase (AtGCN2 is activated and phosphorylates eIF2α. We show that AtGCN2 is essential for plant growth in stress situations and that its activity results in a strong reduction in global protein synthesis. Conclusion Our results suggest that a general amino acid control response is conserved between yeast and plants but that the plant enzyme evolved to fulfill a more general function as an upstream sensor and regulator of diverse stress-response pathways. The activation of AtGCN2 following wounding or exposure to methyl jasmonate, the ethylene precursor 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC and salicylic acid, further suggests that this enzyme could play a role in plant defense against insect herbivores.

  2. Parental RNA is Significantly Degraded During Arabidopsis Seed Germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Li; Jian-Xun Feng; Pei Han; Yu-Xian Zhu

    2006-01-01

    Germination is the first and maybe the foremost growth stage in the life cycle of a plant. Herein, we report that initiation of germination in the Arabidopsis Columbia ecotype was accompanied by a sharp decrease in the amount of extractable total RNA. At the beginning of our germination experiment, we were usually able to obtain 35-40 μg total RNA from 100 mg dry seeds. However, after 3 d of cold stratification, we could only obtain less than 5 μg total RNA from the same amount of starting material. Young seedlings contained approximately 100 μg total RNA per 100 mg fresh tissue. Further studies showed that inhibition of de novo RNA synthesis by actinomycin D prevented the degradation of parental RNA and, in the meantime, significantly delayed the germination process. Several ribonuclease-like genes that were highly expressed in dry seeds, and especially during the cold stratification period, were discovered. We propose that these enzymes are involved in the regulation of parental RNA degradation. These results indicate that parental RNA metabolism may be an important process for Arabidopsis seed germination.

  3. Cold-Weather Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cold-Weather Sports KidsHealth > For Teens > Cold-Weather Sports Print A A A Text Size ... the easiest sports around, snowshoeing can be excellent cold-weather cross-training for runners and cyclists — or ...

  4. Exercising in Cold Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercising in Cold Weather Exercise has benefits all year, even during winter. ... activities when it’s cold outside: l Check the weather forecast. If it’s very windy or cold, exercise ...

  5. Overexpression of VOZ2 confers biotic stress tolerance but decreases abiotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, Yusuke; Fujiwara, Sumire; Kubo, Yasuyuki; Sato, Masa H.

    2013-01-01

    VOZ (vascular plant one zinc-finger protein) is a plant specific one-zinc finger type transcriptional activator, which is highly conserved through land plant evolution. We have previously shown that loss-of-function mutations in VOZ1 and VOZ2 showed increased cold and drought stress tolerances whereas decreased biotic stress resistance in Arabidopsis. Here, we demonstrate that transgenic plants overexpressing VOZ2 impairs freezing and drought stress tolerances but increases resistance to a fu...

  6. The Recovery of Plastid Function Is Required for Optimal Response to Low Temperatures in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Kindgren, Peter; Dubreuil, Carole; Strand, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Cold acclimation is an essential response in higher plants to survive freezing temperatures. Here, we report that two independent mutant alleles of the H-subunit of Mg-chelatase, CHLH, gun5-1 and cch in Arabidopsis are sensitive to low temperatures. Plants were grown in photoperiodic conditions and exposed to low temperatures for short-and long-term periods. Tetrapyrrole biosynthesis was initially significantly inhibited in response to low temperature but recovered in wild type (Col-0), altho...

  7. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  8. How cold is cold dark matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed

  9. Vasogenic shock physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Sotiria Gkisioti; Spyros D Mentzelopoulos

    2011-01-01

    Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can un...

  10. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  11. When Shock Waves Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  12. Rapid Variability Generated at Relativistic Shocks Simulated by Particle-in- Cell Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawal, Ken-Ichi; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Sol, H.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma instabilities excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle acceleration. We have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electronpositron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electrons transverse deflection behind the shock. We calculate the radiation from deflected electrons in the turbulent magnetic fields. Radiation from electrons near the trailing shock will be variable due to fluctuations of density and electromagnetic fields. The properties of this radiation may be important for rapid variability in relativistic jets such as AGN jets and blazars.

  13. Characterization of Arabidopsis sterol glycosyltransferase TTG15/UGT80B1 role during freeze and heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Manoj K; Singh, Gaurav; Tiwari, Shalini; Singh, Ruchi; Kumari, Nishi; Misra, Pratibha

    2015-01-01

    Sterol glycosyltransferases regulate the properties of sterols by catalyzing the transfer of carbohydrate molecules to the sterol moiety for the synthesis of steryl glycosides and acyl steryl glycosides. We have analyzed the functional role of TTG15/UGT80B1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana in freeze/thaw and heat shock stress using T-DNA insertional sgt knockout mutants. Quantitative study of spatial as well as temporal gene expression showed tissue-specific and dynamic expression patterns throughout the growth stages. Comparative responses of Col-0, TTG15/UGT80B1 knockout mutant and p35S:TTG15/UGT80B1 restored lines were analyzed under heat and freeze stress conditions. Heat tolerance was determined by survival of plants at 42°C for 3 h, MDA analysis and chlorophyll fluorescence image (CFI) analysis. Freezing tolerance was determined by survival of the plants at -1°C temperature in non-acclimatized (NA) and cold acclimatized (CA) conditions and also by CFI analysis, which revealed that, p35S:TTG15/UGT80B1 restored plants were more adapted to freeze stress than TTG15/UGT80B1 knockout mutant under CA condition. HPLC analysis of the plants showed reduced sterol glycoside in mutant seedlings as compared to other genotypes. Following CA condition, both β-sitosterol and sitosterol glycoside quantity was more in Col-0 and p35S:TTG15/UGT80B1 restored lines, whereas it was significantly less in TTG15/UGT80B1 knockout mutants. From these results, it may be concluded that due to low content of free sterols and sterol glycosides, the physiology of mutant plants was more affected during both, the chilling and heat stress. PMID:26382564

  14. Cold pool dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  15. Molecular beam brightening by shock-wave suppression

    CERN Document Server

    Segev, Yair; Akerman, Nitzan; Shagam, Yuval; Luski, Alon; Karpov, Michael; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic beams are a prevalent source of cold molecules utilized in the study of chemical reactions, atom interferometry, gas-surface interactions, precision spectroscopy, molecular cooling and more. The triumph of this method emanates from the high densities produced in relation to other methods, however beam density remains fundamentally limited by interference with shock waves reflected from collimating surfaces. Here we show experimentally that this shock interaction can be reduced or even eliminated by cryo-cooling the interacting surface. An increase in beam density of nearly an order of magnitude was measured at the lowest surface temperature, with no further fundamental limitation reached. Visualization of the shock waves by plasma discharge and reproduction with direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations both indicate that the suppression of the shock structure is partially caused by lowering the momentum flux of reflected particles, and significantly enhanced by the adsorption of particles to the ...

  16. Our Favorite Film Shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Rane; Suhr, Christian

    The modern medium of film has long been hailed for its capacity for producing shocks of an entertaining, thought-provoking, or even politically emancipative nature. But what is a shock, how and when does it occur, how long does it last, and are there particular techniques for producing cinematic...

  17. Climate shocks and conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaioannou, Kostadis J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a historical micro-level analysis of the impact of climate shocks on the incidence of civil conflict in colonial Nigeria (1912-1945). Primary historical sources on court cases, prisoners and homicides are used to capture conflict. To measure climate shocks we use the deviation f

  18. Shock in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davendralingam Sinniah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Shock, a major cause of morbidity andmortality in children, is the the most anxiety-provokingemergency that needs to be addressed urgently andeffectively by the attending paediatrician. It is a statewhere the metabolic demands of the tissue are not met dueto circulatory dysfunction. Unlike adults, hypotension isa very late feature of shock in children. As the child’scondition worsens, the clinical presentation of thedifferent causes of shock become similar, and nullifyany aetiological differences. Regardless of the type ofshock, the final common pathway is inadequate tissueperfusion and oxygen supply to meet cellular demands.Delayed recognition and treatment result in progressionfrom compensated reversible shock to uncompensatedirreversible shock with widespread multiple systemorgan failure to death. This paper reviews thephysiological basis, and pathophysiological classificationof the various types of shock and their respectiveaetiologies. The clinical features of the different typesof shock are described, and current diagnostic andtherapeutic strategies are applied for the most effectiveand appropriate treatment for resuscitating the child inshock. A strong index of suspicion, early recognition,timely intervention and transfer to an intensive care unitare critical for successful outcomes in the managementof paediatric shock.

  19. Cold condensation of dust in the ISM

    CERN Document Server

    Rouillé, Gaël; Krasnokutski, Serge A; Krebsz, Melinda; Henning, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The condensation of complex silicates with pyroxene and olivine composition at conditions prevailing in molecular clouds has been experimentally studied. For this purpose, molecular species comprising refractory elements were forced to accrete on cold substrates representing the cold surfaces of surviving dust grains in the interstellar medium. The efficient formation of amorphous and homogeneous magnesium iron silicates at temperatures of about 12 K has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The gaseous precursors of such condensation processes in the interstellar medium are formed by erosion of dust grains in supernova shock waves. In the laboratory, we have evaporated glassy silicate dust analogs and embedded the released species in neon ice matrices that have been studied spectroscopically to identify the molecular precursors of the condensing solid silicates. A sound coincidence between the 10 micron band of the interstellar silicates and the 10 micron band of the low-temperature siliceous condensates can be...

  20. A MULTIPOLAR COLD WAR

    OpenAIRE

    GAGIK HARUTYUNYAN

    2007-01-01

    The present article draws parallels between existing political realities and the onesthat occurred during the Cold War in the second half of the 20th century. Similarto the previous one, the new Cold War is consistent with the logic of «the policy ofdeterrence» which nowadays is directed against the United States. «Cold War-1»reflected stiff competition between the two opposite ideological and geopoliticalprograms. Meanwhile, today we have several poles of power and, therefore, «ColdWar-2» is...

  1. Shock Demagnetization of Pyrrhotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzada, K. L.; Stewart, S. T.; Weiss, b. P.

    2005-01-01

    Maps of the remanent magnetic field of Mars show demagnetized zones within and around giant impact basins. It is likely that vast regions of the Martian crust were demagnetized due to a shock-induced phase change or magnetic transition of magnetic minerals in the crust. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that around the Hellas and Argyre basins, the edges of the unmagnetized zones roughly correspond with peak shock pressure contour lines of a few GPa. Although pyrrhotite is not a major carrier of magnetization in the Earth s crust, it is a common phase in Martian meteorites and may be an important carrier in the Martian crust. Understanding the effects of shock waves on magnetic minerals is critical for determining the origin of the demagnetized zones in impact basins and possibly for identifying the major magnetic carrier phases. Here we present the results of the first controlled shock demagnetization measurements on pyrrhotite. Previous experiments: Shock demagnetization

  2. Stability of shock waves in high temperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dyakov-Kontorovich criteria for spontaneous emission of acoustic waves behind shock fronts are investigated for high temperature aluminum and beryllium plasmas. To this end, the Dyakov and critical stability parameters are calculated from Rankine-Hugoniot curves using a more realistic equation of state (EOS). The cold and ionic contributions to the EOS are obtained via scaled binding energy and mean field theory, respectively. A screened hydrogenic model, including l-splitting, is used to calculate the bound electron contribution to the electronic EOS. The free electron EOS is obtained from Fermi-Dirac statistics. Predictions of the model for ionization curves and shock Hugoniot are found to be in excellent agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. It is observed that the electronic EOS has significant effect on the stability of the planar shock front. While the shock is stable for low temperatures and pressures, instability sets in as temperature rises. The basic reason is ionization of electronic shells and consequent increase in electronic specific heat. The temperatures and densities of the unstable region correspond to those where electronic shells get ionized. With the correct modeling of bound electrons, we find that shock instability for Al occurs at a compression ratio ∼5.4, contrary to the value ∼3 reported in the literature. Free electrons generated in the ionization process carry energy from the shock front, thereby giving rise to spontaneously emitted waves, which decay the shock front.

  3. Cold fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I am pleased to forward to you the Final Report of the Cold Fusion Panel. This report reviews the current status of cold fusion and includes major chapters on Calorimetry and Excess Heat, Fusion Products and Materials Characterization. In addition, the report makes a number of conclusions and recommendations, as requested by the Secretary of Energy

  4. Working in the Cold

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-08

    During the winter, many workers are outdoors, working in cold, wet, icy, or snowy conditions. Learn how to identify symptoms that tell you there may be a problem and protect yourself from cold stress.  Created: 2/8/2016 by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).   Date Released: 2/8/2016.

  5. Cold fusion stays elusive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short overview of papers presented at the 6. international conference on cold fusion which has taken place 13-18 Oct 1996 in Hokkaido (Japan) is given. The typical electrolysis cell used for cold fusion experiments is recalled and some new results are described, like a correlation of helium 4 production and heat excess. (C.B.)

  6. Vasogenic shock physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Gkisioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can understand its utmost importance, not only because of its association with sepsis but also because it can be the common final pathway for long-lasting, severe shock of any cause, even postresuscitation states. The effective management of any patient in shock requires the understanding of its underlying physiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have provided new insights into vascular physiology by revealing the interaction of rather complicated and multifactorial mechanisms, which have not been fully elucidated yet. Some of these mechanisms, such as the induction of nitric oxide synthases, the activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, and vasopressin deficiency, have gained general acceptance and are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vasodilatory shock. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the pathogenesis of vasogenic shock.Keywords: nitric oxide synthases, KATP channels, vasopressin, H2S, vasoplegic syndrome

  7. Collisionless shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collisionless shocks cannot occur naturally on the earth, because nearly all matter here consists of electrically neutral atoms and molecules. In space, however, high temperatures and ultraviolet radiation from hot stars decompose atoms into their constituent nuclei and electrons, producing a soup of electrically charged particles known as a plasma. Plasma physicists proposed that the collective electrical and magnetic properties of plasmas could produce interactions that take the place of collisions and permit shocks to form. In 1964 the theoretical work found its first experimental confirmation. Norman F. Ness and his colleagues at the Goddard Space Flight Center, using data collected from the iMP-1 spacecraft, detected clear signs that a collisionless shock exists where the solar wind encounters the earth's magnetic field. More recent research has demonstrated that collisionless shocks appear in a dazzling array of astronomical settings. For example, shocks have been found in the solar wind upstream (sunward) of all the planet and comets that have been visited by spacecraft. Violent flares on the sun generate shocks that propagate to the far reaches of the solar system; tremendous galactic outbursts create disruptions in the intergalactic medium that are trillions of times larger. In addition, many astrophysicists think that shocks from supernova explosions in our galaxy accelerate cosmic rays, a class of extraordinarily energetic elementary particles and atomic nuclei that rain down on the earth from all directions

  8. Expression of a Carrot 36 kD Antifreeze Protein Gene Improves Cold Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) enable organisms to survive under cold conditions, and have great potential in improving cold tolerance of cold-sensitive plants. In order to determine whether expression of the carrot 36 kD antifreeze protein gene confers improved cold-resistant properties to plant tissues, we tried to obtain transgenic tobacco plants which expressed the antifreeze protein. Cold, salt, and drought induced promoter Prd29A was cloned using PCR from Arabidopsis. Two plant expression vectors based on pBI121 were constructed with CaMV35S:AFP and Prd29A:AFP. Tobacco plantlets were transformed by Agrobacterium-medicated transformation. PCR and Southern blotting demonstrated that the carrot 36 kD afp gene was successfully integrated into the genomes of transformed plantlets. The expression of the afp gene in transgenic plants led to improved tolerance to cold stress.However, the use of the strong constitutive 35S cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter to drive expression of afp also resulted in growth retardation under normal growing conditions. In contrast, the expression of afp driven by the stress-inducible Prd29A promoter from Arabidopsis gave rise to minimal effects on plant growth while providing an increased tolerance to cold stress condition (2℃). The results demonstrated the prospect of using Prd29A-AFP transgenic plants in cold-stressed conditions that will in turn benefit agriculture.

  9. A series of shocks and edges in Abell 2219

    CERN Document Server

    Canning, R E A; Applegate, D E; Kelly, P L; von der Linden, A; Mantz, A; Million, E; Morris, R G; Russell, H R

    2015-01-01

    We present deep, 170 ks, Chandra X-ray observations of Abell 2219 (z=0.23) one of the hottest and most X-ray luminous clusters known, and which is experiencing a major merger event. We discover a 'horseshoe' of high temperature gas surrounding the ram-pressure-stripped, bright, hot, X-ray cores. We confirm an X-ray shock front located north-west of the X-ray centroid and along the projected merger axis. We also find a second shock front to the south-east of the X-ray centroid making this only the second cluster where both the shock and reverse shock are confirmed with X-ray temperature measurements. We also present evidence for a sloshing cold front in the 'remnant tail' of one of the sub-cluster cores. The cold front and north-west shock front geometrically bound the radio halo and appear to be directly influencing the radio properties of the cluster.

  10. THERMAL SHOCK RESISTANCE OF A SODA LIME GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. MALOU

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We studied the thermal shock of a three millimeters thickness soda lime glass using the hot-cold thermal shock technique. The cooling was made by ambient air jet on previously warmed samples. The heat transfer coefficient was about 600 W/°C.m2 (Biot number β = 0.3. The thermal shock duration was fixed at 6 seconds. The hot temperature was taken between 100°C and 550°C while the cold temperature of the air flux was kept constant at 20°C. The acoustic emission technique was used for determining the failure time and the critical temperature difference (ΔTC. By referring to experimental results, thermal shock modelling computations are conducted. Our aim is especially focused on the fracture initiation moments during the cooling process and on the crack initiation sites. The used modeling is based on the local approach of the thermal shock during the experimental data treatment. For each test, the temperature profile and the transient stress state through the samples thickness are determined. By applying the linear superposition property of the stress intensity factors, evolution of the stress intensity factor KI in function of the pre-existing natural flaws in the glass surface is established. The size of the critical flaw is determined by the linear fracture mechanics laws. Computation results confirm the experimental values of the critical difference temperature obtained that is the source of the glass degradation.

  11. Shock breakout theory

    OpenAIRE

    Waxman, Eli; Katz, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    The earliest supernova (SN) emission is produced when the optical depth of the plasma lying ahead of the shock, which ejects the envelope, drops below c/v, where v is the shock velocity. This "breakout" may occur when the shock reaches the edge of the star, producing a bright X-ray/UV flash on time scales of seconds to a fraction of an hour, followed by UV/optical "cooling" emission from the expanding cooling envelope on a day time-scale. If the optical depth of circumstellar material (CSM) e...

  12. Simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks: shock structure and particle acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Spitkovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    We discuss 3D simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks in electron-positron pair plasmas using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The shock structure is mainly controlled by the shock's magnetization ("sigma" parameter). We demonstrate how the structure of the shock varies as a function of sigma for perpendicular shocks. At low magnetizations the shock is mediated mainly by the Weibel instability which generates transient magnetic fields that can exceed the initial field. At larger magnetizations the shock is dominated by magnetic reflections. We demonstrate where the transition occurs and argue that it is impossible to have very low magnetization collisionless shocks in nature (in more than one spatial dimension). We further discuss the acceleration properties of these shocks, and show that higher magnetization perpendicular shocks do not efficiently accelerate nonthermal particles in 3D. Among other astrophysical applications, this may pose a restriction on the structure and composition of gamma-ray...

  13. Facts about the Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Cold What Is a Cold? Colds are minor infections of the nose and throat caused by ... other products such as echinacea, eucalyptus, garlic, honey, lemon, menthol, zinc and vitamin C have received a ...

  14. Winter Storms and Extreme Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes Wildfires Main Content Snowstorms & Extreme Cold This page explains what actions to take when ... snowstorm or extreme cold. Before Snowstorms and Extreme Cold To prepare for a winter storm you should ...

  15. Supply shocks, demand shocks, and labor market fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Helge Braun; Reinout De Bock; Riccardo DiCecio

    2009-01-01

    We use structural vector autoregressions to analyze the responses of worker flows, job flows, vacancies, and hours to shocks. We identify demand and supply shocks by restricting the short-run responses of output and the price level. On the demand side we disentangle a monetary and non-monetary shock by restricting the response of the interest rate. The responses of labor market variables are similar across shocks: expansionary shocks increase job creation, the hiring rate, vacancies, and hour...

