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Sample records for arabica coffees differentiated

  1. Comparative effect of coffee robusta and coffee arabica (Qahwa) on memory and attention.

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    Alharbi, Waheeb D M; Azmat, Aisha; Ahmed, Muhammad

    2018-04-13

    The comparative effects of coffee robusta and coffee arabica (Qahwa) on different attention and memory related assignments were measured in a double-blind study of 300 healthy young adult women who were randomly assigned to one of three different drinks: Group I (coffee robusta sachet dissolved in 100 ml of hot water): Group II (coffee arabica): and group III (100 ml water only). Cognitive function was assessed by standardized tests. Several monitoring cognitive tests and tasks were specifically chosen and performed to investigate the comparative effects of coffee robusta (CR) and coffee arabica (Qahwa; AC) on sleepiness (sleep and clear headed scale), attention (trail A & B, symbol digit, letter cancellation), general cognitive ability (stroop test) and memory (card test). Data was interpreted by analysis of variance (ANOVA). The present study revealed that coffee robusta has beneficial effects on attention, general cognitive ability and memory. Higher though non-significant cognitive scores were associated with coffee robusta consumption. Although, consumption of coffee arabica (Qahwa) has significant effects (P < 0.05) on sleepiness, attention, general cognitive ability and memory and it significantly improve reaction time and correct responses. Since different tasks were related to the sustained attention and working memory processes, results would suggest that coffee arabica (qahwa) could increase the memory and efficiency of the attentional system might be due to the presence of chlorogenic acids (CGA) which are found in less quantity in coffee robusta. However, more studies using larger samples and different tasks are necessary to better understand the effects of coffee robusta and arabica (Qahwa) on attention and memory.

  2. Genetic Diversity of Arabica Coffee (Coffea arabica L. in Nicaragua as Estimated by Simple Sequence Repeat Markers

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    Mulatu Geleta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffea arabica L. (arabica coffee, the only tetraploid species in the genus Coffea, represents the majority of the world’s coffee production and has a significant contribution to Nicaragua’s economy. The present paper was conducted to determine the genetic diversity of arabica coffee in Nicaragua for its conservation and breeding values. Twenty-six populations that represent eight varieties in Nicaragua were investigated using simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. A total of 24 alleles were obtained from the 12 loci investigated across 260 individual plants. The total Nei’s gene diversity (HT and the within-population gene diversity (HS were 0.35 and 0.29, respectively, which is comparable with that previously reported from other countries and regions. Among the varieties, the highest diversity was recorded in the variety Catimor. Analysis of variance (AMOVA revealed that about 87% of the total genetic variation was found within populations and the remaining 13% differentiate the populations (FST=0.13; P<0.001. The variation among the varieties was also significant. The genetic variation in Nicaraguan coffee is significant enough to be used in the breeding programs, and most of this variation can be conserved through ex situ conservation of a low number of populations from each variety.

  3. Microbial inputs in coffee (Coffea arabica L.) production systems, southwestern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Muleta, Diriba

    2007-01-01

    Arabica coffee is the key cash crop and top mainstay of the Ethiopian economy and requires sustainable production methods. Southwestern natural forests, the site of this study, are believed to be the centre of origin and diversity for Coffea arabica and still harbour wild Arabica coffee that may serve as an important gene pool for future breeding. Cost reductions, sustainability and quality improvement are now the major priorities in coffee production systems and require organic growing of co...

  4. Selection of Arabica coffee types resistant to coffee berry disease in Ethiopia

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    Graaff, van der N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Descriptive part. A review is given of: the importance of Coffea arabica to Ethiopia; coffee research; habitus, origin and cultivation of C. arabica ; theoretical aspects of resistance and its implications for the system C.

  5. DIRECT AND INDIRECT SOMATIC EMBRYOGENESIS ON ARABICA COFFEE (Coffea arabica

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    Meynarti Sari Dewi Ibrahim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Propagation of Coffea arabica L. through direct and indirect somatic embryogenesis technique is promising for producing large number of coffee seedlings. The objectives of the research were to evaluate methods for direct and indirect somatic embryo-genesis induction of C. arabica var. Kartika. The explants were the youngest fully expanded leaves of arabica coffee. The evalu-ated medium was modified Murashige and Skoog (MS medium supplemented with a combination of 2.26 µM 2,4-D + 4.54 or 9.08 µM thidiazuron; 4.52 µM 2,4-D + 4.54 or 9.08 µM thidiazuron; or 9.04 µM 2,4-D + 9.08 µM thidiazuron. Both calli (100 mg and pre-embryos developed from the edge of leaf explants were subcultured into regeneration medium (half strength MS with modified vitamin, supplemented with kinetine 9.30 µM and adenine sulfate 40 mg L-1. The results showed coffee leaf explant cultured on medium containing 2.26 µM 2,4-D + 4.54 or 9.08 µM thidiazuron to induce direct somatic embriogenesis from explant, while that of 4.52 or 9.04 µM 2,4-D + 9.08 µM thidiazuron to induced indirect somatic embrio-genesis. The medium for calli induction from coffee by explants was medium supplemented with 4.52 or 9.04 µM 2,4-D in combination with 9.08 µM thidiazuron. On the other hand, the best medium for activation of induction of somatic embryos was MS medium supplemented with 9.04 µM 2,4-D + 9.08 µM thidiazuron. Based on this results, the first step for developing micropropagation for coffee has been resolved. The subsequent studies will be directed to evaluate agronomic performance of the derived planting materials.

  6. Physical and Flavor Profiles of Arabica Coffee as Affected by Cherry Storage Before Pulping

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    Yusianto .

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Harvesting and pulping process of coffee cherry in the same day is inaccesible. Storage of coffee cherry before pulping was carried out incorrectly. Some storage treatments before pulping of Arabica coffee cherry had been examined at Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute using Arabica coffee cherries from Andungsari Experimental Garden, Bondowoso, East Java. Treatments of the experiment were method and period of cherry storage. Methods of coffee cherry storage were put in plastic sacks; immerse in water, without water replacement; and immerse in water with daily water replacement. Period of coffee cherry storage were 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 days. After storage treatments, the coffee cherries were pulped, fermented, washed, sundried, and dehulled. The experiment were carried out using randomized block design with three replications. Observation of coffee cherry during storage periods was done on the physical and temperature. Observation of the green coffee were done on the color dan bulk density. The green coffee were roasted at medium roast level for sensory analysis. Observation of roasting profile were out-turn, bulk density and pH of roasted coffee. Sensory analysis used Specialty Coffee Association of America method. Methods and period of cherry storage before pulping significanly influence on the cherry color, parchment color, green coffee color, and the flavor profile of Arabica coffee. Color of dry parchment changed to be red-brown becouse of cherry immersed in water for two days or more. In plastic sacks, Arabica coffee cherry may be stored only for two days, but underwater with or without water replacement, should be not more than five days. Green and sensory quality of Arabica coffee will be deteriorated after five days storage underwater. Coffee cherry storage immerse in water with daily replacing water may improve sensory quality of Arabica coffee.Key word: Arabica coffe, storage, pulping, flavor, physical

  7. GIS-based multi-criteria analysis for Arabica coffee expansion in Rwanda.

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    Innocent Nzeyimana

    Full Text Available The Government of Rwanda is implementing policies to increase the area of Arabica coffee production. Information on the suitable areas for sustainably growing Arabica coffee is still scarce. This study aimed to analyze suitable areas for Arabica coffee production. We analyzed the spatial distribution of actual and potential production zones for Arabica coffee, their productivity levels and predicted potential yields. We used a geographic information system (GIS for a weighted overlay analysis to assess the major production zones of Arabica coffee and their qualitative productivity indices. Actual coffee yields were measured in the field and were used to assess potential productivity zones and yields using ordinary kriging with ArcGIS software. The production of coffee covers about 32 000 ha, or 2.3% of all cultivated land in the country. The major zones of production are the Kivu Lake Borders, Central Plateau, Eastern Plateau, and Mayaga agro-ecological zones, where coffee is mainly cultivated on moderate slopes. In the highlands, coffee is grown on steep slopes that can exceed 55%. About 21% percent of the country has a moderate yield potential, ranging between 1.0 and 1.6 t coffee ha-1, and 70% has a low yield potential (<1.0 t coffee ha-1. Only 9% of the country has a high yield potential of 1.6-2.4 t coffee ha-1. Those areas are found near Lake Kivu where the dominant soil Orders are Inceptisols and Ultisols. Moderate yield potential is found in the Birunga (volcano, Congo-Nile watershed Divide, Impala and Imbo zones. Low-yield regions (<1 t ha-1 occur in the eastern semi-dry lowlands, Central Plateau, Eastern Plateau, Buberuka Highlands, and Mayaga zones. The weighted overlay analysis and ordinary kriging indicated a large spatial variability of potential productivity indices. Increasing the area and productivity of coffee in Rwanda thus has considerable potential.

  8. Arabica Coffee Farming and Marketing Chain Analysis in Manggarai and EastManggarai Districts

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    Dhiany. Faila Sophia Hartatri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Arabica coffee has a unique flavour and very potential market. The purpose of this study was to analyse Arabica coffee farming and to investigate its performance of marketing chains in Manggarai and East Manggarai Districts, Flores, East Nusa Tenggara Province. This research was conducted in 2008-2010 by interviewing coffee farmers and coffee buyers; using open and close questions. The number of respondents were 100 people in each district. The result showed that land holding per household farmer in Manggarai and East Manggarai were 0.84 ha and 0.92 ha, respectively. Farmers in both districts were within the range of productive age, the farmers who were members of farmer groups in both study sites was £ 50%. Arabica coffee cultivation was still done in a traditional way. Fertilizing and controlling of pest and diseases had not been carried out inten sively. Arabica coffee farming in both district was feasible. BCR, NPV and IRR values in Manggarai were 4.2, Rp8,530,105, and 70.76% respectively, while BCR, NPV, and IRR value in East Manggarai district were 8.1, Rp2,465,833, and 27%, respectively. BEP production and coffee price in Manggarai were 94.2 kg/ha/th and Rp15,913/kg respectively, whereas BEP production and coffee price in East Manggarai were 78,2 kg/ha/th and Rp10,134/kg, respectively. In general, farmers sold their coffee in green bean form. In general, the marketing chains of Arabica coffee in both districts was farmer – collector - trader - exporter.Key words: Arabica coffee, potential market, farming analysis, feasible, marketing chains.

  9. Considerations in breeding for improved yield and quality in arabica coffee (Coffea arabica L.)

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    Walyaro, D.J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Variation for growth., yield and quality characters was studied in a diallel cross among 11 varieties of arabica coffee. The objective was to demonstrate the possible application of such information in breeding programmes for improved yield and coffee quality.
    Growth characters

  10. Effect of roasting degree on the antioxidant activity of different Arabica coffee quality classes.

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    Odžaković, Božana; Džinić, Natalija; Kukrić, Zoran; Grujić, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world, because of its unique sensory properties and physiological properties. Coffee beverages represent a significant source of antioxidants in the consumers' diet and contribute significantly to their daily intake. The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of different roasting degrees on the content of biologically active compounds and antioxidant activity in different quality classes of Arabica coffee. Samples of green Arabica coffee (Rio Minas) of two quality classes from two production batches were used for the research. Roasting was carried out at temperatures of 167, 175 and 171°C. The total phenol content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), flavonol content (FC) and antioxidant activity (DPPH, ABTS) in the coffee extracts was determined. This research shows that TPC was significantly higher (P coffee compared to TPC in roasted coffee, and TPC decreases as the roasting temperature increases. TFC and FC were significantly lower (P coffee than in roasted coffee. Differences in TPC between the 1st and 2nd classes of Arabica coffee were not significant (P > 0.05), while differences in TFC were significant (P coffee from the second production batch and differences in FC were significant (P coffee and for coffee roasted at 175°C. Roasting temperatures have different influences the antioxidant activity (DPPH, ABTS) of coffee and the highest antioxidant activity was determined in coffee roasted at 171°C. An exception was 1st class Arabica coffee roasted at 167°C (ABTS). All samples of 1st class Arabica coffee had higher antioxidant activity (DPPH, ABTS) compared to 2nd class Arabica. This research shows that the bioactive compounds content and antioxidant activity of different quality classes of Arabica coffee are dependent on the degree of roasting. TPC decreases when the roasting temperature increases, while TFC and FC also increase. These results indicate that the antioxidant activity

  11. Physical Land Suitability for Civet Arabica Coffee: Case Study of Bandung and West Bandung Regencies, Indonesia

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    Chairani, E.; Supriatna, J.; Koestoer, R.; Moeliono, M.

    2017-12-01

    Indonesia has been widely known as the best Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) producer, in terms of both aspects, quality and number of product. Currently, its production, however, declines to the 3rd rank internationally. Issues emerged in the coffee cultivation are: land unsuitability, low quality of seeds, and poor management. Among Arabica coffee types, wild civet coffee is the most expensive one and harvested from the coffee beans which have been digested naturally. The study aims to determine the physical suitability of land as well as the constraints related to land for civet Arabica coffee in selected study cases, e.g., Bandung and Bandung Barat. The research methods employ multi-criteria analysis, and combined with weighted overlaying techniques for mapping. The criteria include temperature, rainfall, humidity, duration of dry season, slope, altitude, type of soil, soil texture, and erosion potential. Parameters of civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) are land use, altitude, and temperature. Local policy strongly supports the extensive management for land and the increase of coffee export. Processing data involved matching the comparison between guideline requirements for the land suitability classes, characteristics of Arabica coffee and civet habitat. The results covered the profile suitable land of the civet Arabica coffee in the study areas.

  12. Selection of arabica coffee progenies tolerant to heat stress

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    Alexsandro Lara Teixeira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to high temperatures, practically all coffee farms in the state of Rondonia are of the C. canephora species. Thus, importing arabica coffee from other states becomes necessary for composition of blends, as well as for the specialty or gourmet coffee market. The purpose of this study was to select arabica coffee genotypes that exhibit satisfactory agronomic performance under high temperature conditions. The experiment was conducted in OuroPreto do Oeste, RO, Brazil, with mean annual temperature of 25.8°C and mean annual rainfall of 2300mm year-1. The experiment was composed of 114 arabica coffee genotypes, with 103 progenies and eleven control cultivars, provided by EPAMIG. A randomized block experimental design was used with three replications, spacing of 3.0x1.0 meters and five plants per plot. All the crop seasons showed significant difference for the green coffee yield trait. In joint analysis, significant differences were detected among progenies and control cultivars. In the average of the four harvests, green coffee yield was 32.38 bags ha-1. The cultivars 'CatuaíVermelho IAC 15', 'Obatã IAC 1669-20' and 'Catucaí Amarelo 2SLCAK' stood out, achieving yields greater than 40 bags ha-1. The gain obtained from selection was 14.33 bags ha-1, which is equivalent to an increase of 44.04% in production of green coffee. The progeny H514-7-10-6-2-3-9 stood out with an average yield of 51.20 bags ha-1. In regard to maturation cycle, 56% of the progenies were classified as early maturity and 44% as medium maturity. Late maturity genotypes were not observed

  13. Arabica Coffee Farming and Marketing Chain Analysis in Manggarai and EastManggarai Districts

    OpenAIRE

    Sophia Hartatri, Dhiany. Faila; de Rosari, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Arabica coffee has a unique flavour and very potential market. The purpose of this study was to analyse Arabica coffee farming and to investigate its performance of marketing chains in Manggarai and East Manggarai Districts, Flores, East Nusa Tenggara Province. This research was conducted in 2008-2010 by interviewing coffee farmers and coffee buyers; using open and close questions. The number of respondents were 100 people in each district. The result showed that land holding per household fa...

  14. Mechanical behaviour of Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) beans under loading compression

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    Sigalingging, R.; Herak, D.; Kabutey, A.; Sigalingging, C.

    2018-02-01

    The uniformity of the product of the grinding process depends on various factors including the brittleness of the roasted coffee bean and it affects the extraction of soluble solids to obtain the coffee brew. Therefore, the reaching of a certain degree of brittleness is very important for the grinding to which coffee beans have to be subjected to before brewing. The aims of this study to show the mechanical behaviour of Arabica coffee beans from Tobasa (Indonesia) with roasted using different roasting time (40, 60 and 80 minutes at temperature 174 °C) under loading compression 225 kN. Universal compression testing machine was used with pressing vessel diameter 60 mm and compression speed 10 mm min-1 with different initial pressing height ranging from 20 to 60 mm. The results showed that significant correlation between roasting time and the brittleness.

  15. Inheritance of Arabica Coffee Resistance to Radopholus similisCobb.

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    Retno Hulupi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A research to get inheritance of Arabica coffee resistance to Radopholus similisnematode was done in screen house and laboratory of Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute, also at endemic area of coffee plantation, using F1, F1 R and F2 crossing between BP 542 A(resistant x Andungsari 1 (susceptible with their reciprocal, and BP 542 A x Kartika 1. The purpose of this study that was conducted at seedling stage is to formulate a Strategy for Arabica coffee breeding to get resistant varieties to nematode. As the variables of resistance were weight of seedling biomass, percent of root weight deviation, number of root nematodes, number of soil nematodes, reproduction and percent of necrotic root. Using discriminant analysis and fastclus, those data variables were analyzed for genetic of resistance with Statistical Analysis System programme version 8. Genetic study on the inheritance of resistance to R. similiswas started with evaluation of homozigosity of BP 542 A was resistant parent. The result showed that BP 542 A was heterozygous. Therefore, segregation test could not be suggested with segregation pattern principals as Mendel proposed. Segregation test on BP 542 A showed that it was heterozygote and the resistance was controlled by single gene with complete dominant effect, so the progeny segregated in 75% resistant and 25% susceptible. The result of the test showed the absence of maternal effect for root weight deviation and percentage of necrotic root variables, which meant that no cytoplasmic inheritance was involved. Based on the test of segregation ratio, almost all of the resistance was not appropriate for monogenic and or digenic segregation pattern as expected due to non allelic gene interaction that caused epistasis. Key words: Inheritance, resistance, Arabica coffee, Radopholus similis.

  16. Covering the different steps of the coffee processing: Can headspace VOC emissions be exploited to successfully distinguish between Arabica and Robusta?

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    Colzi, Ilaria; Taiti, Cosimo; Marone, Elettra; Magnelli, Susanna; Gonnelli, Cristina; Mancuso, Stefano

    2017-12-15

    This work was performed to evaluate the possible application of PTR-ToF-MS technique in distinguishing between Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora var. robusta (Robusta) commercial stocks in each step of the processing chain (green beans, roasted beans, ground coffee, brews). volatile organic compounds (VOC) spectra from coffee samples of 7 Arabica and 6 Robusta commercial stocks were recorded and submitted to multivariate statistical analysis. Results clearly showed that, in each stage of the coffee processing, the volatile composition of coffee is highly influenced by the species. Actually, with the exception of green beans, PTR-ToF-MS technique was able to correctly recognize Arabica and Robusta samples. Particularly, among 134 tentatively identified VOCs, some masses (16 for roasted coffee, 12 for ground coffee and 12 for brewed coffee) were found to significantly discriminate the two species. Therefore, headspace VOC analyses was showed to represent a valuable tool to distinguish between Arabica and Robusta. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid approach to identify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

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    Monakhova, Yulia B; Ruge, Winfried; Kuballa, Thomas; Ilse, Maren; Winkelmann, Ole; Diehl, Bernd; Thomas, Freddy; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2015-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy was used to verify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee. Lipophilic extracts of authentic roasted and green coffees showed the presence of established markers for Robusta (16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC)) and for Arabica (kahweol). The integration of the 16-OMC signal (δ 3.165 ppm) was used to estimate the amount of Robusta in coffee blends with an approximate limit of detection of 1-3%. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of 77 commercial coffee samples (coffee pods, coffee capsules, and coffee beans). Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectra of lipophilic and aqueous extracts of 20 monovarietal authentic samples. Clusters of the two species were observed. NMR spectroscopy can be used as a rapid prescreening tool to discriminate Arabica and Robusta coffee species before the confirmation applying the official method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Reducing the acidity of Arabica coffee beans by ohmic fermentation technology

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    Reta; Mursalim; Salengke; Junaedi, M.; Mariati; Sopade, P.

    2017-01-01

    Coffee is widely consumed not only because of its typical taste, but coffee has antioxidant properties because of its polygons, and it stimulates brain performance. The main problem with the consumption of coffee is its content of caffeine. Caffeine when consumed in excess, can increase muscle tension, stimulate the heart, and increase the secretion of gastric acid. In this research, we applied ohmic fermentation technology, which is specially designed to mimic the stomach. Arabica coffee has...

  19. Selected parameters of arabica coffee quality affected by its geographical origin

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    Alica Bobková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to evaluate selected parameters of Arabica coffee quality. Arabica coffee beans originated from 21 different regions of the world. Parameters of their moisture content, water extract, water extract in dry matter, dry mater, caffeine and caffeine content in dry matter were assessed by the Slovak Technical Standard. Dry matter content ranged from 98.64 to 99.07%, the highest content was measured in sample from Cuba. Minimum dry matter content was detected in coffee beans from Mexico. Caffeine in studied samples ranged from 10 200 mg.kg-1 to 13 500 mg.kg-1. The lowest caffeine content was determined in Panama coffee, the highest was found in the sample from Indonesia. The results of moisture content and caffeine in dry mater were evaluated by the Food Code of the Slovak Republic and all observed parameters in the coffee beans meet the maximum levels given in legislation. By statistical procesing it can be seen that coffee samples originating from Ecuador, Indonesia and Nepal were similar in parameters of caffeine content and caffeine in dry matter. Other similar samples originating from Cuba, Peru, Ethiopia and Panama were statistically similar at dry matter content. Special statistical group was coffee from Salvador at the parameters of water extract and water extract in dry matter. Normal 0 21 false false false EN-GB X-NONE X-NONE

  20. The Antifungal Inhibitory Concentration Effectiveness Test From Ethanol Seed Arabica Coffee (Coffea arabica) Extract Against The Growth Of Candida albicans Patient Isolate With In Vitro Method

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    Satria Rakatama, Adam; Pramono, Andri; Yulianti, Retno

    2018-03-01

    Candida albicans are the most frequent cause of Vulvovaginalis Candidiasis infection. Its treatment using antifungal drugs, are oftenly caused side effects. The reduction of C.albicans growth and the reduction of antifungal drugs side effect, were our main purposed. Our study objective is determine the effectiveness of inhibitory power of arabica coffee seed ethanol extract on the growth of C.albicans patient isolates. The type of this research is experimental research. Kirby-bauer method with the Saboraud Dextrose Agar (SDA) media was used in this experiment. Inhibitory zone was observed around the disc, to determine the inhibitory power. The results showed that the inhibitory zone was formed on arabica coffee seed ethanol extract on 10%, 20%, 40%, and 80% concentration. Kruskal-Wallis test results (pthe concentration groups tested against the treatment group. The inhibitory zone was formed because of biochemical compound in arabica coffee seed such as caffeine, phenol, alkaloids, flavonoids, and saponins. Inhibitory zone in C.albicans patient isolates were smaller compared with C.albicans ATCC 90028 as gold standard. This showed that the virulence of C.albicans from patients isolates were higher. We concluded that arabica coffee seed ethanol extract could inhibiting the growth of C.albicans patient isolates. Optimization of coffee seed ethanol extract to obtain maximum active ingredients still needs to be done. This knowledge is expected to be used for the beginning manufacturer antifungal drug from natural product.

  1. Floral Stimulation and Behavior of Insect Pollinators Affected by Pyraclostrobin on Arabica Coffee

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    Tarno, Hagus; Wicaksono, Karuniawan Puji; Begliomini, Edson

    2018-01-01

    Coffee is the most valuable traded commodity after oil. On coffee, bees act to support a pollination that is shown by the number of harvested berries. This research aimed to evaluate the use of pyraclostrobin on flowering stage and insect pollinators on Arabica Coffee. Experiment was conducted in Kalisat Coffee Farm, Jampit, Bondowoso, ca. 1600 meters after sea level from October 2013 to April 2014. Randomized Block Design was adopted in this experiment. Three doses of pyraclostrobin and cont...

  2. Physical and sensory quality of Java Arabica green coffee beans

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    Sunarharum, W. B.; Yuwono, S. S.; Pangestu, N. B. S. W.; Nadhiroh, H.

    2018-03-01

    Demand on high quality coffee for consumption is continually increasing not only in the consuming countries (importers) but also in the producing countries (exporters). Coffee quality could be affected by several factors from farm to cup including the post-harvest processing methods. This research aimed to investigate the influence of different post-harvest processing methods on physical and sensory quality of Java Arabica green coffee beans. The two factors being evaluated were three different post-harvest processing methods to produce green coffee beans (natural/dry, semi-washed and fully-washed processing) under sun drying. Physical quality evaluation was based on The Indonesian National Standard (SNI 01-2907-2008) while sensory quality was evaluated by five expert judges. The result shows that less defects observed in wet processed coffee as compared to the dry processing. The mechanical drying was also proven to yield a higher quality green coffee beans and minimise losses.

  3. A Preliminary Study on Rainfall Interception Loss and Water Yield Analysis on Arabica Coffee Plants in Central Aceh Regency, Indonesia

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    Reza Benara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall interception loss from plants or trees can reduce a net rainfall as source of water yield. The amount of rainfall interception loss depends on kinds of plants and hydro-meteorological characteristics. Therefore, it is important to study rainfall interception loss such as from Arabica Coffee plantation which is as main agricultural commodity for Central Aceh Regency. In this study, rainfall interception loss from Arabica Coffee plants was studied in Kebet Village of Central Aceh Regency, Indonesia from January 20 to March 9, 2011. Arabica coffee plants used in this study was 15 years old, height of 1.5 m and canopy of 4.567 m2. Rainfall interception loss was determined based on water balance approach of daily rainfall, throughfall, and stemflow data. Empirical regression equation between rainfall interception loss and rainfall were adopted as a model to estimate rainfall interception loss from Arabica Coffee plantation, which the coefficient of correlation, r is 0.98. In water yield analysis, this formula was applied and founded that Arabica Coffee plants intercept 76% of annual rainfall or it leaved over annual net rainfall 24% of annual rainfall. Using this net rainfall, water yield produced from Paya Bener River which is the catchment area covered by Arabica Coffee plantation was analyzed in a planning of water supply project for water needs domestic of 3 sub-districts in Central Aceh Regency. Based on increasing population until year of 2025, the results showed that the water yield will be not enough from year of 2015. However, if the catchment area is covered by forest, the water yield is still enough until year of 2025

  4. A Real Option Analysis applied to the production of Arabica and Robusta Coffee in Ecuador

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    Jácome, A.R.; Garrido, A.

    2017-09-01

    The coffee market is distinguished for being volatile and uncertain in terms of domestic and international prices. Arabica and Robusta coffee are produced in 23 provinces of Ecuador. A decade-long decline of coffee production prompted the Ecuadorian government to launch a public program for replanting coffee trees towards the end of 2011. A grower’s decision to enter, remain in or exit the coffee sector is based on fluctuating profits from each year’s harvest sale. We analyzed the hypothesis whereby the coffee grower’s decision to leave the sector is explained by volatile and uncertain prices. This paper aimed to evaluate the coffee sector with an application of Real Option Analysis for the period 2002-2012. We also defined entry (H) and exit (L) prices for Arabica and Robusta coffee for the analyzed period. Our findings revealed high H and L prices encourage growers to leave the sector for the most part of the analyzed period. High H and L prices resulted from high variable cost due to increasing wages for farm workers. The Ecuadorian government is developing a policy to help growers make production more efficient, encouraging them to remain in the sector in the long run.

  5. A Real Option Analysis applied to the production of Arabica and Robusta Coffee in Ecuador

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    Andres R. Jácome

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The coffee market is distinguished for being volatile and uncertain in terms of domestic and international prices. Arabica and Robusta coffee are produced in 23 provinces of Ecuador. A decade-long decline of coffee production prompted the Ecuadorian government to launch a public program for replanting coffee trees towards the end of 2011. A grower’s decision to enter, remain in or exit the coffee sector is based on fluctuating profits from each year’s harvest sale. We analyzed the hypothesis whereby the coffee grower’s decision to leave the sector is explained by volatile and uncertain prices. This paper aimed to evaluate the coffee sector with an application of Real Option Analysis for the period 2002-2012. We also defined entry (H and exit (L prices for Arabica and Robusta coffee for the analyzed period. Our findings revealed high H and L prices encourage growers to leave the sector for the most part of the analyzed period. High H and L prices resulted from high variable cost due to increasing wages for farm workers. The Ecuadorian government is developing a policy to help growers make production more efficient, encouraging them to remain in the sector in the long run.

  6. A Real Option Analysis applied to the production of Arabica and Robusta Coffee in Ecuador

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    Jácome, A.R.; Garrido, A.

    2017-01-01

    The coffee market is distinguished for being volatile and uncertain in terms of domestic and international prices. Arabica and Robusta coffee are produced in 23 provinces of Ecuador. A decade-long decline of coffee production prompted the Ecuadorian government to launch a public program for replanting coffee trees towards the end of 2011. A grower’s decision to enter, remain in or exit the coffee sector is based on fluctuating profits from each year’s harvest sale. We analyzed the hypothesis whereby the coffee grower’s decision to leave the sector is explained by volatile and uncertain prices. This paper aimed to evaluate the coffee sector with an application of Real Option Analysis for the period 2002-2012. We also defined entry (H) and exit (L) prices for Arabica and Robusta coffee for the analyzed period. Our findings revealed high H and L prices encourage growers to leave the sector for the most part of the analyzed period. High H and L prices resulted from high variable cost due to increasing wages for farm workers. The Ecuadorian government is developing a policy to help growers make production more efficient, encouraging them to remain in the sector in the long run.

  7. Socioeconomic and Ecological Dimension of Certified and Conventional Arabica Coffee Production in North Sumatra, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Saragih, Jef Rudiantho

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted in six subdistricts of Simalungun district, North Sumatra, Indonesia. The research objective is knowing the influence of socioeconomic and ecological factors on production of specialty Arabica coffee. Determination of the households sample was using Probability Proportional to Size and Simple Random Sampling for 79 units certified coffee farms and 210 units conventional coffee farms. Farmer’s data was analyzed with multiple linear regression model. Benefit of coffee ce...

  8. Optimizing of Arabica Coffee Bean Fermentation Process Using a Controlled Fermentor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukrisno Widyotomo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available One  of  primary  coffee  processing  steps  which  affect  the  end  quality  isfermentation.  Fermentation  using  a  controlled  fermentor  might  be  usefulbecause  all  of  parameters  which  influence  coffee  quality  can  be  controlled.The  aim of this  research is to evaluate  performance  of  controlled fermentor forfermentation  process  of  Arabica  coffee  beans.  Main  material  of  this  researchwas ripe Arabica coffee cherries from Andungsari Research Station in Bondowoso district.  Research  parameters  were  temperature  with  four  levels  i.e.:  ambient temperature,  30o C,  35oC  and  40oC,  and  fermentation  time  with  three  levels  i.e.: 6  hours,  12  hours,  and  18  hours.  A  horizontal  type  of  modified  fermentor  has been  tested  with  20  kg/batch  or  50%  of  maximum  loading  capacity.  The  result showed  that  an  electric  heater  as  energy  source  can  raise  temperature  duringfermentation  process.  Fermentation  process  using  fermentor  at  30-40oC had  not  significant  effect  on  physical  properties  change  such  as  density,  beancount  per  100  g  and  distribution  of  beans.  Optimum  condition  for  Arabica fermentation  process  in  a  modified  fermentor  reactor  was  25oC  temperature, and  12  hours  fermentation  time.  By  this  condition,  green  beans  have  good organoleptic  score  than  other  fermentation  process  treatments. Key words: Fermentor, fermentation, coffee, quality, organoleptic, horizontal cylinder.

  9. Levels of Antioxidant Activity and Fluoride Content in Coffee Infusions of Arabica, Robusta and Green Coffee Beans in According to their Brewing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolska, J; Janda, Katarzyna; Jakubczyk, K; Szymkowiak, M; Chlubek, D; Gutowska, I

    2017-10-01

    Coffee is a rich source of dietary antioxidants, and this property links with the fact that coffee is one of the world's most popular beverages. Moreover, it is a source of macro- and microelements, including fluoride. The aim of this work was to determine antioxidant activity of coffee beverages and fluoride content depending on different coffee species and conditions of brewing. Three species of coffee, arabica, robusta and green coffee beans obtained from retail stores in Szczecin (Poland) were analyzed. Five different techniques of preparing drink were used: simple infusion, french press, espresso maker, overflow espresso and Turkish coffee. Antioxidant potential of coffee beverages was investigated spectrophotometrically by DPPH method. Fluoride concentrations were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Statistical analysis was performed using Stat Soft Statistica 12.5. Antioxidant activity of infusions was high (71.97-83.21% inhibition of DPPH) depending on coffee species and beverage preparing method. It has been shown that the method of brewing arabica coffee and green coffee significantly affects the antioxidant potential of infusions. The fluoride concentration in the coffee infusions changed depending, both, on the species and conditions of brewing, too (0.013-0.502 mg/L). Methods of brewing didn't make a difference to the antioxidant potential of robusta coffee, which had also the lowest level of fluoride among studied species. Except overflow espresso, the fluoride content was the highest in beverages from green coffee. The highest fluoride content was found in Turkish coffee from green coffee beans.

  10. Antioxidant effect of Arabian coffee ( Coffea arabica L) blended with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the antioxidant activity of Coffea Arabica L in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed C57BL/6J mice. Methods: A decoction of Arabian coffee blended with or without cardamom or cloves was orally administered to HFD-fed C57BL/6J mice for a period of 60 days. At the end of the treatment, blood and tissue samples ...

  11. P Status In Andisol And P Content In Arabica Coffee Seedling Leaves Due To The Application Of Phosphate Providing Microorganisms And Organic Matters In Bener Meriah District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hifnalisa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bener Meriah district is one of the arabica coffee producing regions in Indonesia. Most of arabica coffee in Bener Meriah district grown on Andisol. Generally the availability of P in Andisol is very low. Phosphate providing microorganisms and organic matters can be used to increase Andisol P availability. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of the application of phosphate providing microorganisms and organic matters on P status in Andisol and P content in arabica coffee seedlings leaves in Bener Meriah district. The experiment used a randomized block design that consisted of two factors. Factor I was the application of phosphate providing microorganisms consisting of without microorganisms Glomus sp. Kurthia sp. Corynebacterium sp. and Listeria sp. Factor II was the application of organic matters consisting of T. diversifolia and coffee bean skins. The results of the study showed that Glomus sp. Kurthia sp. Corynebacterium sp. and Listeria sp. decreased soil P-retention by 2.38 5.12 7.48 9.17 respectively increased soil P-available by 24.85 36.03 52.79 77.33 respectively and increased P-content in the arabica coffee seedling leaves by 22.22 33.33 37.0372.27 respectively compared to without the application of microorganisms. The application of coffee bean skins resulted in lower soil P-retention higher soil P-available and P-content in arabica coffee seedling leaves than T. diversifolia. The application of Listeria sp.-coffee bean skins resulted in the lowest soil P-retention the highest soil P-available and P-content in arabica coffee seedlings leaves.

  12. Use of a draft genome of coffee (Coffea arabica) to identify SNPs associated with caffeine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hue T M; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Furtado, Agnelo; Lee, Leonard Slade; Henry, Robert J

    2018-03-07

    Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) has a small gene pool limiting genetic improvement. Selection for caffeine content within this gene pool would be assisted by identification of the genes controlling this important trait. Sequencing of DNA bulks from 18 genotypes with extreme high- or low-caffeine content from a population of 232 genotypes was used to identify linked polymorphisms. To obtain a reference genome, a whole genome assembly of arabica coffee (variety K7) was achieved by sequencing using short read (Illumina) and long-read (PacBio) technology. Assembly was performed using a range of assembly tools resulting in 76 409 scaffolds with a scaffold N50 of 54 544 bp and a total scaffold length of 1448 Mb. Validation of the genome assembly using different tools showed high completeness of the genome. More than 99% of transcriptome sequences mapped to the C. arabica draft genome, and 89% of BUSCOs were present. The assembled genome annotated using AUGUSTUS yielded 99 829 gene models. Using the draft arabica genome as reference in mapping and variant calling allowed the detection of 1444 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with caffeine content. Based on Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes pathway-based analysis, 65 caffeine-associated SNPs were discovered, among which 11 SNPs were associated with genes encoding enzymes involved in the conversion of substrates, which participate in the caffeine biosynthesis pathways. This analysis demonstrated the complex genetic control of this key trait in coffee. © 2018 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Reducing the acidity of Arabica coffee beans by ohmic fermentation technology

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    Reta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is widely consumed not only because of its typical taste, but coffee has antioxidant properties because of its polygons, and it stimulates brain performance. The main problem with the consumption of coffee is its content of caffeine. Caffeine when consumed in excess, can increase muscle tension, stimulate the heart, and increase the secretion of gastric acid. In this research, we applied ohmic fermentation technology, which is specially designed to mimic the stomach. Arabica coffee has high acidity that needs to be reduced than Luwak coffee, although it is cheaper. Hence, the ohmic technology with a time and temperature variation were applied to measure the total acidity of the coffee to determine optimum fermentation conditions. Results revealed that the total acidity of the coffee varied with fermentation conditions (0.18% – 0.73%. Generally, the longer the fermentation and the higher the temperature, the lower the total acidity. The acidity of the Luwak coffee through natural fermentation was 2.34%, which is substantially higher than the total acidity from the ohmic samples. Ohmic-based fermentation technology, therefore, offers improvements in coffee quality.

  14. Chemical characterisation of non-defective and defective green arabica and robusta coffees by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Juliana C F; Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S; Nunes, Marcella

    2008-11-15

    The coffee roasted in Brazil is considered to be of low quality, due to the presence of defective coffee beans that depreciate the beverage quality. These beans, although being separated from the non-defective ones prior to roasting, are still commercialized in the coffee trading market. Thus, it was the aim of this work to verify the feasibility of employing ESI-MS to identify chemical characteristics that will allow the discrimination of Arabica and Robusta species and also of defective and non-defective coffees. Aqueous extracts of green (raw) defective and non-defective coffee beans were analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and this technique provided characteristic fingerprinting mass spectra that not only allowed for discrimination of species but also between defective and non-defective coffee beans. ESI-MS profiles in the positive mode (ESI(+)-MS) provided separation between defective and non-defective coffees within a given species, whereas ESI-MS profiles in the negative mode (ESI(-)-MS) provided separation between Arabica and Robusta coffees. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Exogenous gibberellins inhibit coffee (Coffea arabica cv. Rubi) seed germination and cause cell death in the embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Da E.A.A.; Toorop, P.E.; Nijsse, J.; Bewley, J.D.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of inhibition of coffee (Coffea arabica cv. Rubi) seed germination by exogenous gibberellins (GAs) and the requirement of germination for endogenous GA were studied. Exogenous GA4+7 inhibited coffee seed germination. The response to GA4+7 showed two sensitivity thresholds: a lower one

  16. Response of Arabica Coffee Cultivated on Andisols on Organic Matter Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujiyanto .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Andisols  are characterized  by  dominance  of  amorphous  minerals  which form strong and stable bonding with organic matter, therefore Andisols always contain high organic matter. For that reason, organic fertilizer is generally not applied  on  Andisols,  because  it  is  assumed  that  it  will  not  give   any  positive effect  on  growth  or  yield.  The  experiment  was  aimed  to  evaluate  response  of mature Kartika 1  Arabica coffee variety (seven years old cultivated on  Andisols applied with organic matter derived from cow dung manure. The experiment was carried out at Andungsari  Experimental Station located in Bondowoso District, East  Java. Elevation of the site was 1,150 m asl., with rainfall type of C (Schmidt &  Fergusson.  The  experiment  was    arranged  according  to  completely randomized  block  design  with  four  replications  to  evaluate  effect  of  ninecombination  treatments  of  application  rates  at   application  depths  of  50,  100, and 150 cm. The  range of organic fertilizers rates were  0 - 13.5 kg/tree/year. The experiment revealed that cow dung manure applications on Arabica coffee cultivated  on  Andisols  significantly  increased  yield  at  the  average  of  33% compared  to  the  untreated  crop.  No  significant  effect  of  the  treatment  onvariables of leaf water deficit and soil moisture content during dry season and root  density.  At  range  of  application  depths  of  50  -  150  cm,  the  deeper  the organic matter applications, the higher the yield will be.Key words: Andisols, Arabica coffee, organic matter, cow dung manure

  17. Characterisation of Arabica Coffee Pulp - Hay from Kintamani - Bali as Prospective Biogas Feedstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendroko Setyobudi Roy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The huge amount of coffee pulp waste is an environmental problem. Anaerobic fermentation is one of the alternative solutions. However, availability of coffee pulp does not appear for year-round, whereas biogas needs continuous feedstocks for digester stability. This research uses coffee pulp from Arabica Coffee Factory at Mengani, Kintamani, Bali–Indonesia. The coffee pulp was transformed into coffee pulp-hay product by sun drying for preservations to extend the raw materials through the year. Characterization of coffee pulp-hay was conducted after to keep for 15 mo for review the prospect as biogas feedstocks. Several parameters were analyzed such as C/N ratio, volatile solids, carbohydrate, protein, fat, lignocellulose content, macro-micro nutrients, and density. The review results indicated that coffee pulp-hay is prospective raw material for biogas feedstock. This well-proven preservation technology was able to fulfill the continuous supply. Furthermore, some problems were found in the recent preliminary experiment related to the density and fungi growth in the conventional laboratory digester. Further investigation was needed to implement the coffee pulp – hay as biogas feedstocks.

  18. Sensorial analysis of irradiated coffee (Coffea arabica L.) by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Flavio T.; Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Koike, Amanda C.R.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.; Silva, Maria E.M. Pinto e

    2013-01-01

    Coffee is an important commodity and it is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. The acceptance of coffee by consumers depends mainly on the sensory characteristics of the beverage, that is its flavor, body, color, acidity and aroma. Food irradiation is processing technology environmental friendly and safety which aimed at the improvement of food quality. Depending on the absorbed radiation dose various effects can be achieved resulting in increase the shelf life, disinfestation, microorganism load reduction, without causing sensory changes to the food. Sensory analysis is the examination of a food through the evaluation of the attributes sensorial of product. The objective this paper was to evaluate the sensory properties, acceptance and purchase intent by the consumer of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) after the irradiation process with doses 6.0, 12.0 and 18.0kGy by electron beam. (author)

  19. Sensorial analysis of irradiated coffee (Coffea arabica L.) by electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Flavio T.; Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Koike, Amanda C.R.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H., E-mail: flaviot@ymail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Maria E.M. Pinto e [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Saude Publica. Dept. de Nutricao

    2013-07-01

    Coffee is an important commodity and it is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. The acceptance of coffee by consumers depends mainly on the sensory characteristics of the beverage, that is its flavor, body, color, acidity and aroma. Food irradiation is processing technology environmental friendly and safety which aimed at the improvement of food quality. Depending on the absorbed radiation dose various effects can be achieved resulting in increase the shelf life, disinfestation, microorganism load reduction, without causing sensory changes to the food. Sensory analysis is the examination of a food through the evaluation of the attributes sensorial of product. The objective this paper was to evaluate the sensory properties, acceptance and purchase intent by the consumer of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) after the irradiation process with doses 6.0, 12.0 and 18.0kGy by electron beam. (author)

  20. Productivity of coffee crop (Coffea arabica L.) in conversion to the organic production system

    OpenAIRE

    Malta, Marcelo Ribeiro; Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuária de Minas Gerais - EPAMIG; Pereira, Rosemary Gualberto Fonseca Alvarenga; Universidade Federal de Lavras - UFLA; Chagas, Sílvio Júlio de Rezende; Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuária de Minas Gerais - EPAMIG; Guimarães, Rubens José; Universidade Federal de Lavras - UFLA

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was carried out in Lavras, MG, to verify the productivity of coffee crop (Coffea arabica L.) in conversion to the organic production system. The experiment was set in a six-year old coffee crop of the cultivar Catuaí Amarelo IAC 86, with spacing of 4,0 x 0,6 m, previously cultivated under the conventional system. In the organic treatments a 4 x 4 balanced lattice design with 5 replications in a 3 x 2 x 2 factorial scheme was used, besides 4 additional treatments. The f...

  1. Alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris expressed in Coffea arabica plants inhibits alpha-amylases from the coffee berry borer pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Aulus E A D; Albuquerque, Erika V S; Silva, Maria C M; Souza, Djair S L; Oliveira-Neto, Osmundo B; Valencia, Arnubio; Rocha, Thales L; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F

    2010-06-17

    Coffee is an important crop and is crucial to the economy of many developing countries, generating around US$70 billion per year. There are 115 species in the Coffea genus, but only two, C. arabica and C. canephora, are commercially cultivated. Coffee plants are attacked by many pathogens and insect-pests, which affect not only the production of coffee but also its grain quality, reducing the commercial value of the product. The main insect-pest, the coffee berry borer (Hypotheneumus hampei), is responsible for worldwide annual losses of around US$500 million. The coffee berry borer exclusively damages the coffee berries, and it is mainly controlled by organochlorine insecticides that are both toxic and carcinogenic. Unfortunately, natural resistance in the genus Coffea to H. hampei has not been documented. To overcome these problems, biotechnological strategies can be used to introduce an alpha-amylase inhibitor gene (alpha-AI1), which confers resistance against the coffee berry borer insect-pest, into C. arabica plants. We transformed C. arabica with the alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 gene (alpha-AI1) from the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, under control of the seed-specific phytohemagglutinin promoter (PHA-L). The presence of the alpha-AI1 gene in six regenerated transgenic T1 coffee plants was identified by PCR and Southern blotting. Immunoblotting and ELISA experiments using antibodies against alpha-AI1 inhibitor showed a maximum alpha-AI1 concentration of 0.29% in crude seed extracts. Inhibitory in vitro assays of the alpha-AI1 protein against H. hampei alpha-amylases in transgenic seed extracts showed up to 88% inhibition of enzyme activity. This is the first report showing the production of transgenic coffee plants with the biotechnological potential to control the coffee berry borer, the most important insect-pest of crop coffee.

  2. α-Amylase inhibitor-1 gene from Phaseolus vulgaris expressed in Coffea arabica plants inhibits α-amylases from the coffee berry borer pest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira-Neto Osmundo B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coffee is an important crop and is crucial to the economy of many developing countries, generating around US$70 billion per year. There are 115 species in the Coffea genus, but only two, C. arabica and C. canephora, are commercially cultivated. Coffee plants are attacked by many pathogens and insect-pests, which affect not only the production of coffee but also its grain quality, reducing the commercial value of the product. The main insect-pest, the coffee berry borer (Hypotheneumus hampei, is responsible for worldwide annual losses of around US$500 million. The coffee berry borer exclusively damages the coffee berries, and it is mainly controlled by organochlorine insecticides that are both toxic and carcinogenic. Unfortunately, natural resistance in the genus Coffea to H. hampei has not been documented. To overcome these problems, biotechnological strategies can be used to introduce an α-amylase inhibitor gene (α-AI1, which confers resistance against the coffee berry borer insect-pest, into C. arabica plants. Results We transformed C. arabica with the α-amylase inhibitor-1 gene (α-AI1 from the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, under control of the seed-specific phytohemagglutinin promoter (PHA-L. The presence of the α-AI1 gene in six regenerated transgenic T1 coffee plants was identified by PCR and Southern blotting. Immunoblotting and ELISA experiments using antibodies against α-AI1 inhibitor showed a maximum α-AI1 concentration of 0.29% in crude seed extracts. Inhibitory in vitro assays of the α-AI1 protein against H. hampei α-amylases in transgenic seed extracts showed up to 88% inhibition of enzyme activity. Conclusions This is the first report showing the production of transgenic coffee plants with the biotechnological potential to control the coffee berry borer, the most important insect-pest of crop coffee.

  3. Extraction and evaluation of bioactive compounds with antioxidant potential from green arabica coffee extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona PATRICHE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade researches concerning the essential role of coffee in health and disease prevention showed an increased development. In the present study we obtained extracts from three green Arabica coffee varieties which demonstrated a significant antioxidant potential due to the presence in their composition of two bioactive compounds, caffeine and chlorogenic acids. The content and antioxidant activity of bioactive compounds were evaluated by qualitative and quantitative analyses using spectrophotometric and chromatography methods. The chlorogenic acid was found in high concentrations, being followed by gallic, p-coumaric and ferulic acids. The highest caffeine contents were found in the green coffee extracts of the Supremo–Columbia and Top Quality–Kenya products.

  4. PERBANDINGAN KARAKTERISTIK KIMIA DAN NILAI SENSORI ANTARA KOPI LUWAK DAN KOPI BIASA DARI VARIETAS ARABICA (Cafeea arabica. L) DAN ROBUSTA (Cafeea canephora. L)

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendradatta, Meta; Zainal; Israyanti; Abu Bakar, Tawali

    2012-01-01

    "Luwak??? coffee is well known as an extraordinary coffee due to its taste and high sell price. Special taste and odor of ???luwak??? coffee are caused by the change of protein, fat and caffeine content. This research aimed to know the comparison of caffein content, proximate analysis (protein and fat), taste and odor between ???luwak??? coffee and original coffee from arabika (Caffea arabica L) and robusta (Caffea canephora L) varieties. The treatments were robusta ???luwak???, arabica ???lu...

  5. Coffee seed physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eira, M.T.S.; Silva, da E.A.A.; Castro, de R.D.; Dussert, S.; Walters, C.; Bewley, J.D.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2006-01-01

    Coffee is a member of the Rubiaceae family and the genus Coffea. There are more than 70 species of coffee but only two are economically important: Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora Pierre; 70 % of the coffee traded in the world is arabica and 30 % is robusta (C. canephora). Other species such

  6. Water use efficiency by coffee arabica after glyphosate application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Paolinelli de Carvalho

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many coffee growers apply glyphosate in directed applications, but some phytotoxicity has been noted. It is believed some herbicides can exert a direct or indirect negative effect on photosynthesis by reducing the metabolic rate in a way that can affect the water use efficiency. The objective of this study was to investigate the variables related to water use among coffee cultivars subjected to the application of glyphosate and the effects of each dose. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse using three varieties of coffee (Coffea arabica, Acaiá (MG-6851, Catucaí Amarelo (2SL and Topázio (MG-1190, and three doses of glyphosate (0.0, 115.2 and 460.8 g acid equivalent ha-1, in a factorial 3 x 3 design. At 15 days after application, a reduction in stomatal conductance was observed, and smaller transpiration rate and water use efficiency were found in the fourth leaf at 15 days after application. There was a decrease in the transpiration rate at 45 DAA, with the Acaiá cultivar showing reductions with 115.2 g ha-1. There was transitory reduction in water use efficiency with glyphosate application, but can affect the growth and production. The Acaiá cultivar showed the highest tolerance to glyphosate because the water use efficiency after herbicide application.

  7. Physical and Flavor Quality of Some Potential Varieties of Arabica Coffee in Several Interval Storage Periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffee storage was an active process, where the quality and flavor was depend on the origin, humidity, temperature, period, and ware house condition. The objective of this research was to know quality and flavor of some Arabica coffee varieties in interval of storage periods. The examined coffee varieties were BP 416 A, BP 430 A, BP 432 A, BP 509 A, BP 542 A, P 88, AS 1, S 795, and USDA-762. The treatments were recent harvest, one and two years stored green coffee. The green coffee were wet processed, sun dried, packed in polyethylene bags, one kg/pack and placed in some covered plastic boxes. The boxes were stored in ware house covered with wavy asbes roof and flat asbes ceiling. The green coffee was examined for its moisture content, color, and bulk density. The green coffee was roasted at medium level, and then examined for its the bulk density, yield, volume of swelling, and color of the roasted and powdered. The flavors examination was blind test method. The research showed that storage period significantly influenced the moisture content, color, and bulk density of green coffee, yield, volume of swelling, color of roasted coffee, color, and flavor profile of coffee powder. Those varieties tested showed significantly different on the moisture content, green coffee color, roasted coffee color, coffee powder color, and the profile flavor. The storage period influenced the green coffee color from greenish-gray to yellowish-red. The bulk density of green coffee decreased. The varieties that showed a little color changeduring storage, were BP 430 A,BP 416 A, AS 1, and S 795. One year of storage periode, the green coffee was still had the original color, but after two years, the original color had changed totally. The powder of recent harvest coffee was darker than that of one and two years storage. One year stored coffee had higher quality of aroma, intensity of aroma, quality of flavor, intensity of flavor, acidity, quality of after taste

  8. Floral Stimulation and Behavior of Insect Pollinators Affected by Pyraclostrobin on Arabica Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagus Tarno

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is the most valuable traded commodity after oil. On coffee, bees act to support a pollination that is shown by the number of harvested berries. This research aimed to evaluate the use of pyraclostrobin on flowering stage and insect pollinators on Arabica Coffee. Experiment was conducted in Kalisat Coffee Farm, Jampit, Bondowoso, ca. 1600 meters after sea level from October 2013 to April 2014. Randomized Block Design was adopted in this experiment. Three doses of pyraclostrobin and control were used as treatments such as 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 cc L-1 of pyraclostrobin, and repeated three times. Percentage of fallen flower, fruiting stage, fruit production, frequency of bee`s visitation, and bee`s behavior was observed as variables in this experiment. Results showed that 1 percentage of fallen flowers was reduced by applying pyraclostrobin at 1.5 and 2.0 cc L-1 up to 50 % compared to control, 2 flowering rate was faster than control at 1.5 and 2.0 cc L-1 of pyraclostrobin, 3 application of 1.5 – 2.0 cc L-1 of pyraclostrobin increased the number of young fruits and pinheads, and 4 pollinators preferred to visit flowers of coffee trees which sprayed by pyraclostrobin than control treatment especially Apis mellifera.

  9. Study of composition of espresso coffee prepared from various roast degrees of Coffea arabica L. coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kučera, Lukáš; Papoušek, Roman; Kurka, Ondřej; Barták, Petr; Bednář, Petr

    2016-05-15

    Espresso coffee samples prepared at various roasting degrees defined according to its basic conventional classification (light, medium, medium-dark and dark roasted) were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Obtained raw data were processed using multivariate statistical analysis (Principal Component Analysis, PCA) to evaluate chemical differences between each roasting degrees (untargeted part of study). All four roasting degrees were resolved in appropriate Score plot. Orthogonal Projections to Latent Structures provided signals of significant markers describing the differences among particular roasting degrees. Detailed interpretation of those signals by targeted LC/MS(2) analysis revealed four groups of compounds. The first two groups involve chlorogenic acids and related lactones. The signals of other two sets of markers were ascribed to some specific atractylosides and particular melanoidins. Ratios of contents of selected representatives of each group to the sum of all identified markers were proposed as definite parameters for determination of roasting degree of Brazilian coffee Arabica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of shade on Arabica coffee berry disease development: Toward an agroforestry system to reduce disease impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouen Bedimo, J A; Njiayouom, I; Bieysse, D; Ndoumbè Nkeng, M; Cilas, C; Nottéghem, J L

    2008-12-01

    Coffee berry disease (CBD), caused by Colletotrichum kahawae, is a major constraint for Arabica coffee cultivation in Africa. The disease is specific to green berries and can lead to 60% harvest losses. In Cameroon, mixed cropping systems of coffee with other crops, such as fruit trees, are very widespread agricultural practices. Fruit trees are commonly planted at random on coffee farms, providing a heterogeneous shading pattern for coffee trees growing underneath. Based on a recent study of CBD, it is known that those plants can reduce disease incidence. To assess the specific effect of shade, in situ and in vitro disease development was compared between coffee trees shaded artificially by a net and trees located in full sunlight. In the field, assessments confirmed a reduction in CBD on trees grown under shade compared with those grown in full sunlight. Artificial inoculations in the laboratory showed that shade did not have any effect on the intrinsic susceptibility of coffee berries to CBD. Coffee shading mainly acts on environmental parameters in limiting disease incidence. In addition to reducing yield losses, agroforestry system may also be helpful in reducing chemical control of the disease and in diversifying coffee growers' incomes.

  11. Homostachydrine (pipecolic acid betaine) as authentication marker of roasted blends of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora (Robusta) beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servillo, Luigi; Giovane, Alfonso; Casale, Rosario; Cautela, Domenico; D'Onofrio, Nunzia; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa; Castaldo, Domenico

    2016-08-15

    The occurrence of pipecolic acid betaine (homostachydrine) and its biosynthetic precursor N-methylpipecolic acid was detected for the first time in green coffee beans of Robusta and Arabica species. The analyses were conducted by HPLC-ESI tandem mass spectrometry and the metabolites identified by product ion spectra and comparison with authentic standards. N-methylpipecolic acid was found at similar levels in green coffee beans of Robusta and Arabica, whereas a noticeable difference of homostachydrine content was observed between the two green coffee bean species. Interestingly, homostachydrine content was found to be unaffected by coffee bean roasting treatment because of a noticeable heat stability, a feature that makes this compound a candidate marker to determine the content of Robusta and Arabica species in roasted coffee blends. To this end, a number of certified pure Arabica and Robusta green beans were analyzed for their homostachydrine content. Results showed that homostachydrine content was 1.5±0.5mg/kg in Arabica beans and 31.0±10.0mg/kg in Robusta beans. Finally, to further support the suitability of homostachydrine as quality marker of roasted blends of Arabica and Robusta coffee beans, commercial samples of roasted ground coffee blends were analyzed and the correspondence between the derived percentages of Arabica and Robusta beans with those declared on packages by manufacturers was verified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inoculation of starter cultures in a semi-dry coffee (Coffea arabica) fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Suzana Reis; Miguel, Maria Gabriela da Cruz Pedrozo; Cordeiro, Cecília de Souza; Silva, Cristina Ferreira; Pinheiro, Ana Carla Marques; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of yeasts as starter cultures in coffee semi-dry processing. Arabica coffee was inoculated with one of the following starter cultures: Saccharomyces cerevisiae UFLA YCN727, S. cerevisiae UFLA YCN724, Candida parapsilosis UFLA YCN448 and Pichia guilliermondii UFLA YCN731. The control was not inoculated with a starter culture. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to assess the microbial population, and organic acids and volatile compounds were quantified by HPLC and HS-SPME/GC, respectively. Sensory analyses were evaluated using the Temporal Dominance of Sensations (TDS). DGGE analysis showed that the inoculated yeasts were present throughout the fermentation. Other yeast species were also detected, including Debaryomyces hansenii, Cystofilobasidium ferigula and Trichosporon cavernicola. The bacterial population was diverse and was composed of the following genera: Weissella, Leuconostoc, Gluconobacter, Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Erwinia and Klebsiella. Butyric and propionic acids, were not detected in any treatment A total of 47 different volatiles compounds have been identified. The coffee inoculated with yeast had a caramel flavor that was not detected in the control, as assessed by TDS. The use of starter cultures during coffee fermentation is an interesting alternative for obtaining a beverage quality with distinctive flavor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of gamma radiation (60Co) on the growth of Aspergillus ochraceus coffee (Coffea arabica L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Flavio T.; Duarte, Renato C.; Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Santillo, Amanda G.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H.

    2011-01-01

    Coffee is a major product on the world market. Its acceptance depends strongly on the sensory characteristics of the beverage, that is its aroma and flavor. One of the most important aspects of coffee culture today is the cup quality as such all segments of coffee production network are concentrating efforts to improve this trait. Foods that have been contaminated with fungi may contain may produce many mycotoxins including ochratoxim A (OTA). To prevent OTA in foodstuffs, it is necessary detect the producing fungi early. Ionizing radiation is a safe, environmentally clean, energy efficient process that can be used to increase the quality and reducing the microbiological contamination of the coffee. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different gamma radiation doses (0.0, 6.0, 12.0 and 18.0 kGy) on the growth of Aspergillus ochraceus in coffee (Coffee arabica L.). The analysis were performed to determine the fungi contamination the results were expressed as the viable counts per gram of sample (CFU/g) coffee samples irradiated and unirradiated. The results shows that microbiological contamination of coffee disagrees when increase doses of irradiation. The radiation doses 6.0, 12.0 and 18.0 kGy used resulted in a elimination of the number of Aspergillus ochraceus CFU/g when compared to the nonirradiated control group. Under the present conditions, gamma radiation was found to be an alternative for the control of Aspergillus ochraceus. (author)

  14. Performance of coffee origin and genotype in organoleptic and physical quality of arabica coffee in North Sumatra Province of Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malau, Sabam; Siagian, Albiner; Sirait, Bilter; Pandiangan, Samse

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this research was to determine effect of coffee origin and genotype on organoleptic and physical quality of Arabica coffea L. growing in North Sumatra. Seven districts treated as origins and 28 genotypes were chosen. The research was conducted with nested design with 3 factors. Organoleptic parameters were fragrance/aroma, flavor, aftertaste, acidity, body, uniformity, balance, clean cup, sweetness, overall and total score. Physical quality was green bean weight. The results revealed that origins affected significantly organoleptic quality. Coffee from Dairi showed the highest total score (90,82). Genotypes were significantly different in organoleptic quality. Genotype Da17, Da18, Da19, Da20 and Hu4 had the best total score (89,85 -91,68). Total score did not correlate with green bean weight but had positive correlation with altitude. Among organoleptic parameters, acidity was more significant for total score (r2 = 0,836). Altitude had more effect on acidity (r2 = 0,486).

  15. Differentiation of market coffee and its infusions in view of their mineral composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grembecka, Malgorzata; Malinowska, Ewa; Szefer, Piotr.

    2007-01-01

    The concentrations of 14 elements (Ca, Mg, K, Na, P, Co, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb) were determined in market coffee samples after dry mineralisation of both dry samples and infusions evaporated to dryness. The total metal contents were analysed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F-AAS) using deuterium-background correction. Phosphorus was determined in the form of phosphomolybdate by spectrophotometric method. Reliability of the procedure was checked by the analysis of the certified reference materials Tea (NCS DC 73351), Cabbage (IAEA-359) and Spinach leaves (NIST-1570). It was concluded, based on RDA calculated for essential metals, that coffee infusions are not an important source of bioelements in human diet. In the case of toxic elements Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) was estimated and there is no health hazard associated with exposure to Cd and Pb via coffee consumption. Significant correlation coefficients (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 and p < 0.05) were found between concentrations of some metals in coffee. Factor analysis and canonical analysis were applied to the data processing in order to characterise the market coffee samples. The 12 metals determined were considered as chemical descriptors of each sample. Based on the mineral composition, it was possible to differentiate chemometrically particular types of coffee distinguishing arabica from robusta, ground from instant coffee, and their infusions

  16. Sensory Description of Cultivars (Coffea Arabica L. Resistant to Rust and Its Correlation with Caffeine, Trigonelline, and Chlorogenic Acid Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa de Oliveira Fassio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of the chemical compounds in Arabica coffee beans in the definition of the drink sensory quality and authentication of coffee regions, the aim of this study was to evaluate, from principal component analysis—PCA—if there is a relation between the caffeine, trigonelline, and chlorogenic acid (5-CQA content and the sensory attributes of the drink, and in this context, enabling the differentiation of cultivars in two coffee-producing regions of Brazil. We evaluated seven rust-resistant Coffea arabica cultivars, and two rust-susceptible cultivars in two cultivation environments: Lavras, in the southern region of Minas Gerais state, and Patrocinio in the Cerrado region of Minas Gerais. The flavor and acidity were determinant for differentiation of the cultivars and their interaction with the evaluated environments. Cultivars Araponga MG1, Catigua MG2, and Catigua MG1 are the most suitable for the production of specialty coffee in the state of Minas Gerais. A poor correlation was found between caffeine, trigonelline, 5-CQA contents, and fragrance, flavor, acidity, body, and final score attributes. However, these compounds enabled the differentiation of the environments. The PCA indicated superiority in the sensory quality of cultivars resistant to rust, compared to the control, Bourbon Amarelo, and Topázio MG1190.

  17. DNA pyrosequencing evidence for large diversity differences between natural and managed coffee mycorrhizal fungal communities

    OpenAIRE

    De Beenhouwer , Matthias; Muleta , Diriba; Peeters , Bram; Van Geel , Maarten; Lievens , Bart; Honnay , Olivier

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Arabica coffee is a major agricultural commodity worldwide, representing 60 % of the world’s coffee production. Arabica coffee is cultivated in more than 36 countries and is a key cash crop for many developing countries. Despite the coffee’s huge economic importance, there is very limited knowledge on the association of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi with coffee roots. Therefore, we assessed the mycorrhizal diversity and community composition in Arabica coffee (Coffea ar...

  18. Avaliação de genótipos de cafeeiros Arabica e Robusta no estado do Acre Evaluation of Arabica and Robusta coffee genotypes in the state of Acre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Luis Bergo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Conduziu-se este trabalho, com o objetivo de introduzir e avaliar 40 genótipos de cafeeiros das espécies Coffea arabica e Coffea canephora nas condições edafoclimáticas do Estado do Acre, visando disponibilizar aos cafeicultores acreanos, cultivares com melhor potencial produtivo. Da espécie C. arabica foram avaliados genótipos das cultivares Icatu, Bourbon, Mundo Novo, Catuaí, Obatã e Catimor. Da espécie C. canephora foram avaliadas as cultivares Conilon e Robusta, caracterizadas como Grupo Robusta. Os genótipos utilizados foram provenientes do Instituto Agronômico de Campinas (IAC e da Embrapa Rondônia. O experimento foi conduzido no Campo Experimental da Embrapa Acre, Rio Branco, AC, no período de 1995 a 2004. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados com cinco repetições. As características avaliadas foram: produtividade, altura, diâmetro da copa e vigor. Da espécie C. arabica, grupo Icatu, destacou-se Icatu-PR-182039-1(IAC H 4782-7-788 com produtividade média de café beneficiado de 34 sc/ ha, Icatu IAC-4041; Icatu IAC-2945; Icatu IAC-2944-MT; Icatu IAC-4040 e Icatu IAC-4046 com produtividade variando de 20 a 26 sacas. Para o grupo Catuaí os melhores genótipos foram Obatã IAC 4275, Obatã IAC 1169 e Catimor IAC 4466 com produtividade média de café beneficiado de 49, 45 e 37 sacas por hectare respectivamente. Na espécie C. canephora foram avaliados 8 genótipos das cultivares Conilon e Robusta e quanto à produtividade não houve diferença estatística, observou-se incremento de 7 sacas/ha para a variedade Conilon IAC 66-3 quando comparado ao Conilon plantado na região. Nesta espécie os genótipos apresentaram sintomas de deficiência hídrica na época seca (julho/agosto.This work aimed to introduce and evaluate 40 coffee genotypes of Coffea arabica e Coffea canephora species in soil and weather conditions of Acre and had as main goal to provide cultivars to coffee producers with better potential of

  19. Personal exposure to dust and endotoxin in Robusta and Arabica coffee processing factories in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakwari, Gloria; Mamuya, Simon H D; Bråtveit, Magne; Larsson, Lennart; Pehrson, Christina; Moen, Bente E

    2013-03-01

    Endotoxin exposure associated with organic dust exposure has been studied in several industries. Coffee cherries that are dried directly after harvest may differ in dust and endotoxin emissions to those that are peeled and washed before drying. The aim of this study was to measure personal total dust and endotoxin levels and to evaluate their determinants of exposure in coffee processing factories. Using Sidekick Casella pumps at a flow rate of 2l/min, total dust levels were measured in the workers' breathing zone throughout the shift. Endotoxin was analyzed using the kinetic chromogenic Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Separate linear mixed-effects models were used to evaluate exposure determinants for dust and endotoxin. Total dust and endotoxin exposure were significantly higher in Robusta than in Arabica coffee factories (geometric mean 3.41 mg/m(3) and 10 800 EU/m(3) versus 2.10 mg/m(3) and 1400 EU/m(3), respectively). Dry pre-processed coffee and differences in work tasks explained 30% of the total variance for total dust and 71% of the variance for endotoxin exposure. High exposure in Robusta processing is associated with the dry pre-processing method used after harvest. Dust and endotoxin exposure is high, in particular when processing dry pre-processed coffee. Minimization of dust emissions and use of efficient dust exhaust systems are important to prevent the development of respiratory system impairment in workers.

  20. Physical, Chemicals and Flavors of Some Varieties of Arabica Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusianto .

