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Sample records for arabian y-chromosome diversity

  1. Saudi Arabian Y-Chromosome diversity and its relationship with nearby regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera Vicente M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human origins and migration models proposing the Horn of Africa as a prehistoric exit route to Asia have stimulated molecular genetic studies in the region using uniparental loci. However, from a Y-chromosome perspective, Saudi Arabia, the largest country of the region, has not yet been surveyed. To address this gap, a sample of 157 Saudi males was analyzed at high resolution using 67 Y-chromosome binary markers. In addition, haplotypic diversity for its most prominent J1-M267 lineage was estimated using a set of 17 Y-specific STR loci. Results Saudi Arabia differentiates from other Arabian Peninsula countries by a higher presence of J2-M172 lineages. It is significantly different from Yemen mainly due to a comparative reduction of sub-Saharan Africa E1-M123 and Levantine J1-M267 male lineages. Around 14% of the Saudi Arabia Y-chromosome pool is typical of African biogeographic ancestry, 17% arrived to the area from the East across Iran, while the remainder 69% could be considered of direct or indirect Levantine ascription. Interestingly, basal E-M96* (n = 2 and J-M304* (n = 3 lineages have been detected, for the first time, in the Arabian Peninsula. Coalescence time for the most prominent J1-M267 haplogroup in Saudi Arabia (11.6 ± 1.9 ky is similar to that obtained previously for Yemen (11.3 ± 2 but significantly older that those estimated for Qatar (7.3 ± 1.8 and UAE (6.8 ± 1.5. Conclusion The Y-chromosome genetic structure of the Arabian Peninsula seems to be mainly modulated by geography. The data confirm that this area has mainly been a recipient of gene flow from its African and Asian surrounding areas, probably mainly since the last Glacial maximum onwards. Although rare deep rooting lineages for Y-chromosome haplogroups E and J have been detected, the presence of more basal clades supportive of the southern exit route of modern humans to Eurasian, were not found.

  2. Y chromosome diversity, human expansion, drift, and cultural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaroni, Jacques; Underhill, Peter A.; Cavalli-Sforza, Luca L.

    2009-01-01

    The relative importance of the roles of adaptation and chance in determining genetic diversity and evolution has received attention in the last 50 years, but our understanding is still incomplete. All statements about the relative effects of evolutionary factors, especially drift, need confirmation by strong demographic observations, some of which are easier to obtain in a species like ours. Earlier quantitative studies on a variety of data have shown that the amount of genetic differentiation in living human populations indicates that the role of positive (or directional) selection is modest. We observe geographic peculiarities with some Y chromosome mutants, most probably due to a drift-related phenomenon called the surfing effect. We also compare the overall genetic diversity in Y chromosome DNA data with that of other chromosomes and their expectations under drift and natural selection, as well as the rate of fall of diversity within populations known as the serial founder effect during the recent “Out of Africa” expansion of modern humans to the whole world. All these observations are difficult to explain without accepting a major relative role for drift in the course of human expansions. The increasing role of human creativity and the fast diffusion of inventions seem to have favored cultural solutions for many of the problems encountered in the expansion. We suggest that cultural evolution has been subrogating biologic evolution in providing natural selection advantages and reducing our dependence on genetic mutations, especially in the last phase of transition from food collection to food production. PMID:19920170

  3. Ancient Male Recombination Shaped Genetic Diversity of Neo-Y Chromosome in Drosophila albomicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Koichiro

    2016-02-01

    Researchers studying Y chromosome evolution have drawn attention to neo-Y chromosomes in Drosophila species due to their resembling the initial stage of Y chromosome evolution. In the studies of neo-Y chromosome of Drosophila miranda, the extremely low genetic diversity observed suggested various modes of natural selection acting on the nonrecombining genome. However, alternative possibility may come from its peculiar origin from a single chromosomal fusion event with male achiasmy, which potentially caused and maintained the low genetic diversity of the neo-Y chromosome. Here, we report a real case where a neo-Y chromosome is in transition from an autosome to a typical Y chromosome. The neo-Y chromosome of Drosophila albomicans harbored a rich genetic diversity comparable to its gametologous neo-X chromosome and an autosome in the same genome. Analyzing sequence variations in 53 genes and measuring recombination rates between pairs of loci by cross experiments, we elucidated the evolutionary scenario of the neo-Y chromosome of D. albomicans having high genetic diversity without assuming selective force, i.e., it originated from a single chromosomal fusion event, experienced meiotic recombination during the initial stage of evolution and diverged from neo-X chromosome by the suppression of recombination tens or a few hundreds of thousand years ago. Consequently, the observed high genetic diversity on the neo-Y chromosome suggested a strong effect of meiotic recombination to introduce genetic variations into the newly arisen sex chromosome. PMID:26494844

  4. A recent bottleneck of Y chromosome diversity coincides with a global change in culture

    KAUST Repository

    Karmin, Monika

    2015-04-30

    It is commonly thought that human genetic diversity in non-African populations was shaped primarily by an out-of-Africa dispersal 50–100 thousand yr ago (kya). Here, we present a study of 456 geographically diverse high-coverage Y chromosome sequences, including 299 newly reported samples. Applying ancient DNA calibration, we date the Y-chromosomal most recent common ancestor (MRCA) in Africa at 254 (95% CI 192–307) kya and detect a cluster of major non-African founder haplogroups in a narrow time interval at 47–52 kya, consistent with a rapid initial colonization model of Eurasia and Oceania after the out-of-Africa bottleneck. In contrast to demographic reconstructions based on mtDNA, we infer a second strong bottleneck in Y-chromosome lineages dating to the last 10 ky. We hypothesize that this bottleneck is caused by cultural changes affecting variance of reproductive success among males.

  5. Y-chromosome diversity in Catalan surname samples: insights into surname origin and frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Morata, Neus; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Comas, David; Calafell, Francesc

    2015-11-01

    The biological behavior of the Y chromosome, which is paternally inherited, implies that males sharing the same surname may also share a similar Y chromosome. However, socio-cultural factors, such as polyphyletism, non-paternity, adoption, or matrilineal surname transmission, may prevent the joint transmission of the surname and the Y chromosome. By genotyping 17 Y-STRs and 68 SNPs in ~2500 male samples that each carried one of the 50 selected Catalan surnames, we could determine sets of descendants of a common ancestor, the population of origin of the common ancestor, and the date when such a common ancestor lived. Haplotype diversity was positively correlated with surname frequency, that is, rarer surnames showed the strongest signals of coancestry. Introgression rates of Y chromosomes into a surname by non-paternity, adoption, and transmission of the maternal surname were estimated at 1.5-2.6% per generation, with some local variation. Average ages for the founders of the surnames were estimated at ~500 years, suggesting a delay between the origin of surnames (twelfth and thirteenth centuries) and the systematization of their paternal transmission. We have found that, in general, a foreign etymology for a surname does not often result in a non-indigenous origin of surname founders; however, bearers of some surnames with an Arabic etymology show an excess of North African haplotypes. Finally, we estimate that surname prediction from a Y-chromosome haplotype, which may have interesting forensic applications, has a ~60% sensitivity but a 17% false discovery rate. PMID:25689924

  6. Y-chromosomal diversity in Lebanon is structured by recent historical events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalloua, Pierre A; Xue, Yali; Khalife, Jade; Makhoul, Nadine; Debiane, Labib; Platt, Daniel E; Royyuru, Ajay K; Herrera, Rene J; Hernanz, David F Soria; Blue-Smith, Jason; Wells, R Spencer; Comas, David; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2008-04-01

    Lebanon is an eastern Mediterranean country inhabited by approximately four million people with a wide variety of ethnicities and religions, including Muslim, Christian, and Druze. In the present study, 926 Lebanese men were typed with Y-chromosomal SNP and STR markers, and unusually, male genetic variation within Lebanon was found to be more strongly structured by religious affiliation than by geography. We therefore tested the hypothesis that migrations within historical times could have contributed to this situation. Y-haplogroup J*(xJ2) was more frequent in the putative Muslim source region (the Arabian Peninsula) than in Lebanon, and it was also more frequent in Lebanese Muslims than in Lebanese non-Muslims. Conversely, haplogroup R1b was more frequent in the putative Christian source region (western Europe) than in Lebanon and was also more frequent in Lebanese Christians than in Lebanese non-Christians. The most common R1b STR-haplotype in Lebanese Christians was otherwise highly specific for western Europe and was unlikely to have reached its current frequency in Lebanese Christians without admixture. We therefore suggest that the Islamic expansion from the Arabian Peninsula beginning in the seventh century CE introduced lineages typical of this area into those who subsequently became Lebanese Muslims, whereas the Crusader activity in the 11(th)-13(th) centuries CE introduced western European lineages into Lebanese Christians. PMID:18374297

  7. Y-Chromosomal Diversity in Europe Is Clinal and Influenced Primarily by Geography, Rather than by Language

    OpenAIRE

    Rosser, Z H; Zerjal, T; Hurles, M. E.; Adojaan, M; Alavantic, D; Amorim, A.; Amos, W; Armenteros, M; E Arroyo; Barbujani, G; Beckman, G; Beckman, L.; Bertranpetit, J; Bosch, E.; Bradley, D.G

    2000-01-01

    Clinal patterns of autosomal genetic diversity within Europe have been interpreted in previous studies in terms of a Neolithic demic diffusion model for the spread of agriculture; in contrast, studies using mtDNA have traced many founding lineages to the Paleolithic and have not shown strongly clinal variation. We have used 11 human Y-chromosomal biallelic polymorphisms, defining 10 haplogroups, to analyze a sample of 3,616 Y chromosomes belonging to 47 European and circum-European population...

  8. Y-chromosomal diversity in the population of Guinea-Bissau: a multiethnic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobling Mark A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The geographic and ethnolinguistic differentiation of many African Y-chromosomal lineages provides an opportunity to evaluate human migration episodes and admixture processes, in a pan-continental context. The analysis of the paternal genetic structure of Equatorial West Africans carried out to date leaves their origins and relationships unclear, and raises questions about the existence of major demographic phenomena analogous to the large-scale Bantu expansions. To address this, we have analysed the variation of 31 binary and 11 microsatellite markers on the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome in Guinea-Bissau samples of diverse ethnic affiliations, some not studied before. Results The Guinea-Bissau Y chromosome pool is characterized by low haplogroup diversity (D = 0.470, sd 0.033, with the predominant haplogroup E3a*-M2 shared among the ethnic clusters and reaching a maximum of 82.2% in the Mandenka people. The Felupe-Djola and Papel groups exhibit the highest diversity of lineages and harbor the deep-rooting haplogroups A-M91, E2-M75 and E3*-PN2, typical of Sahel's more central and eastern areas. Their genetic distinction from other groups is statistically significant (P = 0.01 though not attributable to linguistic, geographic or religious criteria. Non sub-Saharan influences were associated with the presence of haplogroup R1b-P25 and particular lineages of E3b1-M78. Conclusion The predominance and high diversity of haplogroup E3a*-M2 suggests a demographic expansion in the equatorial western fringe, possibly supported by a local agricultural center. The paternal pool of the Mandenka and Balanta displays evidence of a particularly marked population growth among the Guineans, possibly reflecting the demographic effects of the agriculturalist lifestyle and their putative relationship to the people that introduced early cultivation practices into West Africa. The paternal background of the Felupe-Djola and Papel

  9. Haplotype diversity of 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci in the Bangladeshi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shafiul; Ali, Md Eunus; Ferdous, Ahmad; Hossain, Tania; Hasan, Md Mahamud; Akhteruzzaman, Sharif

    2010-02-01

    Haplotype and allele frequencies of 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci were determined in 216 unrelated Bangladeshi males. AmpFlSTR Y-filer PCR Amplification kit (Applied Biosystems) was used to type the following Y-STR markers: DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS438, DYS439, DYS437, DYS448, DYS458, DYS456, DYS635, and Y-GATA-H4. A total of 211 haplotypes for the 17 Y-STR markers were detected and, of these, 206 haplotypes were unique. The haplotype diversity was 0.9998, indicating a high potential for differentiating between male individuals in this population. Comparison analysis via Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) and construction of Neighbor Joining Tree revealed a close association of Bangladeshi population with Indian Gaddi and Southern Indian populations. PMID:20129457

  10. Y chromosome STR allelic and haplotype diversity in a Rwanda population from East Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, Kuppareddi; Duncan, George

    2012-03-01

    We have analyzed 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci in a population sample of 69 unrelated male individuals of the Rwanda-Hutu population from East Central Africa using an AmpFlSTR® Yfiler™ PCR amplification kit. A total of 62 unique haplotypes were identified among the 69 individuals studied. The haplotype diversity was found to be 0.9970 for this population. The gene diversity ranged from 0.1130 (DYS392) to 0.7722 (DYS385). Comparison of populations in this study with twenty-five other national and global populations using Principal Co-ordinate Analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic molecular analysis using a genetic distance matrix indicates a delineation of all the African populations from other unrelated populations. The results of population pair-wise Fst p values indicate statistically significant differentiation of the Rwandan population when compared with 25 other global populations including four African populations (p=0.0000). Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) of the Rwanda population with four other African populations indicated a 93% variance within populations and 7% variance among the five populations. A data base search of the 62 haplotypes yielded only one non-African haplotype match, suggesting these haplotypes are unique to the African continent. PMID:22285642

  11. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cíntia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M T; Santos, Lorna H; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; Egyed, Balazs; Balitzki, Beate; Tschumi, Sibylle; Ballard, David; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Barrantes, Xinia; Bäßler, Gerhard; Wiest, Tina; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Davis, Carey; Budowle, Bruce; Burri, Helen; Borer, Urs; Koller, Christoph; Carvalho, Elizeu F; Domingues, Patricia M; Chamoun, Wafaa Takash; Coble, Michael D; Hill, Carolyn R; Corach, Daniel; Caputo, Mariela; D'Amato, Maria E; Davison, Sean; Decorte, Ronny; Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Ottoni, Claudio; Rickards, Olga; Lu, Di; Jiang, Chengtao; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jonkisz, Anna; Frank, William E; Furac, Ivana; Gehrig, Christian; Castella, Vincent; Grskovic, Branka; Haas, Cordula; Wobst, Jana; Hadzic, Gavrilo; Drobnic, Katja; Honda, Katsuya; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Di; Li, Yan; Hu, Shengping; Chen, Shenglan; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Lessig, Rüdiger; Jakovski, Zlatko; Ilievska, Tanja; Klann, Anja E; García, Cristina Cano; de Knijff, Peter; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Kondili, Aikaterini; Miniati, Penelope; Vouropoulou, Maria; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Lindner, Iris; Mansour, Issam; Al-Azem, Mouayyad; Andari, Ansar El; Marino, Miguel; Furfuro, Sandra; Locarno, Laura; Martín, Pablo; Luque, Gracia M; Alonso, Antonio; Miranda, Luís Souto; Moreira, Helena; Mizuno, Natsuko; Iwashima, Yasuki; Neto, Rodrigo S Moura; Nogueira, Tatiana L S; Silva, Rosane; Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kohl, Michael; Nie, Shengjie; Wang, Xianping; Cheng, Baowen; Núñez, Carolina; Pancorbo, Marian Martínez de; Olofsson, Jill K; Morling, Niels; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Pamjav, Horolma; Volgyi, Antonia; Barany, Gusztav; Pawlowski, Ryszard; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pelotti, Susi; Pepinski, Witold; Abreu-Glowacka, Monica; Phillips, Christopher; Cárdenas, Jorge; Rey-Gonzalez, Danel; Salas, Antonio; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Toscanini, Ulises; Piccinini, Andrea; Piglionica, Marilidia; Baldassarra, Stefania L; Ploski, Rafal; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Jastrzebska, Emila; Robino, Carlo; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U; Guevara, Evelyn; Salvador, Jazelyn; Ungria, Maria Corazon De; Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell; Schmidt, Ulrike; Schlauderer, Nicola; Saukko, Pekka; Schneider, Peter M; Sirker, Miriam; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Oh, Yu Na; Skitsa, Iulia; Ampati, Alexandra; Smith, Tobi-Gail; Calvit, Lina Solis de; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Capal, Thomas; Tillmar, Andreas; Nilsson, Helena; Turrina, Stefania; De Leo, Domenico; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cortellini, Venusia; Wetton, Jon H; Gwynne, Gareth M; Jobling, Mark A; Whittle, Martin R; Sumita, Denilce R; Wolańska-Nowak, Paulina; Yong, Rita Y Y; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Roewer, Lutz

    2014-09-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent. PMID:24854874

  12. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cíntia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M.T.; Santos, Lorna H.; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; Egyed, Balazs; Balitzki, Beate; Tschumi, Sibylle; Ballard, David; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Barrantes, Xinia; Bäßler, Gerhard; Wiest, Tina; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Davis, Carey; Budowle, Bruce; Burri, Helen; Borer, Urs; Koller, Christoph; Carvalho, Elizeu F.; Domingues, Patricia M.; Chamoun, Wafaa Takash; Coble, Michael D.; Hill, Carolyn R.; Corach, Daniel; Caputo, Mariela; D’Amato, Maria E.; Davison, Sean; Decorte, Ronny; Larmuseau, Maarten H.D.; Ottoni, Claudio; Rickards, Olga; Lu, Di; Jiang, Chengtao; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jonkisz, Anna; Frank, William E.; Furac, Ivana; Gehrig, Christian; Castella, Vincent; Grskovic, Branka; Haas, Cordula; Wobst, Jana; Hadzic, Gavrilo; Drobnic, Katja; Honda, Katsuya; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Di; Li, Yan; Hu, Shengping; Chen, Shenglan; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Lessig, Rüdiger; Jakovski, Zlatko; Ilievska, Tanja; Klann, Anja E.; García, Cristina Cano; de Knijff, Peter; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Kondili, Aikaterini; Miniati, Penelope; Vouropoulou, Maria; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Lindner, Iris; Mansour, Issam; Al-Azem, Mouayyad; Andari, Ansar El; Marino, Miguel; Furfuro, Sandra; Locarno, Laura; Martín, Pablo; Luque, Gracia M.; Alonso, Antonio; Miranda, Luís Souto; Moreira, Helena; Mizuno, Natsuko; Iwashima, Yasuki; Neto, Rodrigo S. Moura; Nogueira, Tatiana L.S.; Silva, Rosane; Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kohl, Michael; Nie, Shengjie; Wang, Xianping; Cheng, Baowen; Núñez, Carolina; Pancorbo, Marian Martínez de; Olofsson, Jill K.; Morling, Niels; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Pamjav, Horolma; Volgyi, Antonia; Barany, Gusztav; Pawlowski, Ryszard; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pelotti, Susi; Pepinski, Witold; Abreu-Glowacka, Monica; Phillips, Christopher; Cárdenas, Jorge; Rey-Gonzalez, Danel; Salas, Antonio; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Toscanini, Ulises; Piccinini, Andrea; Piglionica, Marilidia; Baldassarra, Stefania L.; Ploski, Rafal; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Jastrzebska, Emila; Robino, Carlo; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U.; Guevara, Evelyn; Salvador, Jazelyn; Ungria, Maria Corazon De; Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell; Schmidt, Ulrike; Schlauderer, Nicola; Saukko, Pekka; Schneider, Peter M.; Sirker, Miriam; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Oh, Yu Na; Skitsa, Iulia; Ampati, Alexandra; Smith, Tobi-Gail; Calvit, Lina Solis de; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Capal, Thomas; Tillmar, Andreas; Nilsson, Helena; Turrina, Stefania; De Leo, Domenico; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cortellini, Venusia; Wetton, Jon H.; Gwynne, Gareth M.; Jobling, Mark A.; Whittle, Martin R.; Sumita, Denilce R.; Wolańska-Nowak, Paulina; Yong, Rita Y.Y.; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Roewer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent. PMID:24854874

  13. A recent bottleneck of Y chromosome diversity coincides with a global change in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmin, Monika; Saag, Lauri; Vicente, Mário;

    2015-01-01

    ancient DNA calibration, we date the Y-chromosomal most recent common ancestor (MRCA) in Africa at 254 (95% CI 192-307) kya and detect a cluster of major non-African founder haplogroups in a narrow time interval at 47-52 kya, consistent with a rapid initial colonization model of Eurasia and Oceania after...

  14. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha;

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DY...

  15. Genetic Diversity and Differentiation in Urban and Indigenous Populations of Mexico: Patterns of Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sobrino, Blanca Z; Pintado-Cortina, Ana P; Sebastián-Medina, Leticia; Morales-Mandujano, Fabiola; Contreras, Alejandra V; Aguilar, Yasnaya E; Chávez-Benavides, Juan; Carrillo-Rodríguez, Aurelio; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Medrano-González, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Aside from the admixture between indigenous people and people from overseas, populations in Mexico changed drastically after the Spanish conquest of the sixteenth century, forming an intricate history that has been underutilized in understanding the genetic population structure of Mexicans. To infer historical processes of isolation, dispersal, and assimilation, we examined the phylogeography of mitochondrial (mt) DNA and Y-chromosome lineages in 3,026 individuals from 10 urban and nine indigenous populations by identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms. A geographic array with a predominance of Amerindian lineages was observed for mtDNA, with northern indigenous populations being divergent from the central and southern indigenous populations; urban populations showed low differentiation with isolation by distance. Y-chromosome variation distinguished urban and indigenous populations through the Amerindian haplogroup Q frequency. The MtDNA and the Y-chromosome together primarily distinguished urban and indigenous populations, with different geographic arrays for both. Gene flow across geographical distance and between the urban and indigenous realms appears to have altered the pre-Hispanic phylogeography in central and southern Mexico, mainly by displacement of women, while maintaining the indigenous isolation in the north, southeast, and Zapotec regions. Most Amerindian mtDNA diversity currently occurs in urban populations and appears to be reduced among indigenous people. PMID:27050033

  16. Y-chromosome haplogroup diversity in the sub-Himalayan Terai and Duars populations of East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Monojit; Palanichamy, Malliya G; Mitra, Bikash; Jin, Jie-Qiong; Chaudhuri, Tapas K; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2011-11-01

    The sub-Himalayan Terai and Duars, the important outermost zones comprising the plains of East India, are known as the reservoirs of ethnic diversity. Analysis of the paternal genetic diversity of the populations inhabiting these regions and their genetic relationships with adjacent Himalayan and other Asian populations has not been addressed empirically. In the present investigation, we undertook a Y-chromosome phylogeographic study on 10 populations (n=375) representing four different linguistic groups from the sub-Himalayan Terai and Duars regions of East India. The high-resolution analysis of Y-chromosome haplogroup variations based on 76 binary markers revealed that the sub-Himalayan paternal gene pool is extremely heterogeneous. Three major haplogroups, namely H, O and R, are shared across the four linguistic groups. The Indo-European-speaking castes exhibit more haplogroup diversity than the tribal groups. The findings of the present investigation suggest that the sub-Himalayan gene pools have received predominant Southeast Asian contribution. In addition, the presence of Northeast and South Asian signatures illustrate multiple events of population migrations as well as extensive genetic admixture amongst the linguistic groups. PMID:21900945

  17. Haplotype diversity of 16 Y-chromosomal STRs in three main ethnic populations (Malays, Chinese and Indians) in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuet Meng; Perumal, Revathi; Keat, Phoon Yoong; Kuehn, Daniel L C

    2007-03-22

    We have analyzed 16 Y-STR loci (DYS456, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS389II, DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635 or Y-GATA C4, DYS392, Y-GATA H4, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS448) from the non-recombining region of the human Y-chromosome in 980 male individuals from three main ethnic populations in Malaysia (Malay, Chinese, Indian) using the AmpFlSTR((R)) Y-filertrade mark (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). The observed 17-loci haplotypes and the individual allele frequencies for each locus were estimated, whilst the locus diversity, haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity were calculated in the three ethnic populations. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that 88.7% of the haplotypic variation is found within population and 11.3% is between populations (fixation index F(ST)=0.113, p=0.000). This study has revealed Y-chromosomes with null alleles at several Y-loci, namely DYS458, DYS392, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS439, DYS448 and Y-GATA H4; and several occurrences of duplications at the highly polymorphic DYS385 loci. Some of these deleted loci were in regions of the Y(q) arm that have been implicated in the occurrence of male infertility. PMID:16457976

  18. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    OpenAIRE

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cíntia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M.T.; Santos, Lorna H; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers ...

  19. Y-chromosome diversity in the Kalmyks at the ethnical and tribal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarchuk, Boris; Derenko, Miroslava; Denisova, Galina; Khoyt, Sanj; Woźniak, Marcin; Grzybowski, Tomasz; Zakharov, Ilya

    2013-12-01

    The Mongolic-speaking Kalmyks currently inhabiting the steppes of the Volga region have Central Asian ancestry and are organized into the tribal groups. The genetic relationships among these tribes and their origin have remained obscure. We analyzed 17 short tandem repeat and 44 binary polymorphisms of Y-chromosome in 426 individuals mainly from three major tribes of the Kalmyks (the Torguuds, Dörwöds and Khoshuuds). Among these tribes, the Dörwöds and Torguuds, as well as the Kalmyks collectively as an ethnic group, showed relatively close genetic affinities to each other and to the Mongols and Altaian Kazakhs, whereas the Khoshuuds were clearly separated from all of them, gathering with the Manchu, Tibetans or Evenks (depending on the algorithm used to calculate genetic distances). The genetic results also indicate that paternal gene flow from East Europeans to the Kalmyks is very little, despite their cohabitation in the North Caspian Steppe during the last 380 years. The occurrence of unique cluster of N1c-Tat haplotypes in the Khoshuuds, which dates to about 340 years and is likely to have East European ancestry, is considered as a result of interethnic contacts occurred soon after the appearance of the Kalmyk tribes in the Volga-Ural region. PMID:24132124

  20. Y-chromosome lineages in Cabo Verde Islands witness the diverse geographic origin of its first male settlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rita; Rosa, Alexandra; Freitas, Ana; Fernandes, Ana; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Brehm, António

    2003-11-01

    The Y-chromosome haplogroup composition of the population of the Cabo Verde Archipelago was profiled by using 32 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers and compared with potential source populations from Iberia, west Africa, and the Middle East. According to the traditional view, the major proportion of the founding population of Cabo Verde was of west African ancestry with the addition of a minor fraction of male colonizers from Europe. Unexpectedly, more than half of the paternal lineages (53.5%) of Cabo Verdeans clustered in haplogroups I, J, K, and R1, which are characteristic of populations of Europe and the Middle East, while being absent in the probable west African source population of Guiné-Bissau. Moreover, a high frequency of J* lineages in Cabo Verdeans relates them more closely to populations of the Middle East and probably provides the first genetic evidence of the legacy of the Jews. In addition, the considerable proportion (20.5%) of E3b(xM81) lineages indicates a possible gene flow from the Middle East or northeast Africa, which, at least partly, could be ascribed to the Sephardic Jews. In contrast to the predominance of west African mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in their maternal gene pool, the major west African Y-chromosome lineage E3a was observed only at a frequency of 15.9%. Overall, these results indicate that gene flow from multiple sources and various sex-specific patterns have been important in the formation of the genomic diversity in the Cabo Verde islands. PMID:12942365

  1. Y-Chromosomal Diversity in Europe Is Clinal and Influenced Primarily by Geography, Rather than by Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Zoë H.; Zerjal, Tatiana; Hurles, Matthew E.; Adojaan, Maarja; Alavantic, Dragan; Amorim, António; Amos, William; Armenteros, Manuel; Arroyo, Eduardo; Barbujani, Guido; Beckman, Gunhild; Beckman, Lars; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Bosch, Elena; Bradley, Daniel G.; Brede, Gaute; Cooper, Gillian; Côrte-Real, Helena B. S. M.; de Knijff, Peter; Decorte, Ronny; Dubrova, Yuri E.; Evgrafov, Oleg; Gilissen, Anja; Glisic, Sanja; Gölge, Mukaddes; Hill, Emmeline W.; Jeziorowska, Anna; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Kayser, Manfred; Kivisild, Toomas; Kravchenko, Sergey A.; Krumina, Astrida; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Lavinha, João; Livshits, Ludmila A.; Malaspina, Patrizia; Maria, Syrrou; McElreavey, Ken; Meitinger, Thomas A.; Mikelsaar, Aavo-Valdur; Mitchell, R. John; Nafa, Khedoudja; Nicholson, Jayne; Nørby, Søren; Pandya, Arpita; Parik, Jüri; Patsalis, Philippos C.; Pereira, Luísa; Peterlin, Borut; Pielberg, Gerli; Prata, Maria João; Previderé, Carlo; Roewer, Lutz; Rootsi, Siiri; Rubinsztein, D. C.; Saillard, Juliette; Santos, Fabrício R.; Stefanescu, Gheorghe; Sykes, Bryan C.; Tolun, Aslihan; Villems, Richard; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    Clinal patterns of autosomal genetic diversity within Europe have been interpreted in previous studies in terms of a Neolithic demic diffusion model for the spread of agriculture; in contrast, studies using mtDNA have traced many founding lineages to the Paleolithic and have not shown strongly clinal variation. We have used 11 human Y-chromosomal biallelic polymorphisms, defining 10 haplogroups, to analyze a sample of 3,616 Y chromosomes belonging to 47 European and circum-European populations. Patterns of geographic differentiation are highly nonrandom, and, when they are assessed using spatial autocorrelation analysis, they show significant clines for five of six haplogroups analyzed. Clines for two haplogroups, representing 45% of the chromosomes, are continentwide and consistent with the demic diffusion hypothesis. Clines for three other haplogroups each have different foci and are more regionally restricted and are likely to reflect distinct population movements, including one from north of the Black Sea. Principal-components analysis suggests that populations are related primarily on the basis of geography, rather than on the basis of linguistic affinity. This is confirmed in Mantel tests, which show a strong and highly significant partial correlation between genetics and geography but a low, nonsignificant partial correlation between genetics and language. Genetic-barrier analysis also indicates the primacy of geography in the shaping of patterns of variation. These patterns retain a strong signal of expansion from the Near East but also suggest that the demographic history of Europe has been complex and influenced by other major population movements, as well as by linguistic and geographic heterogeneities and the effects of drift. PMID:11078479

  2. High Y-chromosomal diversity and low relatedness between paternal lineages on a communal scale in the Western European Low Countries during the surname establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuseau, M H D; Boon, N; Vanderheyden, N; Van Geystelen, A; Larmuseau, H F M; Matthys, K; De Clercq, W; Decorte, R

    2015-07-01

    There is limited knowledge on the biological relatedness between citizens and on the demographical dynamics within villages, towns and cities in pre-17th century Western Europe. By combining Y-chromosomal genotypes, in-depth genealogies and surname data in a strict genetic genealogical approach, it is possible to provide insights into the genetic diversity and the relatedness between indigenous paternal lineages within a particular community at the time of the surname adoption. To obtain these insights, six Flemish communities were selected in this study based on the differences in geography and historical development. After rigorous selection of appropriate DNA donors, low relatedness between Y chromosomes of different surnames was found within each community, although there is co-occurrence of these surnames in each community since the start of the surname adoption between the 14th and 15th century. Next, the high communal diversity in Y-chromosomal lineages was comparable with the regional diversity across Flanders at that time. Moreover, clinal distributions of particular Y-chromosomal lineages between the communities were observed according to the clinal distributions earlier observed across the Flemish regions and Western Europe. No significant indication for genetic differences between communities with distinct historical development was found in the analysis. These genetic results provide relevant information for studies in historical sciences, archaeology, forensic genetics and genealogy. PMID:25873146

  3. 黄牛Y染色体分子遗传多样性研究进展%Progress on Molecular Genetic Diversity of Cattle Y Chromosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冉; 常振华; 徐苹; 黄洁萍; 陈宏; 雷初朝

    2012-01-01

    Y chromosome molecular genetic diversity is an important tool for tracing animal origin, do- mestication history and migrating routines and it can also be used to analyze the paternal genetic diversity of a certain population or investigate the male-mediated introgression between populations. Y chromosome haplotype diversity can be revealed by Y chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism (Y-SNP) and Y chromosome mierosatellite (Y-STR) respectively or by combination of these two kinds of markers together to obtain more specific Y chromosome haplotypes. Cattle have three paternal origins (Y1 ,Y2 in Bos taurus and Y3 in Bos indicus) which can be distinguished by Y-SNP markers, while the abundant specific haplo- types in Y1,Y2 and Y3 haplogroup respectively can be further identified by using Y-STR markers. This paper reviewed the research progress on cattle Y chromosome diversity and paternal origins in China and other foreign countries.%Y染色体分子遗传多样性是追溯动物起源、驯化历史和迁徙路线的重要工具,也可以用来反映动物的父系遗传多样性及用于研究群体间父系介导的杂交情况。Y染色体单倍型多样性可以分别通过Y染色体单核苷酸多态性(Y-SNP)和Y染色体微卫星多态性(Y-STR)或这二者结合起来构建精确的Y染色体单倍型。黄牛有3种父系起源(普通牛Y1、Y2和瘤牛Y3单倍型组),可以通过Y-SNP来区分,通过-STR标记可以区分Y1、Y2和Y3所具有的丰富的精细单倍型。本文汇集了包括中国在内的国内外黄牛Y染色体遗传多样性与起源进化的研究进展。

  4. High Y-chromosomal diversity and low relatedness between paternal lineages on a communal scale in the Western European Low Countries during the surname establishment

    OpenAIRE

    Larmuseau, M H D; Boon, N.; Vanderheyden, N.; Van Geystelen, A.; Larmuseau, H F M; Matthys, K; De Clercq, W.; Decorte, R

    2015-01-01

    There is limited knowledge on the biological relatedness between citizens and on the demographical dynamics within villages, towns and cities in pre-17th century Western Europe. By combining Y-chromosomal genotypes, in-depth genealogies and surname data in a strict genetic genealogical approach, it is possible to provide insights into the genetic diversity and the relatedness between indigenous paternal lineages within a particular community at the time of the surname adoption. To obtain thes...