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana—Aphid Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Louis, Joe; Singh, Vijay,; Shah, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Aphids are important pests of plants that use their stylets to tap into the sieve elements to consume phloem sap. Besides the removal of photosynthates, aphid infestation also alters source-sink patterns. Most aphids also vector viral diseases. In this chapter, we will summarize on recent significant findings in plant-aphid interaction, and how studies involving Arabidopsis thaliana and Myzus persicae (Sülzer), more commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), are beginning to provide impor...

  17. Selenium Speciation in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoou

    2011-01-01

    Selenium has been proved as an essential micronutrient and is beneficial to animals and humans. It is a structural component of the important antioxidant enzyme, glutathione peroxidase, which catalyzes reactions to detoxify reactive oxygen species. However, the essentiality of Se in plants remains controversial and the protective role of Se in plants has rarely been investigated. In this study, Arabidopsis thaliana was grown in controlled environments having selenate or selenite enriched medi...

  18. Stem cell organization in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Wendrich, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Growth of plant tissues and organs depends on continuous production of new cells, by niches of stem cells. Stem cells typically divide to give rise to one differentiating daughter and one non-differentiating daughter. This constant process of self-renewal ensures that the niches of stem cells or meristems stay active throughout plant-life. Specification of stem cells occurs very early during development of the emrbyo and they are maintained during later stages. The Arabidopsis embryo is a hig...

  19. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a toxin produced by some types of Staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS), can be caused by Streptococcal bacteria. Not all staph or strep infections cause toxic ...

  20. Shock structures of astrospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Klaus; Kleimann, Jens; Wiengarten, Tobias; Bomans, Dominik J; Weis, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between a supersonic stellar wind and a (super-)sonic interstellar wind has recently been viewed with new interest. We here first give an overview of the modeling, which includes the heliosphere as an example of a special astrosphere. Then we concentrate on the shock structures of fluid models, especially of hydrodynamic (HD) models. More involved models taking into account radiation transfer and magnetic fields are briefly sketched. Even the relatively simple HD models show a rich shock structure, which might be observable in some objects. We employ a single fluid model to study these complex shock structures, and compare the results obtained including heating and cooling with results obtained without these effects. Furthermore, we show that in the hypersonic case valuable information of the shock structure can be obtained from the Rankine-Hugoniot equations. We solved the Euler equations for the single fluid case and also for a case including cooling and heating. We also discuss the analytic...

  1. Life shocks and homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-12-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  2. Overexpression of Actinidia deliciosa pyruvate decarboxylase 1 gene enhances waterlogging stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Yu; Huang, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Gang; Xuan, Ji-Ping; Guo, Zhong-Ren

    2016-09-01

    Ethanolic fermentation is classically associated with waterlogging tolerance when plant cells switch from respiration to anaerobic fermentation. Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), which catalyzes the first step in this pathway, is thought to be the main regulatory enzyme. Here, we cloned a full-length PDC cDNA sequence from kiwifruit, named AdPDC1. We determined the expression of the AdPDC1 gene in kiwifruit under different environmental stresses using qRT-PCR, and the results showed that the increase of AdPDC1 expression during waterlogging stress was much higher than that during salt, cold, heat and drought stresses. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced the resistance to waterlogging stress but could not enhance resistance to cold stress at five weeks old seedlings. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis could not enhance resistance to NaCl and mannitol stresses at the stage of seed germination and in early seedlings. These results suggested that the kiwifruit AdPDC1 gene is required during waterlogging but might not be required during other environmental stresses. Expression of the AdPDC1 gene was down-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) in kiwifruit, and overexpression of the AdPDC1 gene in Arabidopsis inhibited seed germination and root length under ABA treatment, indicating that ABA might negatively regulate the AdPDC1 gene under waterlogging stress. PMID:27191596

  3. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  4. Cold Fronts in Clusters of Galaxies: Observations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markevitch, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Mergers of galaxy clusters -- some of the most energetic events in the Universe -- produce disturbances in hot intracluster medium, such as shocks and cold fronts, that can be used as tools to study the physics of galaxy clusters. Cold fronts may constrain viscosity and the structure and strength of the cluster magnetic fields. Combined with radio data, these observations also shed light on the production of ultrarelativistic particles that are known to coexist with the cluster thermal plasma. This talk will summarize the current X-ray observations of cluster mergers, as well as some recent radio data and high resolution hydrodynamic simulations.

  5. OsDREB1 Gene from Rice Enhances Cold Tolerance in Tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ping; CHEN Feng; QUAN Chao; ZHANG Guiyou

    2005-01-01

    The OsDREB1 gene from rice encodes a transcription factor belonging to the DREBP transcription factor subfamily. Many DREBP transcription factors regulate gene expression in response to drought, high-salt, and cold stresses by binding specifically to the dehydration-responsive element (DRE). DRE-binding proteins, such as CBF1, DREB1A, and DREB2A, have been cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana and have been proved to play an important role in stress response of Arabidopsis and several other plants. In this study, the OsDREB1 gene was transferred to tobacco plants by the Agrobacterium-mediated transfer method, and 16 transgenic plants were identified. PCR analysis demonstrates that the foreign genes have been integrated into the tobacco genome. Results of freezing stress experiments indicate that the transgenic plants have enhanced cold tolerance.

  6. OsSFR6 is a functional rice orthologue of SENSITIVE TO FREEZING-6 and can act as a regulator of COR gene expression, osmotic stress and freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wathugala, D.L.; Richards, S.A.; Knight, H; Knight, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis protein SENSITIVE TO FREEZING-6 (AtSFR6) is required for cold- and drought-inducible expression of COLD-ON REGULATED (COR) genes and, as a consequence, AtSFR6 is essential for osmotic stress and freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis. Therefore, orthologues of AtSFR6 in crop species represent important candidate targets for future manipulation of stress tolerance. We identified and cloned a homologue of AtSFR6 from rice (Oryza sativa), OsSFR6, and confirmed its orthology in Arabido...

  7. An International Bioinformatics Infrastructure to Underpin the Arabidopsis Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    The future bioinformatics needs of the Arabidopsis community as well as those of other scientific communities that depend on Arabidopsis resources were discussed at a pair of recent meetings held by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) and the North American Arabidopsis Steering C...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK106750 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106750 002-115-C09 At4g15560.1 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, putative / 1-deoxyxylu ... phate synthase, putative / DXP-synthase, putative (DEF ) (CLA1) identical to SP|Q38854 Probable 1-deoxy-D- ... (DXPS). [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana}, DEF ... (def icient in photosynthesis) protein [Arabidopsis ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104851 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104851 001-043-A10 At4g15560.1 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, putative / 1-deoxyxylu ... phate synthase, putative / DXP-synthase, putative (DEF ) (CLA1) identical to SP|Q38854 Probable 1-deoxy-D- ... (DXPS). [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana}, DEF ... (def icient in photosynthesis) protein [Arabidopsis ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100909 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100909 J023132G24 At4g15560.1 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, putative / 1-deoxyxylul ... phate synthase, putative / DXP-synthase, putative (DEF ) (CLA1) identical to SP|Q38854 Probable 1-deoxy-D- ... (DXPS). [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana}, DEF ... (def icient in photosynthesis) protein [Arabidopsis ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK058950 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058950 001-020-A07 At4g15560.1 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, putative / 1-deoxyxylu ... phate synthase, putative / DXP-synthase, putative (DEF ) (CLA1) identical to SP|Q38854 Probable 1-deoxy-D- ... (DXPS). [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana}, DEF ... (def icient in photosynthesis) protein [Arabidopsis ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK059821 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059821 006-205-D11 At4g15560.1 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, putative / 1-deoxyxylu ... phate synthase, putative / DXP-synthase, putative (DEF ) (CLA1) identical to SP|Q38854 Probable 1-deoxy-D- ... (DXPS). [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana}, DEF ... (def icient in photosynthesis) protein [Arabidopsis ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK064944 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064944 J013000P14 At4g15560.1 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, putative / 1-deoxyxylul ... phate synthase, putative / DXP-synthase, putative (DEF ) (CLA1) identical to SP|Q38854 Probable 1-deoxy-D- ... (DXPS). [Mouse-ear cress] {Arabidopsis thaliana}, DEF ... (def icient in photosynthesis) protein [Arabidopsis ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK068400 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068400 J013151M04 At3g45810.1 ferric reductase-like transmembrane component family protein sim ... ilar to respiratory burst ... oxidase protein D RbohD from Arabidopsis thaliana, ... EMBL:AF055357 [gi:3242789], similar to respiratory burst ... oxidase protein D RbohD from Arabidopsis thaliana, ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066013 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066013 J013047I12 At3g45810.1 ferric reductase-like transmembrane component family protein sim ... ilar to respiratory burst ... oxidase protein D RbohD from Arabidopsis thaliana, ... EMBL:AF055357 [gi:3242789], similar to respiratory burst ... oxidase protein D RbohD from Arabidopsis thaliana, ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100241 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100241 J023054P13 At3g45810.1 ferric reductase-like transmembrane component family protein sim ... ilar to respiratory burst ... oxidase protein D RbohD from Arabidopsis thaliana, ... EMBL:AF055357 [gi:3242789], similar to respiratory burst ... oxidase protein D RbohD from Arabidopsis thaliana, ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK318553 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK318553 J075145A22 At3g45810.1 68416.m04958 ferric reductase-like transmembrane component famil ... y protein similar to respiratory burst ... oxidase protein D RbohD from Arabidopsis thaliana, ... EMBL:AF055357 [gi:3242789], similar to respiratory burst ... oxidase protein D RbohD from Arabidopsis thaliana, ...

  18. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR RLK) genetic…

  19. Diffusive Shock Acceleration in Unmodified Relativistic, Oblique Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, D C; Ellison, Donald C.; Double, Glen P.

    2004-01-01

    We present results from a fully relativistic Monte Carlo simulation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in unmodified shocks. The computer code uses a single algorithmic sequence to smoothly span the range from nonrelativistic speeds to fully relativistic shocks of arbitrary obliquity, providing a powerful consistency check. While known results are obtained for nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic parallel shocks, new results are presented for the less explored trans- relativistic regime and for oblique, fully relativistic shocks. We find, for a wide trans-relativistic range extending to shock Lorentz factors >30, that the particle spectrum produced by DSA varies strongly from the canonical f(p) proportional to p^{-4.23} spectrum known to result in ultra-relativistic shocks. Trans- relativistic shocks may play an important role in gamma-ray bursts and other sources and most relativistic shocks will be highly oblique.

  20. The Influence of Shock Treatment on Survival Rate of Intestinal Probiotics during Freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chun; ZHANG Lanwei; LIU Libo; FENG Zhen

    2006-01-01

    Probiotics which can provide potential health benefits for consumers and prevent disease, is the most important research field for functional food in the future.It is the key point that how much the count of bacteria and how long it can preserve. Freeze-drying skill is one of the best preservation methods, but it's defect that damage to biological systems can be attributed to changes in the physical state of membrane lipids or/and changes in the structure of sensitive proteins and the decreased survival rate. This work used pretreatment methods-cold shock and hot shock to reduce the damage to bacteria during freeze-drying. Using unpretreated samples as control, aspects of cold shock or heat shock. The response of Enterococcous faecalis A31 was investigated during lag phase, the middle of exponential growth phase and the terminal of exponential growth phase. The results suggested that when cold shock,the shock protein concentration produced by treated sample within 2 h during the middle of exponential growth phase was higher than 4, 8, 24 h, The concentration of shock protein produced by treated sample at 10℃ was higher than 20℃,The concentration of sample protein at the middle of exponential growth phase was higher than that at the terminal of exponential growth phase. After one-month storage, the survival rate at 10℃ was better than 20 ℃ and 4 ℃comparatively. The survival rate at (6 h) 4 ℃/24 h (lag period) was higher than (10 h) 4 ℃/24 h (the middle of exponential growth phase), and the effect of 10 ℃/8 h shock treatments was best during the middle of exponential growth phase, when hot shock, The concentration of heat shock proteins produced was not obvious, and survival rate was higher at 45 ℃, 30 min than at 45 ℃, 60 min.

  1. Chilling Out with Colds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? ... body already has the best cold cure — your immune system. The immune system defends your body against illness. ...

  2. A Cold Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Since the end of 2009, north China has been repeatedly struck by arctic-like blasts of cold weather. As temperatures have plummeted to historic lows, they have inflicted considerable suffering as well.

  3. A Cold Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU JIANXIONG

    2010-01-01

    @@ Since the end of 2009, north China has been repeatedly struck by arctic-like blasts of cold weather. As temperatures have plummeted to historic lows, they have inflicted considerable suffering as well.

  4. Febrile/cold agglutinins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diagnose certain infections and find the cause of hemolytic anemia (a type of anemia that occurs when red ... or cold agglutinins can help explain why the hemolytic anemia is occurring and direct treatment.

  5. Thioredoxin Reductase Type C (NTRC) Orchestrates Enhanced Thermotolerance to Arabidopsis by Its Redox-Dependent Holdase Chaperone Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ho Byoung Chae; Jeong Chan Moon; Mi Rim Shin; Yong Hun Chi; Young Jun Jung; Sun Yong Lee; Ganesh M.Nawkar

    2013-01-01

    Genevestigator analysis has indicated heat shock induction of transcripts for NADPH-thioredoxin reductase,type C (NTRC) in the light.Here we show overexpression of NTRC in Arabidopsis (NTRCoE) resulting in enhanced tolerance to heat shock,whereas NTRC knockout mutant plants (ntrcl) exhibit a temperature sensitive phenotype.To investigate the underlying mechanism of this phenotype,we analyzed the protein's biochemical properties and protein structure.NTRC assembles into homopolymeric structures of varying complexity with functions as a disulfide reductase,a foldase chaperone,and as a holdase chaperone.The multiple functions of NTRC are closely correlated with protein structure.Complexes of higher molecular weight (HMW) showed stronger activity as a holdase chaperone,while low molecular weight (LMW) species exhibited weaker holdase chaperone activity but stronger disulfide reductase and foldase chaperone activities.Heat shock converted LMW proteins into HMW complexes.Mutations of the two active site Cys residues of NTRC into Ser (C217/454S-NTRC) led to a complete inactivation of its disulfide reductase and foldase chaperone functions,but conferred only a slight decrease in its holdase chaperone function.The overexpression of the mutated C217/454S-NTRC provided Arabidopsis with a similar degree of thermotolerance compared with that of NTRCoE plants.However,after prolonged incubation under heat shock,NTRCoE plants tolerated the stress to a higher degree than C217/454S-NTRCoE plants.The results suggest that the heat shock-mediated holdase chaperone function of NTRC is responsible for the increased thermotolerance of Arabidopsis and the activity is significantly supported by NADPH.

  6. Cold nuclear fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-01-01

    In normal temperature condition, the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance method, realize the combination of deuterium and tritium, helium and lithium... And with a magnetic moment of light nuclei controlled cold nuclear collide fusion, belongs to the nuclear energy research and development in the field of applied technology "cold nuclear collide fusion". According to the similarity of the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance system, the different velocity and energy of the ion be...

  7. LHC cold masses

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    In these pictures some 30 newly-arrived cold masses can be seen awaiting cryostating and subsequent intensive testing before they are installed in the LHC tunnel. Taken in September 2003, they mark the delivery of one-eighth of the total 1232 superconducting coils. These cold masses contain the cryogenics that allow the magnets to be cooled to 1.9 K (-271°C).

  8. Nonlinear Instabilities in Shock-Bounded Slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Vishniac, E T

    1993-01-01

    (substantial changes to section 3.2, otherwise minor) We present an analysis of the hydrodynamic stability of a cold slab bounded by two accretion shocks. Previous numerical work has shown that when the Mach number of the shock is large the slab is unstable. Here we show that to linear order both the bending and breathing modes of such a slab are stable. However, nonlinear effects will tend to soften the restoring forces for bending modes, and when the slab displacement is comparable to its thickness this gives rise to a nonlinear instability. The growth rate of the instability, above this threshold but for small bending angles, is $\\sim c_sk (k\\eta)^{1/2}$, where $\\eta$ is the slab displacement. When the bending angle is large the slab will contain a local vorticity comparable to $c_s/L$, where $L$ is the slab thickness. We discuss the implications of this work for gravitational instabilities of slabs. Finally, we examine the cases of a decelerating slab bounded by a single shock and a stationary slab bounde...

  9. Hydrodynamic modelling of the shock ignition scheme for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shock ignition concept in inertial confinement fusion uses an intense power spike at the end of an assembly laser pulse. The key features of shock ignition are the generation of a high ablation pressure, the shock pressure amplification by at least a factor of a hundred in the cold fuel shell and the shock coupling to the hot-spot. In this thesis, new semi-analytical hydrodynamic models are developed to describe the ignitor shock from its generation up to the moment of fuel ignition. A model is developed to describe a spherical converging shock wave in a pre-heated hot spot. The self-similar solution developed by Guderley is perturbed over the shock Mach number Ms ≥≥1. The first order correction accounts for the effects of the shock strength. An analytical ignition criterion is defined in terms of the shock strength and the hot-spot areal density. The ignition threshold is higher when the initial Mach number of the shock is lower. A minimal shock pressure of 20 Gbar is needed when it enters the hot-spot. The shock dynamics in the imploding shell is then analyzed. The shock is propagating into a non inertial medium with a high radial pressure gradient and an overall pressure increase with time. The collision with a returning shock coming from the assembly phase enhances further the ignitor shock pressure. The analytical theory allows to describe the shock pressure and strength evolution in a typical shock ignition implosion. It is demonstrated that, in the case of the HiPER target design, a generation shock pressure near the ablation zone on the order of 300-400 Mbar is needed. An analysis of experiments on the strong shock generation performed on the OMEGA laser facility is presented. It is shown that a shock pressure close to 300 Mbar near the ablation zone has been reached with an absorbed laser intensity up to 2 * 1015 W:cm-2 and a laser wavelength of 351 nm. This value is two times higher than the one expected from collisional laser absorption only

  10. Shock Heating of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A521

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, H.; Mazzotta, P.; Markevitch, M.; Giacintucci, S.; Brunetti, G.

    2013-01-01

    A521 is an interacting galaxy cluster located at z = 0.247, hosting a low-frequency radio halo connected to an eastern radio relic. Previous Chandra observations hinted at the presence of an X-ray brightness edge at the position of the relic, which may be a shock front. We analyze a deep observation of A521 recently performed with XMM-Newton in order to probe the cluster structure up to the outermost regions covered by the radio emission. The cluster atmosphere exhibits various brightness and temperature anisotropies. In particular, two cluster cores appear to be separated by two cold fronts. We find two shock fronts, one that was suggested by Chandra and that is propagating to the east, and another to the southwestern cluster outskirt. The two main interacting clusters appear to be separated by a shock-heated region, which exhibits a spatial correlation with the radio halo. The outer edge of the radio relic coincides spatially with a shock front, suggesting that this shock is responsible for the generation of cosmic-ray electrons in the relic. The propagation direction and Mach number of the shock front derived from the gas density jump, M = 2.4 +/- 0.2, are consistent with expectations from the radio spectral index, under the assumption of Fermi I acceleration mechanism.

  11. Analysis of Heat Transfer Behaviour of the Conduction Cold Plate System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YangChun-xin; DangChao-Bin

    1995-01-01

    The heat-transfer behaviour of the conduction cold plate system used for avionics is investigated in this paper.The steady-state temperature profile for the cold plate is derived and the relationship between the coolant mass flowrate,the heat load and the highest cold plate temperature is established.A model is proposed to describe the transient thermal rosponse of the cold plate under thermal shock condition.The analytic solution of the transient heat transfer within the cold plate is provided.The results of this paper agree with those of the finite element method and can be used for the structural design and performance evaluation of cold plate system.