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Export of Arabica coffee was 28,100 tons/year or 8.28% total export of Indonesian coffee, most of them are specialty coffee. Beside their origin, variety and determine the of physical, chemical and flavors characters. The promising clones or varieties i.e. BP 416A, BP 418A, BP 430A, BP 431A, BP 432A, BP 507A, BP 508A, BP 509A, BP 511A, BP 513A, BP 516A, BP 517A and BP 518A still not be determined their quality This research was conducted to analyze their physicals, chemicals and flavors during 2 periods of harvesting (2004 and 2005, using AS 1, S 795 and USDA 762 as the control. Mature coffee berry was harvested, sorted manually, and depulped, cleaned manually and then fermented in plastic sacks during 36 hours. The fermented parchment was washed, and then sun dried, dehulled to get green coffee. Observations wre conducted on green coffee yield, husk content, color of green coffee, distribution of size, bulk density of green and roasted coffee, roasting characters, color of roasted beans, and pH, acidity and flavors. The results showed (a The lowest content of husk was BP 432A and the highest was USDA 762. The control varieties of AS 1, S 795 and USDA 762, showed husk content >15%, while those potential varieties were < 15% except BP 416A. (b Beans size >6,5 mm and more than 80% were BP 416A, BP 430A, BP 432A, BP 509A, P 88 and S 795. Green coffee of BP 430A, BP 432A and BP 509A were uniform, but S 795 was not uniform. AS 1 and BP 416A and P 88 was one group; S 795 was one group with BP 542A; BP 509 was a group with BP 432A; but BP4 30A and USDA 762 were the other groups. (c Green coffee of USDA 762 was the palest color, but BP 542A was the darkest color. AS 1 and S 795 were a group with all potential varieties, except BP 542A. (d Roasted coffee of USDA 762 was the palest color and AS 1 was the darkest. In this case, AS 1 was a group with BP 430A, BP 509A and P 88, while S 795 was a group with BP 416A and BP 432A, but USDA 762 and BP 542A were

  1. A Study of Allelopathy of Some Shade Trees to Coffea arabicaL. Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Prawoto

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Because of social economic judgment, many coffee planters nowadays grow Cassia spectabilisand in the certain regions used Cinnamomum burmani, Macadamia integrifolia, Tectona grandisand Cassia siameaas shade trees or intercrops. Before being used in large scale, allelopathy study is appropriate to be done because this effect is much more difficult to be overcome than competiton as growing factor. Research on allelopathy of those species had been conducted in glasshouse of Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute using Salisbury & Ross method. Leachate of Cassia spectabilis Cinnamomum burmani, Macadamia integrifolia, Tectona grandisand Cassia siamea, pure media (without plant and control (well water were used as treatments. Planting material of Cinnamomum burmani, Macadamia integrifolia, Tectona grandisand Cassia siameawere as seedlings of one year old, whereas C. spectabiliswas 3 months old. Those materials were planted in polybags 20 cm x 30 cm and replicated five times. The media was a mixture of top soil, manure and sand 1 : 1 : 1 (v/v. After those species were maintained for one months and Arabica seedlings for three month old, watering of coffee seedlings then using leachate from shade trees media. Every two days, each seedling was applied with 200 ml. Control was applied with well water. Pure media was used to study the effect of nutrient supply contained in the leachate. The experiment was stopped at seven month old of the coffee seedlings. The result showed that C. spectabilisreleased chemicals which showed allelopathic effect to Arabica coffee, their growth was inhibited 10% to control. The growth decreament from Cassia siameaand D. zibethinustreatment mainly caused by lower mineral content in the leachate and indicated by weak allelopathic. On the other hand M. integrifoliaand C. burmanidid not show allelopathic to Arabica coffee. Thus, based on allelopathy aspect, it can be included that C. spectabilisand C. siamea were not

  2. Evaluation of the effect of roasting process on the energy transition and the crystalline structures of Arabica, Robusta, and Liberica coffee from Jambi Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdana, B. M.; Manihuruk, R.; Ashyar, R.; Heriyanti; Sutrisno

    2018-04-01

    The effect of the roasting process has been evaluated to determine of the energy transition and the crystalline structure of three types of coffee, Arabica, Robusta, and Liberica coffee both green and roasted coffee with the roasted temperature at 200°C and 230°C. The crystalline structure of the coffee was evaluated with X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The result exposes that the three types of green coffee showed that an amorphous structure whereas the roasted coffee denotes a crystal structure of sucrose. The varied temperature in the roasting process leads to changes in the crystal structure shown by the peak shift of 2θ for all types of coffee. The added cations, such as Fe2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ ions on Liberica coffee induced of changes in the crystal structures, which are assigned by the peak shift, that imply of metal ions of the sucrose complexes happened in the solution, except for the addition of Mg2+ ion.

  3. Synthèse des résultats de recherche sur l'agronomie du caféier arabica (Coffea arabica L.) au Rwanda au 31 mars 1994

    OpenAIRE

    Rutunga, V.; Kavamahangat, F.; Nsengimana, C.

    1999-01-01

    Synthesis of Results on Coffee Agronomy Research in Rwanda on 31 March 1994. Arabica coffee plays an important role in the macro-economic performance of Rwanda. As a result, Agricultural Research Institutes have done research on coffee agronomy, aimed at improving coffee productivite The ecological conditions for coffee in Rwanda are characterized by inadequate rainfall and high light intensity. Soil parental material and chemical properties are variable amongst different small holders coffee...

  4. Climate-based statistical regression models for crop yield forecasting of coffee in humid tropical Kerala, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, M.; Rajavel, M.; Surendran, U.

    2016-12-01

    A study on the variability of coffee yield of both Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora as influenced by climate parameters (rainfall (RF), maximum temperature (Tmax), minimum temperature (Tmin), and mean relative humidity (RH)) was undertaken at Regional Coffee Research Station, Chundale, Wayanad, Kerala State, India. The result on the coffee yield data of 30 years (1980 to 2009) revealed that the yield of coffee is fluctuating with the variations in climatic parameters. Among the species, productivity was higher for C. canephora coffee than C. arabica in most of the years. Maximum yield of C. canephora (2040 kg ha-1) was recorded in 2003-2004 and there was declining trend of yield noticed in the recent years. Similarly, the maximum yield of C. arabica (1745 kg ha-1) was recorded in 1988-1989 and decreased yield was noticed in the subsequent years till 1997-1998 due to year to year variability in climate. The highest correlation coefficient was found between the yield of C. arabica coffee and maximum temperature during January (0.7) and between C. arabica coffee yield and RH during July (0.4). Yield of C. canephora coffee had highest correlation with maximum temperature, RH and rainfall during February. Statistical regression model between selected climatic parameters and yield of C. arabica and C. canephora coffee was developed to forecast the yield of coffee in Wayanad district in Kerala. The model was validated for years 2010, 2011, and 2012 with the coffee yield data obtained during the years and the prediction was found to be good.

  5. CARACTHERIZATION OF BIOMASS ENERGY AND CARBONIZATION OF COFFEE GRAINS (Coffea arabica, L AND (Cedrelinga catenaeformis, DUKE WOOD RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailton Teixeira do Vale

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Brazil produces annually two million tons of coffee s husks from farms or industrial processing units. This wastematerial can be used for energy production; currently it is mainly used in agricultural practices as field straw cover up. This paperdeals with coffee s (Coffea arabica, L husks biomass energy characteristics, including wood carbonization. As a reference, the samestudy was performed with a wood species regularly used for building construction named Cedrorana (Cedrelinga catenaeformis,Duke. Coffee s husks was obtained from a farm 150 km far from Brasilia city and cedrorana sawdust from a local saw mill. Thispaper presents results from energy and biomass variables like moisture content, bulk density, lower and superior heating power, ashcontent, fixed carbon, volatile matter and volumetric energy. It has also studied carbonization, charcoal, pyroligneous licqor and noncondensablegases. A comparison between Coffee s husk with 0% moisture content and Cedrorana sawdust portrays the followingresults: bulk density 144.41 kg/m3, fixed carbon 10.31%, superior heating power 4.57 kWh (or 16.46 MJ or 3.933 Mcal/kg, charcoalcontent 40,64% and heating value per cubic meter 2,179 MJ/m3

  6. Volatile compounds profiles in unroasted Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora beans from different countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel KNYSAK

    Full Text Available Abstract Aroma is the most important factor in assessing the quality of coffee. The volatile compounds profile could be very important to confirm the authenticity of Coffea arabica. The study was carried out on two species of unroasted coffee beans: Coffea arabica from Colombia and Nepal and Coffea robusta from Uganda and Vietnam. Both Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora were imported to the country of analysis approximately 5 months prior to the research. Before the analysis, the coffee beans were kept in a sealed, dark container, at 21 °C. The tests were performed using an electronic nose. Its functioning is based on gas chromatography with two columns of different polarities in parallel and with 2 ultra sensitive Flame Ionization Detectors (FID. With multivariate statistics – Principal Components Analysis – it was possible to reduce the number of links and present them in two dimensions, which allowed for the unambiguous identification and assignment of samples to a particular species of coffee. By using an electronic nose, one can distinguish and group unroasted coffee beans’ flavours depending on the country of origin and species.

  7. Determination of the Element Contents in Turkish Coffee and Effect of Sugar Addition

    OpenAIRE

    M. M. Fercan; A. S. Kipcak; O. Dere Ozdemir; M. B. Piskin; E. Moroydor Derun

    2016-01-01

    Coffee is a widely consumed beverage with many components such as caffeine, flavonoids, phenolic compounds, and minerals. Coffee consumption continues to increase due to its physiological effects, its pleasant taste, and aroma. Robusta and Arabica are two basic types of coffee beans. The coffee bean used for Turkish coffee is Arabica. There are many elements in the structure of coffee and have various effect on human health such as Sodium (Na), Boron (B), Magnesium (Mg) and Iron (Fe). In this...

  8. Recent Advances in the Genetic Transformation of Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M. K.; Slater, A.

    2012-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most important plantation crops, grown in about 80 countries across the world. The genus Coffea comprises approximately 100 species of which only two species, that is, Coffea arabica (commonly known as arabica coffee) and Coffea canephora (known as robusta coffee), are commercially cultivated. Genetic improvement of coffee through traditional breeding is slow due to the perennial nature of the plant. Genetic transformation has tremendous potential in developing improved coffee varieties with desired agronomic traits, which are otherwise difficult to achieve through traditional breeding. During the last twenty years, significant progress has been made in coffee biotechnology, particularly in the area of transgenic technology. This paper provides a detailed account of the advances made in the genetic transformation of coffee and their potential applications. PMID:22970380

  9. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with shade trees and Coffea arabica L. in a coffee-based agroforestry system in Bonga, Southwestern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Sewnet ,Tadesse Chanie; Tuju, Fassil Assefa

    2013-01-01

    In a first step to understand the interactions between Coffea arabica L. trees and mycorrhizae in Ethio¬pia, an investigation of the current mycorrhizal colonization status of roots was undertaken. We sampled 14 shade tree species occurring in coffee populations in Bonga forest, Ethiopia. Milletia fer¬ruginea, Schefflera abyssinica, Croton macrostachyus, Ficus vasta, F. sur, Albizia gummifera, Olea capensis, Cordia africana, Ehretia abyssinica, Pouteria adolfi-friederici, Pavetta oliveriana, ...

  10. Coffee and spent coffee extracts protect against cell mutagens and inhibit growth of food-borne pathogen microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Cid, C. (Concepción); Peña, M.P. (María Paz) de; Arbillaga, L. (Leire); Vitas, A.I. (Ana Isabel); Bravo, J. (Jimena); Monente, C. (Carmen)

    2015-01-01

    Coffee consumption decreases the risk of oxidative stress-related diseases. The by-product obtained after brewing process (spent coffee) also has antioxidant capacity. Spent coffee and coffee brews (filter and espresso) extracts were obtained from Arabica and Robusta coffees, respectively. Spent coffee showed slightly high amounts in chlorogenic acids, but caffeine content was similar to their respective coffee brew. All samples exhibited strong protection activity against indirect acting mut...

  11. Post-harvest practices linked with ochratoxin A contamination of coffee in three provinces of Cordillera Administrative Region, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelo, Jonathan M; Barcelo, Racquel C

    2018-02-01

    One of the emerging concerns in the Cordillera Administrative Region, Philippines is ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination in coffee. During 2015 to 2016, a total of 51 Arabica (Coffea arabica) coffee samples from Benguet province and 71 Robusta (Coffea canephora var. Robusta) coffee samples from the provinces of Ifugao and Kalinga were analysed for OTA contamination. The OTA-producing fungal contaminants during drying and storage of Arabica and Robusta coffee were Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus ochraceus. Ochratoxin A was more commonly detected in Robusta coffee (36.6%) than in Arabica coffee (21.6%). Among the contaminated samples, Robusta coffee cherries in the drying yard had the highest mean OTA level (120.2 μg kg -1 , n = 10) while roasted Robusta coffee beans had the lowest mean level (4.8 μg kg -1 , n = 9). The onset of contamination of Arabica coffee occurred during storage, with a mean OTA level of 46.7 μg kg -1 (n = 9). Roasted coffee had lower OTA content although five samples had levels >5.0 μg kg -1 . Pearson Chi-square analysis (χ 2 ) and Fisher's exact test revealed that several post-harvest practices involving non-removal of the husk or hull and mixing of defective coffee were significantly associated with the occurrence of OTA during drying and storage (p coffee in all stages of post-harvest and rapid reduction of moisture content particularly during drying.

  12. Influence of coffee/water ratio on the final quality of espresso coffee

    OpenAIRE

    Andueza, S. (Susana); Vila, M.A. (María A.); Peña, M.P. (María Paz) de; Cid, C. (Concepción)

    2007-01-01

    Espresso coffee is a polyphasic beverage in which the physico-chemical and sensory characteristics obviously depend on both the selection of ground roasted coffee and the technical conditions of the percolation process. The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of the coffee/water ratio on the physico-chemical and sensory quality of espresso coffee. Furthermore, the influence of botanical varieties (Arabica and Robusta) and the type of roast (conventional and torrefacto) on the selec...

  13. Physiological Dose-Response of Coffee (Coffea arabica L. Plants to Glyphosate Depends on Growth Stage Respuesta Fisiológica de Plantas de Café (Coffea arabica L. a Glifosato Depende de la Etapa de Crecimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Bianco de Carvalho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is the main herbicide used in coffee (Coffea arabica L. plantations in Brazil. Problems with herbicide drift commonly occur in orchard fields due to non-adequate spraying conditions. A series of experiments was carried out aiming to evaluate physiological dose-response of C. arabica plants submitted to exposure to simulated glyphosate drift in two distinct plant growth stages. Glyphosate was applied at 0, 180, 360, and 720 g acid equivalent (AE ha-1 directly on coffee plants with 10 and 45 d after transplanting (DAT. Glyphosate doses in a range of 180-360 g AE ha-1 increased photosynthesis, transpiration and stomatal conductance in 10 DAT-plants up to 14 d after application (DAA while, in 45 DAT-plants, an increase was observed only up to 2 DAA, but this pattern was not persistent afterwards so that no difference in gas exchange was observed at 60 DAA in both plants. Macronutrient content was not affected by glyphosate application in both plants. Plant DM accumulation was not affected by glyphosate application at 10 DAT-plants, but an increase in plant growth was observed when glyphosate was applied in a range of 360-720 g AE ha-1 in 45 DAT-plants. Coffea arabica cv. Catuaí Vermelho IAC-144 responded differentially to glyphosate drift depending on plant growth stage, regarding on photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance, and plant growth, in spite of macronutrient nutrition was not affected.Glifosato es el principal herbicida utilizado en las plantaciones de café (Coffea arabica L. en Brasil. Problemas con la deriva de herbicidas comúnmente ocurren en los campos de cultivo debido a condiciones no adecuadas de pulverización. Una serie de experimentos se llevó a cabo con el objetivo de evaluar la relación dosis-respuesta fisiológica de plantas de C. arabica expuestas a situaciones simuladas de exposición a deriva de glifosato en dos etapas distintas de crecimiento de las plantas. El glifosato se aplicó en dosis de 0

  14. Differentially Accumulated Proteins in Coffea arabica Seeds during Perisperm Tissue Development and Their Relationship to Coffee Grain Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Leonardo Cardoso; Magalhães, Diogo Maciel De; Labate, Mônica Teresa Veneziano; Guidetti-Gonzalez, Simone; Labate, Carlos Alberto; Domingues, Douglas Silva; Sera, Tumoru; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Pereira, Luiz Filipe Protasio

    2016-02-24

    Coffee is one of the most important crops for developing countries. Coffee classification for trading is related to several factors, including grain size. Larger grains have higher market value then smaller ones. Coffee grain size is determined by the development of the perisperm, a transient tissue with a highly active metabolism, which is replaced by the endosperm during seed development. In this study, a proteomics approach was used to identify differentially accumulated proteins during perisperm development in two genotypes with regular (IPR59) and large grain sizes (IPR59-Graudo) in three developmental stages. Twenty-four spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, corresponding to 15 proteins. We grouped them into categories as follows: storage (11S), methionine metabolism, cell division and elongation, metabolic processes (mainly redox), and energy. Our data enabled us to show that perisperm metabolism in IPR59 occurs at a higher rate than in IPR59-Graudo, which is supported by the accumulation of energy and detoxification-related proteins. We hypothesized that grain and fruit size divergences between the two coffee genotypes may be due to the comparatively earlier triggering of seed development processes in IPR59. We also demonstrated for the first time that the 11S protein is accumulated in the coffee perisperm.

  15. Simple Sequence Repeat Analysis of Selected NSIC-registered Coffee Varieties in the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Daisy May C. Santos; Carla Francesca F. Besa; Angelo Joshua A. Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Coffee (Coffea sp.) is an important commercial crop worldwide. Three species of coffee are used as beverage, namely Coffea arabica, C. canephora, and C. liberica. Coffea arabica L. is the most cultivated among the three coffee species due to its taste quality, rich aroma, and low caffeine content. Despite its inferior taste and aroma, C. canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner, which has the highest caffeine content, is the second most widely cultivated because of its resistance to coffee diseases. O...

  16. Simple Sequence Repeat Analysis of Selected NSIC-registered Coffee Varieties in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy May C. Santos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee (Coffea sp. is an important commercial crop worldwide. Three species of coffee are used as beverage, namely Coffea arabica, C. canephora, and C. liberica. Coffea arabica L. is the most cultivated among the three coffee species due to its taste quality, rich aroma, and low caffeine content. Despite its inferior taste and aroma, C. canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner, which has the highest caffeine content, is the second most widely cultivated because of its resistance to coffee diseases. On the other hand, C. liberica W.Bull ex Hierncomes is characterized by its very strong taste and flavor. The Philippines used to be a leading exporter of coffee until coffee rust destroyed the farms in Batangas, home of the famous Kapeng Barako. The country has been attempting to revive the coffee industry by focusing on the production of specialty coffee with registered varieties on the National Seed Industry Council (NSIC. Correct identification and isolation of pure coffee beans are the main factors that determine coffee’s market value. Local farms usually misidentify and mix coffee beans of different varieties, leading to the depreciation of their value. This study used simple sequence repeat (SSR markers to evaluate and distinguish Philippine NSIC-registered coffee species and varieties. The neighbor-joining tree generated using PAUP showed high bootstrap support, separating C. arabica, C. canephora, and C. liberica from each other. Among the twenty primer pairs used, seven were able to distinguish C. arabica, nine for C. liberica, and one for C. canephora.

  17. Inhibitory effect of Coffea arabica bean in testosterone induced prostatic hyperplasia in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Alfonso G. Cueto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH has been described as the uncontrolled prostate gland growth which leads to difficulty in urination. One of the treatment of BPH is saw palmetto lipid extracts which has been shown to inhibit prostate 5 α-reductase and some of its components (lauric acid, myristic acid and oleic acid also inhibit the enzyme. Coffee was also rich in fatty acids namely linoleic acid, oleic acid and palmitic acid. The aim of this research is to investigate whether coffee is effective in preventing testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats using testosterone propionate and estradiol valerate. After and before the induction, the rats were tested for prostate specific antigen (PSA . The condition of the prostate gland of the test animals were correlated with the results of the said test and in the histopathologic results. After 14 days of experimentation, animals in the test group significantly decreased their PSA levels as compared to the BPH group. The histomorphology showed that Coffea arabica bean oil inhibited testosterone propionate while estradiol valerate induced prostatic hyperplasia. These findings indicate that Coffee arabica bean oil effectively inhibited the development of BPH. With the proven safety of coffee oil, these findings strongly support the feasibility of using Coffea arabica bean oil therapeutically in treating BPH.

  18. Ochratoxigenic fungi associated with green coffee beans (Coffea arabica L.) in conventional and organic cultivation in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fátima Rezende, Elisângela; Borges, Josiane Gonçalves; Cirillo, Marcelo Ângelo; Prado, Guilherme; Paiva, Leandro Carlos; Batista, Luís Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The genera Aspergillus comprises species that produce mycotoxins such as aflatoxins, ochratoxins and patulin. These are cosmopolitan species, natural contaminants of agricultural products. In coffee grains, the most important Aspergillus species in terms of the risk of presenting mycotoxins belong to the genera Aspergillus Section Circumdati and Section Nigri. The purpose of this study was to assess the occurrence of isolated ochratoxigenic fungi of coffee grains from organic and conventional cultivation from the South of Minas Gerais, Brazil, as well as to evaluate which farming system presents higher contamination risk by ochratoxin A (OTA) produced by fungi. Thirty samples of coffee grains (Coffea arabica L.) were analysed, being 20 of them of conventional coffee grains and 10 of them organic. The microbiological analysis was done with the Direct Plating Technique in a Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicol Agar (DRBC) media. The identification was done based on the macro and micro morphological characteristics and on the toxigenic potential with the Plug Agar technique. From the 30 samples analysed, 480 filamentous fungi of the genera Aspergillus of the Circumdati and Nigri Sections were isolated. The ochratoxigenic species identified were: Aspergillus auricoumus, A. ochraceus, A. ostianus, A. niger and A. niger Aggregate. The most frequent species which produces ochratoxin A among the isolated ones was A. ochraceus, corresponding to 89.55%. There was no significant difference regarding the presence of ochratoxigenic A. ochreceus between the conventional and organic cultivation systems, which suggests that the contamination risk is similar for both cultivation systems.

  19. Population dynamics and distribution of the coffee berry borer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population dynamics and distribution of coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) were studied on Coffea arabica L. in southwestern region of Ethiopia. Thirty coffee trees were sampled at weekly intervals from 2000 to 2001. Findings of this study showed that coffee berry borer population ...

  20. Effect of altitude on biochemical composition and quality of green arabica coffee beans can be affected by shade and postharvest processing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worku, Mohammed; de Meulenaer, Bruno; Duchateau, Luc; Boeckx, Pascal

    2018-03-01

    Although various studies have assessed altitude, shade and postharvest processing effects on biochemical content and quality of coffee beans, data on their interactions are scarce. The individual and interactive effects of these factors on the caffeine, chlorogenic acids (CGA) and sucrose contents as well as physical and sensory qualities of green coffee beans from large plantations in southwestern Ethiopia were evaluated. Caffeine and CGA contents decreased with increasing altitude; they respectively declined 0.12 and 1.23gkg -1 100m -1 . Sucrose content increased with altitude; however, the altitude effect was significant for wet-processed beans (3.02gkg -1 100m -1 ), but not for dry-processed beans (0.36g kg -1 100m -1 ). Similarly, sucrose content increased with altitude with much stronger effect for coffee grown without shade (2.11gkg -1 100m -1 ) compared to coffee grown under shade (0.93gkg -1 100m -1 ). Acidity increased with altitude when coffee was grown under shade (0.22 points 100m -1 ), but no significant altitude effect was observed on coffee grown without shade. Beans grown without shade showed a higher physical quality score for dry (37.2) than for wet processing (29.1). These results generally underline the complex interaction effects between altitude and shade or postharvest processing on biochemical composition and quality of green arabica coffee beans. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Effects of gamma radiation of Cobalt-60 on arabica and conillon seeds coffea: physic-chemistry evaluation; Efeitos da radiacao gama do Cobalto-60 em sementes de cafe arabica e conillon: avaliacao fisico-quimica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Marcus Henriques da

    2012-07-01

    Brazil is the largest producer and exporter of coffee in the world. The coffee bean is one of the main products of the Brazilian trade balance. Two species of coffee are the most economically important: the Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora Pierre is the largest representative of the Coffea canephora Pierre is the coffea conillon. Food irradiation is an area of research that aims to increase the shelf life of foods and controlling pests. This study aimed to verify the physicochemical variables of Arabica coffee and conillon were affected when exposed to doses of gamma radiation from cobalt-60. The samples were provided by Polo in Coffee Quality Technology, Federal University of Lavras - UFLA. The coffee samples were subjected to irradiation doses: 0 (control), 5 kGy and 10 kGy, a multipurpose irradiator of IPEN - Research Institute of Nuclear Energy and the University of São Paulo, at a rate of 7.5 kGy / hour. For irradiation the samples were vacuum-packed in appropriate packaging aluminised. After the process of irradiation the samples were stored at a temperature of 15 ± 1 deg C and relative humidity of 17 ± 1%. The following analyzes were performed: levels of total sugars, glucose, sucrose, caffeine, humidity, pH, total acidity, electrical conductivity and fibers. Analyses were performed 1, 30, 60 and 90 days after irradiation, and the results were submitted to analysis of variance and means were compared by Tukey test at 5%. It was observed that the analysis results of the samples irradiated with 5 kGy and 10 kGy showed values similar to the control. It was concluded that irradiation did not induce deleterious effects on arabica coffee seeds and conillon irradiated with 5 kGy and 10 kGy to 90 days after irradiation. (author)

  2. Innovative Strategies for Control of Coffee Insect Pests in Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coffee insect pests are one of the major factors which affect coffee production and quality. globally, coffee insect pests are estimated to cause losses of about 13%. However in Africa, yield losses can be much higher, particularly where Arabica and Robusta coffee are grown for a long time. In Tanzania the major insect pests ...

  3. Some like it hot: the influence and implications of climate change on coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei and coffee production in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Jaramillo

    Full Text Available The negative effects of climate change are already evident for many of the 25 million coffee farmers across the tropics and the 90 billion dollar (US coffee industry. The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei, the most important pest of coffee worldwide, has already benefited from the temperature rise in East Africa: increased damage to coffee crops and expansion in its distribution range have been reported. In order to anticipate threats and prioritize management actions for H. hampei we present here, maps on future distributions of H. hampei in coffee producing areas of East Africa. Using the CLIMEX model we relate present-day insect distributions to current climate and then project the fitted climatic envelopes under future scenarios A2A and B2B (for HADCM3 model. In both scenarios, the situation with H. hampei is forecasted to worsen in the current Coffea arabica producing areas of Ethiopia, the Ugandan part of the Lake Victoria and Mt. Elgon regions, Mt. Kenya and the Kenyan side of Mt. Elgon, and most of Rwanda and Burundi. The calculated hypothetical number of generations per year of H. hampei is predicted to increase in all C. arabica-producing areas from five to ten. These outcomes will have serious implications for C. arabica production and livelihoods in East Africa. We suggest that the best way to adapt to a rise of temperatures in coffee plantations could be via the introduction of shade trees in sun grown plantations. The aims of this study are to fill knowledge gaps existing in the coffee industry, and to draft an outline for the development of an adaptation strategy package for climate change on coffee production. An abstract in Spanish is provided as Abstract S1.

  4. Brazilian Coffee Production as Function of Global Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, A. M. H. D.; Pinto, H. S.; Alfonsi, E. L., Sr.; Alfonsi, W. M. V.; Pereira, V. R.

    2016-12-01

    According to the Brazilian Government the actual area of coffee production in the country is close to 2.25 million hectares. The sector involves 290.000 of farmers with a production of 44 million of 60 Kg bags in 2015. The Arabica Coffee specie is cultivated in the country where the climate condition are characterized by a year mean temperatures between 18°C and 22°C. Temperatures higher than 33°C can cause abortion of flowers during the spring season and reduce the production while lower than 18°C can be affected by frost during winter when the minimum temperature can be lower than 2°C in the shelter. For a better quality of the final product the winter, between July and August, must be dry with rainfall lower than 50 mm/month. The Ministry of Agriculture defines those conditions for the Official Coffee Climatic Risk Zoning. In 2002, a partnership with the British Embassy and 2 Brazilian institutions, i. e. the State University of Campinas - UNICAMP and the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - Embrapa, published the study "Global Warming and the New Geography of Agricultural Production in Brazil" (Pinto and Assad, 2002). This study was based on the PRECIS/Hadley Centre Regional Climate Model future projections. The crop simulations indicated a decrease in the grain production due to temperature rise. Later in 2012, a new study was developed in cooperation with the World Bank to evaluate the future of nine main commodities in Brazil under climate change, including the Arabica coffee. The worst scenario considering any mitigation and adaptation action indicated that the two most affected crops would be the soybean and coffee, with a reduction of 22% and 6.7 % in the yield respectively. Field surveys to evaluate the historical spatial dynamic and migration of Arabica coffee cultivated areas confirmed the results of the previous studies and indicated a recent increase in the search for cooler altitude areas to plant coffee. Also the field observations

  5. Effects of gamma radiation of Cobalt-60 on arabica and conillon seeds coffea: physic-chemistry evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marcus Henriques da

    2012-01-01

    Brazil is the largest producer and exporter of coffee in the world. The coffee bean is one of the main products of the Brazilian trade balance. Two species of coffee are the most economically important: the Coffea arabica L. and Coffea canephora Pierre is the largest representative of the Coffea canephora Pierre is the coffea conillon. Food irradiation is an area of research that aims to increase the shelf life of foods and controlling pests. This study aimed to verify the physicochemical variables of Arabica coffee and conillon were affected when exposed to doses of gamma radiation from cobalt-60. The samples were provided by Polo in Coffee Quality Technology, Federal University of Lavras - UFLA. The coffee samples were subjected to irradiation doses: 0 (control), 5 kGy and 10 kGy, a multipurpose irradiator of IPEN - Research Institute of Nuclear Energy and the University of São Paulo, at a rate of 7.5 kGy / hour. For irradiation the samples were vacuum-packed in appropriate packaging aluminised. After the process of irradiation the samples were stored at a temperature of 15 ± 1 deg C and relative humidity of 17 ± 1%. The following analyzes were performed: levels of total sugars, glucose, sucrose, caffeine, humidity, pH, total acidity, electrical conductivity and fibers. Analyses were performed 1, 30, 60 and 90 days after irradiation, and the results were submitted to analysis of variance and means were compared by Tukey test at 5%. It was observed that the analysis results of the samples irradiated with 5 kGy and 10 kGy showed values similar to the control. It was concluded that irradiation did not induce deleterious effects on arabica coffee seeds and conillon irradiated with 5 kGy and 10 kGy to 90 days after irradiation. (author)

  6. Fumonisin B2 production by Aspergillus niger in Thai coffee beans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanaku, W.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2009-01-01

    During 2006 and 2007, a total of 64 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites in Chiangmai Province and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora) from two growing sites in Chumporn Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for fumonisin contamination...... by black Aspergilli. No Fusarium species known to produce fumonisin were detected, but black Aspergilli had high incidences on both Arabica and Robusta Thai coffee beans. Liquid chromatography (LC) with high-resolution mass spectrometric (HRMS) detection showed that 67% of Aspergillus niger isolates from...... coffee beans were capable of producing fumonisins B2 (FB2) and B4 when grown on Czapek Yeast Agar with 5% NaCl. Small amounts (1-9.7 ng g-1) of FB2 were detected in seven of 12 selected coffee samples after ion-exchange purification and LC-MS/MS detection. Two samples also contained FB4...

  7. Recent advances in coffee berry disease (CBD) control in Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Waller & Bridge) attacks arabic a coffee in most African arabica coffee growing countries. The disease was first recorded in Uganda in 1959 and surveys on the disease indicated that up to 50% crop losses were being incurred. Most of the ...

  8. The economic value of coffee (Coffea arabica) genetic resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hein, L.G.; Gatzweiler, F.

    2006-01-01

    Whereas the economic value of genetic diversity is widely recognized there are, to date, relatively few experiences with the actual valuation of genetic resources. This paper presents an analysis of the economic value of Coffea arabica genetic resources contained in Ethiopian highland forests. The

  9. Coffee berry disease in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, H.

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented on research in Kenya in 1964 - 1969 on anatomical, mycological, epidemiological, chemical control and cultural aspects of coffee berry disease, Colletotrichum coffeanum Noack, of Coffea arabica L. The pathogen causes flower and berry

  10. Differences in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi among three coffee cultivars in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligia Lebrón; Jean D. Lodge; Paul. Bayman

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is important for growth of coffee (Coffea arabica), but differences among coffee cultivars in response to mycorrhizal interactions have not been studied. We compared arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) extraradical hyphae in the soil and diversity of AM fungi among three coffee cultivars, Caturra, Pacas, and Borbon, at three farms in...

  11. Genetic diversity among 16 genotypes of Coffea arabica in the Brazilian cerrado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, C M S; Pimentel, N S; Golynsk, A; Ferreira, A; Vieira, H D; Partelli, F L

    2017-09-21

    For the selection of coffee plants that have favorable characteristics, it is necessary to evaluate variables related to production. Knowledge of the genetic divergence of arabica coffee is of extreme importance, as this knowledge can be associated with plant breeding programs in order to combine genetic divergence with good productive performance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic divergence among 16 genotypes of Coffea arabica with the purpose of identifying the most dissimilar genotypes for the establishment of breeding programs and adaptation to the Brazilian cerrado. The genetic divergence was evaluated using multivariate procedures, the analysis of the average grouping unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) and main components in 2013 and 2014. Eight characters were evaluated in an experiment conducted in Morrinhos, Goiás. The presence of genetic divergence among the 16 C. arabica genotypes under cerrado conditions was recorded. The formation of UPGMA groups for the evaluated characteristics was pertinent due to the number of genotypes. The first three major components accounted for 81.77% of the total variance. The genotype H-419-3-4-4-13(C-241) of low size was the most divergent, followed by Catucaí 2 SL and Catiguá MG2, according to the main components.

  12. Estimation of leaf area in coffee leaves (Coffea arabica L. of the Castillo® variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Unigarro-Muñoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allometric models based on measurements of single leaf dimensions or a combination there are useful tools for determining individual leaf area (LA because they are non-destructive, precise, simple and economical methods. The present study was carried out at the Central Station Naranjal of Cenicafé, located in the Department of Caldas (Colombia, four models were defined using the variables length (L and/or width (W to estimate LA in coffee leaves of the Castillo® variety (Coffea arabica L.. Estimation of regression coefficients was performed using information recorded from 6,441 leaves (group 1, and their validation was performed using records from another 992 leaves (group 2. Leaves were collected from all strata of the canopy and ranged from 0.76 to 140 cm2 in LA. In addition to exhibiting coefficients of variation differing from zero based on t-tests at 1%, the evaluated models possess coefficients of determination between 0.93 and 0.99. Four expressions have developed and adjusted to estimate leaf area in individual leaves, based on the measurement of simple variables and non-destructive.

  13. Genetic molecular analysis of Coffea arabica (Rubiaceae hybrids using SRAP markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Mishra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In Coffea arabica (arabica coffee, the phenotypic as well as genetic variability has been found low because of the narrow genetic basis and self fertile nature of the species. Because of high similarity in phenotypic appearance among the majority of arabica collections, selection of parental lines for inter-varietals hybridization and identification of resultant hybrids at an early stage of plant growth is difficult. DNA markers are known to be reliable in identifying closely related cultivars and hybrids. Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP is a new molecular marker technology developed based on PCR. In this paper, sixty arabica-hybrid progenies belonging to six crosses were analyzed using 31 highly polymorphic SRAP markers. The analysis revealed seven types of SRAP marker profiles which are useful in discriminating the parents and hybrids. The number of bands amplified per primer pair ranges from 6.13 to 8.58 with average number of seven bands. Among six hybrid combinations, percentage of bands shared between hybrids and their parents ranged from 66.29% to 85.71% with polymorphic bands varied from 27.64% to 60.0%. Percentage of hybrid specific fragments obtained in various hybrid combinations ranged from 0.71% to 10.86% and ascribed to the consequence of meiotic recombination. Based on the similarity index calculation, it was observed that F1 hybrids share maximum number of bands with the female parent compared to male parent. The results obtained in the present study revealed the effectiveness of SRAP technique in cultivar identification and hybrid analysis in this coffee species. Rev. Biol. Trop. 59 (2: 607-617. Epub 2011 June 01.

  14. Fumonisin B2 production by Aspergillus niger in Thai coffee beans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanakul, W.; Nielsen, K.F.; Frisvad, J.C.; Samson, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    During 2006 and 2007, a total of 64 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites in Chiangmai Province and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora) from two growing sites in Chumporn Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for fumonisin contamination by

  15. Looking into individual coffee beans during the roasting process: direct micro-probe sampling on-line photo-ionisation mass spectrometric analysis of coffee roasting gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz-Schünemann, Romy; Streibel, Thorsten; Ehlert, Sven; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    A micro-probe (μ-probe) gas sampling device for on-line analysis of gases evolving in confined, small objects by single-photon ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SPI-TOFMS) was developed. The technique is applied for the first time in a feasibility study to record the formation of volatile and flavour compounds during the roasting process within (inside) or in the direct vicinity (outside) of individual coffee beans. A real-time on-line analysis of evolving volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC and SVOC) as they are formed under the mild pyrolytic conditions of the roasting process was performed. The soft-ionisation mass spectra depict a molecular ion signature, which is well corresponding with the existing knowledge of coffee roasting and evolving compounds. Additionally, thereby it is possible to discriminate between Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta). The recognized differences in the roasting gas profiles reflect the differences in the precursor composition of the coffee cultivars very well. Furthermore, a well-known set of marker compounds for Arabica and Robusta, namely the lipids kahweol and cafestol (detected in their dehydrated form at m/z 296 and m/z 298, respectively) were observed. If the variation in time of different compounds is observed, distinctly different evolution behaviours were detected. Here, phenol (m/z 94) and caffeine (m/z 194) are exemplary chosen, whereas phenol shows very sharp emission peaks, caffeine do not have this highly transient behaviour. Finally, the changes of the chemical signature as a function of the roasting time, the influence of sampling position (inside, outside) and cultivar (Arabica, Robusta) is investigated by multivariate statistics (PCA). In summary, this pilot study demonstrates the high potential of the measurement technique to enhance the fundamental knowledge of the formation processes of volatile and semi-volatile flavour compounds inside the individual coffee bean.

  16. Effect of roasting on the carbohydrate composition of Coffea arabica beans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterveld, A.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    Coffee beans (arabica) with different degrees of roast were sequentially extracted with water (90 °C, 1 h), water (170 °C, 30 min), and 0.05 M NaOH (0 °C, 1 h). The amount and composition of polysaccharides, oligosaccharides and monosaccharides in the extracts and residues were analyzed. The results

  17. Can Coffee Chemical Compounds and Insecticidal Plants Be Harnessed for Control of Major Coffee Pests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul W C; Davis, Aaron P; Cossé, Allard A; Vega, Fernando E

    2015-11-04

    Pests and pathogens threaten coffee production worldwide and are difficult to control using conventional methods, such as insecticides. We review the literature on the chemistry of coffee, concentrating on compounds most commonly reported from Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora. Differences in chemistry can distinguish coffee species and varieties, and plants grown under different biogeographic conditions exhibit different chemotypes. A number of chemical groups, such as alkaloids and caffeoylquinic acids, are known to be insecticidal, but most studies have investigated their effects on coffee quality and flavor. More research is required to bridge this gap in knowledge, so that coffee can be bred to be more resistant to pests. Furthermore, we report on some pesticidal plants that have been used for control of coffee pests. Locally sourced pesticidal plants have been underutilized and offer a sustainable alternative to conventional insecticides and could be used to augment breeding for resilience of coffee plants.

  18. Microwave-assisted extraction of green coffee oil and quantification of diterpenes by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukui, A; Santos Júnior, H M; Oigman, S S; de Souza, R O M A; Bizzo, H R; Rezende, C M

    2014-12-01

    The microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of 13 different green coffee beans (Coffea arabica L.) was compared to Soxhlet extraction for oil obtention. The full factorial design applied to the microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), related to time and temperature parameters, allowed to develop a powerful fast and smooth methodology (10 min at 45°C) compared to a 4h Soxhlet extraction. The quantification of cafestol and kahweol diterpenes present in the coffee oil was monitored by HPLC/UV and showed satisfactory linearity (R(2)=0.9979), precision (CV 3.7%), recovery (yield calculated on the diterpenes content for sample AT1 (Arabica green coffee) showed a six times higher value compared to the traditional Soxhlet method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of microsatellite markers for identifying Brazilian coffee arabica varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, E.S.N.; Pinho, Von E.V.R.; Carvalho, M.G.G.; Esselink, G.; Vosman, B.

    2010-01-01

    Microsatellite markers, also known as SSRs (Simple Sequence Repeats), have proved to be excellent tools for identifying variety and determining genetic relationships. A set of 127 SSR markers was used to analyze genetic similarity in twenty five Coffea arabica varieties. These were composed of

  20. High-throughput metabolic profiling of diverse green Coffea arabica beans identified tryptophan as a universal discrimination factor for immature beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoyama, Daiki; Iwasa, Keiko; Seta, Harumichi; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Miura, Daisuke; Wariishi, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Chifumi; Nakahara, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    The maturity of green coffee beans is the most influential determinant of the quality and flavor of the resultant coffee beverage. However, the chemical compounds that can be used to discriminate the maturity of the beans remain uncharacterized. We herein analyzed four distinct stages of maturity (immature, semi-mature, mature and overripe) of nine different varieties of green Coffea arabica beans hand-harvested from a single experimental field in Hawaii. After developing a high-throughput experimental system for sample preparation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) measurement, we applied metabolic profiling, integrated with chemometric techniques, to explore the relationship between the metabolome and maturity of the sample in a non-biased way. For the multivariate statistical analyses, a partial least square (PLS) regression model was successfully created, which allowed us to accurately predict the maturity of the beans based on the metabolomic information. As a result, tryptophan was identified to be the best contributor to the regression model; the relative MS intensity of tryptophan was higher in immature beans than in those after the semi-mature stages in all arabica varieties investigated, demonstrating a universal discrimination factor for diverse arabica beans. Therefore, typtophan, either alone or together with other metabolites, may be utilized for traders as an assessment standard when purchasing qualified trading green arabica bean products. Furthermore, our results suggest that the tryptophan metabolism may be tightly linked to the development of coffee cherries and/or beans.

  1. Characterisation of AC1: a naturally decaffeinated coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Benjamim Benatti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared the biochemical characteristics of the beans of a naturally decaffeinated Arabica coffee (AC1 discovered in 2004 with those of the widely grown Brazilian Arabica cultivar "Mundo Novo" (MN. Although we observed differences during fruit development, the contents of amino acids, organic acids, chlorogenic acids, soluble sugars and trigonelline were similar in the ripe fruits of AC1 and MN. AC1 beans accumulated theobromine, and caffeine was almost entirely absent. Tests on the supply of [2-14C] adenine and enzymatic analysis of theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase in the endosperm of AC1 confirmed that, as in the leaves, caffeine synthesis is blocked during the methylation of theobromine to caffeine. The quality of the final coffee beverage obtained from AC1 was similar to that of MN.

  2. Integrating age in the detection and mapping of incongruous patches in coffee (Coffea arabica) plantations using multi-temporal Landsat 8 NDVI anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemura, Abel; Mutanga, Onisimo; Dube, Timothy

    2017-05-01

    The development of cost-effective, reliable and easy to implement crop condition monitoring methods is urgently required for perennial tree crops such as coffee (Coffea arabica), as they are grown over large areas and represent long term and higher levels of investment. These monitoring methods are useful in identifying farm areas that experience poor crop growth, pest infestation, diseases outbreaks and/or to monitor response to management interventions. This study compares field level coffee mean NDVI and LSWI anomalies and age-adjusted coffee mean NDVI and LSWI anomalies in identifying and mapping incongruous patches across perennial coffee plantations. To achieve this objective, we first derived deviation of coffee pixels from the global coffee mean NDVI and LSWI values of nine sequential Landsat 8 OLI image scenes. We then evaluated the influence of coffee age class (young, mature and old) on Landsat-scale NDVI and LSWI values using a one-way ANOVA and since results showed significant differences, we adjusted NDVI and LSWI anomalies for age-class. We then used the cumulative inverse distribution function (α ≤ 0.05) to identify fields and within field areas with excessive deviation of NDVI and LSWI from the global and the age-expected mean for each of the Landsat 8 OLI scene dates spanning three seasons. Results from accuracy assessment indicated that it was possible to separate incongruous and healthy patches using these anomalies and that using NDVI performed better than using LSWI for both global and age-adjusted mean anomalies. Using the age-adjusted anomalies performed better in separating incongruous and healthy patches than using the global mean for both NDVI (Overall accuracy = 80.9% and 68.1% respectively) and for LSWI (Overall accuracy = 68.1% and 48.9% respectively). When applied to other Landsat 8 OLI scenes, the results showed that the proportions of coffee fields that were modelled incongruent decreased with time for the young age category and

  3. Effect of Superheated Steam Roasting on Radical Scavenging Activity and Phenolic Content of Robusta Coffee Beans

    OpenAIRE

    Ooi Ee Shan; Wahidu Zzaman; Tajul A. Yang

    2015-01-01

    Robusta coffee is one of the coffee species grown in Malaysia. However, there is little research conducted on Robusta coffee beans as Arabica coffee is more popular among the consumers. Coffee is a rich source of antioxidants, therefore research on antioxidant properties of Robusta coffee beans is important to explore its market value. Nowadays, most of coffee analysis is on conventional roasted coffee which reduces their antioxidant properties. In this study, Robusta coffee beans (Coffea can...

  4. Influence of the fungi population on the physicochemical and chemical composition of coffee (Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Auxiliadora Avelar Pereira Pasin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fungi associated with coffee fruits was verified regarding the chemical and physicochemical composition of Coffea arabica L. raw grains. The fruits were harvested at EPAMIG Experimental farm in Lavras, State of Minas Gerais - making up the different samples here analyzed. After processing and drying, the grains were incubated in wet chamber for fungal exteriorization through the blotter test method and submitted to the following analyses: polyphenoloxidase, total reducing and non-reducing sugars, clorogenic acid, titrable acidity, potassium leaching, electric conductivity and caffeine. The occurrence of the P. variable, P. rugulosum, P. funiculosum, F. equiseti, F. semitectum, A.alutaceus, A. niger and C. cladosporioides fungi in the different samples was detected. From the analysis of the results obtained, it was observed that the presence of the Aspergillus alutaceus fungus reduces the activity of the enzyme polyphenoloxidase and increases the values of potassium leaching, electric conductivity and chlorogenic acid. The incidence of the Cladosporium cladosporioides fungus influenced the average values of potassium leaching and electric conductivity.

  5. Influence of integral and decaffeinated coffee brews on metabolic parameters of rats fed with hiperlipidemic diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Ariana de Souza Gomes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of integral and decaffeinated coffee brews (Coffea arabica L and C. canephora Pierre on the metabolic parameters of rats fed with hyperlipidemic diet. Thirty male Wistar rats (initial weight of 270 g ± 20 g were used in the study, which were divided into six groups five each. The treatments were normal diet, hyperlipidemic diet, hyperlipidemic diet associated with integral coffee arabica or canephora brews (7.2 mL/kg/day and hyperlipidemic diet associated to decaffeinated arabica, or canephora brews, using the same dosage. After 41 days, performance analyses were conducted.The rats were then euthanized and the carcasses were used for the analysis of dried ether extract and crude protein. Fractions of adipose tissue were processed for histological analysis. There was a reduction in weight gain and accumulation of lipids in the carcasses, lower diameter of adipocytes and a lower relative weight of the liver and kidneys of rats fed with hyperlipidemic diet associated with integral coffee brew. Integral coffee brew reduced the obesity in the rats receiving hyperlipidemic diet, but the same effect did not occur with the decaffeinated types.

  6. Furan in roasted, ground and brewed coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruczyńska, Eliza; Kowalska, Dorota; Kozłowska, Mariola; Majewska, Ewa; Tarnowska, Katarzyna

    2018-01-01

    Coffee is the most popular hot beverage in the world. The annual coffee production in 2010, 2014 and 2016 was 8.1, 9.0 and 9.3 million tons respectively. There are more than 100 coffee species, but only two of them: Arabica (Coffea arabica) and Robusta (Coffea canephora) have gained commercial importance. During roasting of green coffee beans not only desirable compounds are formed, that exert positive influence on the taste and flavour of coffee, but also small quantities of undesirable ones. Furan (C4H4O) is one of the latter. Furan is a volatile compound (boiling temp. of 31.4 oC) formed during thermal processing of food. The toxicity of furan has been well documented and it is classified as “possible human carcinogen” (Group 2B) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Various pathways have been reported for furan formation during food processing. It can be formed from carbohydrates, amino acids by their thermal degradation or thermal re-arrangement and by oxidation of ascorbic acid and polyunsaturated acids and carotenoids. High concentrations of furan have been reported in coffee, baked and roasted food and in food subjected to preserving in cans and jars. Furan levels in brewed coffee are typically near or below 120 μg/L, but it can approach thousands μg/kg in roasted whole beans or ground coffee. The highest concentration of furan in roasted coffee reaches the level of 7000 μg/kg. Taking into account that coffee is the most popular hot drink, it becomes the main contributor to furan exposure from dietary sources for adults. In this article the published scientific papers concerned with the presence of furan in roasted non-brewed and brewed coffee have been reviewed. The formation mechanisms and occurrence of furan in coffee and the harmful influence of furan on the consumer health have been discussed.

  7. Differential returns from globalization to women smallholder coffee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differential returns from globalization to women smallholder coffee and food ... the same area, female coffee producers represented a higher level of integration ... involved in small-scale production, and of a similar age and education level.

  8. Leaf-associated bacterial microbiota of coffee and its correlation with manganese and calcium levels on leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Leandro Pio de; da Silva, Marcio José da; Mondego, Jorge Maurício

    2018-05-17

    Coffee is one of the most valuable agricultural commodities and the plants' leaves are the primary site of infection for most coffee diseases, such as the devastating coffee leaf rust. Therefore, the use of bacterial microbiota that inhabits coffee leaves to fight infections could be an alternative agricultural method to protect against coffee diseases. Here, we report the leaf-associated bacteria in three coffee genotypes over the course of a year, with the aim to determine the diversity of bacterial microbiota. The results indicate a prevalence of Enterobacteriales in Coffea canephora, Pseudomonadales in C. arabica 'Obatã', and an intriguing lack of bacterial dominance in C. arabica 'Catuaí'. Using PERMANOVA analyses, we assessed the association between bacterial abundance in the coffee genotypes and environmental parameters such as temperature, precipitation, and mineral nutrients in the leaves. We detected a close relationship between the amount of Mn and the abundance of Pseudomonadales in 'Obatã' and the amount of Ca and the abundance of Enterobacteriales in C. canephora. We suggest that mineral nutrients can be key drivers that shape leaf microbial communities.

  9. Antioxidant effect of Arabian coffee (Coffea arabica L) blended with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antioxidants (GSH, vitamins C and E) were significantly elevated (p < 0.05) in mice administered. Arabian coffee ... cancer [9,10]. In addition ... HFD alone. IV. HFD + Arabian coffee + cardamom. V. HFD + Arabian coffee + cardamom + cloves.

  10. Economic Optimization of Nutrient Application to Coffee in Northern Tanzania Using SAFERNAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maro, G.P.; Janssen, B.H.; Msanya, B.M.; Mrema, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work, as an extension to SAFERNAC model, was to establish economically optimum combinations of N, P and K application to Arabica coffee in the Northern coffee zone of Tanzania. The study was conducted in Hai and Lushoto districts between 2010 and 2012. Prices of nutrient inputs and

  11. Pengujian sifat unggul beberapa klon harapan kopi arabika di kebun percobaan Andungsari, Jawa Timur (Testing for superior traits of some arabica coffee promising clones at Andungsari research station, East Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Hulupi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the major diseases which limiting production in arabica coffee is the leaf rust caused by the fungus Hemileia vastatrix, B et Br. Selection and testing on thirteen promising arabica coffee clones were carried out at endemic area for leaf rust disease, Andungsari Research Station, for six fruiting times. The aims of these test were to find out superior planting material as clone with genetic resistance to leaf rust. As the beverage commodities, criterium selections for superiority clone besides resistant to leaf rust and yielding ability of more than 1,5 ton/ha also must be excellent in cup quality. Under this consideration, BP 416 A clone showed as the best high yielding ability i.e. 1,595 kg/ha and stable, besides resistant to leaf rust disease compared to the other clones tested. This clone had good cup quality, better than earlier released variety such as USDA 762 and S 795 although was not better than Andungsari 1 that were planted in the same location. The best physical bean characteristics was obtained on BP 513 A clone wich is derived from S 795 x Caturra red, having 89.2% of normal bean and 18.3% outurn characteristics. However, due to lower yielding and more susceptible to leaf rust, this clone could not be classified as superior clone.

  12. High coffee population density to improve fertility of an oxisol

    OpenAIRE

    Pavan,Marcos Antonio; Chaves,Júlio César Dias; Siqueira,Rubens; Androcioli Filho,Armando; Colozzi Filho,Arnaldo; Balota,Elcio Liborio

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) population densities on the chemical and microbiological properties of an Oxisol. The work was carried out on soil samples of 0-20 cm depth originated from an experimental site which had been used for coffee tree spacing studies during 15 years, in Paraná State, Brazil. Eight coffee tree populations were evaluated: 7143, 3571, 2381, 1786, 1429, 1190, 1020, and 893 trees/ha. Increasing plant population increase...

  13. Anatomical and chemical properties and density of Coffea arabica L. wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Aparecida Pereira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The state of Minas Gerais is the largest producer of coffee in Brazil and the amount of residue in crops seems adequate to support production of solid wood products of Coffea arabica L., which is currently used for energy purposes or remains in the area. This activity adds insignificant value the coffee products and release CO2, which has harmful effects to the environment. This study was conducted with the aim of characterizing technologically Coffea arabica L. wood to enhance its use in furniture, to characterize its anatomical, chemical and wood basic density. The density showed an average of 0.608g.cm-3. The anatomical analysis showed distinct growth layers, semiporosos vessels with simple perforation plates. The axial parenchyma is apotracheal and diffuse in the aggregate with heterogeneous rays, not laminated and fiber libriformes not septate with bordered pits distinct. The chemical content of extract in hot and cold water were respectively 6.1% and 9.6%. The ash content was found to be 0.68%. Data were comparable to those of mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla and Piptadenia peregrina Benth, (angico-vermelho used for the production of furniture.

  14. Difference Spectroscopy in the Analysis of the Effects of Coffee Cherry Processing Variables on the Flavor of Brewed Coffee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, D.J.; Benck, R.M.; Merle, S.F.

    2011-01-01

    Infrared difference spectroscopy was used to study how changes in the processing of Arabica coffee cherries into green beans affected the flavor of coffee brewed from roasted green beans. Paired samples of green beans, in which the drying step or fermentation/washing step in their processing was altered, were roasted and brewed in a standard manner and their ATR-FT-IR spectra obtained. Difference spectra of the 1800 to 1680 cm-1 carbonyl region of water-subtracted spectra of paired samples of these brewed coffees provided data which indicated differences in brewed coffee flavor due to changes in fermentation/washing steps and drying steps involved in the processing of coffee cherries. The role of acid, ketone, aldehyde, ester, lactone, and vinyl ester carbonyl components on the flavor of brewed coffee is proposed that is consistent with the flavors as perceived by the coffee tasters.

  15. Difference Spectroscopy in the Analysis of the Effects of Coffee Cherry Processing Variables on the Flavor of Brewed Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J. Lyman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared difference spectroscopy was used to study how changes in the processing of Arabica coffee cherries into green beans affected the flavor of coffee brewed from roasted green beans. Paired samples of green beans, in which the drying step or fermentation/washing step in their processing was altered, were roasted and brewed in a standard manner and their ATR-FT-IR spectra obtained. Difference spectra of the 1800 to 1680 cm−1 carbonyl region of water-subtracted spectra of paired samples of these brewed coffees provided data which indicated differences in brewed coffee flavor due to changes in fermentation/washing steps and drying steps involved in the processing of coffee cherries. The role of acid, ketone, aldehyde, ester, lactone, and vinyl ester carbonyl components on the flavor of brewed coffee is proposed that is consistent with the flavors as perceived by the coffee tasters.

  16. Isolation, identification and toxigenic potential of ochratoxin A-producing Aspergillus species from coffee beans grown in two regions of Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noonim, P.; Mahakarnchanakul, W.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2008-01-01

    In 2006 and 2007, 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites of Chiang Mai Province, and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora var. robusta) from two growing sites of Chumphon Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for the distribution of fungi...... with the potential to produce ochratoxin A (OTA). The overall percentage of fungal contamination in coffee was 98% and reduced to 60% after surface disinfection. There were remarkable ecological differences in the composition of ochratoxigenic species present in these two regions. Arabica coffee bean samples from...... the North had an average of 78% incidence of colonization with Aspergillus of section Circumdati with Aspergillus westerdijkiae and A. melleus as the predominant species. Aspergillus spp. of section Nigri were found in 75% of the samples whereas A. ochraceus was not detected. Robusta coffee beans from...

  17. Climate and Pest-Driven Geographic Shifts in Global Coffee Production: Implications for Forest Cover, Biodiversity and Carbon Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrach, Ainhoa; Ghazoul, Jaboury

    2015-01-01

    Coffee is highly sensitive to temperature and rainfall, making its cultivation vulnerable to geographic shifts in response to a changing climate. This could lead to the establishment of coffee plantations in new areas and potential conflicts with other land covers including natural forest, with consequent implications for biodiversity and ecosystem services. We project areas suitable for future coffee cultivation based on several climate scenarios and expected responses of the coffee berry borer, a principle pest of coffee crops. We show that the global climatically-suitable area will suffer marked shifts from some current major centres of cultivation. Most areas will be suited to Robusta coffee, demand for which could be met without incurring forest encroachment. The cultivation of Arabica, which represents 70% of consumed coffee, can also be accommodated in the future, but only by incurring some natural forest loss. This has corresponding implications for carbon storage, and is likely to affect areas currently designated as priority areas for biodiversity. Where Arabica coffee does encroach on natural forests, we project average local losses of 35% of threatened vertebrate species. The interaction of climate and coffee berry borer greatly influences projected outcomes. PMID:26177201

  18. The coffee agroforestry system. Its importance for the agro-alimentary and nutritional security in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Abelardo Ponce Vaca

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of coffee growing, Ecuador is characterized by planting two main commercial species of Coffea arabica L. (Arabica coffee, and Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner (Robusta coffee, where small production units and agroforestry systems predominate. To overcome the low national production, which constitutes the central problem of coffee growing in the country, the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock of Ecuador, promoted the project «Reactivation of the Ecuadorian coffee industry», which contributes to food security and nutrition with integral approach. In these circumstances, the objective of this paper is to analyze the importance of coffee agroforestry systems for agro-alimentary and nutritional security in Ecuador. The proposal is born from the agro-economic diagnosis «case study», from the situation of the Coffee Production Units, from the Association of Peasants «Juntos Lucharemos» from the La Unión parish of the Jipijapa county, province of Manabí, in which they settled Main contributions to the agro-alimentary and nutritional security coming from the coffee agroforestry systems, this allowed to analyze characteristics related to the object of study. Based on the research results, gaps in national consumption needs were detected. This proposal contributed to articulate and promote the reactivation of coffee growing on agroecological bases, in harmony with the dimensions of sustainability in order to protect and conserve biodiversity and the coffee forest.

  19. Leaf-associated bacterial microbiota of coffee and its correlation with manganese and calcium levels on leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Pio de Sousa

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Coffee is one of the most valuable agricultural commodities and the plants’ leaves are the primary site of infection for most coffee diseases, such as the devastating coffee leaf rust. Therefore, the use of bacterial microbiota that inhabits coffee leaves to fight infections could be an alternative agricultural method to protect against coffee diseases. Here, we report the leaf-associated bacteria in three coffee genotypes over the course of a year, with the aim to determine the diversity of bacterial microbiota. The results indicate a prevalence of Enterobacteriales in Coffea canephora, Pseudomonadales in C. arabica ‘Obatã’, and an intriguing lack of bacterial dominance in C. arabica ‘Catuaí’. Using PERMANOVA analyses, we assessed the association between bacterial abundance in the coffee genotypes and environmental parameters such as temperature, precipitation, and mineral nutrients in the leaves. We detected a close relationship between the amount of Mn and the abundance of Pseudomonadales in ‘Obatã’ and the amount of Ca and the abundance of Enterobacteriales in C. canephora. We suggest that mineral nutrients can be key drivers that shape leaf microbial communities.

  20. Contribution to the study of 14C-acetate as the precursor of aminoacids in detached leaves of coffee (Coffea arabica cv. Mundo Novo)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasil, O.G.

    1975-01-01

    Labelled acetates with 14 C were used as the forerunner of aminoacids in leaves of coffee (Coffea arabica cv Mundo Novo). Leaves with the labelled acetates were incubated and released CO 2 was retained in paper discs with hiamine for further radioactivity detection. Separated proteins furnished 13 amino-acids through acid hidrolysis, all of them were identified by bidimensional filter paper chromatography. Through the obtained results it is possible to conclude that acetates are metabolized by the leafs and are related to the processes of leaf synthesis. It was possible to show that an utilization of acetate for energetical production via Krebs cycle was donne. The obtained conclusions show too that methylic carbon was more incorporated than carboxylic carbon [pt

  1. Early detection of fungal contamination on green coffee by a MOX sensors based Electronic Nose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sberveglieri, V.; Pulvirenti, A.; Fava, P.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.; Gobbi, E.

    2011-01-01

    Fungal growth can occur on green coffee beans along all the distribution chain, eventually bringing on health hazards to consumers, because of the production of toxic metabolites (mycotoxins). Besides, the sensorial contamination due to volatiles by-products of fungal metabolism could cause defects on coffee also after roasting. Therefore, it is necessary to devise strategies to detect and quantify fungal infection and toxin production at early stages of the food chain. One of the most promising techniques is the analysis of volatile compounds in the headspace gas surrounding the samples. The aim of this work was to verify the ability of the Electronic Nose (EN EOS 835 ) to early detect the microbial contamination of Arabica green coffee. This EN is equipped with Metal Oxide Semiconductor sensor array. Gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the static headspace of non-contaminated Arabica green coffee samples was carried out to confirm the EN ability to provide satisfactory indications about the presence of contamination.

  2. Climate Change Impacts on Worldwide Coffee Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, T.; Rising, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora) plays a vital role in many countries' economies, providing necessary income to 25 million members of tropical countries, and supporting a $81 billion industry, making it one of the most valuable commodities in the world. At the same time, coffee is at the center of many issues of sustainability. It is vulnerable to climate change, with disease outbreaks becoming more common and suitable regions beginning to shift. We develop a statistical production model for coffee which incorporates temperature, precipitation, frost, and humidity effects using a new database of worldwide coffee production. We then use this model to project coffee yields and production into the future based on a variety of climate forecasts. This model can then be used together with a market model to forecast the locations of future coffee production as well as future prices, supply, and demand.

  3. Differences in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi among Three Coffee Cultivars in Puerto Rico

    OpenAIRE

    Lebrón, Ligia; Lodge, D. Jean; Bayman, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is important for growth of coffee (Coffea arabica), but differences among coffee cultivars in response to mycorrhizal interactions have not been studied. We compared arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) extraradical hyphae in the soil and diversity of AM fungi among three coffee cultivars, Caturra, Pacas, and Borbón, at three farms in Puerto Rico. Caturra had significantly lower total extraradical AM hyphal length than Pacas and Borbón at all locations. P content did not differ a...

  4. Redistribution of the solar radiation and the rain inside of coffee plantations (Arabic Coffea L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo Robledo, Alvaro

    2005-01-01

    The following review presents a series of studies on microclimates of non-shaded and shaded conditions of coffee plantations (Coffea arabica L.) in Colombia. Likewise, The redistribution of solar radiation and the temperature, as well as the energy balance, of the coffee plant and the crop are described. The results on the components of water balance and transport of nutrients within the coffee plantations are reported

  5. Application of thermography for monitoring stomatal conductance of Coffea arabica under different shading systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craparo, A C W; Steppe, K; Van Asten, P J A; Läderach, P; Jassogne, L T P; Grab, S W

    2017-12-31

    Stomatal regulation is a key process in the physiology of Coffea arabica (C. arabica). Intrinsically linked to photosynthesis and water relations, it provides insights into the plant's adaptive capacity, survival and growth. The ability to rapidly quantify this parameter for C. arabica under different agroecological systems would be an indispensable tool. Using a Flir E6 MIR Camera, an index that is equivalent to stomatal conductance (I g ) was compared with stomatal conductance measurements (g s ) in a mature coffee plantation. In order to account for varying meteorological conditions between days, the methods were also compared under stable meteorological conditions in a laboratory and I g was also converted to absolute stomatal conductance values (g 1 ). In contrast to typical plant-thermography methods which measure indices once per day over an extended time period, we used high resolution hourly measurements over daily time series with 9 sun and 9 shade replicates. Eight daily time series showed a strong correlation between methods, while the remaining 10 were not significant. Including several other meteorological parameters in the calculation of g 1 did not contribute to any stronger correlation between methods. Total pooled data (combined daily series) resulted in a correlation of ρ=0.66 (P≤2.2e-16), indicating that our approach is particularly useful for situations where absolute values of stomatal conductance are not required, such as for comparative purposes, screening or trend analysis. We use the findings to advance the protocol for a more accurate methodology which may assist in quantifying advantageous microenvironment designs for coffee, considering the current and future climates of coffee growing regions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of coffee (Coffea arabica pulp for the production of briquettes and pellets for heat generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Cubero-Abarca

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Coffee bean (Coffea arabica processing generates high amount of residues that are sources of environmental pollution. Therefore, an appropriate solution is needed. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of coffee pulp to produce briquettes and pellets. The study included pulp drying (using air, solar and hot air methods; the production of briquettes and pellets; the evaluation of their energy, physical and mechanical properties; and the evaluation of pellet quality using X-ray densitometry. The results showed that the pulp presented an initial moisture content of 90%, resulting in drying times of 699, 308 and 55 hours for air, solar and hot air drying, respectively, and the calorific values of the pellets and briquettes were 12,501 kJ kg-1 and 11,591 kJ kg-1, respectively. The ash content was 8.68% for the briquettes and 6.74% for the pellets. The density of the briquettes was 1,110 kg m-3, compared with 1,300 kg m-3 for the pellets. The apparent densities were 1,000 kg m-3 and 600 kg m-3 for the briquettes and pellets, respectively, and the water absorptions by the briquettes were 7.90% and 8.10% by the pellets. The maximum horizontal compression effort was 26.86 kg cm-2, measured in the pellets, compared with 4.52 kg cm-2 in the briquettes. The maximum horizontal load was 93.24 kg, measured in the briquettes, compared with 33.50 kg in the pellets. The value of the pellet durability test was 75.54%. X-ray densitometry showed that the pellet was uniform and a few cracks were observed on the pellet surface.

  7. Phytochemical Profile and in vitro Assessment of the Cytotoxicity of Green and Roasted Coffee Oils (Coffea arabica L. and their Polar Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Lorenzen Voytena

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Green Coffea arabica L. seed oil (GCO has been used as an active cosmetic ingredient in many skin care products, due to its composition and balance of fatty acids. On the other hand, while roasted coffee oil (RCO is mainly used for imparting aroma in the food industry, there is no data available to suggest its safety in cell-based model systems. In this context, the present study aims to evaluate the chemical composition of GCO, RCO, and their correspondent polar fractions (PFs; and assess their cytotoxicity and antioxidant potential in vitro. RCO and RCO PF exhibited significantly higher amounts of phenolic compounds, when compared to both GCO and GCO PF. In the DPPH assay, after 5 min of incubation, RCO inhibited about 80% of radicals, while GCO only achieved half of this activity. Similar results were also obtained for their PFs. Upon exposure to GCO, no cytotoxic effects were observed, in fact, there were slight increments in cell proliferation. Nevertheless, cell exposure to RCO led to significant decreases in cell viability. Increases in the concentration of coffee oil PFs were associated with correspondent relevant increased cytotoxicity. Upon hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress, neither GCO nor RCO treatment were effective in protecting cells.

  8. Synthèse des résultats de recherche sur l'agronomie du caféier arabica (Coffea arabica L. au Rwanda au 31 mars 1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutunga, V.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of Results on Coffee Agronomy Research in Rwanda on 31 March 1994. Arabica coffee plays an important role in the macro-economic performance of Rwanda. As a result, Agricultural Research Institutes have done research on coffee agronomy, aimed at improving coffee productivite The ecological conditions for coffee in Rwanda are characterized by inadequate rainfall and high light intensity. Soil parental material and chemical properties are variable amongst different small holders coffee producers. The available results indicate that spacing in coffee planting of 2 m x 2 m or 2, 5 m x 1, 5 m are convenient. Higher density with "multicaule"planting provided better production with some varieties. Pruning regime has been established but should still be correctly followed. Mulching is the best cultural technique to improve production. It improves soil physical and chemical properties and water storage. It can also improve minerai fertilizer use efficiency. The mulching materials are variable but not enough for ail coffee plantations. Mulch is applied late (July, August in Rwanda. Living cover with different species including legumes cannot replace efficiently the mulch, although the cover of Desmodium sp. and other few species can offer some advantages. Shade trees in coffee plantations have not been successful. N fertilizer followed by K improved coffee production. The effect of P was not clear while Mg deficiency was observed in some plantations. The formula of N.P.K. and N.P.K. Mg. were recommended but their rates should vary according to the sites. Finally, a beneficial effect was observed in using rotted coffee rinds compost.