  5. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  6. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of Arabian horse populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanshour, Anas; Conant, Eleanore; Juras, Rytis; Cothran, Ernest Gus

    2013-01-01

    The Arabian horse ignites imagination throughout the world. Populations of this breed exist in many countries, and recent genetic work has examined the diversity and ancestry of a few of these populations in isolation. Here, we explore 7 different populations of Arabians represented by 682 horses. Three of these are Middle Eastern populations from near the historical origin of the breed, including Syrian, Persian, and Saudi Arabian. The remaining Western populations are found in Europe (the Shagya Arabian and Polish Arabian) and in America (American Arabian). Analysis of genetic structure was carried out using 15 microsatellite loci. Genetic distances, analysis of molecular variance, factorial correspondence analysis, and a Bayesian method were applied. The results consistently show higher level of diversity within the Middle Eastern populations than the Western populations. The Western Arabian populations were the main source among population variation. Genetic differentiation was not strong among all Middle Eastern populations, but all American Arabians showed differentiation from Middle Eastern populations and were somewhat uniform among themselves. Here, we explore the diversities of many different populations of Arabian horses and find that populations not from the Middle East have noticeably lower levels of diversity, which may adversely affect the health of these populations. PMID:23450090

  7. From Arabia to Iberia: A Y chromosome perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, María; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph; Fadhlaoui-Zid, Karima; Álvarez, Joseph; Herrera, Rene J

    2015-06-15

    At different times during recent human evolution, northern Africa has served as a conduit for migrations from the Arabian Peninsula. Although previous researchers have investigated the possibility of the Strait of Gibraltar as a pathway of migration from North Africa to Iberia, we now revisit this issue and theorize that although the Strait of Gibraltar, at the west end of this corridor, has acted as a barrier for human dispersal into Southwest Europe, it has not provided an absolute seal to gene flow. To test this hypothesis, here we use the spatial frequency distributions, STR diversity and expansion time estimates of Y chromosome haplogroups J1-P58 and E-M81 to investigate the genetic imprints left by the Arabian and Berber expansions into the Iberian Peninsula, respectively. The data generated indicate that Arabian and Berber genetic markers are detected in Iberia. We present evidence that suggest that Iberia has received gene flow from Northwest Africa during and prior to the Islamic colonization of 711A.D. It is interesting that the highest frequencies of Arabia and Berber markers are not found in southern Spain, where Islam remained the longest and was culturally most influential, but in Northwest Iberia, specifically Galicia. We propose that Moriscos' relocations to the north during the Reconquista, the migration of cryptic Muslims seeking refuge in a more lenient society and/or more geographic extensive pre-Islamic incursions may explain the higher frequencies and older time estimates of mutations in the north of the Peninsula. These scenarios are congruent with the higher diversities of some diagnostic makers observed in Northwest Iberia. PMID:25701402

  8. Y chromosome haplotype diversity in Mongolic-speaking populations and gene conversion at the duplicated STR DYS385a,b in haplogroup C3-M407.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava; Denisova, Galina; Woźniak, Marcin; Rogalla, Urszula; Dambueva, Irina; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Y chromosome microsatellite (Y-STR) diversity has been studied in different Mongolic-speaking populations from South Siberia, Mongolia, North-East China and East Europe. The results obtained indicate that the Mongolic-speaking populations clustered into two groups, with one group including populations from eastern part of South Siberia and Central Asia (the Buryats, Barghuts and Khamnigans) and the other group including populations from western part of Central Asia and East Europe (the Mongols and Kalmyks). High frequency of haplogroup C3-M407 (>50%) is present in the Buryats, Barghuts and Khamnigans, whereas in the Mongols and Kalmyks its frequency is much lower. In addition, two allelic combinations in DYS385a,b loci of C3-M407 haplotypes have been observed: the combination 11,18 (as well as 11,17 and 11,19) is frequent in different Mongolic-speaking populations, but the 11,11 branch is present mainly in the Kalmyks and Mongols. Results of locus-specific sequencing suggest that the action of gene conversion is a more likely explanation for origin of homoallelic 11,11 combination. Moreover, analysis of median networks of Y-STR haplotypes demonstrates that at least two gene conversion events can be revealed-one of them has probably occurred among the Mongols, and the other event occurred in the Barghuts. These two events give an average gene conversion rate range of 0.24-7.1 × 10(-3) per generation. PMID:26911356

  9. Out of Arabia. The Settlement of Island Soqotra as Revealed by Mitochondrial and Y Chromosome Genetic Diversity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Viktor; Pereira, L.; Kujanová, Martina; Vašíková, A.; Hájek, Martin; Morris, M.; Mulligan, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 4 (2009), s. 439-447. ISSN 0002-9483 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 917 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80020508 Keywords : mtDNA and NRY diversity * regional sampling * phylogeography * migrations * Southern Arabia Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology Impact factor: 2.756, year: 2009 www.interscience.wiley.com

  10. Haplotype diversity of 17 Y-chromosomal STRs in three native Sarawak populations (Iban, Bidayuh and Melanau) in East Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuet Meng; Swaran, Yuvaneswari; Phoon, Yoong Keat; Sothirasan, Kavin; Sim, Hang Thiew; Lim, Kong Boon; Kuehn, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    17 Y-STRs (DYS456, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS389II, DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635 or Y-GATA C4, DYS392, Y-GATA H4, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS448) have been analyzed in 320 male individuals from Sarawak, an eastern state of Malaysia on the Borneo island using the AmpFlSTR Y-filer (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). These individuals were from three indigenous ethnic groups in Sarawak comprising of 103 Ibans, 113 Bidayuhs and 104 Melanaus. The observed 17-loci haplotypes and the individual allele frequencies for each locus were estimated, whilst the locus diversity, haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity were calculated in the three groups. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that 87.6% of the haplotypic variation was found within population and 12.4% between populations (fixation index F(ST)=0.124, p=0.000). This study has revealed that the indigenous populations in Sarawak are distinctly different to each other, and to the three major ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malays, Chinese and Indians), with the Melanaus having a strikingly high degree of shared haplotypes within. There are rare unusual variants and microvariants that were not present in Malaysian Malay, Chinese or Indian groups. In addition, occurrences of DYS385 duplications which were only noticeably present in Chinese group previously was also observed in the Iban group whilst null alleles were detected at several Y-loci (namely DYS19, DYS392, DYS389II and DYS448) in the Iban and Melanau groups. PMID:19414156

  11. Y-chromosome STR haplotypes in Somalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenberg, Charlotte; Simonsen, Bo; Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose;

    2005-01-01

    A total of 201 males from Somalia were typed for the Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 with the PowerPlex Y kit (Promega). A total of 96 different haplotypes were observed and the haplotype diversity was 0.9715. The...

  12. Coral-associated Actinobacteria from the Arabian Gulf: diversity, abundance and biotechnological potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Huda Mahmoud Mahmoud; Aisha Ahmad Kalendar

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacteria are widely distributed in terrestrial environments, where they are considered a significant source of bioactive compounds, mainly antibiotics. Marine Actinobacteria, particularly coral-associated Actinobacteria, have attracted attention recently. In this study, the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria associated with Coscinaraea columna, Platygyra daedalea and Porites harrisoni, north of the Arabian Gulf were investigated. The corals of the Arabian Gulf, one of the world’s...

  13. High level of male-biased Scandinavian admixture in Greenlandic Inuit shown by Y-chromosomal analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Elena; Calafell, Francesc; Rosser, Zoë H; Nørby, Søren; Lynnerup, Niels; Hurles, Matthew E; Jobling, Mark A

    2003-01-01

    We have used binary markers and microsatellites on the Y chromosome to analyse diversity in a sample of Greenlandic Inuit males. This sample contains Y chromosomes typical of those found in European populations. Because the Y chromosome has a unique and robust phylogeny of a time depth that prece...

  14. Diversity and distribution of winter phytoplankton in the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polikarpov, Igor; Saburova, Maria; Al-Yamani, Faiza

    2016-05-01

    The spatial distribution of the phytoplankton (diversity, composition, and cell abundance) was described in relation to local environmental conditions across the Arabian Gulf, the Strait of Hormuz, and the Sea of Oman based on data of ROPME cruise of winter 2006. The 376 phytoplankton taxa identified in these waters represented a diverse composition of species with a prevalence of dinoflagellates and diatoms. Three peaks in the phytoplankton abundance were recorded throughout the studied area associated with diatom-dominated phytoplankton blooms in the central and northwestern part of the Arabian Gulf and in the Sea of Oman and the adjacent waters. The studied area was divided into three main regions by cluster analysis based on differences in the phytoplankton composition and concentration. The Sea of Oman and the Strait of Hormuz were occupied by highly abundant, strongly diatom-dominated phytoplankton assemblage. The Arabian Gulf was divided into two main regions along a diagonal northwest-southeast axis, with rather diatom-dominated phytoplankton assemblage off the south and along the Iranian coast but with flagellate-dominated phytoplankton of the north and along the Arabian coast. The distance-based linear modeling revealed a significant relationship between the phytoplankton composition and water masses as indexed by salinity. Our results demonstrated that abundance and composition of winter phytoplankton were related to water circulation pattern in the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman.

  15. [The evolution of human Y chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianrong; Wang, Meiqin; Li, Shaohua

    2014-09-01

    The human Y chromosome is always intriguing for researchers, because of its role in gender determination and its unusual evolutionary history. The Y chromosome evolves from an autosome, and its evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. The lack of recombination and protein-coding genes and high content of repetitive sequences have hindered the progress in our understanding of the Y chromosome biology. Recently, with the advances in comparative genomics and sequencing technology, the research on Y chromosome has become a hotspot, with an intensified debate about Y-chromosome final destination resulting from degeneration. This review focuses on the structure, inheritance characteristics, gene content, and the origin and evolution of Y chromosome. We also discuss the long-term destiny of Y chromosome. PMID:25252301

  16. Novel Gene Acquisition on Carnivore Y Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, William J.; A J Pearks Wilkerson; Terje Raudsepp; Richa Agarwala; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Roscoe Stanyon; Chowdhary, Bhanu P

    2006-01-01

    Despite its importance in harboring genes critical for spermatogenesis and male-specific functions, the Y chromosome has been largely excluded as a priority in recent mammalian genome sequencing projects. Only the human and chimpanzee Y chromosomes have been well characterized at the sequence level. This is primarily due to the presumed low overall gene content and highly repetitive nature of the Y chromosome and the ensuing difficulties using a shotgun sequence approach for assembly. Here we...

  17. Y-chromosome STR haplotypes in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenberg, Charlotte; Nielsen, Karsten; Simonsen, Bo Thisted;

    2005-01-01

    A total of 185 unrelated Danish males were typed for the Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 using the kits PowerPlex Y (Promega), ReliaGene Y-Plex 6 and ReliaGene Y-Plex 5 (Reliagene Technologies). A total of 163...... different haplotypes were observed and among these, 144 haplotypes were unique. The gene diversity was 0.9985. In DYS392, a variant allele migrating as a 10.2 allele was observed. Sequencing of the allele showed a deletion upstream the repeated area....

  18. Afghanistan from a Y-chromosome perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacau, Harlette; Gayden, Tenzin; Regueiro, Maria; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Bukhari, Areej; Underhill, Peter A; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph L; Herrera, Rene J

    2012-10-01

    Central Asia has served as a corridor for human migrations providing trading routes since ancient times. It has functioned as a conduit connecting Europe and the Middle East with South Asia and far Eastern civilizations. Therefore, the study of populations in this region is essential for a comprehensive understanding of early human dispersal on the Eurasian continent. Although Y- chromosome distributions in Central Asia have been widely surveyed, present-day Afghanistan remains poorly characterized genetically. The present study addresses this lacuna by analyzing 190 Pathan males from Afghanistan using high-resolution Y-chromosome binary markers. In addition, haplotype diversity for its most common lineages (haplogroups R1a1a*-M198 and L3-M357) was estimated using a set of 15 Y-specific STR loci. The observed haplogroup distribution suggests some degree of genetic isolation of the northern population, likely due to the Hindu Kush mountain range separating it from the southern Afghans who have had greater contact with neighboring Pathans from Pakistan and migrations from the Indian subcontinent. Our study demonstrates genetic similarities between Pathans from Afghanistan and Pakistan, both of which are characterized by the predominance of haplogroup R1a1a*-M198 (>50%) and the sharing of the same modal haplotype. Furthermore, the high frequencies of R1a1a-M198 and the presence of G2c-M377 chromosomes in Pathans might represent phylogenetic signals from Khazars, a common link between Pathans and Ashkenazi groups, whereas the absence of E1b1b1a2-V13 lineage does not support their professed Greek ancestry. PMID:22510847

  19. Review of the Y chromosome and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ely

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The Y chromosome from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR has a locus that raises blood pressure 20-25 mmHg. Associated with the SHR Y chromosome effect is a 4-week earlier pubertal rise of testosterone and dependence upon the androgen receptor for the full blood pressure effect. Several indices of enhanced sympathetic nervous system (SNS activity are also associated with the SHR Y chromosome. Blockade of SNS outflow reduced the blood pressure effect. Salt sensitivity was increased by the Y chromosome as was salt appetite which was SNS dependent. A strong correlation (r = 0.57, P<0.001 was demonstrable between plasma testosterone and angiotensin II. Coronary collagen increased with blood pressure and the presence of the SHR Y chromosome. A promising candidate gene for the Y effect is the Sry locus (testis determining factor, a transcription factor which may also have other functions.

  20. Mathematical glimpse on the Y chromosome degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, M. P.

    2006-04-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerate and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Non-recombination of XY pairs has been pointed out as the key factor for the degeneration of the Y chromosome. The aim here is to show that there is a mathematical asymmetry in sex chromosomes which leads to the degeneration of Y chromosomes even in the absence of XX and XY recombination. A model for sex-chromosome evolution in a stationary regime is proposed. The consequences of their asymmetry are analyzed and lead us to a couple of conclusions. First, Y chromosome degeneration shows up sqrt{2} more often than X chromosome degeneration. Second, if nature prohibits female mortalities from beeing exactly 50%, then Y chromosome degeneration is inevitable.

  1. Y-chromosome evolution: emerging insights into processes of Y-chromosome degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-02-01

    The human Y chromosome is intriguing not only because it harbours the master-switch gene that determines gender but also because of its unusual evolutionary history. The Y chromosome evolved from an autosome, and its evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. Recent whole-genome and transcriptome analyses of Y chromosomes in humans and other primates, in Drosophila species and in plants have shed light on the current gene content of the Y chromosome, its origins and its long-term fate. Furthermore, comparative analysis of young and old Y chromosomes has given further insights into the evolutionary and molecular forces triggering Y-chromosome degeneration and into the evolutionary destiny of the Y chromosome. PMID:23329112

  2. The origin of the isolated population of the Faroe Islands investigated using Y chromosomal markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Tove H; Buttenschön, Henriette N; Wang, August G;

    2004-01-01

    complicating direct comparisons with other populations. No extensive immigration from Iceland to the Faroe Islands can be documented in the historical record. We therefore hypothesise that the high degree of Y chromosome similarity between the two populations arose because they were colonised at approximately...... and the Norwegian, Swedish and Icelandic Y chromosomes but also some similarity with the Scottish and Irish Y chromosomes. Diversity measures and estimates of effective population sizes also suggest that the original gene pool of the settlers have been influenced by random genetic drift, thus...

  3. Y-chromosome STR haplotypes in males from Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenberg, Charlotte; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Simonsen, Bo;

    2009-01-01

    A total of 272 males from Greenland were typed for 11 Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 with the PowerPlex Y System (Promega). A total of 146 different haplotypes were observed and the haplotype diversity was 0...

  4. Coral-associated Actinobacteria from the Arabian Gulf: diversity, abundance and biotechnological potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Mahmoud Mahmoud

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Actinobacteria are widely distributed in terrestrial environments, where they are considered a significant source of bioactive compounds, mainly antibiotics. Marine Actinobacteria, particularly coral-associated Actinobacteria, have attracted attention recently. In this study, the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria associated with Coscinaraea columna, Platygyra daedalea and Porites harrisoni, north of the Arabian Gulf were investigated. The corals of the Arabian Gulf, one of the world’s hottest seas, are thriving under extreme water temperatures that exceed 39°C during the summer. Similar water temperatures cause coral bleaching and death in other water bodies. For this reason, the corals of the Gulf are living models for investigating how corals in other settings may survive at the end of the current century.Different coral hosts have been found to harbor equivalent numbers of culturable Actinobacteria in their tissues but not in their mucus. However, different culturable actinobacterial communities have been found to be associated with different coral hosts. Differences in the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria were detected between the mucus and tissue of the same coral host. In addition, temporal and spatial variations in the abundance and diversity of the cultivable actinobacterial communities were detected. In total, 19 different actinobacterial genera, namely Micrococcus, Brachybacterium, Brevibacterium, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Renibacterium, Nocardia, Microbacterium, Dietzia, Cellulomonas, Ornithinimicrobium, Rhodococcus, Agrococcus, Kineococcus, Dermacoccus, Devriesea, Kocuria, Marmoricola and Arthrobacter, were isolated from the coral tissue and mucus samples. Furthermore, 82 isolates related to Micromonospora, Brachybacterium, Nocardia, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces showed antimicrobial activities against representative Gram-positive and/or Gram-negative bacteria. Even though

  5. Y chromosome evolution: emerging insights into processes of Y chromosome degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtrog, Doris

    2014-01-01

    The human Y chromosome is intriguing not only because it harbours the master-switch gene determining gender but also because of its unusual evolutionary trajectory. Previously an autosome, Y chromosome evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. Recent whole-genome and transcriptome analyses of Y chromosomes in humans and other primates, in Drosophila species as well as in plants have shed light on the current gene content of the Y, its origins and its long-term fate. Comparative analysis of young and old Y chromosomes have given further insights into the evolutionary and molecular forces triggering Y degeneration and its evolutionary destiny. PMID:23329112

  6. Novel gene acquisition on carnivore Y chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite its importance in harboring genes critical for spermatogenesis and male-specific functions, the Y chromosome has been largely excluded as a priority in recent mammalian genome sequencing projects. Only the human and chimpanzee Y chromosomes have been well characterized at the sequence level. This is primarily due to the presumed low overall gene content and highly repetitive nature of the Y chromosome and the ensuing difficulties using a shotgun sequence approach for assembly. Here we used direct cDNA selection to isolate and evaluate the extent of novel Y chromosome gene acquisition in the genome of the domestic cat, a species from a different mammalian superorder than human, chimpanzee, and mouse (currently being sequenced. We discovered four novel Y chromosome genes that do not have functional copies in the finished human male-specific region of the Y or on other mammalian Y chromosomes explored thus far. Two genes are derived from putative autosomal progenitors, and the other two have X chromosome homologs from different evolutionary strata. All four genes were shown to be multicopy and expressed predominantly or exclusively in testes, suggesting that their duplication and specialization for testis function were selected for because they enhance spermatogenesis. Two of these genes have testis-expressed, Y-borne copies in the dog genome as well. The absence of the four newly described genes on other characterized mammalian Y chromosomes demonstrates the gene novelty on this chromosome between mammalian orders, suggesting it harbors many lineage-specific genes that may go undetected by traditional comparative genomic approaches. Specific plans to identify the male-specific genes encoded in the Y chromosome of mammals should be a priority.

  7. Die Haplotypisierung des Y-Chromosoms

    OpenAIRE

    Roewer, Lutz

    2001-01-01

    Haploid vererbte Polymorphismen des Y-Chromosoms sind wichtige diagnostische Werkzeuge der forensischen Genetik und verwandter Disziplinen, insbesondere der Anthropologie. Geschlechtsspezifität und uniparentaler Erbgang der Merkmale ermöglichen eine Reihe von Untersuchungen, die mit autosomalen Markern erfolglos bleiben müssen. Kurze tandem-repetitive STR-Sequenzen, die polymorphen Marker der Wahl im forensischen Labor, sind auch auf dem Y-Chromosom nachzuweisen. Aufgrund der rekombinationsfr...

  8. Culture creates genetic structure in the Caucasus: Autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal variation in Daghestan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpending Henry C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Near the junction of three major continents, the Caucasus region has been an important thoroughfare for human migration. While the Caucasus Mountains have diverted human traffic to the few lowland regions that provide a gateway from north to south between the Caspian and Black Seas, highland populations have been isolated by their remote geographic location and their practice of patrilocal endogamy. We investigate how these cultural and historical differences between highland and lowland populations have affected patterns of genetic diversity. We test 1 whether the highland practice of patrilocal endogamy has generated sex-specific population relationships, and 2 whether the history of migration and military conquest associated with the lowland populations has left Central Asian genes in the Caucasus, by comparing genetic diversity and pairwise population relationships between Daghestani populations and reference populations throughout Europe and Asia for autosomal, mitochondrial, and Y-chromosomal markers. Results We found that the highland Daghestani populations had contrasting histories for the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome data sets. Y-chromosomal haplogroup diversity was reduced among highland Daghestani populations when compared to other populations and to highland Daghestani mitochondrial DNA haplogroup diversity. Lowland Daghestani populations showed Turkish and Central Asian affinities for both mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal data sets. Autosomal population histories are strongly correlated to the pattern observed for the mitochondrial DNA data set, while the correlation between the mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome distance matrices was weak and not significant. Conclusion The reduced Y-chromosomal diversity exhibited by highland Daghestani populations is consistent with genetic drift caused by patrilocal endogamy. Mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal phylogeographic comparisons indicate a common Near Eastern

  9. Genetic variation of goat Y chromosome in the Sardinian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonello Carta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sardinian goat population is commonly considered a crossbred of autochthonous animals with improved Mediterranean breeds, mainly the Maltese. It has been demonstrated by using autosomal microsatellites that the Sardinian goats can be divided into three subpopulations: Sardinian, crossbred with Maltese, and Maltese. The aim of this study was to evaluate sequence variation at Y chromosome in Sardinian bucks and to integrate autosomal microsatellites data. Blood from 190 bucks from 68 farms spread in the main Sardinian goat farming areas was sampled. Three ECONOGENE project primer pairs plus an additional one corresponding to a total of 7 SNPs were used. For all common SNPs, the most frequent allele corresponded to the ECONOGENE one. The additional analysed SNP showed allelic frequencies similar to the other markers. The comparison with haplotypes based on the 6 common SNPs showed that the Sardinian most frequent haplotype corresponded to the predominant one in Central Europe. Results of this study showed that the Sardinian goat population has 8 haplotypes resulting in a large diversity of paternal lineages. The next step will be linking autosomal information to Y chromosome data. In fact, up to date, it seems unfeasible to detect recent upgrading breeds by using Y chromosome variation only.

  10. Deep Roots for Aboriginal Australian Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Anders; Nagle, Nano; Chen, Yuan; McCarthy, Shane; Pollard, Martin O; Ayub, Qasim; Wilcox, Stephen; Wilcox, Leah; van Oorschot, Roland A H; McAllister, Peter; Williams, Lesley; Xue, Yali; Mitchell, R John; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-03-21

    Australia was one of the earliest regions outside Africa to be colonized by fully modern humans, with archaeological evidence for human presence by 47,000 years ago (47 kya) widely accepted [1, 2]. However, the extent of subsequent human entry before the European colonial age is less clear. The dingo reached Australia about 4 kya, indirectly implying human contact, which some have linked to changes in language and stone tool technology to suggest substantial cultural changes at the same time [3]. Genetic data of two kinds have been proposed to support gene flow from the Indian subcontinent to Australia at this time, as well: first, signs of South Asian admixture in Aboriginal Australian genomes have been reported on the basis of genome-wide SNP data [4]; and second, a Y chromosome lineage designated haplogroup C(∗), present in both India and Australia, was estimated to have a most recent common ancestor around 5 kya and to have entered Australia from India [5]. Here, we sequence 13 Aboriginal Australian Y chromosomes to re-investigate their divergence times from Y chromosomes in other continents, including a comparison of Aboriginal Australian and South Asian haplogroup C chromosomes. We find divergence times dating back to ∼50 kya, thus excluding the Y chromosome as providing evidence for recent gene flow from India into Australia. PMID:26923783

  11. Genomic Dark Matter Illuminated: Anopheles Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Seth N; Neafsey, Daniel E

    2016-08-01

    Hall et al. have strategically used long-read sequencing technology to characterize the structure and highly repetitive content of the Y chromosome in Anopheles malaria mosquitoes. Their work confirms that this important but elusive heterochromatic sex chromosome is evolving extremely rapidly and harbors a remarkably small number of genes. PMID:27263828

  12. Deep Roots for Aboriginal Australian Y Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Anders; Nagle, Nano; Chen, Yuan; McCarthy, Shane; Pollard, Martin O.; Ayub, Qasim; Wilcox, Stephen; Wilcox, Leah; van Oorschot, Roland A.H.; McAllister, Peter; Williams, Lesley; Xue, Yali; Mitchell, R. John; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Summary Australia was one of the earliest regions outside Africa to be colonized by fully modern humans, with archaeological evidence for human presence by 47,000 years ago (47 kya) widely accepted [1, 2]. However, the extent of subsequent human entry before the European colonial age is less clear. The dingo reached Australia about 4 kya, indirectly implying human contact, which some have linked to changes in language and stone tool technology to suggest substantial cultural changes at the same time [3]. Genetic data of two kinds have been proposed to support gene flow from the Indian subcontinent to Australia at this time, as well: first, signs of South Asian admixture in Aboriginal Australian genomes have been reported on the basis of genome-wide SNP data [4]; and second, a Y chromosome lineage designated haplogroup C∗, present in both India and Australia, was estimated to have a most recent common ancestor around 5 kya and to have entered Australia from India [5]. Here, we sequence 13 Aboriginal Australian Y chromosomes to re-investigate their divergence times from Y chromosomes in other continents, including a comparison of Aboriginal Australian and South Asian haplogroup C chromosomes. We find divergence times dating back to ∼50 kya, thus excluding the Y chromosome as providing evidence for recent gene flow from India into Australia. PMID:26923783

  13. Y-CHROMOSOMAL STR HAPLOTYPE DIVERSITY IN A SAMPLE FROM THE METROPOLITAN AREA OF BUENOS AIRES (ARGENTINA/Diversidad de Haplotipos del cromosoma Y en una muestra del área metropolitana de Buenos Aires (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Parolin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue analizar el origen de los haplotipos del cromosoma Y en una muestra poblacional del Área Metropolitana de Buenos Aires (AMBA, y comparar estos resultados con los obtenidos previamente a nivel mitocondrial. Se determinaron 17 marcadores Y-STRs en 85 donantes no emparentados. Un total de 85 haplotipos únicos fueron observados. La diversidad haplotípica  fue de 1,000+/-0.0018, y la diversidad genética media de 0,680+/-0,095. Los linajes paternos evidenciaron una homogeneidad genética de raíces Europeas (93%, procedentes principalmente de Italia y España. La contribución amerindia paterna asociada al sub-haplogrupo Q1a3a fue relativamente baja (6%. La menor proporción de haplotipos amerindios y el elevado número de linajes maternos (44% de ese origen, revela que ha habido un aporte diferencial por género en la historia de mestizaje de esa población. Se observó un único perfil E1b1a, el cual es predominante en  África subsahariana. Estos datos, conjuntamente con la información histórica y demográfica, nos permite afirmar que el bajo aporte amerindio y subsahariano observado en  la muestra del AMBA, sería el resultado de las migraciones recientes, iniciadas a mediados del siglo XX, principalmente desde el norte de Argentina y de países limítrofes de elevada composición nativa y, en menor medida, africana. Abstract The aim of this work was to analyze the origin of Y-chromosome haplotypes in a sample from Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area (BAMA, and compare these results with those obtained at a mitochondrial level. In order to reach this objective, 17 Y-STRs were determined from 85 unrelated blood donors. A total of 85 unique haplotypes were observed. The haplotype diversity was 1.000+/-0.0018, and the average genetic diversity 0.680+/-0.095. Paternal lineages showed a genetic homogeneity of European roots (93%, mainly from Italy and Spain. Amerindian paternal contribution associated to sub

  14. Sequence conservation on the Y chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, L.H.; Yang-Feng, L. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Lau, C. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The Y chromosome is present in all mammals and is considered to be essential to sex determination. Despite intense genomic research, only a few genes have been identified and mapped to this chromosome in humans. Several of them, such as SRY and ZFY, have been demonstrated to be conserved and Y-located in other mammals. In order to address the issue of sequence conservation on the Y chromosome, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA from a human Y cosmid library as a probe to study the Y chromosomes from other mammalian species. Total DNA from 3,000-4,500 cosmid pools were labeled with biotinylated-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes. For human and primate preparations, human cot1 DNA was included in the hybridization mixture to suppress the hybridization from repeat sequences. FISH signals were detected on the Y chromosomes of human, gorilla, orangutan and baboon (Old World monkey) and were absent on those of squirrel monkey (New World monkey), Indian munjac, wood lemming, Chinese hamster, rat and mouse. Since sequence analysis suggested that specific genes, e.g. SRY and ZFY, are conserved between these two groups, the lack of detectable hybridization in the latter group implies either that conservation of the human Y sequences is limited to the Y chromosomes of the great apes and Old World monkeys, or that the size of the syntenic segment is too small to be detected under the resolution of FISH, or that homologeous sequences have undergone considerable divergence. Further studies with reduced hybridization stringency are currently being conducted. Our results provide some clues as to Y-sequence conservation across species and demonstrate the limitations of FISH across species with total DNA sequences from a particular chromosome.