  12. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  13. A root chicory MADS box sequence and the Arabidopsis flowering repressor FLC share common features that suggest conserved function in vernalization and de-vernalization responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périlleux, Claire; Pieltain, Alexandra; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Bouché, Frédéric; Detry, Nathalie; D'Aloia, Maria; Thiry, Laura; Aljochim, Pierre; Delansnay, Martin; Mathieu, Anne-Sophie; Lutts, Stanley; Tocquin, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Root chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) is a biennial crop, but is harvested to obtain root inulin at the end of the first growing season before flowering. However, cold temperatures may vernalize seeds or plantlets, leading to incidental early flowering, and hence understanding the molecular basis of vernalization is important. A MADS box sequence was isolated by RT-PCR and named FLC-LIKE1 (CiFL1) because of its phylogenetic positioning within the same clade as the floral repressor Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (AtFLC). Moreover, over-expression of CiFL1 in Arabidopsis caused late flowering and prevented up-regulation of the AtFLC target FLOWERING LOCUS T by photoperiod, suggesting functional conservation between root chicory and Arabidopsis. Like AtFLC in Arabidopsis, CiFL1 was repressed during vernalization of seeds or plantlets of chicory, but repression of CiFL1 was unstable when the post-vernalization temperature was favorable to flowering and when it de-vernalized the plants. This instability of CiFL1 repression may be linked to the bienniality of root chicory compared with the annual lifecycle of Arabidopsis. However, re-activation of AtFLC was also observed in Arabidopsis when a high temperature treatment was used straight after seed vernalization, eliminating the promotive effect of cold on flowering. Cold-induced down-regulation of a MADS box floral repressor and its re-activation by high temperature thus appear to be conserved features of the vernalization and de-vernalization responses in distant species. PMID:23581257

  14. Shock-induced changes in HgO powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powder compacts of HgO were subjected to explosively-generated shock-wave loading in Sandia Bear fixtures and recovered for analysis. Although XRD powder spectra show only the orthorhombic form of HgO in both the as-received and recovered samples, XRD line profiles and TEM indicate up to an order of magnitude increase in crystallite size. Magnetic data reveal a superconducting transition below 4.2 K that is attributed to metallic α-Hg formed by a partial, shock-induced decomposition of the HgO, consistent with TEM identification of α-Hg particles using a cold stage. In addition, paramagnetic impurities present in the as-received HgO powder appear to be partially converted to a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic phase that dominates the magnetic properties of the recovered powder. The amounts of both the superconducting and ferromagnetic phases vary strongly with position within the shock recovery capsules

  15. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  16. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  17. Identification, Isolation, and Expression Analysis of Heat Shock Transcription Factors in the Diploid Woodland Strawberry Fragaria vesca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang eHu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs are known to play dominant roles in plant responses to heat, as well as other abiotic or biotic stress stimuli. While the strawberry is an economically important fruit plant, little is known about the Hsf family in the strawberry. To explore the functions of strawberry Hsfs in abiotic and biotic stress responses, this study identified 17 Hsf genes (FvHsfs in a wild diploid woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca, 2n = 2x = 14 and isolated 14 of these genes. Phylogenetic analysis divided the strawberry FvHsfs genes into three main groups. The evolutionary and structural analyses revealed that the FvHsf family is conserved. The promoter sequences of the FvHsf genes contain upstream regulatory elements corresponding to different stress stimuli. In addition, 14 FvHsf-GFP fusion proteins showed differential subcellular localization in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts. Furthermore, we examined the expression of the 17 FvHsf genes in wild diploid woodland strawberries under various conditions, including abiotic stresses (heat, cold, drought, and salt, biotic stress (powdery mildew infection, and hormone treatments (abscisic acid, ethephon, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid. Fifteen of the 17 FvHsf genes exhibited distinct changes on the transcriptional level during heat treatment. Of these 15 FvHsfs, 8 FvHsfs also exhibited distinct responses to other stimuli on the transcriptional level, indicating versatile roles in the response to abiotic and biotic stresses. Taken together, the present work may provide the basis for further studies to dissect FvHsf function in response to stress stimuli.

  18. Heat shock factors in carrot: genome-wide identification, classification, and expression profiles response to abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Li, Meng-Yao; Wang, Feng; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Guang-Long; Ma, Jing; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2015-05-01

    Heat shock factors (HSFs) play key roles in the response to abiotic stress in eukaryotes. In this study, 35 DcHSFs were identified from carrot (Daucus carota L.) based on the carrot genome database. All 35 DcHSFs were divided into three classes (A, B, and C) according to the structure and phylogenetic relationships of four different plants, namely, Arabidopsis thaliana, Vitis vinifera, Brassica rapa, and Oryza sativa. Comparative analysis of algae, gymnosperms, and angiosperms indicated that the numbers of HSF transcription factors were related to the plant's evolution. The expression profiles of five DcHsf genes (DcHsf 01, DcHsf 02, DcHsf 09, DcHsf 10, and DcHsf 16), which selected from each subfamily (A, B, and C), were detected by quantitative real-time PCR under abiotic stresses (cold, heat, high salinity, and drought) in two carrot cultivars, D. carota L. cvs. Kurodagosun and Junchuanhong. The expression levels of DcHsfs were markedly increased by heat stress, except that of DcHsf 10, which was down regulated. The expression profiles of different DcHsfs in the same class also differed under various stress treatments. The expression profiles of these DcHsfs were also different in tissues of two carrot cultivars. This study is the first to identify and characterize the DcHSF family transcription factors in plants of Apiaceae using whole-genome analysis. The results of this study provide an in-depth understanding of the DcHSF family transcription factors' structure, function, and evolution in carrot. PMID:25403331

  19. Identification, isolation, and expression analysis of heat shock transcription factors in the diploid woodland strawberry Fragaria vesca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Han, Yong-Tao; Wei, Wei; Li, Ya-Juan; Zhang, Kai; Gao, Yu-Rong; Zhao, Feng-Li; Feng, Jia-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs) are known to play dominant roles in plant responses to heat, as well as other abiotic or biotic stress stimuli. While the strawberry is an economically important fruit plant, little is known about the Hsf family in the strawberry. To explore the functions of strawberry Hsfs in abiotic and biotic stress responses, this study identified 17 Hsf genes (FvHsfs) in a wild diploid woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca, 2n = 2x = 14) and isolated 14 of these genes. Phylogenetic analysis divided the strawberry FvHsfs genes into three main groups. The evolutionary and structural analyses revealed that the FvHsf family is conserved. The promoter sequences of the FvHsf genes contain upstream regulatory elements corresponding to different stress stimuli. In addition, 14 FvHsf-GFP fusion proteins showed differential subcellular localization in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts. Furthermore, we examined the expression of the 17 FvHsf genes in wild diploid woodland strawberries under various conditions, including abiotic stresses (heat, cold, drought, and salt), biotic stress (powdery mildew infection), and hormone treatments (abscisic acid, ethephon, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid). Fifteen of the seventeen FvHsf genes exhibited distinct changes on the transcriptional level during heat treatment. Of these 15 FvHsfs, 8 FvHsfs also exhibited distinct responses to other stimuli on the transcriptional level, indicating versatile roles in the response to abiotic and biotic stresses. Taken together, the present work may provide the basis for further studies to dissect FvHsf function in response to stress stimuli. PMID:26442049

  20. Diffusive Shock Acceleration in Unmodified Relativistic, Oblique Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Ellison, Donald C.; Double, Glen P.

    2004-01-01

    We present results from a fully relativistic Monte Carlo simulation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in unmodified shocks. The computer code uses a single algorithmic sequence to smoothly span the range from nonrelativistic speeds to fully relativistic shocks of arbitrary obliquity, providing a powerful consistency check. While known results are obtained for nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic parallel shocks, new results are presented for the less explored trans- relativistic regime ...

  1. Vasopressin and septic shock

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Mousavi

    2015-01-01

    Septic shock continues to be one of the leading causes of death in the Intensive Care Units. When the shock state persists after adequate fluid resuscitation,  vasopressor therapy is required to improve and maintain adequate tissue/organ  perfusion in an attempt to improve survival and prevent the development of multiple organ dysfunction and failure. Various studies have suggested that exogenous administration of arginine vasopressin  may  be  an  effective  adjunctive  therapy  to  traditio...

  2. Evolution of Pre- and Post-Copulatory Traits in Male Drosophila melanogaster as a Correlated Response to Selection for Resistance to Cold Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Singh

    Full Text Available In Drosophila melanogaster the fitness of males depends on a broad array of reproductive traits classified as pre- and post-copulatory traits. Exposure to cold stress, can reduce sperm number, male mating ability and courtship behavior. Therefore, it is expected that the adaptation to cold stress will involve changes in pre- and post-copulatory traits. Such evolution of reproductive traits in response to cold stress is not well studied.We selected replicate populations of D. melanogaster for resistance to cold shock. Over 37-46 generations of selection, we investigated pre- and post-copulatory traits such as mating latency, copulation duration, mating frequency, male fertility, fitness (progeny production and sperm competitive ability in male flies subjected to cold shock and those not subjected to cold shock.We found that post cold shock, the males from the selected populations had a significantly lower mating latency along with, higher mating frequency, fertility, sperm competitive ability and number of progeny relative to the control populations.While most studies of experimental evolution of cold stress resistance have documented the evolution of survivorship in response to selection, our study clearly shows that adaptation to cold stress involves rapid changes in the pre- and post-copulatory traits. Additionally, improved performances under stressful conditions need not necessarily trade-off with performance under benign conditions.

  3. "Cold training" affects rat liver responses to continuous cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Paola; Napolitano, Gaetana; Barone, Daniela; Di Meo, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Continuous exposure of homeothermic animals to low environmental temperatures elicits physiological adaptations necessary for animal survival, which are associated to higher generation of pro-oxidants in thermogenic tissues. It is not known whether intermittent cold exposure (cold training) is able to affect tissue responses to continuous cold exposure. Therefore, we investigated whether rat liver responses to continuous cold exposure of 2 days are modified by cold training (1h daily for 5 days per week for 3 consecutive weeks). Continuous cold increased liver oxidative metabolism by increasing tissue content of mitochondrial proteins and mitochondrial aerobic capacity. Cold training did not affect such parameters, but attenuated or prevented the changes elicited by continuous cold exposure. Two-day cold exposure increased lipid hydroperoxide and protein-bound carbonyl levels in homogenates and mitochondria, whereas cold training decreased such effects although it decreased only homogenate protein damage in control rats. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes GPX and GR and H2O2 production were increased by continuous cold exposure. Despite the increase in GPX and GR activities, livers from cold-exposed rats showed increased susceptibility to in vitro oxidative challenge. Such cold effects were decreased by cold training, which in control rats reduced only H2O2 production and susceptibility to stress. The changes of PGC-1, NRF-1, and NRF-2 expression levels were consistent with those induced by cold exposure and cold training in mitochondrial protein content and antioxidant enzyme activities. However, the mechanisms by which cold training attenuates the effects of the continuous cold exposure remain to be elucidated. PMID:26808664

  4. Cold nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhenqiang Huang Yuxiang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In normal temperature condition, the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance method, realize the combination of deuterium and tritium, helium and lithium... And with a magnetic moment of light nuclei controlled cold nuclear collide fusion, belongs to the nuclear energy research and development in the field of applied technology "cold nuclear collide fusion". According to the similarity of the nuclear force constraint inertial guidance system, the different velocity and energy of the ion beam mixing control, developed ion speed dc transformer, it is cold nuclear fusion collide, issue of motivation and the nuclear power plant start-up fusion and power transfer system of the important equipment, so the merger to apply for a patent

  5. Shock waves data for minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  6. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the heart’s main pumping chamber, is causing shock. Medical Procedures and Surgery Sometimes medicines and medical devices aren't enough to treat cardiogenic shock. Medical procedures and surgery can restore blood flow to the ...

  7. INTERFERENCE OF UNIDIRECTIONAL SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study.We consider interference of unidirectional shock waves or, as they are called, catching up shock waves. The scope of work is to give a classification of the shock-wave structures that arise in this type of interaction of shock waves, and the area of their existence. Intersection of unidirectional shock waves results in arising of a shock-wave structure at the intersection point, which contains the main shock wave, tangential discontinuity and one more reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity of unknown beforehand type. The problem of determining the type of reflected discontinuity is the main problem that one has to solve in the study of catching shock waves interference. Main results.The paper presents the pictures of shock-wave structures arising at the interaction of catching up shock waves. The areas with a regular and irregular unidirectional interaction of shocks are described. Characteristic shock-wave structures are of greatest interest, where reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity degenerates into discontinuous characteristics. Such structures have a number of extreme properties. We have found the areas of existence for such shock-wave structures. There are also areas in which the steady-state solution is not available. The latter has determined revival of interest for the theoretical study of the problem, because the facts of sudden shock-wave structure destruction inside the air intake of supersonic aircrafts at high Mach numbers have been discovered. Practical significance.The theory of interference for unidirectional shock waves and design procedure are usable in the design of supersonic air intakes. It is also relevant for application possibility investigation of catching up oblique shock waves to create overcompressed detonation in perspective detonation air-jet and rocket engines.

  8. Instability in Shocked Granular Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Sirmas, Nick; Falle, Sam; Radulescu, Matei

    2013-01-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structur...

  9. Cold regions isotope applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids

  10. Cold regions isotope applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrigo, L.D.; Divine, T.E.

    1976-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) started the Cold Regions Isotope Applications Program in FY-1975 to identify special conditions in the Arctic and similar geographic areas (Cold Regions) where radioisotope power, heater, or sterilization systems would be desirable and economically viable. Significant progress was made in the first year of this program and all objectives for this initial 12-month period were achieved. The major conclusions and recommendations resulting for this effort are described below. The areas of interest covered include: radiosterilization of sewage; heating of septic tanks; and radioisotope thermoelectric generators as power sources for meteorological instruments and navigational aids. (TFD)

  11. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bren d’Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008–2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  12. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Cano, X. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, CU, Coyoacan 04510 DF (Mexico); Kajdic, P. [IRAP-University of Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Morelia (Mexico); Russell, C. T. [ESS and IGPP, University of California, Los Angeles, 603 Charles Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jian, L. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD and University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [SSL, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  13. Shock Waves in Gas Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahman Razani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Shock wave theory was studied in literature by many authors. This article presents a survey with references about various topics related to shock waves: Hyperbolic conservation laws, Well-posedness theory, Compactness theory, Shock and reaction-diffusion wave, The CJ and ZND theory, Existence of detonation in Majda's model, Premixed laminar flame, Multidimensional gas flows, Multidimensional Riemann problem.

  14. Shock Waves in Gas Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolrahman Razani

    2007-01-01

    Shock wave theory was studied in literature by many authors. This article presents a survey with references about various topics related to shock waves: Hyperbolic conservation laws, Well-posedness theory, Compactness theory, Shock and reaction-diffusion wave, The CJ and ZND theory, Existence of detonation in Majda's model, Premixed laminar flame, Multidimensional gas flows, Multidimensional Riemann problem.

  15. CSO and CARMA Observations of L1157. II. Chemical Complexity in the Shocked Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Andrew M.; Dollhopf, Niklaus M.; Corby, Joanna F.; Carroll, P. Brandon; Shingledecker, Christopher N.; Loomis, Ryan A.; Booth, Shawn Thomas; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Herbst, Eric; Remijan, Anthony J.; McGuire, Brett A.

    2016-08-01

    L1157, a molecular dark cloud with an embedded Class 0 protostar possessing a bipolar outflow, is an excellent source for studying shock chemistry, including grain-surface chemistry prior to shocks, and post-shock, gas-phase processing. The L1157-B1 and B2 positions experienced shocks at an estimated ∼2000 and 4000 years ago, respectively. Prior to these shock events, temperatures were too low for most complex organic molecules to undergo thermal desorption. Thus, the shocks should have liberated these molecules from the ice grain-surfaces en masse, evidenced by prior observations of SiO and multiple grain mantle species commonly associated with shocks. Grain species, such as OCS, CH3OH, and HNCO, all peak at different positions relative to species that are preferably formed in higher-velocity shocks or repeatedly shocked material, such as SiO and HCN. Here, we present high spatial resolution (∼3″) maps of CH3OH, HNCO, HCN, and HCO+ in the southern portion of the outflow containing B1 and B2, as observed with Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy. The HNCO maps are the first interferometric observations of this species in L1157. The maps show distinct differences in the chemistry within the various shocked regions in L1157B. This is further supported through constraints of the molecular abundances using the non-LTE code radex. We find that the east/west chemical differentiation in C2 may be explained by the contrast of the shock’s interaction with either cold, pristine material or warm, previously shocked gas, as seen in enhanced HCN abundances. In addition, the enhancement of the HNCO abundance toward the the older shock, B2, suggests the importance of high-temperature O-chemistry in shocked regions.

  16. Vasopressin and septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mousavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Septic shock continues to be one of the leading causes of death in the Intensive Care Units. When the shock state persists after adequate fluid resuscitation,  vasopressor therapy is required to improve and maintain adequate tissue/organ  perfusion in an attempt to improve survival and prevent the development of multiple organ dysfunction and failure. Various studies have suggested that exogenous administration of arginine vasopressin  may  be  an  effective  adjunctive  therapy  to  traditional  catecholamines for the management of hypotension during septic shock. Vasopressin is both a vasopressor  and  an  antidiuretic  hormone.  It  also  has  hemostatic,  gastrointestinal and thermoregulatory  effects, and is an adrenocorticotropic  hormone secretagogue. Vasopressin  is released from the axonal terminals of magnocellular  neurons in the hypothalamus. Vasopressin mediates vasoconstriction  via V1-receptor activation on vascular smooth muscle and mediates its antidiuretic effect via V2-receptor activation in the renal collecting duct system. Vasopressin  infusion of 0.01 to 0.04 U/min in patients with septic shock increases plasma vasopressin levels. Current guidelines from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign recommend arginine vasopressin 0.03 unit/minute may be added to norepinephrine with the anticipation of an effect equal to higher doses of norepinephrine alone. Clinicians must be knowledgeable about the use of vasopressin in septic shock, including controversial areas where guidelines do not always provide solid recommendations.

  17. Radiative accretion shocks along nonuniform stellar magnetic fields in classical T Tauri stars

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, S; Argiroffi, C; Reale, F; Peres, G; Miceli, M; Matsakos, T; Stehle', C; Ibgui, L; de Sa, L; Chie`ze, J P; Lanz, T

    2013-01-01

    (abridged) AIMS. We investigate the dynamics and stability of post-shock plasma streaming along nonuniform stellar magnetic fields at the impact region of accretion columns. We study how the magnetic field configuration and strength determine the structure, geometry, and location of the shock-heated plasma. METHODS. We model the impact of an accretion stream onto the chromosphere of a CTTS by 2D axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations. Our model takes into account the gravity, the radiative cooling, and the magnetic-field-oriented thermal conduction. RESULTS. The structure, stability, and location of the shocked plasma strongly depend on the configuration and strength of the magnetic field. For weak magnetic fields, a large component of B may develop perpendicular to the stream at the base of the accretion column, limiting the sinking of the shocked plasma into the chromosphere. An envelope of dense and cold chromospheric material may also develop around the shocked column. For strong magnetic fields, th...

  18. Commemoration of a cold war

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farbøl, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    This article brings together the fields of Cold War studies and memory studies. In Denmark, a remarkable institutionalisation of Cold War memory has taken place in the midst of a heated ideological battle over the past and whether to remember the Cold War as a ‘war’. Using Danish Cold War museums...... and heritage sites as case studies, this article sheds new light on the politics of history involved in Cold War commemoration. It suggests that the Cold War is commemorated as a war, yet this war memory is of a particular kind: it is a war memory without victims....

  19. In situ local shock speed and transit shock speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watari

    Full Text Available A useful index for estimating the transit speeds was derived by analyzing interplanetary shock observations. This index is the ratio of the in situ local shock speed and the transit speed; it is 0.6–0.9 for most observed shocks. The local shock speed and the transit speed calculated for the results of the magnetohydrodynamic simulation show good agreement with the observations. The relation expressed by the index is well explained by a simplified propagation model assuming a blast wave. For several shocks the ratio is approximately 1.2, implying that these shocks accelerated during propagation in slow-speed solar wind. This ratio is similar to that for the background solar wind acceleration.

    Keywords. Interplanetary physics (Flare and stream dynamics; Interplanetary shocks; Solar wind plasma

  20. Modeling of seasonal soil cold storage using natural cold energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tao; ZHENG Mao-yu; WANG Xiao; KONG Fan-hong

    2010-01-01

    To reduce energy consumption on summer air conditioning,a novel seasonal soil cold storage mode using natural energy is presented and two-dimensional transient heat transfer model of U-tube is developed.The three processes of cold storage in winter,shut-down in transition season and cold extraction in summer are simulated by using sensitive heat capacity method with variable time step.The changing of U-tube outlet water temperature in different periods,daily cold storage and cold extraction are estimated.The temperature field of the U-tube and soil around the tube is investigated.Simulations show that seasonal soil cold storage using natural cold energy is feasible in the north to Changchun,which provides theoretical support for seasonal soil cold storage application.

  1. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and not for use in the treatment or management of an actual poison exposure. If you have an exposure, you should call ... forms that need to be diluted before use. Exposure to concentrated cold wave lotion will cause much more damage than over-the-counter lotion.