  9. Caffeine inheritance in interspecific hybrids of Coffea arabica x Coffea canephora (Gentianales, Rubiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina H.G. Priolli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine inheritance was investigated in F2 and BC1F1 generations between Coffea arabica var. Bourbon Vermelho (BV and Coffea canephora var. Robusta 4x (R4x. The caffeine content of seeds and leaves was determined during 2004 and 2005. Microsatellite loci-markers were used to deduce the meiotic pattern of chromosome pairing of tetraploid interspecific hybrids. Genetic analysis indicated that caffeine content in seeds was quantitatively inherited and controlled by genes with additive effects. The estimates of broad-sense heritability of caffeine content in seeds were high for both generations. In coffee leaves, the caffeine content (BSH from the same populations showed transgressive segregants with enhanced levels and high BSH. Segregation of loci-markers in BC1F1 populations showed that the ratios of the gametes genotype did not differ significantly from those expected assuming random associations and tetrasomic inheritance. The results confirm the existence of distinct mechanisms controlling the caffeine content in seeds and leaves, the gene exchange between the C. arabica BV and C. canephora R4x genomes and favorable conditions for improving caffeine content in this coffee population.

  10. Estimation of Sensory Analysis Cupping Test Arabica Coffee Using NIR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safrizal; Sutrisno; Lilik, P. E. N.; Ahmad, U.; Samsudin

    2018-05-01

    Flavors have become the most important coffee quality parameters now day, many coffee consuming countries require certain taste scores for the coffee to be ordered, the currently used cupping method of appraisal is the method designed by The Specialty Coffee Association Of America (SCAA), from several previous studies was found that Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used to detect chemical composition of certain materials including those associated with flavor so it is possible also to be applied to coffee powder. The aim of this research is to get correlation between NIRS spectrum with cupping scoring by tester, then look at the possibility of testing coffee taste sensors using NIRS spectrum. The coffee samples were taken from various places, altitudes and postharvest handling methods, then the samples were prepared following the SCAA protocol, for sensory analysis was done in two ways, with the expert tester and with the NIRS test. The calibration between both found that Without pretreatment using PLS get RMSE cross validation 6.14, using Multiplicative Scatter Correction spectra obtained RMSE cross validation 5.43, the best RMSE cross-validation was 1.73 achieved by de-trending correction, NIRS can be used to predict the score of cupping.

  11. Spent coffee grounds as a versatile source of green energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondamudi, Narasimharao; Mohapatra, Susanta K; Misra, Mano

    2008-12-24

    The production of energy from renewable and waste materials is an attractive alternative to the conventional agricultural feed stocks such as corn and soybean. This paper describes an approach to extract oil from spent coffee grounds and to further transesterify the processed oil to convert it into biodiesel. This process yields 10-15% oil depending on the coffee species (Arabica or Robusta). The biodiesel derived from the coffee grounds (100% conversion of oil to biodiesel) was found to be stable for more than 1 month under ambient conditions. It is projected that 340 million gallons of biodiesel can be produced from the waste coffee grounds around the world. The coffee grounds after oil extraction are ideal materials for garden fertilizer, feedstock for ethanol, and as fuel pellets.

  12. Effects of maltose and lysine treatment on coffee aroma by flash gas chromatography electronic nose and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuqin; Zhang, Haide; Wen, Nana; Hu, Rongsuo; Wu, Guiping; Zeng, Ying; Li, Xiong; Miao, Xiaodan

    2018-01-01

    Arabica coffee is a sub-tropical agricultural product in China. Coffee undergoes a series of thermal reactions to form abundant volatile profiles after roasting, so it loses a lot of reducing sugars and amino acids. Adding carbonyl compounds with amino acids before roasting could ensure the nutrition and flavour of coffee. The technology is versatile for the development of coffee roasting process. This investigation evaluates the effects of combining maltose and lysine (Lys) to modify coffee aroma and the possibly related mechanisms. Arabica coffee was pretreated with a series of solvent ratios of maltose and Lys with an identical concentration (0.25 mol L -1 ) before microwave heating. It was found that the combination of maltose and Lys significantly (P ≤ 0.05) influenced quality indices of coffee (pH and browning degree). Ninety-six aromatic volatiles have been isolated and identified. Twelve volatile profiles revealed the relationship between fragrance difference and compound content in coffee. Moreover, coffee aroma was modified by a large number of volatiles with different chemical classes and character. Thus, our results suggest that the combination of reagents changed overall aroma quality through a series of complex thermal reactions, especially the ratio of Lys/maltose over 2:1. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Pengaruh penambahan auxin terhadap pertunasan dan perakaran kopi arabika perbanyakan Somatic Embryogenesis (The effects of shooting and rooting of arabica coffee propagation through Embryogenesis Somatic auxin uses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Arimarsetiowati

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Plantlet that has developed shoots and roots will have a high level adaptation in the field. The objective of this experiment was to improve the ability of planlet in shooting and rooting so that it is ready for acclimatization in the field. The increase ability in shooting and rooting of the planlet were conducted by adding various types of auxin in the media. The arabica coffee embryo of clone AS 2K which has entered the phase of the cotyledons was transfered into the treatment media containing half-strength of MS (Murashige & Skoog macro and micro nutrient, vitamin B5, 30 g/L glucose, 100 ml/L coconut water, 50 mg/L AgNO3 added with the combination of IAA, IBA and NAA. The research was conducted by using completely randomized design with seven combined treatment i.e. 0.1 mg/L IBA, 0.1 mg/L NAA, 0.1 mg/L IAA; 0 , 1 mg/L IBA + 0.1 mg/L NAA, 0.1 mg/L IBA + 0.1 mg/L IAA, 0.1 mg/L NAA + 0.1 mg/L IAA; without auxin. There were 12 replications in every treatment and each replication consisted of five cotyledonary embryos. The parameters of observation were the root length, leaf number, leaf area, stem diameter, and height of plantlets. The observations were conducted in eighth weeks after cotyledonary embryo had shoots. The results showed that in the number of leaves and height of planlet parameters, the treatment without auxin was the best result compared to planlet with auxin addition. The addition of auxin varians and their combination did not significantly influent leaf area, root length and stem diameter parameters. The medium tested was optimum for the growth of shoots and roots of AS 2K arabica coffee.

  14. Qualidade da bebida em espécies e populações derivadas de híbridos interespecíficos de Coffea Cupping quality of coffee species and interspecific hybrids

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    Alcides Carvalho

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se, em dois experimentos, a qualidade da bebida das espécies Coffea canephora e C. congensis e derivados de híbridações interespecíficas [C. canephora duplicado (dp x C. arabica, C. canephora x C. eugenioides, C. arabica x C. dewevrei dp e C. racemosa x C. arabica]. Por tratar-se de análise de bebida de cafés pouco conhecidos, avaliou-se a eficiência de uma escala de 1 a 10 pontos em comparação à escala de 0 a 5 pontos utilizada para C. arabica. Foram, também, acrescentadas pelos provadores indicações relacionadas ao gosto da bebida. A escala de 6 pontos mostrou-se pouco eficaz na discriminação dos tratamentos e a de 10 pontos, utilizada alternativamente, revelou-se mais eficiente nos dois experimentos. No primeiro, verificou-se, quanto à qualidade, uma superioridade dos grupos C arabica x C. dewevrei dp e C. canephora dp x C. arabica pelas duas escalas. No segundo experimento, o grupo C. racemosa x C. arabica apresentou a maior média, apesar de não diferir, pela escala 1, dos demais grupos. Pela escala 2, superou, no entanto, os grupos C. canephora e C. congensis. Gostos incomuns foram observados nas amostras com relação à bebida. Atribuem-se à grande diversidade do material analisado e a falta de familiarização dos provadores com espécies bem diferentes de C. arabica, certas discrepâncias com relação à determinação desses defeitos nas amostras analisadas.Investigations on coffee cupping quality of the species C. canephora, C. congensis and several populations derived from interespecific crosses (C. canephora dp x C. arabica, C. canephora x C. eugenioides, C. arabica x C. dewevrei dp and C. racemosa x C. arabica were undertaken in two trials, in order to guide breeding programs using this germoplasm. Two grading systems were used for classification of the cupping quality, the normal six points scale used for C. arabica samples and a new one with 10 points, 1 for the lowest and 10 for the highest quality

  15. Effect of CO2 on somatic embryos development Coffea arabica L. cv. ‘Caturra rojo’ and Clematis tangutica K.

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    Raúl Barbon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies to optimize somatic embryogenesis have traditionally focused on the components of the culture medium but little other in vitro environment factors have been analyzed such as the composition of the gaseous atmosphere. The objective of this work was to determine the influence of CO2 on the development of the somatic embryo during the transition from the globular to the torpedo stage. The research was carried out on two model species for somatic embryogenesis that they are developed in different climatic zones: Coffea arabica L. cv. ‘Caturra rojo’ and Clematis tangutica K. Three CO2 concentrations (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0% combined with 21% O2 and two controls (passive exchange and forced ventilation were used. The effect of CO2 on the differentiation of somatic embryos from globular to torpedo stage in coffee and clematis was demonstrated, since in the treatments with passive exchange, where there was accumulation of CO2, the differentiation of somatic embryos was superior to treatments with forced ventilation. With 5.0% CO2 the process of differentiation of the embryos in the globular stage was stimulated, because in the treatment with this concentration of CO2 for coffee and clematis the highest proportion of embryos in torpedo stages and low levels of malformation were obtained.   Keywords: carbon dioxide, differentiation, in vitro environment, somatic embryogenesis

  16. Time-Resolved Gravimetric Method To Assess Degassing of Roasted Coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrke, Samo; Wellinger, Marco; Suzuki, Tomonori; Balsiger, Franz; Opitz, Sebastian E W; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2018-05-30

    During the roasting of coffee, thermally driven chemical reactions lead to the formation of gases, of which a large fraction is carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Part of these gases is released during roasting while part is retained inside the porous structure of the roasted beans and is steadily released during storage or more abruptly during grinding and extraction. The release of CO 2 during the various phases from roasting to consumption is linked to many important properties and characteristics of coffee. It is an indicator for freshness, plays an important role in shelf life and in packaging, impacts the extraction process, is involved in crema formation, and may affect the sensory profile in the cup. Indeed, and in view of the multiple roles it plays, CO 2 is a much underappreciated and little examined molecule in coffee. Here, we introduce an accurate, quantitative, and time-resolved method to measure the release kinetics of gases from whole beans and ground coffee using a gravimetric approach. Samples were placed in a container with a fitted capillary to allow gases to escape. The time-resolved release of gases was measured via the weight loss of the container filled with coffee. Long-term stability was achieved using a customized design of a semimicro balance, including periodic and automatic zero value measurements and calibration procedures. The novel gravimetric methodology was applied to a range of coffee samples: (i) whole Arabica beans and (ii) ground Arabica and Robusta, roasted to different roast degrees and at different speeds (roast air temperatures). Modeling the degassing rates allowed structural and mechanistic interpretation of the degassing process.

  17. Activity of some isoenzymatic systems in stored coffee grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reni Saath

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Considering the worldwide consumption of coffee, it is natural that throughout the history many people have dedicated the research to markers that contribute somehow on gauging its quality. This research aimed to evaluate the biochemical performance of arabica coffee during storage. Coffee in beans (natural and in parchment (pulped dried in concrete terrace and in dryer with heated air were packed in jute bags and stored in not controlled environmental conditions. Enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, polyphenoloxidase, esterase and lipoxygenase in coffee grains were evaluated at zero, three, six, nine and twelve months by means of electrophoresis. Independently of the drying method, the activity of isoenzymatic complexes highlighted deteriorative processes in stored grains of coffee. The treatments 60/40º C and 60º C used to reduce the water content imposed a greater stress condition, accelerated metabolism of natural coffee in the storage with decreased activity of defense mechanisms due to latent damage in these grains. Natural coffees are more sensible to high drying temperatures and its quality reduces faster than pulped coffee in the storage.

  18. Storage of soil organic carbon in coffee (Coffea arabica L. production systems in the municipality of Líbano, Tolima, Colombia

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    Hernán Jair Andrade Castañeda

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The increase in greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources has resulted in climate change, which affects all living beings. Coffee (Coffea arabica L. plantations, in monoculture or together with timber species such as salmwood (Cordia alliodora, mitigate climate change due to fixation of atmospheric CO2 that is deposited in biomass and soils. This study was carried out in the municipality of Líbano, Tolima, Colombia with the objective of defining which of the following coffee production systems store more soil organic carbon (SOC: 1 monoculture, 2 agroforestry systems (AFS with salmwood, and 3 AFS with plantain. Farms with those systems that are the most dominant in the study zone were selected. From each system, five repetitions were identified to be analyzed with a completely randomized design. In each plot or repetition, five samples for bulk density (BD using the cylinder method and a composite sample for concentration of SOC were taken and analyzed using the Walkley and Black approach. The systems of production did not significantly (p > 0.05 affect either the BD or the concentration of SOC. However, AFS with plantain tended to have less BD than monoculture and AFS with salmwood (0.83 ± 0.03 vs 0.88 ± 0.03 vs 0.92 ± 0.04 g·cm-3, respectively. These systems of production stored between 50 and 54 t·ha-1 of SOC in the top 30 cm, which indicates their capacity for climate change mitigation.

  19. Rust and Thinning Management Effect on Cup Quality and Plant Performance for Two Cultivars of Coffea arabica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria-Beirute, Fabian; Murray, Seth C; Klein, Patricia; Kerth, Chris; Miller, Rhonda; Bertrand, Benoit

    2018-05-30

    Beverage quality is a complex attribute of coffee ( Coffea arabica L.). Genotype (G), environment (E), management (M), postharvest processing, and roasting are all involved. However, little is known about how G × M interactions influence beverage quality. We investigated how yield and coffee leaf rust (CLR) disease (caused by Hemileia vastatrix Berk. et Br.) management affect cup quality and plant performance, in two coffee cultivars. Sensory and chemical analyses revealed that 10 of 70 attributes and 18 of 154 chemical volatile compounds were significantly affected by G and M. Remarkably, acetaminophen was found for the first time in roasted coffee and in higher concentrations under more stressful conditions. A principal component analysis described 87% of the variation in quality and plant overall performance. This study is a first step in understanding the complexity of the physiological, metabolic, and molecular changes in coffee production, which will be useful for the improvement of coffee cultivars.

  20. Optimal conditions for taking spectra of coffee beans plasma spectroscopy induced by laser (LIBS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Guerrero, A. M.; Flores Reyes; Ponce Cabrera, L. V.

    2016-01-01

    Coffee beans, arabica and robusta, from Mexico (Chiapas and Veracruz), Colombia, Kenya and Sumatra were analyzed by Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The time delay and pulse energy were varied in order to find the optimal conditions for taking spectra in coffee beans; finding that the increased visibility of the peaks and the lowest electronic background is observed with 1 s and 450 mJ. Spectra were taken in different regions of grain area to confirm its homogeneous composition. It was found that the intensity of the signal Ca is much higher than that of K in African coffee, lower in the coffee of America, and much lower in the coffee from Asia. (Author)

  1. Quality of the surface of Coffea arabica wood

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    Pedro Paulo de Carvalho Braga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The wood of Coffea arabica L. is considered a a residue of the coffee industry and is widely used as a source of energy. Few studies have shown other destinations such as the manufacture of small objects and furniture with rustic design. The objective of this work was to find the best fit in cutting speed during machining planer trowel the wood of Coffea arabica, taking into consideration the quality of the machined surface. The wood from the Coffea arabica came from an 15 years planting, spacing 3 x 2 m, of the municipality of Machado / MG. The tree was pruned, unfolded and flattened, in order for getting cut-proof of 30 mm thick, with variables length and width. The machining tests were performed at the Laboratory of Wood Machining (DCF / UFLA, varying the cutting speed in plane trowel. The qualification of the machined surface was performed by the feed per tooth (fz, visual analysis (ASTM D 1666-87 and roughness Ra and Rz. It was used a completely randomized design with 30 repetitions. We conducted the analysis of variance test and the average of Scott-Knott, at 5% significance level. It was calculated the percentage of marks obtained for the feed per tooth. The results showed that the quality of machined surface with cutting speeds of 19 and 21 m∙s-1 and forward speed of 6 m∙min-1 were satisfactory with small surveys of fiber and low values of feed per tooth ( fz and roughness Ra and Rz.

  2. Influence of Environmental Conditions and Genetic Background of Arabica Coffee (C. arabica L) on Leaf Rust (Hemileia vastatrix) Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toniutti, Lucile; Breitler, Jean-Christophe; Etienne, Hervé; Campa, Claudine; Doulbeau, Sylvie; Urban, Laurent; Lambot, Charles; Pinilla, Juan-Carlos H; Bertrand, Benoît

    2017-01-01

    Global warming is a major threat to agriculture worldwide. Between 2008 and 2013, some coffee producing countries in South and Central America suffered from severe epidemics of coffee leaf rust (CLR), resulting in high economic losses with social implications for coffee growers. The climatic events not only favored the development of the pathogen but also affected the physiological status of the coffee plant. The main objectives of the study were to evaluate how the physiological status of the coffee plant modified by different environmental conditions impact on the pathogenesis of CLR and to identify indicators of the physiological status able to predict rust incidence. Three rust susceptible genotypes (one inbred line and two hybrids) were grown in controlled conditions with a combination of thermal regime (TR), nitrogen and light intensity close to the field situation before being inoculated with the rust fungus Hemileia vastatrix . It has been demonstrated that a TR of 27-22°C resulted in 2000 times higher sporulation than with a TR of 23-18°C. It has been also shown that high light intensity combined with low nitrogen fertilization modified the CLR pathogenesis resulting in huge sporulation. CLR sporulation was significantly lower in the F1 hybrids than in the inbred line. The hybrid vigor may have reduced disease incidence. Among the many parameters studied, parameters related to photosystem II and photosynthetic electron transport chain components appeared as indicators of the physiological status of the coffee plant able to predict rust sporulation intensity. Taken together, these results show that CLR sporulation not only depends on the TR but also on the physiological status of the coffee plant, which itself depends on agronomic conditions. Our work suggests that vigorous varieties combined with a shaded system and appropriate nitrogen fertilization should be part of an agro-ecological approach to disease control.

  3. Quali- and quantitative analysis of commercial coffee by NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Leila Aley; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto

    2006-01-01

    Coffee is one of the beverages most widely consumed in the world and the 'cafezinho' is normally prepared from a blend of roasted powder of two species, Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora. Each one exhibits differences in their taste and in the chemical composition, especially in the caffeine percentage. There are several procedures proposed in the literature for caffeine determination in different samples like soft drinks, coffee, medicines, etc but most of them need a sample workup which involves at least one step of purification. This work describes the quantitative analysis of caffeine using 1 H NMR and the identification of the major components in commercial coffee samples using 1D and 2D NMR techniques without any sample pre-treatment. (author)

  4. Optimization of coffee (Coffea arabica transformation parameters using uidA and hpt genes: effect of osmotic pre-treatment, helium pressure and target distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés M Gatica

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to optimize the biolistic delivery parameters that affect the DNA delivery and stable expression of marker genes into coffee tissues (Coffea arabica. L. cvs. Caturra and Catuaí. The effect of osmotic preculture length, osmotic concentration of medium, Helium pressure and target distance on transient expression of the uidA gene in coffee leaves and somatic embryos were tested. The highest transient uidA expression was obtained when Caturra (18.3±2.8 and Catuaí (6.8±2.0 leaves and Catuaí embryos (80.0±7.4 were cultured for 5h on Yasuda medium complemented with 0.5M Mannitol +0.5M Sorbitol. The combination of 1100psi and a target distance of 9cm resulted in the highest number of blue spots per Caturra leaf segment (23.6±3.9, whereas for the Catuaí variety the combination of 1100psi and a target distance of six (10.2±1.9 and nine (8.2±1.9 cm gave the highest number of blue spots per leaf segment. The optimized protocol was tested with pCAMBIA 1 301 (uidA gene and the hpt gene, pCAMBIA 1 305.2 (uidA version GUSPlus ™ and the hpt gene and pCAMBIA 1 301-BAR (uidA gene and the bar gene. The highest number of blue spots was obtained when Caturra (54.6±5.7 and Catuaí (28.9±4.3 leaves were bombarded with pCAMBIA 1 305.2. Selection of bombarded coffee tissues with 100mg/l hygromicyn caused the oxidation of tissues. Rev. Biol. Trop. 57 (Suppl. 1: 151-160. Epub 2009 November 30.La presente investigación tuvo como objetivo optimizar los parámetros que afectan la incorporación y expresión de genes marcadores mediante biobalística en segmentos de hoja y embriones somáticos de café (Coffea arabica. L. cvs. Caturra y Catuaí. La mayor expresión transitoria del gen uidA en segmentos de hoja de Caturra (18.3±2.8 y Catuaí (6.8±2.0 y embriones somáticos de Catuaí (80.0±7.4 se obtuvo al cultivar los explantes por cinco horas previo al bombardeo en el medio Yasuda complementado con 0.5M mannitol+0.5M sorbitol

  5. Spatial distribution of the coffee-leaf-miner (Leucoptera coffeella) in an organic coffee (Coffea arabica L.) field in formation

    OpenAIRE

    Scalon, João Domingos; Universidade Federal de Lavras; Freitas, Gabriela Alves; DEX/UFLA; Avelar, Maria Betania Lopes; DEX/UFLA; Zacarias, Mauricio Sérgio; EPAMIG/EcoCentro

    2011-01-01

    Coffee production has been one of the economy pillars of many tropical countries. Unfortunately, this crop is susceptible to infestation by the coffee-leaf-miner (Leucoptera coffeella (Guérin-Mèneville & Perrottet, 1842)) which causes severe damage to coffee plantations with losses that may reach 80% of the total production. In recent years, researchers have been trying to develop practices for minimizing the use of pesticides in the coffee-leaf-miner control. It is well known that the un...

  6. Quantification of the Robusta fraction in a coffee blend via Raman spectroscopy: proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermelinger, Thomas; D'Ambrosio, Lucio; Klopprogge, Babette; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2011-09-14

    Among the 100 different known Coffea species, Coffea arabica L. (Arabica) and Coffea canephora Pierre (Robusta) are the only two of commercial interest. They differ in a range of agronomic, genetic, and chemical properties. Due to the significant price difference between Arabica and Robusta, there is an economic incentive to illicitly replace Arabica with Robusta. Therefore, it is crucial to have accurate methods to determine the Robusta-to-Arabica-ratio in blends. This paper presents the proof of principle of a new and fast approach to determine the Robusta fraction in a blend based on Raman spectroscopy. The oils of two references (a pure Robusta and pure Arabica coffee) and six blends thereof consisting of different Robusta and Arabica fractions were extracted using a Soxhlet system. The solutes were analyzed by means of Raman spectroscopy without further workup. Using the intensity ratio between two Raman peaks, one characteristic for kahweol and one characteristic for fatty acids, allowed determinination of the Robusta content in a given mixture. The intensity ratio is linearly dependent on the Robusta content of the compound. Above a Robusta content of 75 wt %, kahweol was not detectable. The Raman data are in agreement with results obtained from the very time-consuming multistep DIN 10777 procedures based on HPLC.

  7. An endoplasmic reticulum-localized Coffea arabica BURP domain-containing protein affects the response of transgenic Arabidopsis plants to diverse abiotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Sy Nguyen; Kang, Hunseung

    2017-11-01

    The Coffea arabica BURP domain-containing gene plays an important role in the response of transgenic Arabidopsis plants to abiotic stresses via regulating the level of diverse proteins. Although the functions of plant-specific BURP domain-containing proteins (BDP) have been determined for a few plants, their roles in the growth, development, and stress responses of most plant species, including coffee plant (Coffea arabica), are largely unknown. In this study, the function of a C. arabica BDP, designated CaBDP1, was investigated in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. The expression of CaBDP1 was highly modulated in coffee plants subjected to drought, cold, salt, or ABA. Confocal analysis of CaBDP1-GFP fusion proteins revealed that CaBDP1 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. The ectopic expression of CaBDP1 in Arabidopsis resulted in delayed germination of the transgenic plants under abiotic stress and in the presence of ABA. Cotyledon greening and seedling growth of the transgenic plants were inhibited in the presence of ABA due to the upregulation of ABA signaling-related genes like ABI3, ABI4, and ABI5. Proteome analysis revealed that the levels of several proteins are modulated in CaBDP1-expressing transgenic plants. The results of this study underscore the importance of BURP domain proteins in plant responses to diverse abiotic stresses.

  8. Method Development and Validation for the Determination of Caffeine: An Alkaloid from Coffea arabica by High-performance Liquid Chromatography Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveen, P; Lingaraju, H B; Deepak, M; Medhini, B; Prasad, K Shyam

    2018-01-01

    The present study was investigated to develop and validate a reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of caffeine from bean material of Coffee arabica. The separation was achieved on a reversed-phase C18 column using a mobile phase composed of water: methanol (50:50) at a flow rate of 1.0 mlmin-1. The detection was carried out on a UV detector at 272 nm. The developed method was validated according to the requirements for International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guidelines, which includes specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, limit of detection and limit of quantitation. The developed method validates good linearity with excellent correlation coefficient (R2 > 0.999). In repeatability and intermediate precision, the percentage relative standard deviation (% RSD) of peak area was less than 1% shows high precision of the method. The recovery rate for caffeine was within 98.78% - 101.28% indicates high accuracy of the method. The low limit of detection and limit of quantitation of caffeine enable the detection and quantitation of caffeine from C. arabica at low concentrations. The developed HPLC method is a simple, rapid, precisely, accurately and widely accepted and it is recommended for efficient assays in routine work. A simple, accurate, and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for caffeine from Coffea arabica has been developed and validated. The developed HPLC method was validated for linearity, specificity, precision, recovery, limits of detection, and limits of quantification by the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The results revealed that the proposed method is highly reliable. This method could be successfully applied for routine quality work analysis. Abbreviation Used: C. arabica : Coffee arabica, ICH: International Conference on Harmonisation, % RSD: Percentage Relative Standard Deviation, R2: Correlation Coefficient, ppm: Parts per million, LOD: Limits

  9. Perfil sensorial da bebida café (Coffea arabica L. determinado por análise tempo-intensidade Sensorial profile of beverage coffee (Coffea arabica L. determined by analysis time-intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene A. M. Monteiro

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o gosto amargo, sabor fermentado e sabor queimado de nove amostras (mole/clara, dura/clara, rio/clara, mole/expresso, dura/expresso, rio/expresso, mole/escura, dura/escura e rio/escura da bebida café (Coffea arabica L. por meio da análise Tempo-Intensidade (TI. Foram avaliados seis parâmetros da curva: tempo para atingir a intensidade máxima (TImáx, intensidade máxima do estímulo (Imáx, tempo correspondente ao ponto onde a intensidade máxima começa a declinar (Td, tempo de duração da intensidade máxima (Platô, área sob a curva (Área e tempo total de duração do estímulo (Ttot. A análise demonstrou que as amostras de torra escura tiveram maior intensidade máxima (Imáx e tempo de duração do estímulo (Ttot para gosto amargo e sabor queimado, sendo que as amostras de torra clara apresentaram menor intensidade destes estímulos. Em relação ao sabor fermentado, a amostra rio/expresso foi a que apresentou maior intensidade.The present work had as objective to evaluate the bitter taste, fermented flavor and burned flavor of nine samples (soft/light, hard/light, rio/light, soft/express, hard/express, rio/express, soft/dark, hard/dark and rio/dark of the drink coffee (Coffea arabica L. through the analysis Time-Intensity (TI. Six parameters of the curve were evaluated: time to reach the maximum intensity (TImáx, maximum intensity of the incentive (Imáx, time corresponding to the point where the maximum intensity begins to refuse (Td, time of duration of the maximum intensity (Plateau, area under the curve (Área and total time of duration of the incentive (Ttot. The analysis demonstrated that the samples of dark toast had larger maximum intensity (Imáx and time of duration of the incentive (Ttot for bitter taste and burned flavor, while the samples of light toast presented smaller intensity of these stimulus. For the fermented flavor, the sample rio/express was the one that

  10. Identification and Analysis of Jasmonate Pathway Genes in Coffea canephora (Robusta Coffee) by In Silico Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, Kosaraju; Sreenath, H L

    2017-07-01

    Coffea canephora is the commonly cultivated coffee species in the world along with Coffea arabica . Different pests and pathogens affect the production and quality of the coffee. Jasmonic acid (JA) is a plant hormone which plays an important role in plants growth, development, and defense mechanisms, particularly against insect pests. The key enzymes involved in the production of JA are lipoxygenase, allene oxide synthase, allene oxide cyclase, and 12-oxo-phytodienoic reductase. There is no report on the genes involved in JA pathway in coffee plants. We made an attempt to identify and analyze the genes coding for these enzymes in C. canephora . First, protein sequences of jasmonate pathway genes from model plant Arabidopsis thaliana were identified in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. These protein sequences were used to search the web-based database Coffee Genome Hub to identify homologous protein sequences in C. canephora genome using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST). Homologous protein sequences for key genes were identified in the C. canephora genome database. Protein sequences of the top matches were in turn used to search in NCBI database using BLAST tool to confirm the identity of the selected proteins and to identify closely related genes in species. The protein sequences from C. canephora database and the top matches in NCBI were aligned, and phylogenetic trees were constructed using MEGA6 software and identified the genetic distance of the respective genes. The study identified the four key genes of JA pathway in C. canephora , confirming the conserved nature of the pathway in coffee. The study expected to be useful to further explore the defense mechanisms of coffee plants. JA is a plant hormone that plays an important role in plant defense against insect pests. Genes coding for the 4 key enzymes involved in the production of JA viz., LOX, AOS, AOC, and OPR are identified in C. canephora (robusta coffee) by

  11. Prediction of specialty coffee cup quality based on near infrared spectra of green coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolessa, Kassaye; Rademaker, Michael; De Baets, Bernard; Boeckx, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    The growing global demand for specialty coffee increases the need for improved coffee quality assessment methods. Green bean coffee quality analysis is usually carried out by physical (e.g. black beans, immature beans) and cup quality (e.g. acidity, flavour) evaluation. However, these evaluation methods are subjective, costly, time consuming, require sample preparation and may end up in poor grading systems. This calls for the development of a rapid, low-cost, reliable and reproducible analytical method to evaluate coffee quality attributes and eventually chemical compounds of interest (e.g. chlorogenic acid) in coffee beans. The aim of this study was to develop a model able to predict coffee cup quality based on NIR spectra of green coffee beans. NIR spectra of 86 samples of green Arabica beans of varying quality were analysed. Partial least squares (PLS) regression method was used to develop a model correlating spectral data to cupping score data (cup quality). The selected PLS model had a good predictive power for total specialty cup quality and its individual quality attributes (overall cup preference, acidity, body and aftertaste) showing a high correlation coefficient with r-values of 90, 90,78, 72 and 72, respectively, between measured and predicted cupping scores for 20 out of 86 samples. The corresponding root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) was 1.04, 0.22, 0.27, 0.24 and 0.27 for total specialty cup quality, overall cup preference, acidity, body and aftertaste, respectively. The results obtained suggest that NIR spectra of green coffee beans are a promising tool for fast and accurate prediction of coffee quality and for classifying green coffee beans into different specialty grades. However, the model should be further tested for coffee samples from different regions in Ethiopia and test if one generic or region-specific model should be developed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of biocontrol ability of native strains of Trichoderma spp on Rhizoctonia and Fusarium sp in coffee (Coffea arabica in experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Rudy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the indiscriminate use agrochemicals in conventional agriculture, it is causing pollution problems in the environment (soil, air and water, hence the search for alternatives that contribute to agricultural production by agro-chemical free sustainable production. This paper studies the biological control of damping off in coffee (Coffea arabica by applying antagonistic fungus Trichoderma sp. Under experimental conditions at laboratory facilities of the Academic Unit Carmen Pampa Campesina, a community of Carmen Pampa, Township Coroico. The aim of this study was to biologically control the "damping off", they found two genera that cause damping off in seedbed of coffee: Rhizoctonia sp. and Fusarium sp.To determine the percentage of growth and control in the culture medium, we used the method of counting quarters, where they gave the mycelial growth of antagonistic fungus Trichoderma sp., And the fungal pathogens Rhizoctonia sp. and Fusarium sp. Statistically there was a highly significant difference in the variable growth rate of Trichoderma sp. on pathogenic fungi Rhizoctonia sp. and Fusarium sp. at 3, 6 and 9 days that announces the time factor and treatments are interdependent. The control variable showed a highly significant difference in the time factor and treatment, but the interaction shows no significant difference this makes known factors that are independent, so the fungus Trichoderma sp. not depend on time in treatment, thus showing its inhibitory power to Rhizoctonia sp. and Fusarium sp .. This test gives references that there is antagonistic fungus control on the fungal pathogens Rhizoctonia sp. and Fusarium sp.

  13. Towards a Collaborative Research: A Case Study on Linking Science to Farmers’ Perceptions and Knowledge on Arabica Coffee Pests and Diseases and Its Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebig, Theresa; Läderach, Peter; Poehling, Hans-Michael; Kucel, Patrick; Van Asten, Piet; Avelino, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The scientific community has recognized the importance of integrating farmer’s perceptions and knowledge (FPK) for the development of sustainable pest and disease management strategies. However, the knowledge gap between indigenous and scientific knowledge still contributes to misidentification of plant health constraints and poor adoption of management solutions. This is particularly the case in the context of smallholder farming in developing countries. In this paper, we present a case study on coffee production in Uganda, a sector depending mostly on smallholder farming facing a simultaneous and increasing number of socio-ecological pressures. The objectives of this study were (i) to examine and relate FPK on Arabica Coffee Pests and Diseases (CPaD) to altitude and the vegetation structure of the production systems; (ii) to contrast results with perceptions from experts and (iii) to compare results with field observations, in order to identify constraints for improving the information flow between scientists and farmers. Data were acquired by means of interviews and workshops. One hundred and fifty farmer households managing coffee either at sun exposure, under shade trees or inter-cropped with bananas and spread across an altitudinal gradient were selected. Field sampling of the two most important CPaD was conducted on a subset of 34 plots. The study revealed the following findings: (i) Perceptions on CPaD with respect to their distribution across altitudes and perceived impact are partially concordant among farmers, experts and field observations (ii) There are discrepancies among farmers and experts regarding management practices and the development of CPaD issues of the previous years. (iii) Field observations comparing CPaD in different altitudes and production systems indicate ambiguity of the role of shade trees. According to the locality-specific variability in CPaD pressure as well as in FPK, the importance of developing spatially variable and

  14. Towards a Collaborative Research: A Case Study on Linking Science to Farmers' Perceptions and Knowledge on Arabica Coffee Pests and Diseases and Its Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebig, Theresa; Jassogne, Laurence; Rahn, Eric; Läderach, Peter; Poehling, Hans-Michael; Kucel, Patrick; Van Asten, Piet; Avelino, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The scientific community has recognized the importance of integrating farmer's perceptions and knowledge (FPK) for the development of sustainable pest and disease management strategies. However, the knowledge gap between indigenous and scientific knowledge still contributes to misidentification of plant health constraints and poor adoption of management solutions. This is particularly the case in the context of smallholder farming in developing countries. In this paper, we present a case study on coffee production in Uganda, a sector depending mostly on smallholder farming facing a simultaneous and increasing number of socio-ecological pressures. The objectives of this study were (i) to examine and relate FPK on Arabica Coffee Pests and Diseases (CPaD) to altitude and the vegetation structure of the production systems; (ii) to contrast results with perceptions from experts and (iii) to compare results with field observations, in order to identify constraints for improving the information flow between scientists and farmers. Data were acquired by means of interviews and workshops. One hundred and fifty farmer households managing coffee either at sun exposure, under shade trees or inter-cropped with bananas and spread across an altitudinal gradient were selected. Field sampling of the two most important CPaD was conducted on a subset of 34 plots. The study revealed the following findings: (i) Perceptions on CPaD with respect to their distribution across altitudes and perceived impact are partially concordant among farmers, experts and field observations (ii) There are discrepancies among farmers and experts regarding management practices and the development of CPaD issues of the previous years. (iii) Field observations comparing CPaD in different altitudes and production systems indicate ambiguity of the role of shade trees. According to the locality-specific variability in CPaD pressure as well as in FPK, the importance of developing spatially variable and relevant

  15. Towards a Collaborative Research: A Case Study on Linking Science to Farmers' Perceptions and Knowledge on Arabica Coffee Pests and Diseases and Its Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Liebig

    Full Text Available The scientific community has recognized the importance of integrating farmer's perceptions and knowledge (FPK for the development of sustainable pest and disease management strategies. However, the knowledge gap between indigenous and scientific knowledge still contributes to misidentification of plant health constraints and poor adoption of management solutions. This is particularly the case in the context of smallholder farming in developing countries. In this paper, we present a case study on coffee production in Uganda, a sector depending mostly on smallholder farming facing a simultaneous and increasing number of socio-ecological pressures. The objectives of this study were (i to examine and relate FPK on Arabica Coffee Pests and Diseases (CPaD to altitude and the vegetation structure of the production systems; (ii to contrast results with perceptions from experts and (iii to compare results with field observations, in order to identify constraints for improving the information flow between scientists and farmers. Data were acquired by means of interviews and workshops. One hundred and fifty farmer households managing coffee either at sun exposure, under shade trees or inter-cropped with bananas and spread across an altitudinal gradient were selected. Field sampling of the two most important CPaD was conducted on a subset of 34 plots. The study revealed the following findings: (i Perceptions on CPaD with respect to their distribution across altitudes and perceived impact are partially concordant among farmers, experts and field observations (ii There are discrepancies among farmers and experts regarding management practices and the development of CPaD issues of the previous years. (iii Field observations comparing CPaD in different altitudes and production systems indicate ambiguity of the role of shade trees. According to the locality-specific variability in CPaD pressure as well as in FPK, the importance of developing spatially variable

  16. Multi-scale measurements show limited soil greenhouse GAS emissions in Kenyan smallholder coffee-dairy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortiz-Gonzalo, Daniel; de Neergaard, Andreas; Vaast, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    the three main cropping systems found in the area: 1) coffee (Coffea arabica L.); 2) Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum); and 3) maize intercropped with beans (Zea mays and Phaseolus vulgaris). Within these fields, chambers were allocated on fertilised and unfertilised locations to capture spatial...

  17. Effects of shade on growth, production and quality of coffee (Coffea arabica) in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Bote, A.D.; Struik, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The research work was conducted to evaluate the effect of shade on growth and production of coffee plants. To achieve this, growth and productivity of coffee plants growing under shade trees were compared with those of coffee plants growing under direct sun light. Different physiological, environmental and quality parameters were assessed for both treatments. Shade trees protected coffee plants against adverse environmental stresses such as high soil temperatures and low relative humidity. Sh...

  18. Effects of shade on growth, production and quality of coffee (Coffea arabica) in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bote, A.D.; Struik, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    The research work was conducted to evaluate the effect of shade on growth and production of coffee plants. To achieve this, growth and productivity of coffee plants growing under shade trees were compared with those of coffee plants growing under direct sun light. Different physiological,

  19. Inter-genomic DNA Exchanges and Homeologous Gene Silencing Shaped the Nascent Allopolyploid Coffee Genome (Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Lashermes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Allopolyploidization is a biological process that has played a major role in plant speciation and evolution. Genomic changes are common consequences of polyploidization, but their dynamics over time are still poorly understood. Coffea arabica, a recently formed allotetraploid, was chosen to study genetic changes that accompany allopolyploid formation. Both RNA-seq and DNA-seq data were generated from two genetically distant C. arabica accessions. Genomic structural variation was investigated using C. canephora, one of its diploid progenitors, as reference genome. The fate of 9047 duplicate homeologous genes was inferred and compared between the accessions. The pattern of SNP density along the reference genome was consistent with the allopolyploid structure. Large genomic duplications or deletions were not detected. Two homeologous copies were retained and expressed in 96% of the genes analyzed. Nevertheless, duplicated genes were found to be affected by various genomic changes leading to homeolog loss or silencing. Genetic and epigenetic changes were evidenced that could have played a major role in the stabilization of the unique ancestral allotetraploid and its subsequent diversification. While the early evolution of C. arabica mainly involved homeologous crossover exchanges, the later stage appears to have relied on more gradual evolution involving gene conversion and homeolog silencing.

  20. Soil phosphorus dynamics and availability and irrigated coffee yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Henrique Pereira Reis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Research data have demonstrated that the P demand of coffee (Coffea arabica L. is similar to that of short-cycle crops. In this context, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of annual P fertilization on the soil P status by the quantification of labile, moderately labile, low-labile, and total P fractions, associating them to coffee yield. The experiment was installed in a typical dystrophic Red Latosol (Oxisol cultivated with irrigated coffee annually fertilized with triple superphosphate at rates of 0, 50, 100, 200, and 400 kg ha-1 P2O5. Phosphorus fractions were determined in two soil layers: 0-10 and 10-20 cm. The P leaf contents and coffee yield in 2008 were also evaluated. The irrigated coffee responded to phosphate fertilization in the production phase with gains of up to 138 % in coffee yield by the application of 400 kg ha-1 P2O5. Coffee leaf P contents increased with P applications and stabilized around 1.98 g kg-1, at rates of 270 kg ha-1 P2O5 and higher. Soil P application caused, in general, an increase in bioavailable P fractions, which constitute the main soil P reservoir.

  1. Compostos bioativos e atividade antioxidante do café (Coffea arabica L. Coffee (Coffea arabica L. bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Andrade Abrahão

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Conduziu-se este trabalho, com a proposta de avaliar o potencial antioxidante de dois padrões da bebida do café (rio e mole, verdes e torrados, utilizando modelos in vitro. Foram determinados o teor de fenólicos totais, ácido clorogênico (ácido 5-cafeoilquínico e cafeína das bebidas. A avaliação in vitro do potencial antioxidante foi investigada pelos métodos de captação do radical DPPH e pelo poder redutor de metais. Os dois padrões de bebida do café analisados não apresentaram diferenças quanto aos parâmetros cor, ácido clorogênico e cafeína. Observou-se que houve redução nos valores de ácido clorogênico à medida que os grãos foram torrados. O café verde bebida rio apresentou maior teor de fenólicos totais que o café bebida mole. Nos grãos torrados não foi observada diferença. A bebida do café independente da qualidade sensorial apresentou alto poder redutor e importante atividade sequestrante de radicais livres. A atividade sequestrante de radicais livres foi significativamente superior nas amostras obtidas a partir dos grãos torrados, quando comparados aos extratos dos grãos verdes. A torração, porém, reduziu o poder redutor das bebidas do café. Os dados obtidos permitem sugerir que, independente da classificação sensorial da bebida, o café apresenta expressiva capacidade sequestrante de radicais livres e poder redutor de metais.The present work intended to evaluate the antioxidant potential of two coffee sorts (soft and river, green and roasted, in vitro. Phenolic compounds content, chlorogenic acid (5-cafeoyolquinic and caffeine of the beverages were evaluated. In vitro evaluation of the antioxidant potential was investigated by DPPH radical scavenging assay and by reducing the power of metals. Both sorts of coffee did not present statistical differences for color, chlorogenic acid and caffeine. After roasting, 5-cafeoyolquinic acid levels decreased. River coffee beverage presented greater content

  2. Seed-Specific Stable Expression of the ?-AI1 Inhibitor in Coffee Grains and the In Vivo Implications for the Development of the Coffee Berry Borer

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque, ?rika V. S.; Bezerra, Caroline A.; Romero, Juan V.; Valencia, Jorge W. A.; Valencia-Jim?nez, Arnubio; Pimenta, Lucas M.; Barbosa, Aulus E. A. D.; Silva, Maria C. M.; Meneguim, Ana M.; S?, Maria Eug?nia L.; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Fernandez, Diana; Grossi-de-S?, Maria F.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic transformation of coffee (Coffea spp.), the second most traded commodity worldwide, is an alternative approach to introducing features that cannot be introgressed by traditional crossings. The transgenic stability, heritability and quantitative and spatial expression patterns of the seed-specific promoter phytohemagglutinin (PHA-L) from Phaseolus vulgaris were characterized in genetically modified C. arabica expressing the ?-amylase inhibitor-1 (?-AI1) gene. The ?-AI1 inhibitor shows ...

  3. Los Chronica Byzantia-Arabica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos MARTÍN

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Datation (743-744, contextualisation et traduction en espagnol de la Chronica byzantia-arabica.Fechación (743-744, contextualización y traducción al español de la Chronica byzantia-arabica.es

  4. Avaliação da fertilidade dos solos de sistemas agroflorestais com cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L. em Lavras-MG Evaluation of soil fertility in agroforest systems with coffee trees (Coffea arabica L. in Lavras-MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Grandi Salgado

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a fertilidade dos solos em um sistema agroflorestal composto por cafeeiros (Coffea arábica L. - Mundo Novo, ingazeiros (Inga vera Willd e grevíleas (Grevilea robusta A. Cunn, situado em Lavras, Minas Gerais, foi instalado o presente experimento. Usou-se um delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado com três tratamentos e sete repetições. Os tratamentos foram: a cafeeiros a pleno sol, b cafeeiros consorciados com ingazeiros e c cafeeiros consociados com grevílea. Os espaçamentos dos cafeeiros nos três sistemas foi 4 x 1 m, para o ingazeiro 8 m x 15 m e para a grevílea 12 m x 10 m. Aos 15 anos de idade do cafeeiro e do ingazeiro e aos 9 anos da grevílea foram avaliadas as seguintes características dos solos, pH, acidez potencial (H+Al, alumínio trocável (Al+3, bases trocáveis (Ca+2 e Mg+2, potássio disponível (K+, fósforo disponível(P, enxofre (S, CTC efetiva (T, soma de bases (SB, saturação de bases (V e matéria orgânica (MO. Os resultados foram submetidos à analise de variância e as médias, comparadas pelo teste de Scott-Knott. Após a análise dos dados, concluiu-se que, embora tenha havido diferenças entre alguns elementos estudados, as características químicas dos solos nos três sistemas não foram severamente afetadas.The objective of this wark was to evaluat e the soil fertility in an agroforest system using coffee trees (Coffea arabica L - Mundo Novo, inga trees (Inga vera Wild and grevillea trees (Grevillea robusta A Cunn situated in Lavras, Minas Geris. A completely randomized experimental design with tree treatments and seven replicates was utilized. The treatments were : a coffee trees in full sunshine; b coffee trees mixed with inga trees and c coffee trees mixed with grevillea trees. Tree spacings in the three systems were 4 x 1m for coffee, 8 m x 15 m for inga and 12 x 10 m for grevillea. With coffee and inga trees at 15 years of age and grevillea trees at 9 years of age

  5. Viability of drying coffee using liquefied petroleum gas-LPG, firewood eucalyptus and husks of coffee; Viabilidade da secagem do cafe usando GLP, lenha de eucalipto e palha de cafe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrinho, J.C.; Silva, J.N. da; Silva, J.S.; Lacerda Filho, A.F. de [Vicosa Univ., MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola]. E-mail: jcardoso@alunos.ufv.br; jadir@mail.ufv.br; desousae@mail.ufv.br; alacerda@mail.ufv.br

    2000-07-01

    An analysis of the specific consumption of energy and of the comparative costs of the use of the Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG), eucalyptus firewood and coffee husks as sources of energy in the drying of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) was done. Dryers of intermittent crossed flows were used with temperature of the drying air of 60 deg C. The drying in yard was used as witness. It is ended that the use in the different form of energy did not alter the final quality of the product, and that LPG is more efficient in terms of specific consumption of energy that the husks of coffee and eucalyptus firewood, even so, of cost approximately four times or more higher than that of the other fuels. (author)

  6. Climatic factors directly impact the volatile organic compound fingerprint in green Arabica coffee bean as well as coffee beverage quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, B; Boulanger, R; Dussert, S; Ribeyre, F; Berthiot, L; Descroix, F; Joët, T

    2012-12-15

    Coffee grown at high elevations fetches a better price than that grown in lowland regions. This study was aimed at determining whether climatic conditions during bean development affected sensory perception of the coffee beverage and combinations of volatile compounds in green coffee. Green coffee samples from 16 plots representative of the broad range of climatic variations in Réunion Island were compared by sensory analysis. Volatiles were extracted by solid phase micro-extraction and the volatile compounds were analysed by GC-MS. The results revealed that, among the climatic factors, the mean air temperature during seed development greatly influenced the sensory profile. Positive quality attributes such as acidity, fruity character and flavour quality were correlated and typical of coffees produced at cool climates. Two volatile compounds (ethanal and acetone) were identified as indicators of these cool temperatures. Among detected volatiles, most of the alcohols, aldehydes, hydrocarbons and ketones appeared to be positively linked to elevated temperatures and high solar radiation, while the sensory profiles displayed major defects (i.e. green, earthy flavour). Two alcohols (butan-1,3-diol and butan-2,3-diol) were closely correlated with a reduction in aromatic quality, acidity and an increase in earthy and green flavours. We assumed that high temperatures induce accumulation of these compounds in green coffee, and would be detected as off-flavours, even after roasting. Climate change, which generally involves a substantial increase in average temperatures in mountainous tropical regions, could be expected to have a negative impact on coffee quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing polyphenols content and antioxidant activity in coffee beans according to origin and the degree of roasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybkowska, Ewa; Sadowska, Anna; Rakowska, Rita; Dębowska, Maria; Świderski, Franciszek; Świąder, Katarzyna

    The roasting stage constitutes a key component in the manufacturing process of natural coffee because temperature elicits changes in bioactive compounds such as polyphenols and that Maillard-reaction compounds appear, thus affecting the product’s sensory and antioxidant properties. Actual contents of these compounds may depend on which region the coffee is cultivated as well as the extent to which the beans are roasted To determine polyphenols content and antioxidant activity in the ‘Arabica’ coffee type coming from various world regions of its cultivation and which have undergone industrial roasting. Also to establish which coffee, taking into account the degree of roasting (ie. light, medium and strong), is nutritionally the most beneficial The study material was natural coffee beans (100% Arabica) roasted to various degrees, as aforementioned, that had been cultivated in Brazil, Ethiopia, Columbia and India. Polyphenols were measured in the coffee beans by spectrophotometric means based on the Folin-Ciocalteu reaction, whereas antioxidant activity was measured colourimetrically using ABTS+ cat-ionic radicals Polyphenol content and antioxidant activity were found to depend both on the coffee’s origin and degree of roasting. Longer roasting times resulted in greater polyphenol degradation. The highest polyphenol concentrations were found in lightly roasted coffee, ranging 39.27 to 43.0 mg/g, whereas levels in medium and strongly roasted coffee respectively ranged 34.06 to 38.43 mg/g and 29.21 to 36.89 mg/g. Antioxidant activity however significantly rose with the degree of roasting, where strongly roasted coffee had higher such activity than lightly roasted coffee. This can be explained by the formation of Maillard-reaction compounds during roasting, leading then to the formation of antioxidant melanoidin compounds which, to a large extent, compensate for the decrease in polyphenols during roasting Polyphenols levels and antioxidant activities in the

  8. Identification and chromosomal distribution of copia-like retrotransposon sequences in the coffee (Coffea L. genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Carlos Herrera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of copia-like transposable elements in seven coffee (Coffea sp. species, including the cultivated Coffea arabica, was investigated. The highly conserved domains of the reverse transcriptase (RT present in the copia retrotransposons were amplified by PCR using degenerated primers. Fragments of roughly 300 bp were obtained and the nucleotide sequence was determined for 36 clones, 19 of which showed good quality. The deduced amino acid sequences were compared by multiple alignment analysis. The data suggested two distinct coffee RT groups, designated as CRTG1 and CRTG2. The sequence identities among the groups ranged from 52 to 60% for CRTG1 and 74 to 85% for CRTG2. The multiple alignment analysis revealed that some of the clones in CRTG1 were closely related to the representative elements present in other plant species such as Brassica napus, Populus ciliata and Picea abis. Furthermore, the chromosomal localization of the RT domains in C. arabica and their putative ancestors was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis. FISH signals were observed throughout the chromosomes following a similar dispersed pattern with some localized regions exhibiting higher concentrations of those elements, providing new evidence of their relative conservation and stability in the coffee genome

  9. Discrimination of organic coffee via Fourier transform infrared-photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Delgado, Fernando; Marín, Ernesto; Cortés-Hernández, Diego Mauricio; Mejía-Morales, Claudia; García-Salcedo, Angela Janet

    2012-08-30

    Procedures for the evaluation of the origin and quality of ground and roasted coffee are constantly needed for the associated industry due to complexity of the related market. Conventional Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can be used for detecting changes in functional groups of compounds, such as coffee. However, dispersion, reflection and non-homogeneity of the sample matrix can cause problems resulting in low spectral quality. On the other hand, sample preparation frequently takes place in a destructive way. To overcome these difficulties, in this work a photoacoustic cell has been adapted as a detector in a FTIR spectrophotometer to perform a study of roasted and ground coffee from three varieties of Coffea arabica grown by organic and conventional methods. Comparison between spectra of coffee recorded by FTIR-photoacoustic spectrometry (PAS) and by FTIR spectrophotometry showed a better resolution of the former method, which, aided by principal components analysis, allowed the identification of some absorption bands that allow the discrimination between organic and conventional coffee. The results obtained provide information about the spectral behavior of coffee powder which can be useful for establishing discrimination criteria. It has been demonstrated that FTIR-PAS can be a useful experimental tool for the characterization of coffee. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Espresso coffees, caffeine and chlorogenic acid intake: potential health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, Thomas W M; Stalmach, Angelique; Lean, Michael E J; Crozier, Alan

    2012-01-01

    HPLC analysis of 20 commercial espresso coffees revealed 6-fold differences in caffeine levels, a 17-fold range of caffeoylquinic acid contents, and 4-fold differences in the caffeoylquinic acid : caffeine ratio. These variations reflect differences in batch-to-batch bean composition, possible blending of arabica with robusta beans, as well as roasting and grinding procedures, but the predominant factor is likely to be the amount of beans used in the coffee-making/barista processes. The most caffeine in a single espresso was 322 mg and a further three contained >200 mg, exceeding the 200 mg day(-1) upper limit recommended during pregnancy by the UK Food Standards Agency. This snap-shot of high-street expresso coffees suggests the published assumption that a cup of strong coffee contains 50 mg caffeine may be misleading. Consumers at risk of toxicity, including pregnant women, children and those with liver disease, may unknowingly ingest excessive caffeine from a single cup of espresso coffee. As many coffee houses prepare larger volume coffees, such as Latte and Cappuccino, by dilution of a single or double shot of expresso, further study on these products is warranted. New data are needed to provide informative labelling, with attention to bean variety, preparation, and barista methods.

  11. Allelopathic effects of two cover crops Commelina diffusa Burm. F. and Tradescantia zebrina Shunltz on Coffea arabica L.

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    Georgina Berroa Navarro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathic effect of the cover crops Tradescantia zebrina Shunltz (cucaracha and Commelina diffusa Burm. F. (canutillo were evaluated on Coffea arabica Lin. seeds Caturra Rojo variety. Germination tests were carried out “in vitro” and it was evaluated the root longitude, percentage of total germination and period of germination, as well as the height of the plant and the emergency percentage for the incorporation tests to the soil. It was also carried out, to both over crops, the preliminary chemical qualitative characterization. The results showed that the extracts of T. zebrina and of C. diffusa stimulated the “in vitro” germination and growth of C. arabica at different concentration levels. The incorporation to the soil of the extracts of C. diffusa stimulated the development of the plants of C. arabica, in a significant way, that supposes a considerable advantage in that concerns to the employment of these cover crops, when not implying noxious effects beside all the benefits implied when using cover crops. These last ones go from the protection and improvement of the properties of the soil, to the control of the spontaneous flora in the coffee agroecosystems.

  12. Seed-specific stable expression of the alpha-AI1 inhibitor in coffee grains and the in vivo implications for the development of the coffee berry borer

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque, E. V. S.; Bezerra, C. A.; Romero, J. V.; Valencia, J. W. A.; Valencia-Jimenez, A.; Pimenta, L. M.; Barbosa, Aead; Silva, M. C. M.; Meneguim, A. M.; Sa, M. E. L.; Engler, G.; de Almeida-Engler, J.; Fernandez, Diana; Grossi-de-Sa, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic transformation of coffee (Coffea spp.), the second most traded commodity worldwide, is an alternative approach to introducing features that cannot be introgressed by traditional crossings. The transgenic stability, heritability and quantitative and spatial expression patterns of the seed-specific promoter phytohemagglutinin (PHA-L) from Phaseolus vulgaris were characterized in genetically modified C. arabica expressing the alpha-amylase inhibitor-1 (alpha-AI1) gene. The alpha-AI1 inhi...

  13. Identification of novel and conserved microRNAs in Coffea canephora and Coffea arabica

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    Guilherme Loss-Morais

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As microRNAs (miRNAs are important regulators of many biological processes, a series of small RNAomes from plants have been produced in the last decade. However, miRNA data from several groups of plants are still lacking, including some economically important crops. Here microRNAs from Coffea canephora leaves were profiled and 58 unique sequences belonging to 33 families were found, including two novel microRNAs that have never been described before in plants. Some of the microRNA sequences were also identified in Coffea arabica that, together with C. canephora, correspond to the two major sources of coffee production in the world. The targets of almost all miRNAs were also predicted on coffee expressed sequences. This is the first report of novel miRNAs in the genus Coffea, and also the first in the plant order Gentianales. The data obtained establishes the basis for the understanding of the complex miRNA-target network on those two important crops.

  14. Detection of enterotoxins produced by B. cereus through PCR analysis of ground and roasted coffee samples in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Cyllene de Matos Ornelas da Cunha Corrêa de Souza

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is one of the most appreciated drinks in the world. Coffee ground is obtained from the fruit of a small plant that belongs to the genus Coffea. Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora robusta are the two most commercially important species. They are more commonly known as arabica and robusta, respectively. Two-thirds of Coffea arabica plants are grown in South and Central America, and Eastern Africa - the place of origin for this coffee species. Contamination by microorganisms has been a major matter affecting coffee quality in Brazil, mainly due to the harvesting method adopted. Brazilian harvests are based on fruits collected from the ground mixed with those that fall on collection cloths. As the Bacillus cereus bacterium frequently uses the soil as its environmental reservoir, it is easily capable of becoming a contaminant. This study aimed to evaluate the contamination and potential of B. cereus enterotoxin genes encoding the HBL and NHE complexes, which were observed in strains of ground and roasted coffee samples sold in Rio de Janeiro. The PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction results revealed high potential of enterotoxin production in the samples. The method described by Speck (1984 was used for the isolation of contaminants. The investigation of the potential production of enterotoxins through isolates of the microorganism was performed using the B. cereus enterotoxin Reverse Passive Latex Agglutination test-kit (BCET-RPLA, Oxoid, according to the manufacturer's instructions. The potential of enterotoxin production was investigated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods for hblA, hblD and hblC genes (encoding hemolysin HBL and for nheA, nheB and nheC genes (encoding non-hemolytic enterotoxin - NHE. Of all the 17 strains, 100% were positive for at least 1 enterotoxin gene; 52.9% (9/17 were positive for the 3 genes encoding the HBL complex; 35.3% (6/17 were positive for the three NHE encoding genes; and 29.4% (5/17 were positive for

  15. Alterações morfofisiológicas em folhas de Coffea arabica L. cv. "Oeiras" sob influência do sombreamento por Acacia mangium Willd Morphophysiological alterations in leaves of Coffea arabica L. cv. 'Oeiras' shaded by Acacia mangium Willd

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    Inês Angélica Cordeiro Gomes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Diferenças na disponibilidade de radiação podem causar modificações na estrutura e função das folhas do cafeeiro, que podem responder de maneira diferencial à radiação por alterações morfológicas, anatômicas, de crescimento e na taxa fotossintética. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar características morfofisiológicas de cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L. cv. "Oeiras" sombreados por acácia (Acacia mangium Willd. na época seca e chuvosa no sul de Minas Gerais. As maiores taxas fotossintéticas e maiores espessuras da epiderme adaxial foram observadas na estação chuvosa nas linhas de cafeeiros a pleno sol. O sombreamento influenciou em menor espessura das folhas e em espaços intercelulares maiores no tecido esponjoso. Foi também verificada mudança na forma dos cloroplastos, os quais apresentaram-se mais alongados em folhas de cafeeiros a pleno sol quando relacionados aos arborizados.Light availability is one of the most important environmental factors affecting leaf structure and functions in coffee plants that can respond differently to radiation by changes in leaf anatomy, morphology, growth and photosynthetic rate. The objective of this research was evaluate some morphophysiological aspects in leaves of coffee (Coffea arabica L. cv. 'Oeiras' cropped under shelter trees in the south of Minas Gerais during the rainy and dry season. The shade caused lower leaves thickness and higher intercellular spaces in spongious tissue. There was also verified a change in chloroplast shape, which showed more elongated in coffee tree kept at full sunlight in relation to that ones maintained on shading.

  16. Biogenic amine profile in unripe Arabica coffee beans processed according to dry and wet methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Eduardo C; Pereira, Rosemary G F A; Borém, Flávio M; Mendes, Eulália; de Lima, Renato R; Fernandes, José O; Casal, Susana

    2012-04-25

    Immature coffee fruit processing contributes to a high amount of defective beans, which determines a significant amount of low-quality coffee sold in the Brazilian internal market. Unripe bean processing was tested, taking the levels of bioactive amines as criteria for evaluating the extent of fermentation and establishing the differences between processing methods. The beans were processed by the dry method after being mechanically depulped immediately after harvest or after a 12 h resting period in a dry pile or immersed in water. Seven bioactive amines were quantified: putrescine, spermine, spermidine, serotonin, cadaverine, histamine, and tyramine, with global amounts ranging from 71.8 to 80.3 mg/kg. The levels of spermine and spermidine were lower in the unripe depulped coffee than in the natural coffee. The specific conditions of dry and wet processing also influenced cadaverine levels, and histamine was reduced in unripe depulped coffee. A resting period of 12 h does not induce significant alteration on the beans and can be improved if performed in water. These results confirm that peeling immature coffee can decrease fermentation processes while providing more uniform drying, thus reducing the number of defects and potentially increasing beverage quality.

  17. Características fisiológicas e de crescimento de cafeeiro sombreado com guandu e cultivado a pleno sol Physiological characteristics and growth of coffee plants grown under shade of pigeonpea and unshaded

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    Heverly Morais

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available O conhecimento dos efeitos do sombreamento sobre a fisiologia de cafeeiros é importante para se determinar níveis ótimos de radiação e temperatura, bem como para subsidiar estudos sobre o crescimento de plantas sombreadas, a fim de determinar a arquitetura ideal do cafeeiro que maximize a captura da radiação solar disponível em ambientes sombreados. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar características fisiológicas e de crescimento de cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L. cultivados sob sombreamento denso com guandu (Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp. e a pleno sol. O baixo nível de radiação incidente sobre os cafeeiros sombreados com guandu resultou em decréscimos na taxa fotossintética e na transpiração, maior altura de planta, folhas maiores e com menor quantidade de matéria seca. Esses resultados indicam que o excesso de sombra afeta drasticamente a fisiologia e morfologia de C. arabica.The characterization of shade effects on the physiology of coffee is important to determine optimum levels of radiation and temperature, as well as to subsidize studies on growth of shaded plants aiming at determining the ideal coffee plant architecture that maximizes the capture of the available solar radiation in shaded environments. The objective of this work was to evaluate physiological and growth characteristics of coffee (Coffea arabica L. shaded with pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp. and under full sun. The low level of incident radiation on the coffee shaded with pigeonpea caused decreases in the photosynthetic rate and transpiration, increased plant height and leaf size, but diminished leaf dry matter. These results indicate that the excess of shade drastically affects the physiology and morphology of C. arabica.

  18. Seed-Specific Stable Expression of the α-AI1 Inhibitor in Coffee Grains and the In Vivo Implications for the Development of the Coffee Berry Borer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Érika V S; Bezerra, Caroline A; Romero, Juan V; Valencia, Jorge W A; Valencia-Jiménez, Arnubio; Pimenta, Lucas M; Barbosa, Aulus E A D; Silva, Maria C M; Meneguim, Ana M; Sá, Maria Eugênia L; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida-Engler, Janice; Fernandez, Diana; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria F

    Genetic transformation of coffee ( Coffea spp.), the second most traded commodity worldwide, is an alternative approach to introducing features that cannot be introgressed by traditional crossings. The transgenic stability, heritability and quantitative and spatial expression patterns of the seed-specific promoter phytohemagglutinin (PHA-L) from Phaseolus vulgaris were characterized in genetically modified C. arabica expressing the α-amylase inhibitor-1 ( α-AI1 ) gene. The α-AI1 inhibitor shows considerable activity toward digestive enzymes of the coffee berry borer (CBB) Hypothenemus hampei . This insect pest expends its life cycle almost entirely in coffee berries. Transgene containment in the fruit is important to meeting food and environmental safety requirements for releasing genetically modified (GM) crops. PCR analysis of T2 coffee plants showed a Mendelian single-copy segregation pattern. Ectopic transgene expression was only detected in coffee grains, as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR analysis of different plant tissues. An intense immunocytochemical signal associated with α-AI1 protein expression was localized to endospermic cells. In addition, a delay in the larval development of CBB was observed after challenging transgenic coffee seeds with the insect. These results indicate that the PHA-L promoter might be a useful tool in coffee for the seed-specific expression of genes related to coffee bean productivity, quality and pest protection. The biotechnological applicability of the α-AI1 gene for controlling CBB is also discussed. This work is the first report showing a seed-specific transgene expression in coffee plants.

  19. Perdas causadas por Coccus viridis (Hemiptera: Coccidae em mudas de Coffea arabica L.

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    Flávio Lemes Fernandes

    2009-08-01

    Federal University of Viçosa. Seed coffee plants line IAC 15, variety “Catuaí vermelho” (C. arabica were used. The insects were reared into greenhouse and separated of the experiment. The treatments were: infested plants and no infested by adults and nymphs of the green scale. The plants were nourished with compound nutrient solutions. For 110 days evaluated: numbers of adults and nymphs of instar first, second and third, leaf area, diameter of stem and plant height in all repetition. At the end of the experiment were evaluated weights of root, stem, leave and total. The weight of root, total dry matter, leaf area and diameter of the stem at plants no attacked by C. viridis were 1.31, 1.41, 1.50 and 8.93 times more than weight attacked plants, respectively. The main variables were: diameter of the stem (cm, leaf area (cm², weights of root (g, nymphs, adults and all cochineals. Also, parts of the plant (C. arabica were damaged by nymphs (third and adults of C. viridis.

  20. Dynamic of Arabica Coffee Marketing Organization in Ngada District:Progress Upon Implementing of Geographical Indication

    OpenAIRE

    Aklimawati, Lya

    2017-01-01

    Farmer organization has important role on coffee agribusiness development. Organization was positioned as a driving force on farmer economic activities, especially in strengthening partnership networks. Realizing the importance of organization, the aim of this research was to identify the coffee market structure in the scheme of Geographical Indication; to analyze the dynamic of coffee marketing organization at farmers level; and to analyze added value of wet parchment bean sales at the farme...

  1. Climate change impacts on coffee rust disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsi, W. M. V.; Koga-Vicente, A.; Pinto, H. S.; Alfonsi, E. L., Sr.; Coltri, P. P.; Zullo, J., Jr.; Patricio, F. R.; Avila, A. M. H. D.; Gonçalves, R. R. D. V.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in climate conditions and in extreme weather events may affect the food security due to impacts in agricultural production. Despite several researches have been assessed the impacts of extremes in yield crops in climate change scenarios, there is the need to consider the effects in pests and diseases which increase losses in the sector. Coffee Arabica is an important commodity in world and plays a key role in Brazilian agricultural exports. Although the coffee crop has a world highlight, its yield is affected by several factors abiotic or biotic. The weather as well pests and diseases directly influence the development and coffee crop yield. These problems may cause serious damage with significant economic impacts. The coffee rust, caused by the fungus Hemileia vastarix,is among the diseases of greatest impact for the crop. The disease emerged in Brazil in the 70s and is widely spread in all producing regions of coffee in Brazil, and in the world. Regions with favorable weather conditions for the pathogen may exhibit losses ranging from 30% to 50% of the total grain production. The evaluation of extreme weather events of coffee rust disease in futures scenarios was carried out using the climatic data from CMIP5 models, data field of coffee rust disease incidence and, incubation period simulation data for Brazilian municipalities. Two Regional Climate Models were selected, Eta-HadGEM2-ES and Eta-MIROC5, and the Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 w/m2 was adopted. The outcomes pointed out that in these scenarios the period of incubation tends to decrease affecting the coffee rust disease incidence, which tends to increase. Nevertheless, the changing in average trends tends to benefit the reproduction of the pathogen. Once the temperature threshold for the disease reaches the adverse conditions it may be unfavorable for the incidence.