  15. Rainfall-driven sex-ratio genes in African buffalo suggested by correlations between Y-chromosomal haplotype frequencies and foetal sex ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Greyling Barend J; van Wieren Sipke E; Jolles Anna E; Getz Wayne M; Prins Herbert HT; van Hooft Pim; van Helden Paul D; Bastos Armanda DS

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The Y-chromosomal diversity in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) population of Kruger National Park (KNP) is characterized by rainfall-driven haplotype frequency shifts between year cohorts. Stable Y-chromosomal polymorphism is difficult to reconcile with haplotype frequency variations without assuming frequency-dependent selection or specific interactions in th...

  16. Y-chromosome-specific microsatellite variation in Australian aboriginals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, N; van Oorschot, R A; Tyler-Smith, C; Mitchell, R J

    1999-12-01

    The frequency distributions of 4 highly polymorphic Y-chromosome-specific microsatellites (DYS19, DYS390, DYS391, and DYS392) were determined in 79 unrelated Australian Aboriginal males from the Northern Territory. These results are compared with those observed in worldwide populations at both the locus and the haplotype level. Common alleles in Aboriginals are DYS19*15 (49%), DYS19*14 (28%), DYS390*19 (39%), DYS390*24 (20%), DYS391*10 (72%), DYS392*11 (63%), and DYS392*13 (28%). No evidence of reduced gene diversity was observed for these Y-chromosome alleles. DYS390 exhibits the most complex arrangement, displaying a bimodal distribution composed of common alleles (*22-*26), and rare short alleles (*18-*20), with an intermediate allele (*21) being absent. DYS390*20, previously reported only in Papuans and Samoans, is observed for the first time in Aboriginals. Compared with a recent study of Aboriginals, our sample exhibits considerable diversity in the haplotypes associated with the rare DYS390*19 allele, indicating that this allele is of considerable antiquity, if it arose as a single deletion event. Combining all 4 Y-chromosome-linked microsatellites produced 41 unique haplotypes, which were linked using a median-joining network. This network shows that most (78%) of our Aboriginal haplotypes fall into 2 distinct clusters, which likely represent 2 separate lineages. Seven haplotypes are shared with haplotypes found in a recent study of Aboriginals, and 7 are shared with a Spanish population. The cluster of Aboriginal haplotypes associated with the short DYS390 alleles does not share any haplotypes with the Spanish, indicating that this cluster of haplotypes is unique to Australian Aboriginals. Limited data from 4 worldwide populations used to construct haplotypes based on 3 loci (DYS19, DYS390, DYS392) show that only 4 of these haplotypes are seen in Australian Aboriginals. Shared haplotypes may be the result of admixture and/or recurrent mutation at these

  17. Exploring the Y Chromosomal Ancestry of Modern Panamanians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Grugni

    Full Text Available Geologically, Panama belongs to the Central American land-bridge between North and South America crossed by Homo sapiens >14 ka ago. Archaeologically, it belongs to a wider Isthmo-Colombian Area. Today, seven indigenous ethnic groups account for 12.3% of Panama's population. Five speak Chibchan languages and are characterized by low genetic diversity and a high level of differentiation. In addition, no evidence of differential structuring between maternally and paternally inherited genes has been reported in isthmian Chibchan cultural groups. Recent data have shown that 83% of the Panamanian general population harbour mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs of Native American ancestry. Considering differential male/female mortality at European contact and multiple degrees of geographical and genetic isolation over the subsequent five centuries, the Y-chromosome Native American component is expected to vary across different geographic regions and communities in Panama. To address this issue, we investigated Y-chromosome variation in 408 modern males from the nine provinces of Panama and one indigenous territory (the comarca of Kuna Yala. In contrast to mtDNA data, the Y-chromosome Native American component (haplogroup Q exceeds 50% only in three populations facing the Caribbean Sea: the comarca of Kuna Yala and Bocas del Toro province where Chibchan languages are spoken by the majority, and the province of Colón where many Kuna and people of mixed indigenous-African-and-European descent live. Elsewhere the Old World component is dominant and mostly represented by western Eurasian haplogroups, which signal the strong male genetic impact of invaders. Sub-Saharan African input accounts for 5.9% of male haplotypes. This reflects the consequences of the colonial Atlantic slave trade and more recent influxes of West Indians of African heritage. Overall, our findings reveal a local evolution of the male Native American ancestral gene pool, and a strong but

  18. Exploring the Y Chromosomal Ancestry of Modern Panamanians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugni, Viola; Battaglia, Vincenza; Perego, Ugo Alessandro; Raveane, Alessandro; Lancioni, Hovirag; Olivieri, Anna; Ferretti, Luca; Woodward, Scott R; Pascale, Juan Miguel; Cooke, Richard; Myres, Natalie; Motta, Jorge; Torroni, Antonio; Achilli, Alessandro; Semino, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    Geologically, Panama belongs to the Central American land-bridge between North and South America crossed by Homo sapiens >14 ka ago. Archaeologically, it belongs to a wider Isthmo-Colombian Area. Today, seven indigenous ethnic groups account for 12.3% of Panama's population. Five speak Chibchan languages and are characterized by low genetic diversity and a high level of differentiation. In addition, no evidence of differential structuring between maternally and paternally inherited genes has been reported in isthmian Chibchan cultural groups. Recent data have shown that 83% of the Panamanian general population harbour mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of Native American ancestry. Considering differential male/female mortality at European contact and multiple degrees of geographical and genetic isolation over the subsequent five centuries, the Y-chromosome Native American component is expected to vary across different geographic regions and communities in Panama. To address this issue, we investigated Y-chromosome variation in 408 modern males from the nine provinces of Panama and one indigenous territory (the comarca of Kuna Yala). In contrast to mtDNA data, the Y-chromosome Native American component (haplogroup Q) exceeds 50% only in three populations facing the Caribbean Sea: the comarca of Kuna Yala and Bocas del Toro province where Chibchan languages are spoken by the majority, and the province of Colón where many Kuna and people of mixed indigenous-African-and-European descent live. Elsewhere the Old World component is dominant and mostly represented by western Eurasian haplogroups, which signal the strong male genetic impact of invaders. Sub-Saharan African input accounts for 5.9% of male haplotypes. This reflects the consequences of the colonial Atlantic slave trade and more recent influxes of West Indians of African heritage. Overall, our findings reveal a local evolution of the male Native American ancestral gene pool, and a strong but geographically

  19. Diversity of planktonic Ostracods (Crustacea: Ostracoda in the mixed layer of northeastern Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Purushothaman

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic ostracods contribute significantly to the biomass of zooplankton in the Arabian Sea with an unusually high density due to swarming.  However, due to the small size, their abundance is often underestimated.  In this paper, the diversity of planktonic ostracods in the mixed layer depth of the northeastern Arabian Sea in relation to environmental parameters during the summer monsoon is presented.  The mean abundance in the mixed layer depth was very high.  About 26 species belonging to 17 genera representing two families were recognized.  Out of this, 25 species belonged to (3 sub families, 16 genera the order Myodocopa and one to the order Myodocopida.  The dominant species were Cypridina dentata, Euconchoecia aculeata, Conchoecia subarcuata and Orthoconchoecia atlantica.  Cypridina dentata and Euconchoecia aculeata contributed to about 89% of the total abundance.  The results suggest that the distribution and diversity of ostracods were very much influenced by the hydrographic conditions of the Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon. 

  20. Heterogeneity and diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in select Saudi Arabian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSuhaibani, E S; Kizilbash, N A; Malik, S

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the diversity of ABO and Rh blood group genes in the Saudi Arabian population, we assembled the phenotypic data of approximately 66,000 subjects from ten representative Saudi populations: Al-Khobar, Riyadh, Tabuk/Madina Al-Munawaara, Jeddah, Abha, South region, Sakaka, Domah, Al-Qurayat, and Sweer. The frequencies of p[A], q[B], and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus were observed to be 0.1688, 0.1242, and 0.7070, respectively, and the frequency of the D allele at the Rh locus was 0.7138. The heterozygosities at the ABO and Rh loci were 0.4563 and 0.4086, respectively, while the combined heterozygosity was 0.4324. Homogeneity tests revealed the population of Abha to be the most heterogeneous while that of Tabuk/Madina was found to be the least heterogeneous. Homogeneity was higher among the Northern populations while Southern populations demonstrated subdivisions and stratification. Gene diversity analyses yielded a total heterozygosity value of 0.4449. The coefficient of gene differentiation was 0.0090. Nei's genetic distance analyses showed that there was close affinity between the populations of Al-Khobar and Riyadh. The largest differences were observed between the populations of Sakaka and Domah. Furthermore, negative correlations were found between p[A] and r[O] alleles, and between q[B] and r[O] alleles at the ABO locus. Clinal analyses revealed that the r[O] allele showed an increasing trend from North-East to South-West, and conversely the q[B] allele exhibited a decreasing trend at these coordinates. These analyses present interesting aspects of the blood group allele distribution across the geography of Saudi Arabia. PMID:26214466

  1. Globally Divergent but Locally Convergent X- and Y-Chromosome Influences on Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raznahan, Armin; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Greenstein, Deanna; Wallace, Gregory L; Blumenthal, Jonathan D; Clasen, Liv S; Giedd, Jay N

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their unique evolutionary history, modern mammalian X- and Y-chromosomes have highly divergent gene contents counterbalanced by regulatory features, which preferentially restrict expression of X- and Y-specific genes. These 2 characteristics make opposing predictions regarding the expected dissimilarity of X- vs. Y-chromosome influences on biological structure and function. Here, we quantify this dissimilarity using in vivo neuroimaging within a rare cohort of humans with diverse sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). We show that X- and Y-chromosomes have opposing effects on overall brain size but exert highly convergent influences on local brain anatomy, which manifest across biologically distinct dimensions of the cerebral cortex. Large-scale online meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging data indicates that convergent sex chromosome dosage effects preferentially impact centers for social perception, communication, and decision-making. Thus, despite an almost complete lack of sequence homology, and opposing effects on overall brain size, X- and Y-chromosomes exert congruent effects on the proportional size of cortical systems involved in adaptive social functioning. These convergent X-Y effects (i) track the dosage of those few genes that are still shared by X- and Y-chromosomes, and (ii) may provide a biological substrate for the link between SCA and increased rates of psychopathology. PMID:25146371

  2. Y chromosome microdeletions in Turkish infertile men

    OpenAIRE

    Zamani Ayse; Kutlu Ruhusen; Durakbasi-Dursun H; Gorkemli Huseyin; Acar Aynur

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To detect the frequency and types of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men attending to our university intracytoplasmic sperm injection ICSI/IVF centre and fertile control subjects in our patient population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A total of 50 infertile men who were referred to IVF center of Meram medical faculty were selected for the molecular azospermia factor (AZF) screening program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Karyotype analysis and polymeras...

  3. Evolution of Y chromosome gene functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žlůvová, Jitka; Marková, Michaela; Janoušek, Bohuslav; Vyskot, Boris

    Marseilles, 2006. s. 19-19. [10th Evolution ary Biology Meeting at Marseilles. 20.09.2006-22.09.2006, Marseilles] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP204/05/P505; GA ČR(CZ) GD205/05/H505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : Silene latifolia * Y chromosome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  4. Y chromosomal STR analysis using Pyrosequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Hanna; Allen, Marie

    2009-03-01

    Analysis of Y chromosome STR markers has proven to be useful in forensic cases where the samples contain a mixture of DNA from several individuals. STR markers are commonly genotyped based on length separation of PCR products. In this study we evaluated if Pyrosequencing can be used as an alternative method for determining Y-STR variants. In total 70 unrelated Swedish males were typed for the Y chromosomal markers (DYS19, DYS389 I-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393 and DYS438) using Pyrosequencing. Using the 8 markers, 57 unique haplotypes were observed with a discrimination capacity of 0.81. At four loci, the Pyrosequencing analysis revealed sequence variants. The sequence variants were found in the DYS389 II, DYS390, DYS391, and DYS393 loci in frequencies between 1.43% and 14.3%. Pyrosequencing has here been shown to be a useful tool for typing Y chromosomal STRs and the method can provide a complement to conventional forensic Y STR analyses. Moreover, the Pyrosequencing method can be used to rapidly evaluate novel markers. PMID:19215881

  5. Refining the Y chromosome phylogeny with southern African sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Chiara; Hübner, Alexander; Macholdt, Enrico; Ni, Shengyu; Lippold, Sebastian; Schröder, Roland; Mpoloka, Sununguko Wata; Purps, Josephine; Roewer, Lutz; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    The recent availability of large-scale sequence data for the human Y chromosome has revolutionized analyses of and insights gained from this non-recombining, paternally inherited chromosome. However, the studies to date focus on Eurasian variation, and hence the diversity of early-diverging branches found in Africa has not been adequately documented. Here, we analyze over 900 kb of Y chromosome sequence obtained from 547 individuals from southern African Khoisan- and Bantu-speaking populations, identifying 232 new sequences from basal haplogroups A and B. We identify new clades in the phylogeny, an older age for the root, and substantially older ages for some individual haplogroups. Furthermore, while haplogroup B2a is traditionally associated with the spread of Bantu speakers, we find that it probably also existed in Khoisan groups before the arrival of Bantu speakers. Finally, there is pronounced variation in branch length between major haplogroups; in particular, haplogroups associated with Bantu speakers have significantly longer branches. Technical artifacts cannot explain this branch length variation, which instead likely reflects aspects of the demographic history of Bantu speakers, such as recent population expansion and an older average paternal age. The influence of demographic factors on branch length variation has broader implications both for the human Y phylogeny and for similar analyses of other species. PMID:27043341

  6. Y-Chromosome haplogroup I prehistoric gene flow in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siiri Rootsi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate which aspects of contemporary human Y-chromosome variation in Europe are characteristic of primary colonization, late-glacial expansions from refuge areas, Neolithic dispersals or more recent events in gene flow haplogroup I was analyzed. The analysis of Hg I Y chromosomes revealed several sub-clades with distinct geographic distributions. Sub-clade I1a accounts for most of Hg I in Scandinavia, with a rapidly decreasing frequency towards the East European Plain and the Atlantic fringe; but microsatellite diversity reveals that the Iberian Peninsula/Southern France refugial area could be the source region of the early spread of both I1a and the less common I1c. I1b* extends from the eastern Adriatic to Eastern Europe, and declines noticeably towards the southern Balkans, and abruptly towards North Italy. This clade probably diffused after the Last Glacial Maximum from a homeland in the Balkans or Eastern Europe. In contrast, I1b2 most probably arose in southern France/Iberia, underwent a post-glacial expansion, and marked the human colonization of Sardinia about 9000 years ago.

  7. Species diversity variations in Neogene deep-sea benthic foraminifera at ODP Hole 730A, western Arabian Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuvaraja Arumugm; Anil K Gupta; Mruganka K Panigrahi

    2014-10-01

    Deep-sea benthic foraminifera are an important and widely used marine proxy to understand paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic changes on regional and global scales, owing to their sensitivity to oceanic and climatic turnovers. Some species of benthic foraminifera are sensitive to changes in water mass properties whereas others are sensitive to organic fluxes and deep-sea oxygenation. Benthic faunal diversity has been found closely linked to food web, bottom water oxygen levels, and substrate and water mass stability. The present study is aimed at analyzing species diversity trends in benthic foraminifera and their linkages with Indian monsoon variability during the Neogene. Species diversity of benthic foraminifera is examined in terms of number of species (S), information function (H), equitability (E) and Sanders’ rarefied values, which were combined with relative abundances of high and low productivity benthic foraminifera at Ocean Drilling Program Hole 730A, Oman margin, western Arabian Sea. The Oman margin offers the best opportunity to understand monsoon-driven changes in benthic diversity since summer monsoon winds have greater impact on the study area. The species diversity was higher during the early Miocene Climatic Optimum (∼17.2–16.4 Ma) followed by a decrease during 16.4–13 Ma coinciding with a major increase in Antarctic ice volume and increased formation of Antarctic Bottom Water. All the diversity parameters show an increase during 13–11.6 Ma, a gradual decrease during 11.6–9 Ma and then an increase with a maximum at 7 Ma. Thereafter the values show little change until 1.2 Ma when all the parameters abruptly decrease. The benthic foraminiferal populations and diversity at Hole 730A were mainly driven by the Indian monsoon, and polar waters might have played a minor or no role since early Neogene period as the Arabian Sea is an enclosed basin.

  8. New native South American Y chromosome lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jota, Marilza S; Lacerda, Daniela R; Sandoval, José R; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Ohasi, Dominique; Santos-Júnior, José E; Acosta, Oscar; Cuellar, Cinthia; Revollo, Susana; Paz-Y-Miño, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Schurr, Theodore G; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo M; Pena, Sergio Dj; Ayub, Qasim; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Santos, Fabrício R

    2016-07-01

    Many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the non-recombining region of the human Y chromosome have been described in the last decade. High-coverage sequencing has helped to characterize new SNPs, which has in turn increased the level of detail in paternal phylogenies. However, these paternal lineages still provide insufficient information on population history and demography, especially for Native Americans. The present study aimed to identify informative paternal sublineages derived from the main founder lineage of the Americas-haplogroup Q-L54-in a sample of 1841 native South Americans. For this purpose, we used a Y-chromosomal genotyping multiplex platform and conventional genotyping methods to validate 34 new SNPs that were identified in the present study by sequencing, together with many Y-SNPs previously described in the literature. We updated the haplogroup Q phylogeny and identified two new Q-M3 and three new Q-L54*(xM3) sublineages defined by five informative SNPs, designated SA04, SA05, SA02, SA03 and SA29. Within the Q-M3, sublineage Q-SA04 was mostly found in individuals from ethnic groups belonging to the Tukanoan linguistic family in the northwest Amazon, whereas sublineage Q-SA05 was found in Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon ethnic groups. Within Q-L54*, the derived sublineages Q-SA03 and Q-SA02 were exclusively found among Coyaima individuals (Cariban linguistic family) from Colombia, while Q-SA29 was found only in Maxacali individuals (Jean linguistic family) from southeast Brazil. Furthermore, we validated the usefulness of several published SNPs among indigenous South Americans. This new Y chromosome haplogroup Q phylogeny offers an informative paternal genealogy to investigate the pre-Columbian history of South America.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 31 March 2016; doi:10.1038/jhg.2016.26. PMID:27030145

  9. Genetic polymorphisms of 17 short tandem repeat loci on Y chromosome in central Croatian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gršković, Branka; Mršić, Gordan; Polašek, Ozren; Vrdoljak, Andro; Merkaš, Siniša; Anđelinović, Simun

    2011-06-01

    In forensic casework, Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) haplotyping is used in human identification, paternity testing and sexual assault cases where Y-STRs provide a male-specific DNA profile. The aim of this study was to describe the genetic structure of Y chromosome in a central Croatian population. We carried out a statistical analysis of the data from previously performed genetic analyses collected during routine forensic work by the Forensic Science Centre "Ivan Vučetić". A total of 220 unrelated healthy men from central Croatia were selected for the purpose of this study. Genomic DNA was extracted using a Chelex procedure from FTA(®) cards. Y-chromosomal STRs were determined using the AmpFISTR Yfiler PCR amplification kit. The haplotype frequencies were determined by direct counting and analyzed using Arlequin 3.1 and analysis of molecular variance calculated with the Y chromosome haplotype reference database online analysis tool. A total of 212 haplotypes were identified, 204 of which were unique. Total haplotype diversity was 0.993. Locus diversity varied from 0.325 for DYS392 to 0.786 for DYS385. Discrimination capacity was 92.7%. Allele frequencies diversity was 0.615. Intermediate alleles 17.2, 18.2 and 19.2 were found at DYS458 locus. A comparison with published data for the European minimal haplotype set showed the closest relationship to the Croatian capital of Zagreb and Bosnia and Herzegovina with significant genetic distance from Slovenia and Austria. The central Croatian population is now well characterized in terms of Y-chromosome STRs, thus providing a solid basis for further forensic and genetic epidemiology studies. PMID:21279707

  10. Population data for 17 short tandem repeat loci on Y chromosome in northern Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gršković, Branka; Mršić, Gordan; Polašek, Ozren; Vrdoljak, Andro; Merkaš, Siniša; Anđelinović, Simun

    2011-03-01

    Human Y-short tandem repeats (STRs) are tandem repeat arrays of two to seven base pair units on non-recombining region (NRY) of the human Y chromosome. Studies on Y-STR are interesting in both population genetics and forensics. The aim of this study was to investigate the population genetic properties of 17 STR loci on Y chromosome in the northern Croatia region. We carried out a statistical analysis of the data from previously performed genetic analysis collected during routine forensic work by the Forensic Science Centre "Ivan Vučetić". A total of 220 unrelated healthy men from northern Croatia were selected for the purpose of this study. Genomic DNA was extracted using Chelex procedure from FTA(®) cards. Y-chromosomal STRs were determined using the AmpFISTR Yfiler PCR amplification kit. The haplotype frequencies were determined by direct counting and analyzed using Arlequin 3.1 and analysis of molecular variance calculated with the Y chromosome haplotype reference database online analysis tool. A total of 210 haplotypes were identified, 200 of which were unique. Total haplotype diversity was 0.995. Locus diversity varied from 0.331 for DYS392 to 0.783 for DYS385 locus. Allele frequencies diversity was 0.662. Discrimination capacity was 95.7%. The use of European minimal haplotype set indicated the most resemblance of this population to the Croatian capital of Zagreb, with modest resemblance to Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Hungary. This article provides the first overview of the Y chromosome STR variability in northern Croatia, thus providing the referent point for any future forensic and genetic epidemiology efforts in this region. PMID:20859689

  11. Y-chromosome STR haplotypes in males from Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallenberg, Charlotte; Tomas, Carmen; Simonsen, Bo; Morling, Niels

    2009-09-01

    A total of 272 males from Greenland were typed for 11 Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 with the PowerPlex Y System (Promega). A total of 146 different haplotypes were observed and the haplotype diversity was 0.9887. The number of haplotypes seen once was 108 and the most common haplotype was observed in 12 males. A significant F(ST) value was observed (F(ST)=0.012, P<0.00001) when comparing the population of 15 locations in Greenland assigned to 7 groups. The significance could mainly be attributed to the subpopulation of males from Tasiilaq (East of Greenland). The R(ST) value was not statistically significant (R(ST)=0.016, P=0.15). PMID:19647703

  12. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  13. Identification of genetic variation on the horse y chromosome and the tracing of male founder lineages in modern breeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Wallner

    Full Text Available The paternally inherited Y chromosome displays the population genetic history of males. While modern domestic horses (Equus caballus exhibit abundant diversity within maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA, no significant Y-chromosomal sequence diversity has been detected. We used high throughput sequencing technology to identify the first polymorphic Y-chromosomal markers useful for tracing paternal lines. The nucleotide variability of the modern horse Y chromosome is extremely low, resulting in six haplotypes (HT, all clearly distinct from the Przewalski horse (E. przewalskii. The most widespread HT1 is ancestral and the other five haplotypes apparently arose on the background of HT1 by mutation or gene conversion after domestication. Two haplotypes (HT2 and HT3 are widely distributed at high frequencies among modern European horse breeds. Using pedigree information, we trace the distribution of Y-haplotype diversity to particular founders. The mutation leading to HT3 occurred in the germline of the famous English Thoroughbred stallion "Eclipse" or his son or grandson and its prevalence demonstrates the influence of this popular paternal line on modern sport horse breeds. The pervasive introgression of Thoroughbred stallions during the last 200 years to refine autochthonous breeds has strongly affected the distribution of Y-chromosomal variation in modern horse breeds and has led to the replacement of autochthonous Y chromosomes. Only a few northern European breeds bear unique variants at high frequencies or fixed within but not shared among breeds. Our Y-chromosomal data complement the well established mtDNA lineages and document the male side of the genetic history of modern horse breeds and breeding practices.

  14. Y chromosome microdeletions in Turkish infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamani Ayse

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To detect the frequency and types of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men attending to our university intracytoplasmic sperm injection ICSI/IVF centre and fertile control subjects in our patient population. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A total of 50 infertile men who were referred to IVF center of Meram medical faculty were selected for the molecular azospermia factor (AZF screening program. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Karyotype analysis and polymerase chain reaction amplification using 15 Y-specific sequence-tagged sites of AZF region were done. RESULTS: The total prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities was found to be 10% (5/50, including 4 patients with numerical and 1 patient with structural abnormalities. Overall, 4 of the 50 patients tested (8% exhibited deletions of the Y chromosome, 3 of them being azospermic and 1 of them oligospermic men. The frequency of the microdeletions in subgroups with azospermia and oligozoospermia was found to be 10.7% (3/29 and 4.7% (1/21 respectively. Microdeletions of AZFb and AZFc regions were detected in all of the 4 patients. Neither AZFa nor AZFd microdeletions were indicated. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that one must know whether there is a genetic cause for male infertility before patients can be subjected to ISCI or testicular sperm extraction (TESE/ISCI treatment.

  15. Decreased Rate of Evolution in Y Chromosome STR Loci of Increased Size of the Repeat Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järve, Mari; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; Rootsi, Siiri; Help, Hela; Rogaev, Evgeny I.; Khusnutdinova, Elza K.; Kivisild, Toomas; Sanchez, Juan J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Polymorphic Y chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) have been widely used in population genetic and evolutionary studies. Compared to di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats, STRs with longer repeat units occur more rarely and are far less commonly used. Principal Findings In order to study the evolutionary dynamics of STRs according to repeat unit size, we analysed variation at 24 Y chromosome repeat loci: 1 tri-, 14 tetra-, 7 penta-, and 2 hexanucleotide loci. According to our results, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats have approximately two times lower repeat variance and diversity than tri- and tetranucleotide repeats, indicating that their mutation rate is about half of that of tri- and tetranucleotide repeats. Thus, STR markers with longer repeat units are more robust in distinguishing Y chromosome haplogroups and, in some cases, phylogenetic splits within established haplogroups. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Y chromosome STRs of increased repeat unit size have a lower rate of evolution, which has significant relevance in population genetic and evolutionary studies. PMID:19789645

  16. Epigenetic Pattern on the Human Y Chromosome Is Evolutionarily Conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minjie; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Agbagwa, Ikechukwu O; Wang, Ling-Xiang; Wang, Yingzhi; Yan, Shi; Ren, Shancheng; Sun, Yinghao; Pei, Gang; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jiang; Jin, Li; Li, Hui; Sun, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role for mammalian development. However, it is unclear whether the DNA methylation pattern is evolutionarily conserved. The Y chromosome serves as a powerful tool for the study of human evolution because it is transferred between males. In this study, based on deep-rooted pedigrees and the latest Y chromosome phylogenetic tree, we performed epigenetic pattern analysis of the Y chromosome from 72 donors. By comparing their respective DNA methylation level, we found that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was stable among family members and haplogroups. Interestingly, two haplogroup-specific methylation sites were found, which were both genotype-dependent. Moreover, the African and Asian samples also had similar DNA methylation pattern with a remote divergence time. Our findings indicated that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was conservative during human male history. PMID:26760298

  17. Genetic polymorphism of 11 Y-chromosomal STR loci in Yunnan Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanmei, Yang; Tao, Gu; Yubao, Zeng; Chunjie, Xiao; Bifeng, Chen; Shi, Luo; Bingying, Xu; Qiang, Jing; Qinyong, Zhuang; Wen, Zhang; Shengjun, Luo; Shengjie, Nie

    2010-02-01

    Allele frequencies and haplotypes of 11 Y-chromosome STR loci, DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385 ab, DYS438, DYS439 and DYS437 were determined in 320 unrelated Yunnan Han Chinese males. A total of 293 haplotypes were identified, of which 268 were unique, 23 were shared in two individuals, and 2 were shared in three individuals. The allele diversity values for each locus ranged from 0.4087 (DYS438) to 0.9701 (DYS385). The allele observed haplotypes diversity value was 0.9994. The combined Y-chromosome STR polymorphisms provide a powerful discrimination tool for routine forensic applications. PMID:20129460

  18. Genetic polymorphisms for 17 Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes in Jammu and Kashmir Saraswat Brahmin population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bhuvnesh; Raina, Anupuma; Dogra, Tirath Das

    2010-09-01

    In this study 17 Y-chromosomal STRs (including DYS19, DYS389I, DS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y GATA H4) were analysed using blood samples of 122 unrelated male individuals belonging to Saraswat Brahmin community from Jammu (ID YP000599) and Kashmir (ID YP000600) region of J&K state of India. The allelic frequency distribution and haplotype diversity of 17 Y-chromosomal STR for both the populations were calculated. In the Kashmiri Saraswat group, a total of 109 haplotypes were identified in 122 individuals, of these haplotypes, 101 were found only once. The gene diversity values of STR loci ranged from 0.4813 (DYS391) to 0.8645 (DYS385a/b) for Jammu & Kashmiri Saraswat Brahmins. PMID:20621539

  19. Evolutionary interaction between W/Y chromosome and transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwińska, Ewa B; Martyka, Rafał; Tryjanowski, Piotr

    2016-06-01

    The W/Y chromosome is unique among chromosomes as it does not recombine in its mature form. The main side effect of cessation of recombination is evolutionary instability and degeneration of the W/Y chromosome, or frequent W/Y chromosome turnovers. Another important feature of W/Y chromosome degeneration is transposable element (TEs) accumulation. Transposon accumulation has been confirmed for all W/Y chromosomes that have been sequenced so far. Models of W/Y chromosome instability include the assemblage of deleterious mutations in protein coding genes, but do not include the influence of transposable elements that are accumulated gradually in the non-recombining genome. The multiple roles of genomic TEs, and the interactions between retrotransposons and genome defense proteins are currently being studied intensively. Small RNAs originating from retrotransposon transcripts appear to be, in some cases, the only mediators of W/Y chromosome function. Based on the review of the most recent publications, we present knowledge on W/Y evolution in relation to retrotransposable element accumulation. PMID:27000053

  20. Y chromosome microdeletions in azoospermic patients with Klinefelter's syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anurag Mitra; Rima Dada; Rajeev Kumar; Narmada Prasad Gupta; Kiran Kucheria; Satish Kumar Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the occurrence of Y chromosome microdeletions in azoospermic patients with Klinefelter's syndrome (KFS). Methods: Blood and semen samples were collected from azoospermic patients with KFS (n = 14) and a control group of men of proven fertility (n = 13). Semen analysis was done according to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Blood samples were processed for karyotyping, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and measurement of plasma follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) by radioimmunoassay. To determine Y chromosome microdeletions, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of 16 sequence tagged sites (STS) and three genes (DFFRY, XKRY and RBM1 Y) was performed on isolated genomic DNA. Testicular fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) was done in selected cases. Results: Y chromosome microdeletions spanning the azoospermia factor (AZF)a and AZFb loci were found in four of the 14 azoospermic patients with KFS. Karyotype and FISH analysis revealed that, of the four cases showing Y chromosome microdeletion, three cases had a 47,XXY/46,XY chromosomal pattern and one case had a 46,XY/47,XXY/48,XXXY/48,XXYY chromosomal pattern. The testicular FNAC of one sample with Y chromosome microdeletion revealed Sertoli cell-only type of morphology. However, no Y chromosome microdeletions were observed in any of the 13 fertile men. All patients with KFS had elevated plasma FSH levels. Conclusion:Patients with KFS may harbor Y chromosome microdeletions and screening for these should be a part of their diagnostic work-up, particularly in those considering assisted reproductive techniques.