  2. Out in the cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jane

    2016-05-01

    Every now and then, you say something to a patient and wonder whether you should have kept quiet. On this occasion, a female patient and I were indulging in a moment of shared empathy over an annoying symptom we both experience - permanently cold feet. PMID:27154099

  3. Teaching "In Cold Blood."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbrich, Joan D.

    1967-01-01

    The Truman Capote nonfiction novel, "In Cold Blood," which reflects for adolescents the immediacy of the real world, illuminates (1) social issues--capital punishment, environmental influence, and the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots," (2) moral issues--the complexity of man's nature, the responsibility of one man for another, and the place…

  4. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic respon

  5. Recent Cold War Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineo, Ronn

    2003-01-01

    Cold War historiography has undergone major changes since the 1991 collapse of the Soviet Union. For two years (1992-1993) the principal Soviet archives fell open to scholars, and although some of the richest holdings are now once again closed, new information continues to find its way out. Moreover, critical documentary information has become…

  6. Cold spray nozzle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Jeffrey D.; Sanders, Stuart A.

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  7. Cold Lake profitability improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the past ten years, Imperial Oil Ltd. has been carrying out a world scale commercial project, using cyclic steam stimulation (CSS) to extract bitumen from the Cold Lake area. Because of the very heavy and viscous nature of Cold Lake bitumen, Imperial Oil has employed CSS as a means of in-situ enhanced recovery. Although this method has been very effective, production has been challenged by the cost of generating and treating steam. To comply with pipeline constraints, Cold Lake bitumen has had to be blended with a diluent. The blended product has been a desirable refinery feedstock, however, it sells for less that light sweet crude, clearly indicating the need for unit cost reduction. Since the start-up of operations nearly a decade ago cost reductions have been achieved in many areas, including production technology, water management, fuel efficiency, services and maintenance, people productivity, electricity costs, and chemical costs. The combined value of these reductions was claimed to be about one third of production costs, resulting in significantly improved competitive position and profitable development of the Cold Lake deposit. 5 figs

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119708 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119708 002-157-E08 At1g28330.1 dormancy-associated protein, putative (DRM1) identical to dormancy...-associated protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:2995990; similar to dormancy-associated protei

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060981 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060981 006-202-H08 At1g28330.1 dormancy-associated protein, putative (DRM1) identical to dormancy...-associated protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:2995990; similar to dormancy-associated protei

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK111736 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK111736 J023047L09 At1g68370.1 gravity -responsive protein / altered response to gravity ... protein ... (ARG1) identical to Altered Response to Gravity ... [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4249662; contains Pfam p ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK070093 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070093 J023041M10 At2g39290.1 phosphatidylglycerolphosphate synthase (PGS1) identical to phosphati...dylglycerolphosphate synthase GI:13365519 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 7e-78 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060009 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060009 006-302-D03 At2g39290.1 phosphatidylglycerolphosphate synthase (PGS1) identical to phosphati...dylglycerolphosphate synthase GI:13365519 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 8e-71 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK058419 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK058419 001-015-D06 At4g16280.3 flowering time ... control protein / FCA gamma (FCA) identical to S ... P|O04425 Flowering time ... control protein FCA {Arabidopsis thaliana}; four a ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK073225 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073225 J033023C04 At4g16280.3 flowering time ... control protein / FCA gamma (FCA) identical to SP ... |O04425 Flowering time ... control protein FCA {Arabidopsis thaliana}; four a ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102695 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102695 J033103F21 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK102134 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK102134 J033085F12 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066835 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066835 J013087I16 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-171 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065259 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065259 J013002J18 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100523 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100523 J023100P04 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288065 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al to sulfate tansporter Sultr1;3 [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:10716805; contains Pfam profile PF00916: Sulfate... transporter family; contains Pfam profile PF01740: STAS domain; contains TIGRfam profile TIGR00815: sulfate permease 1e-145 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288002 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288002 J075110B01 At1g68510.1 68414.m07826 LOB domain protein 42 ... / lateral organ boundaries do ... main protein 42 ... (LBD42 ) identical to LOB DOMAIN 42 ... [Arabidopsis th ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241043 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available upted by a stop codon, creating non-consensus donor and acceptor splice sites. 2e-41 ... ...tical to SP|P92997 Germin-like protein subfamily 1 member 13 precursor {Arabidopsis thaliana}; exon 2 interr

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243135 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available upted by a stop codon, creating non-consensus donor and acceptor splice sites. 7e-43 ... ...tical to SP|P92997 Germin-like protein subfamily 1 member 13 precursor {Arabidopsis thaliana}; exon 2 interr

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK111785 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK111785 J023089N11 At5g62310.1 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kinase, putative ... nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243050 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243050 J100011E04 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242758 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242758 J090051H03 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242717 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242717 J090043H19 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288095 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288095 J075191E21 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242638 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242638 J090023J02 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242651 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242651 J090026B08 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287631 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287631 J065073J24 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288923 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288923 J090081P06 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242271 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242271 J075187A19 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242681 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242681 J090032N04 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243656 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243656 J100088L22 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241519 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241519 J065170E12 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240655 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK240655 J023135E11 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242733 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242733 J090047O22 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242859 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242859 J090073L24 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243187 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243187 J100039E11 At5g62310.1 68418.m07822 incomplete root hair ... elongation (IRE) / protein kin ... putative nearly identical to IRE (incomplete root hair ... elongation) [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|6729346|dbj| ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242550 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242550 J080319D10 At2g35630.1 68415.m04369 microtubule organization 1 protein (MO...R1) identical to microtubule organization 1 protein GI:14317953 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-44 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK101368 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101368 J033035L13 At5g24270.1 calcineurin B-like protein, putative / calcium sensor ... homolog (S ... OS3) identical to calcium sensor ... homolog [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:3309575; similar ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK111570 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK111570 J013071C24 At5g24270.1 calcineurin B-like protein, putative / calcium sensor ... homolog (S ... OS3) identical to calcium sensor ... homolog [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:3309575; similar ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243065 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243065 J100015N03 At5g24270.1 68418.m02855 calcineurin B-like protein, putative / calcium sensor ... or homolog (SOS3) identical to calcium sensor ... homolog [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:3309575; similar ...

  5. The fifth international conference on Arabidopsis research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangarter, R.; Scholl, R.; Davis, K.; Feldmann, K.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations made in conjunction with the Fifth International Conference on Arabidopsis Research held August 19--22, 1993 at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK070528 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070528 J023060D13 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manganese ... supe ... roxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese ... superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|327 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119904 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119904 002-182-A05 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manganese ... sup ... eroxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese ... superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|327 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104030 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104030 001-020-C01 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manganese ... sup ... eroxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese ... superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|327 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK104160 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104160 006-211-E09 At3g10920.1 superoxide dismutase [Mn], mitochondrial (SODA) / manganese ... sup ... eroxide dismutase (MSD1) identical to manganese ... superoxide dismutase [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|327 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287459 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287459 J043019O07 At4g37000.1 68417.m05242 accelerated cell death ... 2 (ACD2) identical to accele ... rated cell death ... 2 (ACD2) GI:12484129 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288034 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288034 J075140H07 At4g37000.1 68417.m05242 accelerated cell death ... 2 (ACD2) identical to accele ... rated cell death ... 2 (ACD2) GI:12484129 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK111576 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK111576 J013075J23 At1g01510.1 C-terminal binding protein (ANGUSTIFOLIA) nearly id...entical to C-terminal binding protein ANGUSTIFOLIA [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15408535; contains Pfam profile

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK120838 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK120838 J023022B11 At1g01510.1 C-terminal binding protein (ANGUSTIFOLIA) nearly id...entical to C-terminal binding protein ANGUSTIFOLIA [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15408535; contains Pfam profile

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK111921 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK111921 001-013-A10 At1g01510.1 C-terminal binding protein (ANGUSTIFOLIA) nearly i...dentical to C-terminal binding protein ANGUSTIFOLIA [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:15408535; contains Pfam profil

  15. COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED MEDIUM. II. BALMER EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlino, G.; Bandiera, R.; Blasi, P.; Amato, E. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    Strong shocks propagating into a partially ionized medium are often associated with optical Balmer lines. This emission is due to impact excitation of neutral hydrogen by hot protons and electrons in the shocked gas. The structure of such Balmer-dominated shocks has been computed in a previous paper, where the distribution function of neutral particles was derived from the appropriate Boltzmann equation including coupling with ions and electrons through charge exchange and ionization. This calculation showed how the presence of neutrals can significantly modify the shock structure through the formation of a neutral-induced precursor ahead of the shock. Here we follow up on our previous work and investigate the properties of the resulting Balmer emission, with the aim of using the observed radiation as a diagnostic tool for shock parameters. Our main focus is on supernova remnant shocks, and we find that, for typical parameters, the H{alpha} emission typically has a three-component spectral profile, where (1) a narrow component originates from upstream cold hydrogen atoms, (2) a broad component comes from hydrogen atoms that have undergone charge exchange with shocked protons downstream of the shock, and (3) an intermediate component is due to hydrogen atoms that have undergone charge exchange with warm protons in the neutral-induced precursor. The relative importance of these three components depends on the shock velocity, on the original degree of ionization, and on the electron-ion temperature equilibration level. The intermediate component, which is the main signature of the presence of a neutral-induced precursor, becomes negligible for shock velocities {approx}< 1500 km s{sup -1}. The width of the intermediate line reflects the temperature in the precursor, while the width of the narrow one is left unaltered by the precursor. In addition, we show that the profiles of both the intermediate and broad components generally depart from a thermal distribution, as a

  16. Detection of cold pain, cold allodynia and cold hyperalgesia in freely behaving rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woolf Clifford J

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is elicited by cold, and a major feature of many neuropathic pain states is that normally innocuous cool stimuli begin to produce pain (cold allodynia. To expand our understanding of cold induced pain states we have studied cold pain behaviors over a range of temperatures in several animal models of chronic pain. Results We demonstrate that a Peltier-cooled cold plate with ± 1°C sensitivity enables quantitative measurement of a detection withdrawal response to cold stimuli in unrestrained rats. In naïve rats the threshold for eliciting cold pain behavior is 5°C. The withdrawal threshold for cold allodynia is 15°C in both the spared nerve injury and spinal nerve ligation models of neuropathic pain. Cold hyperalgesia is present in the spared nerve injury model animals, manifesting as a reduced latency of withdrawal response threshold at temperatures that elicit cold pain in naïve rats. We also show that following the peripheral inflammation produced by intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant, a hypersensitivity to cold occurs. Conclusion The peltier-cooled provides an effective means of assaying cold sensitivity in unrestrained rats. Behavioral testing of cold allodynia, hyperalgesia and pain will greatly facilitate the study of the neurobiological mechanisms involved in cold/cool sensations and enable measurement of the efficacy of pharmacological treatments to reduce these symptoms.

  17. Numerical simulation of shock initiation of Ni/Al multilayered composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initiation of chemical reaction in cold-rolled Ni/Al multilayered composites by shock compression is investigated numerically. A simplified approach is adopted that exploits the disparity between the reaction and shock loading timescales. The impact of shock compression is modeled using CTH simulations that yield pressure, strain, and temperature distributions within the composites due to the shock propagation. The resulting temperature distribution is then used as initial condition to simulate the evolution of the subsequent shock-induced mixing and chemical reaction. To this end, a reduced reaction model is used that expresses the local atomic mixing and heat release rates in terms of an evolution equation for a dimensionless time scale reflecting the age of the mixed layer. The computations are used to assess the effect of bilayer thickness on the reaction, as well as the impact of shock velocity and orientation with respect to the layering. Computed results indicate that initiation and evolution of the reaction are substantially affected by both the shock velocity and the bilayer thickness. In particular, at low impact velocity, Ni/Al multilayered composites with thick bilayers react completely in 100 ms while at high impact velocity and thin bilayers, reaction time was less than 100 μs. Quantitative trends for the dependence of the reaction time on the shock velocity are also determined, for different bilayer thickness and shock orientation

  18. The chloroplast small heat shock protein undergoes oxidation-dependent conformational changes and may protect plants from oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Härndahl, Ulrika; Hall, Roberta Buffoni; Osteryoung, Katherine W.; Vierling, Elizabeth; Bornman, Janet F.; Sundby, Cecilia

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear-encoded chloroplast-localized Hsp21 is an oligomeric heat shock protein (Hsp), belonging to the protein family of small Hsps and α-crystallins. We have investigated the effects of high temperature and oxidation treatments on the structural properties of Hsp21, both in purified recombinant form and in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants engineered to constitutively overexpress Hsp21. A conformational change was observed for the 300 kDa oligomeric Hsp21 protein during moderate he...

  19. Pressurized-thermal-shock technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was recognized at the time the original Issues on Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) studies were conducted that distinct vertical plumes of cooling water form beneath the cold leg inlet nozzles during those particular transients that exhibit fluid/thermal stratification. The formation of these plumes (referred to as thermal streaming) induces a time-dependent circumferential temperature variation on the inner surface of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) wall that creates an axial stress component. This axial stress component is in addition to the axial stress components induced by time-dependent radial temperature variation through the wall thickness and the time-dependent pressure transient. This additional axial stress component will result in a larger axial stress resultant that results in a larger stress-intensity factor acting on circumferential flaws, thus reducing the fracture margin for circumferential flaws. Although this was recognized at the time of the original IPTS study, the contribution appeared to be relatively small; therefore, it was neglected. The original IPTS studies were performed with OCA-P, a computer program developed at ORNL to analyze the cleavage fracture response of a nuclear RPV subjected to PTS loading. OCA-P is a one-dimensional (1-D) finite-element code that analyzes the stresses and stress-intensity factors (axial and tangential) resulting from the pressure and the radial temperature variation through the wall thickness only. The HSST Program is investigating the potential effects of thermal-streaming-induced stresses in circumferential welds on the reactor vessel PTS analyses. The initial phase of this investigation focused on an evaluation of the available thermal-hydraulic data and analyses results. The objective for the initial phase of the investigation is to evaluate thermal-streaming behavior under conditions relevant to the operation of U.S. PWRs and chracterize any predicted thermal-streaming plumes

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK073140 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available me 4 (EC 3.1.3.16) {Arabidopsis thaliana}, phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 GI:166801 (Arabidopsis thaliana); contains a Ser/Thr protein...AK073140 J033022I01 At2g39840.1 serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP1 isozyme 4 (TOPP4) / phosphoprotein... phosphatase 1 identical to SP|P48484 Serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP1 isozy... phosphatase signature (PDOC00115); contains a metallo-phosphoesterase motif (QDOC50185) 1e-168 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK120439 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available me 4 (EC 3.1.3.16) {Arabidopsis thaliana}, phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 GI:166801 (Arabidopsis thaliana); contains a Ser/Thr protein...AK120439 J013098H20 At2g39840.1 serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP1 isozyme 4 (TOPP4) / phosphoprotein... phosphatase 1 identical to SP|P48484 Serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP1 isozy... phosphatase signature (PDOC00115); contains a metallo-phosphoesterase motif (QDOC50185) 1e-154 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121378 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available me 4 (EC 3.1.3.16) {Arabidopsis thaliana}, phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 GI:166801 (Arabidopsis thaliana); contains a Ser/Thr protein...AK121378 J023127F14 At2g39840.1 serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP1 isozyme 4 (TOPP4) / phosphoprotein... phosphatase 1 identical to SP|P48484 Serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP1 isozy... phosphatase signature (PDOC00115); contains a metallo-phosphoesterase motif (QDOC50185) 1e-142 ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK063856 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yme 4 (EC 3.1.3.16) {Arabidopsis thaliana}, phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 GI:166801 (Arabidopsis thaliana); contains a Ser/Thr protein...AK063856 001-122-D05 At2g39840.1 serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP1 isozyme 4 (TOPP4) / phosphoprotein... phosphatase 1 identical to SP|P48484 Serine/threonine protein phosphatase PP1 isoz... phosphatase signature (PDOC00115); contains a metallo-phosphoesterase motif (QDOC50185) 6e-46 ...

  4. Terpene Specialized Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Tholl, Dorothea; Lee, Sungbeom

    2011-01-01

    Terpenes constitute the largest class of plant secondary (or specialized) metabolites, which are compounds of ecological function in plant defense or the attraction of beneficial organisms. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, nearly all Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) enzymes of the core biosynthetic pathways producing the 5-carbon building blocks of terpenes have been characterized and closer insight has been gained into the transcriptional and posttranscriptional/translational mech...

  5. Genetic and genomic analysis of Rhizoctonia solani interactions with Arabidopsis; evidence of resistance mediated through NADPH oxidases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhonda C Foley

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani is an important soil-borne necrotrophic fungal pathogen, with a broad host range and little effective resistance in crop plants. Arabidopsis is resistant to R. solani AG8 but susceptible to R. solani AG2-1. A screen of 36 Arabidopsis ecotypes and mutants affected in the auxin, camalexin, salicylic acid, abscisic acid and ethylene/jasmonic acid pathways did not reveal any variation in response to R. solani and demonstrated that resistance to AG8 was independent of these defense pathways. The Arabidopsis Affymetrix ATH1 Genome array was used to assess global gene expression changes in plants infected with AG8 and AG2-1 at seven days post-infection. While there was considerable overlap in the response, some gene families were differentially affected by AG8 or AG2-1 and included those involved in oxidative stress, cell wall associated proteins, transcription factors and heat shock protein genes. Since a substantial proportion of the gene expression changes were associated with oxidative stress responses, we analysed the role of NADPH oxidases in resistance. While single NADPH oxidase mutants had no effect, a NADPH oxidase double mutant atrbohf atrbohd resulted in an almost complete loss of resistance to AG8, suggesting that reactive oxidative species play an important role in Arabidopsis's resistance to R. solani.

  6. Genetic and genomic analysis of Rhizoctonia solani interactions with Arabidopsis; evidence of resistance mediated through NADPH oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Rhonda C; Gleason, Cynthia A; Anderson, Jonathan P; Hamann, Thorsten; Singh, Karam B

    2013-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is an important soil-borne necrotrophic fungal pathogen, with a broad host range and little effective resistance in crop plants. Arabidopsis is resistant to R. solani AG8 but susceptible to R. solani AG2-1. A screen of 36 Arabidopsis ecotypes and mutants affected in the auxin, camalexin, salicylic acid, abscisic acid and ethylene/jasmonic acid pathways did not reveal any variation in response to R. solani and demonstrated that resistance to AG8 was independent of these defense pathways. The Arabidopsis Affymetrix ATH1 Genome array was used to assess global gene expression changes in plants infected with AG8 and AG2-1 at seven days post-infection. While there was considerable overlap in the response, some gene families were differentially affected by AG8 or AG2-1 and included those involved in oxidative stress, cell wall associated proteins, transcription factors and heat shock protein genes. Since a substantial proportion of the gene expression changes were associated with oxidative stress responses, we analysed the role of NADPH oxidases in resistance. While single NADPH oxidase mutants had no effect, a NADPH oxidase double mutant atrbohf atrbohd resulted in an almost complete loss of resistance to AG8, suggesting that reactive oxidative species play an important role in Arabidopsis's resistance to R. solani. PMID:23451091

  7. Ethylene positively regulates cold tolerance in grapevine by modulating the expression of ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR 057.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoming; Zhao, Tingting; Gan, Shuheng; Ren, Xiaodie; Fang, Linchuan; Karungo, Sospeter Karanja; Wang, Yi; Chen, Liang; Li, Shaohua; Xin, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene (ET) is a gaseous plant hormone that plays essential roles in biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants. However, the role of ET in cold tolerance varies in different species. This study revealed that low temperature promotes the release of ET in grapevine. The treatment of exogenous 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate increased the cold tolerance of grapevine. By contrast, the application of the ET biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxyvinylglycine reduced the cold tolerance of grapevine. This finding suggested that ET positively affected cold stress responses in grapevine. The expression of VaERF057, an ET signaling downstream gene, was strongly induced by low temperature. The overexpression of VaERF057 also enhanced the cold tolerance of Arabidopsis. Under cold treatment, malondialdehyde content was lower and superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase activities were higher in transgenic lines than in wild-type plants. RNA-Seq results showed that 32 stress-related genes, such as CBF1-3, were upregulated in VaERF057-overexpressing transgenic line. Yeast one-hybrid results further demonstrated that VaERF057 specifically binds to GCC-box and DRE motifs. Thus, VaERF057 may directly regulate the expression of its target stress-responsive genes by interacting with a GCC-box or a DRE element. Our work confirmed that ET positively regulates cold tolerance in grapevine by modulating the expression of VaERF057. PMID:27039848

  8. Kinetic effects in relativistic shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and generation of shocks is a topic of wide interest in many fields of physics, but the role of the kinetics effects and the properties of the particle distribution function across the shock front have not been explored in detail. Using particle-in-cell simulations to study electron-positron collisionless shocks we explore the features of the particle distribution in the upstream, downstream, and shock transition region, and the deviations to a Maxwellian distribution. The theoretical model developed to account for these effects shows that a strong tail can change the shock properties (shock velocity, jump conditions) significantly. However, in the standard case, the decrease of the upstream bulk speed has a bigger impact. These effects are illustrated with particle-in-cell simulations. The relevance of these results for astrophysical shocks is also discussed. (author)

  9. Kinetic effects in relativistic shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and generation of shocks is a topic of wide interest in many fields of physics, but the role of the kinetic effects and the properties of the particle distribution function across the shock front have not been explored in detail, Using particle-in-cell simulations to study electron-positron collisionless shocks we explore the features of the particle distribution in the upstream, downstream, and shock transition region, and the deviations to a Maxwellian distribution. The theoretical model developed to account for these effects shows that a strong tail can change the shock properties (shock velocity, jump conditions) significantly. However, in the standard case, the decrease of the upstream bulk speed has a bigger impact. These effects are illustrated with particle-in-cell simulations. The relevance of these results for astrophysical shocks is also discussed. (author)

  10. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  11. Flu and Colds: In Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help to prevent colds or relieve cold symptoms. Andrographis ( Andrographis paniculata ) Chinese herbal medicines Green tea Guided imagery ... measurements (VAS) to assess the effectiveness of standardized Andrographis paniculata extract SHA-10 in reducing the symptoms ...