  2. A High-Throughput Molecular Pipeline Reveals the Diversity in Prevalence and Abundance of Pratylenchus and Meloidogyne Species in Coffee Plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christopher A; Atkinson, Howard J; Andrade, Alan C; Nguyen, Hoa X; Swibawa, I Gede; Lilley, Catherine J; McCarthy, James; Urwin, P E

    2018-05-01

    Coffee yields are adversely affected by plant-parasitic nematodes and the pathogens are largely underreported because a simple and reliable identification method is not available. We describe a polymerase chain reaction-based approach to rapidly detect and quantify the major Pratylenchus and Meloidogyne nematode species that are capable of parasitizing coffee. The procedure was applied to soil samples obtained from a number of coffee farms in Brazil, Vietnam, and Indonesia to assess the prevalence of these species associated both with coffee (Coffea arabica and C. canephora) and its intercropped species Musa acuminata (banana) and Piper nigrum (black pepper). Pratylenchus coffeae and P. brachyurus were associated with coffee in all three countries but there were distinct profiles of Meloidogyne spp. Meloidogyne incognita, M. exigua, and M. paranaensis were identified in samples from Brazil and M. incognita and M. hapla were detected around the roots of coffee in Vietnam. No Meloidogyne spp. were detected in samples from Indonesia. There was a high abundance of Meloidogyne spp. in soil samples in which Pratylenchus spp. were low or not detected, suggesting that the success of one genus may deter another. Meloidogyne spp. in Vietnam and Pratylenchus spp. in Indonesia were more numerous around intercropped plants than in association with coffee. The data suggest a widespread but differential nematode problem associated with coffee production across the regions studied. The issue is compounded by the current choice of intercrops that support large nematode populations. Wider application of the approach would elucidate the true global scale of the nematode problem and the cost to coffee production. [Formula: see text] Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). This is an open access article distributed under the CC BY 4.0 International license .

  3. Oligopolistic differentiation of the Colombian green bean coffee in the US market

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    Andrés Julián Rendón Cardona

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available New Empirical Industrial Organization (NEIO literature notes that imperfect foreign competition among commodities may be characterized by prices, quantities and product differentiation. This paper shows that the effectiveness of the differentiation strategy of Colombian green bean coffee in the US market has caused Colombia to compete in terms of quantities with its major opponent, Brazil. In order to show it, this paper brings a set of models which allow us to identify the competitive structure followed by Brazil and Colombia in the United States market of green bean coffee imports. These models are evaluated through a likelihood ratio test to determine which of them best explains the data. Stackelberg is the best model showing Brazil’s leadership in terms of quantities.

  4. New Coffee Plant-Infecting Xylella fastidiosa Variants Derived via Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Denancé, Nicolas; Legendre, Bruno; Morel, Emmanuelle; Briand, Martial; Mississipi, Stelly; Durand, Karine; Olivier, Valérie; Portier, Perrine; Poliakoff, Françoise; Crouzillat, Dominique

    2015-12-28

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited phytopathogenic bacterium endemic to the Americas that has recently emerged in Asia and Europe. Although this bacterium is classified as a quarantine organism in the European Union, importation of plant material from contaminated areas and latent infection in asymptomatic plants have engendered its inevitable introduction. In 2012, four coffee plants (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora) with leaf scorch symptoms growing in a confined greenhouse were detected and intercepted in France. After identification of the causal agent, this outbreak was eradicated. Three X. fastidiosa strains were isolated from these plants, confirming a preliminary identification based on immunology. The strains were characterized by multiplex PCR and by multilocus sequence analysis/typing (MLSA-MLST) based on seven housekeeping genes. One strain, CFBP 8073, isolated from C. canephora imported from Mexico, was assigned to X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa/X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi. This strain harbors a novel sequence type (ST) with novel alleles at two loci. The two other strains, CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8074, isolated from Coffea arabica imported from Ecuador, were allocated to X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca. These two strains shared a novel ST with novel alleles at two loci. These MLST profiles showed evidence of recombination events. We provide genome sequences for CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8073 strains. Comparative genomic analyses of these two genome sequences with publicly available X. fastidiosa genomes, including the Italian strain CoDiRO, confirmed these phylogenetic positions and provided candidate alleles for coffee plant adaptation. This study demonstrates the global diversity of X. fastidiosa and highlights the diversity of strains isolated from coffee plants. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Ozonated water in the post-harvest treatment of coffee fruits

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    Fernando J. B. Brandão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ozone is used in many countries for the treatment of effluents, becoming a viable alternative in sanitation of coffee wastewater. However, the strong ozone oxidation, responsible for its germicidal effect, can also compromise grain and beverage quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of Arabica coffee in different periods of treatment with ozonated water and its effect after drying. Coffee fruits were subjected to ozonation at regular intervals of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 min, with continuous stirring promoted by a recirculating water system at constant rate of 1 ppm of solubilized ozone. The design was completely randomized with five treatments and four replicates. After obtaining the data, the analysis of variance was performed and means were compared by Tukey test (p ≤ 0.05. The results showed a partial reduction of fungi after washing with ozonated water, but the same effect was not observed after drying. For coffee quality analysis, the longest times of exposure to the solubilized gas in the water produced some negative results in electrical conductivity and total and reducing sugars. However, the sensory quality of the beverage was maintained.

  6. Oxidative stability of lard and sunflower oil supplemented with coffee extracts under storage conditions

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    Budryn, Grażyna

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative stability of sunflower oil and lard supplemented with water extracts of green and roasted, Arabica and Robusta coffee beans was estimated. A decrease in the rate of fat oxidation reactions during the storage of samples for 12 weeks at ambient temperature which resulted from the addition of coffee extracts was evaluated using standard chemical methods such as the determination of peroxide and p-anisidine value and the assays of conjugated dienes and trienes as well as physical methods such as the determination of thermal profile by DSC. The sensory properties of all fat samples were also determined. These measurements showed that 0.1% water coffee extracts in fats decreased (p < 0.05 the quantities assayed by the chemical methods as compared to the control samples and approximately halved the rate of fat oxidation. In addition, the thermal profile analysis revealed that supplementing with coffee extracts reduced the extent of negative changes in the thermal properties of fats. The effectiveness of the tested coffee extracts decreased in the order: green Robusta > green Arabica > roasted Robusta > roasted Arabica.

    La estabilidad oxidativa de manteca y aceite de girasol suplementados con extractos acuosos de granos de café verde o tostado Arábica y Robusta fue estimada. Un descenso en la velocidad de las reacciones de oxidación de la grasa durante el almacenamiento de las muestras durante 12 semana a temperatura ambiente, que resulto de la adición de los extractos de café, fue evaluada usando métodos químicos estándares tales como la determinación de peróxidos y el índice de paranisidina y ensayos de dienos y trienos conjugados, así como métodos físicos tales como la determinación del perfil térmico por DSC. También las propiedades sensoriales de todas las grasas fueron estimadas. Estas medidas mostraron que extractos acuosos de café al 0.1% en la grasa decrecieron (p < 0.05 los valores obtenidos por los m

  7. Teste de condutividade elétrica individual na avaliação da qualidade fisiológica de sementes de café (Coffea arabica L. Individual electrical conductivity test for evaluation of the physiological quality of coffee seeds (Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula de Souza Cabral Costa

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available O teste de condutividade elétrica é usado para medir os exsudatos das sementes, que certamente refletem a integridade do sistema de membranas. O teste é rápido e de operação simples, mas a metodologia necessita ser testada para cada espécie individualmente para obter uma melhor precisão e exatidão dos resultados. Este trabalho foi conduzido visando determinar o ponto de partição na realização do teste de condutividade elétrica em sementes de café. Dez lotes de sementes de Coffea arabica sem pergaminho, cultivar Acaiá foram usados nesse estudo. Para a avaliação do ponto de partição as sementes foram embebidas por 96 horas e submetidas ao teste de germinação, correlacionando os valores de condutividade observados com os valores obtidos no teste de germinação. O ponto de partição é de 120,5µS.cm-1, considerando 70% de germinação.The conductivity test is used to measure the leaches from the seeds, which certaintily reflect the membrane system integrity. The test is rapid and it is of simple operation, but the methodology needs to be tested for each individual species in order to reach a better precision and accuracy. This work was conducted to determinate the partition point for the realization of electrical conductivity test in coffee seeds. Ten seed lots of Coffea arabica, cultivar Acaiá, without parchment, were used in this study. For the evaluation of the partition point, seeds were imbibed for 96 hours and submitted to the germination test, with the correlation between the conductivity values and those obtained in the germination test being evaluated. The partition point is 120,5µS.cm-1, considering 70% of germination.

  8. Effects of coffee management on deforestation rates and forest integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylander, Kristoffer; Nemomissa, Sileshi; Delrue, Josefien; Enkosa, Woldeyohannes

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge about how forest margins are utilized can be crucial for a general understanding of changes in forest cover, forest structure, and biodiversity across landscapes. We studied forest-agriculture transitions in southwestern Ethiopia and hypothesized that the presence of coffee (Coffea arabica)decreases deforestation rates because of coffee's importance to local economies and its widespread occurrence in forests and forest margins. Using satellite images and elevation data, we compared changes in forest cover over 37 years (1973-2010) across elevations in 2 forest-agriculture mosaic landscapes (1100 km(2) around Bonga and 3000 km(2) in Goma-Gera). In the field in the Bonga area, we determined coffee cover and forest structure in 40 forest margins that differed in time since deforestation. Both the absolute and relative deforestation rates were lower at coffee-growing elevations compared with at higher elevations (-10/20% vs. -40/50% comparing relative rates at 1800 m asl and 2300-2500 m asl, respectively). Within the coffee-growing elevation, the proportion of sites with high coffee cover (>20%) was significantly higher in stable margins (42% of sites that had been in the same location for the entire period) than in recently changed margins (0% of sites where expansion of annual crops had changed the margin). Disturbance level and forest structure did not differ between sites with 30% or 3% coffee. However, a growing body of literature on gradients of coffee management in Ethiopia reports coffee's negative effects on abundances of forest-specialist species. Even if the presence of coffee slows down the conversion of forest to annual-crop agriculture, there is a risk that an intensification of coffee management will still threaten forest biodiversity, including the genetic diversity of wild coffee. Conservation policy for Ethiopian forests thus needs to develop strategies that acknowledge that forests without coffee production may have higher deforestation

  9. Tingkat Kesukaan Konsumen Terhadap Kopi Campuran Robusta Dengan Arabika

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    Elsera Br Tarigan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available (Level Of Consumers Preferences On Coffee Blend Of Robusta And Arabica ABSTRACT. Coffee is the third most consumption beverage after water and tea. The popularity of coffee as beverage makes coffee consumption becomes a habit in rural and urban communities. Arabica and robusta coffee is the most widely sell in the market. Both have distinctive characteristics, arabica has an excellent taste and high selling prices, whereas robusta has high productivity and affordable by the consument. Improving the quality and price of coffee, this study conducted robusta and arabica coffee blending and acceptance tested using the 32 respondents who are semi-skilled respondents. Hedonic test is done to see consumer acceptance of blended coffee between robusta and arabica with a ratio of 3: 1, 2: 1, 1: 1 and robusta as control. The parameters observed were color, aroma, flavor, acidity, body, after taste and overall, using a Likert scale. Respondents consisted of 59.4% men and 40.6% women, with the age range 16 times a week, where the most respondents consume coffee instant. The result of hedonic test of four types of coffee served, male preferred blended coffee 3: 1 specially color, aroma and flavor. However female also prefer blended coffee 3: 1 with dominant variable color and aroma. The correlation between age and the variables especially taste and after-taste for the older male respondents increasingly like the taste of coffee served, and in contrary with the women .

  10. Detection of corn adulteration in Brazilian coffee (Coffea arabica) by tocopherol profiling and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee is a high-value commodity that is a target for adulteration, especially after the beans have been roasted and ground. Countries such as Brazil, the second largest coffee producer, have set limits on the allowable amount of coffee contamination and adulteration. Therefore, there is significant...

  11. Application of EPR spectroscopy to the examination of pro-oxidant activity of coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowian, Daniel; Skiba, Dominik; Kudelski, Adam; Pilawa, Barbara; Ramos, Paweł; Adamczyk, Jakub; Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna

    2014-05-15

    Free radicals present in coffee may be responsible for exerting toxic effects on an organism. The objectives of this work were to compare free radicals properties and concentrations in different commercially available coffees, in solid and liquid states, and to determine the effect of roasting on the formation of free radicals in coffee beans of various origins. The free radicals content of 15 commercially available coffees (solid and liquid) was compared and the impact of processing examined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at X-band (9.3 GHz). First derivative EPR spectra were measured at microwave power in the range of 0.7-70 mW. The following parameters were calculated for EPR spectra: amplitude (A), integral intensity (I), and line-width (ΔBpp); g-Factor was obtained from resonance condition. Our study showed that free radicals exist in green coffee beans (10(16) spin/g), roasted coffee beans (10(18) spin/g), and in commercially available coffee (10(17)-10(18) spin/g). Free radical concentrations were higher in solid ground coffee than in instant or lyophilised coffee. Continuous microwave saturation indicated homogeneous broadening of EPR lines from solid and liquid commercial coffee samples as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes were found to be present in all coffee samples tested, solid and liquid commercial coffees as well as green and roasted coffee beans. Higher free radicals concentrations were obtained for both the green and roasted at 240 °C coffee beans from Peru compared with those originating from Ethiopia, Brazil, India, or Colombia. Moreover, more free radicals occurred in Arabica coffee beans roasted at 240 °C than Robusta. EPR spectroscopy is a useful method of examining free radicals in different types of coffee. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of fungal infection on phenolic compounds during the storage of coffee beans

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    Amal, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This work was undertaken to study the effect of Aspergillus infection on phenolic compounds in beans from four cultivars of the coffee plant (Coffea arabica L.. The effects of storage conditions of the coffee beans were also examined. Methodology and results: Beans from four varieties of coffee were artificially infected with three species of Aspergillus: A. niger, A. melleus and A. alliacus, and stored at 0, 8 and 25 ± 2 °C. After 3, 6 and 9 months, the contents of phenolic compounds in the beans were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Conclusion, significance and impact study: The results of this study showed that phenolic compounds were qualitatively and quantitatively higher in the inoculated beans as compared with the uninfected control beans, reflecting a possible induced defense mechanism in the infected beans. Increased storage periods resulted in higher levels of phenols, but the average total, bound and free phenols did not differ between the cultivars tested. Effective control of Apergillus infection in coffee beans can prevent such changes in phenolics that may affect their commercial value.

  13. Collimated scanning LS-INAA for testing trace elements homogeneity in Brazilian coffee beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagliaferro, F.S.; Nadai Fernandes de, E.A.; Bode, P.; Baas, H.W.

    2008-01-01

    The degree of homogeneity is normally assessed by the variability of the results of independent analyses of several (e.g., 15) normal-scale replicates. Large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis (LS-INAA) with a collimated Ge detector allows inspecting the degree of homogeneity of the initial batch material, using a kilogram-size sample. The test is based on the spatial distributions of induced radioactivity. Such test was applied to samples of Brazilian whole (green) coffee beans (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora) of approximately 1 kg in the frame of development of a coffee reference material. Results indicated that the material do not contain significant element composition inhomogeneities between batches of approximately 30-50 g, masses typically forming the starting base of a reference material. (author)

  14. Cercosporiose progression in the agroforestry consortium coffee-rubber trees

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    Humberto Godoy Androcioli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cercospora coffeicola is one of the primary diseases that affect coffee plants. Studies indicate that shaded coffee plants reduce the incidence of this disease and that the management of trees and coffee plants arrangement influence in the dissemination of cercospora. The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence and severity of C. coffeicola at different distances from double rows of rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis muell. arg. at two different sunlight exposures (north and south. This study was conducted in Londrina, Parana, between 2008 and 2010, with adult plants of the IAPAR 59 cultivar (Coffea arabica L. grown at a spacing of 2.5 m x 1.0 m. The distances between the double rows of rubber trees were 13, 16 and 22 m, compared to plants grown under full sun. The disease incidence was assessed monthly by using a non-destructive method. This analysis was conducted on coffee leaves from the third and fourth pairs of two plagiotropic branches, on eight plants per plot, with five replications. These data were used to calculate the area under the curve for the incidence of the brown eye spot. The highest disease incidence occurred in the coffee plants grown under full sun, whereas lowest disease occurred on plants located at up to two meters away from double rows of rubber trees. The incidence of Cercospora leaf spot increased with the distance from the double rows of rubber trees. The results demonstrate that the mapping of cercospora incidence in shaded coffee plants is essential to determinate the best spacing and plants arrangement.

  15. A field survey on coffee beans drying methods of Indonesian small holder farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siagian, Parulian; Setyawan, Eko Y.; Gultom, Tumiur; Napitupulu, Farel H.; Ambarita, Himsar

    2017-09-01

    Drying agricultural product is a post-harvest process that consumes significant energy. It can affect the quality of the product. This paper deals with literature review and field survey of drying methods of coffee beans of Indonesia farmers. The objective is to supply the necessary information on developing continuous solar drier. The results show that intermittent characteristic of sun drying results in a better quality of coffee beans in comparison with constant convective drying. In order to use energy efficiently, the drying process should be divided into several stages. In the first stage when the moist content is high, higher drying air temperature is more effective. After this step, where the moist content is low, lower drying air temperature is better. The field survey of drying coffee beans in Sumatera Utara province reveals that the used drying process is very traditional. It can be divided into two modes and depend on the coffee beans type. The Arabica coffee is firstly fermented and dried to moisture content of 80% using sun drying method, then followed by Green House model of drying up to moisture content about 12%. The latter typically spends 3 days of drying time. On the other hand, The Robusta coffee is dried by exposing to the sun directly without any treatment. After the coffee beans dried follow by peeled process. These findings can be considered to develop a continuous solar drying that suitable for coffee beans drying.

  16. KELAYAKAN FINANSIAL USAHATANI KOPI ARABIKA DAN PROSPEK PENGEMBANGANNYA DI KETINGGIAN SEDANG

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    Ati Kusmiati

    2015-10-01

    Arabica is the next. Moreover, 70% of world coffee consumption is Arabica coffee and 26% is Robusta. It indicates that the opportunity of Arabica coffee is higher than Robusta. Arabica coffee is suitable for high land;however, some farmers in medium land has cultivated the coffee. One of the area for Arabica coffee plantation in medium land is Karangpring Village, SukorambiSubdistrict, Jember Regency. The area located in the slope of Argopuro Mountain. Therefore, it is important to do research on Arabica coffee farming at medium altitude. The research aims to: (1 analyze the financial feasibility of Arabica coffee farming; (2 analyze the sensitivity of Arabica coffee farming toward increase in production cost and decrease in coffee price; (3 determine the prospect of development of Arabica coffee. The research uses descriptive and analytic methods as research method with sampling method of simple random sampling. Methods used for analysis are (1 financial feasibility with investment criteria of NPV, IRR, Net B/C, Gross B/C, PR and PP; (2 sensitivity analysis through simulation of change in the increase in production cost and decrease in coffee price; and (3 SWOT analysis. Research result shows that Arabica coffee farming at Karangpring Village SukorambiSubdistrict Jember Regency is financially feasible and it is not sensitive to changes in the cost of fertilizer and the selling price. Prospect for development of Arabica coffee farming at the village is in grey area, which is the position of weak but potential.

  17. Melhoramento do cafeeiro: XXXVIII. Observações sobre progênies do cultivar Mundo-Novo de Coffea arabica na estação experimental de Mococa Coffee breeding: XXXVIII-observation on progenies of the Mundo-Novo cultivars of Coffea arabica in the Mococa experimental station

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    Túlio R. Rocha

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available Os dados analisados no experimento localizado em Mococa sobre a produtividade de 112 progênies dos cultivares Mundo-Novo S1 e S2, Bourbon-Amarelo, BourbonVermelho e Caturra-Vermelho de Coffea arabica no período de 1955 a 1971, indicaram que as de Mundo-Novo S1, de prefixos MP 474, MP 502, MP 469, MP 492 e MP 475, revelaram-se como as mais produtivas, assemelhando-se a algumas progênies 'Mundo--Novo' S2. Dentre estas, destacou-se a de prefixo MP 388-6, que atingiu o nível mais elevado de produção do experimento. As progênies de 'Mundo-Novo', em conjunto, produziram 44% a mais do que as de Bourbon-Amarelo e, estas, 60% a mais do que as de Bourbon-Vermelho e Caturra-Vermelho. A altura e o diâmetro da copa atingiram valores médios mais elevados para as progênies de 'Mundo-Novo'. Verificaram-se correlações positivas e altamente significativas entre altura média da planta e diâmetro médio da copa com a produção das progênies. As progênies mais produtivas revelaram rendimento (relação entre peso de café maduro e beneficiado de aproximadamente 6,0 e porcentagem de sementes normais, do tipo chato, acima de 80. Quanto ao tamanho das sementes do tipo chato, duas progênies 'Mundo-Novo' S1, MP 474 e MP 452, apresentaram peneira média maior, permi-tindo seleção de plantas com essa característica e com elevada produção.Coffee progenies of the Mundo-Novo cultivars of Coffea arabica were studied in an experiment located at the Mococa Experimental Station of the Instituto Agronômico in comparison with Bourbon-Amarelo, Bourbon-Vermelho and Caturra-Vermelho cultivars of the same species. During a period of 17 consecutive cropping years (1955-1971, Mundo-Novo yielded approximately 44% more than Bourbon-Amarelo and this cultivars yielded 60% more than Bourbon-Vermelho and Caturra-Vermelho. Among the 89 S1 'Mundo-Novo' progenies, MP 474, MP 502, MP 469, MP 492 and MP 475 yielded as much as the two best 'Mundo-Novo' S2 progenies. Greater

  18. The use of the shaded coffee (sombrío del cafeto production thecnique (Coffea arabica in colombia

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    Gonzalo Enrique Mancilla Díaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The art of coffee production under shade has been one of the most effective methods used by our ancestors in order to adapt the coffee trees to precarious conditions, where they would not otherwise produce profitably due to the conditions of elevation, light, water availability, percentage of organic matter, temperature and other climatic and geographic factors. The objective of this study was to explain in a consistent and clear way the interaction of different effects generated in the soil, atmosphere and the crop, as a result of the use of the shaded coffee technique (sombrío de café in coffee plantations. This provides tools that are applicable to the Colombian coffee growing industry, which can produce an improvement in the use of this technique, based on the zoning of the productive unit. This will generate an increase in the life and productivity of the crop.

  19. Melhoramento do cafeeiro: XXIII - Novos dados sôbre a variabilidade em linhas isogênicas de café Coffee breeding: XXIII variability in isogenic lines of cofeea arabica

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    L. C. Mônaco

    1964-01-01

    turned to yield and plant height variability since among the progenies there were two isogenic lines obtained by doubling the chromosomes of two haploid coffee trees and the hybrid between them. Concerning plant height the variability of the hybrid was similar to that of both isogenic parents indicating no relation between heterozygosis for factors controlling plant height and the uniformity of the progenies. The yield variation of the hybrid was found to be higher,intermediate or lower than the parents depending on the year considered, but the differences between the variances were not statistically significant. The information so far gathered about genetic variability and homeostasis in coffee indicate that heterozygosity seems not to improve the plasticity of the individuals. Natural selection seems to have maintained in the original population genic combinations which would result in better homeostatic strength. It is also possible that the lines studied are genetically not so distinct and only a few loci would be in heterozygous condition. Additional data are required before deciding about the relation between homeostasis and heterozygosis in Coffea arabica.

  20. GENETIC DIVERSITY IN ARABICA COFFEE GROWN IN POTASSIUM-CONSTRAINED ENVIRONMENT

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    Waldênia de Melo Moura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Potassium is a source of non-renewable natural resource, and is used in large quantities in coffee fertilization through basically imported formulations in the form of potassium chloride. An alternative to make production systems more sustainable would be obtaining cultivars more efficient in the use of this nutrient. This study aimed to evaluate the genetic diversity among 20 cultivars of coffee, in conditions of low availability of potassium to identify the best combinations for composing future populations to be used in breeding programs. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with three replications of nutrient solution. Agronomic characteristics and efficiencies of rooting, absorption, translocation, biomass production and potassium utilization were evaluated. The clustering analysis was based on the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean clustering algorithm (UPGMA and canonical variables. Variability was observed for most treatments. The multivariate procedures produced similar discrimination of genotypes, with the formation of five groups. Hybridizations between the cultivar Icatu Precoce IAC 3283 with cultivars Catuaí Amarelo IAC 62, Araponga MG1, Caturra Vermelho IAC 477, Catuaí Vermelho IAC 15, Rubi MG 1192 and Catucaí 785/15, and between the cultivar Tupi IAC 1669-33 with cultivars Icatu Vermelho IAC 4045, Acaiá Cerrado MG 1474 and Oeiras MG 6851 are the most promising for obtaining segregating populations or heterotic hybrids in breeding programs aiming more efficiency in potassium utilization.

  1. Positive and negative aspects of green coffee consumption - antioxidant activity versus mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeszka-Skowron, Magdalena; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Waśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Stępień, Łukasz; Stanisz, Ewa

    2017-09-01

    The quality of coffee depends not only on the contents of healthy compounds but also on its contamination with microorganisms that can produce mycotoxins during development, harvesting, preparation, transport and storage. The antioxidant activity of green coffee brews measured in this study by ABTS, DPPH and Folin-Ciocalteu assays showed that coffee extracts from Robusta beans possessed higher activity in all assays than extracts from Arabica beans. The occurrence of ochratoxin A and aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 and G2) in green coffee beans was studied using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Apart from mycotoxins, the content of ergosterol as a marker indicating fungal occurrence was also determined. Among aflatoxins, aflatoxin B1 was the dominant mycotoxin in coffee bean samples, with the highest level at 17.45 ng g -1 . Ochratoxin A was detected in four samples at levels ranging from 1.27 to 4.34 ng g -1 , and fungi potentially producing this toxin, namely Aspergillus oryzae, Alternaria sp., Aspergillus foetidus, Aspergillus tamarii and Penicillium citrinum, were isolated. Steaming and decaffeination of coffee beans increased antioxidant activities of brews in comparison with those prepared from unprocessed beans. Although toxins can be quantified in green coffee beans and novel fungi were isolated, their concentrations are acceptable according to legal limits. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Pest Management Strategies Against the Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Francisco

    2018-03-22

    Coffee ( Coffea arabica and C. canephora) is one of the most widely traded agricultural commodities and the main cash crop in ∼80 tropical countries. Among the factors that limit coffee production, the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) has been considered the main insect pest, causing losses of over U.S. $500 million dollars annually. Control of this pest has been hindered by two main factors: the cryptic nature of the insect (i.e., protected inside the coffee berry) and the availability of coffee berries in the field allowing the survival of the pest from one generation to the next. Coffee berry borer control has primarily been based on the use of synthetic insecticides. Management strategies have focused on the use of African parasitoids ( Cephalonomia stephanoderis, Prorops nasuta, and Phymastichus coffea), fungal entomopathogens ( Beauveria bassiana), and insect traps. These approaches have had mixed results. Recent work on the basic biology of the insect has provided novel insights that might be useful in developing novel pest management strategies. For example, the discovery of symbiotic bacteria responsible for caffeine breakdown as part of the coffee berry borer microbiome opens new possibilities for pest management via the disruption of these bacteria. Some chemicals with repellent propieties have been identified, and these have a high potential for field implementation. Finally, the publication of the CBB genome has provided insights on the biology of the insect that will help us to understand why it has been so successful at exploiting the coffee plant. Here I discuss the tools we now have against the CBB and likely control strategies that may be useful in the near future.

  3. TRADITIONAL USE OF THREE EDIBLE INSECTS IN COFFEE AGROECOSYSTEMS IN THE STATE OF VERACRUZ

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    Esteban Escamilla Prado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Coffee (Coffea arabica L. is one of the most economically, socioculturally and environmentally important crops in Veracruz. Shade-grown coffee plantations provide environmental services and play a key role in biodiversity conservation. In coffee farms in Veracruz insects are an abundant natural resource, and part of the use of this resource is the consumption of some edible insects in certain coffee regions. The objective of this study was to know the traditional use of three species of edible insects in the coffee agroecosystem of Veracruz. During the period 2007-2012, an ethnoentomological study was conducted in coffee regions from central Veracruz. The insect species identified were the ants chicatanas (Atta mexicana Smith and Atta cephalotes Latreille in the municipality of Huatusco, the larva gusano del jonote (Arsenura armida armida Cramer in the municipalities of Zongolica, Tequila and Tezonapa, and the larva gusanillo (Phassus triangularis H.E. in the municipalities of Córdoba, Ixhuatlán del Café, Tepatlaxco, Chocamán and Zongolica. The results showed the traditional knowledge held by coffee growers related to these edible species which are a valuable natural resource in their coffee plantations. Knowledge on agroecological relationships, collection, consumption and marketing was rescued. In conclusion, the insect species studied are used for local consumption and have great economic potential due to their high sell price during the harvest season.

  4. Diversity and communities of foliar endophytic fungi from different agroecosystems of Coffea arabica L. in two regions of Veracruz, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo-García, Aurora; Anaya, Ana Luisa; Espinosa-García, Francisco J; González, María C

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the biodiversity associated with shaded coffee plantations and the role of diverse agroforestry types in biodiversity conservation and environmental services have been topics of debate. Endophytic fungi, which are microorganisms that inhabit plant tissues in an asymptomatic manner, form a part of the biodiversity associated with coffee plants. Studies on the endophytic fungi communities of cultivable host plants have shown variability among farming regions; however, the variability in fungal endophytic communities of coffee plants among different coffee agroforestry systems is still poorly understood. As such, we analyzed the diversity and communities of foliar endophytic fungi inhabiting Coffea arabica plants growing in the rustic plantations and simple polycultures of two regions in the center of Veracruz, Mexico. The endophytic fungi isolates were identified by their morphological traits, and the majority of identified species correspond to species of fungi previously reported as endophytes of coffee leaves. We analyzed and compared the colonization rates, diversity, and communities of endophytes found in the different agroforestry systems and in the different regions. Although the endophytic diversity was not fully recovered, we found differences in the abundance and diversity of endophytes among the coffee regions and differences in richness between the two different agroforestry systems of each region. No consistent pattern of community similarity was found between the coffee agroforestry systems, but we found that rustic plantations shared the highest number of morphospecies. The results suggest that endophyte abundance, richness, diversity, and communities may be influenced predominantly by coffee region, and to a lesser extent, by the agroforestry system. Our results contribute to the knowledge of the relationships between agroforestry systems and biodiversity conservation and provide information regarding some endophytic fungi and

  5. Meta-analysis for heritability estimates of vegetative and reproductive traits of Coffea arabica L.Meta-análise para estimativas de herdabilidade de caracteres vegetativos e reprodutivos de Coffea arabica L.

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    Danielle Pereira Baliza

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The compilation of informations resulting from independent studies has been difficulted in almost all scientific fields, mainly due to the great number of scientific papers published in recent years. As a result, summarizing information became a need. In this context, a meta-analysis was conducted with the objective of summarizing the estimates for the heritability for vegetative and reproductive traits of coffee (Coffea arabica L.. Heritability estimates were appraised regarding the following traits: average height of plant, average diameter of the canopy, vegetative vigor, production of processed coffee, yield and rust. The data regarding the heritability estimates are from scientific articles published in national and international journals, congress annals, PhD thesis and Master dissertations. The technique of meta-analysis summarized the estimates heritability from different studies and made possible to conclude that all of the appraised traits are highly inherited, reflecting the great genetic variety of coffee plants, and that is possible to reach satisfactory genetic gains in improvement programs in which those traits are evaluated. A compilação de informações advindas de estudos independentes tem sido dificultada em quase todos os campos da ciência, devido principalmente, ao grande número de trabalhos científicos publicados nos últimos anos. Assim, sumarizar informações tornou-se uma necessidade. Neste contexto, uma meta-análise foi conduzida com o objetivo de sistematizar as estimativas para a herdabilidade de caracteres vegetativos e reprodutivos de cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L.. Foram avaliadas as estimativas de herdabilidade referentes aos seguintes caracteres: altura média da planta, diâmetro médio da copa, vigor vegetativo, produção de café beneficiado, rendimento e resistência a ferrugem. Os dados referentes às estimativas de herdabilidade são provenientes de artigos científicos publicados em revistas

  6. Bacillus species (BT42) isolated from Coffea arabica L. rhizosphere antagonizes Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Fusarium oxysporum and also exhibits multiple plant growth promoting activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejela, Tekalign; Thakkar, Vasudev R; Thakor, Parth

    2016-11-18

    Colletotrichum and Fusarium species are among pathogenic fungi widely affecting Coffea arabica L., resulting in major yield loss. In the present study, we aimed to isolate bacteria from root rhizosphere of the same plant that is capable of antagonizing Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Fusarium oxysporum as well as promotes plant growth. A total of 42 Bacillus species were isolated, one of the isolates named BT42 showed maximum radial mycelial growth inhibition against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (78%) and Fusarium oxysporum (86%). BT42 increased germination of Coffee arabica L. seeds by 38.89%, decreased disease incidence due to infection of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides to 2.77% and due to infection of Fusarium oxysporum to 0 (p Fusarium oxysporum. The mechanism of action of inhibition of the pathogenic fungi found to be synergistic effects of secondary metabolites, lytic enzymes, and siderophores. The major inhibitory secondary metabolite identified as harmine (β-carboline alkaloids).

  7. Marketing Strategies Evolved by Entrepreneurs in Marketing the Coffee Products

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    K. Thangaraja

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Results of conjoint analysis showed quality attributes preferred by the entrepreneurs. They were Arabica and Robusta (50:50 mixed variety, mixing of 70:30 coffee, chicory ratio, keeping quality up to 6 months, medium level of taste/aroma, filter size of the powder and roasting time of 15 minutes/ 10 kg of seeds. About 83.00 per cent of entrepreneurs produced coffee powder as a final form of coffee product, nearly two-third (63.00 % of the entrepreneurs did not have any brand name or logo, cent per cent of them reported manual packing only. Major criteria to fix different price rate of coffee product were International daily market price (90.00 %, factors affecting the price policy were market price fluctuation (93.33 %, season (90.00 % and Cent per cent of them had adopted coffee price forecasting broadcasted by various media. Selection of the location depends on nearby town and coffee potential area, techniques to overcome the competitor were better pricing and supply of quality coffee product, attraction of customers depends on personal contact, attractive display boards, quality, taste, aroma and flavor. Promotional activities carried out by the entrepreneurs were developing the customer base (83.33 % and working towards building customer loyalty (76.67%. Relationships followed among stakeholders were good partnership, price and profit sharing, commission basis, service and quality, supply-service and demand. Further, market demand reported by entrepreneurs were: the demand for coffee beans peaked during July to November, coffee powder were more demand in three seasons namely rainy season (June-September, winter season (December- January and summer holidays (April-May. Feedback mechanism reported by coffee entrepreneurs were: quality analysis report received from the export organization, physical analysis, cup test, personal contact through phone, e-mail and also personal letters.

  8. Radiation disinfestation of tobacco leaves and coffee beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soemartaputra, M.H.; Rosalina, S.H.; Rahayu, A.; Harsojo; Kardha, S.

    1985-01-01

    The most important insects found on coffee and tobacco in storage are A. fasciculatus and L. serricorne, respectively. Some genera of mold, such as Rhyzopus, Aspergillus, Penicillium and Mucor, were found on stored coffee. A preliminary study of radiation disinfestation of coffee beans was carried out using 24 bags (each l.5 kg) of Arabica coffee. Each bag was infested with l00 adults of l-day-old to 8-day old A. fasciculatus. One month after infestation, the bags were divided into 6 groups (4 bags each). Five groups were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.05, 0.l0, 0.20, and 0.40 kGy, while the sixth group was fumigated with about 3 g phosphine-m/sup 3/. The work is still in progress. The preliminary data (insect density, percentage weight loss of coffee beans, and mold infestation) from l0 observation periods during 20 weeks of storage after treatment was reported. Radiation disinfestation of tobacco was done on 36 export-size bales (each l00 x 75 x 40 cm in size and about k00 kg in weight) of tobacco. Each bale was infested with larvae, pupae, and adults of L. serricorne. One week after infestation, the bales were divided into 3 groups, the first group kept untreated as controls, the second group irradiated at a dose range of 0.30 to 0.60 kGy, and the third group fumigated with about 3 g phosphine/m/sup 3/. Insect density, leaf moisture content and mold infestation will be observed after 0, 2, 4, and 6 months of storage. The work was begun in October l983 and data presently are being collected

  9. Composition of the root mycorrhizal community associated with Coffea arabica in Fifa Mountains (Jazan region, Saudi Arabia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdhi, Mosbah; Tounekti, Taieb; Al-Turki, Turki Ali; Khemira, Habib

    2017-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) constitute a key functional group of soil biota that can greatly contribute to crop productivity and ecosystem sustainability. They improve nutrient uptake and enhance the ability of plants to cope with abiotic stresses. The presence of AMF in coffee (Coffea arabica L.) plant roots have been reported in several locations but not in Saudi Arabia despite the fact that coffee has been in cultivation here since ancient times. The objective of the present study was to investigate the diversity of AMF communities colonizing the roots of coffee trees growing in two sites of Fifa Mountains (south-west Saudi Arabia): site 1 at 700 m altitude and site 2 at 1400 m. The AMF large subunit rDNA regions (LSU) were subjected to nested PCR, cloning, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. Microscopic observations indicated higher mycorrhizal intensity (24.3%) and spore density (256 spores/100 g of soil) in site 2 (higher altitude). Phylogenetic analysis revealed 10 phylotypes, six belonging to the family Glomeraceae, two to Claroideoglomercea, one to Acaulosporaceae and one to Gigasporaceae family. Glomus was the dominant genus at both sites and the genus Gigaspora was detected only at site 2. This is the first study reporting the presence of AMF in coffee roots and the composition of this particular mycorrhizal community in Saudi Arabia. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Irrigação e certificação da cafeicultura na Região Centro-Oeste de São Paulo Irrigation and certification on coffee crop in mid-west of São Paulo State, Brazil

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    Marcos José Perdoná

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rentabilidade insatisfatória tem provocado diminuição paulatina do parque cafeeiro no Estado de São Paulo. Entre as alternativas para a solução deste problema, duas se destacam: a irrigação das lavouras e a certificação das propriedades. Mesmo em regiões consideradas aptas à cultura do café arábica (Coffea arabica L., o uso da irrigação pode promover, na média dos anos, aumento de produtividade de grãos. Além disso, a certificação do produto favorece sua diferenciação no mercado e pode melhorar os resultados econômicos da atividade. Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o desenvolvimento e a produtividade de cafeeiros submetidos a sistemas irrigados ou não, comparando os dados econômicos na comercialização do café certificado ou não, nas condições da Região Centro-Oeste do Estado de São Paulo. O delineamento utilizado no campo foi o de blocos ao acaso, com dois tratamentos (com e sem irrigação por gotejamento e dez repetições. Foram calculados os custos de produção, bem como a lucratividade com a venda do produto final. A irrigação aumentou o desenvolvimento e a produtividade dos cafeeiros. Houve o retorno do investimento a partir da terceira safra. A venda de café certificado possibilitou resultados econômicos em média de 224,5% superiores ao não certificado. A irrigação aliada à venda de café certificado proporcionou saldo financeiro 1.192% superior ao café não irrigado e não certificado.An unsatisfactory profitability has led to the gradual decline of the coffee plantations in São Paulo. Among the alternatives that arise for solving this problem, two stand out: the irrigation of crops and certification of properties. Even in areas considered suitable for cultivation of arabica coffee (Coffea arabica L., the use of irrigation can promote an increase in grain yield. In addition, the product certification promotes their differentiation in the market and can improve the economic results of

  11. Characterization of Coffee ringspot virus-Lavras: A model for an emerging threat to coffee production and quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramalho, T.O.; Figueira, A.R.; Sotero, A.J. [Universidade Federal de Lavras, Departamento de Fitopatologia, Caixa Postal 3037, CEP 37200-000 Lavras, MG (Brazil); Wang, R. [Department of Plant Pathology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546 (United States); Geraldino Duarte, P.S. [Universidade Federal de Lavras, Departamento de Fitopatologia, Caixa Postal 3037, CEP 37200-000 Lavras, MG (Brazil); Farman, M. [Department of Plant Pathology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546 (United States); Goodin, M.M., E-mail: mgoodin@uky.edu [Department of Plant Pathology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40546 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The emergence of viruses in Coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora), the most widely traded agricultural commodity in the world, is of critical concern. The RNA1 (6552 nt) of Coffee ringspot virus is organized into five open reading frames (ORFs) capable of encoding the viral nucleocapsid (ORF1p), phosphoprotein (ORF2p), putative cell-to-cell movement protein (ORF3p), matrix protein (ORF4p) and glycoprotein (ORF5p). Each ORF is separated by a conserved intergenic junction. RNA2 (5945 nt), which completes the bipartite genome, encodes a single protein (ORF6p) with homology to RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Phylogenetic analysis of L protein sequences firmly establishes CoRSV as a member of the recently proposed Dichorhavirus genus. Predictive algorithms, in planta protein expression, and a yeast-based nuclear import assay were used to determine the nucleophillic character of five CoRSV proteins. Finally, the temperature-dependent ability of CoRSV to establish systemic infections in an initially local lesion host was quantified. - Highlights: • We report genome sequence determination for Coffee ringspot virus (CoRSV). • CoRSV should be considered a member of the proposed Dichorhavirus genus. • We report temperature-dependent systemic infection of an initially local lesion host. • We report in planta protein and localization data for five CoRSV proteins. • In silico predictions of the CoRSV proteins were validated using in vivo assays.

  12. Characterization of Coffee ringspot virus-Lavras: A model for an emerging threat to coffee production and quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, T.O.; Figueira, A.R.; Sotero, A.J.; Wang, R.; Geraldino Duarte, P.S.; Farman, M.; Goodin, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of viruses in Coffee (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora), the most widely traded agricultural commodity in the world, is of critical concern. The RNA1 (6552 nt) of Coffee ringspot virus is organized into five open reading frames (ORFs) capable of encoding the viral nucleocapsid (ORF1p), phosphoprotein (ORF2p), putative cell-to-cell movement protein (ORF3p), matrix protein (ORF4p) and glycoprotein (ORF5p). Each ORF is separated by a conserved intergenic junction. RNA2 (5945 nt), which completes the bipartite genome, encodes a single protein (ORF6p) with homology to RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Phylogenetic analysis of L protein sequences firmly establishes CoRSV as a member of the recently proposed Dichorhavirus genus. Predictive algorithms, in planta protein expression, and a yeast-based nuclear import assay were used to determine the nucleophillic character of five CoRSV proteins. Finally, the temperature-dependent ability of CoRSV to establish systemic infections in an initially local lesion host was quantified. - Highlights: • We report genome sequence determination for Coffee ringspot virus (CoRSV). • CoRSV should be considered a member of the proposed Dichorhavirus genus. • We report temperature-dependent systemic infection of an initially local lesion host. • We report in planta protein and localization data for five CoRSV proteins. • In silico predictions of the CoRSV proteins were validated using in vivo assays

  13. Mapping spatial variability of foliar nitrogen in coffee (Coffea arabica L.) plantations with multispectral Sentinel-2 MSI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemura, Abel; Mutanga, Onisimo; Odindi, John; Kutywayo, Dumisani

    2018-04-01

    Nitrogen (N) is the most limiting factor to coffee development and productivity. Therefore, development of rapid, spatially explicit and temporal remote sensing-based approaches to determine spatial variability of coffee foliar N are imperative for increasing yields, reducing production costs and mitigating environmental impacts associated with excessive N applications. This study sought to assess the value of Sentinel-2 MSI spectral bands and vegetation indices in empirical estimation of coffee foliar N content at landscape level. Results showed that coffee foliar N is related to Sentinel-2 MSI B4 (R2 = 0.32), B6 (R2 = 0.49), B7 (R2 = 0.42), B8 (R2 = 0.57) and B12 (R2 = 0.24) bands. Vegetation indices were more related to coffee foliar N as shown by the Inverted Red-Edge Chlorophyll Index - IRECI (R2 = 0.66), Relative Normalized Difference Index - RNDVI (R2 = 0.48), CIRE1 (R2 = 0.28), and Normalized Difference Infrared Index - NDII (R2 = 0.37). These variables were also identified by the random forest variable optimisation as the most valuable in coffee foliar N prediction. Modelling coffee foliar N using vegetation indices produced better accuracy (R2 = 0.71 with RMSE = 0.27 for all and R2 = 0.73 with RMSE = 0.25 for optimized variables), compared to using spectral bands (R2 = 0.57 with RMSE = 0.32 for all and R2 = 0.58 with RMSE = 0.32 for optimized variables). Combining optimized bands and vegetation indices produced the best results in coffee foliar N modelling (R2 = 0.78, RMSE = 0.23). All the three best performing models (all vegetation indices, optimized vegetation indices and combining optimal bands and optimal vegetation indices) established that 15.2 ha (4.7%) of the total area under investigation had low foliar N levels (landscape scale.

  14. Farmer awareness, coping mechanisms and economic implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coffee leaf rust (CLR) still remains a serious threat to the economics of coffee farming in Uganda. The disease is more severe on Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) at mid and low altitude (1500 m and below) where crop losses is up to 50%. The objective of this study was to document farmers' knowledge about the disease, ...

  15. Prediction of Caffeine Content in Java Preanger Coffee Beans by NIR Spectroscopy Using PLS and MLR Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiastra, I. W.; Sutrisno; Widyotomo, S.; Ayu, P. C.

    2018-05-01

    Caffeine is one of important components in coffee that contributes to the coffee beverages flavor. Caffeine concentration in coffee bean is usually determined by chemical method which is time consuming and destructive method. A nondestructive method using NIR spectroscopy was successfully applied to determine the caffeine concentration of Arabica gayo coffee bean. In this study, NIR Spectroscopy was assessed to determine the caffeine concentration of java preanger coffee bean. A hundred samples, each consist of 96 g coffee beans were prepared for reflectance and chemical measurement. Reflectance of the sample was measured by FT-NIR spectrometer in the wavelength of 1000-2500 nm (10000-4000 cm-1) followed by determination of caffeine content using LCMS method. Calibration of NIR spectra and the caffeine content was carried out using PLS and MLR methods. Several spectra data processing was conducted to increase the accuracy of prediction. The result of the study showed that caffeine content could be determined by PLS model using 7 factors and spectra data processing of combination of the first derivative and MSC of spectra absorbance (r = 0.946; CV = 1.54 %; RPD = 2.28). A lower accuracy was obtained by MLR model consisted of three caffeine and other four absorption wavelengths (r = 0.683; CV = 3.31%; RPD = 1.18).

  16. Simple procedure for nutrient analysis of coffee plant with energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tezotto, Tiago; Favarin, Jose Laercio; Neto, Ana Paula; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes, E-mail: tiago.tezotto@usp.br [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Gratao, Priscila Lupino [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP/ FCAV), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Aplicada a Agropecuaria; Mazzafera, Paulo [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP/IB), SP (Brazil). Dept. Biologia Vegetal

    2013-07-15

    Nutrient analysis is used to estimate nutrient content of crop plants to manage fertilizer application for sustained crop production. Direct solid analysis of agricultural and environmental samples by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) was chosen as alternative technique to evaluate the simultaneous multielemental quantification of the most important essential elements in coffee (Coffea arabica L.) plants. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and certified reference materials made from leaves were used to calibrate and check the trueness of EDXRF method for the determination of the concentration of several nutrients in coffee leaves and branches. Fluorescence spectrometry proved to be advantageous and presented low cost as loose powder samples could be used. Samples collected from a field experiment where coffee plants were treated with excess of Ni and Zn were used to verify the practical application of the method. Good relationships were achieved between certified values and data obtained by EDXRF, with recoveries ranging from 82 to 117 %.(author)

  17. IDIOTIPE KOPI ARABIKA TANAMAN BELUM MENGHASILKAN PADA LINGKUNGAN DATARAN RENDAH DAN MENENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Alnopri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is the second priority and is nationally leading commodity aimed to increase export  as well as  to improve added values of national production in order to gain high compatibility in the international level. The development of coffee plantation in Indonesia focuses on the increased proportion of arabica coffee. The technology offered is to establish the superior characteristics of robusta coffee (lowland habitats and that of arabica coffee (highland habitats into a single crop named robbica cofffee. The idiotype of arabica crops has not been studied at the low and moderate altitude of land.            The study uses a randomized block design arranged at a split-plot, where two altitude act as the main-plot (10 m and 500 m above sea level and ten genotypes of arabica coffee as the sub-plot (five genotypes of arabica and five genotypes of robbica, with three replicates and four crops for each experimental unit. The sample crops are located  at the centre of the plot (two crops for each experimental unit. Variables observed are plant height (cm, stem diameter (mm, are of a couple of leaf (cm2, weight of a couple of leaf (gram, the number of stomata, the level of leaf greeness, the content of leaf chlorophile (A and B, and nitrate reductase activity.            Result of variance analysis showed that genotypes significantly affect plant height, stem diameter, area of a couple of leaf, weight of a couple of leaf, and the number of stomata. The level of leaf greeness, and the number of chlorophile (A and B show insignificant responses genotypes. The study conclude that the idiotype of arabica coffee, i.e. that is having a combination of robusta and arabica performs better than pure arabica, the habitat of moderate altitude is more favourable than that lowland, and the cultivation of arabica at the moderate altitude requires a modification of enviroment by plantibg the shade plant from leguminosae family.

  18. Effect of decaffeination of green and roasted coffees on the in vivo antioxidant activity and prevention of liver injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriene R. Lima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Decaffeination and roasting affects the composition of the chlorogenic acids in coffee, which have antioxidant potential. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of coffee decaffeination on the in vivo antioxidant activity and the prevention of liver damage. The Wistar rats received intraperitoneal doses of carbon tetrachloride and daily doses of Arabica coffee brews (whole and decaffeinated, both green and roasted by gavage for fifteen days. The activity of liver marker enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and serum albumin were measured as well as the quantification of the thiobarbituric acid reactive species and the content of liver total lipids. Aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase are good indicators of liver damage: the results showed that all studied coffee brews decreased the activity of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, and liver levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive species and total lipids. The compounds presents in coffee brews are able to decrease the hepatic lipid peroxidation induced by carbon tetrachloride, making a significant hepatoprotective effect, in accordance with the liver function tests. The coffee brews are hepatoprotective regardless of the decaffeination process and our results suggest a better protection against liver damage for the roasted coffee brews compared with green coffee brews.

  19. Persistence and distribution of [14C]-lindane residues in coffee plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores-Rueegg, E.; Mesquita, T.B.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on weathering, volatilization, absorption, translocation and accumulation of [ 14 C]-lindane (γ-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane) in coffee (Coffeea arabica L. var. Bourbon) plants are reported. Ten days after topical application to the leaf surface the insecticide can be absorbed and translocated to different parts of the plant. It accumulates mainly in the roots and appears in other leaves. In these experiments, when plants are cultivated in nutrient solution, release of radiocarbon through roots could be detected, indicating exchange of labelled material between plant and surrounding media. When the insecticide is supplied to coffee plants through the roots immersed in nutrient solution containing [ 14 C]-lindane, the labelled material is absorbed and, after 24 hours, radioactive material can be detected in young leaves of the upper parts of the plant. Loss of [ 14 C]-lindane by volatilization, evaporation and co-distillation with water is apparently continuous and represents a significant proportion of that applied. (author)

  20. Quality of wholemeal wheat bread enriched with green coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Gawlik-Dziki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific studies have revealed that bioactive components of coffee play a preventive role against various degenerative diseases. Green coffee, in particular, is characterized by its unique composition and properties. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of green coffee (Coffea arabica beans (GCB addition on the quality and antioxidant properties (AA of the wholemeal bread. For bread preparation, flour form GCB, and wholemeal wheat flour, type 2000 were used. Wholemeal wheat flour was replaced with GCB flour at 1 to 5% levels. Loaf volume, texture, color and sensory properties of bread were determined. Furthermore, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were evaluated. The results showed that bread supplementation with GCB had little influence on the bread volume. The highest volume of bread was obtained with 3 and 4% of GCB flour. The texture properties of bread crumb (hardness, elasticity, cohesiveness and chewiness were slightly changed as a result of the GCB addition. The lightness of bread crumb decreased with the GCB addition (average from 46.3 to 42.6. Besides, the addition of GCB significantly enriched wheat bread with hydrophilic phenolic compounds. The phenolic compounds were highly bioaccessible in vitro. Moreover, the GCB addition enhanced antiradical activity of bread.

  1. Quantification of Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta concentration in blends by means of synchronous fluorescence and UV-Vis spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankowska, A; Domagała, A; Kowalewski, W

    2017-09-01

    The potential of fluorescence, UV-Vis spectroscopies as well as the low- and mid-level data fusion of both spectroscopies for the quantification of concentrations of roasted Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta in coffee blends was investigated. Principal component analysis was used to reduce data multidimensionality. To calculate the level of undeclared addition, multiple linear regression (PCA-MLR) models were used with lowest root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) of 3.6% and root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) of 7.9%. LDA analysis was applied to fluorescence intensities and UV spectra of Coffea arabica, canephora samples, and their mixtures in order to examine classification ability. The best performance of PCA-LDA analysis was observed for data fusion of UV and fluorescence intensity measurements at wavelength interval of 60nm. LDA showed that data fusion can achieve over 96% of correct classifications (sensitivity) in the test set and 100% of correct classifications in the training set, with low-level data fusion. The corresponding results for individual spectroscopies ranged from 90% (UV-Vis spectroscopy) to 77% (synchronous fluorescence) in the test set, and from 93% to 97% in the training set. The results demonstrate that fluorescence, UV, and visible spectroscopies complement each other, giving a complementary effect for the quantification of roasted Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora var. robusta concentration in blends. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Interferência de plantas daninhas sobre o crescimento inicial de Coffea arabica Weed effect on the initial growth of Coffea arabica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.T. Fialho

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar os efeitos da interferência de plantas daninhas, em diferentes densidades de infestação, sobre o crescimento de plantas jovens de café arábica. Mudas de café, cultivar Mundo Novo, foram transplantadas, no estádio de quatro a cinco pares de folhas completamente expandidas, para vasos com capacidade de 25 dm³. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação em blocos casualizados, em esquema fatorial (4 x 4; o primeiro fator foi composto por espécies de plantas daninhas (Digitaria horizontalis, Brachiaria decumbens, Brachiaria plantaginea e Mucuna aterrima, e o segundo, por densidades dessas espécies (zero, dois, quatro e seis plantas por vaso, com quatro repetições. O plantio das espécies daninhas foi realizado 60 dias após o transplantio do café (0 DAT. Nesta data e no dia do encerramento do experimento, aos 90 DAT, determinaram-se a altura, a área foliar e o diâmetro do caule da planta de café, para cálculo do incremento dessas variáveis. Aos 90 DAT, determinou-se a matéria seca da parte aérea e radicular do café e das plantas daninhas e a densidade radicular do café. Utilizando esses resultados, estimou-se a razão de massa foliar, razão de massa caulinar, razão de massa radicular, razão de área foliar e a razão sistema radicular/parte aérea das plantas de café. A espécie M. aterrima foi a que mais reduziu a taxa de crescimento, a área foliar, a matéria seca do caule e das folhas e o diâmetro do caule do café. Entre as gramíneas, B. plantaginea foi a que mais reduziu a taxa de crescimento, área foliar, diâmetro do caule e densidade radicular do café. Ocorreu relação negativa entre a densidade de plantas daninhas e as variáveis de crescimento e com a razão de massa radicular e razão sistema radicular/parte aérea.The goal of this work was to evaluate the effects of weeds on the growth of young Arabica coffee plants, at different densities of infestation

  3. Impact of climate change on agro-climatic zoning of Arabica coffee in the State of Espirito Santo, Brazil = Impactos das mudanças climáticas no zoneamento agroclimatológico do café arábica no Espírito Santo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosembergue Bragança

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to define, using current agro-climatic zoning, and for the next 100 years, areas of different climatic suitability for the cultivation of Arabica coffee (Coffea arabica L. in the State of Espirito Santo, Brazil. Monthly and yearly data of average air temperature and rainfall were used, taken from historical series for the period of 1976 to 2006. It was necessary to simulate the effects of temperature increments of +1 ºC, +2 ºC, +3 ºC, +4 ºC and +5 ºC, using the mean result of six models, namely: GFDL-R30 (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, R-30 resolution, CCSR/NIES (Center for Climate Research Studies, CSIROMk2 (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization GCM mark 2, CGCM2 (Canadian Global Coupled Model v 2, ECHAM4 (European Centre Hamburg Model v 4 and HadCM3 (Hadley Centre Coupled Model v 3. The results showed that currently, areas which are completely suitable represent 19.49% of the area of Espirito Santo which, with an increase of 5 °C, would decrease to 0.02%; whereas completely unsuitable areas would increase from 33.47% to 95.63%, making the cultivation of Arabica coffee unsuited to the state if the genetic and physiological characteristics, which have a tolerance limit for the average annual temperature of between 23 °C and 24 °C, are maintained. = Objetivou-se com este trabalho definir, por meio do zoneamento agroclimatológico atual e para os próximos 100 anos, áreas com diferentes aptidões climáticas para a cultura do café arábica (Coffea arabica L., no estado do Espírito Santo. Para isso, foram utilizados dados de temperatura média do ar e precipitação pluviométrica, em escala mensal e anual, de séries históricas representativas do período de 1976 a 2006. Foi necessário simular o efeito do incremento de temperatura de +1 ºC, +2 ºC, +3 ºC, +4 ºC e +5 ºC, por meio da média obtida do resultado de seis modelos, a saber: GFDL-R30 (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

  4. Drip irrigation in coffee crop under different planting densities: Growth and yield in southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleice A. de Assis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation associated to reduction on planting spaces between rows and between coffee plants has been a featured practice in coffee cultivation. The objective of the present study was to assess, over a period of five consecutive years, influence of different irrigation management regimes and planting densities on growth and bean yield of Coffea arabica L.. The treatments consisted of four irrigation regimes: climatologic water balance, irrigation when the soil water tension reached values close to 20 and 60 kPa; and a control that was not irrigated. The treatments were distributed randomly in five planting densities: 2,500, 3,333, 5,000, 10,000 and 20,000 plants ha-1. A split-plot in randomized block design was used with four replications. Irrigation promoted better growth of coffee plants and increased yield that varied in function of the plant density per area. For densities from 10,000 to 20,000 plants ha-1, regardless of the used irrigation management, mean yield increases were over 49.6% compared to the non-irrigated crop.

  5. Effect of sugars on liquid-vapour partition of volatile compounds in ready-to-drink coffee beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccone, P; Lonzarich, V; Navarini, L; Fusella, G; Pittia, P

    2012-09-01

    The effect of sugars (sucrose, lactose, glucose, fructose, 10%w/v) on the liquid-vapour partition of selected volatile compounds of coffee beverages has been investigated in espresso coffee and ready-to-drink (RTD) canned coffee prepared and obtained by using the same Arabica roasted coffee beans blend. Aroma composition of coffee beverages has been preliminary investigated by headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC) and solid phase microextraction-HS-GC-mass spectrometry to characterize the volatile pattern of the systems and to evaluate the effects of sugars on the aroma release/retention. Then, the liquid-vapour partition coefficient (k) of 4 selected key aroma compounds (diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, ethylpyrazine, hexanal) was determined in water, sugars solutions as well as RTD coffee brews added with the same sugars (10%w/v). Sugars added in coffee beverages affected the release of the volatiles and thus its aroma profile with differences due to the type of added sugar and coffee brew type. The k values of the selected volatile compounds resulted different depending on the model system composition (water, coffee brew) and sugar type added. In particular, melanoidins as well as other non-volatile components (lipids, acids, carbohydrates) in the RTD coffee brews could be implied in the change of k of the volatile compounds in respect to that observed in water. The effects of the sugar type on the release/retention of the four key coffee aroma compounds were partly explained in terms of 'salting out' especially for the more polar volatile compounds and in the sucrose-added model systems. The change of chemical and physico-chemical properties of the water and brews induced by the sugars as well as the occurrence of interactions between volatile compounds and non-volatile components may be implied in the reduction of the vapour partition of the aroma compounds. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Sourgrass densities affecting the initial growth and macronutrient content of coffee plants Densidades de capim-amargoso afetando o crescimento inicial e o teor de macronutrientes do cafeeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.B Carvalho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the coexistence effects of coffee (Coffea arabica with densities of sourgrass (Digitaria insularis on crop macronutrient content and plant growth. The experiment was conducted in plots where one coffee plant was maintained in coexistence with 0 (weed-free check, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 sourgrass plants, using a completely randomized design with three replicates. Reduction of coffee growth and macronutrient content, except P that increased, started when the coexistence occurred with sourgrass plants in a density of 1 plant per plot. In general, macronutrient content was reduced by 18-50%, while growth characteristics were reduced by 9-41%, when coffee plants coexisted with 16 plants of sourgrass. Thus, sourgrass competition for nutrients was a strong factor limiting coffee plant growth.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os efeitos da convivência do cafeeiro (Coffea arabica com densidades de capim-amargoso (Digitaria insularis sobre o teor de macronutrientes e o crescimento das plantas da cultura. O experimento foi conduzido em caixas enterradas no solo, onde uma planta de café foi mantida em convivência com 0 (testemunha livre de plantas daninhas, 1, 2, 4, 8 e 16 plantas de capim-amargoso, usando o delineamento inteiramente casualizado com três repetições. A redução no crescimento e no teor de macronutrientes do cafeeiro - exceto P, que aumentou - iniciou-se quando a convivência ocorreu com plantas de capim-amargoso na densidade de uma planta por caixa. Em geral, o teor de macronutrientes foi reduzido em 10-50%, enquanto as características de crescimento foram reduzidas em 9-41%, quando o cafeeiro conviveu com 16 plantas de capim-amargoso. Assim, a competição de capim-amargoso por nutrientes foi um forte fator limitante para o crescimento das plantas de café.

  7. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY FOR SPECIALTY COFFEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vharessa Aknesia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialty coffee is a coffee of premium quality that has been made through various stages of post-harvest processing and strictly controlled to produce distinctive taste of origins. PT Sinar Mayang Lestari is one of the companies that currently produce and develop specialty coffee type, Arabica Java Preanger. The objectives of the study are to examine competitive advantages and develop an alternative strategy that need to be done by PT Sinar Mayang Lestari for their business development. The research methods used are value chain analysis and VRIO framework to explore competitive advantage owned by the company. The result shows the company currently has a temporary competitive advantage of the technological resources and reputation. By using SWOT-AHP technique, the alternative strategies that can be done by company are as follows: 1 increasing the production of natural and honey coffee  type; 2 building coffee center in plantation site for sharing knowledge and innovation media to the farmers; 3 improving the competency of human resource in plantation, post harvest, and promoting area; 4 building management system gradually 5 forwarding integration by building roast and ground coffee business; and 6 maximizing the ability of the land and human resources through research and development.Keywords: competitive advantage, specialty coffee, SWOT-AHP, value chain, VRIOABSTRAKKopi special merupakan kopi dengan kualitas premium yang sudah melalui berbagai tahapan pengolahan pascapanen yang diawasi dengan ketat sehingga menghasilkan cita rasa yang khas sesuai dengan daerah asalnya. PT Sinar Mayang Lestari adalah salah satu perusahaan yang saatini memproduksi dan mengembangkan kopi spesial jenis Arabika Java Preanger. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah menganalisis keunggulan bersaing yang dimiliki dan mengembangkan alternative strategi yang perlu dilakukanoleh PT Sinar Mayang Lestari untuk pengembangan usahanya. Penelitian ini menggunakan analisis rantai

  8. Absorção, translocação e utilização de zinco, cobre e manganês por mudas enxertadas de Coffea arabica Absorption, translocation and utilization of zinc, copper and manganese in grafted seedlings of Coffea arabica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Antonio Tomaz

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparativamente ao pé-franco, a combinação enxerto/porta-enxerto altera os complexos mecanismos de "feedback" entre parte aérea e raízes, afetando de maneira positiva ou negativa a eficiência nutricional da planta. Este trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar, em cultivo hidropônico, a eficiência da absorção, translocação e utilização de Zn, Cu e Mn por mudas de Coffea arabica L., de acordo com o porta-enxerto utilizado. O experimento foi realizado em casa de vegetação, por um período de 170 dias, em vasos que continham areia como substrato, recebendo solução nutritiva circulante. Utilizaram-se, como enxerto, quatro genótipos de C. arabica: os cultivares Catuaí Vermelho IAC 15 e Oeiras MG 6851 e os híbridos 'H 419-10-3-1-5' e 'H 514-5-5-3' , e, como porta-enxerto, quatro genótipos, sendo três de Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froenher: Apoatã LC 2258, Conilon Muriaé-1 e RC EMCAPA 8141 (recombinação entre clones da variedade Robustão Capixaba - EMCAPA 8141 e uma linhagem de Coffea arabica L.: Mundo Novo IAC 376-4, além de quatro pés-francos. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi em blocos casualizados com 20 tratamentos, quatro repetições e uma planta por parcela. A eficiência nutricional das mudas quanto ao Zn, Cu e Mn variou de acordo com a combinação enxerto/porta-enxerto. A progênie 'H 514-5-5-3' foi mais eficiente quanto à utilização de Zn, Cu e Mn e produção de matéria seca, quando combinada com os porta-enxertos Apoatã LC 2258 e Mundo Novo IAC 376-4. O Catuaí Vermelho IAC 15 foi mais eficiente na utilização de Cu e Mn quando combinado com Apoatã LC 2258.There are complexes feedback mechanisms involving the relationship rootstock/scion, whick can positively or negatively affect the plant nutrient efficiency use. The goal of the present work was to evaluate the efficiency of uptake, translocation and utilization of Zn, Cu and Mn in coffee seedlings. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse

  9. Disinfestation of copra, desiccated coconut and coffee beans by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manato, E.C.

    1987-08-01

    Nine insect pests were found associated with copra of which copra beetle, Necrobia rufipes, saw-toothed grain beetle, Oryzaephilus surinamensis, red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne and tropical warehouse moth, Ephestia cautella were found feeding on this food. While feeding on different coffee beans, coffee bean weevil, Araecerus fasciculatus De Geer showed preference on Arabica, Liberica and Excelsa but not in Robusta coffee beans. For mass rearing, the most suitable medium for copra beetle was desiccated coconut + yeast (2:1) and for coffee bean beetle, it was dried cassava chips + yeast (3:1). The life cycles completed in these food media were 43 to 60 and 42 to 56 days by copra beetle and coffee bean weevil respectively. Irradiation studies on these 2 species of insects showed that the eggs were most sensitive followed by larvae and pupae. A dose of 0.05 kGy prevented adult emergence from irradiated eggs and younger larvae, while doses of 0.10 to 0.25 kGy effected the survival of emerged adults. However, a dose of 0.50 kGy would be effective for the disinfestation of small packages (i.e. 0.25 to 0.50 kg in each) of copra or coffee beans initially infested with immature stages of beetles and weevils respectively. Packaging of irradiated commodities in polypropylene bags particularly those impregnated with permethrin prevented reinfestation by the insect pests. Toxic residues of permethrin in the prolypropylene film resulted in high mortality thereby preventing insect penetration of the packaging materials. Both copra beetles and coffee bean weevils were rather good invaders than penetrators as these species entered into the packages readily through existing openings in jute sack, woven polypropylene sack or flour bag. Organoleptic tests showed no change in aroma, flavour and general acceptability of irradiated coffee beans. In microbial studies it was observed that a dose of 0.6 kGy would eliminate Salmonella

  10. Mortalidade de Coccus viridis (Hemiptera: Coccidae por Lecanicillium spp. em diferentes órgãos de Coffea arabica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Lemes Fernandes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste trabalho avaliar a mortalidade de Coccus viridis por Lecanicillium spp. em folhas e ramos de Coffea arabica. O trabalho foi realizado na casa de vegetação na Universidade Federal de Viçosa, entre fevereiro de 2005 a junho de 2006. Foram utilizadas sementes da variedade Catuaí vermelho de café (C. arabica. A solução nutritiva utilizada foi composta por 3,0 mmol/L de N, 9,0 mmol/L de K, 1,0 mmol/L de P, 4,0 mmol/L de Ca, 2,1 mmol/L de S, 46 µmol/L de B, 0,3 µmol/L de Cu, 60,0 µmol/L de Fe, 2,0 µmol/L de Mg, 0,5 µmol/L de Mo e 36,0 µmol/L de Mn. As cochonilhas e o fungo foram coletados de folhas de café em lavouras comerciais de Viçosa, MG e foram mantidos em gaiolas em Casa de Vegetação. As plantas foram infestadas com oito meses de idade. A infestação foi realizada por contato de C. viridis infectadas com o fungo sobre as cochonilhas sadias. As densidades de C. viridis viva e morta nas folhas e nos ramos foram avaliadas aos 0, 15, 30, 35, 45, 60 e 75 dias após a infestação. Usou-se análise de variância, teste de média de Skott-Knott e análise de regressão linear simples a p<0,05. O fungo Lecanicillium spp. causou mortalidade em todos os estádios de C. viridis. De forma geral, a maior mortalidade ocorreu no terceiro ínstar. Além disso, o fungo causou maior mortalidade nesse inseto praga na face abaxial da folha de café. Mortality of Coccus viridis (Hemiptera: Coccidae by Lecanicillium spp. in differents Coffea arabica organs in greenhouseAbstract. The objective of this work was to evaluate the mortality of Coccus viridis by Lecanicillium spp. on faces of the leaves, and branches of Coffea arabica. This work was conducted in greenhouse at UFV. The experiment was carried out from February 2005 to June 2006. Seeds of the lineage IAC 15 from the variety “Catuaí Vermelho” coffee (C. arabica were used. The nutritive solution utilized was composed for 3. 0 mmol/L of N, 9. 0 mmol/L of K, 1. 0 mmol

  11. Vegetative and productive aspects of organically grown coffee cultivars under shaded and unshaded systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta dos Santos Freire Ricci

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Although Coffea arabica species has its origin in the African understories, there is great resistance on the part of the Brazilian producers for growing this species under agroforestry systems as they fear that shading reduces production. This study aimed at evaluating some vegetative traits and the productivity of organically grown coffee (Coffea arabica L. cultivars under shaded and unshaded systems. Twelve treatments consisting of two cultivation systems (shaded and unshaded and six coffee cultivars were arranged in randomized blocks with four replicates, in a split-plot scheme. Shading was provided by banana (Musa sp. and coral bean plants (Erythrinaverna. Shading delayed fruit maturation. Late maturation cultivars, such as the Icatu and the Obatã, matured early in both cultivation systems, while medium and early maturation cultivars presented late maturation. Cultivation in the shaded system increased the leaf area and the number of lower branches, decreased the number of productive nodes per branch, and increased the distance between the nodes and the number of leaves present in the branches. Cultivation in the unshaded system presented greater number of plants with branch blight in relation to plants grown in the shade. The productivity of the cultivars was not different, at 30.0 processed bags per hectare in the shaded system, and 25.8 processed bags per hectare in the unshaded system. The most productive cultivars in the shaded system were the Tupi, the Obatã, and the Catuaí, while no differences between cultivars were obtained in the unshaded system.