  1. Rainfall-driven sex-ratio genes in African buffalo suggested by correlations between Y-chromosomal haplotype frequencies and foetal sex ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greyling Barend J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Y-chromosomal diversity in the African buffalo (Syncerus caffer population of Kruger National Park (KNP is characterized by rainfall-driven haplotype frequency shifts between year cohorts. Stable Y-chromosomal polymorphism is difficult to reconcile with haplotype frequency variations without assuming frequency-dependent selection or specific interactions in the population dynamics of X- and Y-chromosomal genes, since otherwise the fittest haplotype would inevitably sweep to fixation. Stable Y-chromosomal polymorphism due one of these factors only seems possible when there are Y-chromosomal distorters of an equal sex ratio, which act by negatively affecting X-gametes, or Y-chromosomal suppressors of a female-biased sex ratio. These sex-ratio (SR genes modify (suppress gamete transmission in their own favour at a fitness cost, allowing for stable polymorphism. Results Here we show temporal correlations between Y-chromosomal haplotype frequencies and foetal sex ratios in the KNP buffalo population, suggesting SR genes. Frequencies varied by a factor of five; too high to be alternatively explained by Y-chromosomal effects on pregnancy loss. Sex ratios were male-biased during wet and female-biased during dry periods (male proportion: 0.47-0.53, seasonally and annually. Both wet and dry periods were associated with a specific haplotype indicating a SR distorter and SR suppressor, respectively. Conclusions The distinctive properties suggested for explaining Y-chromosomal polymorphism in African buffalo may not be restricted to this species alone. SR genes may play a broader and largely overlooked role in mammalian sex-ratio variation.

  2. Large organic-walled Protista ( Gromia) in the Arabian Sea: Density, diversity, distribution and ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda da Silva, A.; Gooday, A. J.

    2009-03-01

    The genus Gromia includes large marine protists ('gromiids') with filose pseudopodia and sack-like organic tests. The first deep-water species were discovered in the 1990s on the Oman Margin of the Arabian Sea and subsequently found on the Pakistan Margin. We present a survey of gromiids in samples collected off Oman in 2002 and off Pakistan in 2003. In addition to the two species ( Gromia sphaerica and Gromia pyriformis) already described from this area, at least eight undescribed gromiid species were present. Sausage shaped, grape shaped and spherical morphotypes were represented among this material. On the Oman Margin, gromiids occurred in densities up to several thousand individuals m -2 at 1400 and 1700 m but were much less common at 1100 and 2000 m. Apart from G. pyriformis, which was fairly common (several hundred individuals m -2) at 1000 m, gromiids were uncommon in core samples taken off Pakistan, with 11 indiv. m -2 at 1200 m and 19 indiv. m -2 at 1850 m. On both margins, these protists occurred at depths >1000 m where bottom-water oxygen concentrations exceeded ˜0.2 ml l -1 (=8.92 μM l -1) land sediments were fully bioturbated and oxidised. However, they were not observed at similar oxygen levels above the OMZ. Most gromiids lived on the sediment surface with their apertures facing down and their pseudopodia presumably deployed into the sediment to feed on surficial material and associated bacteria. We conclude that these large protists may play an important ecological role in the bathyal Arabian Sea, particularly in carbon cycling but also in structuring the surficial sediments. In addition, their tests, particularly those of G. sphaerica, provide substrates for attached Foraminifera.

  3. Dual origins of dairy cattle farming--evidence from a comprehensive survey of European Y-chromosomal variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, C.J.; Ginja, C.; Kantanen, J.; Perez-Pardal, L.; Tresset, A.; Stock, F.; Gama, L.T.; Penedo, M.C.; Bradley, D.G.; Lenstra, J.A.; Nijman, I.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diversity patterns of livestock species are informative to the history of agriculture and indicate uniqueness of breeds as relevant for conservation. So far, most studies on cattle have focused on mitochondrial and autosomal DNA variation. Previous studies of Y-chromosomal variation, wit

  4. Multiplex PCR and minisequencing of SNPs--a model with 35 Y chromosome SNPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Juan J; Børsting, Claus; Hallenberg, Charlotte;

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a robust single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) typing assay with co-amplification of 25 DNA-fragments and the detection of 35 human Y chromosome SNPs. The sizes of the PCR products ranged from 79 to 186 base pairs. PCR primers were designed to have a theoretical Tm of 60 +/- 5...... approximately 100 pg DNA. The minisequencing reactions were performed simultaneously for all 35 SNPs with fluorescently labelled dideoxynucleotides. The size of the minisequencing primers ranged from 19 to 106 nucleotides. The minisequencing reactions were analysed by capillary electrophoresis and multicolour...... fluorescence detection. Female DNA did not influence the results of Y chromosome SNP typing when added in concentrations more than 300 times the concentrations of male DNA. The frequencies of the 35 SNPs were determined in 194 male Danes. The gene diversity of the SNPs ranged from 0.01 to 0.5....

  5. Larger mitochondrial DNA than Y-chromosome differences between matrilocal and patrilocal groups from Sumatra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen Dröfn; Nandineni, Madhusudan R; Li, Mingkun; Myles, Sean; Gil, David; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Stoneking, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Genetic differences between human populations are typically larger for the Y-chromosome than for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which has been attributed to the ubiquity of patrilocality across human cultures. However, this claim has been disputed, and previous analyses of matrilocal groups give conflicting results. Here we analyse mtDNA variation (complete mtDNA genome sequences via next-generation sequencing) and non-recombining regions of the Y-chromosome variation (Y-single-nucleotide-polymorphisms and Y-short-tandem-repeats (STR)) in a matrilocal group (the Semende) and a patrilocal group (the Besemah) from Sumatra. We find in the Semende significantly lower mtDNA diversity than in the Besemah as expected for matrilocal groups, but unexpectedly we find no difference in Y-chromosome diversity between the groups. We highlight the importance of using complete mtDNA sequences for such analyses, as using only partial sequences (as done in previous studies) can give misleading results. PMID:21407194

  6. Loss of Y Chromosome in Men Tied to Alzheimer's Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss of Y Chromosome in Men Tied to Alzheimer's Risk Study raises provocative questions, expert says To ... age may have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests. The study of ...

  7. Retrieving Y chromosomal haplogroup trees using GWAS data

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Min-Sheng; He, Jun-Dong; Fan, Long; Liu, Jie; Adeola, Adeniyi C; Wu, Shi-Fang; Murphy, Robert W; Yao, Yong-Gang; Zhang, Ya-ping

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetically informative Y chromosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs) integrated in DNA chips have not been sufficiently explored in most genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Herein, we introduce a pipeline to retrieve Y-SNP data. We introduce the software YTool (http://mitotool.org/ytool/) to handle conversion, filtering, and annotation of the data. Genome-wide SNP data from populations in Myanmar are used to construct a haplogroup tree for 117 Y chromosomes based on 369 hig...

  8. Is Native American R Y-Chromosome of African Origin?

    OpenAIRE

    Clyde Winters

    2011-01-01

    Controversey surrounds the phylogeography and origin of the R haplotype among Native Americans. Some researchers have suggested that Europeans spread this haplotype among Native Americans. The purpose of this study was to determine the origin of the R-M173 y-chromosome among Native Americans . It is the third most frequent y-chromosome possessed by Native Americans. Native Americans with the highest frequency of R-M173 haplotypes like the Ojibwa and Seminoles mated frequently with African mal...

  9. Degeneration of the Y chromosome in evolutionary aging models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, M. P.; Onody, R. N.

    2005-06-01

    The Y chromosomes are genetically degenerated and do not recombine with their matching partners X. Recombination of XX pairs is pointed out as the key factor for the Y chromosome degeneration. However, there is an additional evolutionary force driving sex-chromosomes evolution. Here we show this mechanism by means of two different evolutionary models, in which sex chromosomes with non-recombining XX and XY pairs of chromosomes is considered. Our results show three curious effects. First, we observed that even when both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes do not recombine, the Y chromosomes still degenerate. Second, the accumulation of mutations on Y chromosomes followed a completely different pattern then those accumulated on X chromosomes. And third, the models may differ with respect to sexual proportion. These findings suggest that a more primeval mechanism rules the evolution of Y chromosomes due exclusively to the sex-chromosomes asymmetry itself, i.e., the fact that Y chromosomes never experience female bodies. Over aeons, natural selection favored X chromosomes spontaneously, even if at the very beginning of evolution, both XX and XY pairs of chromosomes did not recombine.

  10. The prevalence of Y chromosome microdeletions in Pakistani infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Tabassum Siddiqui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microdeletions of the azoospermia factor locus of the long arm of Y chromosome are an etiological factor of severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in AZF region and their role in infertility in Pakistani population. Materials and Methods: The type of deletions in AZF locus were detected in infertile men (n=113 and the association of Y chromosome microdeletions with male infertility was assessed by including men (50 with normal karyotype and having children. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by multiplex PCR using 10 sequence tagged sites namely sY81, sY130, sY141, sY142, sY155, sY157, sY160, sY182, sY231, and sY202 that covered all three regions of AZF. Results: Individuals with severe oligozoospermia showed 2.86% deletion frequency in AZFc region as compared to azoospermic males (5.5%. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that deletions in Y chromosome are not playing major part in male infertility. Moreover, multiplex-PCR strategy might preferably be employed for the detection of Y chromosome microdeletions allied to male infertility.

  11. Estimating tempo and mode of Y chromosome turnover: explaining Y chromosome loss with the fragile Y hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal sex determination is phylogenetically widespread, having arisen independently in many lineages. Decades of theoretical work provide predictions about sex chromosome differentiation that are well supported by observations in both XY and ZW systems. However, the phylogenetic scope of previous work gives us a limited understanding of the pace of sex chromosome gain and loss and why Y or W chromosomes are more often lost in some lineages than others, creating XO or ZO systems. To gain phylogenetic breadth we therefore assembled a database of 4724 beetle species' karyotypes and found substantial variation in sex chromosome systems. We used the data to estimate rates of Y chromosome gain and loss across a phylogeny of 1126 taxa estimated from seven genes. Contrary to our initial expectations, we find that highly degenerated Y chromosomes of many members of the suborder Polyphaga are rarely lost, and that cases of Y chromosome loss are strongly associated with chiasmatic segregation during male meiosis. We propose the "fragile Y" hypothesis, that recurrent selection to reduce recombination between the X and Y chromosome leads to the evolution of a small pseudoautosomal region (PAR), which, in taxa that require XY chiasmata for proper segregation during meiosis, increases the probability of aneuploid gamete production, with Y chromosome loss. This hypothesis predicts that taxa that evolve achiasmatic segregation during male meiosis will rarely lose the Y chromosome. We discuss data from mammals, which are consistent with our prediction. PMID:24939995

  12. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Fernando L; Poznik, G David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-04-01

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes-including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447-806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7-2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups. PMID:27058445

  13. [Polymorphism of Y-chromosomal microsatellites in Russian population from Southern Federal district of the Russian Federation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornienko, I V; Bondarenko, E V; Mikhalkovich, L S; Moliarchuk, B A; Kotova, E N

    2009-01-01

    Haplotype frequencies and allele distributions at 11 STR loci of the Y chromosome were evaluated in 180 unrelated individuals from Russian population of Southern Federal district of the Russian Federation (Rostov oblast, Krasnodar krai, and Stavropol krai). Among 153 Y-chromosomal haplotypes discovered, 63 were unique. In the sample of Russian population, the most frequent haplotype (frequency of 5.56%) was 16-11,14-13-30-25-11-11-13-14-11-10 (for the loci DYS19, DYS385a,b, DYS3891, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, and DYS439, respectively). Despite the high diversity of Y-chromosomal haplotypes in the Russian populations from the south of Russia (the h value was 0.997, 0.995, and 0.994 in Rostov, Krasnodar, and Stavropol samples, respectively), analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed the absence of differentiation between the populations (phiQST = 0.1%, P=0.36). Comparative differentiation analysis performed for 13 Russian populations from the European part of Russia pointed to low among-population differentiation in Y-chromosomal lineages (phiST = 0.52%, P=0.03). PMID:19239108

  14. Typing of Y chromosome SNPs with multiplex PCR methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2005-01-01

    We describe a method for the simultaneous typing of Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers by means of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategies that allow the detection of 35 Y chromosome SNPs on 25 amplicons from 100 to 200 pg of chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid...... factors for the creation of larger SNP typing PCR multiplexes include careful selection of primers for the primary amplification and the SBE reaction, use of DNA primers with homogenous composition, and balancing the primer concentrations for both the amplification and the SBE reactions....

  15. Dog Y chromosomal DNA sequence: identification, sequencing and SNP discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkness Ewen; Lundeberg Joakim; Angleby Helen; Oskarsson Mattias CR; Natanaelsson Christian; Savolainen Peter

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Population genetic studies of dogs have so far mainly been based on analysis of mitochondrial DNA, describing only the history of female dogs. To get a picture of the male history, as well as a second independent marker, there is a need for studies of biallelic Y-chromosome polymorphisms. However, there are no biallelic polymorphisms reported, and only 3200 bp of non-repetitive dog Y-chromosome sequence deposited in GenBank, necessitating the identification of dog Y chromo...

  16. Y-chromosome STR haplotypes in two population samples: Azores Islands and Central Portugal

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Mónica; Anjos, Maria João; Andrade, Lisa; Lopes, Virgínia; Santos, Márcia V.; Gamero, Joaquín-Jose; Corte Real, Francisco; Vide, Maria-Conceição

    2003-01-01

    The Y-chromosome haplotypes defined by nine STRs (DYS19, DYS385, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392 and DYS393) were studied in 207 unrelated individuals from Central Portugal and 63 from Azores Islands. The most common haplotype in Central Portugal was shared by 3.4% of the males, while 160 haplotypes were unique. In Azores Islands the most common haplotype was shared by 6.4% of the males, while 40 haplotypes were unique. The values of haplotype diversity were 0.993 for Central Portug...

  17. Genetic population study of 11 Y chromosome STR loci in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaloulis, Panayotis; Tsekoura, Konstantina; Vouropoulou, Maria; Miniati, Penelope

    2013-05-01

    Statistical properties of eleven Y chromosome Short Tandem Repeat (STR) markers were analyzed (DYS391, DYS389I, DYS439, DYS389II, DYS438, DYS437, DYS19, DYS392, DYS393, DYS390 and DYS385) in a Greek population sample. The 200 subjects where distributed across Greece, from various Peripheries. 182 distinct haplotypes were found. To validate our results gene diversity has been calculated for the whole population, as well as for each locus individually. Genetic distance has been estimated between this population and Albanian, Egyptian, Italian and Turkish populations. The results indicate that all Y loci are useful for forensic sciences. PMID:23582698

  18. Analysis of 22 Y chromosomal STR haplotypes and Y haplogroup distribution in Pathans of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Young; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Rakha, Allah; Sim, Jeong Eun; Park, Myung Jin; Kim, Na Young; Yang, Woo Ick; Lee, Hwan Young

    2014-07-01

    We analyzed haplotypes for 22 Y chromosomal STRs (Y-STRs), including 17 Yfiler loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DY438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y-GATA-H4) and five additional STRs (DYS388, DYS446, DYS447, DYS449 and DYS464), and Y chromosomal haplogroup distribution in 270 unrelated individuals from the Pathans residing in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas and the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan using in-house multiplex PCR systems. Each Y-STR showed diversities ranging from 0.2506 to 0.8538, and the discriminatory capacity (DC) was 73.7% with 199 observed haplotypes using 17 Yfiler loci. By the addition of 5 Y-STRs to the Yfiler system, the DC was increased to 85.2% while showing 230 observed haplotypes. Among the additional 5 Y-STRs, DYS446, DYS447 and DYS449 were major contributors to enhancing discrimination. In the analysis of molecular variance, the Pathans of this study showed significant differences from other Pathan populations as well as neighboring population sets. In Y-SNP analysis, a total of 12 Y chromosomal haplogroups were observed and the most frequent haplogroup was R1a1a with 49.3% frequency. To obtain insights on the origin of Pathans, the network analysis was performed for the haplogroups G and Q observed from the Pathans and the Jewish population groups including Ashkenazim and Sephardim, but little support for a Jewish origin could be found. In the present study, we report Y-STR population data in Pathans of Pakistan, and we emphasize the need for adding additional markers to the commonly used 17 Yfiler loci to achieve more improved discriminatory capacity in a population with low genetic diversity. PMID:24709582

  19. Genetic portrait of Tamil non-tribal and Irula tribal population using Y chromosome STR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Rajshree; Krishnamoorthy, Kamalakshi; Balasubramanian, Lakshmi; Kunka Mohanram, Ramkumar

    2016-03-01

    The 17 Y chromosomal short tandem repeat loci included in the AmpFlSTR® Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit were used to analyse the genetic diversity of 517 unrelated males representing the non-tribal and Irula tribal population of Tamil Nadu. A total of 392 unique haplotypes were identified among the 400 non-tribal samples whereas 111 were observed among the 117 Irula tribal samples. Rare alleles for the loci DYS458, DYS635 and YGATAH4.1 were also observed in both population. The haplotype diversity for the non-tribal and Irula tribal population were found to be 0.9999, and the gene diversity ranged from 0.2041 (DYS391) to 0.9612 (DYS385). Comparison of the test population with 26 national and global population using principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and determination of the genetic distance matrix using phylogenetic molecular analysis indicate a clustering of the Tamil Nadu non-tribal and Irula tribal population away from other unrelated population and proximity towards some Indo-European (IE) and Asian population. Data are available in the Y chromosome haplotype reference database (YHRD) under accession number YA004055 for Tamil non-tribal and YA004056 for the Irula tribal group. PMID:26024794

  20. Semi-automatic laser beam microdissection of the Y chromosome and analysis of Y chromosome DNA in a dioecious plant, Silene latifolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silene latifolia has heteromorphic sex chromosomes, the X and Y chromosomes. The Y chromosome, which is thought to carry the male determining gene, was isolated by UV laser microdissection and amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR. In situ chromosome suppression of the amplified Y chromosome DNA in the presence of female genomic DNA as a competitor showed that the microdissected Y chromosome DNA did not specifically hybridize to the Y chromosome, but-hybridized to all chromosomes. This result suggests that the Y chromosome does not contain Y chromosome-enriched repetitive sequences. A repetitive sequence in the microdissected Y chromosome, RMY1, was isolated while screening repetitive sequences in the amplified Y chromosome. Part of the nucleotide sequence shared a similarity to that of X-43.1, which was isolated from microdissected X chromosomes. Since fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with RMY1 demonstrated that RMY1 was localized at the ends of the chromosome, RMY1 may be a subtelomeric repetitive sequence. Regarding the sex chromosomes, RMY1 was detected at both ends of the X chromosome and at one end near the pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome. The different localization of RMY1 on the sex chromosomes provides a clue to the problem of how the sex chromosomes arose from autosomes

  1. Coronary Artery Disease: Why We should Consider the Y Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Elsa; Clarence, Elyse Michele; Ahmady, Farah; Chew, Guat Siew; Charchar, Fadi Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality globally. In the last few years our understanding of the genetic and molecular mechanisms that promote CAD in individuals has increased with the advent of the genome era. This complex inflammatory disease has well-defined environmental risk factors. However, in the last 10 years, studies including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have clearly demonstrated a genetic influence on CAD. Recently, studies on the human Y chromosome have also demonstrated that genetic variation within the male-specific region of the Y chromosome (MSY) could play a part in determining cardiovascular risk in men, confirming the notion that the increased risk for CAD in men cannot be fully explained through common CAD risk factors. Here, we review the literature about the pathophysiology of CAD, its potential causes and environmental risk factors known so far. Furthermore, we review the genetics of CAD, especially the latest discoveries regarding the implication of the Y chromosome, the most underexplored portion of the human genome to date, highlighting methods and difficulties arising in this research field, and discussing the importance of considering the Y chromosome in CAD research. PMID:27236216

  2. Why Y chromosome is shorter and women live longer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biecek, P.; Cebrat, S.

    2008-09-01

    We have used the Penna ageing model to analyze how the differences in evolution of sex chromosomes depend on the strategy of reproduction. In panmictic populations, when females (XX) can freely choose the male partner (XY) for reproduction from the whole population, the Y chromosome accumulates defects and eventually the only information it brings is a male sex determination. As a result of shrinking Y chromosome the male genomes de facto loose one copy of the X chromosome information and, as a result, males are characterized by higher mortality, observed also in the human populations. If it is assumed in the model that the presence of the male is indispensable at least during the pregnancy of his female partner and he cannot be seduced by another female at least during the one reproduction cycle-the Y chromosome preserves its content, does not shrink and the lifespan of females and males is the same. Thus, Y chromosome shrinks not because of existing in one copy, without the possibility of recombination, but because it stays under weaker selection pressure; in panmictic populations without the necessity of being faithful, a considerable fraction of males is dispensable and they can be eliminated from the population without reducing its reproduction potential.

  3. Increased Y-chromosome detection by SRY duplexing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Høgh; Clausen, Frederik Banch; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    2012-01-01

    Determining fetal sex noninvasively is dependent of a robust assay. We designed a novel SRY assay and combined it with a SRY assay from literature forming a duplex assay with the same fluorescent dye to increase detection of Y-chromosome at low cell-free fetal DNA or chimeric DNA concentrations....

  4. Repeat Sequences and Base Correlations in Human Y Chromosome Palindromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neng-zhi Jin; Zi-xian Liu; Yan-jiao Qi; Wen-yuan Qiu

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of information theory and statistical methods, we use mutual information, n-tuple entropy and conditional entropy, combined with biological characteristics, to analyze the long range correlation and short range correlation in human Y chromosome palindromes. The magnitude distribution of the long range correlation which can be reflected by the mutual information is P5>P5a>P5b (P5a and P5b are the sequences that replace solely Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats with random uncorrelated sequences in human Y chromosome palindrome 5, respectively); and the magnitude distribution of the short range correlation which can be reflected by the n-tuple entropy and the conditional entropy is P5>P5a>P5b>random uncorrelated sequence. In other words, when the Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats replace with random uncorrelated sequence, the long range and short range correlation decrease gradually. However, the random uncorrelated sequence has no correlation. This research indicates that more repeat sequences result in stronger correlation between bases in human Y chromosome. The analyses may be helpful to understand the special structures of human Y chromosome palindromes profoundly.

  5. A Case of ADHD and a Major Y Chromosome Abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Aisling; Gill, Michael; Fitzgerald, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background: ADHD is a common, heritable disorder of childhood. Sex chromosome abnormalities are relatively rare conditions that are sometimes associated with behavioral disorders. Method: The authors present a male child with ADHD and a major de-novo Y chromosome abnormality consisting of deletion of the long arm and duplication of the short arm.…

  6. GENETIC POLYMORPHISM OF SIX Y CHROMOSOMAL STR IN CHINESE HUI ETHNIC GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Bofeng; Lü Guiping; Yao Guifa; Zhu Jun; Dong Hongwang; Sun Qingdong; Huang Lei; Liu Yao

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study genetic polymorphism of 6 Y chromosomal STR in Hui ethnic group living in Ningxia Hui ethnic autonomous region, in order to evaluate their usefulness in forensic science and enrich the Chinese genetic information resources. Methods We investigated 101 unrelated, healthy, male individuals of Hui ethnic group and studied their allelic frequency distribution and haplotype diversity of 6 Y chromosomal STR. Primer for each loci was labeled with the fluorescent by FAM (blue) or TAMRA(yellow). The data of Hui ethnic group were generated co-amplification, GeneScan, genotype, and genetic distribution analysis. Results 31 alleles and 43 phenotype(DYS385) were detected, with the frequencies ranging from 0.0099-0.7129. Out of a total of 101 individuals, 96 showed different haplotypes; 91 were unique; 5 were found 2 times. The haplotype diversity for 6 Y-STR loci was 0.9990. Conclusion The date obtained can be valuable for individual identification, paternity testing in forensic fields and for population genetics because of 6 Y-STR loci high polymorphism.

  7. Phylogenetic Distinctiveness of Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian Village Dog Y Chromosomes Illuminates Dog Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sarah K.; Pedersen, Niels C.; Jafarishorijeh, Sardar; Bannasch, Danika L.; Ahrens, Kristen D.; Wu, Jui-Te; Okon, Michaella; Sacks, Benjamin N.

    2011-01-01

    Modern genetic samples are commonly used to trace dog origins, which entails untested assumptions that village dogs reflect indigenous ancestry or that breed origins can be reliably traced to particular regions. We used high-resolution Y chromosome markers (SNP and STR) and mitochondrial DNA to analyze 495 village dogs/dingoes from the Middle East and Southeast Asia, along with 138 dogs from >35 modern breeds to 1) assess genetic divergence between Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dogs and their phylogenetic affinities to Australian dingoes and gray wolves (Canis lupus) and 2) compare the genetic affinities of modern breeds to regional indigenous village dog populations. The Y chromosome markers indicated that village dogs in the two regions corresponded to reciprocally monophyletic clades, reflecting several to many thousand years divergence, predating the Neolithic ages, and indicating long-indigenous roots to those regions. As expected, breeds of the Middle East and East Asia clustered within the respective regional village dog clade. Australian dingoes also clustered in the Southeast Asian clade. However, the European and American breeds clustered almost entirely within the Southeast Asian clade, even sharing many haplotypes, suggesting a substantial and recent influence of East Asian dogs in the creation of European breeds. Comparison to 818 published breed dog Y STR haplotypes confirmed this conclusion and indicated that some African breeds reflect another distinct patrilineal origin. The lower-resolution mtDNA marker consistently supported Y-chromosome results. Both marker types confirmed previous findings of higher genetic diversity in dogs from Southeast Asia than the Middle East. Our findings demonstrate the importance of village dogs as windows into the past and provide a reference against which ancient DNA can be used to further elucidate origins and spread of the domestic dog. PMID:22194840

  8. Is Native American R Y-Chromosome of African Origin?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clyde Winters

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Controversey surrounds the phylogeography and origin of the R haplotype among Native Americans. Some researchers have suggested that Europeans spread this haplotype among Native Americans. The purpose of this study was to determine the origin of the R-M173 y-chromosome among Native Americans . It is the third most frequent y-chromosome possessed by Native Americans. Native Americans with the highest frequency of R-M173 haplotypes like the Ojibwa and Seminoles mated frequently with African males. Our findings indicate that the African male, Native American female pattern of mating in the United States probably led to the introduction and spread of R-M173 among Native Americans during slavery.