  12. Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Cold Weather and Cardiovascular Disease Updated:Sep 16,2015 ... Your Heart Health • Watch, Learn & Live Animations Library Cold Weather Fitness Guide Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood ...

  13. Imaging with cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutrons for imaging purposes are provided mainly from thermal beam lines at suitable facilities around the world. The access to cold neutrons is presently limited to very few places only. However, many challenging options for imaging with cold neutrons have been found out, given by the interaction behavior of the observed materials with neutrons in the cold energy range (3-10 A). For absorbing materials, the interaction probability increases proportionally with the wavelength with the consequence of more contrast but less transmission with cold neutrons. Many materials are predominantly scattering neutrons, in particular most of crystalline structural materials. In these cases, cold neutrons play an important role by covering the energy range of the most important Bragg edges given by the lattice planes of the crystallites. This particular behavior can be used for at least two important aspects-choosing the right energy of the initial beam enables to have a material more or less transparent, and a direct macroscopic visualization of the crystalline structure and its change in a manufacturing process. Since 2006, PSI operates its second beam line for neutron imaging, where cold neutrons are provided from a liquid deuterium cold source (operated at 25 K). It has been designed to cover the most current aspects in neutron imaging research with the help of high flexibility. This has been done with changeable inlet apertures, a turbine based velocity selector, two beam positions and variable detector systems, satisfying the demands of the individual investigation. The most important detection system was found to be a micro-tomography system that enables studies in the presently best spatial resolution. In this case, the high contrast from the sample interaction process and the high detection probability for the cold neutrons combines in an ideal combination for the best possible performance. Recently, it was found out that the energy selective studies might become a

  14. Imaging with cold neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, E. H.; Kaestner, A.; Josic, L.; Hartmann, S.; Mannes, D.

    2011-09-01

    Neutrons for imaging purposes are provided mainly from thermal beam lines at suitable facilities around the world. The access to cold neutrons is presently limited to very few places only. However, many challenging options for imaging with cold neutrons have been found out, given by the interaction behavior of the observed materials with neutrons in the cold energy range (3-10 Å). For absorbing materials, the interaction probability increases proportionally with the wavelength with the consequence of more contrast but less transmission with cold neutrons. Many materials are predominantly scattering neutrons, in particular most of crystalline structural materials. In these cases, cold neutrons play an important role by covering the energy range of the most important Bragg edges given by the lattice planes of the crystallites. This particular behavior can be used for at least two important aspects—choosing the right energy of the initial beam enables to have a material more or less transparent, and a direct macroscopic visualization of the crystalline structure and its change in a manufacturing process. Since 2006, PSI operates its second beam line for neutron imaging, where cold neutrons are provided from a liquid deuterium cold source (operated at 25 K). It has been designed to cover the most current aspects in neutron imaging research with the help of high flexibility. This has been done with changeable inlet apertures, a turbine based velocity selector, two beam positions and variable detector systems, satisfying the demands of the individual investigation. The most important detection system was found to be a micro-tomography system that enables studies in the presently best spatial resolution. In this case, the high contrast from the sample interaction process and the high detection probability for the cold neutrons combines in an ideal combination for the best possible performance. Recently, it was found out that the energy selective studies might become a

  15. Role of shock-timing in two-shock platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia; Bradley, Paul; Olson, Rick; Kyrala, George; Peterson, Bob; Devolder, Barbara; Shah, Rahul

    2015-11-01

    In present work we discuss the role of shock-timing and location of shock coalescence in newly developed two-shock platform on NIF. It is generally believed that single-shell capsules perform better when the shocks coalesce in the gas due to lower shell entropy, larger convergence ratio, better hot-spot assembly, and mix. Using HYDRA and RAGE with BHR we investigated this hypothesis for the case of separated reactants capsule and found when shocks coalesced in the gas yield improved by ~ 50% while acceptance energy only increased by ~ 3%. This suggests that improving shock timing can increase the neutron yield without a significant increase in the drive. The picture of how the mix changes with variation in shock timing is not as crisp as the overall performance. In particular, according RAGE with BHR, the mix mass can be higher or lower depending on the strength of the first shock, even when the location of coalescence is the same. However, DT yield, which is a measure of mix, noticeably increases when the shock coalesce in the gas due to prevalence of higher temperatures in the mixed region. So perhaps the mix mass is more sensitive to the strength of the shocks rather than the location of their coalescence.

  16. Cold denaturation of encapsulated ubiquitin

    OpenAIRE

    Pometun, Maxim S.; Peterson, Ronald W.; Babu, Charles R.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical considerations suggest that protein cold denaturation can potentially provide a means to explore the cooperative substructure of proteins. Protein cold denaturation is generally predicted to occur well-below the freezing point of water. Here NMR spectroscopy of ubiquitin encapsulated in reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity alkanes is used to follow cold-induced unfolding to temperatures below −25 °C. Comparison of cold-induced structural transitions in a variety of reverse ...

  17. Chondrules and Nebular Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, E I

    2002-01-01

    Beneath the fusion-encrusted surfaces of the most primitive stony meteorites lies not homogeneous rock, but a profusion of millimeter-sized igneous spheres. These chondrules, and their centimeter-sized counterparts, the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, comprise more than half of the volume fraction of chondritic meteorites. They are the oldest creations of the solar system. Their chemical composition matches that of the solar photosphere in all but the most volatile of elements, reflecting their condensation from the same pristine gas that formed the sun. In this invited editorial, we review the nebular shock wave model of Desch and Connolly (Meteoritics and Planetary Science 2002, 37, 183) that seeks to explain their origin. While the model succeeds in reproducing the unique petrological signatures of chondrules, the origin of the required shock waves in protoplanetary disks remains a mystery. Outstanding questions are summarized, with attention paid briefly to competing models.

  18. Desalination shocks in microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Mani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Salt transport in bulk electrolytes is limited by diffusion and convection, but in microstructures with charged surfaces (e.g. microfluidic devices, porous media, soils, or biological tissues) surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow also contribute to ionic fluxes. For small applied voltages, these effects lead to well known linear electrokinetic phenomena. In this paper, we predict some surprising nonlinear dynamics that can result from the competition between bulk and interfacial transport at higher voltages. When counter-ions are selectively removed by a membrane or electrode, a "desalination shock" can propagate through the microstructure, leaving in its wake an ultrapure solution, nearly devoid of co-ions and colloidal impurities. We elucidate the basic physics of desalination shocks and develop a mathematical theory of their existence, structure, and stability, allowing for slow variations in surface charge or channel geometry. Via asymptotic approximations and similarity solutions, we show that des...

  19. Cold-Fusion Brouhaha Signals Shifts in the Way Science Proceeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Chris

    1989-01-01

    The public display of disagreement between scientists over the reported achievement of cold fusion shocked casual observers but is said by long-time observers to be unremarkable in science history. Concern on all sides focuses on the political and business aspects of discovery and the degree of scientific competition. (MSE)

  20. Shocks in supersonic sand

    OpenAIRE

    Rericha, E.; Bizon, C.; Shattuck, M. D.; Swinney, H. L.

    2001-01-01

    We measure time-averaged velocity, density, and temperature fields for steady granular flow past a wedge and calculate a speed of granular pressure disturbances (sound speed) equal to 10% of the flow speed. The flow is supersonic, forming shocks nearly identical to those in a supersonic gas. Molecular dynamics simulations of Newton's laws and Monte Carlo simulations of the Boltzmann equation yield fields in quantitative agreement with experiment. A numerical solution of Navier-Stokes-like equ...

  1. Human whole body cold adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daanen, Hein A M; Van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2016-01-01

    Reviews on whole body human cold adaptation generally do not distinguish between population studies and dedicated acclimation studies, leading to confusing results. Population studies show that indigenous black Africans have reduced shivering thermogenesis in the cold and poor cold induced vasodilation in fingers and toes compared to Caucasians and Inuit. About 40,000 y after humans left Africa, natives in cold terrestrial areas seems to have developed not only behavioral adaptations, but also physiological adaptations to cold. Dedicated studies show that repeated whole body exposure of individual volunteers, mainly Caucasians, to severe cold results in reduced cold sensation but no major physiological changes. Repeated cold water immersion seems to slightly reduce metabolic heat production, while repeated exposure to milder cold conditions shows some increase in metabolic heat production, in particular non-shivering thermogenesis. In conclusion, human cold adaptation in the form of increased metabolism and insulation seems to have occurred during recent evolution in populations, but cannot be developed during a lifetime in cold conditions as encountered in temperate and arctic regions. Therefore, we mainly depend on our behavioral skills to live in and survive the cold. PMID:27227100

  2. Shock breakout theory

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, Eli

    2016-01-01

    The earliest supernova (SN) emission is produced when the optical depth of the plasma lying ahead of the shock, which ejects the envelope, drops below c/v, where v is the shock velocity. This "breakout" may occur when the shock reaches the edge of the star, producing a bright X-ray/UV flash on time scales of seconds to a fraction of an hour, followed by UV/optical "cooling" emission from the expanding cooling envelope on a day time-scale. If the optical depth of circumstellar material (CSM) ejected from the progenitor star prior to the explosion is larger than c/v, the breakout will take place at larger radii, within the CSM, extending its duration to days time scale. The properties of the early, breakout and cooling, emission carry unique signatures of the structure of the progenitor star (e.g. its radius and surface composition) and of its mass-loss history. The recent progress of wide-field transient surveys enable SN detections on a day time scale, and are being used to set unique constraints on the proge...

  3. Bow shock: Power aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedykh, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    It is clear that the primary energy source for magnetospheric processes is the solar wind, but the process of energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere, or rather, to convecting magnetospheric plasma, appears to be rather complicated. Bow shock is a powerful transformer of the solar wind kinetic energy into the gas dynamic and electromagnetic energy. A jump of the magnetic field tangential component at front crossing means that the front carries an electric current. The solar wind kinetic energy partly transforms to gas kinetic and electromagnetic energy during its passage through the bow shock front. The transition layer (magnetosheath) can use part of this energy for accelerating of plasma, but can conversely spend part its kinetic energy on the electric power generation, which afterwards may be used by the magnetosphere. Thereby, transition layer can be both consumer (sink) and generator (source) of electric power depending upon special conditions. The direction of the current behind the bow shock front depends on the sign of the IMF Bz-component. It is this electric current which sets convection of plasma in motion.

  4. Application of probabilistic methods for evaluation of thermal shock scenarios for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes analysis of PSA-1 models. The objectives of the analysis are to identify, group and the frequency of potential scenarios of brittle fracture of the reactor pressure vessel due to thermal shock and cold overpressure using Zaporizhzhya NPP -1 as an example

  5. WISPy cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Paola [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Cadamuro, Davide; Redondo, Javier [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-01-15

    Very weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs), such as axion-like particles (ALPs) or hidden photons (HPs), may be non-thermally produced via the misalignment mechanism in the early universe and survive as a cold dark matter population until today. We find that, both for ALPs and HPs whose dominant interactions with the standard model arise from couplings to photons, a huge region in the parameter spaces spanned by photon coupling and ALP or HP mass can give rise to the observed cold dark matter. Remarkably, a large region of this parameter space coincides with that predicted in well motivated models of fundamental physics. A wide range of experimental searches - exploiting haloscopes (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques - can probe large parts of this parameter space in the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  6. Progress with cold antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The creation of cold antihydrogen by the ATHENA and ATRAP collaborations, working at CERN's unique Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility, has ushered in a new era in atomic physics. This contribution will briefly review recent results from the ATHENA experiment. These include discussions of antiproton slowing down in a cold positron gas during antihydrogen formation, information derived on the dependence of the antihydrogen formation rate upon the temperature of the stored positron plasma and, finally, upon the spatial distribution of the emitted anti-atoms. We will discuss the implications of these studies for the major outstanding goal of trapping samples of antihydrogen for precise spectroscopic comparisons with hydrogen. The physics motivations for undertaking these challenging experiments will be briefly recalled

  7. "Miniature Cold War?"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Fu: Relations between America and Russia are one of the most important bilateral ties that could affect the trend of world situation.What's the matter with U. S. -Russia ties? What's wrong with their bilateral relations? People tend to ask these days. Some observers on both sides suggest that post 9/11 honeymoon has turned sour when joint effort against challenges from nontraditional security issues failed to remove original bilateral contradictions over traditional security concerns.Japanese Jiji News Agency saw "a miniature Cold War" evolving and the British Guardian even bluntly pronounced "a new Cold War" on January 3, asserting that disintegration of the former Soviet Union did not terminate bilateral contention, which has only been performed on an international stage more complicated than ever before, with covert scheming against each other replacing overt, direct confrontation. How about starting our discussion with those comments?

  8. Cold fusion: an outlaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents a status report on cold fusion. The experiment conducted by S.Pons and M.Fleischmann suggests that nuclear reactions can be triggered by particular chemical conditions. This experiment was difficult to reproduce because of the great number of variables that are to be mastered. The Stanford Research Institute realised an extensive study of this experiment. Its results show that an energy excess occurs in certain conditions and is very dependent on the quality of involved materials: some batches of palladium are more active than others. The author draws a parallel between cold fusion and the latest works of Japanese and Russian scientists which show that nuclear reactions can be induced by biological processes. A review of theoretical models explaining the fusion process is made and an extensive bibliography is given. (A.C.)

  9. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The same argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions

  10. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Shrivastava; Kailash

    2005-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics and traumatology is still a young therapy method. Since the last few years the development of shock wave therapy has progressed rapidly. Shock waves have changed the treatment of urolithiasis substantially. Today shock waves are the first choice to treat kidney and urethral stones. Urology has long been the only medical field for shock waves in medicine. Meanwhile shock waves have been used in orthopedics and traumatology to treat insertion tendinitis, avascular necrosis of the head of femur and other necrotic bone alterations. Another field of shock wave application is the treatment of tendons, ligaments and bones on horses in veterinary medicine. In the present paper we discuss the basic theory and application of shock waves and its history in medicine. The idea behind using shock wave therapy for orthopedic diseases is the stimulation of healing in tendons, surrounding tissue and bones. This is a completely different approach compared to urology where shock waves are used for disintegration.

  11. Cold heteromolecular dipolar collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Sawyer, Brian C.; Stuhl, Benjamin K.; Yeo, Mark; Tscherbul, Timur V.; Hummon, Matthew T.; Xia, Yong; Klos, Jacek; Patterson, David; Doyle, John M.; Ye, Jun

    2010-01-01

    We present the first experimental observation of cold collisions between two different species of neutral polar molecules, each prepared in a single internal quantum state. Combining for the first time the techniques of Stark deceleration, magnetic trapping, and cryogenic buffer gas cooling allows the enhancement of molecular interaction time by 10$^5$. This has enabled an absolute measurement of the total trap loss cross sections between OH and ND$_3$ at a mean collision energy of 3.6 cm$^{-...

  12. The CMS COLD BOX

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    The CMS detector is built around a large solenoid magnet. This takes the form of a cylindrical coil of superconducting cable that generates a field of 3.8 Tesla: about 100,000 times the magnetic field of the Earth. To run, this superconducting magnet needs to be cooled down to very low temperature with liquid helium. Providing this is the job of a compressor station and the so-called “cold box”.

  13. Clumpy cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  14. Hot fusion, cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication of observations of nuclear fusion reactions in electrolysis experiments has led to hope that an easy way to domesticate this major source of energy had been found. In this article are recalled the classical solutions which are studied for hot fusion, the state of the art the difficulties and the perspectives, followed by the present situation concerning the experiments related to what has been called, perhaps a little too quickly, cold fusion

  15. Prevention of cold injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Tipton, Mike

    2006-01-01

    On the 19th and 20th May 2005, civilian and military scientists, medical officers, engineers and other personnel from NATO and Partners for Peace countries met in Amsterdam, The Netherlands for a Human Factors and Medicine Panel Specialist's meeting (HFM-126/RSM) on the "Prevention of Cold Injuries". The meeting was organized by the Human Factors and Medicine Panel in close collaboration with TNO Human Factors, The Netherlands and the Royal Netherlands Navy (RLN). The meeting comprised two 45...

  16. Cold-induced metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic response in infants and several animal species. In adult humans, however, its role is less clear. Here we explore recent findings on the role and variability of nonshivering thermogenesis in adults. Rece...

  17. Cold Dark Matter Models

    OpenAIRE

    Dodelson, Scott; Gates, Evalyn; Turner, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    Motivated by inflation, the theory of big-bang nucleosynthesis and the quest for a deeper understanding of the fundamental forces and particles, a very successful paradigm for the development of structure in the Universe has evolved. It holds that most of the matter exists in the form of slowly moving elementary particles left over from the earliest moments (cold dark matter or CDM) and that the small density inhomogeneities that seed structure formation arose from quantum fluctuations around...

  18. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Bret, Antoine; Bykov, Andrei;

    2016-01-01

    galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space...... in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics....

  19. Cold Stowage Flight Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Sharon E.; Melendez, David T.

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) provides a test bed for researchers to perform science experiments in a variety of fields, including human research, life sciences, and space medicine. Many of the experiments being conducted today require science samples to be stored and transported in a temperature controlled environment. NASA provides several systems which aid researchers in preserving their science. On orbit systems provided by NASA include the Minus Eighty Laboratory freezer for ISS (MELFI), Microgravity Experiment Research Locker Incubator (MERLIN), and Glacier. These freezers use different technologies to provide rapid cooling and cold stowage at different temperature levels on board ISS. Systems available to researchers during transportation to and from ISS are MERLIN, Glacier, and Coldbag. Coldbag is a passive cold stowage system that uses phase change materials to maintain temperature. Details of these current technologies are provided along with operational experience gained to date. This paper discusses the capability of the current cold stowage hardware and how it may continue to support NASA s mission on ISS and in future exploration missions.

  20. Advances in Arabidopsis research in China from 2006 to 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yan; ZUO JianRu; YANG WeiCai

    2007-01-01

    @@ Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant species, has a number of advantages over other plant species as an experimental organism due to many of its genetic and genomic features. The Chinese Arabidopsis community has made significant contributions to plant biology research in recent years[1,2]. In 2006, studies of plant biology in China received more attention than ever before, especially those pertaining to Arabidopsis research. Here we briefly summarize recent advances in Arabidopsis research in China.

  1. Support for cold neutron utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    - Support for experiments by users of cold neutron scattering instrument - Short-term training of current and potential users of cold neutron scattering instrument for their effective use of the instrument - International collaboration for advanced utilization of cold neutron scattering instruments - Selection and training of qualified instrument scientists for vigorous research endeavors and outstanding achievements in experiments with cold neutron - Research on nano/bio materials using cold neutron scattering instruments - Bulk nano structure measurement using small angle neutron scattering and development of analysis technique

  2. Effect of ion viscosity on dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a nonextensive magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear features of dust ion-acoustic shock waves (DIASWs) in a magnetoplasma containing cold positive ions, nonextensive electrons, and immobile negatively charged dust grains taking into account the cold ion kinematic viscosity are investigated. The reductive perturbation technique is used to derive a Zakharov-Kuznetsov-Burgers (ZK-Burgers). It is found that the fundamental properties of the DIASWs are significantly modified by the different system parameters such as the nonextensive parameter, the ion gyrofrequency, the dust concentration, the viscosity parameter, and the direction cosines. Also, the polarities (positive and negative shocks) of the potential are found to exist in the plasma under consideration. The implications of our results may be used in understanding the acoustic shock waves propagation in laboratory and space plasmas.