  12. Pengaruh Faktor Sosial Ekonomi dan Ekologi terhadap Produksi Kopi Arabika Spesialti dalam Pengembangan Ekonomi Lokal di Kabupaten Simalungun

    OpenAIRE

    Saragih, Jef Rudiantho

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research is to know the influence of socioeconomic and ecological factors on production of specialty Arabica coffee in Simalungun District. In addition, research also examined the benefit of coffee certification program, land use and analysis of policy and program need. This studies underlying model of local economic development (LED) based on agribusiness of specialty Arabica coffee. Selection of the sample area is carried out by multi-stage cluster sampl...

  13. Development of an instant coffee enriched with chlorogenic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Marinês Paula; Vignoli, Josiane Alessandra; Benassi, Marta de Toledo

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to present possible formulations for an instant coffee product enriched with chlorogenic acids for the Brazilian market. Formulations were prepared with different concentrations of freeze dried extracts of green Coffea canephora beans (G) added to freeze dried extracts of roasted Coffea arabica (A) and Coffea canephora (C). Medium (M) and dark (D) roasting degrees instant coffee were produced (AM, AD, CM and CD) to obtain four formulations with green extract addition (AMG, ADG, CMG and CDG). Chlorogenic acids were determined by HPLC, with average contents of 7.2 %. Roasted extracts and formulations were evaluated for 5-CQA and caffeine contents (by HPLC), browned compounds (absorbance 420 nm), and antioxidant activity (ABTS and Folin). Coffee brews of the four formulations were also assessed in a lab-scale test by 42 consumers for acceptance of the color, aroma, flavor and body, overall acceptance and purchase intent, using a 10 cm hybrid scale. The formulations obtained acceptance scores of 6.6 and 7.7 for all attributes, thus they were equally acceptable. Greater purchase intent was observed for ADG, CDG and CMG (6.9) in comparison to AMG (6.1). The formulations had, on average, 2.5 times more 5-CQA than the average obtained from conventional commercial instant coffees. In addition to being more economically viable, the formulations developed with C. canephora (CDG and CMG) showed greater antioxidant potential (32.5 g of Trolox/100 g and 13.8 g of gallic acid equivalent/100 g) due to a balance in the amount of bioactive compounds.

  14. Determination of selenium in roasted beans coffee samples consumed in Algeria by radiochemical neutron activation analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messaoudi, Mohammed; Begaa, Samir; Hamidatou, Lylia; Salhi, M'hamed

    2018-01-01

    The essential trace element selenium is a focus of attention due to its effects on human health, there being consequences of both its deficiency and excess. Due to the ultra-trace content of selenium, the neutron activation analysis method (NAA) is difficult to apply. We therefore made use of the radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) to determine Se at low level concentrations in several consumed food items in Algeria. A radiochemical procedure based on liquid-liquid separation was established in our laboratory. In this research we focused on the determination of selenium in two species of coffee: Arabica and Robusta. The accuracy of the method was assessed by analyzing the certified reference material NIST-SRM 1573a (tomato leaves). The results obtained show a selenium variation from 0.025 to 0.052 μg/g in coffee beans and an average yield of the separation of about 85%. The results of this study were compared with those obtained with samples from Brazilian, Caribbean, Indian and Kenyan coffee beans.

  15. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of Coffea arabica (L.) is greatly enhanced by using established embryogenic callus cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Following genome sequencing of crop plants, one of the main challenges today is determining the function of all the predicted genes. When gene validation approaches are used for woody species, the main obstacle is the low recovery rate of transgenic plants from elite or commercial cultivars. Embryogenic calli have frequently been the target tissue for transformation, but the difficulty in producing or maintaining embryogenic tissues is one of the main problems encountered in genetic transformation of many woody plants, including Coffea arabica. Results We identified the conditions required for successful long-term proliferation of embryogenic cultures in C. arabica and designed a highly efficient and reliable Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method based on these conditions. The transformation protocol with LBA1119 harboring pBin 35S GFP was established by evaluating the effect of different parameters on transformation efficiency by GFP detection. Using embryogenic callus cultures, co-cultivation with LBA1119 OD600 = 0.6 for five days at 20 °C enabled reproducible transformation. The maintenance conditions for the embryogenic callus cultures, particularly a high auxin to cytokinin ratio, the age of the culture (optimum for 7-10 months of proliferation) and the use of a yellow callus phenotype, were the most important factors for achieving highly efficient transformation (> 90%). At the histological level, successful transformation was related to the number of proembryogenic masses present. All the selected plants were proved to be transformed by PCR and Southern blot hybridization. Conclusion Most progress in increasing transformation efficiency in coffee has been achieved by optimizing the production conditions of embryogenic cultures used as target tissues for transformation. This is the first time that a strong positive effect of the age of the culture on transformation efficiency was demonstrated. Our results make Agrobacterium

  16. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of Coffea arabica (L. is greatly enhanced by using established embryogenic callus cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lashermes Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following genome sequencing of crop plants, one of the main challenges today is determining the function of all the predicted genes. When gene validation approaches are used for woody species, the main obstacle is the low recovery rate of transgenic plants from elite or commercial cultivars. Embryogenic calli have frequently been the target tissue for transformation, but the difficulty in producing or maintaining embryogenic tissues is one of the main problems encountered in genetic transformation of many woody plants, including Coffea arabica. Results We identified the conditions required for successful long-term proliferation of embryogenic cultures in C. arabica and designed a highly efficient and reliable Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method based on these conditions. The transformation protocol with LBA1119 harboring pBin 35S GFP was established by evaluating the effect of different parameters on transformation efficiency by GFP detection. Using embryogenic callus cultures, co-cultivation with LBA1119 OD600 = 0.6 for five days at 20 °C enabled reproducible transformation. The maintenance conditions for the embryogenic callus cultures, particularly a high auxin to cytokinin ratio, the age of the culture (optimum for 7-10 months of proliferation and the use of a yellow callus phenotype, were the most important factors for achieving highly efficient transformation (> 90%. At the histological level, successful transformation was related to the number of proembryogenic masses present. All the selected plants were proved to be transformed by PCR and Southern blot hybridization. Conclusion Most progress in increasing transformation efficiency in coffee has been achieved by optimizing the production conditions of embryogenic cultures used as target tissues for transformation. This is the first time that a strong positive effect of the age of the culture on transformation efficiency was demonstrated. Our

  17. Agrometeorological parameters for prediction of the maturation period of Arabica coffee cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzopane, José Ricardo Macedo; Salva, Terezinha de Jesus Garcia; de Lima, Valéria Bittencourt; Fazuoli, Luiz Carlos

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the harvest period of coffee fruits based on the relationship between agrometeorological parameters and sucrose accumulation in the seeds. Over the crop years 2004/2005 and 2006/2007, from 150 days after flowering (DAF) onwards, samples of 50 fruits of cultivars Mundo Novo IAC 376-4, Obatã IAC 1669-20 and Catuaí Vermelho IAC 144 were collected from coffee trees located in Campinas, Brazil. The endosperm of the fruits was freeze-dried, ground and analyzed for sucrose content by high-performance liquid chromatography. A weather station provided data to calculate the accumulated growing degree-day (GDD) units, and the reference (ETo) and actual (ETr) evapotranspiration rates. The results showed that the highest rates of sucrose accumulation occurred at the transition from the cane-green to the cherry phenological stage. Models for the estimation of sucrose content during maturation based on meteorological variables exhibited similar or better performance than the DAF variable, with better results for the variables GDD and ETo. The Mundo Novo cultivar reached the highest sucrose level in the endosperm after 2,790 GDD, while cultivar Catuaí attained its maximum sucrose concentration after the accumulated evapotranspiration rate has reached a value of 870 mm. As for cultivar Obatã, the maximum sucrose concentration was predicted with the same degree of accuracy using any of the parameters investigated. For the Obatã cultivar, the values of the variables calculated for the maximum sucrose concentration to be reached were 249 DAF, 3,090 GDD, 1,020 ETo and 900 ETr.

  18. Determination of dew absorption by coffee plant through deuterium concentrations in leaf water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leopoldo, P R [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas e Biologicas de Botucatu (Brazil); Salati, E; Matsui, E [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Piracicaba (Brazil)

    1975-12-01

    The effect of dew falling on leaves on the water metabolism of the coffee plant (Coffea arabica) is examined. The use of natural stable isotopes variations in plant physiological studies is demonstrated. Water extracted from leaf samples is analysed by mass spectrometry. Analyses of deuterium concentrations in water extracted from plant leaves, dew and nutrient solutions are made. Determination of changes in deuterium concentration in the water of leaves from plants exposed to dew, compared with leaves not exposed to dew, is carried out. Results show that during daytime there is an enrichment in deuterium in water contained in the leaves, while at night the opposite occurs.

  19. Determination of dew absorption by coffee plant through deuterium concentrations in leaf water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leopoldo, P.R.; Salati, E.; Matsui, E.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of dew falling on leaves on the water metabolism of the coffee plant (Coffea arabica) is examined. The use of natural stable isotopes variations in plant physiological studies is demonstrated. Water extracted from leaf samples is analysed by mass spectrometry. Analyses of deuterium concentrations in water extracted from plant leaves, dew and nutrient solutions are made. Determination of changes in deuterium concentration in the water of leaves from plants exposed to dew, compared with leaves not exposed to dew, is carried out. Results show that during daytime there is an enrichment in deuterium in water contained in the leaves, while at night the opposite occurs [pt

  20. Melhoramento do cafeeiro: XLII. Produtividade de progênies derivadas de hibridação dos cultivares Laurina e Mundo Novo Coffee breeding: XLII. Yield of progenies from crosses of Laurina and Mundo Novo cultivars of Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcides Carvalho

    1988-01-01

    pleiotropic effect. Due to the market interest for coffee with low caffeine content, selection work has been initiated some years ago in order to improve yield of the Laurina cultivars. Crosses and backcrosses (BC1 were undertaken with selected plants of the Mundo Novo cultivars of C. arabica and the best F1 plants were selfed. A yield trial was established in Campinas, State of São Paulo, Brazil, with two groups of F2 plants, normal (LrLr, Lrlr and Laurina (lrlr with BC1 plants, and 'Mundo Novo' and 'Catuaí Amarelo' as control cultivars. Results from the first eight consecutive harvests indicated that BC, and F2 laurina plants had higher yields than the normal F2 plants, however lower than that of the control cultivars. Some BC1 and F2 plants revealed high individual yield indicating that continued breeding of these progenies could result in selection of commercially acceptable Laurina progenies.

  1. Free and proteic aminoacids from acetate 14C metabolism in detached leaves of coffee plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasil, O.G.; Crocomo, O.J.

    1981-01-01

    The acetate 14 C was studied as the forerunner of proteic and free aminoacids in detached leaves of coffee (coffea arabica L.cv. Mundo Novo). The detached leaves were incubated with acetate -1- 14 C and -2- 14 C during several times (15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 minutes), out of luminosity. The ethanol 80% soluble fraction gave origin to free aminoacid after ion - exchange chromatography. The insoluble fraction through acid hydrolisis furnished proteic aminoacids. The data showed that the acetate molecules contributed for the aminoacids molecules structure, methylic carbon being more incorporated than the carboxylic carbon. (Author) [pt

  2. Recuperação do cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L. após recepa, submetido a diferentes lâminas de água e parcelamentos da adubação = Recovery of coffee tree (Coffea arabica L. after pruning under different irrigation depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelte Resende Arantes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Visando reduzir o período de recuperação das lavouras após a recepa, neste trabalho objetivou-se avaliar a influência de diferentes lâminas de irrigação e do parcelamento da adubação sobre o crescimento do cafeeiro. Foram utilizadas quatro diferentes lâminas de irrigação (0, 40, 80 e 120% da ECA-Precipitação e três parcelamentos da adubação com N e K (quatro, oito e 12 vezes. O experimento foi conduzido no Sul de Minas Gerais, com o cafeeiro (Coffea arabica cv. Topázio MG-1190, plantado no espaçamento de 1,8 x 0,7 m e recepado 65 meses após o plantio. O delineamentoexperimental utilizado foi em blocos casualizados com parcelas subdivididas. Os parâmetros avaliados foram altura da planta, diâmetro do ramo ortotrópico, número de internódios e diâmetro da copa. O crescimento do cafeeiro foi influenciado pela irrigação, mas não foi influenciado pelo parcelamento da adubação. A lâmina de 120% do saldo do balanço ECA - P proporcionou maior crescimento.In order to reduce the recovery period of the orchard coffeeafter pruning, this work was carried out with the objective of evaluating the influence of different irrigation depths and splitting of N and K with fertirrigation on the growth of coffee plants. The experiment was carried out in southern Minas Gerais State with coffeaarabica cv. Topázio MG-1190 implanted with 1.8 x 0.7 m spacing. Irrigations corresponded to 0, 40, 80 and 120% of the evaporation from a Class A pan – precipitation (ECA-P and N and K split in 4, 8 and 12 applications. A randomized block design with four replicationswas used. Plant height, diameter of orthotropic branches, number of internodes and crown diameter were evaluated. The fertilizer splitting was found not to provide any increase in growth of the coffee plant. The depth of 120%*ECA-P provided the greatest growth ofcoffee plants when compared to others.

  3. Crescimento vegetativo e produção de cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L. recepados em duas épocas, conduzidos em espaçamentos crescentes Vegetative growth and yield of coffee plants (Coffea arabica L. in two different pruning times, conducted at different spacings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Parreiras Pereira

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi instalado na Fazenda Experimental da Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuária de Minas Gerais - EPAMIG em Machado, Sul de Minas Gerais, em 1992, com o objetivo de avaliar as conseqüências da redução dos espaçamentos entre as linhas e entre as plantas na linha de plantio sobre a produção e a fenologia do cafeeiro(Coffea arabica L.. O delineamento experimental foi o blocos casualizados - DBC, em um arranjo fatorial 4 x 3 com parcela subdividida, sendo quatro distâncias entre as linhas (2,0; 2,5; 3,0 e 3,5 m e três distâncias entre as plantas na linha de plantio (0,5; 0,75; 1,0 m, e duas épocas de poda (uma precoce feita logo após a colheita em de julho 2002 e a outra tardia em de janeiro de 2003, totalizando 24 tratamentos com três repetições. Em julho de 2002 e em janeiro de 2003 foi realizada a poda tipo "recepa", na qual foram conduzidas duas brotações por planta. Em agosto de 2004, avaliou-se o crescimento dos componentes vegetativos e a produção das parcelas. Os espaçamentos adotados não influenciaram o crescimento de nenhum dos componentes vegetativos das brotações no período avaliado. Todas as características vegetativas foram influenciadas positivamente pela adoção da poda precoce, assim como a produtividade da primeira colheita realizada após a poda, que foi também influenciada positivamente pela adoção de espaçamentos mais adensados. Os cafeeiros que foram submetidos à poda tardia não produziram, em julho de 2004, como aqueles podados precocemente.The experiment was established in the Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuária de Minas Gerais - Epamig Experiment Station, located in the city of Machado, south of the Minas Gerais state, Brazil, in the year of 1992, with the objective of evaluating the consequences of the reduction on planting spaces among rows and among plants, upon beans yield and plant phenology (Coffea arabica L.. The experimental design used was a 4x 3 factorial with split plot at

  4. Non-destructive analysis of sucrose, caffeine and trigonelline on single green coffee beans by hyperspectral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaso, Nicola; Whitworth, Martin B; Grebby, Stephen; Fisk, Ian D

    2018-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a novel technology for the food sector that enables rapid non-contact analysis of food materials. HSI was applied for the first time to whole green coffee beans, at a single seed level, for quantitative prediction of sucrose, caffeine and trigonelline content. In addition, the intra-bean distribution of coffee constituents was analysed in Arabica and Robusta coffees on a large sample set from 12 countries, using a total of 260 samples. Individual green coffee beans were scanned by reflectance HSI (980-2500nm) and then the concentration of sucrose, caffeine and trigonelline analysed with a reference method (HPLC-MS). Quantitative prediction models were subsequently built using Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression. Large variations in sucrose, caffeine and trigonelline were found between different species and origin, but also within beans from the same batch. It was shown that estimation of sucrose content is possible for screening purposes (R 2 =0.65; prediction error of ~0.7% w/w coffee, with observed range of ~6.5%), while the performance of the PLS model was better for caffeine and trigonelline prediction (R 2 =0.85 and R 2 =0.82, respectively; prediction errors of 0.2 and 0.1%, on a range of 2.3 and 1.1% w/w coffee, respectively). The prediction error is acceptable mainly for laboratory applications, with the potential application to breeding programmes and for screening purposes for the food industry. The spatial distribution of coffee constituents was also successfully visualised for single beans and this enabled mapping of the analytes across the bean structure at single pixel level. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Proteolytic activities of bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi isolated from coffee fruit (Coffea arabica L. = Atividade proteolítica de bactérias, leveduras e fungos filamentosos presentes em grãos de café (Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Pereira Rodarte

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available One hundred forty-four microorganisms previously isolated from coffee fruit (Coffea arabica were grown on casein agar to evaluate their proteolytic activities. Fifty percent of filamentous fungi, 52.5% of bacteria and 2.6% of yeasts were able to secrete proteases. Positiveisolates were further examined in liquid culture for their protease activities by hydrolysis of casein at different pH values (5.0, 7.0 and 9.0 at 30 oC. Bacillus megaterium, B. subtilis, Enterobacteragglomerans, Kurthia sp, Pseudomonas paucimobilis and Tatumella ptyseos demonstrated the highest proteolytic activities at pH 9.0. One yeast isolate, Citeromyces matritensis, had a proteolytic activityof 2.40 U at pH 5.0. Aspergillus dimorphicus, A. ochraceus, Fusarium moniliforme, F. solani, Penicillium fellutanum and P. waksmanii showed the highest activities. Of the bacterial isolates, the highestenzyme activities were observed in B. subtilis 333 (27.1 U, Tatumella ptyseos (27.0 U and B. megaterium 817 (26.2 U. Of the filamentous fungi, Aspergillus ochraceus (48.7 U, Fusarium moniliforme 221 (37.5 U and F. solani 359 (37.4 U had the highest activities at pH 9.0. Este trabalho teve por objetivos avaliar a capacidade de secreção de proteases extracelulares por 144 microrganismos, previamente isoladosde grãos de café (Coffea arabica durante fermentação por via seca, e determinar a atividade das enzimas produzidas. Os microrganismos foram cultivados em ágar-caseína para avaliação da produção de enzimas proteolíticas. Dos 40 isolados de bactéria presentes na amostra, 52,5% apresentaram resultado positivo para o teste. Considerando os 66 isolados de fungos filamentosos, 50% foram capazes de secretar proteases, enquanto que dos 38 isolados de leveduras, apenas 2,6% conseguiram promover a hidrólise da caseína do meio. Os isolados que apresentaram capacidade de secreção de proteases foram, posteriormente, cultivados em meio líquido para a determinação da atividade

  6. Efeitos de águas residuárias de café no crescimento vegetativo de cafeeiros em seu primeiro ano Effects of processing coffee wastewater on first year coffee plants growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés S. Ribeiro

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ao utilizar o solo como forma de tratamento e de disposição final de águas residuárias de café (ARC e essa como fonte de água e de nutrientes para os cafeeiros, solucionam-se problemas ambientais e diminuem-se os custos de produção para o cafeicultor. Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar os efeitos de diferentes doses de potássio aplicadas via ARC no crescimento vegetativo de cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L., Catuaí' e Catucaí', em seu primeiro ano, bem como o incremento de potássio e a condutividade elétrica na solução do solo. O estudo foi desenvolvido em casa de vegetação do Departamento de Engenharia, na Universidade Federal de Lavras, no município de Lavras - MG. Os tratamentos foram definidos por diferentes doses de potássio (K+: 30 mg L-1; 65 mg L-1; 100 mg L-1; 135 mg L-1, aplicadas via ARC, e pela testemunha (água de irrigação e adubação convencional. ARC com concentrações até 135 mg L-1 de potássio contribui para o crescimento vegetativo do cafeeiro, especificamente, altura de planta e diâmetro do ramo ortotrópico, mostrando-se igualmente, ou melhor, que a água de irrigação e potássio por meio da adubação convencional. Além disso, o aumento na concentração de potássio do solo em todos os tratamentos não foi suficiente para aumentar a condutividade elétrica em níveis que possam afetar o crescimento da planta, no período avaliado.Using the soil as a form of treatment and final disposal for coffee wastewater(CW, considering its water and nutrient content to the coffee, solves environmental problems and reduces production costs for coffee growers. This research had the objective to evaluate the influence of different potassium levels from WC on the growth of (Coffea arabica L., Catuaí' and Catucaí' coffee varieties, in their fist year, as well the potassium increase and electrical conductivity in the soil solution. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse of the Engineering Department, of

  7. Application of RNAi to confirm theobromine as the major intermediate for caffeine biosynthesis in coffee plants with potential for construction of decaffeinated varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Shinjiro; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Morimoto, Masayuki; Sano, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    The caffeine biosynthetic pathway in coffee plants has been proposed to involve three distinct N -methyltransferases, xanthosine methyltransferase (XMT), 7- N -methylxanthine methyltransferase (MXMT; theobromine synthase), and 3,7-dimethylxanthine methyltransferase (DXMT; caffeine synthase). We previously isolated all corresponding cDNAs designated as CaXMT1 , CaMXMT1 , CaMXMT2 and CaDXMT1 , respectively, and showed that caffeine was indeed synthesized in vitro by the combination of their gene products. In order to regulate caffeine biosynthesis in planta , we suppressed expression of CaMXMT1 by the double stranded RNA interference (RNAi) method. For this purpose, we first established a protocol for efficient somatic embryogenesis of Coffea arabica and C. canephora , and then Agrobacterium -mediated transformation techniques. The RNAi transgenic lines of embryogenic tissues derived from C. arabica and transgenic plantlets of C. canephora demonstrated a clear reduction in transcripts for CaMXMT1 in comparison with the control plants. Transcripts for CaXMT1 and CaDXMT1 were also reduced in the most cases. Both embryonic tissues and plantlets exhibited a concomitant reduction of theobromine and caffeine contents to a range between 30% and 50% of that of the control. These results suggest that the CaMXMT1 -RNAi sequence affected expression of not only CaMXMT1 itself, but also CaXMT1 and CaDXMT1 , and that, since the reduction in theobromine content was proportional to that for caffeine, it is involved in the major synthetic pathway in coffee plants. The results also indicate that the method can be practically applied to produce decaffeinated coffee plants.

  8. Influence of the genotype and density of inoculation on the differentiation of somatic embryos of Coffea arabica L. cv. Red Caturra and Coffea canephora cv. Robusta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Barbón

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The conditions were established for the differentiation of somatic embryos from cell suspensions in the genotype Caturra rojo (Coffea arabica and Robusta (Coffea canephora. Cell suspensions with high embryogenic potentials and stable coefficients of multiplication were used. While studying the density of inoculation, for the phase of differentiation for both varieties, differences appeared in the embryogenic capacity among them, being reached a whole of 556 500 ES.l-1 for the variety Caturra rojo and 298 670 SE.l-1 for the variety Robusta. The biggest number of embryos in torpedo state, were obtained with a density of inoculation of 0.5 gFW.l-1 for the variety Caturra rojo and 5.0 gMF.l-1 for the variety Robusta. Key Words: cell suspensions, embryogenic potential, somatic Embryogenesis, embryogenic cells

  9. Partial resistance to fruit necrosis associated to Colletotrichum spp. among arabic coffee genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Hiroshi Sera

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance to fruit necrosis associated to Colletotrichum spp. in Coffea arabica L.. Twenty-two arabic coffee genotypes were performed in a randomized block design, with three replications and ten plants per plot. They were evaluated for the variables fruit necrosis, luminosity index inside of the plant canopy and fruits per productive nodes of the plants. There was genetic variability for the resistance to fruit necrosis. Different partial resistance levels, varying from highly susceptible (score = 3.89 to moderately resistant (score = 1.77 were observed. The genotypes that presented moderate resistance were the cultivars IPR-100, IPR-103, IPR-105 and IPR-108 and the coffee selection IAPAR-00023.Diferentes espécies de fungo do gênero têm sido associadas a perdas na cafeicultura brasileira. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resistência à necrose de frutos associada ao Colletotrichum spp. em Coffea arabica L.. Vinte e dois genótipos de café foram avaliados no delineamento em blocos ao acaso com três repetições e dez plantas por parcela. As avaliações foram realizadas no IAPAR, Londrina, em janeiro de 2004 para as variáveis necrose de frutos, índice de luminosidade dentro da copa da planta e frutos por nó produtivo. Existe variabilidade genética em cafeeiros arábicos para a resistência à necrose de frutos. Foi observado diferentes níveis de resistência parcial, variando de altamente suscetível (nota = 3,89 a moderadamente resistente (nota = 1,77. Os genótipos que apresentaram moderada resistência foram as cultivares IPR-100, IPR-103, IPR-105 e IPR-108 e a seleção de café IAPAR-00023.

  10. Key Success Factors in the Brazilian Coffee Agrichain: Present and Future Challenges

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    Luciana Florêncio de Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee production has grown 100% in volume over the past 30 years, accounting for 144 million coffee bags produced in 2015. Brazil responded to 42% of this production, along with Vietnam (19%, Colombia (9%, Indonesia (8%, and Ethiopia (4% (OIC, 2016. Following this pace, the consumption expanded not only in such traditional markets as the United States (4.2 kg/year, Germany (6.9 kg/year, and France (5.7 kg/year but also in tea-driven markets, such as Japan, Korea, Russia, and China (CECAFE, 2013. In 2015, Brazil harvested 43.2 million 60-kg bags of green coffee, 32 million of which were of Arabica coffee and 11.2 million of a Conilon species (CONAB, 2016. The planted area in Brazil is 2.3 million hectares, and there are about 287,000 producers, predominantly mini- and small farmers. Having continental dimensions, the country presents a variety of climates, reliefs, altitudes, and latitudes that allow the production of a wide range of types and qualities of coffee (MAPA, 2016. This research aimed to clarify present and future challenges for the Brazilian coffee agrichain, considering the growing demand and also competitiveness between the coffee countries’ producers. To capture the vivid perception of the actors in the coffee chain, a qualitative approach was employed. The research was conducted in three phases. In the first phase, 10 coffee specialists were interviewed to identify the coffee sector’s main milestones for Brazil over the next 30 years. The findings culminated in eight key success factors for coffee-farming management. Finally, in the second phase, the results of phase two were submitted for analysis by 39 coffee farmers through three discussion panels held in the major producing regions: Sul de Minas (corresponding to 25% of the national production, Cerrado Mineiro (with 10%, and Matas de Minas (with 16% (MAPA, 2016. The third phase comprised the data analysis, aggregating the patterns by regions and by critical factors. The

  11. Caracterização de lavouras cafeeiras cultivadas sob o sistema orgânico no sul de Minas Gerais Characterization of coffee crops cultivated on organic system in the south of Minas Gerais

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    Marcelo Ribeiro Malta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available As exigências do mercado por cafés de melhor qualidade estão sendo responsáveis pela difusão e adoção de novas tecnologias de produção e preparo de café. Entre os cafés especiais, o café orgânico é um dos que mais vem se destacando neste segmento. Desta forma, objetivou-se nesse trabalho, a avaliação das características agronômicas de lavouras cafeeiras (Coffea arabica L. sob o sistema orgânico de produção, localizadas no Município de Poço Fundo, sul de Minas Gerais. Foram caracterizadas em 21 lavouras cafeeiras orgânicas as cultivares utilizadas, a população cafeeira, o tipo de colheita e secagem adotadas, a produtividade e qualidade do café, a fertilidade do solo e o estado nutricional do cafeeiro. Através dos resultados obtidos, concluiu-se que os cafeeiros conduzidos sob o sistema orgânico de produção apresentam potencial para produzirem cafés de boa qualidade. Em relação à fertilidade do solo, os baixos valores de pH e o desequilíbrio das relações entre K, Ca e Mg observados na maioria dessas lavouras, sugerem que esses fatores podem afetar o crescimento, o desenvolvimento e a produção dos cafeeiros submetidos ao manejo orgânico do sul de Minas Gerais.The market demands for coffee of better quality are being responsible for diffusion and adoption of new production technologies and coffee preparation. Among the special coffee, the organic coffee is one of the most important in this group. So, this paper had the aim of evaluating the agronomical traits of coffee crops (Coffea arabica L. on organic system production, located in Poço Fundo district, South of Minas Gerais. One obtained information about the management of 21 organic coffee crops, like: cultivars, coffee tree population, harvest and drying adopted systems, yield and coffee quality, soil fertility and coffee nutritional status. Based on the obtained results, it is possible to conclude that coffee trees conducted under organic system

  12. Enhancement of electrical conductivity in the Gum Arabica complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Sourav S.; Sarkar, A.

    2009-01-01

    Gum Arabica is a natural biopolymer obtained from plant Acacia Arabica. In this present study the electro-active nature of its complex has been investigated. The complexes were developed using pure Gum Arabica and pure Citric acid by the sol-gel process. The scope of complex formation has been investigated and their natures were examined experimentally. The experiments which were carried out in this work are namely d.c V-I characteristics, d.c Arrhenius, ion transference number measurement, UV-VIS and IR photo-absorption. Solid specimen of the complex at various concentration of Citric acid has been developed for d.c experiments and adequate specimens were also developed for UV-VIS experiment. The result of d.c V-I characteristics on specimens at different Citric acid concentrations shows that d.c conductivity increases with concentration of the acid. The said enhancement is observed to be about 100 times that of pure hosts. The ion transference number measurement shows that the total conductivity increases with external acid concentration of which d.c conductivity enhance many times compared to that of ionic part. The result from d.c Arrhenius study shows that electro-thermal activation energy decreases with increasing acid concentration leading to enhancement of electronic conductivity of the complex. The result of UV-VIS study confirms the formation of the acid complex of Gum Arabica. The nature of photo-absorption indicates very clearly that main absorption region shows gradual shifts towards longer wavelength with increase of acid concentration. The result of FTIR absorption shows the structural concepts of electro-activity and complex formation indication of pure Gum Arabica. The overall analysis shows that the electro-activity of the mentioned biopolymer may be tailored.

  13. Conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase belonged to motif B′ methyltransferase family in Coffea arabica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Kouichi; Matsuzaki, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Shiho; Tokiwano, Tetsuo; Yoshizawa, Yuko; Kato, Misako

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Trigonelline synthase catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline. We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene(s) from Coffea arabica. - Highlights: • Trigonelline is a major compound in coffee been same as caffeine is. • We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene. • Coffee trigonelline synthases are highly homologous with coffee caffeine synthases. • This study contributes the fully understanding of pyridine alkaloid metabolism. - Abstract: Trigonelline (N-methylnicotinate), a member of the pyridine alkaloids, accumulates in coffee beans along with caffeine. The biosynthetic pathway of trigonelline is not fully elucidated. While it is quite likely that the production of trigonelline from nicotinate is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase, as is caffeine synthase (CS), the enzyme(s) and gene(s) involved in N-methylation have not yet been characterized. It should be noted that, similar to caffeine, trigonelline accumulation is initiated during the development of coffee fruits. Interestingly, the expression profiles for two genes homologous to caffeine synthases were similar to the accumulation profile of trigonelline. We presumed that these two CS-homologous genes encoded trigonelline synthases. These genes were then expressed in Escherichiacoli, and the resulting recombinant enzymes that were obtained were characterized. Consequently, using the N-methyltransferase assay with S-adenosyl[methyl- 14 C]methionine, it was confirmed that these recombinant enzymes catalyzed the conversion of nicotinate to trigonelline, coffee trigonelline synthases (termed CTgS1 and CTgS2) were highly identical (over 95% identity) to each other. The sequence homology between the CTgSs and coffee CCS1 was 82%. The pH-dependent activity curve of CTgS1 and CTgS2 revealed optimum activity at pH 7.5. Nicotinate was the specific methyl acceptor for CTgSs, and no activity was detected with any other nicotinate derivatives, or with

  14. Conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase belonged to motif B′ methyltransferase family in Coffea arabica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Kouichi, E-mail: koumno@akita-pu.ac.jp [Faculty of Bioresource Sciences, Akita Prefectural University, Akita City, Akita 010-0195 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Masahiro [Faculty of Bioresource Sciences, Akita Prefectural University, Akita City, Akita 010-0195 (Japan); Kanazawa, Shiho [Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University, Otsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Tokiwano, Tetsuo; Yoshizawa, Yuko [Faculty of Bioresource Sciences, Akita Prefectural University, Akita City, Akita 010-0195 (Japan); Kato, Misako [Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University, Otsuka, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan)

    2014-10-03

    Graphical abstract: Trigonelline synthase catalyzes the conversion of nicotinic acid to trigonelline. We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene(s) from Coffea arabica. - Highlights: • Trigonelline is a major compound in coffee been same as caffeine is. • We isolated and characterized trigonelline synthase gene. • Coffee trigonelline synthases are highly homologous with coffee caffeine synthases. • This study contributes the fully understanding of pyridine alkaloid metabolism. - Abstract: Trigonelline (N-methylnicotinate), a member of the pyridine alkaloids, accumulates in coffee beans along with caffeine. The biosynthetic pathway of trigonelline is not fully elucidated. While it is quite likely that the production of trigonelline from nicotinate is catalyzed by N-methyltransferase, as is caffeine synthase (CS), the enzyme(s) and gene(s) involved in N-methylation have not yet been characterized. It should be noted that, similar to caffeine, trigonelline accumulation is initiated during the development of coffee fruits. Interestingly, the expression profiles for two genes homologous to caffeine synthases were similar to the accumulation profile of trigonelline. We presumed that these two CS-homologous genes encoded trigonelline synthases. These genes were then expressed in Escherichiacoli, and the resulting recombinant enzymes that were obtained were characterized. Consequently, using the N-methyltransferase assay with S-adenosyl[methyl-{sup 14}C]methionine, it was confirmed that these recombinant enzymes catalyzed the conversion of nicotinate to trigonelline, coffee trigonelline synthases (termed CTgS1 and CTgS2) were highly identical (over 95% identity) to each other. The sequence homology between the CTgSs and coffee CCS1 was 82%. The pH-dependent activity curve of CTgS1 and CTgS2 revealed optimum activity at pH 7.5. Nicotinate was the specific methyl acceptor for CTgSs, and no activity was detected with any other nicotinate derivatives, or

  15. KAJIAN CIDER SEBAGAI ALTERNATIF PENGANEKARAGAMAN PRODUK KOPI Study of Cider as Alternative Product Diversivication from Coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suharyono Apno Sugito

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Coffee is an important export commodity from Indonesia. There are not many processed product from coffee, and sincecoffee is a delightful refreshing beverage, it is interesting to make product diversivication from coffee. An alternative processing could be a cider. Coffee used in this research were decaffeinated, Robusta and Arabica coffee. The amount of added sugar were 15 %, 20 %, and 25 %. Natural cultures, combination of Sacharomyces cerevisiae and Acetobacter xylinum, combination of Sacharomyces ludwigii and Acetobacter xylinum, combination of  S. cerevisiae, S. ludwigii, and A. xylinum were used as starters. The parameters observed included: reducing sugar content, alcohol, total tertitrasi acid, pH and Organoleptic Test (color, aroma, taste, clarity, and general acceptance. Coffee cider with the highest overall acceptance score was made from decaffeinated coffee, with 20 % sugar addition and combination of S. ludwigii and A. xylinum as starter.The result of correlation analysis showed a negative significant correlation between reducing sugar content and aroma of coffee cider. Positive significant correlation were found between total titrable acidity and aroma, taste and overall acceptance of coffee cider. ABSTRAK Kopi merupakan komoditas ekspor penting   Indonesia. Tidak banyak produk olahan dari kopi, yang lebih dikenalsebagai minuman menyegarkan dan menyenangkan, sehingga menarik untuk membuat diversifikasi produk kopi. Salah satu alternatif adalah pengolahan cider. Kopi yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah kopi tanpa kafein, Robusta dan Arabika. Jumlah gula yang ditambahkan adalah 15 %, 20 %, dan 25 %. Kultur alami, kombinasi Sacharomyces cerevisea dan Acetobacter xylinum, kombinasi Sacharomyces Ludwigii dan Acetobacter xylinum, kombinasi S. cerevisiae, S.Ludwigii , dan A.xylinum digunakan sebagai starter. Parameter yang diamati meliputi: kadar gula pereduksi, alkohol, total asam tertitrasi, pH dan Uji Organoleptik (warna

  16. Turkish cultural heritage: a cup of coffee

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    Birsen Yılmaz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Setting out a fabulous journey from a tiny bean, coffee is the stimulant of the heart and mind and a mysterious plant that strengthens friendship and also takes your tiredness away during the day. Although information on how and where the coffee came from is not clear, Sheikh Şazeli is regarded as the “father” by coffee makers. The word coffee originates from “Kaffa”, a primary coffee production center in Abyssinia, Africa, which can be considered the homeland of coffee. According to this consideration, in Abyssinia, coffee was consumed with bread; it was then pulped and brought to Yemen, and Yemeni people started to cultivate coffee. The word “kahve” in Turkish does not mean the coffee plant like its synonym in Arabic but means the beverage made by boiling. Turkish coffee is a blend of high-quality Arabic-type coffee beans, originating from Brazil and Central America and moderately roasted and ground finely. The way it is prepared differentiates Turkish coffee from others. This coffee was called Turkish coffee because of a new method of preparation invented by Turkish people where it is boiled in copper coffee pots. Turkish coffee that has spread around the world with this name has been an indispensable part of the cultural and social history of Turks.

  17. The 'PUCE CAFE' Project: the first 15K coffee microarray, a new tool for discovering candidate genes correlated to agronomic and quality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privat, Isabelle; Bardil, Amélie; Gomez, Aureliano Bombarely; Severac, Dany; Dantec, Christelle; Fuentes, Ivanna; Mueller, Lukas; Joët, Thierry; Pot, David; Foucrier, Séverine; Dussert, Stéphane; Leroy, Thierry; Journot, Laurent; de Kochko, Alexandre; Campa, Claudine; Combes, Marie-Christine; Lashermes, Philippe; Bertrand, Benoit

    2011-01-05

    Understanding the genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of coffee biology will have an impact on future agronomical improvements for this economically important tree. During the past years, EST collections were generated in Coffee, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics. The "PUCE CAFE" Project, organized by the scientific consortium NESTLE/IRD/CIRAD, has developed an oligo-based microarray using 15,721 unigenes derived from published coffee EST sequences mostly obtained from different stages of fruit development and leaves in Coffea Canephora (Robusta). Hybridizations for two independent experiments served to compare global gene expression profiles in three types of tissue matter (mature beans, leaves and flowers) in C. canephora as well as in the leaves of three different coffee species (C. canephora, C. eugenoides and C. arabica). Microarray construction, statistical analyses and validation by Q-PCR analysis are presented in this study. We have generated the first 15 K coffee array during this PUCE CAFE project, granted by Génoplante (the French consortium for plant genomics). This new tool will help study functional genomics in a wide range of experiments on various plant tissues, such as analyzing bean maturation or resistance to pathogens or drought. Furthermore, the use of this array has proven to be valid in different coffee species (diploid or tetraploid), drastically enlarging its impact for high-throughput gene expression in the community of coffee research.

  18. The 'PUCE CAFE' Project: the First 15K Coffee Microarray, a New Tool for Discovering Candidate Genes correlated to Agronomic and Quality Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leroy Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of coffee biology will have an impact on future agronomical improvements for this economically important tree. During the past years, EST collections were generated in Coffee, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics. Results The "PUCE CAFE" Project, organized by the scientific consortium NESTLE/IRD/CIRAD, has developed an oligo-based microarray using 15,721 unigenes derived from published coffee EST sequences mostly obtained from different stages of fruit development and leaves in Coffea Canephora (Robusta. Hybridizations for two independent experiments served to compare global gene expression profiles in three types of tissue matter (mature beans, leaves and flowers in C. canephora as well as in the leaves of three different coffee species (C. canephora, C. eugenoides and C. arabica. Microarray construction, statistical analyses and validation by Q-PCR analysis are presented in this study. Conclusion We have generated the first 15 K coffee array during this PUCE CAFE project, granted by Génoplante (the French consortium for plant genomics. This new tool will help study functional genomics in a wide range of experiments on various plant tissues, such as analyzing bean maturation or resistance to pathogens or drought. Furthermore, the use of this array has proven to be valid in different coffee species (diploid or tetraploid, drastically enlarging its impact for high-throughput gene expression in the community of coffee research.

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhiza alters metal uptake and the physiological response of Coffea arabica seedlings to increasing Zn and Cu concentrations in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, S A L; Silveira, A P D; Mazzafera, P

    2010-10-15

    Studies on mycorrhizal symbiosis effects on metal accumulation and plant tolerance are not common in perennial crops under metal stress. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of mycorrhization on coffee seedlings under Cu and Zn stress. Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) uptake and some biochemical and physiological traits were studied in thirty-week old Coffea arabica seedlings, in response to the inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and to increasing concentrations of Cu or Zn in soil. The experiments were conducted under greenhouse conditions in a 2×4 factorial design (inoculation or not with AMF and 0, 50, 150 and 450mgkg(-1) Cu or 0, 100, 300 and 900mgkg(-1) Zn). Non-mycorrhizal plants maintained a hampered and slow growth even in a soil with appropriate phosphorus (P) levels for this crop. As metal levels increased in soil, a greater proportion of the total absorbed metals were retained by roots. Foliar Cu concentrations increased only in non-mycorrhizal plants, reaching a maximum concentration of 30mgkg(-1) at the highest Cu in soil. Mycorrhization prevented the accumulation of Cu in leaves, and mycorrhizal plants showed higher Cu contents in stems, which indicated a differential Cu distribution in AMF-associated or non-associated plants. Zn distribution and concentrations in different plant organs followed a similar pattern independently of mycorrhization. In mycorrhizal plants, only the highest metal concentrations caused a reduction in biomass, leading to significant changes in some biochemical indicators, such as malondialdehyde, proline and amino acid contents in leaves and also in foliar free amino acid composition. Marked differences in these physiological traits were also found due to mycorrhization. In conclusion, AMF protected coffee seedlings against metal toxicity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity, and the Effect of the Aqueous Extract of Coffee (Coffea arabica L.) Bean Residual Press Cake on the Skin Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affonso, Regina Celis Lopes; Voytena, Ana Paula Lorenzen; Fanan, Simone; Pitz, Heloísa; Coelho, Daniela Sousa; Horstmann, Ana Luiza; Pereira, Aline; Uarrota, Virgílio Gavicho; Hillmann, Maria Clara; Varela, Lucas Andre Calbusch; Ribeiro-do-Valle, Rosa Maria; Maraschin, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The world coffee consumption has been growing for its appreciated taste and its beneficial effects on health. The residual biomass of coffee, originated in the food industry after oil extraction from coffee beans, called coffee beans residual press cake, has attracted interest as a source of compounds with antioxidant activity. This study investigated the chemical composition of aqueous extracts of coffee beans residual press cake (AE), their antioxidant activity, and the effect of topical application on the skin wound healing, in animal model, of hydrogels containing the AE, chlorogenic acid (CGA), allantoin (positive control), and carbopol (negative control). The treatments' performance was compared by measuring the reduction of the wound area, with superior result ( p coffee AE (78.20%) with respect to roasted coffee AE (53.71%), allantoin (70.83%), and carbopol (23.56%). CGA hydrogels reduced significantly the wound area size on the inflammatory phase, which may be associated with the well known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions of that compound. The topic use of the coffee AE studied improved the skin wound healing and points to an interesting biotechnological application of the coffee bean residual press cake.

  1. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity, and the Effect of the Aqueous Extract of Coffee (Coffea arabica L. Bean Residual Press Cake on the Skin Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Celis Lopes Affonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The world coffee consumption has been growing for its appreciated taste and its beneficial effects on health. The residual biomass of coffee, originated in the food industry after oil extraction from coffee beans, called coffee beans residual press cake, has attracted interest as a source of compounds with antioxidant activity. This study investigated the chemical composition of aqueous extracts of coffee beans residual press cake (AE, their antioxidant activity, and the effect of topical application on the skin wound healing, in animal model, of hydrogels containing the AE, chlorogenic acid (CGA, allantoin (positive control, and carbopol (negative control. The treatments’ performance was compared by measuring the reduction of the wound area, with superior result (p<0.05 for the green coffee AE (78.20% with respect to roasted coffee AE (53.71%, allantoin (70.83%, and carbopol (23.56%. CGA hydrogels reduced significantly the wound area size on the inflammatory phase, which may be associated with the well known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions of that compound. The topic use of the coffee AE studied improved the skin wound healing and points to an interesting biotechnological application of the coffee bean residual press cake.

  2. Diversification and Labor Market Effects of the Mexican Coffee Crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Padron, B.; Burger, C.P.J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses how coffee-producing households responded to the low coffee prices prevailing around 2003. We provide theory on differential responses in regions dedicated to coffee growing, compared to more diversified or better accessible regions. We show how labor market effects can explain

  3. Proteomic analysis of apoplastic fluid of Coffea arabica leaves highlights novel biomarkers for resistance against Hemileia vastatrix

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    Leonor eGuerra-Guimarães

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A proteomic analysis of the apoplastic fluid (APF of coffee leaves was conducted to investigate the cellular processes associated with incompatible (resistant and compatible (susceptible Coffea arabica-Hemileia vastatrix interactions, during the 24-96 hai period. The APF proteins were extracted by leaf vacuum infiltration and protein profiles were obtained by 2-DE. The comparative analysis of the gels revealed 210 polypeptide spots whose volume changed in abundance between samples (control, resistant and susceptible during the 24-96 hai period. The proteins identified were involved mainly in protein degradation, cell wall metabolism and stress/defense responses, most of them being hydrolases (around 70%, particularly sugar hydrolases and peptidases/proteases. The changes in the APF proteome along the infection process revealed two distinct phases of defense responses, an initial/basal one (24-48 hai and a late/specific one (72-96 hai. Compared to susceptibility, resistance was associated with a higher number of proteins, which was more evident in the late/specific phase. Proteins involved in the resistance response were mainly, glycohydrolases of the cell wall, serine proteases and pathogen related-like proteins (PR-proteins, suggesting that some of these proteins could be putative candidates for resistant markers of coffee to H. vastatrix. Antibodies were produced against chitinase, pectin methylesterase, serine carboxypeptidase, reticuline oxidase and subtilase and by an immunodetection assay it was observed an increase of these proteins in the resistant sample. With this methodology we have identified proteins that are candidate markers of resistance and that will be useful in coffee breeding programs to assist in the selection of cultivars with resistance to H. vastatrix.

  4. Differentiation of specialty coffees by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özdestan, Ö.; Ruth, van S.M.; Alewijn, M.; Koot, A.H.; Romano, A.; Cappelin, L.; Biasioli, F.

    2013-01-01

    In the coffee sector a diversity of certifications is available, with the most well-known being organic and fair trade. Intrinsic markers of products may help to assure the authenticity of food products and complement administrative controls. In the present study 110 market coffees with special

  5. Influência de diferentes sistemas de colheita na qualidade do café (Coffea arabica L. Influence of different harvest systems on quality of coffee (Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio de Carvalho Júnior

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar a influência da colheita na qualidade do café, foram estudados seis diferentes sistemas. O experimento foi conduzido na fazenda Rancho Fundo, município de Campos Gerais, MG, no Departamento de Ciência dos Alimentos da UFLA e no Centro Tecnológico do Sul de Minas da EPAMIG. Em uma lavoura da cultivar Acaiá Cerrado, foram sorteadas, ao acaso, dezoito parcelas com trinta metros de comprimento. A colheita foi realizada quando a lavoura apresentava aproximadamente 20% de frutos verdes. Um terço do café derriçado de cada parcela era formado pela mistura de frutos provenientes da lavoura. O restante do café foi lavado e separado em frutos-bóia e verde/cereja. Os diferentes tipos de café foram colocados no terreiro de secagem até atingirem o teor de água de 11% (b.u.. Após a secagem, o café foi beneficiado e submetido às seguintes avaliações: polifenóis, açúcares totais, redutores e não-redutores, sólidos solúveis totais, acidez titulável total e prova de xícara. Analisando os resultados obtidos, apesar de terem sido observadas diferenças significativas entre os valores médios de polifenóis, açúcares, sólidos solúveis e acidez titulável para os diferentes sistemas de colheita, não foi possível estabelecer uma associação definida entre sistema de colheita e composição química. Não foi possível também distinguir, a partir da prova de xícara, diferenças na qualidade do café em função do sistema de colheita, pois, todas as amostras analisadas apresentaram bebida classificada como mole, apenas mole e dura.Aiming to evaluating the influence of the harvest on coffee quality, six harvest systems with different mechanization level were studied. The present work was developed on the Rancho Fundo farm, Campos Gerais town, MG, in the Food Science Department of the UFLA and in the “Centro Tecnológico do Sul de Minas” of EPAMIG. In a crop of the Acaiá Cerrado cultivars were randomized

  6. High coffee population density to improve fertility of an oxisol Densidade populacional de cafeeiros para melhorar a fertilidade de um latossolo

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    Marcos Antonio Pavan

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of coffee (Coffea arabica L. population densities on the chemical and microbiological properties of an Oxisol. The work was carried out on soil samples of 0-20 cm depth originated from an experimental site which had been used for coffee tree spacing studies during 15 years, in Paraná State, Brazil. Eight coffee tree populations were evaluated: 7143, 3571, 2381, 1786, 1429, 1190, 1020, and 893 trees/ha. Increasing plant population increased soil pH, exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, extractable P, organic carbon, moisture content and coffee root colonization by vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and decreased exchangeable Al and microbial biomass. Such results were attributed to better erosion control, improved plant residue management and nutrient cycling, and decreased leaching losses. Increasing coffee tree population per unit of area has shown to be an important reclamation recuperation strategy for improving fertility of the acid soils in Paraná, Brazil.O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar os efeitos de diferentes densidades de população de cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L. nas propriedades químicas, físicas e microbiológicas do solo. Amostras de um Latossolo foram coletadas na profundidade 0-20 cm em um experimento de campo onde estavam sendo avaliadas diferentes populações de cafeeiros. Os tratamentos foram 7.143, 3.571, 2.381, 1.786, 1.429, 1.190, 1.020 e 893 covas/ha. Os resultados demonstraram que o aumento da população de plantas por unidade de área aumentou o pH, o Ca, o Mg e o K trocáveis, o P disponível, o carbono orgânico, o teor de umidade e a colonização radicular por micorrizas, e diminuiu o Al trocável e a biomassa microbiana. Foram considerados como causas da melhoria da fertilidade do solo, sob cafeeiros adensados, o adequado controle da erosão, o correto manejo dos resíduos vegetais e a baixa lixiviação dos íons. O manejo da população de cafeeiros pode

  7. Culture-Dependent and -Independent Methods to Investigate the Predominant Microorganisms Associated with Wet Processed Coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaomin; Dong, Honghong; Yang, Pan; Yang, Ruijuan; Lu, Jun; Lv, Jie; Sheng, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The fermentation process of Yunnan arabica coffee is a typical wet fermentation. Its excellent quality is closely related to microbes in the process of fermentation. The purpose of this study was to isolate and identify the microorganisms in the wet method of coffee processing in Yunnan Province, China. Microbial community structure and dominant bacterial species were evaluated by traditional cultivated separation method and PCR-DGGE technology, and were further analyzed in combination with the changes of organic acid content, activity of pectinase, and physical parameters (pH and temperature). A large number of microorganisms which can produce pectinase were found. Among them, Enterobacter cowanii, Pantoea agglomerans, Enterobacteriaceae bacterium, and Rahnella aquatilis were the predominant gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus cereus was the predominant gram-positive bacterium, Pichia kluyveri, Hanseniaspora uvarum, and Pichia fermentans were the predominant yeasts, and all those are pectinase-producing microorganisms. As for the contents of organic acids, oxalic was the highest, followed by acetic and lactic acids. Butyrate and propionate, which were unfavorable during the fermentation period, were barely discovered.

  8. Carboidratos na bebida do café preparado sob diferentes processos Coffee carbohydrates in different preparations of the beverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Câmara Mattos Martins

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O café é uma das bebidas mais consumidas no mundo e seus polissacarídeos têm sido investigados devido a sua grande importância comercial. Os principais polissacarídeos de café são os galactomananos e arabinogalactanos, considerados como fibras alimentares não digeridas no sistema digestivo humano. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo quantificar e determinar a composição de monossacarídeos e de polissacarídeos na bebida do café. As preparações foram realizadas em coador de papel tradicional, em cafeteira elétrica e em máquina expresso, utilizando café Arábica (Coffea arabica. Determinações quantitativas e qualitativas dos açúcares foram realizadas, respectivamente, por análises colorimétricas e cromatografia de troca aniônica (HPAEC. O rendimento de sólidos solúveis foi maior em café expresso, sendo os valores cerca de 3,6 vezes superiores àqueles de café de cafeteira elétrica com filtro de papel. Preparações de café expresso foram as que resultaram em maiores teores de açúcares totais não redutores por volume de bebida. Entretanto, os valores de açúcares totais foram significativamente maiores na preparação em cafeteira elétrica, quando expressos pelo total de sólidos solúveis extraídos, indicando que o tempo de extração é provavelmente mais eficiente do que a temperatura. A composição em monossacarídeos foi similar em todas as amostras e independente do modo de preparação do café. Todos apresentaram arabinose (14-15%, galactose (29-30%, glucose (6% e manose 48-49%. Não se sabe se os polissacarídeos de café exercem as mesmas funções que a goma guar como fibra, mas, se isto ocorrer, esta é possivelmente uma das mais importantes fibras alimentares que ingerimos, levando em consideração a popularidade do café.Coffee is highly consumed worldwide and therefore one of the best studied beverages regarding chemical composition. Most of the soluble solids in coffee are carbohydrates

  9. Influence of Storage of Wet Arabica Parchment Prior to Wet Hulling on Moulds Development, OchratoxinA Contamination, and Cup Quality of Mandheling Coffee

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    Cahya Ismayadi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Mandheling coffee has been a well known specialty coffees for decades and the demand for this coffee is currently increasing. This coffee is characterised by low acidity, heavy-complex body, spicy-little earthy and fruity flavor. Mandheling coffee is produced by smallholder farmers in the highland surrounding Lake TobaNorth Sumatra in an unique way i.e. following de-pulping and 1–2 days sundrying, wet parchment is stored for varying periods up to a few weeks, the parchments are then de-hulled when still wet (40–45% moisture content then the beans sundried. The handling procedure presumably contributes to the unique cup character of Mandheling coffee. On the other hand the storage of wet pachments may cause mould growth and mycotoxin contamination. This trial was designed to study the influence of storage of wet parchments prior to wet hulling on mould development, OTA contamination and cup Mandheling characteristic of the coffee product. The normal wet process, drying of parchment thoroughly to 12% moisture content was used as the control. Parchment coffees (6 lots used for this trial were drawn from farmers and collectors in the region. The wet parchments (41.74–53.96% moisture content were stored for 1 (D1, 7 (D7 and 14 (D14 days in PE sacks in a warehouse in the region. During the storage period, when there was visible mould growth, the parchments were spread on a plastic sheet inside the warehouse, as per common practice to suppress the mould growth. Following storage, the wet parchment was de-hulled and then sun-dried to a moisture content of 12% (MC12% or dried to a moisture content of 17%, and held in storage for 3 weeks prior to final drying to 12% mc. The ‘normal wet process’ i.e. fresh-non stored parchments dried thoroughly to 12%, were used as the control. Parameters measured were visual evaluation, mould infestation, a w, moisture content (MC on the stored parchment; while for dried beans mould infestation, OTA content and

  10. Agroforestry systems, nutrients in litter and microbial activity in soils cultivated with coffee at high altitude

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    Krystal de Alcantara Notaro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Agroforestry systems are an alternative option for sustainable production management. These systems contain trees that absorb nutrients from deeper layers of the soil and leaf litter that help improve the soil quality of the rough terrain in high altitude areas, which are areas extremely susceptible to environmental degradation. The aim of this study was to characterize the stock and nutrients in litter, soil activity and the population of microorganisms in coffee (Coffea arabica L. plantations under high altitude agroforestry systems in the semi-arid region of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Samples were collected from the surface litter together with soil samples taken at two depths (0-10 and 10-20 cm from areas each subject to one of the following four treatments: agroforestry system (AS, native forest (NF, biodynamic system (BS and coffee control (CT.The coffee plantation had been abandoned for nearly 15 years and, although there had been no management or harvesting, still contained productive coffee plants. The accumulation of litter and mean nutrient content of the litter, the soil nutrient content, microbial biomass carbon, total carbon, total nitrogen, C/N ratio, basal respiration, microbial quotient, metabolic quotient and microbial populations (total bacteria, fluorescent bacteria group, total fungi and Trichoderma spp. were all analyzed. The systems thatwere exposed to human intervention (A and BS differed in their chemical attributes and contained higher levels of nutrients when compared to NF and CT. BS for coffee production at high altitude can be used as a sustainable alternative in the high altitude zones of the semi-arid region in Brazil, which is an area that is highly susceptible to environmental degradation.

  11. Avaliação de produtividade de progênies de cafeeiro em dois sistemas de plantio Yield evaluation of coffee plant (Coffea arabica L. progenies in two tillage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladyston Rodrigues Carvalho

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com o presente trabalho analisar a influência do sistema de plantio (adensado e convencional e a produtividade de cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L., resultantes do cruzamento de Catuaí Vermelho IAC 99 com Mundo Novo IAC 379-19. Foram utilizadas 29 progênies, na 4ª geração por autofecundação do 2º retrocruzamento de Catuaí Vermelho com Mundo Novo desenvolvidas pelo programa de Melhoramento Genético do Cafeeiro em Minas Gerais, coordenado pela EPAMIG. Utilizou-se como testemunha 13 cultivares, Topázio MG-1189 e 1189 SL, Catuaí Vermelho IAC-15, IAC-99 e IAC-144, Catuaí Amarelo MG-17, Rubi MG-1192 e 1192SL, Acaiá Cerrado MG-1474 e 1474 SL, Mundo Novo IAC379-19, IAC-376-4 e 376-4 SL. O experimento foi instalado na Fazenda Experimental da EPAMIG, em São Sebastião do Paraíso, MG em janeiro de 1996 no espaçamento de 3,50 x 1,00 m (sistema convencional e 1,80 x 0,60 m (sistema adensado. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, sendo os tratamentos compostos por 42 progênies/cultivares com três repetições e seis plantas por parcela com a análise de variância, em parcelas subdivididas, onde cada biênio (agrupamento de colheita foi considerado como uma subparcela. Avaliou-se a produção de grãos em sacas de 60 kg de café beneficiado/ha. Verificou-se nos resultados que a produtividade inicial no sistema adensado foi maior que no sistema convencional, porém com base no desenvolvimento das plantas essa diferença tendeu a diminuir. Para ambos os sistemas de plantio, pode-se utilizar qualquer uma das cultivares uma vez que as mesmas comportaram-se de forma semelhante. As cultivares utilizadas como testemunha que apresentaram as maiores produtividades foram Topázio MG-1189 e 1189 SL, Rubi MG-1192 e 1192SL, Catuaí Vermelho IAC 15 e IAC 144 e Mundo Novo IAC-376-4 e 376-4SL.The present work was carried out in order to analyze the planting system (high and low plant stand influence on coffee trees (Coffea

  12. Influence of the in vitro environment on the germination of somatic embryos of Coffea arabica L. cv. 'Caturra rojo' and Clematis tangutica K.

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    Raúl Barbon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro environment is a factor that in recent years has begun to investigate, because gases such as oxygen, carbon dioxide and ethylene play an important role in the morphogenesis of somatic embryos and their development in plants. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of the CO2 on the germination of coffee somatic embryos (Coffea arabica L. cv. 'Caturra rojo' and clematis (Clematis tangutica K.. Three gas mixtures composed of CO2 concentrations (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0% combined with 21% O2 and two controls (passive exchange and forced ventilation were used. A positive effect of CO2 on the germination of somatic embryos in the torpedo stage in coffee and clematis was obtained, because in the treatments with passive exchange, where there was CO2 accumulation, germination of the somatic embryos was superior to the treatments with Forced ventilation. With 2.5% and 5.0% CO2, the germination process is stimulated while with 10.0% CO2 there is an inhibition of germination with the appearance of malformations and hyperhydricity.   Keywords: gaseous atmosphere, carbon dioxide, somatic embryogenesis, secondary embryogenesis, hyperhydricity

  13. The dynamic of the “Coffee Quality Paraná” contest in the production of specialty coffees

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    Lorian Voigt-Gair

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Paraná, the concentration of efforts of various organizations have collaborated to improve the image of coffee. This work aims to study the coffee samples, through the sensory attributes scored in the “Test Cup” Contest of “Coffee Quality Paraná” from 2004 to 2009 and to prove the qualification of rural extension technicians and producers in order to obtain a differentiated with high quality product, linked to the methodology of marketing strategy. The study was conducted with 570 samples from 55 municipalities and analyzed in state steps of this contest. It was concluded that the methodology used in the Contest “Coffee Quality Paraná” encourages constant improvement and disseminates technical and scientific innovations in various links in the productive chain, having as the final result the increasing of the amount of coffee produced in Paraná with excellent quality drink.

  14. Avaliação da suscetibilidade à Xylella fastidiosa em diferentes espécies de cafeeiro Susceptibity valuation to Xylella fastidiosa in different coffee species

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    Rachel Benetti Queiroz-Voltan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A bactéria Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. foi detectada pela primeira vez em cafeeiro no Brasil, em 1995, entretanto acredita-se que a cultura foi infectada por essa bactéria há muitos anos, embora os sintomas fossem atribuídos a um estresse nutricional. Até o momento têm sido realizados estudos principalmente com espécies de C. arabica e C. canephora, porém, em outras espécies do gênero, somente foi detectada sua presença. Neste trabalho, objetivou-se avaliar a proporção de elementos de vaso do xilema obstruídos, total e parcialmente, pela X. fastidiosa, naturalmente infectadas, em diferentes espécies de cafeeiro do Banco de Germoplasma do IAC, visando identificar material resistente a essa bactéria para ser utilizado no programa de melhoramento genético. Os acessos estudados foram: C. canephora (progenitora da 'Guarini', C. liberica var. liberica, os quatro acessos de C. liberica var. dewevrei (Ugandae, Dibowskii, Abeokutae, Excelsa e o híbrido interespecífico Piatã (C. arabica X C. liberica var. dewevrei. Todos eles mostraram-se menos suscetíveis à X. fastidiosa. A porcentagem de obstrução dos elementos de vasos na folha não foi maior que 0,6% na maioria dos acessos, com exceção de Excelsa e do híbrido Piatã com até 2% de obstrução, sendo bem menos suscetíveis a essa bactéria do que as cultivares de C. arabica. Trata-se, portanto, de materiais genéticos importantes para serem utilizados no programa de melhoramento do cafeeiro visando à resistência ao agente dessa doença.Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. bacteria was firstly detected in coffee plants in Brazil in 1995. However it is believed to be attacking this crop this time. Disease symptoms have been attributed mostly to nutritional unbalances. Up to date studies have comprised only the species C. arabica and C. canephora. However X. fastidiosa was also detected in other Coffea species, but without disease symptoms. Aiming to identify in the IAC

  15. Analisis Finansial dan Nilai Tambah Pengolahan Kopi Arabika di Koperasi Tani Manik Sedana Kabupaten Bangli

    OpenAIRE

    DEWI, NI LUH MADE INDAH MURDYANI; BUDIASA, I WAYAN; DEWI, IDA AYU LISTIA

    2015-01-01

    Financial Analysis and Added Value Manufacturing of Arabica Coffee at Farm Cooperative of Manik Sedana Bangli Regency The study aims to analyze added value and feasibility study of Arabica Coffee manufacturing at Farm Cooperative of Manik Sedana. Survey method was used to gather primary data from five persons of management board of the company. Secondary data related to this study were collected from appropiate sources. The added value for one production cycle was accounted by using Hayami ...