  9. Y-chromosome E haplogroups: their distribution and implication to the origin of Afro-Asiatic languages and pastoralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremeskel, Eyoab I; Ibrahim, Muntaser E

    2014-12-01

    Archeological and paleontological evidences point to East Africa as the likely area of early evolution of modern humans. Genetic studies also indicate that populations from the region often contain, but not exclusively, representatives of the more basal clades of mitochondrial and Y-chromosome phylogenies. Most Y-chromosome haplogroup diversity in Africa, however, is present within macrohaplogroup E that seem to have appeared 21 000-32 000 YBP somewhere between the Red Sea and Lake Chad. The combined analysis of 17 bi-allelic markers in 1214 Y chromosomes together with cultural background of 49 populations displayed in various metrics: network, multidimensional scaling, principal component analysis and neighbor-joining plots, indicate a major contribution of East African populations to the foundation of the macrohaplogroup, suggesting a diversification that predates the appearance of some cultural traits and the subsequent expansion that is more associated with the cultural and linguistic diversity witnessed today. The proto-Afro-Asiatic group carrying the E-P2 mutation may have appeared at this point in time and subsequently gave rise to the different major population groups including current speakers of the Afro-Asiatic languages and pastoralist populations. PMID:24667790

  10. Y Chromosome Microdeletions in Idiopathic Infertile Men from West Azarbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiarash Attar

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although assisted reproduction techniques are used extensively in Iran, screening for Y chromosome microdeletions before intracytoplasmic sperm injection is often undervalued. Our aim was to investigate Y chromosome microdeletions in men with idiopathic azoospermia or severe oligospermia.Materials and Methods: In 99 selected patients with azoospermia or severe oligospermia and elevated levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone in combination with low serum testosterone levels, 20 pairs of sequence-tagged site-based primer sets specific for the Y microdeletion loci were analyzed. Primers were chosen to cover azoospermia factor (AZF regions as well as deleted in azoospermia (DAZ and the sex-determining region on Y chromosome (SRY genes. Also, 100 healthy men served as a control group.Results: Twenty-four patients (24.2% had microdeletions in AZF genes, but no microdeletions were found in men in the control group. In 15 patients (62.5%, 1 deletion was found. Six patients (25% had 2, and 3 (12.5% had 3 deletions. The deletions mainly comprised the AZFc region (in 21 of 24 patients; 87.5%, which corresponds to the DAZ gene. Deletions in AZFb were found in 7 patients (29.2%, and 4 (16.7% had deletions in the proximal part of AZF regions near SRY gene. No microdeletions were seen in the AZFa or SRY gene. Conclusion: Our results emphasize that Y chromosome microdeletion analysis should be carried out in all patients with idiopathic azoospermia or severe oligospermia who are candidates for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  11. A microarray system for Y chromosomal and mitochondrial single nucleotide polymorphism analysis in chimpanzee populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrés, Olga; Rönn, Ann-Charlotte; Bonhomme, Maxime; Kellermann, Thomas; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Doxiadis, Gaby; Verschoor, Ernst J; Goossens, Benoît; Domingo-Roura, Xavier; Bruford, Michael W; Bosch, Montserrat; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2008-05-01

    Chimpanzee populations are diminishing as a consequence of human activities, and as a result this species is now endangered. In the context of conservation programmes, genetic data can add vital information, for instance on the genetic diversity and structure of threatened populations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are biallelic markers that are widely used in human molecular studies and can be implemented in efficient microarray systems. This technology offers the potential of robust, multiplexed SNP genotyping at low reagent cost in other organisms than humans, but it is not commonly used yet in wild population studies. Here, we describe the characterization of new SNPs in Y-chromosomal intronic regions in chimpanzees and also identify SNPs from mitochondrial genes, with the aim of developing a microarray system that permits the simultaneous study of both paternal and maternal lineages. Our system consists of 42 SNPs for the Y chromosome and 45 SNPs for the mitochondrial genome. We demonstrate the applicability of this microarray in a captive population where genotypes accurately reflected its large pedigree. Two wild-living populations were also analysed and the results show that the microarray will be a useful tool alongside microsatellite markers, since it supplies complementary information about population structure and ecology. SNP genotyping using microarray technology, therefore, is a promising approach and may become an essential tool in conservation genetics to help in the management and study of captive and wild-living populations. Moreover, microarrays that combine SNPs from different genomic regions could replace microsatellite typing in the future. PMID:21585830

  12. A multistep process for the dispersal of a Y chromosomal lineage in the Mediterranean area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, P; Tsopanomichalou, M; Duman, T; Stefan, M; Silvestri, A; Rinaldi, B; Garcia, O; Giparaki, M; Plata, E; Kozlov, A I; Barbujani, G; Vernesi, C; Papola, F; Ciavarella, G; Kovatchev, D; Kerimova, M G; Anagnou, N; Gavrila, L; Veneziano, L; Akar, N; Loutradis, A; Michalodimitrakis, E N; Terrenato, L; Novelletto, A

    2001-07-01

    In this work we focus on a microsatellite-defined Y-chromosomal lineage (network 1.2) identified by us and reported in previous studies, whose geographic distribution and antiquity appear to be compatible with the Neolithic spread of farmers. Here, we set network 1.2 in the Y-chromosomal phylogenetic tree, date it with respect to other lineages associated with the same movements by other authors, examine its diversity by means of tri- and tetranucleotide loci and discuss the implications in reconstructing the spread of this group of chromosomes in the Mediterranean area. Our results define a tripartite phylogeny within HG 9 (Rosser et al. 2000), with the deepest branching defined by alleles T (Haplogroup Eu10) or G (Haplogroup Eu9) at M172 (Semino et al. 2000), and a subsequent branching within Eu9 defined by network 1.2. Population distributions of HG 9 and network 1.2 show that their occurrence in the surveyed area is not due to the spread of people from a single parental population but, rather, to a process punctuated by at least two phases. Our data identify the wide area of the Balkans, Aegean and Anatolia as the possible homeland harbouring the largest variation within network 1.2. The use of recently proposed tests based on the stepwise mutation model suggests that its spread was associated to a population expansion, with a high rate of male gene flow in the Turkish-Greek area. PMID:11592923

  13. Genetic data from Y chromosome STR and SNP loci in Ukrainian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielnik-Sikorska, Marta; Daca, Patrycja; Woźniak, Marcin; Malyarchuk, Boris A; Bednarek, Jarosław; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    We have tested a sample of 154 unrelated males from Lviv region (Ukraine) for 11 Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci (DYS19, DYS385a, DYS385b, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, YGATA_H4.1). Haplotype and haplogroup diversity values were calculated for the population under study. Genetic distances (R(ST)) to 9 other Slavic populations were calculated based on 12 Y-STR loci. Haplotype frequencies and MDS plots were constructed based on genetic distances. Haplogroup frequency patterns revealed in Ukraine are similar to those characteristic of other European populations. However, it also allowed for identification a specific genetic component in Ukrainian sample which seems to originate from areas dwelled by Western Slavs, i.e. subhaplogroup R1a1a7, at frequency of 13.65%. Analysis of R(ST) distances and AMOVA revealed high level of heterogeneity between Slavic populations inhabiting the south and north part of Europe, determined geographically rather than by linguistic factors. It has also been found a closer similarity (in the values of R(ST)) between Ukrainian and Slovak populations than between Ukrainians and other Slavic population samples. PMID:22673612

  14. Diversity of nitrite reductase genes (nirS) in the denitrifying water column of the coastal Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, D.A.; Francis, C.A.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Ward, B.B.

    is a potent greenhouse gas that is also in- volved in the destruction of the ozone layer (Crutzen 1979, Lashof & Ahuja 1990, Waibel et al. 1999). Water column denitrification in the Arabian Sea occurs in 2 geographically distinct locations, one within... takes place along the entire shelf of the southwest coast of India, inject- ing nitrate-rich waters into the photic layers. The intense productivity that ensues leads to O 2 depletion and then to denitrifying conditions in the subsurface shelf waters...

  15. Genetic analysis of 17 Y-chromosomal STRs haplotypes of Chinese Tibetan ethnic minority group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhou; Jun, Wang; XingBo, Song; XiaoJun, Lu; Liu, Ding; BinWu, Ying

    2010-03-01

    We have co-amplified and analyzed 17 Y-chromosomal STRs loci (DYS19, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS438, DYS439, DYS437, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, YGATA-H4 and DYS385a/b) in 132 healthy unrelated autochthonous male individuals of Chinese Tibetan ethnic group residing in Lassa area of China. The gene diversity values for the Y-STRs loci ranged from a minimum 0.206 for DYS391 locus to a maximum of 0.912 for DYS385a/b locus in the populations. A total of 123 haplotypes were identified, among which 115 were unique and 8 occurred more than once. The overall haplotype diversity for 17 Y-STRs loci was 0.998. Research results will be valuable for forensic use in the regions and for Chinese population genetic study. PMID:20116321

  16. Human Y Chromosome Haplogroup N: A Non-trivial Time-Resolved Phylogeography that Cuts across Language Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilumäe, Anne-Mai; Reidla, Maere; Chukhryaeva, Marina; Järve, Mari; Post, Helen; Karmin, Monika; Saag, Lauri; Agdzhoyan, Anastasiya; Kushniarevich, Alena; Litvinov, Sergey; Ekomasova, Natalya; Tambets, Kristiina; Metspalu, Ene; Khusainova, Rita; Yunusbayev, Bayazit; Khusnutdinova, Elza K; Osipova, Ludmila P; Fedorova, Sardana; Utevska, Olga; Koshel, Sergey; Balanovska, Elena; Behar, Doron M; Balanovsky, Oleg; Kivisild, Toomas; Underhill, Peter A; Villems, Richard; Rootsi, Siiri

    2016-07-01

    The paternal haplogroup (hg) N is distributed from southeast Asia to eastern Europe. The demographic processes that have shaped the vast extent of this major Y chromosome lineage across numerous linguistically and autosomally divergent populations have previously been unresolved. On the basis of 94 high-coverage re-sequenced Y chromosomes, we establish and date a detailed hg N phylogeny. We evaluate geographic structure by using 16 distinguishing binary markers in 1,631 hg N Y chromosomes from a collection of 6,521 samples from 56 populations. The more southerly distributed sub-clade N4 emerged before N2a1 and N3, found mostly in the north, but the latter two display more elaborate branching patterns, indicative of regional contrasts in recent expansions. In particular, a number of prominent and well-defined clades with common N3a3'6 ancestry occur in regionally dissimilar northern Eurasian populations, indicating almost simultaneous regional diversification and expansion within the last 5,000 years. This patrilineal genetic affinity is decoupled from the associated higher degree of language diversity. PMID:27392075

  17. Y chromosome haplogroup distribution in Indo-European speaking tribes of Gujarat, western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Priyanka; Aggarwal, Aastha; Mitra, Siuli; Italia, Yazdi M; Saraswathy, Kallur N; Chandrasekar, Adimoolam; Kshatriya, Gautam K

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out in the Indo-European speaking tribal population groups of Southern Gujarat, India to investigate and reconstruct their paternal population structure and population histories. The role of language, ethnicity and geography in determining the observed pattern of Y haplogroup clustering in the study populations was also examined. A set of 48 bi-allelic markers on the non-recombining region of Y chromosome (NRY) were analysed in 284 males; representing nine Indo-European speaking tribal populations. The genetic structure of the populations revealed that none of these groups was overtly admixed or completely isolated. However, elevated haplogroup diversity and FST value point towards greater diversity and differentiation which suggests the possibility of early demographic expansion of the study groups. The phylogenetic analysis revealed 13 paternal lineages, of which six haplogroups: C5, H1a*, H2, J2, R1a1* and R2 accounted for a major portion of the Y chromosome diversity. The higher frequency of the six haplogroups and the pattern of clustering in the populations indicated overlapping of haplogroups with West and Central Asian populations. Other analyses undertaken on the population affiliations revealed that the Indo-European speaking populations along with the Dravidian speaking groups of southern India have an influence on the tribal groups of Gujarat. The vital role of geography in determining the distribution of Y lineages was also noticed. This implies that although language plays a vital role in determining the distribution of Y lineages, the present day linguistic affiliation of any population in India for reconstructing the demographic history of the country should be considered with caution. PMID:24614885

  18. Hidden Y Chromosome Mosaicism in 48 Egyptian Patients with Turner’s Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mervat M. El-Eshmawy; Sohier Yahia; El-Dahtory, Faeza A.; Sahar Hamed; El Hadidy M. El Hadidy; Mohamed Ragab

    2013-01-01

    Background. The presence of Y chromosome material in Turner’s syndrome (TS) patients is a risk factor for the development of gonadoblastoma. Although conventional cytogenetic analysis is the definitive diagnosis of TS, low level Y chromosome mosaicism may be missed. Molecular analysis has demonstrated a higher proportion of mosaicism, but there is controversy regarding the prevalence of Y chromosome-derived material in those patients. Aim and Methods. This study was conducted to investiga...

  19. Evaluating the Y chromosomal timescale in human demographic and lineage dating

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chuan-Chao; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Jin, Li; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Y chromosome is a superb tool for inferring human evolution and recent demographic history from a paternal perspective. However, Y chromosomal substitution rates obtained using different modes of calibration vary considerably, and have produced disparate reconstructions of human history. Here, we discuss how substitution rate and date estimates are affected by the choice of different calibration points. We argue that most Y chromosomal substitution rates calculated to date have shortcomings, ...

  20. "Mitochondrial Eve", "Y Chromosome Adam", testosterone, and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    I suggest primate evolution began as a consequence of increased testosterone in males which increased aggression and sexuality, therefore, reproduction and success. With time, negative effects of excessive testosterone reduced spermatogenesis and started a decline of the group. Approximately 30-40 million years ago, the gene DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) appeared on the Y chromosome, increased spermatogenesis, and rescued the early primates from extinction. (Note: DAZ is considered by some to specifically, positively affect spermatogenesis; others suggest it has no effect on spermatogenesis.) Hominid evolution continued with increasing testosterone. The advent of increased testosterone in females of Homo erectus (or Homo ergaster) increased the female-to-male body size ratio, and eventually produced another era of excessive testosterone. Excessive testosterone caused a reduction in population size (bottleneck) that produced the "Mitochondrial Eve" (ME) mechanism. (Only certain females continued during the bottleneck to transmit their mitochondrial DNA.) That is, the ME mechanism culminated, again, in excessive testosterone and reduced spermatogenesis in the hominid line. Approximately 50,000 to 200,000 years ago, a "doubling" of the DAZ gene occurred on the Y chromosome in hominid males which rescued the hominid line with increased spermatogenesis in certain males. This produced the "Y Chromosome Adam" event. The doubling of DAZ allowed further increases in testosterone in hominids that resulted in the increased size and development of the brain. Modern humans periodically fluctuate between the positive and negative consequences of increased levels of testosterone, currently identifiable as the secular trend, increased infections, and reduced spermatogenesis. PMID:12449688

  1. PREVALENCE OF Y CHROMOSOME MICRODELETIONS IN IRANIAN INFERTILE MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Akbari Asbagh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the frequency of Y chromosome AZF (Azoospermia Factor subregions, microdeletions in patients with idiopathic nonobstructive azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia. Subjects included 40 men who had been referred to infertility clinics for assisted reproduction, 37 were azoospermic and 3 had severe oligospermia. Medical history and physical exam revealed no evidence of infection, obstruction of seminal tract, endocrine failure or chromosomal anomalies. Hormonal study was performed for all patients. Twenty six men had biopsies of the testes including 11 patients with hypospermatogenesis, 9 patients with maturation arrest, 4 patients with sertoli cell only syndrome and 2 patients with tubular sclerosis. In 14 men who did not have a testicular biopsy multiple, epididymal and testicular sperm aspirations under anesthesia failed and testicular sperm extraction was subsequently performed for ICSI. DNA was isolated from blood samples. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of 11 loci spanning the AZFa, AZFb and AZFc subregions of the Y chromosome using sY81, sY83, sY127, sY130, sY131, sY147, sY149, sY157, sY158, sY254 and sY276 was performed. Microdeletions of the Y chromosome were found in two of the patients (5%, who had azoospermia. Deletions were restricted to DAZ (deleted in azoospermia locus in AZFc subregion. One of the patients had a history of cryptorchidism and the second had undergone a left side varicocelectomy. Testicular pathology showed sertoli cell only syndrome in both of them. Our experience adds to the current logic that men with azoospermia or severe oligospermia should be evaluated for Yq11 microdeletions before deciding to operate varicoceles or else scheduling them for assisted reproductive techniques.

  2. Shotgun metagenomic data reveals signifcant abundance but low diversity of Candidatus Scalindua marine anammox bacteria in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    laura eVillanueva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox bacteria are responsible for a significant portion of the loss of fixed nitrogen from the oceans, making them important players in the global nitrogen cycle. To date, marine anammox bacteria found in both water columns and sediments worldwide belong almost exclusively to Candidatus Scalindua species. Recently the genome assembly of a marine anammox enrichment culture dominated by Candidatus Scalindua profunda became available and can now be used as a template to study metagenome data obtained from various oxygen minimum zones. Here, we sequenced genomic DNA from suspended particulate matter recovered at the upper (170 m deep and center (600 m area of the oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea by SOLiD and Ion Torrent technology. The genome of Candidatus Scalindua profunda served as a template to collect reads. Based on the mapped reads marine anammox Abundance was estimated to be at least 0.4% in the upper and 1.7% in the center area. Single nucleotide variation (SNV analysis was performed to assess diversity of the Candidatus Scalindua populations. Most highly covered were the two diagnostic anammox genes hydrazine synthase (scal_01318c, hzsA and hydrazine dehydrogenase (scal_03295, hdh, while other genes involved in anammox metabolism (narGH, nirS, amtB, focA and ACS had a lower coverage but could still be assembled and analyzed. The results show that Candidatus Scalindua is abundantly present in the Arabian Sea OMZ, but that the diversity within the ecosystem is relatively low.

  3. Distribution of Y-chromosomal haplotypes in the Central Portuguese population using 17-STRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Ana Margarida; Carvalho, Mónica; Lopes, Virgínia; Serra, Armando; Costa, Heloísa Afonso; Andrade, Lisa; Balsa, Filipa; Oliveira, Clara; Batista, Luísa; Gamero, Joaquín; Anjos, Maria João; Gusmão, Leonor; Corte-Real, Francisco

    2009-12-01

    17 Y-chromosome STR loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS456, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385 a/b, DYS458, DYS439, DYS635, GATA H4.1, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS448) were determined for 303 unrelated males, living in Central Portugal, using the AmpFlSTR YFiler PCR Amplification kit (Applied Biosystems). A total of 287 different haplotypes were found, 272 being unique. The overall haplotype diversity (HD) was determined as 0.9996, a value similar to other YFiler data sets. Y-STR polymorphisms in Central Portugal population, using YFiler, provide a powerful discrimination tool for routine forensic applications. PMID:19948320

  4. Hidden Y Chromosome Mosaicism in 48 Egyptian Patients with Turner's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Eshmawy, Mervat M; Yahia, Sohier; El-Dahtory, Faeza A; Hamed, Sahar; El Hadidy, El Hadidy M; Ragab, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Background. The presence of Y chromosome material in Turner's syndrome (TS) patients is a risk factor for the development of gonadoblastoma. Although conventional cytogenetic analysis is the definitive diagnosis of TS, low level Y chromosome mosaicism may be missed. Molecular analysis has demonstrated a higher proportion of mosaicism, but there is controversy regarding the prevalence of Y chromosome-derived material in those patients. Aim and Methods. This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of hidden Y chromosome mosaicism in 48 TS Egyptian patients using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for molecular DNA analysis of SRY gene and compare our results with those in the literature. Results. None of TS patients had a cytogenetically obvious Y chromosome; Y chromosome material was detected only at molecular analysis. SRY gene was found in 9 TS patients (18.75%) with the classical 45,X karyotype, whereas all other patients were SRY negative. Conclusion. Cytogenetically undetected Y chromosome mosaicism is common in TS patients; these data reinforce the need for adequate diagnosis of Y chromosome material in those patients. Molecular screening for Y chromosome-derived DNA should be routinely carried out in all TS patients. PMID:23984076

  5. High frequencies of Y chromosome lineages characterized by E3b1, DYS19-11, DYS392-12 in Somali males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Hallenberg, Charlotte; Børsting, Claus;

    2005-01-01

    We genotyped 45 biallelic markers and 11 STR systems on the Y chromosome in 201 male Somalis. In addition, 65 sub-Saharan Western Africans, 59 Turks and 64 Iraqis were typed for the biallelic Y chromosome markers. In Somalis, 14 Y chromosome haplogroups were identified including E3b1 (77.6%) and K2...... (10.4%). The haplogroup E3b1 with the rare DYS19-11 allele (also called the E3b1 cluster gamma) was found in 75.1% of male Somalis, and 70.6% of Somali Y chromosomes were E3b1, DYS19-11, DYS392-12, DYS437-14, DYS438-11 and DYS393-13. The haplotype diversity of eight Y-STRs ('minimal haplotype') was 0.......9575 compared to an average of 0.9974 and 0.9996 in European and Asian populations. In sub-Saharan Western Africans, only four haplogroups were identified. The West African clade E3a was found in 89.2% of the samples and the haplogroup E3b1 was not observed. In Turks, 12 haplogroups were found including J2*(xJ2...

  6. Great ape Y Chromosome and mitochondrial DNA phylogenies reflect subspecies structure and patterns of mating and dispersal

    OpenAIRE

    Hallast, Pille; Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Batini, Chiara; Zadik, Daniel; Rocchi, Mariano; Schempp, Werner; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Mark A Jobling

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of genetic diversity in great ape species is likely to have been affected by patterns of dispersal and mating. This has previously been investigated by sequencing autosomal and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but large-scale sequence analysis of the male-specific region of the Y Chromosome (MSY) has not yet been undertaken. Here, we use the human MSY reference sequence as a basis for sequence capture and read mapping in 19 great ape males, combining the data with sequences extract...

  7. Mating patterns amongst Siberian reindeer herders: inferences from mtDNA and Y-chromosomal analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakendorf, Brigitte; Novgorodov, Innokentij N; Osakovskij, Vladimir L; Stoneking, Mark

    2007-07-01

    The Evenks and Evens, who speak closely related languages belonging to the Northern Tungusic branch of the Tungusic family, are nomadic reindeer herders and hunters. They are spread over an immense territory in northeastern Siberia, and consequently different subgroups are in contact with diverse peoples speaking Samoyedic, Turkic, Mongolic, Chukotka-Kamchatkan, and Yukaghir languages. Nevertheless, the languages and culture of the Evenks and Evens are similar enough for them to have been classified as a single ethnic group in the past. This linguistic and cultural similarity indicates that they may have spread over their current area of habitation relatively recently, and thus may be closely related genetically. On the other hand, the great distances that separate individual groups of Evens and Evenks from each other might have led to preferential mating with geographic neighbors rather than with linguistically related peoples. In this study, we assess the correlation between linguistic and genetic relationship in three different subgroups of Evenks and Evens, respectively, via mtDNA and Y-chromosomal analyses. The results show that there is some evidence of a common origin based on shared mtDNA lineages and relatively similar Y-haplogroup frequencies amongst most of the Evenk and Even subgroups. However, there is little sharing of Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes, indicating that males within Evenk and Even subgroups have remained relatively isolated. There is further evidence of some female admixture in different Even subgroups with their respective geographic neighbors. However, the Tungusic groups, and especially the Evenks, show signs of genetic drift, making inferences about their prehistory difficult. PMID:17492671

  8. Structure and evolution of the Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA of cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaar, Edward Louis Christian

    2004-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on the structure and evolution of the bovine Y-chromosome and the use of paternal markers in molecular diagnostics. The Y-chromosome has emerged together with the X-chromosome early during the evolution of the mammals by differentiation of a pair of a

  9. An efficient multiplex genotyping approach for detecting the major worldwide human Y-chromosome haplogroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Oven (Mannis); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); A. Ralf (Arwin)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The Y chromosome is paternally inherited and therefore serves as an evolutionary marker of patrilineal descent. Worldwide DNA variation within the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome can be represented as a monophyletic phylogenetic tree in which the branches (haplogrou

  10. Chimpanzee and human Y chromosomes are remarkably divergent in structure and gene content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Hughes; H. Skaletsky; T. Pyntikova; T.A. Graves; S.K.M. van Daalen; P.J. Minx; R.S. Fulton; S.D. McGrath; D.P. Locke; C. Friedman; B.J. Trask; E.R. Mardis; W.C. Warren; S. Repping; S. Rozen; R.K. Wilson; D.C. Page

    2010-01-01

    The human Y chromosome began to evolve from an autosome hundreds of millions of years ago, acquiring a sex-determining function and undergoing a series of inversions that suppressed crossing over with the X chromosome(1,2). Little is known about the recent evolution of the Y chromosome because only

  11. Dual origins of dairy cattle farming--evidence from a comprehensive survey of European Y-chromosomal variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceiridwen J Edwards

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diversity patterns of livestock species are informative to the history of agriculture and indicate uniqueness of breeds as relevant for conservation. So far, most studies on cattle have focused on mitochondrial and autosomal DNA variation. Previous studies of Y-chromosomal variation, with limited breed panels, identified two Bos taurus (taurine haplogroups (Y1 and Y2; both composed of several haplotypes and one Bos indicus (indicine/zebu haplogroup (Y3, as well as a strong phylogeographic structuring of paternal lineages. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Haplogroup data were collected for 2087 animals from 138 breeds. For 111 breeds, these were resolved further by genotyping microsatellites INRA189 (10 alleles and BM861 (2 alleles. European cattle carry exclusively taurine haplotypes, with the zebu Y-chromosomes having appreciable frequencies in Southwest Asian populations. Y1 is predominant in northern and north-western Europe, but is also observed in several Iberian breeds, as well as in Southwest Asia. A single Y1 haplotype is predominant in north-central Europe and a single Y2 haplotype in central Europe. In contrast, we found both Y1 and Y2 haplotypes in Britain, the Nordic region and Russia, with the highest Y-chromosomal diversity seen in the Iberian Peninsula. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that the homogeneous Y1 and Y2 regions reflect founder effects associated with the development and expansion of two groups of dairy cattle, the pied or red breeds from the North Sea and Baltic coasts and the spotted, yellow or brown breeds from Switzerland, respectively. The present Y1-Y2 contrast in central Europe coincides with historic, linguistic, religious and cultural boundaries.

  12. On the Y-chromosome haplogroup C3c classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava; Denisova, Galina

    2012-10-01

    As there are ambiguities in classification of the Y-chromosome haplogroup C3c, relatively frequent in populations of Northern Asia, we analyzed all three haplogroup-defining markers M48, M77 and M86 in C3-M217-individuals from Siberia, Eastern Asia and Eastern Europe. We have found that haplogroup C3c is characterized by the derived state at M48, whereas mutations at both M77 and M86 define subhaplogroup C3c1. The branch defined by M48 alone would belong to subhaplogroup C3c*, characteristic for some populations of Central and Eastern Siberia, such as Koryaks, Evens, Evenks and Yukaghirs. Subhaplogroup C3c* individuals could be considered as remnants of the Neolithic population of Siberia, based on the age of C3c*-short tandem repeat variation amounting to 4.5 ± 2.4 thousand years. PMID:22810113

  13. Biotinylated Y chromosome specific probe for human sexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human chromosome DNA from WBC or fetus chorion samples were digested with Hae III and hybridized with biotinylated Y chromosome specific probe by Southern blotting, and hybridization signals were developed by the ABC (Avidin-biotin-alkaline phosphatase complex) system. The hybridization signal for 0.1 μg of male DNA could be detected clearly, while the signal for even 5 μg of female DNA could not. Parallel tests showed that the sexing results using 32P-labeled and biotinylated Y probe were identical. This suggests that the biotinylated Y probe can be applied to the determination of X-linked genetic diseases and sex abnormality, forensic analysis, sex determination of sportsmen and women, heterosexual transplanation of bone marrow, etc. It could become a convenient means for genetic diagnosis

  14. Y-chromosome and mtDNA genetics reveal significant contrasts in affinities of modern Middle Eastern populations with European and African populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, Danielle A; Douaihy, Bouchra; Haber, Marc; Youhanna, Sonia C; Salloum, Angélique; Ghassibe-Sabbagh, Michella; Johnsrud, Brian; Khazen, Georges; Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth; Soria-Hernanz, David F; Wells, R Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Platt, Daniel E; Zalloua, Pierre A

    2013-01-01

    The Middle East was a funnel of human expansion out of Africa, a staging area for the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution, and the home to some of the earliest world empires. Post LGM expansions into the region and subsequent population movements created a striking genetic mosaic with distinct sex-based genetic differentiation. While prior studies have examined the mtDNA and Y-chromosome contrast in focal populations in the Middle East, none have undertaken a broad-spectrum survey including North and sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and Middle Eastern populations. In this study 5,174 mtDNA and 4,658 Y-chromosome samples were investigated using PCA, MDS, mean-linkage clustering, AMOVA, and Fisher exact tests of F(ST)'s, R(ST)'s, and haplogroup frequencies. Geographic differentiation in affinities of Middle Eastern populations with Africa and Europe showed distinct contrasts between mtDNA and Y-chromosome data. Specifically, Lebanon's mtDNA shows a very strong association to Europe, while Yemen shows very strong affinity with Egypt and North and East Africa. Previous Y-chromosome results showed a Levantine coastal-inland contrast marked by J1 and J2, and a very strong North African component was evident throughout the Middle East. Neither of these patterns were observed in the mtDNA. While J2 has penetrated into Europe, the pattern of Y-chromosome diversity in Lebanon does not show the widespread affinities with Europe indicated by the mtDNA data. Lastly, while each population shows evidence of connections with expansions that now define the Middle East, Africa, and Europe, many of the populations in the Middle East show distinctive mtDNA and Y-haplogroup characteristics that indicate long standing settlement with relatively little impact from and movement into other populations. PMID:23382925

  15. On the edge of Bantu expansions: mtDNA, Y chromosome and lactase persistence genetic variation in southwestern Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beleza Sandra

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current information about the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples is hampered by the scarcity of genetic data from well identified populations from southern Africa. Here, we fill an important gap in the analysis of the western edge of the Bantu migrations by studying for the first time the patterns of Y-chromosome, mtDNA and lactase persistence genetic variation in four representative groups living around the Namib Desert in southwestern Angola (Ovimbundu, Ganguela, Nyaneka-Nkumbi and Kuvale. We assessed the differentiation between these populations and their levels of admixture with Khoe-San groups, and examined their relationship with other sub-Saharan populations. We further combined our dataset with previously published data on Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation to explore a general isolation with migration model and infer the demographic parameters underlying current genetic diversity in Bantu populations. Results Correspondence analysis, lineage sharing patterns and admixture estimates indicate that the gene pool from southwestern Angola is predominantly derived from West-Central Africa. The pastoralist Herero-speaking Kuvale people were additionally characterized by relatively high frequencies of Y-chromosome (12% and mtDNA (22% Khoe-San lineages, as well as by the presence of the -14010C lactase persistence mutation (6%, which likely originated in non-Bantu pastoralists from East Africa. Inferred demographic parameters show that both male and female populations underwent significant size growth after the split between the western and eastern branches of Bantu expansions occurring 4000 years ago. However, males had lower population sizes and migration rates than females throughout the Bantu dispersals. Conclusion Genetic variation in southwestern Angola essentially results from the encounter of an offshoot of West-Central Africa with autochthonous Khoisan-speaking peoples from the south. Interactions between the Bantus

  16. Afghanistan's ethnic groups share a Y-chromosomal heritage structured by historical events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel E; Ashrafian Bonab, Maziar; Youhanna, Sonia C; Soria-Hernanz, David F; Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Douaihy, Bouchra; Ghassibe-Sabbagh, Michella; Rafatpanah, Hoshang; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Whale, John; Balanovsky, Oleg; Wells, R Spencer; Comas, David; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Zalloua, Pierre A

    2012-01-01

    Afghanistan has held a strategic position throughout history. It has been inhabited since the Paleolithic and later became a crossroad for expanding civilizations and empires. Afghanistan's location, history, and diverse ethnic groups present a unique opportunity to explore how nations and ethnic groups emerged, and how major cultural evolutions and technological developments in human history have influenced modern population structures. In this study we have analyzed, for the first time, the four major ethnic groups in present-day Afghanistan: Hazara, Pashtun, Tajik, and Uzbek, using 52 binary markers and 19 short tandem repeats on the non-recombinant segment of the Y-chromosome. A total of 204 Afghan samples were investigated along with more than 8,500 samples from surrounding populations important to Afghanistan's history through migrations and conquests, including Iranians, Greeks, Indians, Middle Easterners, East Europeans, and East Asians. Our results suggest that all current Afghans largely share a heritage derived from a common unstructured ancestral population that could have emerged during the Neolithic revolution and the formation of the first farming communities. Our results also indicate that inter-Afghan differentiation started during the Bronze Age, probably driven by the formation of the first civilizations in the region. Later migrations and invasions into the region have been assimilated differentially among the ethnic groups, increasing inter-population genetic differences, and giving the Afghans a unique genetic diversity in Central Asia. PMID:22470552

  17. Nilotes from Karamoja, Uganda: haplotype data defined by 17 Y-chromosome STRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Verónica; Alves, Cíntia; Amorim, António; Carracedo, Angel; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Gusmão, Leonor

    2010-07-01

    In this work 118 Nilote male samples were genotyped from Karamoja region, in Northeast Uganda, through 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs)-DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and GATA H4.1. A total of 94 different haplotypes were found, where 19 were shared by at least two individuals, and haplotype diversity amounted to 0.9958+/-0.0017. When considering only the nine Y-STRs included in the minimal haplotype (YHRD) the haplotype diversity decreased to 0.9807+/-0.0048, a similar value to those found in other African populations such as Mozambique, Angola and Guinea-Bissau. Population comparisons were performed between our sample and nine other African populations. Significant R(st) genetic distances were obtained between the Nilote population from Karamoja and all African populations used for comparison, except Xhosa sample from South Africa. In the multidimensional scaling (MDS) plot, the Karamoja sample is well separated from all other populations, standing between the Ethiopia and the Bantu samples, although closer to this last group. PMID:20457037

  18. Afghanistan's ethnic groups share a Y-chromosomal heritage structured by historical events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Haber

    Full Text Available Afghanistan has held a strategic position throughout history. It has been inhabited since the Paleolithic and later became a crossroad for expanding civilizations and empires. Afghanistan's location, history, and diverse ethnic groups present a unique opportunity to explore how nations and ethnic groups emerged, and how major cultural evolutions and technological developments in human history have influenced modern population structures. In this study we have analyzed, for the first time, the four major ethnic groups in present-day Afghanistan: Hazara, Pashtun, Tajik, and Uzbek, using 52 binary markers and 19 short tandem repeats on the non-recombinant segment of the Y-chromosome. A total of 204 Afghan samples were investigated along with more than 8,500 samples from surrounding populations important to Afghanistan's history through migrations and conquests, including Iranians, Greeks, Indians, Middle Easterners, East Europeans, and East Asians. Our results suggest that all current Afghans largely share a heritage derived from a common unstructured ancestral population that could have emerged during the Neolithic revolution and the formation of the first farming communities. Our results also indicate that inter-Afghan differentiation started during the Bronze Age, probably driven by the formation of the first civilizations in the region. Later migrations and invasions into the region have been assimilated differentially among the ethnic groups, increasing inter-population genetic differences, and giving the Afghans a unique genetic diversity in Central Asia.