  3. Expression of Vitis amurensis NAC26 in Arabidopsis enhances drought tolerance by modulating jasmonic acid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Linchuan; Su, Lingye; Sun, Xiaoming; Li, Xinbo; Sun, Mengxiang; Karungo, Sospeter Karanja; Fang, Shuang; Chu, Jinfang; Li, Shaohua; Xin, Haiping

    2016-04-01

    The growth and fruit quality of grapevines are widely affected by abnormal climatic conditions such as water deficits, but many of the precise mechanisms by which grapevines respond to drought stress are still largely unknown. Here, we report that VaNAC26, a member of the NAC transcription factor family, was upregulated dramatically during cold, drought and salinity treatments in Vitis amurensis, a cold and drought-hardy wild Vitis species. Heterologous overexpression of VaNAC26 enhanced drought and salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Higher activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower concentrations of H2O2 and O2 (-) were found in VaNAC26-OE lines than in wild type plants under drought stress. These results indicated that scavenging by reactive oxygen species (ROS) was enhanced by VaNAC26 in transgenic lines. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis revealed that genes related to jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis and signaling were upregulated in VaNAC26-OE lines under both normal and drought conditions. VaNAC26 showed a specific binding ability on the NAC recognition sequence (NACRS) motif, which broadly exists in the promoter regions of upregulated genes in transgenic lines. Endogenous JA content significantly increased in the VaNAC26-OE lines 2 and 3. Our data suggest that VaNAC26 responds to abiotic stresses and may enhance drought tolerance by transcriptional regulation of JA synthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:27162276

  4. Comprehensive Functional Analysis of the Catalase Gene Family in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Yan Du; Peng-Cheng Wang; Jia Chen; Chun-Peng Song

    2008-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, catalase (CAT) genes encode a small family of proteins including CAT1, CAT2 and CAT3, which catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and play an important role in controlling homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we analyze the expression profiles and activities of three catalases under different treatments including drought, cold, oxidative stresses, abscisic acid and salicylic acid in Arabidopsis. Our results reveal that CAT1 is an important player in the removal of H2O2 generated under various environmental stresses. CAT2 and CAT3 are major H2O2 scavengers that contribute to ROS homeostasis in light or darkness, respectively. In addition, CAT2 is activated by cold and drought stresses and CAT3 is mainly enhanced by abscisic acid and oxidative treatments as well as at the senescence stage. These results, together with previous data, suggest that the network of transcriptional control explains how CATs and other scavenger enzymes such as peroxidase and superoxide dismutase may be coordinately regulated during development, but differentially expressed in response to different stresses for controlling ROS homeostasis.

  5. Expression of Vitis amurensis NAC26 in Arabidopsis enhances drought tolerance by modulating jasmonic acid synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Linchuan; Su, Lingye; Sun, Xiaoming; Li, Xinbo; Sun, Mengxiang; Karungo, Sospeter Karanja; Fang, Shuang; Chu, Jinfang; Li, Shaohua; Xin, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    The growth and fruit quality of grapevines are widely affected by abnormal climatic conditions such as water deficits, but many of the precise mechanisms by which grapevines respond to drought stress are still largely unknown. Here, we report that VaNAC26, a member of the NAC transcription factor family, was upregulated dramatically during cold, drought and salinity treatments in Vitis amurensis, a cold and drought-hardy wild Vitis species. Heterologous overexpression of VaNAC26 enhanced drought and salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Higher activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower concentrations of H2O2 and O2 − were found in VaNAC26-OE lines than in wild type plants under drought stress. These results indicated that scavenging by reactive oxygen species (ROS) was enhanced by VaNAC26 in transgenic lines. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis revealed that genes related to jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis and signaling were upregulated in VaNAC26-OE lines under both normal and drought conditions. VaNAC26 showed a specific binding ability on the NAC recognition sequence (NACRS) motif, which broadly exists in the promoter regions of upregulated genes in transgenic lines. Endogenous JA content significantly increased in the VaNAC26-OE lines 2 and 3. Our data suggest that VaNAC26 responds to abiotic stresses and may enhance drought tolerance by transcriptional regulation of JA synthesis in Arabidopsis.

  6. Quasiperpendicular high Mach number Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, A H; Dougherty, M K; Burgess, D; Fujimoto, M; Hospodarsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasi-perpendicular shocks across two orders of magnitude in Alfven Mach number (MA) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted timescale of ~0.3 {\\tau}c, where {\\tau}c is the ion gyroperio...

  7. Nanoindentation of shock deformed alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current study, the experimental results on the nanoindentation response of both as prepared and shock recovered alumina of 10 μm grain size and identical processing history are presented and analyzed. The shock recovery experiments were deliberately conducted with gas gun arrangements at shock pressures much above the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) of alumina. The nanoindentation experiments were conducted at 10-1000 mN load with a Berkovich indenter. The nanohardness and Young's modulus value of shock recovered alumina were always lower than those of the as prepared alumina samples. Subsequently, the detailed characterizations of the shock recovered alumina samples by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to understand the reasons behind the drop in nanohardness and Young's modulus of shock recovered alumina samples.

  8. ACCRETION SHOCKS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AND THEIR SZ SIGNATURE FROM COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cold dark matter (CDM) hierarchical structure formation models predict the existence of large-scale accretion shocks between the virial and turnaround radii of clusters of galaxies. Kocsis et al. suggest that the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal associated with such shocks might be observable with the next generation radio interferometer, ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array). We study the three-dimensional distribution of accretion shocks around individual clusters of galaxies drawn from adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of ΛCDM (dark energy dominated CDM) models. In relaxed clusters, we find two distinct sets of shocks. One set ('virial shocks'), with Mach numbers of 2.5-4, is located at radii 0.9-1.3 R vir, where R vir is the spherical infall estimate of the virial radius, covering about 40%-50% of the total surface area around clusters at these radii. Another set of stronger shocks (external shocks) is located farther out, at about 3 R vir, with large Mach numbers (∼100), covering about 40%-60% of the surface area. We simulate SZ surface brightness maps of relaxed massive galaxy clusters drawn from high-resolution AMR runs, and conclude that ALMA should be capable of detecting the virial shocks in massive clusters of galaxies. More simulations are needed to improve estimates of astrophysical noise and to determine optimal observational strategies.

  9. Hemorrhagic shock impairs myocardial cell volume regulation and membrane integrity in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in vitro myocardial slice technique was used to quantitate alterations in cell volume regulation and membrane integrity after 2 h or hemorrhagic shock. After in vitro incubation in Krebs-Ringer-phosphate medium containing trace [14C]inulin, values (ml H2O/g dry wt) for control nonshocked myocardial slices were 4.03 /plus minus/ 0.11 (SE) for total water, 2.16 /plus minus/ 0.07 for inulin impermeable space, and 1.76 /plus minus/ 0.15 for inulin diffusible space. Shocked myocardial slices showed impaired response to cold incubation. After 2 h of in vivo shock, total tissue water, inulin diffusible space, and inulin impermeable space increased significantly for subendocardium, whereas changes in subepicardium parameters were minimal. Shock-induced cellular swelling was accompanied by an increased total tissue sodium, but no change in tissue potassium. Calcium entry blockade in vivo significantly reduced subendocardial total tissue water as compared with shock-untreated dogs. In addition, calcium entry blockade reduced shock-induced increases in inulin diffusible space. In vitro myocardial slice studies confirm alterations in subendocardial membrane integrity after 2 h of in vivo hemorrhagic shock. Shock-induced abnormalities in myocardial cell volume regulation are reduced by calcium entry blockade in vivo

  10. Gene–culture shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hyperbolic model is presented which generalises Aoki's parabolic system for the combined propagation of a mutant gene together with a cultural innovation. It is shown that this model allows for the propagation of a shock wave and the shock amplitude is calculated numerically. Particular attention is paid to the case where the shock moves into a region where the frequencies of the mutant gene and of the individuals adopting the innovation are zero.

  11. Measurement of Strong Shock Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Hajime Takada; Daisuke Fujimaki; Takao Tsuboi

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with measurement of a strong shock pressure like an imploding detonation of over 1 GPa which cannot be measured directly with currently available commercial pressure transducers. After the transfer functions of three kinds of materials were measured using a shock tube, Teflon was selected as a shock absorber. As an example of pressure beyond the limit of the pressure transducer, we tried to measure pressure at the center of an imploding detonation. From this measurement, we c...

  12. Mining the active proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renier A. L. Van Der Hoorn

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Assigning functions to the >30.000 proteins encoded by the Arabidopsis genome is a challenging task of the Arabidopsis Functional Genomics Network. Although genome-wide technologies like proteomics and transcriptomics have generated a wealth of information that significantly accelerated gene annotation, protein activities are poorly predicted by transcript or protein levels as protein activities are post-translationally regulated. To directly display protein activities in Arabidopsis proteomes, we developed and applied Activity-based Protein Profiling (ABPP. ABPP is based on the use of small molecule probes that react with the catalytic residues of distinct protein classes in an activity-dependent manner. Labeled proteins are separated and detected from proteins gels and purified and identified by mass spectrometry. Using probes of six different chemotypes we have displayed of activities of 76 Arabidopsis proteins. These proteins represent over ten different protein classes that contain over 250 Arabidopsis proteins, including cysteine- serine- and metallo-proteases, lipases, acyltransferases, and the proteasome. We have developed methods for identification of in vivo labeled proteins using click-chemistry and for in vivo imaging with fluorescent probes. In vivo labeling has revealed novel protein activities and unexpected subcellular activities of the proteasome. Labeling of extracts displayed several differential activities e.g. of the proteasome during immune response and methylesterases during infection. These studies illustrate the power of ABPP to display the functional proteome and testify to a successful interdisciplinary collaboration involving chemical biology, organic chemistry and proteomics.

  13. Bioavailability of nanoparticulate hematite to Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental effects and bioavailability of nanoparticulate iron (Fe) to plants are currently unknown. Here, plant bioavailability of synthesized hematite Fe nanoparticles was evaluated using Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) as a model. Over 56-days of growing wild-type A. thaliana, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had lower plant biomass, lower chlorophyll concentrations, and lower internal Fe concentrations than the Fe-treatment. Results for the no-Fe and nanoparticle-Fe treatments were consistently similar throughout the experiment. These results suggest that nanoparticles (mean diameter 40.9 nm, range 22.3–67.0 nm) were not taken up and therefore not bioavailable to A. thaliana. Over 14-days growing wild-type and transgenic (Type I/II proton pump overexpression) A. thaliana, the Type I plant grew more than the wild-type in the nanoparticle-Fe treatment, suggesting Type I plants cope better with Fe limitation; however, the nanoparticle-Fe and no-Fe treatments had similar growth for all plant types. -- Highlights: ► Iron nanoparticles were synthesized and assessed for bioavailability to Arabidopsis. ► Arabidopsis grew better in the presence of EDTA-bound iron than nanoparticulate iron. ► Arabidopsis grew the same in the presence of nanoparticulate iron compared to no iron. -- Synthesized iron nanoparticles were not bioavailable to Arabidopsis thaliana in agar nutrient media

  14. Melatonin induces the transcripts of CBF/DREB1s and their involvement in both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haitao; Qian, Yongqiang; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; He, Chaozu

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a naturally occurring small molecule that acts as an important secondary messenger in plant stress responses. However, the mechanism underlying the melatonin-mediated signaling pathway in plant stress responses has not been established. C-repeat-binding factors (CBFs)/Drought response element Binding 1 factors (DREB1s) encode transcription factors that play important roles in plant stress responses. This study has determined that endogenous melatonin and transcripts level of CBFs (AtCBF1, AtCBF2, and AtCBF3) in Arabidopsis leaves were significantly induced by salt, drought, and cold stresses and by pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 infection. Moreover, both exogenous melatonin treatment and overexpression of CBFs conferred enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Notably, AtCBFs and exogenous melatonin treatment positively regulated the mRNA expression of several stress-responsive genes (COR15A, RD22, and KIN1) and accumulation of soluble sugars content such as sucrose in Arabidopsis under control and stress conditions. Additionally, exogenous sucrose also conferred improved resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Taken together, this study indicates that AtCBFs confer enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, and AtCBF-mediated signaling pathway and sugar accumulation may be involved in melatonin-mediated stress response in Arabidopsis, at least partially. PMID:26182834

  15. Expression of a High Mobility Group Protein Isolated from Cucumis sativus Affects the Germination of Arabidopsis thaliana under Abiotic Stress Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Young Jang; Kyung Jin Kwak; Hunseung Kang

    2008-01-01

    Although high mobility group B (HMGB) proteins have been identified from a variety of plant species, their importance and functional roles in plant responses to changing environmental conditions are largely unknown. Here, we investigated the functional roles of a CsHMGB isolated from cucumber (Cucurnis sativus L.) in plant responses to environmental stimuli. Under normal growth conditions or when subjected to cold stress, no differences in plant growth were found between the wild.type and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing CsHMGB. By contrast, the transgenic Arabidopsis plants displayed retarded germination compared with the wild-type plants when grown under high salt or dehydration stress conditions. Germination of the transgenic plants was delayed by the addition of abscisic acid (ABA), implying that CsHMGB affects germination through an ABA-dependent way. The expression of CsHMGB had affected only the germination stage, and CsHMGB did not affect the seedling growth of the transgenic plants under the stress conditions. The transcript levels of several germination-responsive genes were modulated by the expression of CsHMGB in Arabidopsis. Taken together, these results suggest that ectopic expression of a CsHMGB in Arabidopsis modulates the expression of several germination-responsive genes, and thereby affects the germination of Arabidopsis plants under different stress conditions.

  16. Vibration Isolation Review: II. Shock Excitation

    OpenAIRE

    F.C. Nelson

    1996-01-01

    This is the second part of a two part review of shock and vibration isolation. It covers three distinct categories of shock excitation—pulselike shock, velocity shock, and complex shock—and discusses the means that are available in each case to measure the effectiveness of shock mitigation by the imposition of flexible connections between the isolated system and its base.

  17. Rapid growth reduces cold resistance: evidence from latitudinal variation in growth rate, cold resistance and stress proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robby Stoks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physiological costs of rapid growth may contribute to the observation that organisms typically grow at submaximal rates. Although, it has been hypothesized that faster growing individuals would do worse in dealing with suboptimal temperatures, this type of cost has never been explored empirically. Furthermore, the mechanistic basis of the physiological costs of rapid growth is largely unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Larvae of the damselfly Ischnura elegans from two univoltine northern and two multivoltine southern populations were reared at three temperatures and after emergence given a cold shock. Cold resistance, measured by chill coma recovery times in the adult stage, was lower in the southern populations. The faster larval growth rates in the southern populations contributed to this latitudinal pattern in cold resistance. In accordance with their assumed role in cold resistance, Hsp70 levels were lower in the southern populations, and faster growing larvae had lower Hsp70 levels. Yet, individual variation in Hsp70 levels did not explain variation in cold resistance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: WE PROVIDE EVIDENCE FOR A NOVEL COST OF RAPID GROWTH: reduced cold resistance. Our results indicate that the reduced cold resistance in southern populations of animals that change voltinism along the latitudinal gradient may not entirely be explained by thermal selection per se but also by the costs of time constraint-induced higher growth rates. This also illustrates that stressors imposed in the larval stage may carry over and shape fitness in the adult stage and highlights the importance of physiological costs in the evolution of life-histories at macro-scales.

  18. Historical Oil Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, James D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the history of the oil industry with a particular focus on the events associated with significant changes in the price of oil. Although oil was used much differently and was substantially less important economically in the nineteenth century than it is today, there are interesting parallels between events in that era and more recent developments. Key post-World-War-II oil shocks reviewed include the Suez Crisis of 1956-57, the OPEC oil embargo of 1973-1974, the Iranian revo...

  19. Cold fusion in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since early April a great deal of excitement has been created over the Fleischmann/Pons cold fusion experiment, which if it performs as advertised, could turn out to be mankind's best hope of heading off the energy crisis scheduled for early in the next century. Dozens of groups around the world are now attempting to duplicate the experiment to see if Fleischmann and Pons' discovery is an experimental mistake, an unknown electrochemical effect or a new kind of fusion reaction. This article puts the experiment into the perspective of today and looks at how it might affect the energy scene tomorrow if it should turn out to be commercially exploitable. (author)

  20. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanbhag, Satish; Spivak, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria is a rare cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia predominantly seen as an acute form in young children after viral illnesses and in a chronic form in some hematological malignancies and tertiary syphilis. It is a complement mediated intravascular hemolytic anemia associated with a biphasic antibody against the P antigen on red cells. The antibody attaches to red cells at colder temperatures and causes red cell lysis when blood recirculates to warmer parts of the body. Treatment is mainly supportive and with red cell transfusion, but immunosuppressive therapy may be effective in severe cases. PMID:26043386

  1. The Isis cold moderators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ISIS is a pulsed spallation neutron source where neutrons are produced by the interaction of a 160 kW proton beam of energy 800 MeV in a water-cooled Tantalum Target. The fast neutrons produced are thermalized in four moderators: two ambient water, one liquid methane operating at 100K and a liquid hydrogen moderator at 20 K. This paper gives a description of the construction of both cold moderator systems, details of the operating experience and a description of the current development program.

  2. Exception in Cold War

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ In the Cold War, India mainly focused its Southeast Asia Strategy on preserving the regional peace and stability, fearing that changes in Southeast Asia would impact India. Generally speaking, India would like to see a relatively strong, stable and independent Southeast Asia, which would guarantee the stability of its east wing. However, fettered by its limited power, its non-alignment policy and its special relation with Soviet Union, India's policy toward Southeast Asia remained relatively passive and its relation with Southeast Asia was, to some extent, trapped in a historical "intermission."

  3. Recent Progress in Arabidopsis Research in China: A Preface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong Xu

    2006-01-01

    @@ In 2002, a workshop on Arabidopsis research in China was held in Shanghai, when a small group of Chinese plant scientists was working on this model species. Since then, we have witnessed the rapid growth of Arabidopsis research in China. This special issue of Journal of Integrative Plant Biology is dedicated exclusively to the Fourth Workshop on Arabidopsis Research in China, scheduled on November 30, 2005, in Beijing. In addition to reports collected in this special issue, the Chinese Arabidopsis community has been able to make significant contributions to many research fields. Here, I briefly summarize recent advances in Arabidopsis research in China.

  4. Effect of power density and pulse repetition on laser shock peening of Ti-6Al-4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser shock peening (LSP) was applied to Ti-6Al-4V (wt.%) simulated airfoil specimens using a Nd:Glass laser. Laser shock peening processing parameters examined in the present study included power density (5.5, 7, and 9 GW/cm2) and number of laser pulses per spot (one and three pulses/spot). The LSP's Ti-6Al-4V samples were examined using x-ray diffraction techniques to determine the residual stress distribution and percent cold work as a function of depth. It was found that the residual stress state and percent of cold work were relatively independent of LSP power density. However, the number of laser pulses per spot had a significant effect on both residual stress and percent of cold work for a given power density level. In addition, there was a strong correlation between the magnitude of residual compressive stresses generated and the percent cold work measured

  5. The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara

    2016-05-11

    Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  6. Particle Acceleration at Shocks: Insights from Supernova Remnant Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. W. Jones

    2011-12-01

    I review some basic properties of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in the context of young supernova remnants (SNRs). I also point out some key differences with cosmological, cluster-related shocks. DSA seems to be very efficient in strong, young SNR shocks. Provided the magnetic fields exceed some hundreds of Gauss (possibly amplified by CR related dynamics), these shocks can accelerate cosmic ray hadrons to PeV energies in the time available to them. Electron energies, limited by radiative losses, are likely limited to the TeV range. Injection of fresh particles at these shocks is poorly understood, but hadrons are much more easily injected than the more highly magnetized electrons. That seems supported by observational data, as well. So, while CR protons in young SNRs may play very major roles in the SNR evolution, the CR electron populations have minimal such impact, despite their observational importance.