  16. Avaliação do teor de cafeína em folhas e grãos de acessos de café arábica Evaluation of the caffeine content in leaves and grains of arabica coffee accessions

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    Alexsandro Lara Teixeira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo identificar, dentro do banco de germoplasma do estado de Minas Gerais, acessos de Coffea arabica L. com baixos teores de cafeína e verificar a existência de correlação entre o teor de cafeína dos grãos e de folhas ainda no estádio de mudas, viabilizando a prática da seleção precoce. Foram utilizados 75 acessos de café (cultivares, híbridos e alguns genótipos selvagens oriundos do banco de germoplasma de café do Estado de Minas Gerais. Para estudo da correlação foram utilizados oito cultivares no delineamento de blocos casualizados com três repetições. Avaliaram-se os teores de cafeína presentes nos grãos e no terceiro e quarto par de folhas verdadeiras. Seis acessos apresentaram teores de cafeína nos grãos menores que 0,88%. Correlações significativas para teor de cafeína foram observadas entre o terceiro (0,69 e quarto par de folhas (0,92 e os grãos. Foram identificados acessos com teores reduzidos de cafeína e boa produtividade de grãos, podendo ser utilizados como genitores em programas de melhoramento. Verificou-se que é possível realizar a seleção precoce para teor de cafeína, em plantas de cafeeiro ainda no estádio de mudas, por meio da avaliação do quarto par de folhas.The aim of this study was to identify, within the germplasm bank of the Minas Gerais state, Coffea arabica L. accessions with low levels of caffeine and check the correlation between grain and leaves in seedling stage, making possible the practice of early selection. Seventy-five coffe accessions (cultivars, hybrids and several wild genotypes were evaluated from the coffee germplasm bank of the Minas Gerais state. In the correlation study, eight cultivars were used on randomized complete block design with three replications. Were evaluated the caffeine levels in the grains and the third and fourth pair of true leaves. Six accessions had caffeine levels in grains smaller than 0.88%. Was also detected

  17. ABA Inhibits Embryo Cell Expansion and Early Cell Division Events During Coffee (Coffea arabica 'Rubi') Seed Germination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, da E.A.A.; Toorop, P.E.; Lammeren, van A.A.M.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims: Coffee seed germination represents an interplay between the embryo and the surrounding endosperm. A sequence of events in both parts of the seed determines whether germination will be successful or not. Following previous studies, the aim here was to further characterize the

  18. Root biomass, turnover and net primary productivity of a coffee agroforestry system in Costa Rica: effects of soil depth, shade trees, distance to row and coffee age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrenet, Elsa; Roupsard, Olivier; Van den Meersche, Karel; Charbonnier, Fabien; Pastor Pérez-Molina, Junior; Khac, Emmanuelle; Prieto, Iván; Stokes, Alexia; Roumet, Catherine; Rapidel, Bruno; de Melo Virginio Filho, Elias; Vargas, Victor J; Robelo, Diego; Barquero, Alejandra; Jourdan, Christophe

    2016-08-21

    In Costa Rica, coffee (Coffea arabica) plants are often grown in agroforests. However, it is not known if shade-inducing trees reduce coffee plant biomass through root competition, and hence alter overall net primary productivity (NPP). We estimated biomass and NPP at the stand level, taking into account deep roots and the position of plants with regard to trees. Stem growth and root biomass, turnover and decomposition were measured in mixed coffee/tree (Erythrina poeppigiana) plantations. Growth ring width and number at the stem base were estimated along with stem basal area on a range of plant sizes. Root biomass and fine root density were measured in trenches to a depth of 4 m. To take into account the below-ground heterogeneity of the agroforestry system, fine root turnover was measured by sequential soil coring (to a depth of 30 cm) over 1 year and at different locations (in full sun or under trees and in rows/inter-rows). Allometric relationships were used to calculate NPP of perennial components, which was then scaled up to the stand level. Annual ring width at the stem base increased up to 2·5 mm yr -1 with plant age (over a 44-year period). Nearly all (92 %) coffee root biomass was located in the top 1·5 m, and only 8 % from 1·5 m to a depth of 4 m. Perennial woody root biomass was 16 t ha -1 and NPP of perennial roots was 1·3 t ha -1 yr -1 Fine root biomass (0-30 cm) was two-fold higher in the row compared with between rows. Fine root biomass was 2·29 t ha -1 (12 % of total root biomass) and NPP of fine roots was 2·96 t ha -1 yr -1 (69 % of total root NPP). Fine root turnover was 1·3 yr -1 and lifespan was 0·8 years. Coffee root systems comprised 49 % of the total plant biomass; such a high ratio is possibly a consequence of shoot pruning. There was no significant effect of trees on coffee fine root biomass, suggesting that coffee root systems are very competitive in the topsoil. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on

  19. Populações de minhocas em sistemas agroflorestais com café convencional e orgânico Earthworms populations in agroforestry systems with conventional and organic coffee

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    Adriana Maria de Aquino

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, neste estudo, determinar se as populações das minhocas são alteradas em função do manejo do café (Coffea arabica em Turrialba, CostaRica. Os seguintes sistemas de cultivo do café foram estudados: a pleno sol (PS e sombreado com eritrina, Erythrina poeppigiana (E; terminalia, Terminalia amazonia (T e cashá, Chloroleucon eurycyclum (Ab. A hipótese foi de que o manejo orgânico do café e o fornecimento da serapilheira de melhor qualidade favoreceria a diversidade, a densidade e a biomassa das minhocas. As populações das minhocas foram alteradas, em função do manejo com insumos sintéticos ou orgânicos , sendo a densidade menor no café a pleno sol. Entre as espécies utilizadas no sombreamento, a eritrina parece limitar a abundância das minhocas. Contudo, favorece a diversidade das mesmas, tendo sido registradas duas espécies de minhocas com papéis ecológicos diferenciados, Pontoscolex corethrurus, endogeica e Metaphire californica, anécica; ao contrário dos demais tratamentos, onde somente foi encontrada a primeira espécie, considerada cosmopolita com distribuição pantropical.The aim of this study was to determine whether the populations of the earthworms are altered by coffee systems in Turrialba, Costa Rica. The following coffee management systems were studied: the sun and shading with Erythrina poeppigiana; terminalia, Terminalia amazonia or cashá, Chloroleucon eurycyclum. The hypothesis was that the organic management of the coffee and the litter input of better quality would favor the diversity, the density and the biomass of the earthworms. The populations of earthworms were differentiated with the synthetic or organic input. However, the density was lower in the coffee under the sun anyone the used species in the agroforestry, the eritrina seems to limit the abundance of the earthworms, but it favors the diversity of the same ones, being registered two species of earthworms with differentiated

  20. Compositional changes of proteins and amino acids in germinating coffee seeds

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    Milton Massao Shimizu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endosperm is the main reserve tissue in coffee seeds. Coffee (Coffea arabica L. seeds were germinated for six weeks and qualitative and quantitative changes in amino acids and proteins were investigated. The total content of free amino acids were reduced during germination, however, protein content remained constant. SDS-PAGE profiles showed that legumin-like proteins became less stained in the last weeks. Asparagine, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine and lysine were the major free amino acids, although serine and glutamine were also significant. Except for tyrosine, which increased with germination, all other amino acids were reduced. Analysis of the amino acid composition of the total soluble protein showed glutamic acid/glutamine and glycine as the main amino acids. However, other amino acids such as leucine, aspartic acid/asparagine, alanine, lysine, serine were also found in reasonable amounts.Endosperma é o principal tecido de reserva em sementes de café. Sementes de café (Coffea arabica L. foram germinadas por seis semanas e as alterações qualitativas e quantitativas de aminoácidos e proteínas foram investigadas. O conteúdo total de aminoácidos livres reduziu durante a germinação, no entanto, o conteúdo de proteínas permaneceu constante. Perfis eletroforéticos de proteínas em SDS-PAGE mostraram que proteínas do tipo legumina foram menos coradas nas últimas semanas. Asparagina, ácido glutâmico, ácido aspártico, alanina e lisina foram os principais aminoácidos, apesar de que serina e glutamina também estavam presentes em quantidades significativas. Exceto tirosina, a qual aumentou durante a germinação, todos os outros aminoácidos tiveram redução em sua concentração. A análise aminoacídica da fração de proteína solúvel total mostrou que ácido glutâmico/glutamina e glicina eram os principais aminoácidos presentes. No entanto, outros aminoácidos, tais como leucina, ácido asp

  1. Sensitive response and resistance to bery disease ( Colletotrichum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seedling hypocotyls and attached green coffee berries of 11 Coffea arabica varieties and a Robusta coffee cultivar, with different levels of resistance to coffee berry disease (Colletotrichum kahawae), were examined under a microscope for differences in the development of infections caused by single-conidium isolates of ...

  2. HOW COFFEE COMPANIES CAN STAY COMPETITIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RALUCA DANIELA RIZEA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The coffee shop industry in the U.S. includes 20,000 stores with combined annual revenue of about $11 billion. Major companies include Starbucks, Dunkin’ Donuts, Caribou, Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, and Diedrich (Gloria Jean’s. The industry is highly concentrated at the top and fragmented at the bottom: the top 50 companies have over 70 percent of industry sales. Coffee is one of the world’s largest commodities. The top green coffee producing countries are Brazil, Colombia, and Vietnam. Many grower countries are small, poor developing nations that depend on coffee to sustain local economies. The U.S. is the world’s largest importer of green coffee beans and the largest consumer of coffee. The main objective of this study is to investigate the competitive strategies that U.S. coffee franchise companies adopt considering customers’ expectations and industry best practices. In order to achieve this objective, a best practice benchmarking analysis was performed taking into account the top U.S. coffee companies This analysis showed that product and service innovation are necessary in order to stay competitive in the market and attract new or to keep existing customers successfully. Many customers focus on the special atmosphere each store has and which is characterized by the location, music, interior design, seating or whether internet access is provided. Particularly for specialty coffee shops it is important not to sell only the beverage but the whole experience. Coffee shops have to establish a unique image that prevents customers from buying products from another shop or use home-brewing systems which are also on the rise in American households. In addressing the increased level of competition, every company’s focus should be on differentiating from the rest of the market in every possible business segment (products, atmosphere, location, image etc..

  3. Drinking Coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøbæk, Pernille Solveig

    2015-01-01

    The chapter explores how coffee is an integral part of our daily life. Focusing on coffee drinking at home, at work, and on the go I show that coffee consumption is a social practice. The chapter illustrates through everyday examples that coffee is more than a caffeine drug. Coffee, with or without...... caffeine, is a social lubricant. We talk to each other and share emotions with one another as we share a cup of coffee. Coffee makes conversation and we embrace coffee, to stay or to go, in the daily rhythm of our busy and global social existence. The practice and sociality of coffee consumption provide...... the coffee industry with the opportunity to make money on our coffee preferences – indeed, also for those of us who actually dislike the taste of coffee. Would you prefer coffee mixed and stirred with non-coffee products such as salt, caramel and licorice? Then you are one of us in the modern age of coffee...

  4. An integrated framework for assessing vulnerability to climate change and developing adaptation strategies for coffee growing families in Mesoamerica.

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    María Baca

    Full Text Available The Mesoamerican region is considered to be one of the areas in the world most vulnerable to climate change. We developed a framework for quantifying the vulnerability of the livelihoods of coffee growers in Mesoamerica at regional and local levels and identify adaptation strategies. Following the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC concepts, vulnerability was defined as the combination of exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity. To quantify exposure, changes in the climatic suitability for coffee and other crops were predicted through niche modelling based on historical climate data and locations of coffee growing areas from Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador and Nicaragua. Future climate projections were generated from 19 Global Circulation Models. Focus groups were used to identify nine indicators of sensitivity and eleven indicators of adaptive capacity, which were evaluated through semi-structured interviews with 558 coffee producers. Exposure, sensitivity and adaptive capacity were then condensed into an index of vulnerability, and adaptation strategies were identified in participatory workshops. Models predict that all target countries will experience a decrease in climatic suitability for growing Arabica coffee, with highest suitability loss for El Salvador and lowest loss for Mexico. High vulnerability resulted from loss in climatic suitability for coffee production and high sensitivity through variability of yields and out-migration of the work force. This was combined with low adaptation capacity as evidenced by poor post harvest infrastructure and in some cases poor access to credit and low levels of social organization. Nevertheless, the specific contributors to vulnerability varied strongly among countries, municipalities and families making general trends difficult to identify. Flexible strategies for adaption are therefore needed. Families need the support of government and institutions specialized in impacts of

  5. Acúmulo de nutrientes em frutos de cafeeiro em duas altitudes de cultivo: micronutrientes Nutrient accumulation in coffee fruits at two at two plantation altitudes: micronutrients

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    Bruno Galvêas Laviola

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Dado à importância de se conhecer a exportação de micronutrientes pelos frutos, bem como, as épocas em que são mais demandados pelo cafeeiro, estudou-se o acúmulo de B, Cu, Fe, Mn e Zn em frutos de Coffea arabica L da antese à maturação, em lavouras estabelecidas em duas altitudes. Estudou-se também a variação no teor desses elementos. Estudou-se o acúmulo de B, Cu, Fe, Mn e Zn em frutos de cafeeiro arábico da antese à maturação em duas altitudes, bem como a variação na concentração dos elementos em folhas dos ramos produtivos. O experimento foi constituído da variedade de cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L. Catuaí IAC 44 cultivada a 720 e 950 m de altitude, no município de Martins Soares-MG. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente ao acaso, com três repetições, usando um esquema de parcela subdividida no tempo. O aumento da altitude influenciou o ciclo reprodutivo do cafeeiro, demandando maior tempo para formação dos frutos. O consumo de nutrientes pelos frutos, assim como o enchimento de grãos, foi mais crítico em condições de menor altitude, já que a planta necessitou completar esses processos em menor espaço de tempo. No estádio de expansão rápida, a percentagem de acúmulo de micronutrientes foi maior na altitude de 720 m, comparada à de 950 m. De modo geral, a altitude influenciou a variação das concentrações foliares de nutrientes, apesar de não se ter observado resposta-padrão da concentração foliar ao aumento da altitude. Conclui-se que a altitude teve influência na extensão do ciclo, bem como no acúmulo de micronutrientes em frutos e na variação, das concentrações foliares destes elementos em folhas de cafeeiro.In view of the importance of knowing fruit micronutrients export from the soil, and the season in which its coffee-plant demand is higher, the accumulation of B, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn in fruits as well as the variation in the leaf content of the elements in productive branches of

  6. Taxonomia de Coffea arabica L. VI: caracteres morfológicos dos haplóides

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    A. Carvalho

    1952-06-01

    monosperma, bem como as plantas bullata, podem ser encontradas em qualquer variedade de café, motivo por que não devem ser consideradas como variedades, mas, apenas, como haplóides ou poliplóides das variedades de que se originaram.Haploid plants were found in progenies of the following varieties of Coffea arabica : typica, bourbon, maragogipe, semperflorens, laurina, erecta, caturra and San Ramon. These haploids resemble the normal plants from which they have originated ; they are reduced in size, their branches are more slender and the leaves are narrower and thinner. Flowers are normal, smaller, with very low fertility, due to abnormal meiosis. The dominant genetic factors maragogipe (Mg, erecta (Er, caturra (Ct, and San Ramon, and the recessive factors semperflorens (sf and laurina (lr have the same phenotypical expression both in haploid and normal plants. The Br (bronze young leaves gene shows incomplete dominance, the heterozygous plants having light bronze tips; the haploid with a single dose of Br has also a light bronze color of the young leaves. In the presence of tt the Na gene is incompletely dominant the heterozygotes having the murta phenotype (ttNana. Haploids derived from bourbon (ttNaNa, therefore hemizygotes t Na, do not resemble murta but bourbon. Attention was called to pure lines obtained through duplication of chromosome number of haploids, for use in progeny tests, in order to measure the environmental variation, and also to determine mutation rate in C. arabica. Observation on meiosis and the results of genetic analysis have already pointed out that C. arabica is probably an allotetraploid of ancient origin ; this has been confirmed by the study of the haploids here described. Monosperma coffee plants with 22 somatic chromosomes, and the bullata types with 66 or 88 chromoeomes, should not be considered any more as varieties of C. arabica, but only as haploids or polyploids of the varieties from which they originated.

  7. Transferência de fatores genéticos de resistência a Hemileia vastatrix para o cultivar mundo novo Transference of the genes SH2 and SH3 for resistance to Hemileia vastatrix to the mundo novo cultivar of C. arabica

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    A. Carvalho

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Cafeeiros portadores dos fatores genéticos SH2 ou SH2 e SH3, simultaneamente, que conferem resistência a várias raças de Hemileia vastatrix, foram cruzados com plantas selecionadas do cultivar mundo novo de Coffea arabica a fim de se obter, em F2, recombinações com resistência a esse patógeno e elevada produtividade. Analisaram-se 14 populações F2 segregando apenas para o fator SH2, oito para os fatores SH2 e HS3, e três populações que dão, em sua descendência, plantas do grupo A, resistentes a todas as raças do patógeno até agora conhecidas. De 22.356 cafeeiros originalmente plantados em ensaio, a duas mudas por cova, em parcelas casualizadas, fez-se uma primeira seleção deixando apenas um cafeeiro por cova, reduzindo-se para 11.178 as plantas em estudo. Com base no aspecto vegetativo, na produtividade, na ausência de defeitos nos frutos e na reação de resistência ao agente causal da ferrugem, realizaram-se sucessivas seleções escolhendo-se finalmente, apenas 100 cafeeiros do tipo mundo novo e resistentes a H. vastatrix para derivação das populações F2 e prosseguimento da seleção.Coffee trees homozygous for the alleles SH2 or SH2 and SH3 which confer resistance to several physiological races of Hemileia vastatrix, were crossed to selected plants of Mundo Novo cultivar of Coffea arabica and the F2 generations were studied aiming to develop new high yielding and resistant coffee recombinations. A complete randomized field trial was stablished including 14 F2 populations segregating for SH2, eight populations segregating for SH2 and SH3 genes, and three populations segregating for plants of the A group of reaction to the H. vastatrix attack. A total of 22,356 F2 plants were analysed. Based on the plant vigor, yield capacity, percentage of normal developed seeds and resistance reaction to H. vastatrix, three successive series of selection were undertaken leaving only 100 coffee trees for development of F3 populations

  8. A liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of salicylic, jasmonic and abscisic acids in Coffea arabica leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá, Marta; Ferreira, João P; Queiroz, Vagner T; Vilas-Boas, Luís; Silva, Maria C; Almeida, Maria H; Guerra-Guimarães, Leonor; Bronze, Maria R

    2014-02-01

    Plants have developed an efficient system of recognition that induces a complex network of signalling molecules such as salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA) and abscisic acid (ABA) in case of a pathogenic infection. The use of specific and sensitive methods is mandatory for the analysis of compounds in these complex samples. In this study a liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of SA, JA and ABA in Coffea arabica (L.) leaves in order to understand the role of these phytohormones in the signalling network involved in the coffee defence response against Hemileia vastatrix. The results showed that the method was specific, linear (r ≥ 0.99) in the range 0.125-1.00 µg mL⁻¹ for JA and ABA and 0.125-5.00 µg mL⁻¹ for SA, and precise (relative standard deviation ≤11%), and the limit of detection (0.010 µg g⁻¹ fresh weight) was adequate for quantifying these phytohormones in this type of matrix. In comparison with healthy leaves, those infected with H. vastatrix (resistance reaction) displayed an increase in SA level 24 h after inoculation, suggesting the involvement of an SA-dependent pathway in coffee resistance. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Determinants of crop diversity and composition in Enset-coffee agroforestry homegardens of Southern Ethiopia

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    Tesfaye Abebe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Households in much of the tropics depend for their livelihoods on the variety and continued production of food and other products that are provided by their own farms. In such systems, maintenance of agrobiodiversity and ensuring food security are important for the well being of the population. The enset-coffee agroforestry homegardens of Southern Ethiopia that are dominated by two native perennial crops, Coffee (Coffea arabica L. and Enset (Enset ventricosum Welw. Cheesman, are examples of such agricultural systems. This study was conducted in Sidama administrative zone of Southern Ethiopia to determine the factors that influence the diversity and composition of crops in the systems. Data were collected from 144 sample homegardens selected from four districts. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to relate indices of crop diversity and area share of major crops with the physical and socioeconomic factors. The study revealed that socioeconomic factors, mainly proximity to markets, affected negatively crop species richness. The production area of the main crops enset and coffee decreased with increasing proximity to market and road while that of maize and khat increased. At household level, farm size had a significant effect on area share of enset and coffee. As farm size increased the share of the cash crop, coffee increased but that of the staple, enset declined. Enset, which is the backbone of the system in terms of food security, is declining on small farms and the share of monoculture maize system is increasing. The trend towards declining agrobiodiversity, and reduction in the production area of the main perennial crops and their gradual replacement with monoculture fields could make the systems liable to instability and collapse. As these sites are high potential agricultural areas, intensification can be achieved by integrating high-value and more productive crops, such as fruits, spices and vegetables, while maintaining the

  10. Differentiation strategies in coffee global value chains through reference to territorial origin in Latin American countries

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    Marescotti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For many years coffee has been regarded as a commodity. Recently, new trends both at consumption and production level created new opportunities for de-commodifying the coffee market, by a differentiation based on social, environmental and territorial resources, and consequently for strengthening local agro-food systems and improving the position of farmers in the value chain. In this perspective, territorial origin is one promising lever of differentiation, and there is a growing number of initiatives trying to develop protected Geographical Indications in coffee value chains. This work aims at identifying the different logics surrounding the construction of protected Geographical Indications (GIs in the coffee industry in Latin America, and to discuss the role of history and tradition in relation to the link to specific local resources. Our analysis highlights a variety of typologies of GI initiatives, which follow different logics and strategies, and interpret the concept of “origin” in different ways, especially when compared to the European Union one. However the role that history and traditions play in American coffee GIs is not yet relevant.Durante mucho tiempo, el café ha sido considerado como un producto commodity, de carácter indiferenciado. Recientemente, nuevas tendencias en la producción y el consumo de café han creado nuevas oportunidades para emprender estrategias de diferenciación (de-commodify en el mercado del café, basadas en los recursos locales de carácter social, medioambiental y territorial y, consecuentemente, con una finalidad de impulsar los sistemas agroalimentarios locales y de mejorar la situación de los agricultores en la cadena de valor. Desde esta perspectiva, el origen territorial se convierte en una herramienta prometedora de diferenciación del producto. Existe un número creciente de iniciativas cuyo propósito es desarrollar Indicaciones Geográficas (IGs en el ámbito de las cadenas de valor del

  11. Determinação simultânea de precursores de serotonina - triptofano e 5-hidroxitriptofano - em café Simultaneous determination of serotonin precursors - tryptophan and 5-hidroxytryptophan - in coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina C. L. Martins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies attributed positive effects in the central nervous system (CNS to coffee. Among possible active constituents, serotonin, a neurotransmitter in the CNS, is present; but dietary sources do not cross the blood-brain barrier. Tryptophan and 5-hidroxytryptophan (5-HTP are serotonin precursors and can affect brain concentrations. An ion-pair-HPLC, post-column derivatization with o-phthalaldehyde and fluorimetric detection before and after hydrolysis with NaOH and extraction with methanol:water was developed for the simultaneous determination of these compounds. It was selective, sensitive (LOD = 0.3 and 0.2 μg/mL, precise (91.3 and 94.2% recovery for tryptophan and 5-HTP, respectively, and linear from 0.3 to 40 μg/mL for both compounds. It was applied to green and roasted arabica and robusta coffees.

  12. Teor de óleo e de cafeína em variedades de café Oil and caffeine content in the coffee bean

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    J. S. Tango

    1963-01-01

    Full Text Available Determinou-se a porcentagem de óleo e de cafeína em sementes de diversas variedades de Coffee arabica. As sementes provieram de frutos despolpados, secos em terreiro sem despolpar, ou secos na própria planta. O tratamento des frutos influiu sôbre o teor de óleo, sendo também significativa a diferença entre as variedades. Os dados confirmam resultados anteriores de que a variedade mucronata é rica e a, variedade laurina, pobre, em óleo. No que concerne ao teor de cafeína, o tratamento dos frutos não mostrou influência, mas pronunciada diferença se constatou entre as variedades. Sete das variedades se mostraram mais pobres do que o café 'Sumatra', tomado comg padrão. A variedade laurina destacou-se das demais pelo baixo teor dêsse alcalóide com, aproximadamente, a metade do nível encontrado nas demais variedades analisadas, o que a torna valiosa para um piano de melhoramento visando a redução do nível de cafeína nas sementes.Oil and caffeine contents were determined for seed samples obtained from cherries of sixteen varieties of Coffea arabica which were submitted to three types of treatments pulped, non pulped and left to dry with pericarp in the sun, or naturally dried on the tree. Cherry processing seems not to have influence on the oil content in the seeds (table I, but significant differences were noted among the varieties with respect to this characteristic. Mucronata revealed to have high oil content while the laurina is a low oil producing variety. Coffee cherries left to dry on the trees gave lower caffeine content. Seven of the sixteen varieties presented a lower caffeine content than the standard 'Sumatra'. The laurinis variety had an exceptional lower caffeine content of about half the amount found in the control. Laurina characteristics are controlled by a recessive allele lr with strong pleiotropic effects. It is not yet known how the laurina allele affects the chemical reactions which lead to a so low caffeine

  13. Variação das dimensões características e da forma dos frutos de café durante o processo de secagem Variation of characteristic dimensions and forms of coffee fruits during drying process

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    Paulo C. Corrêa

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito da variação do teor de umidade nas dimensões e propriedades físicas-esfericidade e circularidade do fruto do café das espécies arabica e canephora, de diferentes variedades. Os resultados obtidos permitiram afirmar que a redução do teor de umidade afeta de forma acentuada as características físicas do fruto do cafeeiro das espécies e variedades estudadas, indicando que são importantes as variações das dimensões do fruto ao longo do processo de secagem e, ainda, que as expressões matemáticas ajustadas aos dados obtidos representaram de forma satisfatória os fenômenos estudados.The present work had as objective to evaluate the effect of moisture content variation on dimensions and physical properties (sphericity and roundness of coffee fruit of the arabica and canephora species, for different varieties. The obtained results show that the reduction of moisture content affects in an accentuated way the physical characteristics of coffee fruit of the studied species and varieties, indicating that the variations of dimensions of the fruit along the drying process are important. Further, the mathematical expressions adjusted to the data were satisfactory for the studied phenomena.

  14. Zoneamento agroclimático da cultura do café para a Bacia do Rio Doce Agriculture-climatological zoning of coffee crop for the Rio Doce Basin

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    Edson Luís Nunes

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste trabalho, através da geoespacialização, a identificação das regiões aptas, restritas e inaptas ao cultivo do café (Coffea arabica L. na Bacia do Rio Doce. Utilizou-se para tal, dados de temperatura e déficit hídrico de 50 estações meteorológicas instaladas na bacia e em bacias limítrofes. Os dados de déficit hídrico foram determinados utilizando o balanço hídrico segundo Thornthwaite & Mather (1955. Foram identificadas regiões equivalentes a um terço da bacia, localizadas na parte central e no nordeste da mesma, como sendo inaptas ao cultivo do café, conforme os critérios de produtividade relacionados com as exigências térmicas e hídricas da cultura.It was aimed in this work, through the geospatialization, the identification of the apt, restricted and inapt regions for cultivation of coffee (Coffea arabica L. in Rio Doce watershed. It was used for such, temperature and water deficit data of 50 meteorological stations installed in the watershed and in bordering watershed. The data of water deficit were determined using the water balance according to Thornthwaite & Mather (1955. They were identified equivalent regions the one third of the watershed, located in the central part and in the northeast of the same, as being inapt to the cultivation of coffee, according to the productivity criterions related with the thermal and hydric demands of culture.

  15. Microscopia eletrônica de varredura do endosperma de café (Coffea arabica L. durante o processo de secagem Scanning electron microscopy of the endosperm of coffee (Coffea arabica L. during the drying process

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    Reni Saath

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A manutenção da integridade das membranas celulares, entre outros eventos, é um forte indicativo de que a qualidade do café foi preservada na pós-colheita. Objetivou-se neste trabalho, analisar o efeito de diferentes métodos de secagem na manutenção da integridade da parede celular e da membrana plasmática de café natural e café despolpado, buscando determinar as condições e o momento em que ocorrem as rupturas microscópicas. Os cafés foram submetidos a um período de pré-secagem em terreiro. Após este, uma parcela de cada tipo de café foi desidratada no terreiro e, outra, à temperatura de 40ºC e 60ºC em secadores de camada fixa, monitorando-se a temperatura e o teor de água até 11% (bu. Nesse período, grãos foram aleatoriamente amostrados e fragmentos do endosperma preparados para a microscopia eletrônica de varredura, registrando-se diversas eletromicrografias, avaliando-se as alterações na membrana plasmática da célula do endosperma dos grãos de cafés em função do teor de água e tempo de secagem. O citoplasma das células a 11% (bu de teor de água não foi comprometido na secagem em terreiro e a 40°C; na secagem a 60°C, observou-se comprometimento nas estruturas celulares nos cafés com teor de água de 20% (bu.The maintenance of the integrity of cellular membranes, among other events, is a strong indicator that the quality of the coffee was preserved in the post-harvesting process. Therefore, this work aimed to analyze the effect of different drying methods on the maintenance of the integrity of cell walls and plasma membrane of natural and de-pulped coffee in order to determine the conditions and the moment that microscopic ruptures take place. The coffee was submitted to a pre-drying period on a concrete patio. After this, a sample of each type of coffee was dehydrated outdoors and another, with heated air at 40ºC and 60ºC in fixed-layer dryers, controlling the grain temperature and the moisture

  16. Effect of the inoculation density in Coffea arabica L. cv. `Caturra rojo' somatic embryos germination in RITA® Temporary Immersion System

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    Raúl Barbon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of somatic embryogenesis of coffee (Coffea spp. in liquid culture medium is a viable alternative for the propagation of these species. The use of liquid culture medium and temporary immersion systems could increase the germination of somatic embryos and improve the quality of plants. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of inoculation density on germination of somatic embryos of Coffea arabica L. cv. `Caturra rojo' in temporary immersion systems RITA®. It were used as inoculum densities 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 somatic embryos per RITA®. After 90 days of culture the number of somatic embryos germinated, hyperhydricity symptoms, number of true leaves, length and root development was quantified. With inoculum density of 70 somatic embryos per RITA®, it was obtained a highest germination percentage (60% with good leaf development and length of the plants. Key words: hyperhydricity, liquid culture medium, partial germination, total germination, somatic embryogenesis

  17. Contribuição do porta-enxerto, no teor de cafeína em grãos de café Contribution of the root-stock on the caffeine content of the coffee grains

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    M. Melo

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available A contribuição do porta-enxerto no teor de cafeína dos grãos de café foi investigada nos cultivares mundo novo e laurina de Coffea arabica e no robusta de C. canephora, os quais diferem marcadamente no teor desse alcalóide. Os resultados obtidos indicam que o porta-enxerto, independentemente de seu genótipo, não exerce efeito mensurável sobre o teor de cafeína nos grãos. Variações individuais foram verificadas no teor de cafeína no robusta, devido à sua variabilidade genética, indicando a possibilidade de seleção para essa característica dentro desse material. Do ponto de vista agrícola o robusta poderia ser usado como porta-enxerto para as seleções de C. arabica, sem qualquer efeito no produto final.The contribution of the root-stock on the caffeine content of the coffee grains was studied in the Mundo Novo and Laurina cultivais of Coffea arabica and in the Rubosta cultivar of C. canephora which markedly differ in the alkaloid content. The results indicate that the root-stock, independently of its genotype, does not influence the caffeine content of the grains. Individual variation in caffeine content was found in the Robusta due to its genetic variability, pointing out to the possibility of selection for this characteristics in this material. It was also concluded that Robusta cultivars can be used as root-stock for Arabica selections without affecting the final product.

  18. Fontes e proporção de material orgânico para a produção de mudas de cafeeiro em tubetes Sources and proportions of organic components for production of coffee tree seedling (Coffea arabica L. in small plastic containers

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    Ricardo Dias

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, objetivou-se avaliar a qualidade das mudas de cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L. produzidas em tubetes com substrato artificial suplementado com fontes de material orgânico em diferentes proporções. O experimento foi conduzido sob delineamento experimental de blocos casualizados em esquema fatorial 3 x 6, com quatro repetições em parcelas formadas por seis tubetes. O primeiro fator correspondeu às fontes de material orgânico (esterco bovino, húmus de minhoca e cama de peru e o segundo, suas proporções (0, 20, 40, 60, 80 e 100% no substrato artificial (BioPlant-café fertilizado com osmocote® (NPK 15-09-12. As características avaliadas foram: altura da muda, diâmetro de caule, número de pares de folhas, área foliar e massa seca da parte aérea e do sistema radicular. Pode-se concluir que o húmus de minhoca adicionado ao substrato artificial na proporção de 80% ou em uso exclusivo (100% aumentou a área foliar das mudas de cafeeiro e, como conseqüência proporcionou um maior acúmulo de massa seca da parte aérea. O uso de esterco bovino (acima de 30% e a cama de peru não alterou ou reduziu as características vegetativas das mudas de cafeeiro (altura da muda, diâmetro de caule, número de pares de folhas e área foliar e diminuiu o acúmulo de massa seca.This work aimed to evaluate the quality of coffee seedlings (Coffea arabica L. produced in small plastic containers with artificial substrate supplemented with sources of organic components in different proportions. The experiment was carried out using the randomized block design, in a 3 x 6 factorial structure, with four replications in plots composed of small plastic containers. The first factor corresponded to the sources (cattle manure, earthworm casting, and turkey manure and the second to the proportions (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100% in the artificial substrate (BioPlant-café® fertilized with osmocote® (NPK 15-09-12. The characteristics evaluated were

  19. Produtividade do cafeeiro Mundo Novo enxertado e submetido à adubação verde antes e após recepa da lavoura Productivity of grafted coffee during intercropping with five leguminous species in the western region of São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Martins Paulo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudaram-se a produção e o crescimento do cafeeiro Mundo Novo (Coffea arabica L. enxertado sobre o Apoatã IAC 2258 (Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner submetido à adubação verde com as seguintes espécies leguminosas: crotalária espectábilis (Crotalaria spectabilis Roth., crotalária júncea (Crotalaria juncea L., guandu [Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp.], mucuna anã (Stizolobium deeringeanum Bort. e soja IAC 9 [Glycine max (L. Merril] e um tratamento testemunha sem plantas leguminosas. As leguminosas foram semeadas a 50 cm da projeção da copa dos cafeeiros e incorporadas no florescimento. O experimento foi desenvolvido no Pólo Regional de Desenvolvimento Tecnológico dos Agronegócios da Alta Paulista, em Adamantina, no período de 1989 a 1995. Adotou-se o delineamento estatístico de blocos ao acaso com seis tratamentos e cinco repetições. Os adubos verdes crotalária espectábilis, crotalária júncea, mucuna anã e soja, durante o período experimental, e a crotalária espectábilis após a recepa, não diminuíram a produção do cafeeiro. O guandu, embora tenha aumentado o teor de matéria orgânica do solo, foi a única leguminosa que diminuiu a produção e o diâmetro do caule dos cafeeiros. O guandu e a crotalária júncea, respectivamente, produziram as maiores quantidades de fitomassa seca. A produção do café se correlacionou inversamente com a fitomassa seca das leguminosas e positivamente com altura e diâmetro do caule do cafeeiro.Yield of arabica coffee (Coffea arabica of grafted onto robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner Apoatã IAC 2258 was evaluated during six years of intercropping with five leguminous species: sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L., Crotalaria spectabilis Roth., dwarf velvet bean (Stizolobium deeringeanum Bort., soybean Glycine max (L. Merryl] and pigeon pea [Cajanus cajan (L. Millsp.] in the Western region of São Paulo State, Brazil, from 1989 to 1995. Leguminous species were sown 50 cm

  20. Soil quality under two different management schemes in coffee plantations of southern Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Eduardo Valbuena-Calderón

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop an additive soil quality index (ASQI in agrofostery managements of coffee (Coffea arabica L.. The study took place under two intense and traditional management schemes, in nine farms (32 lots in the south of Colombia, during 2013. A separation of means analysis was held through the LSD Fisher test (P<0,05 to each of the physical and chemical variables of the soil. The variables that showed differences between the schemes were submitted to a main components analysis to select the minimum data set (MDS of the components that explained the most variability and the redundancy was veri ed within the indicators, based on the correlation. The ASQI was obtained from the total sum of soil quality index (SQI of all the indicators, taking into account that the higher the score of the ASQI, the higher the quality of the soil within the study system. The selected physical variables were the content of sand and clay; while the chemical variables were: organic carbon (OC, P, CA, Mg, total bases (TB and Ca/Mg. The best ASQI was obtained from traditional management, because the value of the selected variables matched in a bigger proportion with the quality objective identi ed for the ASQI quanti cation; in this case the crop yield, based on limit values for coffee plantations.

  1. Correction to Hepper and Friis's analysis of Flora Aegyptiaco-Arabica:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryding, Olof; Friis, Ib

    2014-01-01

    The name Nepeta nepetellae has been accepted in Carl Christensen’s standard index to Forsskål’s Flora Aegyptiaco-Arabica, listed in Index Kewensis and IPNI, listed as an accepted name in The Plant List and accepted in Hepper and Friis’s revision of the plants of Forsskål’s Flora Aegyptiaco-Arabic...... to the currently used names and clarify a complex nomenclatural situation, which has confused several previous authors on the subject. The meanings of asterisked names in Flora Aegyptiaco-Arabica and their bearing for N. nepetellae are briefly reviewed.......The name Nepeta nepetellae has been accepted in Carl Christensen’s standard index to Forsskål’s Flora Aegyptiaco-Arabica, listed in Index Kewensis and IPNI, listed as an accepted name in The Plant List and accepted in Hepper and Friis’s revision of the plants of Forsskål’s Flora Aegyptiaco......-Arabica. If accepted, N. nepetellae may threaten names in current use in Arabia and Africa. However, the name is so similar to the earlier N. nepetella L. that the two names are likely to be confused. Nepeta nepetellae is rejected as a later illegitimate homonym of N. nepetella, which will remove the threat...

  2. Organic matter and soil moisture content and double cropping with organic matter sourceplants

    OpenAIRE

    John Bako Baon; Aris Wibawa

    2005-01-01

    Double cropping of coffee with organic matter source plants is thought to increase organic matter content of soil. This study examined the effect of double cropping of coffee and organic matter source plants on soil organic matter content and yield of coffee plants. Arabica coffee trees in Andungsari Experimental Station (Bondowoso district), 1400 m asl. and climate type C; and Robusta coffee trees in Sumberasin Experimental Station (Malang district), 550 m asl. and climate type C, were used ...

  3. Efficiency of removal of bod5 and ss in sedimentation tanks and filters in wastewater treatment systems for coffee bean (Coffea arabica processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Gutiérrez Guzmán

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available n order to evaluate the current operating conditions of wastewater treatment systems of small scale coffee growers in the south of Huila a lab-scale prototype (S 1:25 was constructed. It was composed of both a sediment tank and a filter fit in series, simulating similar operating conditions used by coffee producers. Removal of biological oxygen demand (BOD5 and suspended solids (SS was performed in wastewater from coffee bean processing. A 23 factorial experimental design for the evaluation of the type of sedimentation tank, type of filter and hydraulic retention time (HRT in the sedimentation tank was employed. The results showed high removal efficiencies of suspended solid concentrations (more than 95%, and low removal efficiencies in BOD5 (about 20%. The combination of tank type 1 (square with a lower area, filter type 1 (upflow anaerobic filter – UAF and HRT of 30 hours had the highest removal efficiency.

  4. Ion beam analysis of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debastiani, R.; Santos, C.E.I. dos; Yoneama, M.L.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    The way that coffee is prepared (using roasted ground coffee or roasted coffee beans) may influence the quality of beverage. Therefore, the aim of this work is to use ion beam techniques to perform a full elemental analysis of packed roasted ground coffee and packed roasted coffee beans, as well as green coffee beans. The samples were analyzed by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission). Light elements were measured through RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) experiments. Micro-PIXE experiments were carried out in order to check the elemental distribution in the roasted and green coffee beans. In general, the elements found in ground coffee were Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr. A comparison between ground coffee and grinded roasted beans shows significant differences for several elements. Elemental maps reveal that P and K are correlated and practically homogeneously distributed over the beans

  5. Ion beam analysis of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debastiani, R., E-mail: rafa_debas@yahoo.com.br; Santos, C.E.I. dos; Yoneama, M.L.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J.F.

    2014-01-01

    The way that coffee is prepared (using roasted ground coffee or roasted coffee beans) may influence the quality of beverage. Therefore, the aim of this work is to use ion beam techniques to perform a full elemental analysis of packed roasted ground coffee and packed roasted coffee beans, as well as green coffee beans. The samples were analyzed by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission). Light elements were measured through RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) experiments. Micro-PIXE experiments were carried out in order to check the elemental distribution in the roasted and green coffee beans. In general, the elements found in ground coffee were Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr. A comparison between ground coffee and grinded roasted beans shows significant differences for several elements. Elemental maps reveal that P and K are correlated and practically homogeneously distributed over the beans.

  6. A hibridação interespecífica no melhoramento do cafeeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Teixeira Mendes

    1951-12-01

    Full Text Available The cultivation of coffee in the American coffee producing countries is not faced with any serious handicap. The future can not be far distant, however, when it will be necessary to establish new plantations back on the high-priced old exploited lands. Need will be felt for improved varieties. At the same time, it is not known if in a near future the American coffee growers will not be in trouble with diseases as terrible as Hemileia, which the present age of transport cannot restrict to non-American areas. In the program of coffee improvement, interspecific crosses are expected to take a very important place. The introducing of desired characteristics of other species into Coffea arabica by hybridization is made difficult by the fact that, while C. arabica is self-fertile, the other species are self-sterile. It is known, also, that the high cup quality C. arabica species, with 44 somatic chromosomes, gives sterile triploid hybrids (2n = 33 when crossed to the leaf disease resistant Coffea canephora and other diploid (2n = 22 species. Very seldom, however, do the triploids produce seed, as a result of back-cross to C. arabica either through open or controlled pollination. The cytological constitution of the plants obtained from these seeds is variable ; some triploids give rise to seedlings having mostly a chromosome number around 44 ; the progeny plants from other hybrids have this number mostly around 55. Numerous aneuploids have been found among these progenies. Attention has been given to the plants derived from the hybrids as to their developmental and production characteristics. At least two 44-chromosome plants have shown to be interesting in these respects and one of them, productive and self-fertile, showed up characteristics very similar to the maragogipe variety of C. arabica. More detailed comparative observations are necessary ; however, the obtaining of such a plant proves that the triploids are a permanent source of new

  7. Pattern recognition applied to mineral characterization of Brazilian coffees and sugar-cane spirits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Andrea P.; Santos, Mirian C.; Lemos, Sherlan G.; Ferreira, Marcia M.C.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nobrega, Joaquim A.

    2005-01-01

    Aluminium, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb, S, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, and Zn were determined in coffee and sugar-cane spirit (cachaca) samples by axial viewing inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Pattern recognition techniques such as principal component analysis and cluster analysis were applied to data sets in order to characterize samples with relation to their geographical origin and production mode (industrial or homemade and organically or conventionally produced). Attempts to correlate metal ion content with the geographical origin of coffee and the production mode (organic or conventional) of cachaca were not successful. Some differentiation was suggested for the geographical origin of cachaca of three regions (Northeast, Central, and South), and for coffee samples, related to the production mode. Clear separations were only obtained for differentiation between industrial and homemade cachacas, and between instant soluble and roasted coffees

  8. Coffee intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Marilyn C

    2012-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world. Its widespread popularity and availability has fostered public health concerns of the potential health consequences of regular coffee consumption. Epidemiological studies of coffee intake and certain health outcomes have been inconsistent. The precise component of coffee potentially contributing to development of these conditions also remains unclear. One step toward addressing the challenges in studying the impact coffee has on health is a better understanding of the factors contributing to its consumption and physiological effects. This chapter focuses on those factors that are genetically determined and briefly summarizes progress in applying this knowledge to epidemiological studies of coffee and disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of roasting temperatures and gamma irradiation on the content of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and soluble carbohydrates of coffee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.N.; Aguilar, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    Two varieties of Puerto Rican coffee, Coffea canephora L. var. Robusta, and Coffea arabica L. var. Borbon, were subjected to four different doses of radiation and roasted at two different temperatures. Aqueous extracts of the ground coffee beans were analyzed for chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid at 324 nm and 360 nm wavelength settings, respectively. Samples subjected to the roasting treatments in conjuction with irradiation treatments were treated with basic lead acetate prior to the colorimetric analyses in order to eliminate interfering substances. The total carbohydrate content was also determined by colorimetric techniques with anthrone reagent. The total nitrogen content of the pulverized samples were determined by the micro-Kjeldahl method. While roasting treatments caused a reduction in the concentrations of the chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and the carbohydrates, the radiation treatments increased the concentrations of soluble carbohydrates without affecting the concentrations of chlorogenic acid or caffeic acid. It therefore appears that radiation treatments seem to cause degradation of the acid-polysaccharide complexes liberating soluble sugars. There were no noticable changes in the total content of nitrogen caused by roasting or the radiation treatments as indicated by the statistical analysis employing the split plot design. (author)

  10. Somatic Embryogenesis in Coffee: The Evolution of Biotechnology and the Integration of Omics Technologies Offer Great Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Nádia A; Panis, Bart; Carpentier, Sebastien C

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important crops cultivated around the world is coffee. There are two main cultivated species, Coffea arabica and C. canephora. Both species are difficult to improve through conventional breeding, taking at least 20 years to produce a new cultivar. Biotechnological tools such as genetic transformation, micropropagation and somatic embryogenesis (SE) have been extensively studied in order to provide practical results for coffee improvement. While genetic transformation got many attention in the past and is booming with the CRISPR technology, micropropagation and SE are still the major bottle neck and urgently need more attention. The methodologies to induce SE and the further development of the embryos are genotype-dependent, what leads to an almost empirical development of specific protocols for each cultivar or clone. This is a serious limitation and excludes a general comprehensive understanding of the process as a whole. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of which achievements and molecular insights have been gained in (coffee) somatic embryogenesis and encourage researchers to invest further in the in vitro technology and combine it with the latest omics techniques (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and phenomics). We conclude that the evolution of biotechnology and the integration of omics technologies offer great opportunities to (i) optimize the production process of SE and the subsequent conversion into rooted plantlets and (ii) to screen for possible somaclonal variation. However, currently the usage of the latest biotechnology did not pass the stage beyond proof of potential and needs to further improve.

  11. An Evaluation of the Genetic Diversity of Xylella fastidiosa Isolated from Diseased Citrus and Coffee in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, X; Miranda, V S; Machado, M A; Lemos, E G; Hartung, J S

    2001-06-01

    ABSTRACT Strains of Xylella fastidiosa, isolated from sweet orange trees (Citrus sinensis) and coffee trees (Coffea arabica) with symptoms of citrus variegated chlorosis and Requeima do Café, respectively, were indistinguishable based on repetitive extragenic palindromic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR assays. These strains were also indistinguishable with a previously described PCR assay that distinguished the citrus strains from all other strains of Xylella fastidiosa. Because we were not able to document any genomic diversity in our collection of Xylella fastidiosa strains isolated from diseased citrus, the observed gradient of increasing disease severity from southern to northern regions of São Paulo State is unlikely due to the presence of significantly different strains of the pathogen in the different regions. When comparisons were made to reference strains of Xylella fastidiosa isolated from other hosts using these methods, four groups were consistently identified consistent with the hosts and regions from which the strains originated: citrus and coffee, grapevine and almond, mulberry, and elm, plum, and oak. Independent results from random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR assays were also consistent with these results; however, two of the primers tested in RAPD-PCR were able to distinguish the coffee and citrus strains. Sequence comparisons of a PCR product amplified from all strains of Xylella fastidiosa confirmed the presence of a CfoI polymorphism that can be used to distinguish the citrus strains from all others. The ability to distinguish Xylella fastidiosa strains from citrus and coffee with a PCR-based assay will be useful in epidemiological and etiological studies of this pathogen.

  12. Assessment of Cellular Mutagenicity of Americano Coffees from Popular Coffee Chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Chen, Po-Wen; Wang, Jung-Yu; Kuo, Tai-Chen

    2017-09-01

    Coffee is a popular beverage worldwide, but coffee beans can be contaminated with carcinogens. The Ames Salmonella mutagenicity test is often used for analysis of carcinogens for mutagenicity. However, previous studies have provided controversial data about the direct mutagenicity of coffee beans based on Ames test results. This study was conducted to determine the mutagenicity of popular Americano coffee based on results from the Ames test. Coffee samples without additives that were served by five international coffee chain restaurants were subjected to the analysis using Salmonella Typhimurium tester strains TA98, TA100, and TA1535. The levels of bacterial revertants in samples from coffee chains were lower than the twofold criterion of the control sets, and no significant dose-response effect was observed with or without rat liver enzyme activation. These data indicate that Americano coffees from the selected coffee chains possessed no direct mutagenic activity with or without enzyme activation. These findings suggest a low mutagenic risk from Americano coffees served by the selected coffee chains and support the use of other methods to confirm the nonmutagenicity of coffee products. These results are consistent with most recent epidemiological reports.

  13. Acute effects of light and dark roasted coffee on glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rakvaag, Elin; Dragsted, Lars Ove

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epidemiological evidence suggests that coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Coffee contains caffeine and several other components that may modulate glucose regulation. The chlorogenic acids (CGA) in coffee have been indicated as constituents that may help...... to normalize the acute glucose response after a carbohydrate challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate whether two coffee beverages that differ in CGA content due to different roasting degrees will differentially affect glucose regulation. METHODS: In a controlled crossover trial, 11 healthy fasted...... volunteers consumed 300 mL of either light (LIR) or dark (DAR) roasted coffee, or water, followed 30 min later by a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Blood samples were drawn at baseline, 30, 60, and 120 min. Differences in glucose and insulin responses and insulin sensitivity index (ISI) were...

  14. Uma nova forma de Coffea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Krug

    1950-01-01

    úmero diplóide de C. Dewevrei, o que parece confirmado pelos resultados obtidos nas hibridações com C. arabica. Apresentam-se também algumas informações preliminares sôbre a sua constituição genética, derivadas de um extenso projeto de cruzamentos com espécies e também genótipos diferentes de C. arabica (nana; prpr; FsFs; lrlr; momo; MgMg; ErEr; C-; CtCt; cece; etc. Concluiu-se que a nova forma é extremamente heterozigota, com relação aos fatôres determinantes dos seus principais caracteres morfológicos, e que possui vários alelos dos fatôres conhecidos de C. arabica, apresentando os indivíduos F1, e os "backcrosses" com esta espécie, acentuada predominância dos caracteres da nova forma. A auto-esterilidade predomina nas gerações de "backcrosses" seguidos, já se tendo encontrado, entretanto, plantas razoavelmente auto-férteis. Além de constituir material básico de grande importância para as tentativas de síntese de novos tipos de cafeeiros, a forma em questão também está sendo ensaiada em plantações mistas, intercalando-se o seu clone (cafeeiros enxertados com fileiras de cafeeiros arábica (bourbon, etc., que servirão de agentes polinizadores. Conclui-se que a descoberta dêsse cafeeiro, em Terra Roxa, facilitará a solução do problema da formação de novos cafezais em terras extremamente esgotadas.In the past 18 years coffee breeding investigations by the Genetics Division of the Instituto Agronômico have been largeiy confined to the species C. arabica because it is the species that produces coffee of the best marketable qualities. Coffee cultivation in depleted soils requires the use of very vigorous plants. Vigorous plant growth is more frequently found in some diploid species of Coffea. Artificial hybridization of these diploid species with the tetraploid species C. arabica has been tried in several of the Institutes' Experiment Stations where breeding work on coffee is underway. Small scale breeding tests have also been carried

  15. Have coffee reforms and coffee supply chains affected farmers' income? The case of coffee growers in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Murekezi, Abdoul Karim; Loveridge, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Low prices in the international coffee markets have worsened the economic well-being among coffee farmers. In the face of this situation, the Government of Rwanda has introduced coffee sector reforms that aimed to transform the sector in a way that targets the high quality market and moves away from the bulk coffee market. The high quality coffee market has shown consistent growth over time and exhibits price premiums in international market. If these high prices are passed on to farmers who ...

  16. In vitro AND in vivo ANTHELMINTIC EFFECT OF Coffea arabica RESIDUES AGAINTS AN Haemonchus contortus ISOLATE WITH LOW SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TANNINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.I. Ortiz-Ocampo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic (AH effect of the percolated by-product of Coffea arabica against a Haemonchus contortus isolate with low susceptibility to tannins. Firstly, the susceptibility to tannins of Paraíso H. contortus isolate was evaluated with the in vitro larval exsheathment inhibition assay (LEIA using an acetone:water (70:30 extract of Acacia pennatula. Afterwards, the in vitro AH effect of acetone:water extracts of percolated C. arabica by-products (Clean and Smooth (CS and Shade Grown (SG Starbucks® were evaluated. Then, the in vivo AH effect was determined in growing sheep (4 months old and 15.2 kg bodyweight, infected with H. contortus (Paraiso isolate and fed with a diet containing the percolated by-product of C. arabica. Three experimental groups were formed (n = 6 lambs: GC Group (control diet without C. arabica, GCA Group (feed containing 10% C. arabica and, GCA+PEG (polyethilenglycol Group (feed with 10% C. arabica + PEG as a tannin inhibitor. Fecal samples were obtained daily from the rectum of lambs (days 1 to 20 of the study. The H. contortus isolate tolerated the A. pennatula extract at concentrations of 150 and 300 μg extract/ml PBS (P > 0.05, which confirmed its low susceptibility to tannins. The C. arabica CS extract reduced the exsheatment from 150 μg of extract/ml PBS and the SG variety from 1200 μg of extract/ml PBS (P0.05. In conclusion, the C. arabica percolated by-product extracts showed in vitro AH effect against exsheathment. However, the consumption of feed containing 10% of the percolated by-product did not show an in vivo AH effect in sheep infected with the Paraiso H. contortus isolate. The latter could be due to the low susceptibility towards the secondary compounds of tannin rich plants of the H. contortus isolate used in this study.

  17. Smashing CoffeeScript

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Brew the perfect code with CoffeeScript If you're familiar with JavaScript and the often-frustrating process of creating complex applications, a nice cup of CoffeeScript can help. CoffeeScript is a programming language that compiles into JavaScript and simplifies the entire development process. Now you can tap the full power of CoffeeScript with Smashing CoffeeScript. This full-color, practical book explains CoffeeScript language, syntax, and processes, and will soon have you producing concise and quality code. Ultimately, you'll create RIAs and mobile apps faster, with less

  18. Shaded Coffee: A way to Increase Sustainability in Brazilian Organic Coffee plantations

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Cassio Franco; De Nadai Fernandes, Elisabete A.; Tagliaferro, Fábio Sileno

    2008-01-01

    Consumption of specialty coffee, mainly organic coffee, increases worldwide following the tendency of consuming social and ecological sustainable products. Brazil is the world largest coffee producer, with an average of 2,300,000 tons of green coffee in the last 5 years. Cultivation of organic coffee and shaded coffee are common in Central America, while in Brazil both conventional and organic coffee are cultivated in the full sun system. The full sun system is criticized due to the lack of b...

  19. Effects of tea and coffee on cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøhn, Siv K; Ward, Natalie C; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Croft, Kevin D

    2012-06-01

    Tea and coffee have been associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), both positively and negatively. Epidemiological data suggest that black and green tea may reduce the risk of both coronary heart disease and stroke by between 10 and 20%. Experimental and clinical trial data generally indicate either neutral or beneficial effects on risk factors and pathways linked to the development of CVD. Controversy still exists regarding the effects of coffee, where there have been concerns regarding associations with hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension and myocardial infarction. However, long term moderate intake of coffee is not associated with detrimental effects in healthy individuals and may even protect against the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The detrimental effects of coffee may be associated with the acute pressor effects, most likely due to caffeine at high daily intakes, and lipids from boiled coffee can contribute to raised serum cholesterol. Genetic polymorphisms in enzymes involved in uptake, metabolism and excretion of tea and coffee compounds are also associated with differential biological effects. Potential mechanisms by which tea and coffee phytochemicals can exert effects for CVD protection include the regulation of vascular tone through effects on endothelial function, improved glucose metabolism, increased reverse cholesterol transport and inhibition of foam cell formation, inhibition of oxidative stress, immunomodulation and effects on platelet function (adhesion and activation, aggregation and clotting). The phytochemical compounds in tea and coffee and their metabolites are suggested to influence protective endogenous pathways by modulation of gene-expression. It is not known exactly which compounds are responsible for the suggestive protective effects of tea and coffee. Although many biologically active compounds have been identified with known biological effects, tea and coffee contain many unidentified compounds with potential

  20. Impacts of leaf age and heat stress duration on photosynthetic gas exchange and foliar nonstructural carbohydrates in Coffea arabica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielle E. Marias; Frederick C. Meinzer; Christopher Still

    2017-01-01

    Given future climate predictions of increased temperature, and frequency and intensity of heat waves in the tropics, suitable habitat to grow ecologically, economically, and socially valuable Coffea arabica is severely threatened. We investigated how leaf age and heat stress duration impact recovery from heat stress in C. arabica...

  1. Evaluation of Antioxidant Activity of Medicinal Plant Extracts Produced for Commercial Purpose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Sathisha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant potential of some herbal plant extracts (commercial products was measured using various in vitro assays. Among the extracts from Curcuma longa, Caffea arabica, Tribulus terrestris, Bacopa monnieri and Trigonella foenum- graecum, the Curcuma longa and coffee bean extract (Caffea Arabica showed greater antioxidant activity measured as scavenging of DPPH, superoxide radicals, reducing power and inhibition of microsomal lipid peroxidation.

  2. Karakteristik Tanah Gambut Topogen Yang Dijadikan Sawah Dan Dialihfungsikan Menjadi Pertanaman Kopi Arabika Dan Hortikultura

    OpenAIRE

    Sihite, Linda Wati

    2013-01-01

    This research is aimed to know the changes characteristic of topogenous peat soil that increased into paddy field and be converted into arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) and horticulture farm. This research was conducted in Desa Hutabagasan, Kecamatan Doloksanggul, Kabupaten Humbang Hasundutan and soil analyse properties was held in Chemical and Soil fertility Laboratory and Riset and Technology Laboratory, Agriculture Faculty of North Sumatera University. Observation and ...

  3. Flavononol Glycosides of Reseda arabica (Resedaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djemaa Berrehal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Five flavonol glycosides, kaempferol 3,7-di-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside (1 , isorhamnetin 3,7-di-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside (2 , kaempferol 3-O- β -D-glucopyranoside-7-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside (3 , isorhamnetin 3-O- β -D-glucopyranoside-7-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside (4, Kaempferol 3-O- β -xylopyranosyl-(1'''→2''-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside-7-O- α -L-rhamnopyranoside (5, have been isolated from the aerial parts of Reseda arabica. Their structures were established on the basis of physical and spectroscopic analysis, and by comparison with the literature data.

  4. Differential returns from globalization to women smallholder coffee and food producers in rural Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanyamurwa, J M; Wamala, S; Baryamutuma, R; Kabwama, E; Loewenson, R

    2013-09-01

    Globalization-related measures to liberalize trade and stimulate export production were applied in Uganda in the late 1980s, including in the coffee production sector, to revitalize agricultural production, increase incomes to farmers and improve rural food security. To explore the different effects of such measures on the health and dietary outcomes of female coffee and food small holder farmers in Uganda. We gathered evidence through a cross-sectional comparative interview survey of 190 female coffee producers and 191 female food producers in Ntungamo district. The study mostly employed quantitative methods of data collection, targeting the sampled households. We also utilized qualitative data; collected three months after the household survey data had been collected and their analysis had been accomplished. Using qualitative interviews based on an unstructured interview guide, extra qualitative information was collected from key informants at national, district and community levels. This was among other underlying principles to avoid relying on snapshot information earlier collected at household level in order to draw valid and compelling conclusions from the study. We used indicators of production, income, access to food and dietary patterns, women's health and health care. Of the two groups selected from the same area, female coffee producers represented a higher level of integration into liberalised export markets. Document review suggests that, although Uganda's economy grew in the period, the household economic and social gains after the liberalization measures may have been less than expected. In the survey carried out, both food and coffee producers were similarly poor, involved in small-scale production, and of a similar age and education level. Coffee producers had greater land and livestock ownership, greater access to inputs and higher levels of income and used a wider variety of markets than food producers, but they had to work longer hours to obtain

  5. Spices Coffee : Innovation Strategy To Increase Quality On Powder Coffee Farmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, I. T.; Indah, P. N.; Widayanti, S.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study is a) to analyze the condition of internal environment industry spices coffee, b) to analyze the condition of the external environment industry spices coffee, and c) to determine the technological innovation strategy spices coffee in order to improve the competitiveness of the coffee people. Most of the coffee grown in Tutur district is cultivated by smallholder farms, resulting in low quality. The strategy of coffee spice agro-industry aims to increase the added value of the products so that farmers obtain higher coffee prices. Activities include the provision of raw materials, processing, supply of final products, and marketing.The results showed that the internal environmental conditions that have the highest value is the strengthen factors. The highest score of strengthen factors is the availability of coffee, availability of labor and communications group. The highest score of opportunity factors is technological assistance from the government and other government support for the development of people’s coffee industry and high market potential. The development of agrotourism should improve as well as expand the network to seize market. The strategy should be applied in the development of spices coffee industry is to support aggressive growth (Growth-oriented strategy).

  6. Analysis of acrylamide in coffee and dietary exposure to acrylamide from coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granby, Kit; Fagt, Sisse

    2004-01-01

    An analytical method for analysing acrylamide in coffee was validated. The analysis of prepared coffee includes a comprehensive clean-up using multimode solid-phase extraction (SPE) by automatic SPE equipment and detection by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray...... in the positive mode. The recoveries of acrylamide in ready-to-drink coffee spiked with 5 and 10 mug l(-1) were 96 +/- 14% and 100 +/- 8%, respectively. Within laboratory reproducibility for the same spiking levels were 14% and 9%, respectively. Coffee samples (n = 25) prepared twice by coffee machines and twice...... by a French Press Cafetiere coffee maker contained 8 +/- 3 mug l(-1) and 9 +/- 3 mug l(-1) acrylamide. Five ready-to-drink instant coffee prepared twice contained 8 +/- 2 mug l(-1). Hence, the results do not show significant differences in the acrylamide contents in ready-to-drink coffee prepared by coffee...

  7. The effect of dewaxing of green coffee on the coffee brew

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegen, G.H.D. van der

    1979-01-01

    The two commercially most important mild treatments for green coffee are the steam treatment and the dewaxing process. In the former treatment the green coffee is just steamed. In the dewaxing process the waxy layer is extracted from the green coffee with an organic solvent, after which this coffee

  8. Estudos histoplásticos da interação Colletotrichum gloeosporioides: cafeeiro Histopathological studies of the interaction Colletotrichum gloeosporioides: coffee tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Souza Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nos estudos envolvendo a interação Colletotrichum gloeosporioides-cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L., poucas são as informações a respeito do modo de penetração e colonização deste patógeno. Estudou-se por meio da microscopia eletrônica de varredura (MEV, os eventos de pré-penetração e penetração de C. gloeosporioides em hipocótilos de cafeeiros e a colonização natural de ramos e frutos provenientes de plantas com mancha manteigosa. Realizaram-se três ensaios. No primeiro, fez-se a observação dos eventos de pré-penetração de C. gloeosporioides inoculados em hipocótilos de plântulas da cv. Acaiá Cerrado com e sem ferimentos; no segundo, observou-se a colonização de ramos enfermos em que havia murcha drástica e necrose local e, no terceiro, a colonização de frutos enfermos. A germinação dos conídios nos hipocótilos feridos ocorreu 6 horas após a inoculação, com a formação de um ou dois tubos germinativos terminais e a adesão dos conídios nas depressões dos hipocótilos. Apressórios globosos a subglobosos e de contorno regular surgiram 12 horas após a inoculação. Até 72 horas, não foi possível observar a formação de acérvulos sobre os tecidos submetidos à inoculação. Nos ramos observava-se colonização nos vasos floema e parênquima cortical. Nos frutos em diferentes estádios de maturação foi observada a colonização do tecido próximo à epiderme e colapso dos estômatos na área lesionada.In studies involving the interaction Colletotrichum gloeosporioides - coffee trees (Coffea arabica L. there is little information regarding the pre-penetration, penetration and colonization pathways of this pathogen. The objectives of this work were: 1. to study through scanning electron microscopy (SEM the pre-penetration and penetration events of C. gloeosporioides in hypocotyls of coffee plantlets; 2. to observe the colonization of Colletotrichum spp. in branches and fruits of coffee trees with blister

  9. Packaging Attributes of Antioxidant-Rich Instant Coffee and Their Influence on the Purchase Intent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinês P. Corso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to identify the most important packaging attributes for purchasing a product not currently on the Brazilian market: antioxidant-rich instant coffee, a blend of roasted coffee and green coffee. Five package types of the same brand of instant antioxidant-rich coffee marketed in different countries were evaluated through a focus group. The attributes’ glass shape, glass lid color and label, information and brand were selected for the quantitative study. The purchase intent for the packaging images was evaluated with conjoint analysis. In general, an increased purchase intent was verified for more modern packages and browner labels that indicated roasted coffee. The consumers preferred the image of green and roasted coffee beans next to the cup of coffee and valued information about the product’s differentiation (the origin, type, quantity and functions of antioxidants that was presented in the form of explanatory charts on the back of the packaging.

  10. Anatomia e desenvolvimento ontogenético de Coffea arabica L. var. typica Cramer Anatomy and ontogenetical development of Coffea arabica L. var. typica Cramer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Dedecca

    1957-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo anatômico de Coffea arabica L. var. typica Cramer tem por finalidade fornecer informações básicas necessárias ao estudo da anatomia comparada das principais espécies e variedades de cafeeiros, cultivadas no Estado de São Paulo. Nesta primeira contribuição o autor realiza o estudo anatômico detalhado dos órgãos vegetativos e reprodutivos da variedade typica, não se limitando apenas à anatomia descritiva dos diversos órgãos, mas também, sempre que possível, discutindo o desenvolvimento ontogenético das diversas partes do cafeeiro. No estudo da raíz e do caule procurou-se estabelecer a duração do desenvolvimento primário, assinalando o local de aparecimento, primeiramente do câmbio vascular e, posteriormente, do felógeno ou câmbio suberoso. Na discussão da anatonia das folhas mereceu especial atenção o estudo das domácias, sua morfologia e possível função. As flores são estudadas detalhadamente nos seus diversos elementos. Nos capítulos referentes à anatomia do fruto e da semente, além do estudo puramente descritivo das suas estruturas são ainda discutidas as diversas modificações verificadas durante o desenvolvimento do ovário e dos óvulos, respectivamente em fruto e sementes.The knowledge of the anatomy of Coffea arabica L. var. typica Cramer should be considered as a basic contribution to the comparative study of the anatomy of coffee species and varieties cultivated in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. The detailed investigations carried out on the vegetative and reproductive organs of the coffee plant revealed the following. The roots at the end of the primary growth present a protostelic, poliarch (6, 7, 8, 9, 11 primary xylem bundles, and exarch structure, the following tissues or zone of tissues being visible: root cap, epidermis, exodermis, cortex, endodermis, pericycle, primary phloem and primary xylem. This primary growth has a very short duration and is very soon followed by the

  11. Comparison of Attenuated Total Reflectance Mid-Infrared, Near Infrared, and 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopies for the Determination of Coffee’s Geographical Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Medina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensorial properties of Colombian coffee are renowned worldwide, which is reflected in its market value. This raises the threat of fraud by adulteration using coffee grains from other countries, thus creating a demand for robust and cost-effective methods for the determination of geographical origin of coffee samples. Spectroscopic techniques such as Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, near infrared (NIR, and mid-infrared (mIR have arisen as strong candidates for the task. Although a body of work exists that reports on their individual performances, a faithful comparison has not been established yet. We evaluated the performance of 1H-NMR, Attenuated Total Reflectance mIR (ATR-mIR, and NIR applied to fraud detection in Colombian coffee. For each technique, we built classification models for discrimination by species (C. arabica versus C. canephora (or robusta and by origin (Colombia versus other C. arabica using a common set of coffee samples. All techniques successfully discriminated samples by species, as expected. Regarding origin determination, ATR-mIR and 1H-NMR showed comparable capacity to discriminate Colombian coffee samples, while NIR fell short by comparison. In conclusion, ATR-mIR, a less common technique in the field of coffee adulteration and fraud detection, emerges as a strong candidate, faster and with lower cost compared to 1H-NMR and more discriminating compared to NIR.

  12. Método para determinação de carboidratos empregado na triagem de adulterações em café

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Daiane Pauli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective in this work was to validate a chromatography method for the determination of total carbohydrates in soluble coffee, using a HPLC-UV-VIS with postcolumn derivatization system, in order to verify adulterant additions. The validated method was accurate and robust. Adulteration could be observed by increasing xylose and glucose levels in samples with addition of coffee husks and starchy products while decreasing of galactose and mannose characteristic carbohydrates presenting in high concentration in soluble coffees produced by arabica and robusta coffee beans.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF COFFEE MARKET AND CHANGES IN COFFEE CONSUMPTION AMONG POLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Chudy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of a survey concerning coffee consumption together with results of visual and instrumental coffee analyses. The investigations focused on the type of additives used when preparing coffee. Based on the survey it was found that 58.3% respondents use sweeteners and 92.7% coffee whiteners (mainly milk with 3.2% fat content.

  14. The performances of coffee processors and coffee market in the Republic of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuševa Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to investigate the performances of coffee processors and coffee market in Serbia based on the market concentration analysis, profitability analysis, and profitability determinants analysis. The research was based on the sample of 40 observations of coffee processing companies divided into two groups: large and small coffee processors. The results indicate that two large coffee processors have dominant market share. Even though the Serbian coffee market is an oligopolistic, profitability analysis indicates that small coffee processors have a significant better profitability ratio than large coffee processors. Furthermore, results show that profitability ratio is positively related to the inventory turnover and negatively related to the market share.

  15. Incidence of fruit flies on coffee and citrus and quarantine treatment of citrus fruits by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raga, Adalton

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the fruit fly infestation on coffee and citrus, and also to determine gamma radiation doses for immature stages of Ceratitis capitata and Anastrepha fraterculus, in order to satisfy quarantine regulations. Coffee arabica varieties Icatu Vermelho, Catuai Amarelo, Mundo Novo and Sarchimor showed the highest infestation indices (pupa/berry): 0.53; 0,41; 0.33 and 0.36. respectively Icatu Vermelho and Catuai Vermelho showed the highest values of pupa/berry weight (0.49 and 0.39, respectively), and Robusta (Coffea canephora) presented the lowest index (0.01). The following fruit flies were found in coffee berries: C. capitata (76.6%) Anastrepha spp. (7.4%) and Lonchaeidae (17.0%). In area near coffee plantation, fruit fly infestation indices in sweet oranges were of 4.77 larvae/kg and 0.55 larva/fruit. The infestation indices for sweet orange, collected from five regions of the State of Sao Paulo ranged from 0.73 to 7.60 pupa/kg and 0.12 to 1.27 pupa/fruit. The same species of fruit flies were found in oranges. In the case of C. capitata eggs with 24-48 hours old, 20 Gy prevented completely adult emergence (artificial diet and orange). No emergence of adult occurred when C. capitata larvae of third instar were irradiated at 20 Gy in their rearing medium. But at 25 Gy, the number of adults was reduced by 54% and 97% from larval infestation in oranges and grapefruit, respectively. A dose of 30 Gy was required to prevent medfly emergence from third instar larvae in grapefruit. A dose of 15 Gy was required for third instar, to prevent adult emergence of A. fraterculus. No adult emerged from C third instar, to prevent adult emergence of A. fraterculus. No adult emerged from C capitata pre-pupa irradiated at 30 Gy. One medfly adult emerged from pupa (3-4 days after pupating) irradiated at 120 Gy. At the same dose, sixteen A. fraterculus adults emergency from irradiated pupa with 5-6 days old. (author)

  16. SINET: Ethiopian Journal of Science - Vol 30, No 1 (2007)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... L. in Afromontane rainforests of Ethiopia: distribution, ecology and conservation ... performance of Metarhizium anisoliae var. acridum (Green Muscle) against ... sucrose and trigolline contents among Ethiopian Arabica coffee accessories ...