  19. Y chromosome genetic variation in the Italian peninsula is clinal and supports an admixture model for the Mesolithic-Neolithic encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Cristian; Brisighelli, Francesca; Scarnicci, Francesca; Arredi, Barbara; Caglia', Alessandra; Vetrugno, Giuseppe; Tofanelli, Sergio; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Paoli, Giorgio; Pascali, Vincenzo L

    2007-07-01

    The Italian peninsula, given its geographical location in the middle of the Mediterranean basin, was involved in the process of the peopling of Europe since the very beginning, with first settlements dating to the Upper Paleolithic. Later on, the Neolithic revolution left clear evidence in the archeological record, with findings going back to 7000 B.C. We have investigated the demographic consequences of the agriculture revolution in this area by genotyping Y chromosome markers for almost 700 individuals from 12 different regions. Data analysis showed a non-random distribution of the observed genetic variation, with more than 70% of the Y chromosome diversity distributed along a North-South axis. While the Greek colonisation during classical time appears to have left no significant contribution, the results support a male demic diffusion model, even if population replacement was not complete and the degree of Neolithic admixture with Mesolithic inhabitants was different in different areas of Italy. PMID:17275346

  20. Y chromosome microdeletion in a case with Klinefelter's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samli, H; Samli, M M; Azgoz, A; Solak, M

    2006-01-01

    In male infertility, the frequency of genetic factors is high. Klinefelter's Syndrome is the most frequent sex chromosomal abnormality detected in male infertility. In this study we report a patient diagnosed with Klinefelter's Syndrome with a deletion of the Yq interval. The patient was 24-years old with primary infertility. Semen analyses carried out in triplicate indicated azoospermia. The plasma leutenizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were abnormally high and the testosterone level was lower than the usual range. Each of his testes had a volume of 3 cc. Peripheral blood karyotype analysis showed Klinefelter's Syndrome (47, XXY) pattern. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA was performed using the following primers; AZFa (sY81, sY82, sY84), AZFb (sY127, sY142, sY164, RBM1), AZFc (CDY, BPY, sY254, sY255, sY277), AZFd (sY152, sY145, sY153). Analysis revealed a single deletion of AZFa region (sY84). Deletion of the AZFa region may be an additional factor for absolute azoospermia in men with Klinefelter's Syndrome. For individuals with Klinefelter's Syndrome who plan to undergo assisted reproduction techniques, Y chromosome microdeletion screening can diagnostically be convenient. PMID:17028090

  1. Polymorphisms of two Y chromosome microsatellites in Chinese cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Kai

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two Y chromosome specific microsatellites UMN2404 and UMN0103 were genotyped and assessed for polymorphisms in a total of 423 unrelated males from 25 indigenous Chinese cattle breeds. Consistently, both microsatellites displayed specific indicine and taurine alleles in each bull examined. The indicine and taurine alleles were detected in 248 males (58.6%, and 175 males (41.4%, respectively, although these frequencies varied amongst different breeds examined. The indicine alleles dominated in the southern group (92.4%, while the taurine alleles dominated in the northern group (95.5%. Hainan Island was possibly the site for the origin of Chinese zebu, and Tibetan cattle were probably independently domesticated from another strain of Bos primigenius. The geographical distribution of these frequencies reveals a pattern of male indicine introgression and a hybrid zone of indicine and taurine cattle in China. The declining south-to-north and east-to-west gradient of male indicine introgression in China could be explained by historical data, geographical segregation and temperature and weather conditions.

  2. Polymorphic distribution of Y-chromosome haplotype and mitochondrial DNA in the Bouyei people in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永念; 左丽; 文波; 柯越海; 黄薇; 金力

    2004-01-01

    @@ In the evolution of humans, many kinds of mutations in the human genome have been accumulated, providing credible genetic evidence for the study of human origins and migrations. The "out-of-Africa" hypothesis of modern human evolution and the genetic origin of the Japanese has come about by studying mitochondrial DNA.l,2 Recently, researchers have recognized the power of Y-chromosome markers in resolving migratory patterns of modern humans as more and more Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism markers have been found. The markers on the nonrecombinant part of the Y-chromosome allows for the reconstruction of intact haplotypes which are probably the best genetic tools to study human migrations. We can analyze the paternal history of some people in different areas by Y-chromosome haplotypes.

  3. Idiopathic cases of male infertility from a region in India show low incidence of Y-chromosome microdeletion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Ambasudhan; K Singh; J K Agarwal; S K Singh; A Khanna; R K Sah; I Singh; R Raman

    2003-09-01

    Chromosomal and Y-chromosomal microdeletion analysis has been done in cases of idiopathic infertility with the objective of evaluating the frequency of chromosomal and molecular anomaly as the causal factor of infertility. Barring a few cases of Klinefelter syndrome (XXY or XY/XXY mosaics), no chromosomal anomaly was encountered. Y-microdeletion was analysed by PCR-screening of STSs from different regions of the AZF (AZFa, AZFb, AZFc) on the long arm of the Y, as well as by using DNA probes of the genes RBM, DAZ (Yq), DAZLA (an autosomal homologue of DAZ) and SRY (Yp; sex determining gene). Out of 177 cases examined, 9 (azoospermia – 8 and oligoasthenospermia – 1) showed partial deletion of AZF. The size of deletion varied among patients but AZFc was either totally or partially removed in all of them. In contrast, no deletion was detected in AZFa. Testis biopsy done on a limited number of cases (50) showed diverse stages of spermatogenic arrest with no specific correlation with the genotype. The frequency of Y-chromosome microdeletion in our samples (∼ 5%) is much lower than the frequency (∼ 10%) reported globally and the two previous reports from India. We contend that the frequency may be affected by population structures in different geographical regions.

  4. No signature of Y chromosomal resemblance between possible descendants of the Cimbri in Denmark and Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Børglum, Anders D; Vernesi, Cristiano; Jensen, Peter K A; Madsen, Bo; Haagerup, Annette; Barbujani, Guido

    2007-02-01

    Two European populations are believed to be related to the ancient Germanic tribe Cimbri: one living in Northern Italy, the other living in Jutland, Denmark. The people called Cimbri are documented in the ancient Roman historical record. Arriving from the far north their movements can be tracked from successive battles with the Romans. The Cimbri finally entered Italy from the northeast and were defeated at Vercellae (present day Vercelli) in 101 BC by Gaius Marius and his professional legions. Classical sources from the first centuries AD relate the homeland of the Cimbri to the coasts around the Elb estuary (northern Germany) or specifically towards the north (Himmerland in northern Jutland). In the alpine parts of Veneto, northeast of the historical battlefield, local traditions dating back to late medieval time, identify a local population as Cimbri living in Terra dei Cimbri. They are considered the descendents of the Germanic combatants that fled the battlefield at Vercelli. As the defeated Cimbri that possibly fled to the mountains of Northern Italy most likely would have been male (warriors), the present study investigated the possible Y chromosomal diversity of the two present populations using microsatellite markers and single nucleotide polymorphisms. While Cimbri from Himmerland resembled their geographical neighbors from Denmark for the Y-chromosome markers, Cimbri from Italy were significantly differentiated both from Cimbri from Himmerland and from Danes. Therefore, we were not able to show any biological relationship for uniparentally transmitted markers. PMID:17133438

  5. Prevalence of Y-chromosome sequences and gonadoblastoma in Turner syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra Bernadete Trovó de Marqui; Roseane Lopes da Silva-Grecco; Marly Aparecida Spadotto Balarin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the prevalence of Y-chromosome sequences and gonadoblastoma in patients with Turner syndrome (TS) using molecular techniques. Data source: A literature search was performed in Pubmed, limiting the period of time to the years 2005–2014 and using the descriptors: TS and Y sequences (n=26), and TS and Y-chromosome material (n=27). The inclusion criteria were: articles directly related to the subject and published in English or Portuguese. Articles which did not me...

  6. Y-chromosome variability in four Native American populations from Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The allele and haplotype frequencies for 13 Y-chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) [nine STRs loci of the minimal Y chromosome haplotype (DYS19/DYS385a/DYS385b/DYS389-I/DYS389-II/DYS390/ DYS391/DYS392/ DYS393) plus four additional loci (DYS388/DYS426/DYS439/ DXYS156)] were determined in 99 males f...

  7. Ancestral Asian source(s) of new world Y-chromosome founder haplotypes.

    OpenAIRE

    Karafet, T.M.; Zegura, S L; Posukh, O.; Osipova, L; A. Bergen; Long, J; Goldman, D.; Klitz, W.; Harihara, S; de Knijff, P.; Wiebe, V.; Griffiths, R. C.; Templeton, A R; Hammer, M. F.

    1999-01-01

    Haplotypes constructed from Y-chromosome markers were used to trace the origins of Native Americans. Our sample consisted of 2,198 males from 60 global populations, including 19 Native American and 15 indigenous North Asian groups. A set of 12 biallelic polymorphisms gave rise to 14 unique Y-chromosome haplotypes that were unevenly distributed among the populations. Combining multiallelic variation at two Y-linked microsatellites (DYS19 and DXYS156Y) with the unique haplotypes results in a to...

  8. Taiwan Y-chromosomal DNA variation and its relationship with Island Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Trejaut, Jean A; Poloni, Estella S.; Yen, Ju-Chen; Lai, Ying-Hui; Loo, Jun-Hun; Lee, Chien-Liang; He, Chun-Lin; Lin, Marie

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Much of the data resolution of the haploid non-recombining Y chromosome (NRY) haplogroup O in East Asia are still rudimentary and could be an explanatory factor for current debates on the settlement history of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA). Here, 81 slowly evolving markers (mostly SNPs) and 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats were used to achieve higher level molecular resolution. Our aim is to investigate if the distribution of NRY DNA variation in Taiwan and ISEA is consistent ...

  9. Evaluation of Y chromosomal SNP haplogrouping in the HID-Ion AmpliSeq™ Identity Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Eriko; Minaguchi, Kiyoshi; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran; Kakimoto, Yu; Satoh, Fumiko; Nakatome, Masato; Miyashita, Keiko; Osawa, Motoki

    2016-09-01

    The Y chromosomal haplogroup determined from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) combinations is a valuable genetic marker to study ancestral male lineage and ethical distribution. Next-generation sequencing has been developed for widely diverse genetics fields. For this study, we demonstrate 34 Y-SNP typing employing the Ion PGM™ system to perform haplogrouping. DNA libraries were constructed using the HID-Ion AmpliSeq™ Identity Panel. Emulsion PCR was performed, then DNA sequences were analyzed on the Ion 314 and 316 Chip Kit v2. Some difficulties became apparent during the analytic processes. No-call was reported at rs2032599 and M479 in six samples, in which the least coverage was observed at M479. A minor misreading occurred at rs2032631 and M479. A real time PCR experiment using other pairs of oligonucleotide primers showed that these events might result from the flanking sequence. Finally, Y haplogroup was determined completely for 81 unrelated males including Japanese (n=59) and Malay (n=22) subjects. The allelic divergence differed between the two populations. In comparison with the conventional Sanger method, next-generation sequencing provides a comprehensive SNP analysis with convenient procedures, but further system improvement is necessary. PMID:27591541

  10. Y-Chromosome and Mitochondrial DNA Phylogeny of Poliyar, Malaikuravar and Palliyar Tribes of Tamilnadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Abilash

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the project was to study the inter genetic diversity within and between Poliyar, Malaikuravar and Palliyar tribal populations of Tamil Nadu and to compare these populations with other populations of India and other parts of the world. 50 Poliyar, 24 Malaikuravar and 20 Palliyar samples were taken for the study. Mitochondrial DNA makers HVR1 and from Y-chromosome, SNPs were analysed. The high frequency of C 6 T at 16223 locus of HVR1 region suggests that these populations might fall into “M” haplogroup. Median Joining Network analysis reveals that three populations are endogamous as they showed very less haplotypes. In the Neighbour Joining Tree, Poliyar are clustering with Palliyar, palliyan and kadar tribes of TamilNadu. Malaikuravar are clustering with satmani tribal population whereas Palliyar are clustering with palliyan and kadar tribes of TamilNadu. The mismatch distribution graph reveals that population growth is constant in paliyar while it is expanding in case of Malaikuravar. The Poliyar tribes show this tribes going to show the bottle neck. Y-SNP analysis revealed that Poliyar, Malaikuravar and Palliyar, fall into haplogroup VI, VIII and X suggesting that they must have migrated from South India, Pakistan, South Asia and Central Asia, as there haplotypes are found predominantly in the above region. To elucidate their migration routes, subhaplotyping needed to be done.

  11. Population data for 12 Y-chromosome STR loci in a sample from El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosa, Juan Carlos; Morales, Josefina A; Yurrebaso, Iñaki; Gusmão, Leonor; García, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    Haplotype, allele frequencies and population data of 12 Y-chromosome STR loci DYS19, DYS385, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 were determined from a sample of 150 unrelated male individuals from El Salvador, Central America. A total of 131 haplotypes were identified by the 12 Y-STR loci of which 118 were unique. The haplotype diversity (99.08%) and the proportion of different haplotypes (87.33%) were estimated. R(ST) genetic distances were calculated between El Salvador and other populations from Southern and Central America, Europe and Africa. The highest R(ST) genetic distances were found when comparing El Salvador with African populations (0.334

  12. Population data for 12 Y-chromosome STR loci in a sample from Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matamoros, Mireya; Yurrebaso, Iñaki; Gusmão, Leonor; García, Oscar

    2009-09-01

    Haplotype, allele frequencies and population data of 12 Y-chromosome STR loci DYS19, DYS385, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 were determined from a sample of 128 unrelated male individuals from Honduras, Central America. A total of 112 haplotypes were identified by the 12 Y-STR loci of which 98 were unique. The haplotype diversity (98.99%) and the proportion of different haplotypes (87.50%) were estimated. Genetic distances were calculated between Honduras and other populations from Southern and Central America, Europe and Africa. The analysis of a Multi Dimensional Scaling (MDS) plot, based on pairwise R(ST) genetic distances, allowed to conclude that Honduras is highly differentiated from the African samples (0.343< or =R(ST)< or =0.620; P=0.000) and from a Native American sample from Argentina, Tobas (R(ST)=0.210, P=0.000). Honduras showed a lower genetic distance to the European cluster (composed by European and South American general population samples from Brazil, Argentina, Colombia and Venezuela) than to the Central American cluster (Mexico and El Salvador). PMID:19628418

  13. Population genetics of Y-chromosome STRs in a population of Northern Greeks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovatsi, Leda; Saunier, Jessica L; Irwin, Jodi A

    2009-12-01

    Seventeen Y STR loci were typed in a population sample of 191 unrelated male individuals from Northern Greece. Haplotypes are presented for the following loci: DYS456, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS389II, DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635, DYS392, Y GATA H4, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS448. The overall haplotype diversity was 0.9992. This database study provides significant additional information for the application of Y-chromosomal STRs to forensic identification efforts in Greece by nearly doubling both the number of individuals and the number of Y-loci typed from Greek populations. These samples have been previously typed for autosomal STRs [L. Kovatsi, T.J. Parsons, R.S. Just, J.A. Irwin, Genetic variation for 15 autosomal STR loci (PowerPlex 16) in a population sample from northern Greece, Forensic Sci. Int. 159 (2006) 61-63] and the mitochondrial DNA control region [J. Irwin, J. Saunier, K. Strouss, C. Paintner, T. Diegoli, K. Sturk, L. Kovatsi, A. Brandstatter, M.A. Cariolou, W. Parson, T.J. Parsons, Mitochondrial control region sequences from northern Greece and Greek Cypriots, Int. J. Legal Med. 122 (2008) 87-89]. PMID:19948315

  14. Genetic admixture history of Eastern Indonesia as revealed by Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Stefano; Grunz, Katharina E; Brauer, Silke; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Castrì, Loredana; Sudoyo, Herawati; Marzuki, Sangkot; Barnes, Robert H; Schmidtke, Jörg; Stoneking, Mark; Kayser, Manfred

    2009-08-01

    Eastern Indonesia possesses more linguistic diversity than any other region in Southeast Asia, with both Austronesian (AN) languages that are of East Asian origin, as well as non-Austronesian (NAN) languages of likely Melanesian origin. Here, we investigated the genetic history of human populations from seven eastern Indonesian islands, including AN and NAN speakers, as well as the relationship between languages and genes, by means of nonrecombining Y-chromosomal (NRY) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis. We found that the eastern Indonesian gene pool consists of East Asian as well as Melanesian components, as might be expected based on linguistic evidence, but also harbors putative indigenous eastern Indonesian signatures that perhaps reflect the initial occupation of the Wallacea by aboriginal hunter-gatherers already in Palaeolithic times. Furthermore, both NRY and mtDNA data showed a complete lack of correlation between linguistic and genetic relationships, most likely reflecting genetic admixture and/or language shift. In addition, we noted a small fraction of the NRY and mtDNA data shared between eastern Indonesians and Australian Aborigines likely reflecting an ancient link between Asia and Australia. Our data thus provide insights into the complex genetic ancestry history of eastern Indonesian islanders characterized by several admixture episodes and demonstrate a clear example of the lack of the often-assumed correlation between the genes and languages of human populations. PMID:19414523

  15. Design and validation of a highly discriminatory 10-locus Y-chromosome STR multiplex system

    KAUST Repository

    D'Amato, María Eugenia

    2011-03-01

    The Y-chromosome STRs (short tandem repeat) markers are routinely utilized in the resolution of forensic casework related to sexual assault. For this, the forensic community has adopted a set of eleven (core) Y-STR that is incorporated in all commercial diagnostic systems. Our previous studies of Y-STR polymorphisms in the South African population identified low levels of diversity and discrimination capacity for many commercial marker sets, determining a limited applicability of these systems to the local population groups. To overcome this shortcoming, we designed a Y-STR 10-plex system that shows higher discriminatory capacity (DC) than available commercial systems. The markers were selected from a population group of 283 individuals with African, European and Asian ancestry genotyped at 45 Y-STRs, applying an optimization based selection procedure to achieve the highest possible DC with the minimal number of markers. The 10-plex was satisfactorily subjected to developmental validation tests following the SWGDAM guidelines and shows potential for its application to genealogical and evolutionary studies. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Y-chromosomal variation in sub-Saharan Africa: insights into the history of Niger-Congo groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Filippo, Cesare; Barbieri, Chiara; Whitten, Mark; Mpoloka, Sununguko Wata; Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen Drofn; Bostoen, Koen; Nyambe, Terry; Beyer, Klaus; Schreiber, Henning; de Knijff, Peter; Luiselli, Donata; Stoneking, Mark; Pakendorf, Brigitte

    2011-03-01

    Technological and cultural innovations as well as climate changes are thought to have influenced the diffusion of major language phyla in sub-Saharan Africa. The most widespread and the richest in diversity is the Niger-Congo phylum, thought to have originated in West Africa ∼ 10,000 years ago (ya). The expansion of Bantu languages (a family within the Niger-Congo phylum) ∼ 5,000 ya represents a major event in the past demography of the continent. Many previous studies on Y chromosomal variation in Africa associated the Bantu expansion with haplogroup E1b1a (and sometimes its sublineage E1b1a7). However, the distribution of these two lineages extends far beyond the area occupied nowadays by Bantu-speaking people, raising questions on the actual genetic structure behind this expansion. To address these issues, we directly genotyped 31 biallelic markers and 12 microsatellites on the Y chromosome in 1,195 individuals of African ancestry focusing on areas that were previously poorly characterized (Botswana, Burkina Faso, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Zambia). With the inclusion of published data, we analyzed 2,736 individuals from 26 groups representing all linguistic phyla and covering a large portion of sub-Saharan Africa. Within the Niger-Congo phylum, we ascertain for the first time differences in haplogroup composition between Bantu and non-Bantu groups via two markers (U174 and U175) on the background of haplogroup E1b1a (and E1b1a7), which were directly genotyped in our samples and for which genotypes were inferred from published data using linear discriminant analysis on short tandem repeat (STR) haplotypes. No reduction in STR diversity levels was found across the Bantu groups, suggesting the absence of serial founder effects. In addition, the homogeneity of haplogroup composition and pattern of haplotype sharing between Western and Eastern Bantu groups suggests that their expansion throughout sub-Saharan Africa reflects a rapid spread followed by

  17. Phenotypic variation within European carriers of the Y-chromosomal gr/gr deletion is independent of Y-chromosomal background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krausz, C; Giachini, C; Xue, Y;

    2008-01-01

    of duplications and the Y-chromosomal haplogroup were characterised. Although the study had good power to detect factors that accounted for >or=5.5% of the variation in sperm concentration, no such factor was found. A negative effect of gr/gr deletions followed by b2/b4 duplication was found within...

  18. Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Intermediate Variant Alleles DYS392.2, DYS449.2, and DYS385.2 Delineate New Phylogenetic Substructure in Human Y-chromosome Haplogroup Tree

    OpenAIRE

    Myres, Natalie M.; Ritchie, Kathleen H.; Lin, Alice A; Hughes, Robert H.; Woodward, Scott R.; Underhill, Peter A

    2009-01-01

    Aim To determine the human Y-chromosome haplogroup backgrounds of intermediate-sized variant alleles displayed by short tandem repeat (STR) loci DYS392, DYS449, and DYS385, and to valuate the potential of each intermediate variant to elucidate new phylogenetic substructure within the human Y-chromosome haplogroup tree. Methods Molecular characterization of lineages was achieved using a combination of Y-chromosome haplogroup defining binary polymorphisms and up to 37 ...

  19. Evolution of the DAZ gene and the AZFc region on primate Y chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jane-Fang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Azoospermia Factor c (AZFc region of the human Y chromosome is a unique product of segmental duplication. It consists almost entirely of very long amplicons, represented by different colors, and is frequently deleted in subfertile men. Most of the AZFc amplicons have high sequence similarity with autosomal segments, indicating recent duplication and transposition to the Y chromosome. The Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ gene within the red-amplicon arose from an ancestral autosomal DAZ-like (DAZL gene. It varies significantly between different men regarding to its copy number and the numbers of RNA recognition motif and DAZ repeat it encodes. We used Southern analyses to study the evolution of DAZ and AZFc amplicons on the Y chromosomes of primates. Results The Old World monkey rhesus macaque has only one DAZ gene. In contrast, the great apes have multiple copies of DAZ, ranging from 2 copies in bonobos and gorillas to at least 6 copies in orangutans, and these DAZ genes have polymorphic structures similar to those of their human counterparts. Sequences homologous to the various AZFc amplicons are present on the Y chromosomes of some but not all primates, indicating that they arrived on the Y chromosome at different times during primate evolution. Conclusion The duplication and transposition of AZFc amplicons to the human Y chromosome occurred in three waves, i.e., after the branching of the New World monkey, the gorilla, and the chimpanzee/bonobo lineages, respectively. The red-amplicon, one of the first to arrive on the Y chromosome, amplified by inverted duplication followed by direct duplication after the separation of the Old World monkey and the great ape lineages. Subsequent duplication/deletion in the various lineages gave rise to a spectrum of DAZ gene structure and copy number found in today's great apes.

  20. Sequencing of rhesus macaque Y chromosome clarifies origins and evolution of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) genes

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Jennifer F.; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of Y chromosome evolution often emphasize gene loss, but this loss has been counterbalanced by addition of new genes. The DAZ genes, which are critical to human spermatogenesis, were acquired by the Y chromosome in the ancestor of Old World monkeys and apes. We and our colleagues recently sequenced the rhesus macaque Y chromosome, and comparison of this sequence to human and chimpanzee enables us to reconstruct much of the evolutionary history of DAZ. We report that DAZ arrived on the...

  1. Toward Male Individualization with Rapidly Mutating Y-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Kaye N; Ralf, Arwin; Aboukhalid, Rachid; Achakzai, Niaz M; Anjos, Maria J; Ayub, Qasim; Balažic, Jože; Ballantyne, Jack; Ballard, David J; Berger, Burkhard; Bobillo, Cecilia; Bouabdellah, Mehdi; Burri, Helen; Capal, Tomas; Caratti, Stefano; Cárdenas, Jorge; Cartault, François; Carvalho, Elizeu F; Carvalho, Monica; Cheng, Baowen; Coble, Michael D; Comas, David; Corach, Daniel; D'Amato, Maria E; Davison, Sean; de Knijff, Peter; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A; Decorte, Ronny; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Dupuy, Berit M; Elmrghni, Samir; Gliwiński, Mateusz; Gomes, Sara C; Grol, Laurens; Haas, Cordula; Hanson, Erin; Henke, Jürgen; Henke, Lotte; Herrera-Rodríguez, Fabiola; Hill, Carolyn R; Holmlund, Gunilla; Honda, Katsuya; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Inokuchi, Shota; Jobling, Mark A; Kaddura, Mahmoud; Kim, Jong S; Kim, Soon H; Kim, Wook; King, Turi E; Klausriegler, Eva; Kling, Daniel; Kovačević, Lejla; Kovatsi, Leda; Krajewski, Paweł; Kravchenko, Sergey; Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Lee, Eun Young; Lessig, Ruediger; Livshits, Ludmila A; Marjanović, Damir; Minarik, Marek; Mizuno, Natsuko; Moreira, Helena; Morling, Niels; Mukherjee, Meeta; Munier, Patrick; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Neuhuber, Franz; Nie, Shengjie; Nilasitsataporn, Premlaphat; Nishi, Takeki; Oh, Hye H; Olofsson, Jill; Onofri, Valerio; Palo, Jukka U; Pamjav, Horolma; Parson, Walther; Petlach, Michal; Phillips, Christopher; Ploski, Rafal; Prasad, Samayamantri P R; Primorac, Dragan; Purnomo, Gludhug A; Purps, Josephine; Rangel-Villalobos, Hector; Rębała, Krzysztof; Rerkamnuaychoke, Budsaba; Gonzalez, Danel Rey; Robino, Carlo; Roewer, Lutz; Rosa, Alexandra; Sajantila, Antti; Sala, Andrea; Salvador, Jazelyn M; Sanz, Paula; Schmitt, Cornelia; Sharma, Anil K; Silva, Dayse A; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Sijen, Titia; Sirker, Miriam; Siváková, Daniela; Škaro, Vedrana; Solano-Matamoros, Carlos; Souto, Luis; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Sudoyo, Herawati; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Taylor, Duncan; Tillmar, Andreas; Tsybovsky, Iosif S; Tyler-Smith, Chris; van der Gaag, Kristiaan J; Vanek, Daniel; Völgyi, Antónia; Ward, Denise; Willemse, Patricia; Yap, Eric PH; Yong, Rita YY; Pajnič, Irena Zupanič; Kayser, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Relevant for various areas of human genetics, Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are commonly used for testing close paternal relationships among individuals and populations, and for male lineage identification. However, even the widely used 17-loci Yfiler set cannot resolve individuals and populations completely. Here, 52 centers generated quality-controlled data of 13 rapidly mutating (RM) Y-STRs in 14,644 related and unrelated males from 111 worldwide populations. Strikingly, >99% of the 12,272 unrelated males were completely individualized. Haplotype diversity was extremely high (global: 0.9999985, regional: 0.99836–0.9999988). Haplotype sharing between populations was almost absent except for six (0.05%) of the 12,156 haplotypes. Haplotype sharing within populations was generally rare (0.8% nonunique haplotypes), significantly lower in urban (0.9%) than rural (2.1%) and highest in endogamous groups (14.3%). Analysis of molecular variance revealed 99.98% of variation within populations, 0.018% among populations within groups, and 0.002% among groups. Of the 2,372 newly and 156 previously typed male relative pairs, 29% were differentiated including 27% of the 2,378 father–son pairs. Relative to Yfiler, haplotype diversity was increased in 86% of the populations tested and overall male relative differentiation was raised by 23.5%. Our study demonstrates the value of RM Y-STRs in identifying and separating unrelated and related males and provides a reference database. PMID:24917567

  2. Analysis of the Ceratitis capitata y chromosome using in situ hybridization to mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Ceratitis capitata the Y chromosome is responsible for sex-determination. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for cytogenetic analysis of mitotic chromosomes. FISH with the wild-type strain EgyptII and two repetitive DNA probes enabled us to differentiate between the short and the long arm of the Y chromosome and gives a much better resolution than C-banding of mitotic chromosomes. We identified the Y-chromosomal breakpoints in Y-autosome translocations using FISH. Even more complex rearrangements i.e. deletions and insertions in some translocation strains were detected by this method. A strategy for mapping the primary sex determination factor in Ceratitis capitata by FISH is presented. (author)

  3. Evaluating the Y chromosomal timescale in human demographic and lineage dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan-Chao; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Jin, Li; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Y chromosome is a superb tool for inferring human evolution and recent demographic history from a paternal perspective. However, Y chromosomal substitution rates obtained using different modes of calibration vary considerably, and have produced disparate reconstructions of human history. Here, we discuss how substitution rate and date estimates are affected by the choice of different calibration points. We argue that most Y chromosomal substitution rates calculated to date have shortcomings, including a reliance on the ambiguous human-chimpanzee divergence time, insufficient sampling of deep-rooting pedigrees, and using inappropriate founding migrations, although the rates obtained from a single pedigree or calibrated with the peopling of the Americas seem plausible. We highlight the need for using more deep-rooting pedigrees and ancient genomes with reliable dates to improve the rate estimation. PMID:25215184

  4. Sexual dimorphism in white campion: complex control of carpel number is revealed by Y chromosome deletions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexual dimorphism in the dioecious plant white campion (Silene latifolia = Melandrium album) is under the control of two main regions on the Y chromosome. One such region, encoding the gynoecium-suppressing function (GSF), is responsible for the arrest of carpel initiation in male flowers. To generate chromosomal deletions, we used pollen irradiation in male plants to produce hermaphroditic mutants (bsx mutants) in which carpel development was restored. The mutants resulted from alterations in at least two GSF chromosomal regions, one autosomal and one located on the distal half of the (p)-arm of the Y chromosome. The two mutations affected carpel development independently, each mutation showing incomplete penetrance and variegation, albeit at significantly different levels. During successive meiotic generations, a progressive increase in penetrance and a reduction in variegation levels were observed and quantified at the level of the Y-linked GSF (GSF-Y). Possible mechanisms are proposed to explain the behavior of the bsx mutations: epigenetic regulation or/and second-site mutation of modifier genes. In addition, studies on the inheritance of the hermaphroditic trait showed that, unlike wild-type Y chromosomes, deleted Y chromosomes can be transmitted through both the male and the female lines. Altogether, these findings bring experimental support, on the one hand, to the existence on the Y chromosome of genic meiotic drive function(s) and, on the other hand, to models that consider that dioecy evolved through multiple mutation events. As such, the GSF is actually a system containing more than one locus and whose primary component is located on the Y chromosome

  5. An Assay to Detect In Vivo Y Chromosome Loss in Drosophila Wing Disc Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Szabad, Janos; Bellen, Hugo J.; Venken, Koen J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of the Y chromosome in Drosophila has no impact on cell viability and therefore allows us to assay the impact of environmental agents and genetic alterations on chromosomal loss. To detect in vivo chromosome loss in cells of the developing Drosophila wing primordia, we first engineered a Y chromosome with an attP docking site. By making use of the ΦC31 integrase system, we site-specifically integrated a genomic transgene encompassing the multiple wing hair ( mwh ) locus into this attP si...