  7. Plane shock compression generators, utilizing convergence of conical shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of experimental testing of shock wave generators, based on irregular Mach reflection of shock waves in a conical geometry, along with the results of numerical simulation is presented. The shock in a layered cylindrical central body was produced by an impact of a converging conical flyer plate. Conical flyer plate was originating from initially cylindrical cavity liner in a cylindrical HE charge that was launched by a sliding detonation. This approach led to device simplification, since manufacturing of conical parts from metal and explosive is not required. The sequential detonation of HE charge by a multi- point distributor was employed to vary the geometry of formed conical flyer. The dependence of parameters of shock wave in cylindrical Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) core on launch angle was investigated. It was found that launch angles below 10° lead to failure of the Mach reflection mode, while larger angles produced flat Mach disks that can be utilized in various shock experiments.

  8. NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signaling is not involved in elevated CO2-induced heat stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Ahammed, Golam Jalal; LI, XIN; Yu, Jingquan; Kai SHI

    2015-01-01

    Elevated CO2 can protect plants from heat stress (HS); however, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we used a set of Arabidopsis mutants such as salicylic acid (SA) signaling mutants nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1 (npr1-1 and npr1-5) and heat-shock proteins (HSPs) mutants (hsp21 and hsp70-1) to understand the requirement of SA signaling and HSPs in elevated CO2-induced HS tolerance. Under ambient CO2 (380 µmol mol−1) conditions, HS (42°C, 24 h) drastically decrea...

  9. Development of an annular arc accelerator shock tube driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    An annular arc accelerator (ANAA) shock tube driver has been developed that deposits the energy of an arc discharge into a flowing gas, which then expands and cools without any delay for the opening of a diaphragm. A simplified one-dimensional flow analysis of the ANAA shock tube has been performed, which indicates that shock velocities greater than 40 km/sec may be obtained using a 300-kJ capacitor bank. The ANAA driver consists of a high-pressure driver, an expansion section, and an electrode section. In operation, the cold gas driver is pressurized until the diaphragm bursts, sending a pressure front down the expansion tube to the arc section. When the accelerated flow arrives at the electrode section, a 100-capacitor, 300-kJ capacitor bank is discharged either by breaking an insulating diaphragm between the electrodes or by the triggering of a series of external switches. Shock velocities of 28 km/sec have been obtained, and modifications are described that are expected to improve performance.

  10. COLPEX - Cold Pool Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, H.; Price, J.; Horlacher, V.; Sheridan, P. F.; Vosper, S. B.; Brown, A. R.; Mobbs, S. D.; Ross, A. N.

    2009-04-01

    Planning has started towards designing a new field campaign aimed at studying the behaviour of the boundary layer over complex terrain. Of specific interest is the formation of cold-pools in valleys during stable night-time conditions. The field campaign will run continuously until the end of the winter in 2009/10. The experiment will make use of a wide variety of ground-based sensors including turbulence towers, automatic weather stations, Doppler lidar, radiation sensors and soil temperature probes. We also hope to deploy an instrumented car and a tethered balloon facility for limited periods. Data from the field campaign will be used for a number of purposes. Firstly, to increase our understanding of how the valley cold pools form and why, for instance, some valleys offer a more favourable environment for their formation than others. Secondly, to investigate the formation and dissipation of fog in complex terrain. Thirdly, the data set will also be used to help validate and develop the Met Office Unified Model at high resolution. An area for the experiment has been identified in the Shropshire/Powis area of the UK where a network of valleys and low hills exist with a typical valley width of ~1.5km and hill top to valley floor heights of 75-200m. 0m.

  11. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  12. And what about cold fusion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviews the experimental results that have been achieved concerning cold fusion. 12 experiments or methods involving cold fusion processes have been recorded till now, they are very briefly described. The author discusses the correlation between the helium produced in a Pons-Fleischmann cell and the amount of energy released. The author regrets the worldwide lack of money for cold fusion programs. (A.C.)

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243152 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ase PP1 isozyme 4 (EC 3.1.3.16) {Arabidopsis thaliana}, phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 GI:166801 (Arabidopsis thaliana); contains...P1 isozyme 4 (TOPP4) / phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 identical to SP|P48484 Serine/threonine protein phosphat... a Ser/Thr protein phosphatase signature (PDOC00115); contains a metallo-phosphoesterase motif (QDOC50185) 1e-154 ... ...AK243152 J100032N02 At2g39840.1 68415.m04893 serine/threonine protein phosphatase P

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288069 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ase PP1 isozyme 4 (EC 3.1.3.16) {Arabidopsis thaliana}, phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 GI:166801 (Arabidopsis thaliana); contains...P1 isozyme 4 (TOPP4) / phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 identical to SP|P48484 Serine/threonine protein phosphat... a Ser/Thr protein phosphatase signature (PDOC00115); contains a metallo-phosphoesterase motif (QDOC50185) 6e-70 ... ...AK288069 J075158N05 At2g39840.1 68415.m04893 serine/threonine protein phosphatase P

  15. Gibberellins control fruit patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Girin, Thomas; Sorefan, Karim; Fuentes, Sara; Wood, Thomas A; Lawrenson, Tom; Sablowski, Robert; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-10-01

    The Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT (IND) and ALCATRAZ (ALC) specify tissues required for fruit opening that have major roles in seed dispersal and plant domestication. Here, we show that synthesis of the phytohormone gibberellin is a direct and necessary target of IND, and that ALC interacts directly with DELLA repressors, which antagonize ALC function but are destabilized by gibberellin. Thus, the gibberellin/DELLA pathway has a key role in patterning the Arabidopsis fruit, and the interaction between DELLA and bHLH proteins, previously shown to connect gibberellin and light responses, is a versatile regulatory module also used in tissue patterning. PMID:20889713

  16. Ion reflection and downstream thermalization at the quasi-parallel bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, J. T.; Thomsen, M. F.; Bame, S. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    Using the results of ISEE 2 plasma and magnetic field measurements, two features related to the ion thermalization process at high-Mach-number (M above 2) quasi-parallel collisionless shocks are discussed. These are the presence of a coherent secondary beam of ions within the shock layer which is considered to be produced by reflection, and downstream ion distributions which contain both a relatively cold core of directly transmitted ions and a hotter 'shell' of ions, which appear to result from the disruption and scattering of ions initially reflected at the shock. Evidence is presented that coherent ion reflection is an important element of the ion energy dissipation process at high-Mach-number quasi-parallel shocks.

  17. Numerical modeling of slow shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews previous attempt and the present status of efforts to understand the structure of slow shocks by means of time dependent numerical calculations. Studies carried out using MHD or hybrid-kinetic codes have demonstrated qualitative agreement with theory. A number of unresolved issues related to hybrid simulations of the internal shock structure are discussed in some detail. 43 refs., 8 figs

  18. Cold War in Southern Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Graham

    2010-01-01

    Review Article: Cold War in Southern Africa Gary Baines, Peter Vale (eds.) (2008), Beyond the Border War: New Perspectives on Southern Africa’s Late-Cold War Conflicts , Pretoria: Unisa Press, ISBN 978 1 86888 456 8, xix + 342 pp. Sue Onslow (ed.) (2009), Cold War in Southern Africa: White Power, Black Liberation , Abingdon: Routledge, ISBN 978 0 415 47420 7, 253 pp. Vladimir Shubin (2008), The Hot “Cold War†: The USSR in Southern Africa , London: Pluto Press, ISBN 978 0745324722, 320 p...

  19. Comparison of methods for extracting thylakoid membranes of Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang-Er; Yuan, Shu; Schröder, Wolfgang P

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible methods for extracting thylakoid membranes are required for the analysis of photosynthetic processes in higher plants such as Arabidopsis. Here, we compare three methods for thylakoid extraction using two different buffers. Method I involves homogenizing the plant material with a metal/glass blender; method II involves manually grinding the plant material in ice-cold grinding buffer with a mortar and method III entails snap-freezing followed by manual grinding with a mortar, after which the frozen powder is thawed in isolation buffer. Thylakoid membrane samples extracted using each method were analyzed with respect to protein and chlorophyll content, yields relative to starting material, oxygen-evolving activity, protein complex content and phosphorylation. We also examined how the use of fresh and frozen thylakoid material affected the extracts' contents of protein complexes. The use of different extraction buffers did not significantly alter the protein content of the extracts in any case. Method I yielded thylakoid membranes with the highest purity and oxygen-evolving activity. Method III used low amounts of starting material and was capable of capturing rapid phosphorylation changes in the sample at the cost of higher levels of contamination. Method II yielded thylakoid membrane extracts with properties intermediate between those obtained with the other two methods. Finally, frozen and freshly isolated thylakoid membranes performed identically in blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis experiments conducted in order to separate multimeric protein supracomplexes. PMID:26337850

  20. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquet, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a 1D shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios $\\epsilon \\gtrsim 0.1$, and possibly even for solar abundances because of "sandblasting" by finer dust. A flow with $\\epsilon \\gtrsim 10$ requires much smaller shock velocities ($\\sim 2$ vs 8 k...

  1. Numerical simulation of thermal stratification in cold legs by using openFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a small-break loss-of-coolant accident in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), emergency core cooling system (ECCS) is actuated and cold water is injected into cold legs. Insufficient mixing of injected cold water and hot primary coolant results in thermal stratification, which is a matter of concern for evaluation of pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in view of aging and life extension of nuclear power plants. In this study, an open source CFD software, OpenFOAM, is used to simulate mixing and thermal stratification in the cold leg of ROSA/LSTF, which is the largest thermal-hydraulic integral test facility simulating PWR. One of the cold-leg is numerically simulated from the outlet of primary coolant pump to the inlet of downcomer. ECCS water is injected from injection nozzle connected at the top of the cold leg into the steady-state natural circulation flow under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions. The temperature distribution in the cold leg is compared with experimental and FLUENT's results. Effects of turbulent flow models and secondary flow due to the elbow section of the cold leg are discussed for the case with the single-phase natural circulation. Injection into a two-phase stratified flow is also simulated and predictive and numerical capabilities of OpenFOAM are discussed. (author)

  2. Adapted cold shower as a potential treatment for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, Nikolai A

    2008-01-01

    Depression is a debilitating mood disorder that is among the top causes of disability worldwide. It can be characterized by a set of somatic, emotional, and behavioral symptoms, one of which is a high risk of suicide. This work presents a hypothesis that depression may be caused by the convergence of two factors: (A) A lifestyle that lacks certain physiological stressors that have been experienced by primates through millions of years of evolution, such as brief changes in body temperature (e.g. cold swim), and this lack of "thermal exercise" may cause inadequate functioning of the brain. (B) Genetic makeup that predisposes an individual to be affected by the above condition more seriously than other people. To test the hypothesis, an approach to treating depression is proposed that consists of adapted cold showers (20 degrees C, 2-3 min, preceded by a 5-min gradual adaptation to make the procedure less shocking) performed once or twice daily. The proposed duration of treatment is several weeks to several months. The following evidence appears to support the hypothesis: Exposure to cold is known to activate the sympathetic nervous system and increase the blood level of beta-endorphin and noradrenaline and to increase synaptic release of noradrenaline in the brain as well. Additionally, due to the high density of cold receptors in the skin, a cold shower is expected to send an overwhelming amount of electrical impulses from peripheral nerve endings to the brain, which could result in an anti-depressive effect. Practical testing by a statistically insignificant number of people, who did not have sufficient symptoms to be diagnosed with depression, showed that the cold hydrotherapy can relieve depressive symptoms rather effectively. The therapy was also found to have a significant analgesic effect and it does not appear to have noticeable side effects or cause dependence. In conclusion, wider and more rigorous studies would be needed to test the validity of the

  3. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN reduces impact of freezing temperatures on photosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fan; Jacquard, Cédric; Villaume, Sandra; Michel, Jean; Rabenoelina, Fanja; Clément, Christophe; Barka, Essaid A.; Dhondt-Cordelier, Sandrine; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Several plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are known to improve plant tolerance to multiple stresses, including low temperatures. However, mechanisms underlying this protection are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the endophytic PGPR, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN (Bp PsJN), on Arabidopsis thaliana cold tolerance using photosynthesis parameters as physiological markers. Under standard conditions, our results indicated that Bp PsJN inoculation led to growth promotion of Arabidopsis plants without significant modification on photosynthesis parameters and chloroplast organization. However, bacterial colonization induced a cell wall strengthening in the mesophyll. Impact of inoculation modes (either on seeds or by soil irrigation) and their effects overnight at 0, -1, or -3°C, were investigated by following photosystem II (PSII) activity and gas exchanges. Following low temperatures stress, a decrease of photosynthesis parameters was observed. In addition, during three consecutive nights or days at -1°C, PSII activity was monitored. Pigment contents, RuBisCO protein abundance, expression of several genes including RbcS, RbcL, CBF1, CBF2, CBF3, ICE1, COR15a, and COR78 were evaluated at the end of exposure. To assess the impact of the bacteria on cell ultrastructure under low temperatures, microscopic observations were achieved. Results indicated that freezing treatment induced significant changes in PSII activity as early as the first cold day, whereas the same impact on PSII activity was observed only during the third cold night. The significant effects conferred by PsJN were differential accumulation of pigments, and reduced expression of RbcL and COR78. Microscopical observations showed an alteration/disorganization in A. thaliana leaf mesophyll cells independently of the freezing treatments. The presence of bacteria during the three successive nights or days did not significantly improved A. thaliana

  4. Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN reduces damages to freezing temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan eSU

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Several plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are known to improve plant tolerance to multiple stresses, including low temperatures. However, mechanisms underlying this protection are still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the endophytic PGPR, Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN (Bp PsJN, on Arabidopsis thaliana cold tolerance using photosynthesis parameters as physiological markers.Under standard conditions, our results indicated that Bp PsJN inoculation led to growth promotion of Arabidopsis plants without significant modification on photosynthesis parameters and chloroplast organization. However, bacterial colonization induced a cell wall strengthening in the mesophyllImpact of inoculation modes (either on seeds or by soil irrigation and their effects overnight at 0, -1 or -3°C, were investigated by following photosystem II (PSII activity and gas exchanges. Following low temperatures stress, a decrease of photosynthesis parameters was observed. In addition, during three consecutive nights or days at -1°C, PSII activity was monitored. Pigment contents, RuBisCO protein abundance, expression of several genes including RbcS, RbcL, CBF1, CBF2, CBF3, ICE1, COR15a, and COR78 were evaluated at the end of exposure. To assess the impact of the bacteria on cell ultrastructure under low temperatures, microscopic observations were achieved. Results indicated that freezing treatment induced significant changes in PSII activity as early as the first cold day, whereas the same impact on PSII activity was observed only during the third cold night. The significant effects conferred by PsJN were differential accumulation of pigments, and reduced expression of RbcL and COR78. Microscopical observations showed an alteration/disorganization in A. thaliana leaf mesophyll cells independently of the freezing treatments. The presence of bacteria during the three successive nights or days did not significantly improved A

  5. Transcriptomic profiling during the post-harvest of heat-treated Dixiland Prunus persica fruits: common and distinct response to heat and cold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A Lauxmann

    Full Text Available Cold storage is extensively used to slow the rapid deterioration of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch fruit after harvest. However, peach fruit subjected to long periods of cold storage develop chilling injury (CI symptoms. Post-harvest heat treatment (HT of peach fruit prior to cold storage is effective in reducing some CI symptoms, maintaining fruit quality, preventing softening and controlling post-harvest diseases. To identify the molecular changes induced by HT, which may be associated to CI protection, the differential transcriptome of peach fruit subjected to HT was characterized by the differential display technique. A total of 127 differentially expressed unigenes (DEUs, with a presence-absence pattern, were identified comparing peach fruit ripening at 20°C with those exposed to a 39°C-HT for 3 days. The 127 DEUs were divided into four expression profile clusters, among which the heat-induced (47% and heat-repressed (36% groups resulted the most represented, including genes with unknown function, or involved in protein modification, transcription or RNA metabolism. Considering the CI-protection induced by HT, 23-heat-responsive genes were selected and analyzed during and after short-term cold storage of peach fruit. More than 90% of the genes selected resulted modified by cold, from which nearly 60% followed the same and nearly 40% opposite response to heat and cold. Moreover, by using available Arabidopsis microarray data, it was found that nearly 70% of the peach-heat responsive genes also respond to cold in Arabidopsis, either following the same trend or showing an opposite response. Overall, the high number of common responsive genes to heat and cold identified in the present work indicates that HT of peach fruit after harvest induces a cold response involving complex cellular processes; identifying genes that are involved in the better preparation of peach fruit for cold-storage and unraveling the basis for the CI protection

  6. Transcriptomic profiling during the post-harvest of heat-treated Dixiland Prunus persica fruits: common and distinct response to heat and cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauxmann, Martin A; Brun, Bianca; Borsani, Julia; Bustamante, Claudia A; Budde, Claudio O; Lara, María V; Drincovich, María F

    2012-01-01

    Cold storage is extensively used to slow the rapid deterioration of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) fruit after harvest. However, peach fruit subjected to long periods of cold storage develop chilling injury (CI) symptoms. Post-harvest heat treatment (HT) of peach fruit prior to cold storage is effective in reducing some CI symptoms, maintaining fruit quality, preventing softening and controlling post-harvest diseases. To identify the molecular changes induced by HT, which may be associated to CI protection, the differential transcriptome of peach fruit subjected to HT was characterized by the differential display technique. A total of 127 differentially expressed unigenes (DEUs), with a presence-absence pattern, were identified comparing peach fruit ripening at 20°C with those exposed to a 39°C-HT for 3 days. The 127 DEUs were divided into four expression profile clusters, among which the heat-induced (47%) and heat-repressed (36%) groups resulted the most represented, including genes with unknown function, or involved in protein modification, transcription or RNA metabolism. Considering the CI-protection induced by HT, 23-heat-responsive genes were selected and analyzed during and after short-term cold storage of peach fruit. More than 90% of the genes selected resulted modified by cold, from which nearly 60% followed the same and nearly 40% opposite response to heat and cold. Moreover, by using available Arabidopsis microarray data, it was found that nearly 70% of the peach-heat responsive genes also respond to cold in Arabidopsis, either following the same trend or showing an opposite response. Overall, the high number of common responsive genes to heat and cold identified in the present work indicates that HT of peach fruit after harvest induces a cold response involving complex cellular processes; identifying genes that are involved in the better preparation of peach fruit for cold-storage and unraveling the basis for the CI protection induced by HT. PMID

  7. Analysis of shock implosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishkin, E.A.; Alejaldre, C. (Polytechnic Inst. of New York, Brooklyn (USA))

    1984-06-01

    An imploding shock wave, coming from infinity, moves through an ideal gas with the adiabatic constant ..gamma... To define a single-valued self-similar coefficient over the whole classical interval 1<..gamma..

  8. Shock waves & explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Sachdev, PL

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the causes and effects of explosions is important to experts in a broad range of disciplines, including the military, industrial and environmental research, aeronautic engineering, and applied mathematics. Offering an introductory review of historic research, Shock Waves and Explosions brings analytic and computational methods to a wide audience in a clear and thorough way. Beginning with an overview of the research on combustion and gas dynamics in the 1970s and 1980s, the author brings you up to date by covering modeling techniques and asymptotic and perturbative methods and ending with a chapter on computational methods.Most of the book deals with the mathematical analysis of explosions, but computational results are also included wherever they are available. Historical perspectives are provided on the advent of nonlinear science, as well as on the mathematical study of the blast wave phenomenon, both when visualized as a point explosion and when simulated as the expansion of a high-pressure ...

  9. The cosmic-ray shock structure problem for relativistic shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    The time asymptotic behaviour of a relativistic (parallel) shock wave significantly modified by the diffusive acceleration of cosmic-rays is investigated by means of relativistic hydrodynamical equations for both the cosmic-rays and thermal gas. The form of the shock structure equation and the dispersion relation for both long and short wavelength waves in the system are obtained. The dependence of the shock acceleration efficiency on the upstream fluid spped, long wavelength Mach number and the ratio N = P sub co/cP sub co+P sub go)(Psub co and P sub go are the upstream cosmic-ray and thermal gas pressures respectively) are studied.