  17. Recommendations for the regionalizing of coffee cultivation in Colombia: a methodological proposal based on agro-climatic indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García L, Juan Carlos; Posada-Suárez, Húver; Läderach, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Colombian National Federation of Coffee Growers (FNC) conducted an agro-ecological zoning study based on climate, soil, and terrain of the Colombian coffee-growing regions (CCGR) located in the tropics, between 1° and 11.5° N, in areas of complex topography. To support this study, a climate baseline was constructed at a spatial resolution of 5 km. Twenty-one bioclimatic indicators were drawn from this baseline data and from yield data for different coffee genotypes evaluated under conditions at eight experimental stations (ESs) belonging to the National Center for Coffee Research (CENICAFÉ). Three topographic indicators were obtained from a digital elevation model (DEM). Zoning at a national level resulted in the differentiation of 12 agro-climatic zones. Altitude notably influenced zone differentiation, however other factors such as large air currents, low-pressure atmospheric systems, valleys of the great rivers, and physiography also played an important role. The strategy of zoning according to coffee-growing conditions will enable areas with the greatest potential for the development of coffee cultivation to be identified, criteria for future research to be generated, and the level of technology implementation to be assessed.

  18. Genética de Coffea: XV - Hereditariedade dos característicos principais de Coffea arabica L. Var. semperflorens K.M.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carvalho

    1952-06-01

    Full Text Available No planalto de São Paulo, o cafeeiro normalmente floresce duas a quatro vezes por ano, nos períodos compreendidos entre fins de julho a novembro. Raramente floresce mais vêzes, e um pouco além dessa estação. Em 1934, foram encontrados alguns cafeeiros da espécie C. arabica, caracterizados por seu florescimento quase que continuamente durante o ano. A êsse mutante foi dada a denominação de semperflorens. Os resultados da análise genética apresentados indicam que os característicos principais do semperflorens, a forma da planta, tipo de ramificação e florescimento quase que contínuo, são controlados por um par de fatôres genéticos recessivos. Êsse fator genético tem por símbolo sf sf, correspondente à abreviação da palavra semperflorens. Os resultados dos cruzamentos entre o semperflorens e as variedades murta e nana indicam que o semperflorens deve ter-se originado como uma mutação recessiva do bourbon. Apesar de terem sido encontrados cafeeiros semperflorens quase que simultâneamente em Ribeirão Prêto e Campinas, é mais provável que a mutação tenha ocorrido em Ribeirão Preto, onde o café bourbon foi cultivado pela primeira vez em São Paulo. Além de apresentar o semperflorens interêsse do ponto de vista fisiológico, tem também valor econômico, por ser produtivo e possuir boa resistência à sêca, motivo pelo qual numerosas progênies dêsse cafeeiro vêm sendo estudadas, visando o isolamento de linhagens ainda mais produtivas.Under normal environmental conditions coffee plants in the State of São Paulo flower two to four times during the period of July to November. Only rarely do they flower beyond these limits. In 1934 a few coffee plants of the species C. arabica were found which flower almost at any period of the year. This mutant was named semperflorens. The results of the gene tical analysis here presented indicate that the characteristics of this mutant are controled by one pair of recessive

  19. Analysis of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) performance in relation to radiation level and rate of nitrogen supply II. Uptake and distribution of nitrogen, leaf photosynthesis and first bean yields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bote, Adugna Debela; Zana, Zewdneh; Ocho, Fikre L.; Vos, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Natural supply of nitrogen is often limiting coffee production. From the viewpoints of growth and biomass production, adequate nitrogen supply is important. Growing coffee under full sunlight not only enhances potential yields but also increases demands for nitrogen fertilizer, the extent of which

  20. Production of Flammulina velutipes on coffee husk and coffee spent-ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leifa Fan

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid state cultivation (SSC was carried out to evaluate the feasibility of using coffee husk and spent-ground as substrates for the production of edible mushroom Flammulina under different conditions of moisture and spawn rate. The strain of F. velutipes LPB 01 was adapted for a coffee husk extract medium. Best results were obtained with 25% spawn rate, though there was not much difference when lower spawn rates (10-20% were used. Ideal moisture content for mycelial growth was 60% and 55% for coffee husk and spent-ground, respectively. With coffee husk as substrate, first fructification occurred after 25 days of inoculation and the biological efficiency reached about 56% with two flushes after 40 days. With spent-ground as substrate, first fructification occurred 21 days after inoculation and the biological efficiency reached about 78% in 40 days. There was decrease in the caffeine and tannins contents (10.2 and 20.4%, respectively in coffee husk after 40 days. In coffee spent-ground, the tannin contents decreased by 28% after 40 days. These decrease was attributed to the degradation of caffeine or tannins by the culture because these were not adsorbed in the fungal mycelia. Results showed the feasibility of using coffee husk and coffee spent-ground as substrate without any nutritional supplementation for cultivation of edible fungus in SSC. Spent ground appeared better than coffee husk.

  1. Caracterização e dinâmica de colonização de Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fresen. de vries em frutos do cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L. Characterization and dynamic of colonization of Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fresen. de Vries in coffee fruits (Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Tadeu Galvão Pereira

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A presença de fungos em associação natural com frutos do cafeeiro é considerada um fator importante influenciando a qualidade do café. A influência negativa de algumas espécies de Aspergillus é conhecida, comprometendo inclusive a segurança do produto. Os relatos de fungos influenciando positivamente a qualidade se resumem à ocorrência de Cladosporium sp. associados a grãos que originaram cafés de boa qualidade, porém informações exatas sobre a espécie e a sua dinâmica no campo são escassas. Objetivando caracterizar a espécie associada ao cafeeiro e sua dinâmica de colonização, 18 isolados de Cladosporium foram caracterizados e identificados. A dinâmica de colonização do fungo nas comunidades externa e interna do fruto do cafeeiro foi estudada ao longo do período de desenvolvimento do fruto. A espécie associada ao cafeeiro foi identificada como Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fresen. de Vries. A dinâmica do fungo é característica de um fungo saprófita encontrado em intensidade máxima quando os frutos estão nos estágios de cereja.The natural occurrence of fungi in coffee fruits is considered an important factor influencing the quality of coffee. The negative effect of some Aspergillus species in coffee, which can also affect safety of the product, is well known. Otherwise, there are reports describing the positive influence of fungi in coffee quality, but they are limited to the occurrence of Cladosporium sp. in fruits, and its correlation with a product of good quality. Indeed, the exact information about the species involved and dynamics of colonization are not available. The objective of this work was to identify and characterize the species of Cladosporium, detected in coffee fruits, and study the dynamics of colonization of the fruits during the maturation process. The species found on coffee fruits was identified as Cladosporium cladosporioides (Fresen. de Vries. and the dynamics of colonization showed the

  2. Correlação entre precursores e voláteis em café arábica brasileiro processado pelas vias seca, semiúmida e úmida e discriminação através da análise por componentes principais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa P. Arruda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of pre-processing of arabica coffee beans on the composition of volatile precursors including sugars, chlorogenic acids, phenolics, proteins, aminoacids, trigonelline and fatty acids was assessed and correlated with volatiles formed during roasting. Reducing sugars and free aminoacids were highest for natural coffees whereas total sugars, chlorogenic acids and trigonelline were highest for washed coffees. The highest correlation was observed for total phenolics and volatile phenolics (R= 0.999. Experimental data were evaluated by Principal Components Analysis and results showed that washed coffees formed a distinct group in relation to semi-washed and natural coffees.

  3. [Establisment of a genetic transformation method of coffee (Coffea arabica cv. Catimor) and incorporation of bar gene for ammonium glufosinate resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Da Silva, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    In order to establish a successful method of genetic transformation in Coffea arabica cv. Catimor, different conditions of generation and electroporation were evaluated on different plant tissues. Cell suspension system was improved using one hormone only (BA), obtaining high yields of primary and secondary somatic embryo production. For selection of viable and potentially transformed cells, MTT (1%) method and ammonium glufosinate concentration (1 mg/L in leaf, callus and embryos; and 5 mg/L in cells) were established. Different conditions were evaluated to electroporate different explants (embryogenic callus, vitroplants leaves, globular and torpedo embryos). The highest gus gene expression percentage by explant were found on enzymatic treated tissues at 375 V/cm in callus, and at 625 V/cm in leaves and embryos. Torpedo embryos cultured on liquid medium were the only type of tissue that could regenerate into plants, where secondary somatic embryos were obtained. Those embryos were positive to the gus gene histochemical test and to the gus and bar genes amplification on a PCR reaction.

  4. Bioactive Hydantoin Alkaloids from the Red Sea Marine Sponge Hemimycale arabica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Diaa T A; Shaala, Lamiaa A; Alshali, Khalid Z

    2015-10-28

    In the course of our continuing efforts to identify bioactive secondary metabolites from Red Sea marine invertebrates, we have investigated the sponge Hemimycale arabica. The antimicrobial fraction of an organic extract of the sponge afforded two new hydantoin alkaloids, hemimycalins A and B (2 and 3), together with the previously reported compound (Z)-5-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)imidazolidine-2,4-dione (1). The structures of the compounds were determined by extensive 1D and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC and HMBC) studies and high-resolution mass spectral determinations. Hemimycalins A (2) and B (3) represent the first examples of the natural N-alkylated hydantoins from the sponge Hemimycale arabica. Compounds 1-3 displayed variable antimicrobial activities against E. coli, S. aureus, and C. albicans. In addition, compound 1 displayed moderate antiproliferative activity against the human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell line. These findings provide further insight into the chemical diversity as well as the biological activity of this class of compounds.

  5. Bioactive Hydantoin Alkaloids from the Red Sea Marine Sponge Hemimycale arabica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaa T. A. Youssef

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the course of our continuing efforts to identify bioactive secondary metabolites from Red Sea marine invertebrates, we have investigated the sponge Hemimycale arabica. The antimicrobial fraction of an organic extract of the sponge afforded two new hydantoin alkaloids, hemimycalins A and B (2 and 3, together with the previously reported compound (Z-5-(4-hydroxybenzylideneimidazolidine-2,4-dione (1. The structures of the compounds were determined by extensive 1D and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC and HMBC studies and high-resolution mass spectral determinations. Hemimycalins A (2 and B (3 represent the first examples of the natural N-alkylated hydantoins from the sponge Hemimycale arabica. Compounds 1–3 displayed variable antimicrobial activities against E. coli, S. aureus, and C. albicans. In addition, compound 1 displayed moderate antiproliferative activity against the human cervical carcinoma (HeLa cell line. These findings provide further insight into the chemical diversity as well as the biological activity of this class of compounds.

  6. Wake up and smell the coffee. Caffeine, coffee, and the medical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, T

    1992-11-01

    Caffeine is a methylxanthine whose primary biologic effect is antagonism of the adenosine receptor. Its presence in coffee, tea, soda beverages, chocolate, and many prescription and over-the-counter drugs makes it the most commonly consumed stimulant drug. Initially caffeine increases blood pressure, plasma catecholamine levels, plasma renin activity, serum free fatty acid levels, urine production, and gastric acid secretion. Its long-term effects have been more difficult to substantiate. Most of the caffeine consumed in the United States is in coffee, which contains many other chemicals that may have other biologic actions. The consumption of coffee is a self-reinforcing behavior, and caffeine dependence and addiction are common. Coffee and caffeine intake have been linked to many illnesses, but definitive correlations have been difficult to substantiate. Initial trials showing coffee's association with coronary disease and myocardial infarction have been difficult to reproduce and have many confounding variables. Recent studies showing a larger effect over long follow-up periods and with heavy coffee consumption have again brought the question of the role of coffee in disease states to the fore. Caffeine in average dosages does not seem to increase the risk of arrhythmia. At present there is no convincing evidence that caffeine or coffee consumption increases the risk for any solid tumor. The intake of coffee and caffeine has clearly been decreasing in this country over the past two decades, largely brought about by the increasing health consciousness of Americans. Although there have been many studies that hint that the fears of increased disease with coffee drinking may be warranted, many questions have yet to be answered about the health effects of coffee and caffeine use.

  7. Coffee and Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhawan, Manav; Anand, Anil C

    2016-03-01

    Coffee is the most popular beverage in the world. Consumption of coffee has been shown to benefit health in general, and liver health in particular. This article reviews the effects of coffee intake on development and progression of liver disease due to various causes. We also describe the putative mechanisms by which coffee exerts the protective effect. The clinical evidence of benefit of coffee consumption in Hepatitis B and C, as well as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and alcoholic liver disease, has also been presented. Coffee consumption is associated with improvement in liver enzymes (ALT, AST, and GGTP), especially in individuals with risk for liver disease. Coffee intake more than 2 cups per day in patients with preexisting liver disease has been shown to be associated with lower incidence of fibrosis and cirrhosis, lower hepatocellular carcinoma rates, as well as decreased mortality.

  8. Use of classifier to determine coffee harvest time by detachment force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo M. de Barros

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Coffee quality is an essential aspect to increase its commercial value and for the Brazilian coffee business to remain prominent in the world market. Fruit maturity stage at harvest is an important factor that affects the quality and commercial value of the product. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop a classifier using neural networks to distinguish green coffee fruits from mature coffee fruits, based on the detachment force. Fruit detachment force and the percentage value of the maturity stage were measured during a 75-day harvest window. Collections were carried out biweekly, resulting in five different moments within the harvest period. A classifier was developed using neural networks to distinguish green fruits from mature fruits in the harvest period analyzed. The results show that, in the first half of June, the supervised classified had the highest success percentage in differentiating green fruits from mature fruits, and this period was considered as ideal for a selective harvest under these experimental conditions.

  9. Too much coffee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    coffee can be motivated to drink less coffee. The ethnomethodological perspective reveals how the participants’ different common-sense and hierarchical perceptions of a normative theory and its meaning in practice appears to guide the talk about how to motivate the patient to drink less coffee....... The negotiation between the researchers’ and practitioners’ approach to the coffee drinking patient facilitate a more profound understanding of how different knowledge forms can be at play in other ways than expected. In conclusion the findings show that dialogue and interplay between different knowledge forms...

  10. Green Coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... coffee product Coffee Slender (Med-Eq Ltd., Tonsberg, Norway), lose an average of 2.5 to 3. ... might increase the risk of experiencing serious or life-threatening side effects such as high blood pressure, ...

  11. Tea and coffee consumption in relation to DNA methylation in four European cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Weronica E; Tobi, Elmar W; Ahsan, Muhammad; Lampa, Erik; Ponzi, Erica; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Georgiadis, Panagiotis; Lumey, L H; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Botsivali, Maria; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Karlsson, Torgny; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Palli, Domenico; Ingelsson, Erik; Hedman, Åsa K; Nilsson, Lena M; Vineis, Paolo; Lind, Lars; Flanagan, James M; Johansson, Åsa

    2017-08-15

    Lifestyle factors, such as food choices and exposure to chemicals, can alter DNA methylation and lead to changes in gene activity. Two such exposures with pharmacologically active components are coffee and tea consumption. Both coffee and tea have been suggested to play an important role in modulating disease-risk in humans by suppressing tumour progression, decreasing inflammation and influencing estrogen metabolism. These mechanisms may be mediated by changes in DNA methylation. To investigate if DNA methylation in blood is associated with coffee and tea consumption, we performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study for coffee and tea consumption in four European cohorts (N = 3,096). DNA methylation was measured from whole blood at 421,695 CpG sites distributed throughout the genome and analysed in men and women both separately and together in each cohort. Meta-analyses of the results and additional regional-level analyses were performed. After adjusting for multiple testing, the meta-analysis revealed that two individual CpG-sites, mapping to DNAJC16 and TTC17, were differentially methylated in relation to tea consumption in women. No individual sites were associated with men or with the sex-combined analysis for tea or coffee. The regional analysis revealed that 28 regions were differentially methylated in relation to tea consumption in women. These regions contained genes known to interact with estradiol metabolism and cancer. No significant regions were found in the sex-combined and male-only analysis for either tea or coffee consumption. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Eventos do processo de infecção de Colletotrichum gloeosporioides inoculados em folhas de Coffea arabica L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimar Batista Ferreira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve por objetivo obter informações sobre os eventos de pré-penetração, penetração e colonização de isolados de C. gloeosporioides, obtidos de mangueira e cafeeiro, quando inoculados em folhas de cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L. da cultivar Catucaí Vermelho. As folhas foram selecionadas, padronizadas e lavadas, demarcando-se áreas circulares de 0,5 cm de diâmetro na face abaxial, inoculando-se uma alíquota de 20 µL da suspensão de conídios. Utilizou-se um isolado obtido de mangueira e dois isolados obtidos de cafeeiro com mancha manteigosa. Realizaram-se avaliações com 3, 6, 8, 12, 24, 36, 48, 72, 96, 144 e 240 horas após a inoculação (hai. Todos os materiais foram processados e observados em microscópico eletrônico de varredura. Os conídios de todos os isolados aderiram freqüentemente nas depressões das células da epiderme e células-guarda dos estômatos, formando septo antes da germinação. A penetração, na maior parte, se deu por via direta e algumas vezes por estômatos. Isolados de cafeeiro germinaram em folhas de 6 a 8 hai, produzindo apressórios 12 hai e acérvulos de 96 a 144 hai. O isolado de mangueira germinou de 6 a 8 hai com formação de apressório de 8 a 12 hai e produziu novos conídios diretamente em hifas conidiogênicas. Não foi observada a formação acérvulos para este isolado.The present study was carried out with the objective to provide information on the pre-penetration, penetration and colonization events of isolates of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from mango and coffee, when inoculated in coffee leaves. The cultivar Catucaí Vermelho was used in all experiments. Coffee leaves were selected, standardized and washed in sterile water. After that, circular areas of 0.5 cm in diameter were marked on the undersurface of the leaves. In the center of each circular area, 20 µL of spore suspension was deposited. One isolate from mango and two from coffee presenting blister

  13. [Coffee as hepatoprotective factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szántová, Mária; Ďurkovičová, Zuzana

    The mind about the coffee did change upon the recent studies and metaanalysis of the last years. Consensual protective effect of coffee on the progression of chronic liver diseases (NASH, viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, hepatocelullar carcinoma) was detected in experimental, clinical and large population studies together with decrease of mortality. Antioxidant, antifibrotic, insulinsensitizing and anticarcinogenic effect of coffee were detected. Modulation of genetic expression of key enzymes of fatty acid synthesis, modulation of mRNA included in autophagia, reduction of stress of endoplasmatic reticulum together with decrease of proinflammatory cytokines and decrease of fibrogenesis are main mechanisms. Chlorogenic acids, diterpens (cafestol, kahweol), caffein, polyfenols and melanoidins are key protective components of coffee. Inverse dose-dependent correlation of coffee consumption with liver diseases was found in clinical and population studies. Coffee is non-pharmacological tool of primary and secondary prevention of chronic liver diseases. Review of published data together with supposed mechanisms of hepatoprotection are given.Key words: coffee - hepatoprotective effect - metaanalysis.

  14. Coffee and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Bodil Hammer

    Background: Coffee consumption in Denmark is high also among pregnant women and it is presumably their main source of caffeine intake. Coffee or caffeine intake during pregnancy has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes such as spontaneous abortion, stillbirth and reduced fetal growth. However...... a review of the literature indicates that further studies are needed to test the hypothesis of an effect of coffee or caffeine on the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes.The aim of the thesis was to study the relation between coffee and the risk of fetal death and the relation between caffeine intake...

  15. lon beam analysis of Brazilian coffee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debastiani, R.; Santos, C.E.I. dos; Ramos, M.M.; Souza, V.S.; Yoneama, M.L.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande so Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Coffee is one of the most popular and consumed beverages worldwide. Consumers can make the beverage from different types of coffee such as ground coffee, instant coffee or grinding roasted coffee beans. Each type of coffee leads to different characteristics in flavor and scent. The aim of this work is to perform an elemental analysis of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. To that end, eight popular Brazilian ground coffee brands have been chosen to make a comparative study among brands. One of these brands was selected for a complete study of the beverage preparation process. This same brand offers packages of roasted coffee beans, which allowed the elemental comparison between ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. Roasted coffee beans were ground with a pestle and mortar. The beverage was prepared using a typical coffee pot. The spent and liquid coffees were submitted to a heat treatment and subsequently homogenized and pressed into pellets. The filters used in the coffee pot were analyzed as well. For micro-PIXE studies, coffee beans were cut in different parts for analysis. Samples of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans (grind) were analyzed by PIXE, while light elements like C, O and N were analyzed by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry). The roasted coffee beans were analyzed by micro-PIXE to check the elemental distribution in the beans. The elements found in powder coffee were Mg, AI, Si, P, S, CI, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rb. Potassium is the element with higher concentration, while Ti and Zn are trace elements. AI, Si and Ti showed the same concentration for all brands. Potassium and chlorine have high solubility, and about 80% of their concentration is transferred from the powder to the beverage during the infusion. Mg, P, CI, K, Mn, Fe, Zn and Rb showed significant variation between ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. The elemental maps show that potassium and phosphorus are correlated, and iron appears in particular

  16. lon beam analysis of Brazilian coffee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debastiani, R.; Santos, C.E.I. dos; Ramos, M.M.; Souza, V.S.; Yoneama, M.L.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Coffee is one of the most popular and consumed beverages worldwide. Consumers can make the beverage from different types of coffee such as ground coffee, instant coffee or grinding roasted coffee beans. Each type of coffee leads to different characteristics in flavor and scent. The aim of this work is to perform an elemental analysis of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. To that end, eight popular Brazilian ground coffee brands have been chosen to make a comparative study among brands. One of these brands was selected for a complete study of the beverage preparation process. This same brand offers packages of roasted coffee beans, which allowed the elemental comparison between ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. Roasted coffee beans were ground with a pestle and mortar. The beverage was prepared using a typical coffee pot. The spent and liquid coffees were submitted to a heat treatment and subsequently homogenized and pressed into pellets. The filters used in the coffee pot were analyzed as well. For micro-PIXE studies, coffee beans were cut in different parts for analysis. Samples of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans (grind) were analyzed by PIXE, while light elements like C, O and N were analyzed by RBS (Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry). The roasted coffee beans were analyzed by micro-PIXE to check the elemental distribution in the beans. The elements found in powder coffee were Mg, AI, Si, P, S, CI, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rb. Potassium is the element with higher concentration, while Ti and Zn are trace elements. AI, Si and Ti showed the same concentration for all brands. Potassium and chlorine have high solubility, and about 80% of their concentration is transferred from the powder to the beverage during the infusion. Mg, P, CI, K, Mn, Fe, Zn and Rb showed significant variation between ground coffee and roasted coffee beans. The elemental maps show that potassium and phosphorus are correlated, and iron appears in particular

  17. Farmers' experiences in the management of pests and diseases of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    Evaluation of farmers' experiences on pests and diseases is important for the development and introduction of management ... involved in on-farm testing and promotion of calliandra in ... bananas (Musa species), coffee (Coffea arabica L.) and.

  18. East African Journal of Sciences - Vol 9, No 2 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association of Arabica coffee quality attributes with selected soil chemical properties ... change resilient cultural practices on productivity of faba bean (Vicia faba l.) ... for enhanced livelihood and food security in Dilla District, Southern Ethiopia ...

  19. BAP, 2,4-D e ácido acetilsalicílico na indução e diferenciação de calos em anteras de Coffea arabica L BAP, 2,4-D and acetyl-salicylic acid on the callus induction and differentiation in Coffea arabica L. anthers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelaide Siqueira Silva

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available O melhoramento genético do cafeeiro por meio de métodos convencionais é um processo demorado para se obter uma nova cultivar. A redução desse tempo é possível através da produção de linhagens homozigóticas, oriundas de dihaplóides obtidas através da cultura de anteras. Objetivou-se aplicar a técnica da cultura de anteras em diferentes cvs. de Coffea arabica L. para induzir a formação de calos e regenerar plântulas di-haplóides, com uso de reguladores vegetais. Os experimentos foram conduzidos no laboratório de Biotecnologia Vegetal da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (UFU. Anteras das cultivares Mundo Novo LCP-379-19 e Catuaí Vermelho H2077-2-5-44 foram inoculadas em meio MS suplementado com 2,0 mg L-1 de 2,4-D e AAS, nas concentrações de 0; 8; 16; 32 e 64 mg L-1. Calos de 'Catuaí Vermelho 44' foram subcultivados em meio MS acrescido de diferentes concentrações de BAP (0; 2; 4 e 8 mg L-1 e 2,4-D (0; 1; 2 e 4 mg L-1. Tanto para as cvs. Mundo Novo quanto para Catuaí Vermelho 44 o aumento das concentrações de AAS diminuiu a formação de próembrióides nos calos e somente o 2,4-D foi capaz de promover a formação de calos friáveis, porém o equilíbrio da auxina e da citocinina utilizadas no trabalho, favoreceram a produção de calos friáveis.Coffee plant breeding through conventional methods demands a long time to obtain new cultivars. The reduction of this period is possible through the production of homozygous lines, from dihaploids obtained via anther culture. The aim of this study was to apply the anther culture technique on different C. arabica L. cultivars to induce calli formation and to regenerate dihaploid seedlings with the use of plant growth regulators. The experiments were accomplished in the Plant Biotechnology laboratory at Uberlândia Federal University (UFU. Anthers of the cultivars Mundo Novo LCP-379-19 and Catuaí Vermelho H2077-2-5-44 were inoculated on MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg L-1

  20. Effect on light intensity and mineral nutrition on carbohydrate and organic acid content in leaves of young coffee plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, G.; Vento, Kh.

    1975-01-01

    Young coffee plants (Coffea arabica, L., var. Caturra) were grown under different conditions of mineral nutrition (1/8 N-P-K, N-P-K, 3 N-P-K, N 1/2-P-K and N-2P-K) and illumination (directly in the sunlight or shaded) with the aim of studying the effect of light and mineral nutrition on carbohydrate and organic acid content of the leaves. For determining these compounds 14 CO 2 was used. Sugars were separated after the method of paper chromatography. The results obtained showed that the incorporation of 14 C in sugars and organic acids was more intensive in plants grown directly in the sunlight, while in starch 14 C was incorporated more intensively in the shaded plants. Carbohydrate content rose parallel to the increase of nitrogen in the nutrient solution. Changingthe rate of phosphorus from 1/2P to two doses exerted highest effect on 14 C incorporation in starch and in hemicellulose. (author)

  1. Detecção de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares em raízes de cafeeiro e de crotalária cultivada na entrelinha Detection of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in roots of coffee plants and crotalaria cultivated between rows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARNALDO COLOZZI FILHO

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a ocorrência de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs no solo rizosférico e nas raízes de cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L. e de Crotalaria breviflora DC., cultivada na entrelinha como adubo verde. Amostras de solo rizosférico e raízes foram coletadas em julho de 1997, em parte de um experimento de longa duração conduzido no campo pelo Instituto Agronômico do Paraná, no município de Mirasselva, PR. Determinou-se a diversidade de FMAs, por meio da identificação morfológica dos esporos, a freqüência de ocorrência de populações de FMAs por meio da contagem direta de esporos no solo, e a colonização radicular. Extraiu-se DNA de raízes de cafeeiro colonizadas e não-colonizadas e de esporos de Acaulospora longula e Scutellospora gilmorei, coletados na rizosfera, realizando-se a PCR ("Polimerase chain reaction" com primers ITS ("Internal transcribed spacer" e comparando os perfis de bandas obtidos. O cultivo de crotalária na entrelinha do cafeeiro aumentou a concentração de esporos de FMAs na rizosfera do cafeeiro. A crotalária e o cafeeiro estimularam populações diferentes de FMAs. O gênero Acaulospora predominou na rizosfera do cafeeiro, e Scutellospora e Gigaspora na rizosfera da crotalária. Usando técnicas moleculares, foi possível caracterizar FMAs na rizosfera e nas raízes colonizadas do cafeeiro. O fungo micorrízico Scutellospora gilmorei, de ocorrência comum em cafeeiro e crotalária, não foi encontrado colonizando as raízes do cafeeiro. O uso de técnicas moleculares pode auxiliar no estudo da dinâmica populacional de FMAs no campo.The sporulation and occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF was evaluated in the coffee trees (Coffea arabica L. and Crotalaria breviflora DC. rhizosphere and roots. C. breviflora was intercropped for green manure of the coffee plants. Samples of rhizosphere soil and roots were collected in July of 1997 in a long-time experiment localized at the Instituto Agron

  2. [Coffee in Cancer Chemoprevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirthová, J; Gál, B; Smilek, P; Urbánková, P

    Coffee consumption is associated with a reduced risk of several diseases including cancer. Its chemopreventive effect has been studied in vitro, in animal models, and more recently in humans. Several modes of action have been proposed, namely, inhibition of oxidative stress and damage, activation of metabolizing liver enzymes involved in carcinogen detoxification processes, and anti-inflammatory effects. The antioxidant activity of coffee relies partly on its chlorogenic acid content and is increased during the roasting process. Maximum antioxidant activity is observed for medium-roasted coffee. The roasting process leads to the formation of several components, e.g., melanoidins, which have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Coffee also contains two specific diterpenes, cafestol and kahweol, which have anticarcinogenic properties. Roasted coffee is a complex mixture of various chemicals. Previous studies have reported that the chemopreventive components present in coffee induce apoptosis, inhibit growth and metastasis of tumor cells, and elicit antiangiogenic effects. A meta-analysis of epidemiological studies showed that coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of developing various malignant tumors. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms and the experimental and epidemiological evidence supporting the chemopreventive effect of coffee.Key words: coffee - chemoprevention - antioxidative enzyme - detoxification enzyme - anti-inflammatory effect The authors declare they have no potential conflicts of interest concerning drugs, products, or services used in the study. The Editorial Board declares that the manuscript met the ICMJE recommendation for biomedical papers.Submitted: 11. 9. 2016Accepted: 24. 11. 2016.

  3. Do Coffee Farmers Benefit in Food Security from Participating in Coffee Cooperatives? Evidence from Southwest Ethiopia Coffee Cooperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumeta, Zekarias; D'Haese, Marijke

    2018-06-01

    Most coffee in Ethiopia is produced by smallholder farmers who face a daily struggle to get sufficient income but also to feed their families. At the same time, many smallholder coffee producers are members of cooperatives. Yet, literature has paid little attention to the effect of cooperatives on combating food insecurity among cash crop producers including coffee farmers. The objective of the study was to investigate how coffee cooperative membership may affect food security among coffee farm households in Southwest Ethiopia. The study used cross-sectional household data on income, expenditure on food, staple food production (maize and teff), and utilization of improved inputs (fertilizer and improved seed) collected from 256 randomly selected farm households (132 cooperative members and 124 nonmembers) and applied an inverse probability weighting (IPW) estimation to assess the impact of cooperative membership on food security. The result revealed that cooperative membership has a positive and significant effect on staple food production (maize and teff) and facilitated technological transformation via increased utilization of fertilizer and improved seeds. Nonetheless, the effect on food expenditure and income could not be confirmed. Findings suggest a trade-off between coffee marketing and input supply functions of the cooperatives, impairing their true food security impact from the pooled income and production effect.

  4. Identification Of Geographical Origin Of Coffee Before And After Roasting By Electronic Noses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sberveglieri, V.; Concina, I.; Falasconi, M.; Ongo, E.; Pulvirenti, A.; Fava, P.

    2011-09-01

    Geographical origin traceability of food is a relevant issue for both producers' business protection and customers' rights safeguard. Differentiation of coffees on the basis of geographical origin is still a challenging issue, though possible by means of chemical techniques [1]. Between the most widely consumed beverage, coffee is a valuable one, with an aroma constituted by hundreds of volatiles [2]. Since the final global volatile composition is also determined by the cultivation climatic conditions, Electronic Noses (ENs) could be interesting candidates for distinguishing the geographical provenience by exploiting differences in chemical volatile profile. The present investigation is directed toward the characterization of green and roasted coffees samples according to their geographical origin.

  5. Anatomical changes on coffee leaves infected by Pseudomonas syringae pv. garcae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Mateus Rivero Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAlthough poorly studied, the bacterial halo blight is an important disease in the major coffee-producing states of Brazil. External damage and anatomical changes on leaves were measured in seedlings of Coffea arabica cv. Mundo Novo, susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae pv. garcae, by using histological sections obtained at 10 and 20 days after inoculation (DAI. The changes on the epidermis were smaller than the lesions measured in the mesophyll, irrespective of the evaluated colonization period, showing that the internal damage caused by the bacterium represent twice the damage observed externally. From the inoculation site, lysis occurred on the epidermal cells and on the palisade and spongy parenchyma cells, with strong staining of their cellular contents, as well as abnormal intercellular spaces in the palisade parenchyma, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of mesophyll cells and partial destruction of chloroplasts. Additionally, this study revealed the presence of inclusion bodies in epidermal and mesophyll cells. Bacterial masses were found in the apoplast between and within mesophyll cells. Bacteria were also observed in the bundle sheath and vascular bundles and were more pronounced at 20 DAI, not only near the inoculation site but also in distant areas, suggesting displacement through the vascular system. These results can be useful to understand this plant-pathogen interaction.

  6. Caracterização microclimática em cultivo consorciado café/banana Microclimatic characterization in coffee and banana intercrop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. M. Pezzopane

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Medições de radiação solar global, velocidade do vento, temperatura e umidade relativa do ar, foram realizadas em cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L. cv. Icatu Vermelho IAC 4045, cultivados a pleno sol e consorciados com bananeira (MusaspAAB 'Prata Anã', em Mococa, SP (21º 28' S, 47º 01' W, altitude 665 m, entre outubro de 2001 e setembro de 2002. Os elementos foram monitorados em um ponto do cultivo a pleno sol e em dois pontos do cultivo consorciado, sendo um próximo à planta de banana e outro situado em uma condição central, entre as plantas de banana. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que o cultivo consorciado de café promoveu atenuação dos valores médios da radiação solar global, tendo sido mais evidente no ponto amostral situado próximo às bananeiras. Verificou-se, ainda, uma redução média de 48% na velocidade do vento no cultivo consorciado, influenciada pela época do ano, além do desbaste das bananeiras. Com relação à temperatura e umidade do ar, foram encontradas diferenças apenas na temperatura máxima no ponto central da parcela do cultivo consorciado que, por sua vez, apresentou médias superiores em relação ao cultivo a pleno sol no verão e outono e em relação ao ponto situado próximo às bananeiras na primavera, verão e outono; essas diferenças foram mais significativas em dias com condição ensolarada e de pouca ocorrência de vento.Microclimatic measurements (solar radiation, wind speed, air temperature and relative humidity were taken on a daily and hourly basis, from October, 2001 to September, 2002 in a coffee crop (Coffea arabica L. cv. Icatu Verrmelho IAC 4045, grown in two different conditions: shaded by banana (Musa sp AAB 'Prata Anã' and unshaded. The experiment was carried out at Mococa, São Paulo State, Brazil (21º 28' S, 47º 01' W, altitude 665 m. The microclimatic measurements were taken in one position of the unshaded coffee crop and in two different positions of the shaded coffee crop

  7. Composição química, produção e qualidade do café fertilizado com diferentes fontes e doses de nitrogênio Chemical composition, yield and quality of the fertilized coffee with different sources and doses of nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Ribeiro Malta

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Conduziu-se este experimento com a finalidade de se analisar o efeito da adubação nitrogenada sobre a produção e qualidade do café (Coffea arabica L. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, no esquema de parcelas subdivididas, utilizando-se seis fontes de nitrogênio (N: calcionamida, nitrato de potássio, nitrocálcio, sulfato de amônio, uréia e nitrato de amônio, nas parcelas, e quatro doses de N (0, 80, 160 e 320 kg ha-1 aplicadas nas subparcelas, com três blocos. Avaliaram-se a produção e as variáveis: atividade da polifenoloxidase, acidez titulável total, açúcares totais, compostos fenólicos totais, ácidos clorogênicos totais, cafeína e prova de xícara. Não houve resposta significativa de produção às fontes e doses de N. Observou-se redução na qualidade do café ao utilizar-se nitrocálcio e nitrato de amônio como fontes de N. Quanto às doses utilizadas, as fontes de N apresentaram efeitos diferenciados em relação à composição química e qualidade do café; entretanto, observou-se, pelas análises da atividade enzimática da polifenoloxidase, acidez titulável total, ácidos clorogênicos totais e compostos fenólicos totais, que doses mais elevadas de sulfato de amônio têm efeito negativo sobre a qualidade dos grãos.This experiment was conducted to analyze the effect of nitrogen fertilization on coffee yield and quality (Coffea arabica L. The experimental design was a randomized complete-block with the split-plot scheme, in which six sources of nitrogen (N were used: calcionamida, potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate, ammonium sulphate, urea and ammonium nitrate in the plots combined with four doses of N (0, 80, 160 and 320 kg ha-1 applied in the subplots, with three replications. Yield and qualitative variables such as polyphenoloxidase activity, total titrable acidity, total sugars, total phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acids, caffeine and sensorial analysis were evaluated. There was no

  8. Efeito da bebida de café descascado sobre a atividade antioxidante, os parâmetros hematológicos e bioquímicos em ratos Peeled coffee brew effect in the antioxidant activity hematological and biochemical parameters in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Maris da Silveira Duarte

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar o efeito da bebida filtrada, preparada com café-arábica descascado, sobre a peroxidação de lipídios, os parâmetros hematológicos e bioquímicos in vivo. Para isso foram utilizados ratos que ingeriram 280 mg/kg/dia da bebida de café por 7 dias (tratamento agudo e 30 dias (tratamento crônico. A fim de determinar se a bebida de café é capaz de reduzir o estresse oxidativo, foi analisada a peroxidação de lipídios isolados de cérebro de rato analisando-se as substâncias reativas do ácido tiobarbitúrico. A ingestão da bebida por 7 e 30 dias inibiu significativamente a peroxidação lipídica (p The aim of this study was to verify the effect of filtered coffee brew prepared with peeled Coffea arabica on the lipid peroxidation and on hematological and biochemical parameters in vivo. Rats were ingested 280 mg/kg/day of coffee brew for 7 days (acute treatment and 30 days (chronic treatment. In order to determine whether coffee can reduce the oxidative stress, the rats brain isolated lipid peroxidation was accessed evaluating the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARs.The ingestion of coffee brew for 7 and 30 days inhibited, significantly, the malondialdehyde concentration (p 0.05 between the percentage of peroxidation inhibition when the acute (48.6% and chronic (53.4% treatments were compared. The chronic ingestion of moderate doses of filtered coffee brew did not modify the plasma level of the hematological and biochemical parameters analyzed. The results indicate the beneficial health effect of moderated filtered coffee brew ingestion since it inhibited lipid peroxidation, but did not change the rats cholesterol and triacylglycerol plasma levels.

  9. Identification of biochemical features of defective Coffea arabica L. beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, María I; Vaughan, Michael J; Bonello, Pierluigi; McSpadden Gardener, Brian; Grotewold, Erich; Alonso, Ana P

    2017-05-01

    Coffee organoleptic properties are based in part on the quality and chemical composition of coffee beans. The presence of defective beans during processing and roasting contribute to off flavors and reduce overall cup quality. A multipronged approach was undertaken to identify specific biochemical markers for defective beans. To this end, beans were split into defective and non-defective fractions and biochemically profiled in both green and roasted states. A set of 17 compounds in green beans, including organic acids, amino acids and reducing sugars; and 35 compounds in roasted beans, dominated by volatile compounds, organic acids, sugars and sugar alcohols, were sufficient to separate the defective and non-defective fractions. Unsorted coffee was examined for the presence of the biochemical markers to test their utility in detecting defective beans. Although the green coffee marker compounds were found in all fractions, three of the roasted coffee marker compounds (1-methylpyrrole, 5-methyl- 2-furfurylfuran, and 2-methylfuran) were uniquely present in defective fractions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Application of gas chromatography/flame ionization detector-based metabolite fingerprinting for authentication of Asian palm civet coffee (Kopi Luwak).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumhawan, Udi; Putri, Sastia Prama; Yusianto; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2015-11-01

    Development of authenticity screening for Asian palm civet coffee, the world-renowned priciest coffee, was previously reported using metabolite profiling through gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). However, a major drawback of this approach is the high cost of the instrument and maintenance. Therefore, an alternative method is needed for quality and authenticity evaluation of civet coffee. A rapid, reliable and cost-effective analysis employing a universal detector, GC coupled with flame ionization detector (FID), and metabolite fingerprinting has been established for discrimination analysis of 37 commercial and non-commercial coffee beans extracts. gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) provided higher sensitivity over a similar range of detected compounds than GC/MS. In combination with multivariate analysis, GC/FID could successfully reproduce quality prediction from GC/MS for differentiation of commercial civet coffee, regular coffee and coffee blend with 50 wt % civet coffee content without prior metabolite details. Our study demonstrated that GC/FID-based metabolite fingerprinting can be effectively actualized as an alternative method for coffee authenticity screening in industries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Online monitoring of coffee roasting by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS): towards a real-time process control for a consistent roast profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Flurin; Gloess, Alexia N; Keller, Marco; Wetzel, Andreas; Schenker, Stefan; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2012-03-01

    A real-time automated process control tool for coffee roasting is presented to consistently and accurately achieve a targeted roast degree. It is based on the online monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the off-gas of a drum roaster by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry at a high time (1 Hz) and mass resolution (5,500 m/Δm at full width at half-maximum) and high sensitivity (better than parts per billion by volume). Forty-two roasting experiments were performed with the drum roaster being operated either on a low, medium or high hot-air inlet temperature (= energy input) and the coffee (Arabica from Antigua, Guatemala) being roasted to low, medium or dark roast degrees. A principal component analysis (PCA) discriminated, for each one of the three hot-air inlet temperatures, the roast degree with a resolution of better than ±1 Colorette. The 3D space of the three first principal components was defined based on 23 mass spectral profiles of VOCs and their roast degree at the end point of roasting. This provided a very detailed picture of the evolution of the roasting process and allowed establishment of a predictive model that projects the online-monitored VOC profile of the roaster off-gas in real time onto the PCA space defined by the calibration process and, ultimately, to control the coffee roasting process so as to achieve a target roast degree and a consistent roasting.

  12. Can good coffee prices increase smallholder revenue?

    OpenAIRE

    Pinard, Fabrice; Aithal, Anand

    2011-01-01

    The global coffee market is currently plagued by 2 paradoxes, a coffee boom in consuming countries, and a coffee crisis in producing countries (over supply of low quality coffee and shortage of high quality coffee) which is actually driving the coffee market (Daviron and Ponte, 2005). After the termination of the International Coffee Agreement between producing and consuming countries in 1989, the coffee market has been in a flux, with market forces and over supply bringing down the coffee pr...

  13. Compaction caused by mechanized operations in a Red- Yellow Latosol cultivated with coffee over time Compactação causada pelas operações mecanizadas em um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo cultivado com cafeeiros ao longo do tempo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cristina Caruana Martins

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The main source of soil structure degradation in coffee plantation is the machinery traffic because these operations may cause soil compaction affecting the crop development. This study aimed to generate the load-bearing capacity models for a Red-Yellow Latosol and to determine through the use of these models the soil susceptibility to compaction of the coffee plantation due to the implantation time and the compaction caused by the machinery traffic on the traffic lines located at the top and bottom of the ground. This study was carried out in the EPAMIG Experimental Farm, located at Três Pontas, MG, in coffee plantations (Coffee arabica L. with 2, 7, 18 and 33 years of establishment. To obtain the load-bearing capacity models, 12 undisturbed soil samples were randomly collected in the 0-3 cm and 15-18 cm layers in the position between the rows for each establishment time of the coffee plantation. It was also randomly collected 10 undisturbed soil samples for each establishment time of the coffee plantations along the tractor traffic lines located at the top and bottom of the ground. These undisturbed soil samples were used in the uniaxial compression tests. The use of the load-bearing capacity models allow to identify the soil susceptibility to compaction due to the implementation time of the coffee plantation and the compaction caused by the machinery traffic on the traffic lines located at the top and bottom of the ground. The percentage of compacted soil samples increases with the establishment time in the layer of 15-18 cm.A principal fonte de degradação da estrutura do solo na exploração cafeeira é o tráfego de máquinas, pois essas operações podem causar compactação do solo, afetando o desenvolvimento da cultura. Neste estudo, objetivou-se gerar os modelos de capacidade de suporte de carga para um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo e determinar por meio do uso desses modelos a suscetibilidade à compactação do solo, pelo tempo de

  14. Overview of the functional virulent genome of the coffee leaf rust pathogen Hemileia vastatrix with an emphasis on early stages of infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro eTalhinhas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hemileia vastatrix is the causal agent of coffee leaf rust, the most important disease of coffee (Coffea arabica. In this work, a 454-pyrosequencing transcriptome analysis of H. vastatrix germinating urediniospores (gU and appressoria (Ap was performed and compared to previously published in planta haustoria-rich (H data. A total of 9234 transcripts were identified and annotated. Ca. 50% of these transcripts showed no significant homology to international databases. Only 784 sequences were shared by the three conditions, and 75% were exclusive of either gU (2146, Ap (1479 or H (3270. Relative transcript abundance and RT-qPCR analyses for a selection of genes indicated a particularly active metabolism, translational activity and production of new structures in the appressoria and intense signalling, transport, secretory activity and cellular multiplication in the germinating urediniospores, suggesting the onset of a plant-fungus dialogue as early as at the germ tube stage. Gene expression related to the production of carbohydrate-active enzymes and accumulation of glycerol in germinating urediniospores and appressoria suggests that combined lytic and physical mechanisms are involved in appressoria-mediated penetration. Besides contributing to the characterisation of molecular processes leading to appressoria-mediated infection by rust fungi, these results point towards the identification of new H. vastatrix candidate virulence factors, with 516 genes predicted to encode secreted proteins.

  15. Towards a Balanced Sustainability Vision for the Coffee Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Samper

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As one of the world’s most traded agricultural commodities, coffee constitutes a significant part of the overall economy and a major source of foreign revenue for many developing countries. Coffee also touches a large portion of the world’s population in the South, where it is mainly produced, and in the North, where it is primarily consumed. As a product frequently purchased by a significant share of worldwide consumers on a daily basis in social occasions, the coffee industry has earned a high profile that also attracts the interest of non-governmental organizations, governments, multilateral organizations and development specialists and has been an early adopter of Voluntary Sustainability Standards (VSS. Responding to the trend of increased interest on sustainability, it is therefore not surprising that coffee continues to be at the forefront of sustainability initiatives that transcend into other agricultural industries. Based on literature and authors’ experiences, this article reflects on the VSS evolution and considers a sustainability model that specifically incorporates producers’ local realities and deals with the complex scenario of sustainability challenges in producing regions. Agreeing on a joint sustainability approach with farmers’ effective involvement is necessary so that the industry as a whole (up and downstream value chain actors can legitimately communicate its own sustainability priorities. This top-down/bottom-up approach could also lead to origin-based, actionable and focused sustainability key performance indicators, relevant for producers and consistent with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. The initiative also aims to provide a sustainability platform for single origin coffees and Geographical Indications (GIs in accordance with growers’ own realities and regions, providing the credibility that consumers now expect from sustainability initiatives, additional differentiation options for origin

  16. Coffee, hunger, and peptide YY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, James A; Geliebter, Allan

    2012-06-01

    There is evidence from several empirical studies suggesting that coffee may help people control body weight. Our objective was to assess the effects of caffeine, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee, both alone and in combination with 75 g of glucose, on perceived hunger and satiety and related peptides. We conducted a placebo-controlled single-blinded randomized 4-way crossover trial. Eleven healthy male volunteers (mean age, 23.5 ± 5.7 years; mean BMI, 23.6 ± 4.2 kg/m(2)) ingested 1 of 3 test beverages (caffeine in water, caffeinated coffee, or decaffeinated coffee) or placebo (water), and 60 minutes later they ingested the glucose. Eight times during each laboratory visit, hunger and satiety were assessed by visual analog scales, and blood samples were drawn to measure 3 endogenous peptides associated with hunger and satiety: ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and leptin. Compared to placebo, decaffeinated coffee yielded significantly lower hunger during the whole 180-minute study period and higher plasma PYY for the first 90 minutes (p hunger or PYY. Caffeinated coffee showed a pattern between that of decaffeinated coffee and caffeine in water. These findings suggest that one or more noncaffeine ingredients in coffee may have the potential to decrease body weight. Glucose ingestion did not change the effects of the beverages. Our randomized human trial showed that decaffeinated coffee can acutely decrease hunger and increase the satiety hormone PYY.

  17. Efficiency and response of conilon coffee clones to phosphorus fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Deleon Martins

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on nutritional efficiency of phosphorus in conilon coffee plants are important tools to unravel the high limitation that natural low levels of this nutrient in soil impose to these species cultivars. Therefore, this study aimed at evaluating the nutritional efficiency and the response to phosphorus of conilon coffee clones. Plants were managed during 150 days in pots containing 10 dm³ of soil, in greenhouse. A factorial scheme 13 x 2 was used, with three replications, being the factors: 13 clones constituting the clonal cultivar "Vitória Incaper 8142" and two levels of phosphate fertilization (0% and 150% of the P2O5 usualy recommended, in a completely randomized design (CRD. The results indicate a differentiated response of dry matter production and of phosphorus content on each level of phosphate fertilization for the conilon coffee clones and that CV-04, CV-05 and CV-08 clones are nutritionally efficient and responsive to the phosphate fertilization.

  18. Prenatal exposure to cigarettes, alcohol, and coffee and the risk for febrile seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, M; Wisborg, K; Henriksen, TB

    2005-01-01

    of extensive brain growth and differentiation in this period. We evaluated the association between prenatal exposure to cigarettes, alcohol, and coffee and the risk for febrile seizures in 2 population-based birth cohorts. METHODS: The Aarhus Birth Cohort consisted of 25,196 children of mothers who were...... Birth Cohort, but the corresponding association was weak in the Aalborg-Odense cohort. We found no association between maternal alcohol and coffee consumption and the risk for febrile seizures. The results were similar for simple and complex febrile seizures. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that prenatal...... exposure to low to moderate levels of alcohol and coffee has no impact on the risk for febrile seizures, whereas a modest smoking effect cannot be ruled out....

  19. Yield performance and leaf nutrient levels of coffee cultivars under different plant densities Produtividade e níveis foliares de nutrientes em cultivares de café sob diferentes populações de plantas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edison Martins Paulo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Coffee (Coffea Arabica L. plantations using adapted cultivars to regional environmental conditions with optimal plant population density and adequate nutrition are expected to show high yield responses. The triennial production and leaf macronutrient concentrations of four coffee cultivars were studied under different plant population densities. Catuaí Amarelo (IAC 47, Obatã (IAC 1669-20, Acaiá (IAC 474-19 and Icatu Amarelo (IAC 2944 were planted in densities of 2,500; 5,000; 7,519; and 10,000 plants ha-1 with one plant per hole and two plants per hole in the 2,500 plant ha-1. Plants were homogeneously fertilized without liming. As the population density increased the triennial coffee productivity increased, the yield per plant decreased, and leaf concentrations of phosphorus (P, potassium (K and sulfur (S increased. Coffee plants under dense systems presented equal or higher leaf macronutrient concentrations compared to the plants under conventional population. Taller cultivars presented the highest nutrient concentration values, and Obatã, a dwarf cultivar, the lowest values. Higher coffee yields and lower leaf P, Ca and S concentrations were observed in plots with one plant compared to the plots with two plants. In general, the coffee cultivars had leaf N and S concentrations above the reference limits reported in the literature, but leaf concentrations of other macronutrients were within adequate ranges.Cultivares de cafeeiro (Coffea Arabica L. adaptadas às regiões de cultivo, com população de plantas otimizada e adequado estado nutricional são premissas para a obtenção de produções elevadas de café. Estudou-se a produção trienal de café e o teor foliar de macronutrientes de cultivares de cafeeiro em função das densidades de plantio. Foram utilizados os cultivares Catuaí Amarelo (IAC 47, Obatã (IAC 1669-20, Acaiá (IAC 474-19 e Icatu Amarelo (IAC 2944 nas populações de 2.500 plantas ha-1 com duas plantas por cova; e, 5

  20. Efficiency and response of conilon coffee genotypes to nitrogen supply

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to differentiate genotypes with higher efficiency and responsiveness to nitrogen supply, to understand how the nitrogen supply can impact the dry matter allocation and the accumulation of this nutrient in the different plant compartments of genotypes of conilon coffee, cultivated under ...

  1. Color stability of restorative materials in response to Arabic coffee, Turkish coffee and Nescafe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samadani, Khalid H

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of Arabic coffee, Turkish coffee and Nescafe on the color stability of four different composite resins after a period of aging time 1, 7 and 30 days. Twenty specimens from each type of tested composite resin material were prepared. Five specimens from each tested material (Z350 XT, Artist, GC and Z250) was evaluated after storage in Arabic coffee, Turkish coffee, Nescafe and distil water (control) at 37°C in a dark container for 1, 7 and 30 days. Color measurement was done using colorimeter based on the CIE L* a* b* color scale. Color differences ΔE*ab, Δb* and Δa* among specimens immersed in distil water and staining coffee beverages were evaluated overtime. Mean values were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Tukey test with p Nescafe except Δa*. The highest total color difference ΔE*ab after 30 days was in group A Arabic coffee (ΔE > 1.5 perceivable) and not perceivable in group B Turkish coffee and group C Nescafe. For Δb* all materials discolored toward yellowness after 30 days except Arabic coffee group which shifted from yellowness toward blueness (Δb*> 1.5 perceivable). The effect of staining beverages on the resin composite materials increases with time of aging toward yellowness and not perceivable in all groups except with Arabic coffee which had highest effect after 30 days and the discoloration shifted from yellowness to blueness perceivable.

  2. Coffee and liver health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisco, Filomena; Lembo, Vincenzo; Mazzone, Giovanna; Camera, Silvia; Caporaso, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely used beverages in the world. It includes a wide array of components that can have potential implications for health. Several epidemiological studies associate coffee consumption with a reduced incidence of various chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. Over the past 20 years, an increasing number of epidemiological and experimental studies have demonstrated the positive effects of coffee on chronic liver diseases. Coffee consumption has been inversely associated with the activity of liver enzymes in subjects at risk, including heavy drinkers. Coffee favours an improvement in hepatic steatosis and fibrosis, and a reduction in cirrhosis and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanisms of action through which it exerts its beneficial effects are not fully understood. Experimental studies show that coffee consumption reduces fat accumulation and collagen deposition in the liver and promotes antioxidant capacity through an increase in glutathione as well as modulation of the gene and protein expression of several inflammatory mediators. Animal and in vitro studies indicate that cafestol and kahweol, 2 diterpens, can operate by modulating multiple enzymes involved in the detoxification process of carcinogens causing hepatocellular carcinoma. It is unclear whether the benefits are significant enough to "treat" patients with chronic liver disease. While we await clarification, moderate daily unsweetened coffee use is a reasonable adjuvant to therapy for these patients.

  3. Melhoramento do cafeeiro: XIX - Pesquisas sôbre o café semperflorens Coffee breeding: XIX - Researches on the semperflorens coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célio S. Novaes Antunes

    1960-01-01

    -se, também, a tendência de crescimento dos valores da peneira média, a partir de janeiro, cujo máximo ocorreu em junho, declinando até dezembro. Tem-se que tal variabilidade mensal está ligada a épocas diferentes de desenvolvimento dos frutos. O pêso médio de 100 sementes não se mostrou muito variável, é da ordem de 10,52 gramas, exceto em 1941, em que se revelou menor e correspondeu à menor produção anual e aos valores mais reduzidos de peneira méida. Nos meses, os maiores valores se verificaram a partir de abri], com máximo em julho. Não se mostraram correlacionados os dados médios mensais do pêso de sementes e as produções médias mensais; obteve-se, entretanto, correlação positiva entre o pêso de sementes e os valores mensais de peneira média. As quantidades de sementes do tipo moca revelaram-se bem variáveis. Assinalaram-se, em seis anos de determinações, limites extremos de 3,5% e 23,0%. Nos meses, as porcentagens mais elevadas desse tipo de semente ocorreram em junho e julho, quando a produção é reduzida; os valores mínimos se situaram no período de outubro a dezembro. Dada a produtividade não elevada do café semperflorens, o cultivo em larga escala dêsae cafeeiro deixou de apresentar interesse econômico. Contudo, êsse mutante, pelo contínuo florescimento que exibe, poderá desempenhar um valor todo especial para as análises genéticas do café e, também, para as pesquisas fisiológicas.The main feature of the semperflorens mutant of Coffea arabica is its ability to produce flowers during the whole year, whereas other commercial types of the same species have a definitive flowering period. In the S. Paulo plateau this occurs only at the beginning of the rainy season, August-October. The yield of several progenies of the semperflorens coffee, the period of fruit development, and the size and types of seeds produced were recorded for a few years in plantings made in three localities of the state of S. Paulo: Campinas (1940

  4. Resistência parcial à necrose dos frutos em genótipos de café arábica Partial resistance to fruit necrosis in arabic coffee genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Hiroshi Sera

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, objetivou-se identificar em genótipos de café arábica (Coffea arabica L. fontes de resistência à necrose de frutos em condições de campo. As variáveis resistência à necrose de frutos ("NF", quantidade média de frutos por nó produtivo ("FN" e índice de luminosidade dentro da copa da planta ("LUM" foram avaliadas em ensaio de campo no IAPAR (Londrina, em dezembro de 2004, em cafeeiros com três anos de idade. Foi avaliada a variável "NF", atribuindo notas de 1 a 5 sendo 1 para plantas com 0 % a 5 % de frutos necrosados. "FN" foi avaliada seguindo uma escala de notas de 1 a 5, onde 1 representa plantas com 0 a 3 frutos/ nó e nota 5 com mais do que 15 frutos/ nó. A avaliação da variável "LUM" foi visual e seguiu as notas de 1 a 5, onde 1 representa plantas com pouca luminosidade dentro da copa da planta. Dos 19 genótipos avaliados, 2 apresentaram moderada resistência, 7 moderada suscetibilidade, 5 suscetíveis e 5 altamente suscetíveis. As cultivares Obatã IAC 1669-20 e Catucaí Vermelho 4-79 apresentaram o melhor nível de resistência parcial de campo, ou seja, com moderada resistência à necrose de frutos associada ao Colletotrichum spp.The aim of this research was to identify in Coffea arabica L. coffee genotypes resistance sources to fruit necrosis in field conditions. The variables fruit necrosis ("NF", fruits per productive nodes average ("FN" and luminosity index inside of the plant canopy ("LUM" were evaluated in field assay at IAPAR (Londrina, in December 2004 on three years old coffee trees. The "NF" variable were evaluated attributing scores from 1 to 5, where score 1 represented plants with 0 to 5 % of necrosed fruits. "FN" were evaluated following a score scale from 1 to 5, where score 1 represented plants with 0 to 3 fruits/ node and score 5 with more than 15 fruits/ node. The evaluation of the variable "LUM" was visual and followed the scores from 1 to 5, where score 1 represented plants with

  5. Water and coffee: a systems approach to improving coffee harvesting work in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Barbara A; Bao, Stephen S; Russell, Steven; Stewart, Kate

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to reduce the physical load on coffee-harvesting workers while maintaining productivity. Coffee is second to oil in commodity trading. Water is becoming scarce worldwide. The global virtual water footprint for one cup of coffee is 140 liters. Shade-grown coffee is one approach to reducing the water footprint. A participatory ergonomics approach was used during two Nicaraguan shade-grown coffee harvesting seasons to reduce the physical load on harvesters with the use of a newly designed bag instead of a basket strapped around the waist. Productivity in the mountainous, shade-grown coffee farms was maintained while physical load on the worker was improved somewhat.Among basket users, 84.2% reported pain in at least one body area compared with 78.9% of bag users (ns). Nonetheless, 74% of participants liked the bag "much better" than the basket. Workers identified ways the bag could be improved further with the use of local materials.These suggestions included (a) reducing the horizontal distance of the bag to reduce reach and (b) having waterproof material on the bag between the worker and the bag to reduce moisture and damage to the berries.There was no difference in productivity between using the bag and using the small basket. Workers are extending this participatory approach to how to get the harvested coffee cherries down the mountain other than carrying 40-kg bags on their backs. The ultimate goal is to make the coffee-harvesting bag design available to harvesters around the world.

  6. Coffee and Tea Consumption Are Inversely Associated with Mortality in a Multiethnic Urban Population123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardener, Hannah; Rundek, Tatjana; Wright, Clinton B.; Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Sacco, Ralph L.

    2013-01-01

    Coffee and tea are commonly consumed beverages. Inverse associations with mortality have been suggested for coffee and tea, but the relationships with cause-specific mortality are not well understood. We examined regular and decaffeinated coffee and tea in relation to mortality due to all causes, vascular, nonvascular, and cancer in the multi-ethnic, prospective, population-based Northern Manhattan Study. The study population included 2461 participants with diet data who were free of stroke, myocardial infarction, and cancer at baseline (mean age 68.30 ± 10.23 y, 36% men, 19% white, 23% black, 56% Hispanic). During a mean follow-up of 11 y, we examined the associations between coffee and tea consumption, assessed by food frequency questionnaire, and 863 deaths (342 vascular related and 444 nonvascular including 160 cancer deaths) using multivariable-adjusted Cox models. Coffee consumption was inversely associated with all-cause mortality [for each additional cup/d, HR = 0.93 (95% CI: 0.88, 0.99); P = 0.02]. Caffeinated coffee was inversely associated with all-cause mortality, driven by a strong protection among those who drank ≥4 cups/d. An inverse dose-response relationship between tea and all-cause mortality was suggested [for each additional cup/d, HR = 0.91 (95% CI: 0.84, 0.99); P = 0.01]. Coffee consumption ≥4/d was protective against nonvascular death [vs. coffee and vascular-related mortality among Hispanics only. Further study is needed, including investigation into the mechanisms and compounds in coffee and tea responsible for the inverse associations with mortality. The differential relationship between coffee and vascular death across race/ethnicity underscores the need for research in similar multi-ethnic cohorts including Hispanics. PMID:23784068

  7. Sensitivity to coffee and subjective health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J.; Koppes, L.L.J.; Twisk, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The question was whether health complaints are associated with coffee consumption and self reported sensitivity to coffee. Participants were 89 men and 107 women, all coffee drinkers. Questionnaires were used at 2 points of time with an interval of 3.7 years. The correlations among coffee

  8. Toward systems epidemiology of coffee and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Marilyn C

    2015-02-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has been associated with many health conditions. This review examines the limitations of the classic epidemiological approach to studies of coffee and health, and describes the progress in systems epidemiology of coffee and its correlated constituent, caffeine. Implications and applications of this growing body of knowledge are also discussed. Population-based metabolomic studies of coffee replicate coffee-metabolite correlations observed in clinical settings but have also identified novel metabolites of coffee response, such as specific sphingomyelin derivatives and acylcarnitines. Genome-wide analyses of self-reported coffee and caffeine intake and serum levels of caffeine support an overwhelming role for caffeine in modulating the coffee consumption behavior. Interindividual variation in the physiological exposure or response to any of the many chemicals present in coffee may alter the persistence and magnitude of their effects. It is thus imperative that future studies of coffee and health account for this variation. Systems epidemiological approaches promise to inform causality, parse the constituents of coffee responsible for health effects, and identify the subgroups most likely to benefit from increasing or decreasing coffee consumption.

  9. Mainstreaming sustainable coffee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.

    2013-01-01

    This overview article examines the various dimensions of sustainable coffee as well as the actors involved and their perceptions of how to advance the market from niche to mainstream. The issues at hand are very complex, with different types of coffee producers, manufacturing/roasting companies and

  10. Determination of trace elements in coffee beans and instant coffee of various origins by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, J.H.; Fatima, I.; Arif, M.; Qureshi, I.H.

    2006-01-01

    Extensive use of coffee, by one-third of world's population, entails the evaluation of trace element contents in it. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was successfully employed to determine the concentration of 20 trace elements (essential, toxic and nonessential) in four samples of coffee beans of various origins and two instant coffee brands most commonly consumed in Pakistan. Base-line values of certain toxic and essential elements in coffee are provided. The daily intake of essential and toxic elements through coffee was estimated and compared with the recommended values. The cumulative intake of Mn is four times higher than the recommended value and that of toxic elements is well below the tolerance limits. (author)

  11. Thrips (Thysanoptera) of coffee flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A survey of thrips (Thysanoptera) associated with coffee flowers was conducted in coffee plantations in Chiapas, Mexico. The main objectives were to identify them and to determine whether they were carrying coffee pollen grains. A total of 40 thrips species in 22 genera were identified. The most com...

  12. Growing Coffee in the Shade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thapa, Sushil; Lantinga, Egbert A.

    2017-01-01

    Coffee white stem borer, Xylotrechus quadripes Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is a major coffee pest in parts of Asia and Africa. In recent years, the pest has also been found in American countries. This study in Gulmi District, Nepal, aimed to determine the infestation by coffee white stem

  13. Caffeine content of decaffeinated coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Rachel R; Fuehrlein, Brian; Goldberger, Bruce A; Gold, Mark S; Cone, Edward J

    2006-10-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed drug in the world with coffee representing a major source of intake. Despite widespread availability, various medical conditions necessitate caffeine-restricted diets. Patients on certain prescription medications are advised to discontinue caffeine intake. Such admonition has implications for certain psychiatric patients because of pharmacokinetic interactions between caffeine and certain anti-anxiety drugs. In an effort to abstain from caffeine, patients may substitute decaffeinated for caffeinated coffee. However, decaffeinated beverages are known to contain caffeine in varying amounts. The present study determined the caffeine content in a variety of decaffeinated coffee drinks. In phase 1 of the study, 10 decaffeinated samples were collected from different coffee establishments. In phase 2 of the study, Starbucks espresso decaffeinated (N=6) and Starbucks brewed decaffeinated coffee (N=6) samples were collected from the same outlet to evaluate variability of caffeine content of the same drink. The 10 decaffeinated coffee samples from different outlets contained caffeine in the range of 0-13.9 mg/16-oz serving. The caffeine content for the Starbucks espresso and the Starbucks brewed samples collected from the same outlet were 3.0-15.8 mg/shot and 12.0-13.4 mg/16-oz serving, respectively. Patients vulnerable to caffeine effects should be advised that caffeine may be present in coffees purported to be decaffeinated. Further research is warranted on the potential deleterious effects of consumption of "decaffeinated" coffee that contains caffeine on caffeine-restricted patients. Additionally, further exploration is merited for the possible physical dependence potential of low doses of caffeine such as those concentrations found in decaffeinated coffee.

  14. Process technology of luwak coffee through bioreactor utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadipernata, M.; Nugraha, S.

    2018-01-01

    Indonesia has an advantage in producing exotic coffee that is Luwak coffee. Luwak coffee is produced from the fermentation process in digestion of civet. Luwak coffee production is still limited due to the difficulty level in the use of civet animals as the only medium of Luwak coffee making. The research was conducted by developing technology of luwak coffee production through bioreactor utilization and addition the bacteria isolate from gastric of civet. The process conditions in the bioreactor which include temperature, pH, and bacteria isolate of civet are adjusted to the process that occurs in civet digestion, including peristaltic movement on the stomach and small intestine of the civet will be replaced by the use of propellers that rotate on the bioreactor. The result of research showed that proximat analysis data of artificial/bioreactor luwak coffee did not significant different with original luwak coffee. However, the original luwak coffee has higher content of caffeine compared to bioreactor luwak coffee. Based on the cuping test the bioreactor luwak coffee has a value of 84.375, while the original luwak coffee is 84.875. As the result, bioreactor luwak coffee has excellent taste that similiar with original luwak coffee taste.