  6. Genetic Heritage of the Balto-Slavic Speaking Populations: A Synthesis of Autosomal, Mitochondrial and Y-Chromosomal Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniarevich, Alena; Utevska, Olga; Chuhryaeva, Marina; Agdzhoyan, Anastasia; Dibirova, Khadizhat; Uktveryte, Ingrida; Möls, Märt; Mulahasanovic, Lejla; Pshenichnov, Andrey; Frolova, Svetlana; Shanko, Andrey; Metspalu, Ene; Reidla, Maere; Tambets, Kristiina; Tamm, Erika; Koshel, Sergey; Zaporozhchenko, Valery; Atramentova, Lubov; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Davydenko, Oleg; Goncharova, Olga; Evseeva, Irina; Churnosov, Michail; Pocheshchova, Elvira; Yunusbayev, Bayazit; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Marjanović, Damir; Rudan, Pavao; Rootsi, Siiri; Yankovsky, Nick; Endicott, Phillip; Kassian, Alexei; Dybo, Anna; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Balanovska, Elena; Metspalu, Mait; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard; Balanovsky, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    The Slavic branch of the Balto-Slavic sub-family of Indo-European languages underwent rapid divergence as a result of the spatial expansion of its speakers from Central-East Europe, in early medieval times. This expansion-mainly to East Europe and the northern Balkans-resulted in the incorporation of genetic components from numerous autochthonous populations into the Slavic gene pools. Here, we characterize genetic variation in all extant ethnic groups speaking Balto-Slavic languages by analyzing mitochondrial DNA (n = 6,876), Y-chromosomes (n = 6,079) and genome-wide SNP profiles (n = 296), within the context of other European populations. We also reassess the phylogeny of Slavic languages within the Balto-Slavic branch of Indo-European. We find that genetic distances among Balto-Slavic populations, based on autosomal and Y-chromosomal loci, show a high correlation (0.9) both with each other and with geography, but a slightly lower correlation (0.7) with mitochondrial DNA and linguistic affiliation. The data suggest that genetic diversity of the present-day Slavs was predominantly shaped in situ, and we detect two different substrata: 'central-east European' for West and East Slavs, and 'south-east European' for South Slavs. A pattern of distribution of segments identical by descent between groups of East-West and South Slavs suggests shared ancestry or a modest gene flow between those two groups, which might derive from the historic spread of Slavic people. PMID:26332464

  7. Genetic evidence of an East Asian origin and paleolithic northward migration of Y-chromosome haplogroup N.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Shi

    Full Text Available The Y-chromosome haplogroup N-M231 (Hg N is distributed widely in eastern and central Asia, Siberia, as well as in eastern and northern Europe. Previous studies suggested a counterclockwise prehistoric migration of Hg N from eastern Asia to eastern and northern Europe. However, the root of this Y chromosome lineage and its detailed dispersal pattern across eastern Asia are still unclear. We analyzed haplogroup profiles and phylogeographic patterns of 1,570 Hg N individuals from 20,826 males in 359 populations across Eurasia. We first genotyped 6,371 males from 169 populations in China and Cambodia, and generated data of 360 Hg N individuals, and then combined published data on 1,210 Hg N individuals from Japanese, Southeast Asian, Siberian, European and Central Asian populations. The results showed that the sub-haplogroups of Hg N have a distinct geographical distribution. The highest Y-STR diversity of the ancestral Hg N sub-haplogroups was observed in the southern part of mainland East Asia, and further phylogeographic analyses supports an origin of Hg N in southern China. Combined with previous data, we propose that the early northward dispersal of Hg N started from southern China about 21 thousand years ago (kya, expanding into northern China 12-18 kya, and reaching further north to Siberia about 12-14 kya before a population expansion and westward migration into Central Asia and eastern/northern Europe around 8.0-10.0 kya. This northward migration of Hg N likewise coincides with retreating ice sheets after the Last Glacial Maximum (22-18 kya in mainland East Asia.

  8. The fragile Y hypothesis: Y chromosome aneuploidy as a selective pressure in sex chromosome and meiotic mechanism evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2015-09-01

    Loss of the Y-chromosome is a common feature of species with chromosomal sex determination. However, our understanding of why some lineages frequently lose Y-chromosomes while others do not is limited. The fragile Y hypothesis proposes that in species with chiasmatic meiosis the rate of Y-chromosome aneuploidy and the size of the recombining region have a negative correlation. The fragile Y hypothesis provides a number of novel insights not possible under traditional models. Specifically, increased rates of Y aneuploidy may impose positive selection for (i) gene movement off the Y; (ii) translocations and fusions which expand the recombining region; and (iii) alternative meiotic segregation mechanisms (achiasmatic or asynaptic). These insights as well as existing evidence for the frequency of Y-chromosome aneuploidy raise doubt about the prospects for long-term retention of the human Y-chromosome despite recent evidence for stable gene content in older non-recombining regions. PMID:26200104

  9. Genetic population analysis of 17 Y-chromosomal STRs in three states (Valle del Cauca, Cauca and Nariño) from Southwestern Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julieta Avila, Sandra; Briceño, Ignacio; Gómez, Alberto

    2009-05-01

    Seventeen Y-chromosomal (DYS19, DYS389 I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS438, DYS439, DYS437, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, YGATA-H4 and DYS385a/b) short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphic systems were typed in three South West Colombian populations: Valle (short term for Valle del Cauca), Cauca and Nariño. DYS385a/b showed the highest gene diversity in the three populations. A total of 287 different Y-chromosome haplotypes were observed in the 308 males analyzed, and the haplotype diversity among populations was 0.9977. The most frequent haplotype was observed only three times and only nineteen others were observed two times. The highest gene diversity was found in Valle and the lowest in Cauca. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that variation is mainly within populations (99.1%) in agreement with previous results in European populations. In conclusion, these populations could be pooled together in order to create one "Colombian-Mestizo" database for forensic use. PMID:19329077

  10. Toward Male Individualization with Rapidly Mutating Y-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Ballantyne (Kaye); A. Ralf (Arwin); R. Aboukhalid (Rachid); N.M. Achakzai (Niaz); T. Anjos (Tania); Q. Ayub (Qasim); J. Balažic (Jože); J. Ballantyne (Jack); D.J. Ballard (David); B. Berger (Burkhard); C. Bobillo (Cecilia); M. Bouabdellah (Mehdi); H. Burri (Helen); T. Capal (Tomas); S. Caratti (Stefano); J. Cárdenas (Jorge); F. Cartault (François); E.F. Carvalho (Elizeu); M. de Carvalho (Margarete); B. Cheng (Baowen); M.D. Coble (Michael); D. Comas (David); D. Corach (Daniel); M. D'Amato (Mauro); S. Davison (Sean); P. de Knijff (Peter); M.C.A. de Ungria (Maria Corazon); R. Decorte (Ronny); T. Dobosz (Tadeusz); B.M. Dupuy (Berit); S. Elmrghni (Samir); M. Gliwiński (Mateusz); S.C. Gomes (Sara); L. Grol (Laurens); C. Haas (Cordula); E. Hanson (Erin); J. Henke (Jürgen); L. Henke (Lotte); F. Herrera-Rodríguez (Fabiola); C.R. Hill (Carolyn); G. Holmlund (Gunilla); K. Honda (Katsuya); U.-D. Immel (Uta-Dorothee); S. Inokuchi (Shota); R. Jobling; M. Kaddura (Mahmoud); J.S. Kim (Jong); S.H. Kim (Soon); W. Kim (Wook); T.E. King (Turi); E. Klausriegler (Eva); D. Kling (Daniel); L. Kovačević (Lejla); L. Kovatsi (Leda); P. Krajewski (Paweł); S. Kravchenko (Sergey); M.H.D. Larmuseau (Maarten); E.Y. Lee (Eun Young); R. Lessig (Rüdiger); L.A. Livshits (Ludmila); D. Marjanović (Damir); M. Minarik (Marek); N. Mizuno (Natsuko); H. Moreira (Helena); N. Morling (Niels); M. Mukherjee (Meeta); P. Munier (Patrick); J. Nagaraju (Javaregowda); F. Neuhuber (Franz); S. Nie (Shengjie); P. Nilasitsataporn (Premlaphat); T. Nishi (Takeki); H.H. Oh (Hye); S. Olofsson (Sylvia); V. Onofri (Valerio); J. Palo (Jukka); H. Pamjav (Horolma); W. Parson (Walther); M. Petlach (Michal); C. Phillips (Christopher); R. Ploski (Rafal); S.P.R. Prasad (Samayamantri P.); D. Primorac (Dragan); G.A. Purnomo (Gludhug); J. Purps (Josephine); H. Rangel-Villalobos (Hector); K. Reogonekbała (Krzysztof); B. Rerkamnuaychoke (Budsaba); D.R. Gonzalez (Danel Rey); C. Robino (Carlo); L. Roewer (Lutz); A. de Rosa (Anna); A. Sajantila (Antti); A. Sala (Andrea); J.M. Salvador (Jazelyn); P. Sanz (Paula); C. Schmitt (Christian); A.K. Sharma (Anisha K.); D.A. Silva (Dayse); K.-J. Shin (Kyoung-Jin); T. Sijen (Titia); M. Sirker (Miriam); D. Siváková (Daniela); V. Škaro (Vedrana); C. Solano-Matamoros (Carlos); L. Souto (L.); V. Stenzl (Vlastimil); H. Sudoyo (Herawati); D. Syndercombe-Court (Denise); A. Tagliabracci (Adriano); D. Taylor (Duncan); A. Tillmar (Andreas); I.S. Tsybovsky (Iosif); C. Tyler-Smith (Chris); K. van der Gaag (Kristiaan); D. Vanek (Daniel); A. Völgyi (Antónia); D. Ward (Denise); P. Willemse (Patricia); E.P.H. Yap (Eric); Z-Y. Yong (Ze-Yie); I.Z. Pajnič (Irena Zupanič); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRelevant for various areas of human genetics, Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are commonly used for testing close paternal relationships among individuals and populations, and for male lineage identification. However, even the widely used 17-loci Yfiler set cannot resolve ind

  11. Y-chromosomal variation confirms independent domestications of swamp and river buffalo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yindee, M.; Vlamings, B. H.; Wajjwalku, W.; Techakumphu, M.; Lohachit, C.; Sirivaidyapong, S.; Thitaram, C.; Amarasinghe, A. A A W K; Alexander, P. A B D A; Colenbrander, B.; Lenstra, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Y-chromosomal variation in the water buffalo was analysed by sequencing of DBY, ZFY and SRY gene segments. A clear separation of the paternal lineages of the river and swamp types parallels the differences between their maternal lineages and nuclear DNA. Sequence divergence was found to be comparabl

  12. The origin of the isolated population of the Faroe Islands investigated using Y chromosomal markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Tove H; Buttenschön, Henriette N; Wang, August G;

    2004-01-01

    Historical, archaeological and linguistic sources suggest that the ancestors of the present day population in the Faroe Islands may have their origin in several different regions surrounding the North Atlantic Ocean. In this study we use binary and microsatellite markers of the Y chromosome to...

  13. Prevalence of Y-chromosome sequences and gonadoblastoma in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete Trovó; da Silva-Grecco, Roseane Lopes; Balarin, Marly Aparecida Spadotto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the prevalence of Y-chromosome sequences and gonadoblastoma in patients with Turner syndrome (TS) using molecular techniques. Data source: A literature search was performed in Pubmed, limiting the period of time to the years 2005–2014 and using the descriptors: TS and Y sequences (n=26), and TS and Y-chromosome material (n=27). The inclusion criteria were: articles directly related to the subject and published in English or Portuguese. Articles which did not meet these criteria and review articles were excluded. After applying these criteria, 14 papers were left. Data synthesis: The main results regarding the prevalence of Y-chromosome sequences in TS were: (1) about 60% of the studies were conducted by Brazilian researchers; (2) the prevalence varied from 4.6 to 60%; (3) the most frequently investigated genes were SRY, DYZ3 and TSPY; (4) seven studies used only polymerase chain reaction, while in the remaining seven it was associated with FISH. Nine of the 14 studies reported gonadectomy and gonadoblastoma. The highest prevalence of gonadoblastoma (33%) was found in two studies. In five out of the nine papers evaluated the prevalence of gonadoblastoma was 10–25%; in two of them it was zero. Conclusions: According to these data, molecular analysis to detect Y-chromosome sequences in TS patients is indicated, regardless of their karyotype. In patients who test positive for these sequences, gonadoblastoma needs to be investigated. PMID:26525685

  14. Prevalence of Y-chromosome sequences and gonadoblastoma in Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Bernadete Trovó de Marqui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess the prevalence of Y-chromosome sequences and gonadoblastoma in patients with Turner syndrome (TS using molecular techniques. Data source: A literature search was performed in Pubmed, limiting the period of time to the years 2005–2014 and using the descriptors: TS and Y sequences (n=26, and TS and Y-chromosome material (n=27. The inclusion criteria were: articles directly related to the subject and published in English or Portuguese. Articles which did not meet these criteria and review articles were excluded. After applying these criteria, 14 papers were left. Data synthesis: The main results regarding the prevalence of Y-chromosome sequences in TS were: (1 about 60% of the studies were conducted by Brazilian researchers; (2 the prevalence varied from 4.6 to 60%; (3 the most frequently investigated genes were SRY, DYZ3 and TSPY; (4 seven studies used only polymerase chain reaction, while in the remaining seven it was associated with FISH. Nine of the 14 studies reported gonadectomy and gonadoblastoma. The highest prevalence of gonadoblastoma (33% was found in two studies. In five out of the nine papers evaluated the prevalence of gonadoblastoma was 10–25%; in two of them it was zero. Conclusions: According to these data, molecular analysis to detect Y-chromosome sequences in TS patients is indicated, regardless of their karyotype. In patients who test positive for these sequences, gonadoblastoma needs to be investigated.

  15. Toward Male Individualization with Rapidly Mutating Y-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballantyne, Kaye N; Ralf, Arwin; Aboukhalid, Rachid;

    2014-01-01

    Relevant for various areas of human genetics, Y-chromosomal STRs (Y-STRs) are commonly used for testing close paternal relationships amongst individuals and populations, and for male lineage identification. However, even the widely used 17-loci Yfiler set cannot resolve individuals and populations...

  16. The Papaya Y Chromosome Evolved Recently and Shows Gene Paucity and DNA Sequence Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex chromosomes in flowering plants, in contrast to those in animals, evolved relatively recently and only a few are heteromorphic. At cytological level, the sex chromosomes of papaya appear homomorphic, nevertheless, we are finding the papaya Y chromosome shows features of incipient sex chromosome ...

  17. Genetic sub-structure in western Mediterranean populations revealed by 12 Y-chromosome STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez, V; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Sánchez, J J;

    2008-01-01

    Haplotype and allele frequencies of 12 Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385 a/b, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439) included in the Powerplex(R) Y System were determined in seven western Mediterranean populations from Valencia...

  18. Early events in the evolution of the Silene latifolia Y chromosome: Male specialization and recombination arrest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žlůvová, Jitka; Georgiev, S.; Janoušek, Bohuslav; Charlesworth, D.; Vyskot, Boris; Negrutiu, I.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 177, č. 1 (2007), s. 375-386. ISSN 0016-6731 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : evolution * Silene * Y chromosome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.001, year: 2007

  19. Analysis of SINE and LINE repeat content of Y chromosomes in the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortschak, R Daniel; Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Grützner, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Monotremes feature an extraordinary sex-chromosome system that consists of five X and five Y chromosomes in males. These sex chromosomes share homology with bird sex chromosomes but no homology with the therian X. The genome of a female platypus was recently completed, providing unique insights into sequence and gene content of autosomes and X chromosomes, but no Y-specific sequence has so far been analysed. Here we report the isolation, sequencing and analysis of approximately 700 kb of sequence of the non-recombining regions of Y2, Y3 and Y5, which revealed differences in base composition and repeat content between autosomes and sex chromosomes, and within the sex chromosomes themselves. This provides the first insights into repeat content of Y chromosomes in platypus, which overall show similar patterns of repeat composition to Y chromosomes in other species. Interestingly, we also observed differences between the various Y chromosomes, and in combination with timing and activity patterns we provide an approach that can be used to examine the evolutionary history of the platypus sex-chromosome chain. PMID:19874720

  20. A comparative analysis of Y chromosome and mtDNA phylogenies of the Hylobates gibbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Yi-Chiao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary relationships of closely related species have long been of interest to biologists since these species experienced different evolutionary processes in a relatively short period of time. Comparison of phylogenies inferred from DNA sequences with differing inheritance patterns, such as mitochondrial, autosomal, and X and Y chromosomal loci, can provide more comprehensive inferences of the evolutionary histories of species. Gibbons, especially the genus Hylobates, are particularly intriguing as they consist of multiple closely related species which emerged rapidly and live in close geographic proximity. Our current understanding of relationships among Hylobates species is largely based on data from the maternally-inherited mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs. Results To infer the paternal histories of gibbon taxa, we sequenced multiple Y chromosomal loci from 26 gibbons representing 10 species. As expected, we find levels of sequence variation some five times lower than observed for the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome. Although our Y chromosome phylogenetic tree shows relatively low resolution compared to the mtgenome tree, our results are consistent with the monophyly of gibbon genera suggested by the mtgenome tree. In a comparison of the molecular dating of divergences and on the branching patterns of phylogeny trees between mtgenome and Y chromosome data, we found: 1 the inferred divergence estimates were more recent for the Y chromosome than for the mtgenome, 2 the species H. lar and H. pileatus are monophyletic in the mtgenome phylogeny, respectively, but a H. pileatus individual falls into the H. lar Y chromosome clade. Conclusions Based on the ~6.4 kb of Y chromosomal DNA sequence data generated for each of the 26 individuals in this study, we provide molecular inferences on gibbon and particularly on Hylobates evolution complementary to those from mtDNA data. Overall, our results illustrate the utility of

  1. Understanding the Y chromosome variation in Korea--relevance of combined haplogroup and haplotype analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myung Jin; Lee, Hwan Young; Yang, Woo Ick; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2012-07-01

    We performed a molecular characterization of Korean Y-chromosomal haplogroups using a combination of Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs) and Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs). In a test using DNA samples from 706 Korean males, a total of 19 different haplogroups were identified by 26 Y-SNPs including the newly redefined markers (PK4, KL2, and P164) in haplogroup O. When genotyping the SNPs, phylogenetic nonequivalence was found between SNPs M117 and M133, which define haplogroup O3a3c1 (O3a2c1a according to the updated tree of haplogroup O by Yan et al. (European Journal of Human Genetics 19:1013-1015, 2011)), suggesting that the position of the M133 marker should be corrected. We have shown that the haplotypes consisted of DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS448, and DYS388 loci, which exhibit a relatively lower mutation rate, can preserve phylogenetic information and hence can be used to roughly distinguish Y-chromosome haplogroups, whereas more rapidly mutating Y-STRs such as DYS449 and DYS458 are useful for differentiating male lineages. However, at the relatively rapidly mutating DYS447, DYS449, DYS458, and DYS464 loci, unusually short alleles and intermediate alleles with common sequence structures are informative for elucidating the substructure within the context of a particular haplogroup. In addition, some deletion mutations in the DYS385 flanking region and the null allele at DYS448 were associated with a single haplogroup background. These high-resolution haplogroup and haplotype data will improve our understanding of regional Y-chromosome variation or recent migration routes and will also help to infer haplogroup background or common ancestry. PMID:22569803

  2. Y-Chromosome variation in hominids: intraspecific variation is limited to the polygamous chimpanzee.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Greve

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that the Y-specific ampliconic fertility genes DAZ (deleted in azoospermia and CDY (chromodomain protein Y varied with respect to copy number and position among chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes. In comparison, seven Y-chromosomal lineages of the bonobo (Pan paniscus, the chimpanzee's closest living relative, showed no variation. We extend our earlier comparative investigation to include an analysis of the intraspecific variation of these genes in gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus, and examine the resulting patterns in the light of the species' markedly different social and mating behaviors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH of DAZ and CDY in 12 Y-chromosomal lineages of western lowland gorilla (G. gorilla gorilla and a single lineage of the eastern lowland gorilla (G. beringei graueri showed no variation among lineages. Similar findings were noted for the 10 Y-chromosomal lineages examined in the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus, and 11 Y-chromosomal lineages of the Sumatran orangutan (P. abelii. We validated the contrasting DAZ and CDY patterns using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR in chimpanzee and bonobo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High intraspecific variation in copy number and position of the DAZ and CDY genes is seen only in the chimpanzee. We hypothesize that this is best explained by sperm competition that results in the variant DAZ and CDY haplotypes detected in this species. In contrast, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans-species that are not subject to sperm competition-showed no intraspecific variation in DAZ and CDY suggesting that monoandry in gorillas, and preferential female mate choice in bonobos and orangutans, probably permitted the fixation of a single Y variant in each taxon. These data support the notion that the evolutionary history of a primate Y chromosome is not simply encrypted in its DNA

  3. Radical remodeling of the Y chromosome in a recent radiation of malaria mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrew Brantley; Papathanos, Philippos-Aris; Sharma, Atashi; Cheng, Changde; Akbari, Omar S; Assour, Lauren; Bergman, Nicholas H; Cagnetti, Alessia; Crisanti, Andrea; Dottorini, Tania; Fiorentini, Elisa; Galizi, Roberto; Hnath, Jonathan; Jiang, Xiaofang; Koren, Sergey; Nolan, Tony; Radune, Diane; Sharakhova, Maria V; Steele, Aaron; Timoshevskiy, Vladimir A; Windbichler, Nikolai; Zhang, Simo; Hahn, Matthew W; Phillippy, Adam M; Emrich, Scott J; Sharakhov, Igor V; Tu, Zhijian Jake; Besansky, Nora J

    2016-04-12

    Y chromosomes control essential male functions in many species, including sex determination and fertility. However, because of obstacles posed by repeat-rich heterochromatin, knowledge of Y chromosome sequences is limited to a handful of model organisms, constraining our understanding of Y biology across the tree of life. Here, we leverage long single-molecule sequencing to determine the content and structure of the nonrecombining Y chromosome of the primary African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae We find that the An. gambiae Y consists almost entirely of a few massively amplified, tandemly arrayed repeats, some of which can recombine with similar repeats on the X chromosome. Sex-specific genome resequencing in a recent species radiation, the An. gambiae complex, revealed rapid sequence turnover within An. gambiae and among species. Exploiting 52 sex-specific An. gambiae RNA-Seq datasets representing all developmental stages, we identified a small repertoire of Y-linked genes that lack X gametologs and are not Y-linked in any other species except An. gambiae, with the notable exception of YG2, a candidate male-determining gene. YG2 is the only gene conserved and exclusive to the Y in all species examined, yet sequence similarity to YG2 is not detectable in the genome of a more distant mosquito relative, suggesting rapid evolution of Y chromosome genes in this highly dynamic genus of malaria vectors. The extensive characterization of the An. gambiae Y provides a long-awaited foundation for studying male mosquito biology, and will inform novel mosquito control strategies based on the manipulation of Y chromosomes. PMID:27035980

  4. Brown and polar bear Y chromosomes reveal extensive male-biased gene flow within brother lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidon, Tobias; Janke, Axel; Fain, Steven R; Eiken, Hans Geir; Hagen, Snorre B; Saarma, Urmas; Hallström, Björn M; Lecomte, Nicolas; Hailer, Frank

    2014-06-01

    Brown and polar bears have become prominent examples in phylogeography, but previous phylogeographic studies relied largely on maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or were geographically restricted. The male-specific Y chromosome, a natural counterpart to mtDNA, has remained underexplored. Although this paternally inherited chromosome is indispensable for comprehensive analyses of phylogeographic patterns, technical difficulties and low variability have hampered its application in most mammals. We developed 13 novel Y-chromosomal sequence and microsatellite markers from the polar bear genome and screened these in a broad geographic sample of 130 brown and polar bears. We also analyzed a 390-kb-long Y-chromosomal scaffold using sequencing data from published male ursine genomes. Y chromosome evidence support the emerging understanding that brown and polar bears started to diverge no later than the Middle Pleistocene. Contrary to mtDNA patterns, we found 1) brown and polar bears to be reciprocally monophyletic sister (or rather brother) lineages, without signals of introgression, 2) male-biased gene flow across continents and on phylogeographic time scales, and 3) male dispersal that links the Alaskan ABC islands population to mainland brown bears. Due to female philopatry, mtDNA provides a highly structured estimate of population differentiation, while male-biased gene flow is a homogenizing force for nuclear genetic variation. Our findings highlight the importance of analyzing both maternally and paternally inherited loci for a comprehensive view of phylogeographic history, and that mtDNA-based phylogeographic studies of many mammals should be reevaluated. Recent advances in sequencing technology render the analysis of Y-chromosomal variation feasible, even in nonmodel organisms. PMID:24667925

  5. Unique signatures of natural background radiation on human Y chromosomes from Kerala, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Premi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most frequently observed major consequences of ionizing radiation are chromosomal lesions and cancers, although the entire genome may be affected. Owing to its haploid status and absence of recombination, the human Y chromosome is an ideal candidate to be assessed for possible genetic alterations induced by ionizing radiation. We studied the human Y chromosome in 390 males from the South Indian state of Kerala, where the level of natural background radiation (NBR is ten-fold higher than the worldwide average, and that from 790 unexposed males as control. RESULTS: We observed random microdeletions in the Azoospermia factor (AZF a, b and c regions in >90%, and tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism (CNP of 11 different Y-linked genes in about 80% of males exposed to NBR. The autosomal homologues of Y-linked CDY genes largely remained unaffected. Multiple polymorphic copies of the Y-linked genes showing single Y-specific signals suggested their tandem duplication. Some exposed males showed unilocus duplication of DAZ genes resulting in six copies. Notably, in the AZFa region, approximately 25% of exposed males showed deletion of the DBY gene, whereas flanking genes USP9Y and UTY remained unaffected. All these alterations were detected in blood samples but not in the germline (sperm samples. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to high levels of NBR correlated with several interstitial polymorphisms of the human Y chromosome. CNPs and enhanced transcription of the SRY gene after duplication are envisaged to compensate for the loss of Y chromosome in some cells. The aforesaid changes, confined to peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggest a possible innate mechanism protecting the germline DNA from the NBR. Genome analysis of a larger population focusing on greater numbers of genes may provide new insights into the mechanisms and risks of the resultant genetic damages. The present work demonstrates unique signatures of NBR on human Y chromosomes

  6. Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes in Central Thai population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriboonpiputtana, T; Jomsawat, U; Rinthachai, T; Thanakitgosate, J; Shotivaranon, J; Limsuwanachot, N; Polyorat, P; Rerkamnuaychoke, B

    2010-04-01

    12 Y-STR loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS438, DYS439 and DYS437) were typed with PowerPlex Y System (Promega, USA) in a total sample of 501 unrelated males from the central part of Thailand. Allele frequencies and gene diversity for each Y-STR locus were determined. Haplotype diversity from the combined 12 Y-STR loci was 0.9996. The present results can be used as Thai ethnic genetic information resources in routine forensic analysis. PMID:20215020

  7. A highly polymorphic insertion in the Y-chromosome amelogenin gene can be used for evolutionary biology, population genetics and sexing in Cetacea and Artiodactyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crouau-Roy Brigitte

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early radiation of the Cetartiodactyla is complex, and unambiguous molecular characters are needed to clarify the positions of hippotamuses, camels and pigs relative to the remaining taxa (Cetacea and Ruminantia. There is also a need for informative genealogic markers for Y-chromosome population genetics as well as a sexing method applicable to all species from this group. We therefore studied the sequence variation of a partial sequence of the evolutionary conserved amelogenin gene to assess its potential use in each of these fields. Results and discussion We report a large interstitial insertion in the Y amelogenin locus in most of the Cetartiodactyla lineages (cetaceans and ruminants. This sex-linked size polymorphism is the result of a 460–465 bp inserted element in intron 4 of the amelogenin gene of Ruminants and Cetaceans. Therefore, this polymorphism can easily be used in a sexing assay for these species. When taking into account this shared character in addition to nucleotide sequence, gene genealogy follows sex-chromosome divergence in Cetartiodactyla whereas it is more congruent with zoological history when ignoring these characters. This could be related to a loss of homology between chromosomal copies given the old age of the insertion. The 1 kbp Amel-Y amplified fragment is also characterized by high nucleotide diversity (64 polymorphic sites spanning over 1 kbp in seven haplotypes which is greater than for other Y-chromosome sequence markers studied so far but less than the mitochondrial control region. Conclusion The gender-dependent polymorphism we have identified is relevant not only for phylogenic inference within the Cetartiodactyla but also for Y-chromosome based population genetics and gender determination in cetaceans and ruminants. One single protocol can therefore be used for studies in population and evolutionary genetics, reproductive biotechnologies, and forensic science.