  10. Experiments in cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of Steve Jones and others in muon-catalyzed cold fusion of deuterium and hydrogen suggests the possibility of such fusion catalyzed by ions, or combinations of atoms, or more-or-less free electrons in solid and liquid materials. A hint that this might occur naturally comes from the heat generated in volcanic action in subduction zones on the earth. It is questionable whether the potential energy of material raised to the height of a midocean ridge and falling to the depth of an ocean trench can produce the geothermal effects seen in the volcanoes of subduction zones. If the ridge, the trench, the plates, and the asthenosphere are merely visible effects of deeper density-gradient driven circulations, it is still uncertain that observed energy-concentration effects fit the models

  11. Cold Atmospherical Gas Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the gas discharge with a cold neutral component and the hot electrons can exist in a relatively dry air at the standard and much low pressure. The discharge existence region have been determined with balance between the nitrogen ionization processes by an electric field and attachment of electrons to the water and oxygen atoms. A discharge can exist only at such (w≤10-2) values of relative humidity and definite reduced electric field (E/p) values which respond threshold electric field strength Elhr at given pressure ρ. At standard pressure the threshold field compose 4.65 kV/cm. A plasma parameter calculation carried out at the local temperature and charged particle density balance conditions

  12. Sonluminescence and cold fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TVPrevenslik

    1996-01-01

    A theory of sonoluminescence(SL) proposed asserts bubbles collapse in a pancake shape almost isothermally at constant volume.SL induced hot fusion at -107℃is most likely impossible.By the proposed theory,the bubbles are treated as miniature IRasers with the dimension between pancake faces equal to the half wavelength of the standing wave in resonance with the IRaser cavity dimensions.Before collapse,the IRasers are filled with 5-10eV of IR radiation from the Plank energy in the ambient surroundings.During collapse,the IUR radiation is trapped within the IRaser by the high IR reflectivity of the bubble wall water molecules.As the IRaser cavity dimension dercreases,the cavity resonant frequency increases.The bubble wall molecules undergo a continuous population inversion by always being pumped to higher energy states that favor stimulated emission instead of absorption.IRaser resonant intensification produces 5-10MeV,i.e.,-106UV photons with 5-10eV.On average,SL induced cold fuison does not occur although a few X-ray photons are produced.If the IR thermal energy before collapse is enhanced to a total energy of 10keV.say by exciting the vibration modes of the water molecules at 2.73um with a HF laser,collapse produces an average X-ray energy of about 10keV.unlike hot fusion ,Sl induced cold fusion is not impossible.

  13. Heat-shock protein 70 expression in shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhenyu; JIAO Chuanzhen; XIANG Jianhai

    2004-01-01

    Using western immunoblotting, we obtained heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) induction data and distribution in different tissues from shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis during thermal and immune-challenged stresses. This is probably the first report of the effects of various stressors on the expression of HSP70 in shrimp. HSP70 was prominently induced in hepatopancreas and gills, but not in muscle, eyestalk and hemolymph, when the shrimp were exposed to heat shock and Vibrio anguillavium-challenged stresses. Cold shock and WSSV treatment had no significant effects on the levels of HSP70 expression in all tissues examined. HSP70 induction was greatest after 2 h exposure to heat shock stress, which was elevated after acute heat shock exposure of 10℃ above ambient temperature.

  14. Plant protein kinase genes induced by drought, high salt and cold stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Drought, high salt and cold are three different kinds of environment stresses that severely influence the growth, development and productivity of crops. They all decrease the water state of plant cells, and consequently result in the harm of plant from water deficit. Several genes encoding protein kinases and induced by drought, high salt and low temperature have been isolated from Arabidopsis. These protein kinases include receptor protein kinase (RPK), MAP kinases, ribosomal-protein kinases and transcription-regulation protein kinase. The expression features of these genes and the regulatory roles of these protein kinases in stress response and signal transduction are discussed.

  15. Simulation of Relativistic Shocks and Associated Self-Consistent Radiation for GRB Prompt Emission and Afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Niemiec, J.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Guiriec, S.; Fishman, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma instabilities excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle acceleration. We have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. This simulation corresponds to a case for gamma-ray burst afterglows. We will simulate colliding shells as an internal shock model for prompt emission. Turbulent magnetic fields generated by a slower shell will be collided by a faster shell. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the shock. We calculate the radiation from deflected electrons in the turbulent magnetic fields. The properties of this radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts

  16. Shocking features in the merging galaxy cluster RXJ0334.2-0111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasadia, Sarthak; Sun, Ming; Morandi, Andrea; Sarazin, Craig; Clarke, Tracy; Nulsen, Paul; Massaro, Francesco; Roediger, Elke; Harris, Dan; Forman, Bill

    2016-05-01

    We present a 66 ks Chandra X-ray observation of the galaxy cluster RXJ0334.2-0111. This deep observation revealed a unique bow shock system associated with a wide angle tail (WAT) radio galaxy and several intriguing substructures. The temperature across the bow shock jumps by a factor of ˜1.5 (from 4.1 to 6.2 keV), and is consistent with the Mach number M = 1.6_{-0.3}^{+0.5}. A second inner surface brightness edge is a cold front that marks the border between infalling subcluster cool core and the intracluster medium of the main cluster. The temperature across the cold front increases from 1.3_{-0.8}^{+0.3} to 6.2_{-0.6}^{+0.6} keV. We find an overpressurized region ˜250 kpc east of the cold front that is named `the eastern extension (EE)'. The EE may be a part of the third subcluster in the ongoing merger. We also find a tail shaped feature that originates near the bow shock and may extend up to a distance of ˜1 Mpc. This feature is also likely overpressurized. The luminous FR-I radio galaxy, 3C89, appears to be the cD galaxy of the infalling subcluster. We estimated 3C89's jet power from jet bending and the possible interaction between the X-ray gas and the radio lobes. A comparison between the shock stand-off distance and the Mach number for all known shock front/cold front combinations suggests that the core is continuously shrinking in size by stripping.

  17. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Marcowith, A; Bykov, A; Dieckman, M E; Drury, L O C; Lembege, B; Lemoine, M; Morlino, G; Murphy, G; Pelletier, G; Plotnikov, I; Reville, B; Riquelme, M; Sironi, L; Novo, A Stockem

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebul\\ae, active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space. It is complexified by the impact due to high-energy cosmic rays in astrophysical environments. This review adresses the physics of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle acceleration based on a close examination of available multi-wavelength or in-situ observations, analytical and numerical developments. A particular emphasize is made on the different instabilities triggered during the shock formation and in a...

  18. Shock wave loading of a magnetic guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindt, L.

    2011-10-01

    velocities and a shock wave is created between the two velocity regions. In order to conserve number of particle, momentum and enthalpy the density of the atomic beam passing through the shock wave must increase. We have build such a shock wave in an atomic beam and observed the density increase due to this. As an extra feature having a subsonic beam on a downward slope adds an extra density increase due to gravitational compression. Loading ultra cold atoms into a 3D trap from the dense subsonic beam overcomes the problem with 2D cooling and thermal conductivity. This was done and evaporative cooling was applied creating an unprecedented large number rubidium BEC.

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK066771 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066771 J013083K07 At1g01170.1 ozone-responsive stress-related protein, putative s...imilar to stress-related ozone-induced protein AtOZI1 (GI:790583) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains 1 predicted transmembrane domain; 2e-29 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK059353 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059353 001-026-D01 At1g01170.1 ozone-responsive stress-related protein, putative ...similar to stress-related ozone-induced protein AtOZI1 (GI:790583) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains 1 predicted transmembrane domain; 2e-29 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK059160 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059160 001-023-D05 At1g01170.1 ozone-responsive stress-related protein, putative ...similar to stress-related ozone-induced protein AtOZI1 (GI:790583) [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains 1 predicted transmembrane domain; 3e-28 ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242849 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242849 J090072M15 At1g68370.1 68414.m07809 gravity -responsive protein / altered response to gravity ... ty protein (ARG1) identical to Altered Response to Gravity ... [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4249662; contains Pfam p ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288959 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288959 J090084E19 At1g68370.1 68414.m07809 gravity -responsive protein / altered response to gravity ... ty protein (ARG1) identical to Altered Response to Gravity ... [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4249662; contains Pfam p ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243008 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243008 J090097H12 At1g68370.1 68414.m07809 gravity -responsive protein / altered response to gravity ... ty protein (ARG1) identical to Altered Response to Gravity ... [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4249662; contains Pfam p ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK288072 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK288072 J075161I05 At1g68370.1 68414.m07809 gravity -responsive protein / altered response to gravity ... ty protein (ARG1) identical to Altered Response to Gravity ... [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4249662; contains Pfam p ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243178 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243178 J100036P15 At1g68370.1 68414.m07809 gravity -responsive protein / altered response to gravity ... ty protein (ARG1) identical to Altered Response to Gravity ... [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4249662; contains Pfam p ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243505 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243505 J100074N19 At1g68370.1 68414.m07809 gravity -responsive protein / altered response to gravity ... ty protein (ARG1) identical to Altered Response to Gravity ... [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4249662; contains Pfam p ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287577 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287577 J065037N08 At1g68370.1 68414.m07809 gravity -responsive protein / altered response to gravity ... ty protein (ARG1) identical to Altered Response to Gravity ... [Arabidopsis thaliana] GI:4249662; contains Pfam p ...

  9. Protease gene families in Populus and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansson Stefan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteases play key roles in plants, maintaining strict protein quality control and degrading specific sets of proteins in response to diverse environmental and developmental stimuli. Similarities and differences between the proteases expressed in different species may give valuable insights into their physiological roles and evolution. Results We have performed a comparative analysis of protease genes in the two sequenced dicot genomes, Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa by using genes coding for proteases in the MEROPS database 1 for Arabidopsis to identify homologous sequences in Populus. A multigene-based phylogenetic analysis was performed. Most protease families were found to be larger in Populus than in Arabidopsis, reflecting recent genome duplication. Detailed studies on e.g. the DegP, Clp, FtsH, Lon, rhomboid and papain-Like protease families showed the pattern of gene family expansion and gene loss was complex. We finally show that different Populus tissues express unique suites of protease genes and that the mRNA levels of different classes of proteases change along a developmental gradient. Conclusion Recent gene family expansion and contractions have made the Arabidopsis and Populus complements of proteases different and this, together with expression patterns, gives indications about the roles of the individual gene products or groups of proteases.

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241402 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241402 J065159A02 At4g19070.1 68417.m02810 cadmium-responsive protein / cadmium i...nduced protein (AS8) identical to cadmium induced protein AS8 SP:P42735 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-11 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242143 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to GI:6573119 from [Lycopersicon esculentum] (Plant Physiol. 122 (1), 292 (2000)) 3e-12 ... ... identical to SP|Q9C888 Phospholipase D epsilon (EC 3.1.4.4) (AtPLDepsilon) (PLD epsilon) (PLDalpha3) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; simil

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242143 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to GI:6573119 from [Lycopersicon esculentum] (Plant Physiol. 122 (1), 292 (2000)) 6e-22 ... ... identical to SP|Q9C888 Phospholipase D epsilon (EC 3.1.4.4) (AtPLDepsilon) (PLD epsilon) (PLDalpha3) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; simil

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK240654 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ar to GI:6573119 from [Lycopersicon esculentum] (Plant Physiol. 122 (1), 292 (2000)) 1e-160 ... ... identical to SP|Q9C888 Phospholipase D epsilon (EC 3.1.4.4) (AtPLDepsilon) (PLD epsilon) (PLDalpha3) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; simil

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242290 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242290 J075191E07 At4g13870.1 68417.m02148 Werner Syndrome-like exonuclease (WEX)... contains Pfam profile PF01612: 3'-5' exonuclease; identical to Werner Syndrome-like exonuclease [Arabidopsis thaliana] GP:28195109 gb:AAO33765 1e-20 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK063585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK063585 001-118-A04 At4g13870.2 Werner Syndrome-like exonuclease (WEX) contains Pf...am profile PF01612: 3'-5' exonuclease; identical to Werner Syndrome-like exonuclease [Arabidopsis thaliana] GP:28195109 gb:AAO33765 6e-16 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242290 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242290 J075191E07 At4g13870.2 68417.m02149 Werner Syndrome-like exonuclease (WEX)... contains Pfam profile PF01612: 3'-5' exonuclease; identical to Werner Syndrome-like exonuclease [Arabidopsis thaliana] GP:28195109 gb:AAO33765 1e-20 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243230 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243230 J100044L04 At1g19850.1 68414.m02490 transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP) /... auxin-responsive protein (IAA24) / auxin response factor 5 (ARF5) identical to transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP/IAA24/ARF5) SP:P93024 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-65 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK103452 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK103452 J033129I11 At1g19850.1 transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP) / auxin-respon...sive protein (IAA24) / auxin response factor 5 (ARF5) identical to transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP/IAA24/ARF5) SP:P93024 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-166 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK318617 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK318617 J100090H20 At1g19850.1 68414.m02490 transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP) /... auxin-responsive protein (IAA24) / auxin response factor 5 (ARF5) identical to transcription factor MONOPTEROS (MP/IAA24/ARF5) SP:P93024 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-63 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287832 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287832 J065187F20 At1g30950.1 68414.m03790 unusual floral organ (UFO ) / F-box family protein ( ... ubunit; almost identical to unusual floral organs (UFO )GI:4376159 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] Landsberg-e ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241547 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241547 J065176G22 At1g30950.1 68414.m03790 unusual floral organ (UFO ) / F-box family protein ( ... ubunit; almost identical to unusual floral organs (UFO )GI:4376159 from [Arabidopsis thaliana] Landsberg-e ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242616 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ve contains PF00481: Protein phosphatase 2C domain; identical to protein phosphatase 2C (GI:4587992) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-34 ... ...AK242616 J090017C19 At2g40180.1 68415.m04941 protein phosphatase 2C, putative / PP2C, putati

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242846 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ve contains PF00481: Protein phosphatase 2C domain; identical to protein phosphatase 2C (GI:4587992) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 9e-12 ... ...AK242846 J090071I10 At2g40180.1 68415.m04941 protein phosphatase 2C, putative / PP2C, putati

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241162 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241162 J065116A05 At5g54800.1 68418.m06826 glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator, putative identic...al to glucose 6 phosphate/phosphate translocator [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|7229675|gb|AAF42936 2e-11 ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242098 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ve contains PF00481: Protein phosphatase 2C domain; identical to protein phosphatase 2C (GI:4587992) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-22 ... ...AK242098 J075143H11 At2g40180.1 68415.m04941 protein phosphatase 2C, putative / PP2C, putati

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243041 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ve contains PF00481: Protein phosphatase 2C domain; identical to protein phosphatase 2C (GI:4587992) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4e-31 ... ...AK243041 J100008G07 At2g40180.1 68415.m04941 protein phosphatase 2C, putative / PP2C, putati

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243539 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ve contains PF00481: Protein phosphatase 2C domain; identical to protein phosphatase 2C (GI:4587992) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6e-34 ... ...AK243539 J100078G04 At2g40180.1 68415.m04941 protein phosphatase 2C, putative / PP2C, putati

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242576 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ve contains PF00481: Protein phosphatase 2C domain; identical to protein phosphatase 2C (GI:4587992) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-22 ... ...AK242576 J090009A15 At2g40180.1 68415.m04941 protein phosphatase 2C, putative / PP2C, putati

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK289111 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ve contains PF00481: Protein phosphatase 2C domain; identical to protein phosphatase 2C (GI:4587992) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 5e-20 ... ...AK289111 J090096N14 At2g40180.1 68415.m04941 protein phosphatase 2C, putative / PP2C, putati

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK289248 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK289248 J100079D02 At5g54800.1 68418.m06826 glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator, putative identic...al to glucose 6 phosphate/phosphate translocator [Arabidopsis thaliana] gi|7229675|gb|AAF42936 7e-19 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287695 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ve contains PF00481: Protein phosphatase 2C domain; identical to protein phosphatase 2C (GI:4587992) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 3e-81 ... ...AK287695 J065129B08 At2g40180.1 68415.m04941 protein phosphatase 2C, putative / PP2C, putati

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243048 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243048 J100010D20 At1g07370.1 68414.m00786 proliferating cell nuclear ... antigen 1 (PCNA1) identi ... cal to SP|Q9M7Q7 Proliferating cellular nuclear ... antigen 1 (PCNA 1) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; nearly ... identical to SP|Q43124 Proliferating cell nuclear ... antigen (PCNA) {Brassica napus}; contains Pfam pro ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK071591 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK071591 J023105C08 At2g29570.1 proliferating cell nuclear ... antigen 2 (PCNA2) identical to SP|Q9Z ... W35 Proliferating cell nuclear ... antigen 2 (PCNA 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; nearly ... identical to SP|Q43124 Proliferating cell nuclear ... antigen (PCNA) {Brassica napus}; contains Pfam pro ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243048 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243048 J100010D20 At2g29570.1 68415.m03591 proliferating cell nuclear ... antigen 2 (PCNA2) identi ... cal to SP|Q9ZW35 Proliferating cell nuclear ... antigen 2 (PCNA 2) {Arabidopsis thaliana}; nearly ... identical to SP|Q43124 Proliferating cell nuclear ... antigen (PCNA) {Brassica napus}; contains Pfam pro ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241265 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241265 J065132C02 At3g19450.1 68416.m02466 cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD ) identical to S ... 523 Cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.195) (CAD ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-81 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105739 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105739 001-202-A05 At3g19450.1 cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD ) identical to SP|P48523 Cin ... namyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.195) (CAD ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2e-46 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243022 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243022 J100001E20 At3g19450.1 68416.m02466 cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD ) identical to S ... 523 Cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.195) (CAD ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 4e-64 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287708 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287708 J065132C02 At3g19450.1 68416.m02466 cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD ) identical to S ... 523 Cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.195) (CAD ) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 1e-81 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK121261 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121261 J023104H13 At1g55350.4 calpain-type cysteine protease family identical to calpain...-like protein GI:20268660 from [Arabidopsis thaliana]; contains Pfam profiles: PF00648 Calpain family... cysteine protease, PF01067 Calpain large subunit,domain III; identical to cDNA calpain-like protein GI:20268659 0.0 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK100867 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK100867 J023124E13 At2g29640.1 josephin family protein contains Pfam domain PF02099: Jose...phin; similar to Josephin-like protein (Swiss-Prot:O82391) [Arabidopsis thaliana] 7e-59 ...

  1. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK065851 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK065851 J013041L15 At1g79010.1 NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase 23 kDa subunit, mitochondrial (TY ... ursor (EC 1.6.5.3) (EC 1.6.99.3) (Complex I-23KD) (CI -23KD) (Complex I- 28.5KD) (CI -28.5KD) {Arabidopsis ...

  2. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119532 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119532 001-203-F01 At1g79010.1 NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase 23 kDa subunit, mitochondrial (T ... ursor (EC 1.6.5.3) (EC 1.6.99.3) (Complex I-23KD) (CI -23KD) (Complex I- 28.5KD) (CI -28.5KD) {Arabidopsis ...

  3. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243512 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243512 J100075C18 At4g16280.3 68417.m02471 flowering time ... control protein / FCA gamma (FCA) id ... entical to SP|O04425 Flowering time ... control protein FCA {Arabidopsis thaliana}; four a ...

  4. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK243512 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK243512 J100075C18 At4g16280.2 68417.m02470 flowering time ... control protein / FCA gamma (FCA) id ... entical to SP|O04425 Flowering time ... control protein FCA {Arabidopsis thaliana}; four a ...

  5. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242890 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242890 J090079L19 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-130 ...

  6. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 2e-65 ...

  7. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK110534 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK110534 002-168-A07 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-114 ...

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 1e-24 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32540.1 68415.m03975 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-45 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At1g32180.1 68414.m03958 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-9 (gi:9622890) from Zea mays 3e-66 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK069071 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069071 J023010H01 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-167 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 1e-124 ...

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060286 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060286 001-006-C08 At2g32540.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 6e-78 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g38190.1 68417.m05391 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit gi:2827143 from [Arabidopsis thaliana], cellulose synthase-5 (gi:9622882) from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  16. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At2g32530.1 68415.m03974 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 2e-29 ...

  17. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 5e-25 ...

  18. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242585 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242585 J090010M20 At5g16910.1 68418.m01982 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulo...se synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 1e-28 ...

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK105393 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK105393 001-123-B04 At5g16910.1 cellulose synthase family protein similar to gi:2827143 cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit, Arabidopsis thaliana, gi:9622886 cellulose synthase-7 from Zea mays 0.0 ...

  20. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK242601 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK242601 J090014G03 At4g23990.1 68417.m03448 cellulose synthase family protein similar to cellulose... synthase catalytic subunit from Arabidopsis thaliana [gi:5230423], cellulose synthase-5 from Zea mays [gi:9622882] 8e-25 ...