  15. The Impact of Coffee on Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieber, Karen

    2017-11-01

    Coffee is one of the most popular and widely consumed beverages worldwide due to its stimulating effects on the central nervous system as well as its taste and aroma. Coffee is a complex mixture of more than 800 volatile compounds whereas caffeine and chlorogenic acids are the most common compounds. During the last years, coffee has progressively moved to a less negative position on health due to its better-known pharmacology. Caffeine, e.g., in a cup of coffee, appears to exert most of its effects through an antagonism of the adenosine receptors. Novel approaches in epidemiological studies and experimental researches suggest that coffee consumption may help to prevent several chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and liver disease. Most prospective cohort studies have not found coffee consumption to be associated with a significantly increased cardiovascular disease risk. There is also evidence that decaffeinated coffee may, in some respect, have similar benefits as regular coffee, indicating that besides caffeine other components contribute to the health protecting effects. For adults consuming moderate amounts of coffee (3 - 4 cups/d providing 300 - 400 mg/d of caffeine), there is little evidence of health risks and some evidence of health benefits. This review provides up-to-date information about coffee on health. Topics addressed include the cardiovascular system, liver diseases, and diabetes as well as gastrointestinal disorders. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Tolerance of Coffea arabica L. seeds to sub zero temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Vilas Boas Coelho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Preservation of the quality of coffee seeds is hindered by their intermediate behavior in storage. However, long-term storage at sub zero temperatures may be achieved by adjusting the water content of the seeds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tolerance of coffee seeds to freezing, in relation to physiological and enzymatic modifications. Coffee seeds were dried in two manners, rapid and slow, to water contents of interest, 0.67, 0.43, 0.25, 0.18, 0.11, and 0.05 g H2O g-¹ dw (dry basis. After drying, the seeds were stored at a temperature of -20 ºC and of 86 ºC for 24 hours and for 12 months, and then compared to seeds in cold storage at 10 ºC. The seeds were evaluated through calculation of percentage of normal seedlings, percentage of seedlings with expanded cotyledonary leaves, dry matter of roots and of hypocotyls, and viability of embryos in the tetrazolium test. Expression of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase were evaluated by means of electrophoretic analysis. Only seeds dried more slowly to 0.18 g H2O g-1 dw present relative tolerance to storing at -20 °C for 12 months. Coffee seeds do not tolerate storage at a temperature of -86 ºC for 12 months. Water contents below 0.11g H2O g-¹ dw and above 0.43 g H2O g-¹ dw hurt the physiological quality of coffee seeds, regardless of the type of drying, temperature, and storage period. Coffee seed embryos are more tolerant to desiccation and to freezing compared to whole seeds, especially when the seeds are dried to 0.05 g H2O g-¹ dw. The catalase enzyme can be used as a biochemical marker to study tolerance to freezing in coffee seeds.

  17. Turkish cultural heritage: a cup of coffee

    OpenAIRE

    Birsen Yılmaz; Nilüfer Acar-Tek; Saniye Sözlü

    2017-01-01

    Setting out a fabulous journey from a tiny bean, coffee is the stimulant of the heart and mind and a mysterious plant that strengthens friendship and also takes your tiredness away during the day. Although information on how and where the coffee came from is not clear, Sheikh Şazeli is regarded as the “father” by coffee makers. The word coffee originates from “Kaffa”, a primary coffee production center in Abyssinia, Africa, which can be considered the homeland of coffee. According to this con...

  18. Markkinointiviestintäsuunnitelma : Classic Coffee Oy

    OpenAIRE

    Eerola, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön aiheena oli laatia markkinointiviestintäsuunnitelma kalenterivuodelle 2016 vuosikellon muodossa, toimintansa jo vakiinnuttaneelle Classic Coffee Oy:lle. Classic Coffee Oy on vuonna 2011 perustettu, Tampereella toimiva kahvila-alan yritys joka tarjoaa lounaskahvilatoiminnan lisäksi laadukkaita konditoria-palveluita, yritys- ja kokoustarjoiluja sekä tilavuokrausta. Classic Coffee Oy:llä on yksi kahvila, Classic Coffee Tampella. Kahvila sijaitsee Tampellassa, Tampereen keskustan vä...

  19. Social Capital And Economic Behavior Of Farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heliawaty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrac The purpose of this study to analyze the relationship between social capital affects economic behavior in producing coffee plants in improving coffee farmers income. This study was conducted in the district of Bantaeng South Sulawesi. Subdistrict Tampobulu selected purposively. The study lasted for four months of April to July 2014. The data used in this study consist of primary data and secondary data. It can be concluded that social capital is trust networking and institutions affect economic behavior namely the production of coffee plants. Trust improving technology adoption Robusta and Arabica coffee cuttings while distrust led to rampant theft of coffee is still green. Networking affect the price of coffee and institutions influence the behavior of farmers in obtaining venture capital through middlemen. It is expected that future studies should be focused on the factors that influence the innovative behavior in increasing the production of coffee plants.

  20. Complementary Coffee Cups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchoff, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    What may have been the birth of a new calculus problem took place when the author noticed that two coffee cups, one convex and one concave, fit nicely together, and he wondered which held more coffee. The fact that their volumes were about equal led to the topic of this article: complementary surfaces of revolution with equal volumes.

  1. Evaluation of physiological changes in coffee seedlings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field experiments were carried out at three locations with different vegetation in Nigeria between 1996 and 1998 to determine the physiological changes in coffee intercropped with maize, cassava and plantain. There were four intercropping treatments comprising coffee/maize, coffee/cassava, coffee/plantain and ...

  2. Biodiesel Production from Spent Coffee Grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinová, Lenka; Bartošová, Alica; Sirotiak, Maroš

    2017-06-01

    The residue after brewing the spent coffee grounds is an oil-containing waste material having a potential of being used as biodiesel feedstock. Biodiesel production from the waste coffee grounds oil involves collection and transportation of coffee residue, drying, oil extraction, and finally production of biodiesel. Different methods of oil extraction with organic solvents under different conditions show significant differences in the extraction yields. In the manufacturing of biodiesel from coffee oil, the level of reaction completion strongly depends on the quality of the feedstock oil. This paper presents an overview of oil extraction and a method of biodiesel production from spent coffee grounds.

  3. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for caffeine and theobromine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jin

    Full Text Available Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine and theobromine (3, 7-dimethylxanthine are the major purine alkaloids in plants, e.g., tea (Camellia sinensis and coffee (Coffea arabica. Caffeine is a major component of coffee and is used widely in food and beverage industries. Most of the enzymes involved in the caffeine biosynthetic pathway have been reported previously. Here, we demonstrated the biosynthesis of caffeine (0.38 mg/L by co-expression of Coffea arabica xanthosine methyltransferase (CaXMT and Camellia sinensis caffeine synthase (TCS in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, we endeavored to develop this production platform for making other purine-based alkaloids. To increase the catalytic activity of TCS in an effort to increase theobromine production, we identified four amino acid residues based on structural analyses of 3D-model of TCS. Two TCS1 mutants (Val317Met and Phe217Trp slightly increased in theobromine accumulation and simultaneously decreased in caffeine production. The application and further optimization of this biosynthetic platform are discussed.

  4. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for caffeine and theobromine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Bhuiya, Mohammad Wadud; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, XiangQi; Han, Jixiang; Deng, WeiWei; Wang, Min; Yu, Oliver; Zhang, Zhengzhu

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3, 7-dimethylxanthine) are the major purine alkaloids in plants, e.g., tea (Camellia sinensis) and coffee (Coffea arabica). Caffeine is a major component of coffee and is used widely in food and beverage industries. Most of the enzymes involved in the caffeine biosynthetic pathway have been reported previously. Here, we demonstrated the biosynthesis of caffeine (0.38 mg/L) by co-expression of Coffea arabica xanthosine methyltransferase (CaXMT) and Camellia sinensis caffeine synthase (TCS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, we endeavored to develop this production platform for making other purine-based alkaloids. To increase the catalytic activity of TCS in an effort to increase theobromine production, we identified four amino acid residues based on structural analyses of 3D-model of TCS. Two TCS1 mutants (Val317Met and Phe217Trp) slightly increased in theobromine accumulation and simultaneously decreased in caffeine production. The application and further optimization of this biosynthetic platform are discussed.

  5. Uso do teste Lercafé para a caracterização de danos em sementes de cafeeiro Characterization of injuries in coffee seeds through Lercafé test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista Zonta

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a utilização do teste Lercafé, para estimar a germinação e caracterizar diferentes tipos de danos em sementes de cafeeiro. Utilizaram-se sementes de cafeeiro arábica cultivar Catuaí IAC 44, submetidas aos seguintes tratamentos: sementes sem dano, sementes com dano por secagem a 40 e 60ºC, e sementes brocadas. As sementes foram avaliadas pelos testes de germinação e Lercafé. Em relação aos dois tipos de danos, os resultados de germinação, estimada pelo Lercafé, apresentaram alta correlação com os obtidos pelo teste de germinação. O dano por secagem à alta temperatura caracterizou-se pelo aparecimento de manchas esverdeadas espalhadas, que atingiram parcial ou totalmente o endosperma da semente. O dano por broca caracterizou-se por uma depressão circundada por um anel de coloração verde. O teste Lercafé é eficiente para estimar a germinação e caracterizar os danos por secagem à alta temperatura e os causados por broca, em sementes de cafeeiro.The objective of this work was to evaluate the use of the Lercafé test for estimating the germination and characterizing different types of injuries in coffee seeds. Seeds of arabica coffee cultivar Catuaí IAC 44 were submitted to the following treatments: nondamaged seeds, heat damage (at 40 and 60ºC, and bug damage. Seeds were assessed by the tests of germination and Lercafé. The germination results estimated by Lercafé test had high correlation with the results from the germination test for the two types of injuries. The heat damage, by drying seeds at high temperatures, was characterized by scattered green stains, partially or totally covering the seed endosperm. A sunken lesion surrounded by a green ring characterized the damage by coffee berry borer. Lercafé test is efficient to estimate the germination and to characterize the injuries by heat and coffee berry borer, in coffee seeds.

  6. Coffee consumption and risk of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Samuel O; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Diehl, Nancy D; Serie, Daniel J; Custer, Kaitlynn M; Arnold, Michelle L; Wu, Kevin J; Cheville, John C; Thiel, David D; Leibovich, Bradley C; Parker, Alexander S

    2017-08-01

    Studies have suggested an inverse association between coffee consumption and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC); however, data regarding decaffeinated coffee are limited. We conducted a case-control study of 669 incident RCC cases and 1,001 frequency-matched controls. Participants completed identical risk factor questionnaires that solicited information about usual coffee consumption habits. The study participants were categorized as non-coffee, caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee drinkers. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for multiple risk factors for RCC. Compared with no coffee consumption, we found an inverse association between caffeinated coffee consumption and RCC risk (OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.57-0.99), whereas we observed a trend toward increased risk of RCC for consumption of decaffeinated coffee (OR 1.47; 95% CI 0.98-2.19). Decaffeinated coffee consumption was associated also with increased risk of the clear cell RCC (ccRCC) subtype, particularly the aggressive form of ccRCC (OR 1.80; 95% CI 1.01-3.22). Consumption of caffeinated coffee is associated with reduced risk of RCC, while decaffeinated coffee consumption is associated with an increase in risk of aggressive ccRCC. Further inquiry is warranted in large prospective studies and should include assessment of dose-response associations.

  7. The Climate Change and Rwandan Coffee Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidele Hakorimana

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a detailed overview of the current situation of the coffee sector in the Rwandan economy and identifies the possible challenges that the sector is currently facing. The study has identified the economic and the livelihood indicators for farmers who are engaged in coffee production and also gives the Rwandan coffee sector’ situation and its position in the global coffee market. Also, the research has found out that in Rwanda, nearly 500,000 farmers produce coffee along with other crops, notably beans, savory banana and corn and found out that in 2012, coffee accounted for almost 30 percent of Rwanda’s total export revenue. On the other hand, the study revealed that the sector throughout all the coffee production process, has undergone different challenges especially climate change as it is reported by the Ministry of Agriculture and Animal resources. A low yield was reported in 2007 and climate variability was quoted among the causes. Insufficient rainfall in the last three months of 2006 (the period of coffee flowering proceeding the short dry season in the first two months of 2007 was recorded. The reduced rainfall was also poorly distributed across coffee growing regions in Rwanda. In addition, the research revealed that even though the area under coffee production is increasing, the coffee production is decreasing due to unexpected climate change and variability in current years and also the improper use of chemical fertilizers by coffee farmers is very critical. The study concluded that adding value to the coffee supply chain of Rwanda is adding direct economic benefits and important indirect social benefits to the lives of individuals and to the health of communities in Rwanda. Moreover, more effort should continue to raise the profile of the Rwandan coffee sector suggesting that proper use of chemical fertilizers, solid marketing channels and climate change adaptations measures would be the fair ways of making the

  8. Coffee Production in Kavre and Lalitpur Districts, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogendra Kumar Karki

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Coffee (Coffea spp is an important and emerging cash crop having potential to provide farmers employment and income generation opportunities. This crop is well adapted to the climatic conditions of mid-hills of Nepal. Thus, majority of the farmers are attracted towards cultivation of coffee because of demands in national and international market. Coffee is now becoming integral part of farming system in rural areas. However, information on performance of coffee and farmers response has not been well documented. Therefore, we undertook the present work to analyze demography, ethnicity, household occupation, literacy status, average land holding, coffee cultivation area, livelihood and sources of income of coffee growers, production and productivity, pricing, cropping pattern of the coffee and problesm faced by them in mid hill district of Kavrepalanchowk (hereafter ‘Kavre’ and Lalitpur Districts. All the samples were taken randomly and selected from coffee producing cooperative of Kavre and Lalitpur. Our analysis showed that the male farmer dominant over female on adopting coffee cultivation in both districts with higher value in Kavre. Brahmin and Chetri ethnic communities were in majority over others in adopting the coffee cultivation. Literate farmers were more dominant over illiterates on adopting the coffee cultivation, The mean land holding was less, ranging from 0.15 to 2.30 ha for coffee cultivation, the history of coffee cultivation in Kavre showed that highest number of farmers were engaged in coffee farming from last 16 years. The mean yield of fresh cherry was 1027.20 kg/ha in Kavre, while it was 1849.36 kg/ha in Lalitpur. The study revealed that majority of the coffee plantations were between 6-10 years old. The major problems facing by coffee farmers were diseases spread, lack of irrigation facility and drying of plants. Despite of that the coffee farming was one of the rapidly emerging occupations among the farmers in both

  9. Coffee harvest management by manipulation of coffee flowering with plant growth regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    The breaking of coffee flower bud dormancy is known to be associated with one or more significant rainfall events following an extended period of dryness. In Hawaii, lack of a distinct wet-dry season poses serious problems for coffee growers because flowering is spread over several months. Multiple...

  10. Buying cannabis in 'coffee shops'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monshouwer, Karin; Van Laar, Margriet; Vollebergh, Wilma A

    2011-03-01

    The key objective of Dutch cannabis policy is to prevent and limit the risks of cannabis consumption for users, their direct environment and society ('harm reduction'). This paper will focus on the tolerated sale of cannabis in 'coffee shops'. We give a brief overview of Dutch policy on coffee shops, its history and recent developments. Furthermore, we present epidemiological data that may be indicative of the effects of the coffee shop policy on cannabis and other drug use. Dutch coffee shop policy has become more restrictive in recent years and the number of coffee shops has decreased. Cannabis prevalence rates in the adult population are somewhat below the European average; the rate is relatively high among adolescents; and age of first use appears to be low. On a European level, the use of hard drugs in both the Dutch adult and adolescent population is average to low (except for ecstasy among adults). International comparisons do not suggest a strong, upward effect of the coffee shop system on levels of cannabis use, although prevalence rates among Dutch adolescents give rise to concern. Furthermore, the coffee shop system appears to be successful in separating the hard and soft drugs markets. Nevertheless, in recent years, issues concerning the involvement of organised crime and the public nuisance related to drug tourism have given rise to several restrictive measures on the local level and have sparked a political debate on the reform of Dutch drug policy. © 2011 Trimbos Institute.

  11. Variation in caffeine concentration in single coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Glen P; Wu, Alex; Yiran, Liang; Force, Lesleigh

    2013-11-13

    Twenty-eight coffee samples from around the world were tested for caffeine levels to develop near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) calibrations for whole and ground coffee. Twenty-five individual beans from five of those coffees were used to develop a NIRS calibration for caffeine concentration in single beans. An international standard high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to analyze for caffeine content. Coffee is a legal stimulant and possesses a number of heath properties. However, there is variation in the level of caffeine in brewed coffee and other caffeinated beverages. Being able to sort beans on the basis of caffeine concentration will improve quality control in the level of caffeine in those beverages. The range in caffeine concentration was from 0.01 mg/g (decaffeinated coffee) to 19.9 mg/g (Italian coffee). The majority of coffees were around 10.0-12.0 mg/g. The NIRS results showed r(2) values for bulk unground and ground coffees were >0.90 with standard errors coffee beans. One application of this calibration could be sorting beans on caffeine concentration to provide greater quality control for high-end markets. Furthermore, bean sorting may open new markets for novel coffee products.

  12. Use of colour parameters for roasted coffee assessment Utilização dos parâmetros de cor para avaliação do café torrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalina Cavaco Bicho

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fast and non-destructive indicators were evaluated as tools to measure the technological quality of Arabica and Robusta coffee. Accordingly, considering the roasting intensity in highly valuable commercial samples, volume, mass, apparent density, moisture, total ash, ash insoluble in hydrochloric acid, and ether extract were characterized. The chromatic parameters L*, C*, Hº were measured using illuminants D65 and C. It was found that in roasted coffee beans, the parameters L*, C*, Hº, and coordinate b* had an antagonist interaction due to an increase in the roasting intensity, whereas after milling, only L* and Hº decreased progressively. Considering that the parameters L* and Hº followed similar patterns using both illuminants, D65 and C, it can be concluded that they are appropriate to evaluate coffee colour changes during roasting, enabling a relationship with coffee quality.Avaliaram-se indicadores não destrutivos e de execução rápida, para aferir a qualidade tecnológica de cafés Arábica e Robusta. Neste contexto, considerando a intensidade da torra em amostras com elevado interesse comercial, caracterizaram-se o volume, massa, densidade aparente, umidade, cinzas totais e insolúveis em ácido clorídrico e do extrato etéreo. Foram então analisados os parâmetros cromáticos L*, C*, Hº utilizando os iluminantes D65 e C. Verificou-se que em grãos de café torrado os parâmetros L*, C*, Hº e a coordenada b* mostraram uma interação antagônica face ao acréscimo da intensidade da torra, enquanto, após a moagem, apenas o L* e o Hº decresceram progressivamente. Considerando que a coordenada L* não variou significativamente com a aplicação dos dois iluminantes, concluiu-se que este parâmetro é o mais adequado para estudar a evolução da cor durante a torra, permitindo ainda estabelecer uma correlação com a qualidade.

  13. Acute effects of decaffeinated coffee and the major coffee components chlorogenic acid and trigonelline on glucose tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, A.E.; Olthof, M.R.; Meeuse, J.C.; Seebus, E.; Heine, R.J.; van Dam, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Coffee consumption has been associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes. We evaluated the acute effects of decaffeinated coffee and the major coffee components chlorogenic acid and trigonelline on glucose tolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We conducted a randomized crossover

  14. Interações entre auxinas e ácido bórico, no enraizamento de estacas caulinares de Coffea arabica L. cv. Mundo Novo Interactions between auxins and boric acid in the rooting of stem cuttings Coffea arabica L. cv. "Mundo Novo"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.O. Ono

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como finalidade, estudar o efeito de auxinas e do boro no enraizamento de estacas caulinares de Coffea arabica L. cv. "Mundo Novo". As estacas foram retiradas de ramos ortotrópicos semi-lenhosos de cafeeiro, as quais foram tratadas durante 24 horas com soluções de IBA ou NAA e boro, e a mistura das três substâncias, resultando um total de 14 tratamentos. Para a avaliação do objetivo em questão, foram realizadas as seguintes observações, mediante coleta após 90 dias de plantio: número de estacas enraizadas e número de estacas com calos. Através dos resultados obtidos, pode-se concluir que, para obter um maior número de estacas enraizadas, é conveniente o tratamento com NAA à 100 ou 200 ppm mais boro.The present research had as purpose to study auxin and boron effects on rooting of Coffea arábica L. cv. "Mundo Novo" stem cuttings. The cuttings were taken from orthotropous semi-hardwood branches of coffee-tree, which were treated during 24 hours with IBA or NAA and boron solutions, and the mixture of the three substances, resulting a total of 14 treatments. The following observations were realized, taking the cuttings 90 days after planting: number of rooted cuttings and "callus" formation per cutting. It can be concluded that to obtain a higher number of rooted cuttings, the treatment with NAA at 100 or 200 ppm plus boron is the most suitable.

  15. Good news for coffee addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas H

    2009-06-01

    Whether it's a basic Mr. Coffee or a gadget that sports a snazzy device for grinding beans on demand, the office coffee machine offers a place for serendipitous encounters that can improve the social aspect of work and generate new ideas. What's more, a steaming cup of joe may be as good for your health as it is for the bottom line, says Lee, a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and the CEO of Partners Community HealthCare. Fears of coffee's carcinogenic effects now appear to be unfounded, and, in fact, the brew might even protect against some types of cancer. What's more, coffee may guard against Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia and somehow soften the blow of a heart attack. Of course, its role as a pick-me-up is well known. So there's no need to take your coffee with a dollop of guilt, especially if you ease up on the sugar, cream, double chocolate, and whipped-cream topping.

  16. HOW COFFEE COMPANIES CAN STAY COMPETITIVE

    OpenAIRE

    RALUCA DANIELA RIZEA; ROXANA SARBU; ELENA CONDREA

    2014-01-01

    The coffee shop industry in the U.S. includes 20,000 stores with combined annual revenue of about $11 billion. Major companies include Starbucks, Dunkin’ Donuts, Caribou, Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, and Diedrich (Gloria Jean’s). The industry is highly concentrated at the top and fragmented at the bottom: the top 50 companies have over 70 percent of industry sales. Coffee is one of the world’s largest commodities. The top green coffee producing countries are Brazil, Colombia, and Vietnam. Many...

  17. A proposal to correct external effects in the coffee market: a tax on regular coffee and tea to subsidise the fair trade coffee

    OpenAIRE

    Galarraga, Ibon; Markandya, Anil

    2006-01-01

    This paper justifies the need to introduce a tax on regular coffee drinkers in the UK to subsidise the fair trade/organic coffee production. This policy will allow to take full account of the negative external effect of regular coffee production while internalising the positive effect of fair trade initiatives. Designing such a policy is possible and the benefits of it can be calculated. This paper shows how. Propuesta para corregir las externalidades en el mercado de café: un impuesto sobre ...

  18. Bioprospecting endophytic bacteria for biological control of coffee leaf rust Bioprospecção de bactérias endofíticas como agentes de biocontrole da ferrugem do cafeeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Franco Shiomi

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of plant diseases due to the action of endophytic microorganisms has been demonstrated in several pathosystems. Experiments under controlled conditions involving endophytic bacteria isolated from leaves and branches of Coffea arabica L and Coffea robusta L were conducted with the objective of evaluating the inhibition of germination of Hemileia vastatrix Berk. & Br., race II, urediniospores and the control of coffee leaf rust development in tests with leaf discs, detached leaves, and on potted seedling of cv. Mundo Novo. The endophytic bacterial isolates tested proved to be effective in inhibiting urediniospore germination and/or rust development, with values above 50%, although the results obtained in urediniospore germination tests were inferior to the treatment with fungicide propiconazole. Endophytic isolates TG4-Ia, TF2-IIc, TF9-Ia, TG11-IIa, and TF7-IIa, demonstrated better coffee leaf rust control in leaf discs, detached leaves, and coffee plant tests. The endophytic isolates TG4-Ia and TF9-Ia were identified as Bacillus lentimorbus Dutky and Bacillus cereus Frank. & Frank., respectively. Some endophytic bacterial isolates were effective in controlling the coffee leaf rust, although some increased the severity of the disease. Even though a relatively small number of endophytic bacteria were tested, promising results were obtained regarding the efficiency of coffee leaf rust biocontrol. These selected agents appears to be an alternative for future replacement of chemical fungicide.Supressão de doenças de plantas por microrganismos endofíticos tem sido demonstrada em diversos patossistemas. Neste trabalho foram selecionados isolados de bactérias endofíticas de folhas e ramos de cafeeiro com potencial para o controle biológico da ferrugem do cafeeiro, pois é conhecido que esses microrganismos podem possuir essa característica. Bactérias endofíticas isoladas previamente de folhas e ramos de Coffea arabica L e Coffea

  19. Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interaction Analysis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work deals with modeling and examining the GxE interaction pattern of the multi-environment trials of 43 genotypes and eight environments from Southern Ethiopia coffee (Coffea Arabica L.) collections using a randomized complete block design (RCBD) with four replications. The work further attempts to predict yield ...

  20. Microclimatic characterization and productivity of coffee plants grown under shade of pigeon pea in Southern Brazil Caracterização microclimática e produtividade de cafeeiros sombreados com guandu no Sul do Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heverly Morais

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on coffee (Coffea arabica L. cultivation in agroforestry systems in Southern Brazil have shown the potential of partial shading to improve management of this crop. The objective of this work was to evaluate microclimatic conditions and their effects on coffee production of plants shaded with pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan in comparison to unshaded ones, from May 2001 to August 2002 in Londrina, State of Paraná, Brazil. The appraised microclimatic characteristics were: global radiation, photosynthetic and radiation balance; air, leaf and soil temperatures; and soil humidity. Shading caused significant reduction in incident global solar radiation, photosynthetically active radiation and net radiation, and attenuated maximum leaf, air and soil temperatures, during the day. Shade also reduced the rate of cooling of night air and leaf temperatures, especially during nights with radiative frost. Soil moisture at 0-10 cm depth was higher under shade. The shaded coffee plants produced larger cherries due to slower maturation, resulting in larger bean size. Nevertheless, plants under shade emitted less plagiotropic branches, with smaller number of nodes per branch, and fewer nodes with fruits, resulting in a large reduction in coffee production. These results show the need to find an optimal tree density and management that do not compromise coffee production and protect against extreme temperatures.Recentes estudos sobre cafeeiros (Coffea arabica L. cultivados em sistemas agroflorestais no Sul do Brasil têm mostrado o potencial do sombreamento parcial no manejo desta cultura. O objectivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as condições do microclima e seus efeitos na produção de café sombreado com guandu (Cajanus cajan, em comparação ao cultivado a pleno sol, no período de maio de 2001 a agosto de 2002 em Londrina, PR. As características microclimáticas avaliadas foram: radiação global, fotossintética e saldo de radiação; temperaturas

  1. Consumer Acceptance of a Polyphenolic Coffee Beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy; Kuchera, Meredith; Smoot, Katie; Diako, Charles; Vixie, Beata; Ross, Carolyn F

    2016-10-05

    The objective of this study was to determine if Chardonnay grape seed pomace (GSP), a waste stream of wine production, could be used as a functional ingredient in brewed coffee. Two consumer panels were conducted to assess the acceptance of coffee at coffee replacement (w/w) values of 0% (control), 6.25%, 12.50%, 18.75%, or 25% GSP. The 1st consumer panel (n = 80) assessed the coffee samples served "black." The 2nd panel (n = 67) assessed the coffee samples with adjustment (that is, sweeteners, milk, and cream) options available. Consumer sensory evaluation involved evaluating the 5 treatments individually for acceptance of appearance, aroma, taste/flavor, and overall acceptance using a 9-point hedonic scale. A check-all-that-apply questionnaire surveyed the sensory attributes describing aroma, appearance, and taste/flavor of the samples. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity was used to measure the effects of antioxidant levels in GSP coffee samples. Results showed that GSP could be added at 6.25% replacement without significantly affecting the overall consumer acceptance of coffee compared to the control (0% GSP). Above 6.25% GSP supplementation, the coffee beverage was described as more tan, milky, watery/dilute, and mild, and was generally less accepted by the consumers. GSP also increased the antioxidant capacity of the coffee compared to the control (0% GSP), with no significant differences among replacement values. Therefore, 6.25% GSP replacement is recommended for creating coffee beverages acceptable to consumers. Further in vivo investigation may substantiate the free-radical scavenging capacity of GSP coffee and its potential health benefits. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. USING HOT WIRE TECHNIQUE FOR MEASURING THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF INFUSIONS OF ORGANIC AND CONVENTIONAL COFFEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gordillo-Delgado

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The technique of hot wire, a versatile method of low cost and high accuracy for measuring the thermal conductivity of fluids through the increasing temperature of a wire that is immersed into the liquid and between its ends a potential difference is abruptly applied. Using well-known conductivity liquids: water, ethylene glycol and glycerine, the system was tested and calibrated. In this work, this procedure was used to measure the thermal conductivity of the infusion samples of organic and conventional coffee. The same roast degree of the beans was verified with a colorimeter and the preparation was made by pressing 22g of coffee powder in 110mL of water. The obtained data were subjected to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and this confirmed that the differences in the thermophysical parameter in the two samples are significant with a confidence level of 95\\%. On this way, it was proved that the thermal conductivity value of the coffee infusion allows differentiate between organic and conventional coffee.

  3. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for Kona coffee authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Jun, Soojin; Bittenbender, H C; Gautz, Loren; Li, Qing X

    2009-06-01

    Kona coffee, the variety of "Kona typica" grown in the north and south districts of Kona-Island, carries a unique stamp of the region of Big Island of Hawaii, U.S.A. The excellent quality of Kona coffee makes it among the best coffee products in the world. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy integrated with an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory and multivariate analysis was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of ground and brewed Kona coffee and blends made with Kona coffee. The calibration set of Kona coffee consisted of 10 different blends of Kona-grown original coffee mixture from 14 different farms in Hawaii and a non-Kona-grown original coffee mixture from 3 different sampling sites in Hawaii. Derivative transformations (1st and 2nd), mathematical enhancements such as mean centering and variance scaling, multivariate regressions by partial least square (PLS), and principal components regression (PCR) were implemented to develop and enhance the calibration model. The calibration model was successfully validated using 9 synthetic blend sets of 100% Kona coffee mixture and its adulterant, 100% non-Kona coffee mixture. There were distinct peak variations of ground and brewed coffee blends in the spectral "fingerprint" region between 800 and 1900 cm(-1). The PLS-2nd derivative calibration model based on brewed Kona coffee with mean centering data processing showed the highest degree of accuracy with the lowest standard error of calibration value of 0.81 and the highest R(2) value of 0.999. The model was further validated by quantitative analysis of commercial Kona coffee blends. Results demonstrate that FTIR can be a rapid alternative to authenticate Kona coffee, which only needs very quick and simple sample preparations.

  4. Occurrence of acrylamide carcinogen in Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea from Saudi Arabian market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Rizwan; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Naushad, Mu; Alomary, Ahmed Khodran; Alfadul, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alsohaimi, Ibrahim Hotan; Algamdi, Mohammad Saad

    2017-02-01

    The present work describes the outcomes of the assessment on acrylamide contents in a number of thermally treated foods (Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea) obtained from the Saudi Arabian markets. A total of 56 food samples of different brands and origin were studied, the amounts of acrylamide in Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea were obtained in the range of 10 to 682 μg kg-1. In comparison to coffee (152-682 μg kg-1), the Arabic coffee Qahwa (73-108 μg kg-1) and tea (10-97 μg kg-1) contain lower amounts of acrylamide. Among the analyzed samples, the green tea contained low amounts of acrylamide ranged from 10 to 18 μg kg-1, and thus the green tea could be considered as a healthier hot drink. A great variation of acrylamide formation has been observed in these food products. This divergence may be due to the initial concentration of amino acids especially asparagines and reducing sugars in food products, in addition to roasting temperature and time, pH and water activity. The obtained data can also be used in epidemiological investigation to estimate the acrylamide exposure from nutritional survey.

  5. Effect of 6-BA on nodal explant bud sproutings of Coffea arabica cv. Mundo Novo Efeito de 6-BA na brotação de gemas de explantes nodais de Coffea arabica cv. Mundo Novo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Carlos da Silva Ramos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffee plants can be micropropagated by nodal bud sprouting using the 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA hormone. However, literature reports the use of a wide range of 6-BA, from 0.5 to 88.8 µM L-1. So, this study was performed to narrow that range. Nodal explants of Coffea arabica cv Mundo Novo obtained from in vitro plantlets were inoculated on gelled-MS medium supplemented with different concentrations of 6-BA. Two assays were carried out: in the first one, 6-BA was used at concentrations of 0, 5, 25, 50, and 100 µM L-1, being evaluated at 43 and 123 days. In the second experiment, dosis of 10, 20 and 30 µM L-1, have evaluated at 65 and 100 days. Treatments with 6-BA induced multiple sprouting from the nodal explants, which were best characterized around 100 days after inoculation. The nodal explants grew taller and showed multiple shoots, whereas the effect of 6-BA at 5 to 25 µM L-1 was similar to that with higher concentrations (50 and 100 µM L-1. Nodal explants yielded from 2.9 to 6.0 buds per node, achieving height of 1.3 to 1.5 cm at 5 to 25 µM L-1 of 6-BA, whereas they yielded from 4.3 to 4.9 buds per node but the sprouting grew about 0.8 cm at 50 and 100 µM L-1 of 6-BA. This study indicated that multiple sprouting of lateral buds can be induced by lower concentrations of 6-BA, for example, from 10 to 30 µM L-1, diminishing possible risks of somaclonal variation due to high levels of hormone concentration.O cafeeiro pode ser micropropagado via brotação de gemas laterais, aplicando o regulador de crescimento 6-benzilaminopurina (6-BA. Entretanto, a literatura apresenta ampla variação da dose empregada, desde 0.5 a 88.8 µM L-1. Assim, este estudo visou otimizar doses para explantes nodais do cafeeiro C. arabica cv Mundo Novo. Explantes nodais, obtidos de plântulas cultivadas in vitro, foram inoculados em meio MS geleificado, com adição de diferentes concentrações de 6-BA. Foram feitos dois experimentos: no primeiro, 6-BA foi

  6. The Little Book on CoffeeScript

    CERN Document Server

    MacCaw, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This little book shows JavaScript developers how to build superb web applications with CoffeeScript, the remarkable little language that's gaining considerable interest. Through example code, this guide demonstrates how CoffeeScript abstracts JavaScript, providing syntactical sugar and preventing many common errors. You'll learn CoffeeScript's syntax and idioms step by step, from basic variables and functions to complex comprehensions and classes. Written by Alex MacCaw, author of JavaScript Web Applications (O'Reilly), with contributions from CoffeeScript creator Jeremy Ashkenas, this book

  7. Can Elevated Air [CO2] Conditions Mitigate the Predicted Warming Impact on the Quality of Coffee Bean?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. Ramalho

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate changes, mostly related to high temperature, are predicted to have major negative impacts on coffee crop yield and bean quality. Recent studies revealed that elevated air [CO2] mitigates the impact of heat on leaf physiology. However, the extent of the interaction between elevated air [CO2] and heat on coffee bean quality was never addressed. In this study, the single and combined impacts of enhanced [CO2] and temperature in beans of Coffea arabica cv. Icatu were evaluated. Plants were grown at 380 or 700 μL CO2 L-1 air, and then submitted to a gradual temperature rise from 25°C up to 40°C during ca. 4 months. Fruits were harvested at 25°C, and in the ranges of 30–35 or 36–40°C, and bean physical and chemical attributes with potential implications on quality were then examined. These included: color, phenolic content, soluble solids, chlorogenic, caffeic and p-coumaric acids, caffeine, trigonelline, lipids, and minerals. Most of these parameters were mainly affected by temperature (although without a strong negative impact on bean quality, and only marginally, if at all, by elevated [CO2]. However, the [CO2] vs. temperature interaction strongly attenuated some of the negative impacts promoted by heat (e.g., total chlorogenic acids, thus maintaining the bean characteristics closer to those obtained under adequate temperature conditions (e.g., soluble solids, caffeic and p-coumaric acids, trigonelline, chroma, Hue angle, and color index, and increasing desirable features (acidity. Fatty acid and mineral pools remained quite stable, with only few modifications due to elevated air [CO2] (e.g., phosphorous and/or heat. In conclusion, exposure to high temperature in the last stages of fruit maturation did not strongly depreciate bean quality, under the conditions of unrestricted water supply and moderate irradiance. Furthermore, the superimposition of elevated air [CO2] contributed to preserve bean quality by modifying and mitigating

  8. Can Elevated Air [CO2] Conditions Mitigate the Predicted Warming Impact on the Quality of Coffee Bean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, José C.; Pais, Isabel P.; Leitão, António E.; Guerra, Mauro; Reboredo, Fernando H.; Máguas, Cristina M.; Carvalho, Maria L.; Scotti-Campos, Paula; Ribeiro-Barros, Ana I.; Lidon, Fernando J. C.; DaMatta, Fábio M.

    2018-01-01

    Climate changes, mostly related to high temperature, are predicted to have major negative impacts on coffee crop yield and bean quality. Recent studies revealed that elevated air [CO2] mitigates the impact of heat on leaf physiology. However, the extent of the interaction between elevated air [CO2] and heat on coffee bean quality was never addressed. In this study, the single and combined impacts of enhanced [CO2] and temperature in beans of Coffea arabica cv. Icatu were evaluated. Plants were grown at 380 or 700 μL CO2 L-1 air, and then submitted to a gradual temperature rise from 25°C up to 40°C during ca. 4 months. Fruits were harvested at 25°C, and in the ranges of 30–35 or 36–40°C, and bean physical and chemical attributes with potential implications on quality were then examined. These included: color, phenolic content, soluble solids, chlorogenic, caffeic and p-coumaric acids, caffeine, trigonelline, lipids, and minerals. Most of these parameters were mainly affected by temperature (although without a strong negative impact on bean quality), and only marginally, if at all, by elevated [CO2]. However, the [CO2] vs. temperature interaction strongly attenuated some of the negative impacts promoted by heat (e.g., total chlorogenic acids), thus maintaining the bean characteristics closer to those obtained under adequate temperature conditions (e.g., soluble solids, caffeic and p-coumaric acids, trigonelline, chroma, Hue angle, and color index), and increasing desirable features (acidity). Fatty acid and mineral pools remained quite stable, with only few modifications due to elevated air [CO2] (e.g., phosphorous) and/or heat. In conclusion, exposure to high temperature in the last stages of fruit maturation did not strongly depreciate bean quality, under the conditions of unrestricted water supply and moderate irradiance. Furthermore, the superimposition of elevated air [CO2] contributed to preserve bean quality by modifying and mitigating the heat impact

  9. Can Elevated Air [CO2] Conditions Mitigate the Predicted Warming Impact on the Quality of Coffee Bean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, José C; Pais, Isabel P; Leitão, António E; Guerra, Mauro; Reboredo, Fernando H; Máguas, Cristina M; Carvalho, Maria L; Scotti-Campos, Paula; Ribeiro-Barros, Ana I; Lidon, Fernando J C; DaMatta, Fábio M

    2018-01-01

    Climate changes, mostly related to high temperature, are predicted to have major negative impacts on coffee crop yield and bean quality. Recent studies revealed that elevated air [CO 2 ] mitigates the impact of heat on leaf physiology. However, the extent of the interaction between elevated air [CO 2 ] and heat on coffee bean quality was never addressed. In this study, the single and combined impacts of enhanced [CO 2 ] and temperature in beans of Coffea arabica cv. Icatu were evaluated. Plants were grown at 380 or 700 μL CO 2 L -1 air, and then submitted to a gradual temperature rise from 25°C up to 40°C during ca. 4 months. Fruits were harvested at 25°C, and in the ranges of 30-35 or 36-40°C, and bean physical and chemical attributes with potential implications on quality were then examined. These included: color, phenolic content, soluble solids, chlorogenic, caffeic and p -coumaric acids, caffeine, trigonelline, lipids, and minerals. Most of these parameters were mainly affected by temperature (although without a strong negative impact on bean quality), and only marginally, if at all, by elevated [CO 2 ]. However, the [CO 2 ] vs. temperature interaction strongly attenuated some of the negative impacts promoted by heat (e.g., total chlorogenic acids), thus maintaining the bean characteristics closer to those obtained under adequate temperature conditions (e.g., soluble solids, caffeic and p -coumaric acids, trigonelline, chroma, Hue angle, and color index), and increasing desirable features (acidity). Fatty acid and mineral pools remained quite stable, with only few modifications due to elevated air [CO 2 ] (e.g., phosphorous) and/or heat. In conclusion, exposure to high temperature in the last stages of fruit maturation did not strongly depreciate bean quality, under the conditions of unrestricted water supply and moderate irradiance. Furthermore, the superimposition of elevated air [CO 2 ] contributed to preserve bean quality by modifying and mitigating

  10. Frações oxidáveis do carbono orgânico de latossolo cultivado com cafeeiro em diferentes espaçamentos de plantio Oxidizible organic carbon fractions in a latosol cultivated with coffee at different planting spacings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otacílio José Passos Rangel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este estudo avaliar a suscetibilidade à oxidação pelo permanganato de potássio do carbono presente em Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico típico, cultivado com cafeeiro (Coffea arabica L., em diferentes espaçamentos de plantio, em experimento localizado na Fazenda Experimental da EPAMIG, em Machado (MG. Os tratamentos avaliados, instalados a campo em 1992, consistiram na combinação de quatro espaçamentos entre linhas (2,0, 2,5, 3,0 e 3,5 m, com três espaçamentos entre plantas (0,5, 0,75 e 1,0 m. Uma área de mata próxima ao experimento foi amostrada e usada como referência. Para a avaliação do grau de oxidação do carbono orgânico (CO, as amostras de solo foram coletadas na entrelinha (EL e na projeção da copa (PC do cafeeiro, nas camadas de solo de 0-0,05 e 0-0,1 m. Na camada superficial do solo (0-0,05 m, os teores de C lábil na entrelinha são, em geral, maiores do que os observados nas amostras coletadas na projeção da copa do cafeeiro. A amplitude de variação dos teores de C nas frações orgânicas obedece à seguinte ordem decrescente: C lábil> C não lábil > C orgânico, o que indica o maior potencial do C lábil em avaliar o impacto de diferentes sistemas de adensamento e manejo do cafeeiro, sobre os compartimentos de matéria orgânica. Os teores de C lábil e C não lábil não são influenciados pelo número de plantas por área, mas são dependentes da largura de rua do cafeeiro, da profundidade e do local de coleta das amostras de solo.The present work was carried out to evaluate soil carbon susceptibility to oxidation by potassium permanganate in adystroferric Red Latosol (Oxisol cultivated with coffee (Coffea arabica L. at different planting spacings. The experiment was installed in 1992 at the Experimental Farm of EPAMIG, in Machado (Minas Gerais State-Brazil. Treatments consisted of a combination of four row spacings (2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 m with three spacings within the row (0.5, 0

  11. African Journal of Biotechnology - Vol 7, No 18 (2008)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AFLP analysis among Ethiopian arabica coffee genotypes · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for resistance to gray leaf spot and common rust diseases ... Response of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars to foliar and soil ... Effect of ultraviolet B irradiation on accumulation of catechins in tea ...

  12. Evaluation of the International coffee market conditions

    OpenAIRE

    FISAKOVA O.S.

    2014-01-01

    This article includes analysis of coffee market and its conditions for coffee companies. Also, coffee export amounts and prices are compared and analyzed. Statistics were collected over few last years to present accurate research

  13. How coffee affects metabolic syndrome and its components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baspinar, B; Eskici, G; Ozcelik, A O

    2017-06-21

    Metabolic syndrome, with its increasing prevalence, is becoming a major public health problem throughout the world. Many risk factors including nutrition play a role in the emergence of metabolic syndrome. Of the most-consumed beverages in the world, coffee contains more than 1000 components such as caffeine, chlorogenic acid, diterpenes and trigonelline. It has been proven in many studies that coffee consumption has a positive effect on chronic diseases. In this review, starting from the beneficial effects of coffee on health, the relationship between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome and its components has been investigated. There are few studies investigating the relationship between coffee and metabolic syndrome, and the existing ones put forward different findings. The factors leading to the differences are thought to stem from coffee variety, the physiological effects of coffee elements, and the nutritional ingredients (such as milk and sugar) added to coffee. It is reported that consumption of coffee in adults up to three cups a day reduces the risk of Type-2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  14. Roasted and Ground Coffee: A Study of Extenders, Substitutes and Alternative Coffee Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    other large food service organizations. The policy of adjusting the amount of R&G coffee used in brewing recipes according to consumer preferences , as...health, such as in the reduction of caffeine levels, as well as’ general consumer preferences for hot beverages with lower levels of coffee- like

  15. Efeito da Xylella fastidiosa em cafeeiros em diferentes regiões edafoclimáticas Effect of Xylella fastidiosa in coffee plants at different edaphoclimatic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Benetti Queiroz-Voltan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A bactéria Xylella fastidiosa vem causando problemas para a cafeicultura, uma vez que sua presença, associada a diversos fatores de estresse, provoca um decréscimo na produção devido à diminuição no número e tamanho dos frutos e à morte de alguns ramos. Este trabalho objetiva avaliar o efeito da X. fastidiosa sobre cultivares de Coffea arabica (enxertados ou não através da quantificação da proporção de vasos do xilema obstruídos pela bactéria, nas diferentes partes da planta e entre ramos com e sem sintoma da doença, em experimentos desenvolvidos em diferentes regiões edafoclimáticas. Avaliou-se também a distribuição das classes de infecção nas diferentes partes da planta nos materiais genéticos estudados. Os experimentos foram instalados em 1986 em Mococa e Garça (SP e as amostras para o estudo anatômico, retiradas em abril de 1998 e 2000 (período de estresse hídrico, respectivamente, das plantas de cafeeiros dessas áreas. Na região de Mococa, observou-se que a nervura principal e o pecíolo foram os tecidos com proporção maior de vasos do xilema obstruídos pela X. fastidiosa; na região de Garça, foram o pecíolo e o caule. Não houve diferenças significativas na obstrução de elementos de vaso do xilema do cafeeiro ocasionado pela bactéria entre as duas regiões estudadas. Não houve tolerância à bactéria nos materiais genéticos, havendo no entanto variação dentro de cada um deles. Na região de Garça, nas plantas de café, observou-se alta proporção de vasos obstruídos nas raízes (3%, entretanto, não houve dano maior na parte aérea.The Xylella fastidiosa bacterium causes problems to coffee cultivation because of a relationship with various stress factors, leading to reduction on coffee production by decreasing fruit number and size, as well as senescence of branches. This research aimed to evaluate the effect of Xylella fastidiosa to Coffea arabica cultivars (grafted or not through the

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of a solar coffee maker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosa-Montemayor, F.; Jaramillo, O.A.; Rio, J.A. del

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel solar concentrating application, a coffee brewing system using a satellite TV mini-Dish concentrator coupled to a stovetop espresso coffee maker. We present a theoretical model for the thermal behavior of the water in the lower chamber of the coffee maker. We validate the model obtaining good agreement with the experimental results. Our findings indicate that the coffee brewing system works, it takes 30-50 min to complete its task. The model and our practical experience encourage us to improve the concentration device in order to obtain a useful solar coffee maker, using the theoretical model as a safe guide to achieve this.

  17. Thermodynamic analysis of a solar coffee maker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa-Montemayor, F.; Jaramillo, O.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Privada Xochicalco S/N, Temixco, Morelos CP 62580 (Mexico); del Rio, J.A. [Centro Morelense de Innovacion y Tranferencia Tecnologica, CCyTEM, Camino Temixco a Emiliano Zapata, Km 0.3, Colonia Emiliano Zapata, Morelos CP 62760 (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we present a novel solar concentrating application, a coffee brewing system using a satellite TV mini-Dish concentrator coupled to a stovetop espresso coffee maker. We present a theoretical model for the thermal behavior of the water in the lower chamber of the coffee maker. We validate the model obtaining good agreement with the experimental results. Our findings indicate that the coffee brewing system works, it takes 30-50 min to complete its task. The model and our practical experience encourage us to improve the concentration device in order to obtain a useful solar coffee maker, using the theoretical model as a safe guide to achieve this. (author)

  18. Insight into the time-resolved extraction of aroma compounds during espresso coffee preparation: online monitoring by PTR-ToF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-López, José A; Zimmermann, Ralf; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2014-12-02

    Using proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS), we investigated the extraction dynamic of 95 ion traces in real time (time resolution = 1 s) during espresso coffee preparation. Fifty-two of these ions were tentatively identified. This was achieved by online sampling of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in close vicinity to the coffee flow, at the exit of the extraction hose of the espresso machine (single serve capsules). Ten replicates of six different single serve coffee types were extracted to a final weight between 20-120 g, according to the recommended cup size of the respective coffee capsule (Ristretto, Espresso, and Lungo), and analyzed. The results revealed considerable differences in the extraction kinetics between compounds, which led to a fast evolution of the volatile profiles in the extract flow and consequently to an evolution of the final aroma balance in the cup. Besides exploring the time-resolved extraction dynamics of VOCs, the dynamic data also allowed the coffees types (capsules) to be distinguished from one another. Both hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) showed full separation between the coffees types. The methodology developed provides a fast and simple means of studying the extraction dynamics of VOCs and differentiating between different coffee types.

  19. [Coffee can protect against disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, Kjeld; Krogholm, Kirstine Suszkiewicz; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Hyldstrup, Lars; Jørgensen, Kasper; Larsen, Mogens Lytken; Tjønneland, Anne Marie

    2012-09-24

    A moderate daily intake of 3-4 cups of coffee has convincing protective effects against development of type 2 diabetes and Parkinson's disease. The literature also indicates that moderate coffee intake reduces the risk of stroke, the overall risk of cancer, Alzheimer's disease, suicide and depression. However, pregnant women, people suffering from anxiety disorder and persons with a low calcium intake should restrain from moderate or high intake of coffee due to uncertainty regarding potential negative effects on pregnancy, anxiety and risk of osteoporosis, respectively.

  20. Relationship between aluminum stress and caffeine biosynthesis in suspension cells of Coffea arabica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech-Kú, Roberto; Muñoz-Sánchez, J Armando; Monforte-González, Miriam; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe; Rodas-Junco, Beatriz A; González-Mendoza, Víctor M; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M Teresa

    2018-04-01

    Toxicity by aluminum is a growth-limiting factor in plants cultivated in acidic soils. This metal also promotes signal transduction pathways leading to the biosynthesis of defense compounds, including secondary metabolites. In this study, we observed that Coffea arabica L. cells that were kept in the dark did not produce detectable levels of caffeine. However, irradiation with light and supplementation of the culture medium with theobromine were the best conditions for cell maintenance to investigate the role of aluminum in caffeine biosynthesis. The addition of theobromine to the cells did not cause any changes to cell growth and was useful for the bioconversion of theobromine to caffeine. During a short-term AlCl 3 -treatment (500μM) of C. arabica cells kept under light irradiation, increases in the caffeine levels in samples that were recovered from both the cells and culture media were evident. This augmentation coincided with increases in the enzyme activity of caffeine synthase (CS) and the transcript level of the gene encoding this enzyme (CS). Together, these results suggest that actions by Al and theobromine on the same pathway lead to the induction of caffeine biosynthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of the energy efficiency of coffee drying with different revolving combinations time; Estudo da eficiencia energetica de secagem de cafe com diferentes combinacoes de tempo de revolvimento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greco, Marcelo; Campos, Alessandro Torres [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Marechal Candido Rondon, PR (Brazil). Grupo de Pesquisas em Ambiencia do Oeste do Parana (GPEA)], e-mail: greco.b@bol.com.br; Molin, Roberto Natal dal; Oliveira, Marcos C. Oliveira; Camara, Roberto J; Klein, Jeferson [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Marechal Candido Rondon, PR (Brazil); Siqueira Filho, Roberto [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana (UNIOESTE), Marechal Candido Rondon, PR (Brazil); Ministerio da Agricultura, Pecuaria e Abastecimento (MAPA), Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This work objected to evaluate the energy efficiency in the coffee (Coffea arabica L.) drying with different combinations of revolving time in a fixed bed dryer. The experiment was developed the months of June and July of 2003, in a farm located in the municipal district of Jesuitas-Parana State, Brazil. The product quality evaluations were accomplished in the Consolata Agricultural Cooperative Ltda. (COPACOL). The grains parameters were evaluated at the Seeds Technology Laboratory, at the UNIOESTE Campus Marechal Candido Rondon. A fixed bed model dryer was used, with a metallic drying chamber, of cylindrical format, with an adapted grain revolving system, keeping the air temperature at 75 deg C. It was observed that the energy consumed for burning the fuel (wood) overcame the electric energy consumed by the motors. The air relative humidity and temperature exercised influence in the drying time. The combination that provided larger energy efficiency was the continuous ventilation drying, with revolving times of 40 minutes each 2 hours. (author)

  2. 'Sensory analysis of specialty coffee from different environmental conditions in the region of Matas de Minas, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice de Souza Silveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Specialty coffees can be differentiated in various ways, including the environmental conditions in which they are produced and the sensory composition of the drink. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of altitude, slope exposure and fruit color on the sensory attributes of cafes of the region of Matas de Minas. Sampling points were georeferenced in four altitude ranges (< 700 m; 700 ≤ x ≤ 825 m, 825 < x < 950 m and ≥ 950 m of the coffee crop; two fruit colors of var. Catuaí (yellow and red; and two slope exposures (North-facing and South-facing. Coffee fruit at the cherry stage were processed and submitted to sensory analysis. The sensory attributes evaluated were overall perception, clean cup, balance, aftertaste, sweetness, acidity, body and flavor, which made up the final score. The scores were examined by ANOVA and means were compared by the Tukey test (p ≤ 0.05. From the sensory standpoint, coffee fruits of both colors are similar, as well as the coffees from both slope exposures when these factors were analyzed separately. However, at higher altitudes, Yellow Catuaí produces coffees with better sensory quality. Similarly, coffees from North-facing slopes, at higher altitudes produce better quality cup. The altitude is the main factor that interferes with coffee quality in the area. All factors together contribute to the final quality of the beverage produced in the region of Matas de Minas.

  3. O dimorfismo dos ramos em Coffea arabica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carvalho

    1950-06-01

    branches was found to be permanent and irreversible. The same irreversible condition was observed to be true of rooted stem cuttings of plagiotropic branches. A special study was made of Coffea arabica var. erecta, a dominant mutant, which has upright growing lateral branches. Experiments revealed that even in this coffee genotype dimorphism exists, as grafts obtained from lateral branches only formed low shrubs, in spite of the fact their branches grew upright. Even with this specific genotype it was found necessary to use the tips of orthotropic branches in order to obtain normal plant development. Several hypothesis are presented which might explain this phenomenon. Attention is called to the fact that the buds which exist close together in the leaf axils of the main stem have already differentiated into either the orthotropic or plagiotropic form and that their subsequent growth will be governed by this prior differentation.

  4. Tea, coffee and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andy H; Fraser, Michelle L; Binns, Colin W

    2009-02-01

    Worldwide, prostate cancer has the second highest incidence of all cancers in males with incidence and mortality being much higher in affluent developed countries. Risk and progression of the disease may be linked to both genetic and environmental factors, especially dietary factors. Tea and coffee are two of the most popular beverages in the world and have been investigated for possible effects on health outcomes, including cancer. However, very little dietary advice for their consumption exists. The evidence for a relationship between coffee or tea consumption and prostate cancer is reviewed in this paper. While current evidence indicates that coffee is a safe beverage, its consumption probably has no relationship with prostate cancer. Tea, especially green tea, has shown some potential in the prevention of prostate cancer. While evidence from epidemiologic studies is currently inconclusive, strong evidence has emerged from animal and in vitro studies. We also consider what level of evidence is required to make recommendations for preventive measures to the public. Although evidence on the relationship between coffee, tea and prostate cancer is not complete, we consider it strong enough to recommend tea as a healthier alternative to coffee.

  5. How Competitive is the Dutch Coffee market?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.H. Bettendorf (Leon); F. Verboven

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWorld coffee bean prices have shown large fluctuations during the past years. Consumer prices for roasted coffee, in contrast, have varied considerably less. This article investigates whether the weak relationship between coffee bean and consumer prices can be explained by a lack of

  6. Seletividade e controle de plantas daninhas com oxyfluorfen e sulfentrazone na implantação de lavoura de café Weed selectivity and control with oxyfluorfen and sulfentrazone in young arabica coffee plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.E.O. Magalhães

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar a seletividade do oxyfluorfen e do sulfentrazone e o controle de plantas daninhas em diferentes épocas após o transplantio das mudas de café no campo. Foram realizados três ensaios no delineamento experimental de blocos casualizados com dez tratamentos e quatro repetições. No ensaio 1, aos 30 dias após o transplantio (DAT e, no ensaio 2, aos 90 DAT, testaram-se duas doses de oxyfluorfen (0,36 e 0,72 kg i.a. ha-1 e de sulfentrazone (0,4 e 0,6 kg i.a. ha-1, em jato dirigido ao solo (com proteção das mudas e em área total. No ensaio 3, os mesmos herbicidas e doses foram aplicados, porém aos 300 DAT e apenas em aplicação dirigida, testando-se duas pontas de pulverização de diferentes potenciais de deriva. Em todos os ensaios, acrescentaram-se as testemunhas capinada e sem capina. A entrelinha foi manejada com roçada. Foram identificadas as espécies de plantas daninhas e suas densidades. A eficácia dos herbicidas e suas seletividades também foram avaliadas. A principal planta daninha que ocorreu na área experimental foi Brachiaria decumbens. Sintomas visuais de toxicidade foram observados apenas quando os herbicidas foram aplicados em área total (ensaios 1 e 2, independentemente da dose e época de aplicação. No ensaio 3, independentemente do herbicida, da dose e da ponta utilizada, não houve sintomas visuais de toxicidade, nem redução no crescimento das plantas, em função da aplicação dirigida. Em todas as épocas o controle de plantas daninhas foi eficiente, porém a seletividade só foi alcançada na aplicação dirigida, para ambos os herbicidas.This study aimed to evaluate oxyfluorfen and sulfentrazone selectivity and weed control in young coffee plantations (Coffea arabica cv. Red Catuaí. Three trials were conducted in a randomized complete block design, with 10 treatments and four replicates. In the first and second trials, at 30 and 90 days after transplanting (DAT

  7. Coffee Bean Grade Determination Based on Image Parameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ferdiansjah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Quality standard for coffee as an agriculture commodity in Indonesia uses defect system which is regulated in Standar Nasional Indonesia (SNI for coffee bean, No: 01-2907-1999. In the Defect System standard, coffee bean is classified into six grades, from grade I to grade VI depending on the number of defect found in the coffee bean. Accuracy of this method heavily depends on the experience and the expertise of the human operators. The objective of the research is to develop a system to determine the coffee bean grading based on SNI No: 01-2907-1999. A visual sensor, a webcam connected to a computer, was used for image acquisition of coffee bean image samples, which were placed under uniform illumination of 414.5+2.9 lux. The computer performs feature extraction from parameters of coffee bean image samples in the term of texture (energy, entropy, contrast, homogeneity and color (R mean, G mean, and B mean and determines the grade of coffee bean based on the image parameters by implementing neural network algorithm. The accuracy of system testing for the coffee beans of grade I, II, III, IVA, IVB, V, and VI have the value of 100, 80, 60, 40, 100, 40, and 100%, respectively.

  8. How Can High-Biodiversity Coffee Make It to the Mainstream Market? The Performativity of Voluntary Sustainability Standards and Outcomes for Coffee Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solér, Cecilia; Sandström, Cecilia; Skoog, Hanna

    2017-02-01

    This article investigates the outcomes of mainstream coffee voluntary sustainability standards for high-biodiversity coffee diversification. By viewing voluntary sustainability standards certifications as performative marketing tools, we address the question of how such certification schemes affect coffee value creation based on unique biodiversity conservation properties in coffee farming. To date, the voluntary sustainability standards literature has primarily approached biodiversity conservation in coffee farming in the context of financial remuneration to coffee farmers. The performative analysis of voluntary sustainability standards certification undertaken in this paper, in which such certifications are analyzed in terms of their effect on mutually reinforcing representational, normalizing and exchange practices, provides an understanding of coffee diversification potential as dependent on standard criteria and voluntary sustainability standards certification as branding tools. We draw on a case of high-biodiversity, shade-grown coffee-farming practice in Kodagu, South-West India, which represents one of the world's biodiversity "hotspots".

  9. How Can High-Biodiversity Coffee Make It to the Mainstream Market? The Performativity of Voluntary Sustainability Standards and Outcomes for Coffee Diversification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solér, Cecilia; Sandström, Cecilia; Skoog, Hanna

    2017-02-01

    This article investigates the outcomes of mainstream coffee voluntary sustainability standards for high-biodiversity coffee diversification. By viewing voluntary sustainability standards certifications as performative marketing tools, we address the question of how such certification schemes affect coffee value creation based on unique biodiversity conservation properties in coffee farming. To date, the voluntary sustainability standards literature has primarily approached biodiversity conservation in coffee farming in the context of financial remuneration to coffee farmers. The performative analysis of voluntary sustainability standards certification undertaken in this paper, in which such certifications are analyzed in terms of their effect on mutually reinforcing representational, normalizing and exchange practices, provides an understanding of coffee diversification potential as dependent on standard criteria and voluntary sustainability standards certification as branding tools. We draw on a case of high-biodiversity, shade-grown coffee-farming practice in Kodagu, South-West India, which represents one of the world's biodiversity "hotspots".

  10. ASSESSMENT OF METALS IN ROASTED INDIGENOUS COFFEE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Department of Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box. 1176, Addis .... cultivation region of Ethiopian coffee by elemental analysis. ... health regulatory limits of the metals in coffee to provide guideline information on the .... Procedures tested for digestion of roasted coffee samples. No.

  11. Coffee Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Stephanie L; Rennert, Hedy S; Rennert, Gad; Gruber, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Coffee contains several bioactive compounds relevant to colon physiology. Although coffee intake is a proposed protective factor for colorectal cancer, current evidence remains inconclusive. We investigated the association between coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer in 5,145 cases and 4,097 controls from the Molecular Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (MECC) study, a population-based case-control study in northern Israel. We also examined this association by type of coffee, by cancer site (colon and rectum), and by ethnic subgroup (Ashkenazi Jews, Sephardi Jews, and Arabs). Coffee data were collected by interview using a validated, semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Coffee consumption was associated with 26% lower odds of developing colorectal cancer [OR (drinkers vs. non-drinkers), 0.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.64-0.86; P consumption alone (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68-0.99; P = 0.04) and for boiled coffee (OR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.71-0.94; P = 0.004). Increasing consumption of coffee was associated with lower odds of developing colorectal cancer. Compared with 2.5 servings/day (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.39-0.54; P colorectal cancer (Ptrend cancers. Coffee consumption may be inversely associated with risk of colorectal cancer in a dose-response manner. Global coffee consumption patterns suggest potential health benefits of the beverage for reducing the risk of colorectal cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(4); 634-9. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Micro-CT unveils the secret life of the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei; Coleoptera, Curculionidae: Scolytinae) inside coffee berries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari); Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) is the most important insect pest of coffee worldwide, and due to the cryptic life habit of the insect inside coffee berries, effective pest management strategies have been difficult to develop. In this pap...

  13. Impact of caffeine and coffee on our health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira; Ramirez-Mares, Marco Vinicio

    2014-10-01

    Coffee is the most frequently consumed caffeine-containing beverage. The caffeine in coffee is a bioactive compound with stimulatory effects on the central nervous system and a positive effect on long-term memory. Although coffee consumption has been historically linked to adverse health effects, new research indicates that coffee consumption may be beneficial. Here we discuss the impact of coffee and caffeine on health and bring attention to the changing caffeine landscape that includes new caffeine-containing energy drinks and supplements, often targeting children and adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of a treatment system wastewater prebeneficiado of coffee (Coffea arabica implemented in the community Carmen Pampa province of Nor Yungas of La Paz Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez Javier

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted in prebeneficiadora coffee plant of UAC-CP, located in the community of Carmen Pampa, Coroico Municipality, Nor Yungas of La Paz department. The objective was to determine the efficiency of wastewater treatment prebeneficiado coffee because it is not known to be effective in reducing the level of contamination of treated wastewater, and according to the results to correct and / or validate directly model system in place. For their study was established seven sampling points within the system of treatment and four replications were made at different times and with different amounts of coffee cherry. We evaluated the parameters of temperature, pH, settleable solids, total suspended solids, fixed and volatile, biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand and dissolved oxygen. The temperature of wastewater entering the system has recorded 16.5 o C, increasing during the treatment process at 17.5 °C and record the output is 16.5 ºC. The pH increased from 4.51 to 6.04 which occurred at the last two gaps oxygenation and not in the neutralization tank. Settleable solids (SS increased from 0.1 mg / L to 0.15 mg / L, which was recorded at the lakes of oxygen, is attributed to the drag of fine gravel. Total suspended solids (TSS have been reduced from 1927.5 mg / L to 299 mg / L gradually throughout the treatment process. Fixed suspended solids (SSF were reduced from 137.5 mg / L to 58.5 mg / L. Volatile suspended solids (VSS were reduced from 1790 mg / L to 240.5 mg / L. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD was reduced from 6102.5 mg O2 / L to 1245 mg O2 / L. The chemical oxygen demand (COD was reduced from 9800 mg O2 / L to 1658.75 mg O2 / L. Dissolved oxygen (DO increased from 0 to 2.4 mg O2 / L, in the last two gaps in oxygenation, due to the reduction of solids and chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen. Of the nine parameters measured, six meet the maximum permissible values for download in source receptor (stream

  15. Freezing as a treatment to prevent the spread of coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) is the most serious insect pest of coffee around the world. While it is already present in most of the world’s major coffee growing regions, it is important to delay further spread and to prevent re-introductions which might include hyperparasites or...

  16. Analisis Customer Segment, Channels, Dan Customer Relationship Dalam Pembentukan Value Proposition Di Starbucks Coffee (Studi Kasus Pada Starbucks Coffee Indonesia)

    OpenAIRE

    Nurmanisa, Aisy; Wilopo,; Sanawiri, Brillyanes

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to understand and explain; How to Starbucks Coffee create value proposition for their customer? How to Starbucks Coffee segmented the customer, to create the value proposition? How to Starbucks Coffee build and choose the channels to grab the customer and create value proposition? How to Starbucks Coffee build a customer relationship and create value proposition from the process? .This reaserch uses primery data descriptive analysis method with fenomelogy kualitative o...

  17. Economic injury level for the coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) using attractive traps in Brazilian coffee fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, F L; Picanço, M C; Campos, S O; Bastos, C S; Chediak, M; Guedes, R N C; Silva, R S

    2011-12-01

    The currently existing sample procedures available for decision-making regarding the control of the coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) are time-consuming, expensive, and difficult to perform, compromising their adoption. In addition, the damage functions incorporated in such decision levels only consider the quantitative losses, while dismissing the qualitative losses. Traps containing ethanol, methanol, and benzaldehyde may allow cheap and easy decision-making. Our objective was to determine the economic injury level (EIL) for the adults of the coffee berry borer by using attractant-baited traps. We considered both qualitative and quantitative losses caused by the coffee borer in estimating the EILs. These EILs were determined for conventional and organic coffee under high and average plant yield. When the quantitative losses caused by H. hampei were considered alone, the EILs ranged from 7.9 to 23.7% of bored berries for high and average-yield conventional crops, respectively. For high and average-yield organic coffee the ELs varied from 24.4 to 47.6% of bored berries, respectively. When qualitative and quantitative losses caused by the pest were considered together, the EIL was 4.3% of bored berries for both conventional and organic coffee. The EILs for H. hampei associated to the coffee plants in the flowering, pinhead fruit, and ripening fruit stages were 426, 85, and 28 adults per attractive trap, respectively.

  18. [Spectroscopic methods applied to component determination and species identification for coffee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-zhou; Xu, Li-li; Qin, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    Spectroscopic analysis was applied to the determination of the nutrient quality of ground, instant and chicory coffees. By using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-ES), nine mineral elements were determined in solid coffee samples. Caffeine was determined by ultraviolet (UV) spectrometry and organic matter was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Oxidation-reduction titration was utilized for measuring the oxalate. The differences between ground coffee and instant coffee was identified on the basis of the contents of caffeine, oxalate and mineral elements. Experimental evidence showed that, caffeine in instant coffee was 2-3 times higher than in ground coffee. Oxalate in instant coffee was significantly higher in ground coffee. Mineral elements of Mg, P and Zn in ground coffee is lower than in instant coffee, while Cu is several times higher. The mineral content in chicory coffee is overall lower than the instant coffee. In addition, we determined the content of Ti for different types of coffees, and simultaneously detected the elements of Cu, Ti and Zn in chicory coffee. As a fast detection technique, FTIR spectroscopy has the potential of detecting the differences between ground coffee and instant coffee, and is able to verify the presence of caffeine and oxalate.

  19. AFLP analysis among Ethiopian arabica coffee genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... AFLP analysis. AFLP analysis was performed following the protocol of Vos et al. ... 72oC. All polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were perform- ... ACT/MseI-CAG showed the highest value for MI ..... WL, Lee M, Porter K (2000).

  20. Influence of conjunctive use of coffee effluent and fresh water on performance of robusta coffee and soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salakinkop, S R; Shivaprasad, P

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the influence of treated coffee effluent irrigation on performance of established robusta coffee, nutrient contribution and microbial activities in the soil. The results revealed that the field irrigated with coffee effluent from aerobic tank having COD of 1009 ppm, did not affect the yield of clean coffee (1309 kg/ha) and it was statistically similar (on par) with the plots irrigated with fresh water (1310 kg/ha) with respect to clean coffee yield. Effluent irrigation increased significantly the population bacteria, yeast, fungi, actinomycetes and PSB (122, 52, 12, 34 and 6 x 104/g respectively)) in the soil compared to the soil irrigated with fresh water (87, 22, 5, 24 and 2 x 10(4)/g respectively). The organic carbon (2.60%), available nutrients in the soil like P (57.2 kg/ha), K (401.6 kg/ha, Ca (695.3 ppm), S (5.3 ppm),Cu (4.09 ppm) and Zn(4.78 ppm) were also increased due to effluent irrigation compared to fresh water irrigation. Thus analysis of coffee effluent for major and minor plant nutrients content revealed its potential as source of nutrients and water for plant growth.