  8. Dual origins of Finns revealed by Y chromosome haplotype variation.

    OpenAIRE

    Kittles, R A; Perola, M; Peltonen, L; Bergen, A W; Aragon, R A; Virkkunen, M; Linnoila, M; Goldman, D; Long, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    The Finnish population has often been viewed as an isolate founded 2, 000 years ago via a route across the Gulf of Finland. The founding event has been characterized as involving a limited number of homogeneous founders, isolation, and subsequent rapid population growth. Despite the purported isolation of the population, levels of gene diversity for the Finns at autosomal and mitochondrial DNA loci are indistinguishable from those of other Europeans. Thus, mixed or dual origins for the Finns ...

  9. Exploring the Y Chromosomal Ancestry of Modern Panamanians

    OpenAIRE

    Grugni, Viola; Battaglia, Vincenza; Perego, Ugo Alessandro; Raveane, Alessandro; Lancioni, Hovirag; OLIVIERI, ANNA; Ferretti, Luca; Woodward, Scott R.; Pascale, Juan Miguel; Cooke, Richard; Myres, Natalie; Motta, Jorge; Torroni, Antonio; Achilli, Alessandro; Semino, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    Geologically, Panama belongs to the Central American land-bridge between North and South America crossed by Homo sapiens >14 ka ago. Archaeologically, it belongs to a wider Isthmo-Colombian Area. Today, seven indigenous ethnic groups account for 12.3% of Panama’s population. Five speak Chibchan languages and are characterized by low genetic diversity and a high level of differentiation. In addition, no evidence of differential structuring between maternally and paternally inherited genes has ...

  10. Y-chromosome evidence supports widespread signatures of three-species Canis hybridization in eastern North America

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Paul J.; Rutledge, Linda Y; Wheeldon, Tyler J; Patterson, Brent R; White, Bradley N

    2012-01-01

    There has been considerable discussion on the origin of the red wolf and eastern wolf and their evolution independent of the gray wolf. We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and a Y-chromosome intron sequence in combination with Y-chromosome microsatellites from wolves and coyotes within the range of extensive wolf–coyote hybridization, that is, eastern North America. The detection of divergent Y-chromosome haplotypes in the historic range of the eastern wolf is concordant with earlier mtDNA ...

  11. Shared Y chromosome repetitive DNA sequences in stallion and donkey as visualized using whole-genomic comparative hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mezzanotte

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of stallion (Spanish breed and donkey (Spanish endemic Zamorano-Leonés were compared using whole comparative genomic in situ hybridization (W-CGH technique, with special reference to the variability observed in the Y chromosome. Results show that these diverging genomes still share some highly repetitive DNA families localized in pericentromeric regions and, in the particular case of the Y chromosome, a sub-family of highly repeated DNA sequences, greatly expanded in the donkey genome, accounts for a large part of the chromatin in the stallion Y chromosome.

  12. Peopling of the North Circumpolar Region – Insights from Y Chromosome STR and SNP Typing of Greenlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Jill Katharina; Pereira, Vania; Børsting, Claus;

    2015-01-01

    17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs). Approximately 40% of the analyzed Greenlandic Y chromosomes were of European origin (I-M170, R1a-M513 and R1b-M343). Y chromosomes of European origin were mainly found in individuals from the west and south coasts of Greenland, which is in agreement...... origin in the northeastern parts of North America and could be descendants of the Dorset culture. This in turn points to the possibility that the current Inuit population in Greenland is comprised of individuals of both Thule and Dorset descent....

  13. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Walther Traut

    2010-09-01

    The phorid fly Megaselia scalaris is a laboratory model for the turnover and early differentiation of sex chromosomes. Isolates from the field have an XY sex-determining mechanism with chromosome pair 2 acting as X and Y chromosomes. The sex chromosomes are homomorphic but display early signs of sex chromosome differentiation: a low level of molecular differences between X and Y. The male-determining function $(M)$, maps to the distal part of the Y chromosome’s short arm. In laboratory cultures, new Y chromosomes with no signs of a molecular differentiation arise at a low rate, probably by transposition of to these chromosomes. Downstream of the primary signal, the homologue of the Drosophila doublesex (dsx) is part of the sex-determining pathway while Sex-lethal (Sxl), though structurally conserved, is not.

  14. Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes in Inuit and Danish population samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Elena; Rosser, Zoë H; Nørby, Søren;

    2003-01-01

    Nineteen Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs), DYS19, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385, DYS388, DYS434, DYS435, DYS436, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS460, DYS461 and DYS462 were typed in Inuit (n=70) and Danish (n=62) population samples.......Nineteen Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs), DYS19, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385, DYS388, DYS434, DYS435, DYS436, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS460, DYS461 and DYS462 were typed in Inuit (n=70) and Danish (n=62) population samples....

  15. Y-chromosome haplotype distribution in Han Chinese populations and modern human origin in East Asians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the distribution of Y-chromosome haplotype using 19 Y-SNPs in Han Chinese populations from 22 provinces of China. Our data indicate distinctive patterns of Y chromosome between southern and northern Han Chinese populations. The southern populations are much more polymorphic than northern populations. The latter has only a subset of the southern haplotypes. This result confirms the genetic difference observed between southern and northern ethnic populations in East Asia. It supports the hypothesis that the first settlement of modern hu-mans of African origin occurred in the southern part of East Asia during the last Ice Age, and a northward migration led to the peopling of northern China.

  16. The X and Y chromosome in meiosis: how and why they keep silent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Godfried W van der Heijden; Maureen Eijpe; Willy M Baarends

    2011-01-01

    The XX/XY sex chromosomal system of mammals,including human,challenges the chromosome pairing mechanism during male meiosis.Pairing and subsequent separation of homologous chromosomes generates haploid cells from diploid cells during the meiotic divisions.One of the basic requirements for recognition between homologous chromosomes is DNA sequence identity.Since the X and Y chromosome share little homology,their quest for each other is difficult,and has special characteristics.During the lengthy meiotic prophase,all autosomal chromosomes synapse,by forming a special protein structure called the synaptonemal complex,which connects the chromosomal axes.In contrast,the X and Y chromosome synapse only in the short homologous pseudoautosomal regions,and form the so-called XY body.

  17. The peopling of Korea revealed by analyses of mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomal markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Jun Jin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Koreans are generally considered a northeast Asian group because of their geographical location. However, recent findings from Y chromosome studies showed that the Korean population contains lineages from both southern and northern parts of East Asia. To understand the genetic history and relationships of Korea more fully, additional data and analyses are necessary. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequence variation in the hypervariable segments I and II (HVS-I and HVS-II and haplogroup-specific mutations in coding regions in 445 individuals from seven east Asian populations (Korean, Korean-Chinese, Mongolian, Manchurian, Han (Beijing, Vietnamese and Thais. In addition, published mtDNA haplogroup data (N = 3307, mtDNA HVS-I sequences (N = 2313, Y chromosome haplogroup data (N = 1697 and Y chromosome STR data (N = 2713 were analyzed to elucidate the genetic structure of East Asian populations. All the mtDNA profiles studied here were classified into subsets of haplogroups common in East Asia, with just two exceptions. In general, the Korean mtDNA profiles revealed similarities to other northeastern Asian populations through analysis of individual haplogroup distributions, genetic distances between populations or an analysis of molecular variance, although a minor southern contribution was also suggested. Reanalysis of Y-chromosomal data confirmed both the overall similarity to other northeastern populations, and also a larger paternal contribution from southeastern populations. CONCLUSION: The present work provides evidence that peopling of Korea can be seen as a complex process, interpreted as an early northern Asian settlement with at least one subsequent male-biased southern-to-northern migration, possibly associated with the spread of rice agriculture.

  18. Cladistic association analysis of Y chromosome effects on alcohol dependence and related personality traits

    OpenAIRE

    Kittles, Rick A.; Long, Jeffrey C.; Bergen, Andrew W; Eggert, Monica; Virkkunen, Matti; Linnoila, Markku; Goldman, David

    1999-01-01

    Association between Y chromosome haplotype variation and alcohol dependence and related personality traits was investigated in a large sample of psychiatrically diagnosed Finnish males. Haplotypes were constructed for 359 individuals using alleles at eight loci (seven microsatellite loci and a nucleotide substitution in the DYZ3 alphoid satellite locus). A cladogram linking the 102 observed haplotype configurations was constructed by using parsimony with a single-step mutation model. Then, a ...

  19. A collaborative study of the EDNAP group regarding Y-chromosome binary polymorphism analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brion, María; Dupuy, Berit M; Heinrich, Marielle;

    2005-01-01

    typing. A total of 535 samples from six different European populations were also analysed. In Galicia (NW Spain) and Belgium, the most frequent haplogroup was R1b*(xR1b1,R1b3df). Haplogroup F*(xK) is one of the most frequent in Austria and Denmark, while the lowest frequency appear in Belgium. Haplogroup...... frequencies found in this collaborative study were compared with previously published European Y-chromosome haplogroup data....

  20. Genetic data for 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci in Macedonians in the Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovski, Zlatko; Nikolova, Ksenija; Jankova-Ajanovska, Renata; Marjanovic, Damir; Pojskic, Naris; Janeska, Biljana

    2011-08-01

    The population data were obtained for the 16 Y chromosomal STR loci included in the AmpFistr(®)Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit (DYS456, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS389II, DYS458, DYS19, DYS385 a/b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635, DYS392, Y-GATA H4, DYS437, DYS438, DYS448) in a sample of 262 unrelated men from the Republic of Macedonia. PMID:21549657

  1. Y-Chromosome Variation in Hominids: Intraspecific Variation Is Limited to the Polygamous Chimpanzee

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriele Greve; Evguenia Alechine; Pasantes, Juan J.; Christine Hodler; Wolfram Rietschel; Robinson, Terence J.; Werner Schempp

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that the Y-specific ampliconic fertility genes DAZ (deleted in azoospermia) and CDY (chromodomain protein Y) varied with respect to copy number and position among chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). In comparison, seven Y-chromosomal lineages of the bonobo (Pan paniscus), the chimpanzee's closest living relative, showed no variation. We extend our earlier comparative investigation to include an analysis of the intraspecific variation of these genes in go...

  2. Y-chromosomal evidence for a limited Greek contribution to the Pathan population of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Firasat, Sadaf; Khaliq, Shagufta; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Papaioannou, Myrto; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Underhill, Peter A; Ayub, Qasim

    2006-01-01

    Three Pakistani populations residing in northern Pakistan, the Burusho, Kalash and Pathan claim descent from Greek soldiers associated with Alexander’s invasion of southwest Asia. Earlier studies have excluded a substantial Greek genetic input into these populations, but left open the question of a smaller contribution. We have now typed 89 binary polymorphisms and 16 multiallelic, short-tandem-repeat (STR) loci mapping to the male-specific portion of the human Y chromosome in 952 males, incl...

  3. Introducing the Algerian Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosome Profiles into the North African Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekada, Asmahan; Fregel, Rosa; Cabrera, Vicente M.; Larruga, José M.; Pestano, José; Benhamamouch, Soraya; González, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    North Africa is considered a distinct geographic and ethnic entity within Africa. Although modern humans originated in this Continent, studies of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome genealogical markers provide evidence that the North African gene pool has been shaped by the back-migration of several Eurasian lineages in Paleolithic and Neolithic times. More recent influences from sub-Saharan Africa and Mediterranean Europe are also evident. The presence of East-West and North-South haplogroup frequency gradients strongly reinforces the genetic complexity of this region. However, this genetic scenario is beset with a notable gap, which is the lack of consistent information for Algeria, the largest country in the Maghreb. To fill this gap, we analyzed a sample of 240 unrelated subjects from a northwest Algeria cosmopolitan population using mtDNA sequences and Y-chromosome biallelic polymorphisms, focusing on the fine dissection of haplogroups E and R, which are the most prevalent in North Africa and Europe respectively. The Eurasian component in Algeria reached 80% for mtDNA and 90% for Y-chromosome. However, within them, the North African genetic component for mtDNA (U6 and M1; 20%) is significantly smaller than the paternal (E-M81 and E-V65; 70%). The unexpected presence of the European-derived Y-chromosome lineages R-M412, R-S116, R-U152 and R-M529 in Algeria and the rest of the Maghreb could be the counterparts of the mtDNA H1, H3 and V subgroups, pointing to direct maritime contacts between the European and North African sides of the western Mediterranean. Female influx of sub-Saharan Africans into Algeria (20%) is also significantly greater than the male (10%). In spite of these sexual asymmetries, the Algerian uniparental profiles faithfully correlate between each other and with the geography. PMID:23431392

  4. Sexual dimorphism in white campion: deletion on the Y chromosome results in a floral asexual phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White campion is a dioecious plant with heteromorphic X and Y sex chromosomes. In male plants, a filamentous structure replaces the pistil, while in female plants the stamens degenerate early in flower development. Asexual (asx) mutants, cumulating the two developmental defects that characterize the sexual dimorphism in this species, were produced by gamma ray irradiation of pollen and screening in the M1 generation. The mutants harbor a novel type of mutation affecting an early function in sporogenous/parietal cell differentiation within the anther. The function is called stamen-promoting function (SPF). The mutants are shown to result from interstitial deletions on the Y chromosome. We present evidence that such deletions tentatively cover the central domain on the (p)-arm of the Y chromosome (Y2 region). By comparing stamen development in wild-type female and asx mutant flowers we show that they share the same block in anther development, which results in the production of vestigial anthers. The data suggest that the SPF, a key function(s) controlling the sporogenous/parietal specialization in premeiotic anthers, is genuinely missing in females (XX constitution). We argue that this is the earliest function in the male program that is Y-linked and is likely responsible for ''male dimorphism'' (sexual dimorphism in the third floral whorl) in white campion. More generally, the reported results improve our knowledge of the structural and functional organization of the Y chromosome and favor the view that sex determination in this species results primarily from a trigger signal on the Y chromosome (Y1 region) that suppresses female development. The default state is therefore the ancestral hermaphroditic state

  5. The Peopling of Korea Revealed by Analyses of Mitochondrial DNA and Y-Chromosomal Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Han-Jun; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Kim, Wook

    2009-01-01

    Background The Koreans are generally considered a northeast Asian group because of their geographical location. However, recent findings from Y chromosome studies showed that the Korean population contains lineages from both southern and northern parts of East Asia. To understand the genetic history and relationships of Korea more fully, additional data and analyses are necessary. Methodology and Results We analyzed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation in the hypervariable segments I ...

  6. Association between Y-chromosome AZFc region micro-deletions with recurrent miscarriage

    OpenAIRE

    Saeede Soleimanian; Seyyed Mahdi Kalantar; Mohamad Hasan Sheikhha; Mohamad Ali Zaimy; Azam Rasti; Hossein Fazli

    2013-01-01

    Background: In human, about 25% of implanted embryos are losing 1-2 week following attachment to the uterus. A subset of this population will have three or more consecutive miscarriages which define as repeated pregnancy loss (RPL). Introducing the assisted reproductive technologies (ARTS) made a chance for infertile couples to solve their childless problem. Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the incidence of Y-chromosome AZF region's micro-deletions in male partners of couples w...

  7. Y-Chromosome Variation in Hominids: Intraspecific Variation Is Limited to the Polygamous Chimpanzee

    OpenAIRE

    Greve, Gabriele; Alechine, Evguenia; Pasantes, Juan J.; Hodler, Christine; Rietschel, Wolfram; Robinson, Terence J; Schempp, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated that the Y-specific ampliconic fertility genes DAZ (deleted in azoospermia) and CDY (chromodomain protein Y) varied with respect to copy number and position among chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). In comparison, seven Y-chromosomal lineages of the bonobo (Pan paniscus), the chimpanzee's closest living relative, showed no variation. We extend our earlier comparative investigation to include an analysis of the intraspecific variation of these genes in gor...

  8. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome-specific EST sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chuan-Liang Deng; Wei-Li Zhang; Ying Cao; Shao-Jing Wang; Shu-Fen Li; Wu-Jun Gao; Long-Dou Lu

    2015-12-01

    The genome of spinach single chromosome complement is about 1000 Mbp, which is the model material to study the molecular mechanisms of plant sex differentiation. The cytological study showed that the biggest spinach chromosome (chromosome 1) was taken as spinach sex chromosome. It had three alleles of sex-related , m and . Many researchers have been trying to clone the sex-determining genes and investigated the molecular mechanism of spinach sex differentiation. However, there are no successful cloned reports about these genes. A new technology combining chromosome microdissection with hybridization-specific amplification (HSA) was adopted. The spinach Y chromosome degenerate oligonucleotide primed-PCR (DOP-PCR) products were hybridized with cDNA of the male spinach flowers in florescence. The female spinach genome was taken as blocker and cDNA library specifically expressed in Y chromosome was constructed. Moreover, expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences in cDNA library were cloned, sequenced and bioinformatics was analysed. There were 63 valid EST sequences obtained in this study. The fragment size was between 53 and 486 bp. BLASTn homologous alignment indicated that 12 EST sequences had homologous sequences of nucleic acids, the rest were new sequences. BLASTx homologous alignment indicated that 16 EST sequences had homologous protein-encoding nucleic acid sequence. The spinach Y chromosome-specific EST sequences laid the foundation for cloning the functional genes, specifically expressed in spinach Y chromosome. Meanwhile, the establishment of the technology system in the research provided a reference for rapid cloning of other biological sex chromosome-specific EST sequences.

  9. Screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in idiopathic and nonidiopathic infertile men with varicocele and cryptorchidism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ning-hong; WU Hong-fei; ZHANG Wei; ZHUO Zuo-min; QIAN Li-xing; HUA Li-xing; GUO Lin; FENG Ning-han

    2005-01-01

    Background Cytogenetic and molecular studies of azoospermic and oligozoospermic males have suggested the presence of azoospermia factors (AZF) in the Y chromosome. Deletion in AZF regions has been reported to disrupt spermatogenesis and cause infertility. Several candidate genes responsible for spermatogenesis have been identified in this region and some of them are thought to be functional in human spermatogenesis. And we reported clinical and molecular studies of Y chromosome microdeletions in Chinese. This study aimed at assessing the frequency of microdeletions in Chinese men with idiopathic and nonidiopathic infertility problems and dicussing the clinical significance of the AZF region.Methods In this study, we screened 143 infertile men (62 with idiopathic infertilitas and 81 with nonidiopathic infertilitas), in whom karyotype, sperm count, hormonal parameters and fine needle aspiration cytology were evaluated. Genomic DNA was extracted from the peripheral leukocytes. Molecular analysis was performed by two multiplex polymerase chain reactions (PCR) using a set of a sequence tagged sites (STS) from 3 different regions of the Y chromosome: AZFa (sY84, sY86), AZFb (sY127, sY134), AZFc (sY254, sY255).Results Nineteen point four percent of idiopathic males (12/62, 19.4%) had microdeletions of either the AZFa, AZFb, AZFc or AZFb+c region. Significantly, a high frequency of microdeletions (9/81, 11.1%) was found in nonidiopathic patients with varicocele and cryptorchidism. No deletions were found in healthy fertile men. There were no significant differences in the localization and extent of deletions between idiopathic and nonidiopathic patients.Conclusions The knowledge of the presence of these deletions in idiopathic and nonidiopathic cases is important to understand the prognosis, better management and counsel these patients accordingly. Furthermore, a more extended screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in idiopathic and nonidiopathic men, particularly

  10. Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA characterization of Pasiegos, a human isolate from Cantabria (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maca-Meyer, N; Sánchez-Velasco, P; Flores, C; Larruga, J-M; González, A-M; Oterino, A; Leyva-Cobián, F

    2003-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences and Y chromosome haplotypes were characterized in Pasiegos, a human isolate from Cantabria, and compared with those of other Cantabrian and neighbouring Northern Spain populations. Cantabria appears to be a genetically heterogeneous community. Whereas Lebaniegos do not differ from their eastern Basque and western Asturian and Galician neighbours, Pasiegos and other non-Lebaniego Cantabrians show significant differences with all of them. Pasiegos are peculiar for their high frequencies of Y chromosomal markers (E-M81) with North African assignation, and Y chromosomal (R-SRY2627) and mtDNA (V, I, U5) markers related to northern European populations. This dual geographic contribution is more in agreement with the complex demographic history of this isolate, as opposed to recent drift effects. The high incidence in Cantabrians with pre-V and V mtDNA haplotypes, considered as a signal of Postglacial recolonization in Europe from south-western refugees, points to such refugees as a better candidate population than Basques for this expansion. However, this does not discount a conjoint recolonization. PMID:12914567

  11. First Polish DNA "manhunt"--an application of Y-chromosome STRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettlaff-Kakol, A; Pawlowski, R

    2002-10-01

    This study presents the application of Y-chromosomal STR polymorphisms to male identification in the case of a serial rapist and woman murderer in Poland. Since August 1996 a rapist from Swinoujscie (northwest Poland) committed at least 14 rapes. In the year 2000 he brutally raped 8 young girls and murdered a 22-year-old girl. DNA profiles obtained from semen stains left at the scenes of crime gave information that one and the same man had committed all the rapes. The Y-chromosome haplotype (9 loci) obtained was used for the elimination process of 421 suspects. One man was found who had an identical DNA profile in all Y-chromosome STR loci analysed and possessed common alleles in 9 out of 10 autosomal loci, strongly suggesting that the real rapist and the typed man were closely related males. Analysis of reference DNA obtained from the man's brother revealed an identical DNA STR profile to that identified at the crime scenes. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case in Poland and probably in Eastern Europe where DNA typing of a large population was used to identify the offender. PMID:12376840

  12. Recent Male-Mediated Gene Flow over a Linguistic Barrier in Iberia, Suggested by Analysis of a Y-Chromosomal DNA Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurles, Matthew E.; Veitia, Reiner; Arroyo, Eduardo; Armenteros, Manuel; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Pérez-Lezaun, Anna; Bosch, Elena; Shlumukova, Maria; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; McElreavey, Ken; López de Munain, Adolfo; Röhl, Arne; Wilson, Ian J.; Singh, Lalji; Pandya, Arpita; Santos, Fabrício R.; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Summary We have examined the worldwide distribution of a Y-chromosomal base-substitution polymorphism, the T/C transition at SRY-2627, where the T allele defines haplogroup 22; sequencing of primate homologues shows that the ancestral state cannot be determined unambiguously but is probably the C allele. Of 1,191 human Y chromosomes analyzed, 33 belong to haplogroup 22. Twenty-nine come from Iberia, and the highest frequencies are in Basques (11%; n=117) and Catalans (22%; n=32). Microsatellite and minisatellite (MSY1) diversity analysis shows that non-Iberian haplogroup-22 chromosomes are not significantly different from Iberian ones. The simplest interpretation of these data is that haplogroup 22 arose in Iberia and that non-Iberian cases reflect Iberian emigrants. Several different methods were used to date the origin of the polymorphism: microsatellite data gave ages of 1,650, 2,700, 3,100, or 3,450 years, and MSY1 gave ages of 1,000, 2,300, or 2,650 years, although 95% confidence intervals on all of these figures are wide. The age of the split between Basque and Catalan haplogroup-22 chromosomes was calculated as only 20% of the age of the lineage as a whole. This study thus provides evidence for direct or indirect gene flow over the substantial linguistic barrier between the Indo-European and non–Indo-European–speaking populations of the Catalans and the Basques, during the past few thousand years. PMID:10521311

  13. Population data for Y-chromosome haplotypes defined by AmpFlSTR YFiler PCR amplification kit in North Sardinia (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiani, Maria Elena; Mameli, Alessandro; Piras, Gavino; Berti, Andrea; Calo, Carla Maria; Vona, Giuseppe

    2009-06-01

    The 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) included in the AmpFlSTR YFiler Amplification Kit (AB Applied Biosystems) (DYS19, DYS3891, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and GATA H4.1) were typed in 100 samples from North Sardinia (Italy). A total of 91 different haplotypes were found, where 9 haplotypes were shared by two individuals. The overall haplotype diversity (HD) was 0.9982. DYS458 non-consensus alleles were found in one samples, and one in the DYS438. We found a double peak in one sample for the DYS19 with alleles 15/16. Population comparisons with available 10 YSTR loci data in Mediterranean Basin samples were undertaken, significant differences were observed between our sample and all the compared populations, except for a entire sample from Sardinia. Prediction of haplogroups showed I2al was found to be the most frequent haplogroup (33%) in our sample. Testing high-resolution Y-chromosome data sets it is useful in autochthonous population and micro-population studies to highlight the most informative loci for evolutionary aims. PMID:19662792

  14. Genome-Wide Search Identifies 1.9 Mb from the Polar Bear Y Chromosome for Evolutionary Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Bidon, Tobias; Schreck, Nancy; Hailer, Frank; Nilsson, Maria A.; Janke, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The male-inherited Y chromosome is the major haploid fraction of the mammalian genome, rendering Y-linked sequences an indispensable resource for evolutionary research. However, despite recent large-scale genome sequencing approaches, only a handful of Y chromosome sequences have been characterized to date, mainly in model organisms. Using polar bear (Ursus maritimus) genomes, we compare two different in silico approaches to identify Y-linked sequences: 1) Similarity to known Y-linked genes a...

  15. Evolution of homologous sequences on the human X and Y chromosomes, outside of the meiotic pairing segment.

    OpenAIRE

    Bickmore, W A; Cooke, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    A sequence isolated from the long arm of the human Y chromosome detects a highly homologous locus on the X. This homology extends over at least 50 kb of DNA and is postulated to be the result of a transposition event between the X and Y chromosomes during recent human evolution, since homologous sequences are shown to be present on the X chromosome alone in the chimpanzee and gorilla.

  16. Meta-Analysis Reveals that Genes Regulated by the Y Chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster Are Preferentially Localized to Repressive Chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Sackton, Timothy; Hartl, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila Y chromosome is a degenerated, heterochromatic chromosome with few functional genes. Despite this, natural variation on the Y chromosome in D. melanogaster has substantial trans-acting effects on the regulation of X-linked and autosomal genes. It is not clear, however, whether these genes simply represent a random subset of the genome or whether specific functional properties are associated with susceptibility to regulation by Y-linked variation. Here, we present a meta-analysi...

  17. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    OpenAIRE

    Dinić Jelena; Kušić Jelena; Nikolić Аleksandra; Divac Aleksandra; Ristanović Momčilo; Radojković Dragica

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome...

  18. Genetic polymorphism of human Y chromosome and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases: a study in WOBASZ cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kostrzewa

    Full Text Available Genetic variants of Y chromosome predispose to hypertension in rodents, whereas in humans the evidence is conflicting. Our purpose was to study the distribution of a panel of Y chromosome markers in a cohort from a cross-sectional population-based study on the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in Poland (WOBASZ study. The HindIII, YAP Y chromosome variants, previously shown to influence blood pressure, lipid traits or height, as well as SNPs defining main Y chromosome haplogroups, were typed in 3026, 2783 and 2652 samples, respectively. In addition, 4 subgroups (N~100 each representing extremes of LDL concentration or blood pressure (BP were typed for a panel of 17 STRs. The HindIII and YAP polymorphism were not associated with any of the studied traits. Analysis of the haplogroup distribution showed an association between higher HDL level and hg I-M170 (P = 0.02, higher LDL level and hg F*(xI-M170, J2-M172, K-M9 (P = 0.03 and lower BMI and hg N3-Tat (P = 0.04. Analysis of STRs did not show statistically significant differences. Since all these associations lost statistical significance after Bonferroni correction, we conclude that a major role of Y chromosome genetic variation (defined by HindIII, YAP or main Y chromosome haplogroups in determining cardiovascular risk in Poles is unlikely.

  19. Late Neolithic expansion of ancient Chinese revealed by Y chromosome haplogroup O3a1c-002611

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Chao WANG; Shi YAN; Zhen-Dong QIN; Yan LU; Qi-Liang DING; Lan-Hai WEI; Shi-Lin LI

    2013-01-01

    Y chromosome haplogroup O3-M122 is the most prevalent haplogroup in East Asia,and provides an ideal tool for dissecting primary dispersals of the East Asians.Most of the sub-haplogroups of O3-M122 have been sufficiently investigated except for O3al c-002611,despite its great prevalence and huge population,especially in Han Chinese.In this study,we identified 508 individuals with haplogroup O3 a 1 c-002611 out of 7801 males from 117 East and Southeast Asian populations,typed at two newly discovered downstream Y-SNP markers and ten commonly used Y-STRs.Defined by SNPs IMS-JST002611 (in short,002611),F11,and F238,three lineages internal to haplogroup O3alc-002611 have distinct geographical distributions.Furthermore,Y-STR diversity shows a general south-tonorth decline,which is consistent with the prehistorically northward migration of the other O3-M122 lineages.The northward migration ofhaplogroup O3alc-002611 started about 13 thousand years ago (KYA).The expansions of subclades F11 and F238 in ancient Han Chinese began about 5 and 7 KYA immediately after the separation between the ancestors of the Han Chinese and Tibeto-Burman.

  20. Great ape Y Chromosome and mitochondrial DNA phylogenies reflect subspecies structure and patterns of mating and dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallast, Pille; Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Batini, Chiara; Zadik, Daniel; Rocchi, Mariano; Schempp, Werner; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of genetic diversity in great ape species is likely to have been affected by patterns of dispersal and mating. This has previously been investigated by sequencing autosomal and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but large-scale sequence analysis of the male-specific region of the Y Chromosome (MSY) has not yet been undertaken. Here, we use the human MSY reference sequence as a basis for sequence capture and read mapping in 19 great ape males, combining the data with sequences extracted from the published whole genomes of 24 additional males to yield a total sample of 19 chimpanzees, four bonobos, 14 gorillas, and six orangutans, in which interpretable MSY sequence ranges from 2.61 to 3.80 Mb. This analysis reveals thousands of novel MSY variants and defines unbiased phylogenies. We compare these with mtDNA-based trees in the same individuals, estimating time-to-most-recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for key nodes in both cases. The two loci show high topological concordance and are consistent with accepted (sub)species definitions, but time depths differ enormously between loci and (sub)species, likely reflecting different dispersal and mating patterns. Gorillas and chimpanzees/bonobos present generally low and high MSY diversity, respectively, reflecting polygyny versus multimale-multifemale mating. However, particularly marked differences exist among chimpanzee subspecies: The western chimpanzee MSY phylogeny has a TMRCA of only 13.2 (10.8-15.8) thousand years, but that for central chimpanzees exceeds 1 million years. Cross-species comparison within a single MSY phylogeny emphasizes the low human diversity, and reveals species-specific branch length variation that may reflect differences in long-term generation times. PMID:26883546

  1. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome microdelations as potential causes of male infertility in Serbian patients, as well as to test the hypothesis that CFTR mutations in infertile men are predominantly located in the several last exons of the gene. Methods. This study has encompassed 33 men with oligo- or azoospermia. The screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region was performed by multiplex PCR analysis. The screening of the CFTR gene was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method. Results. Deletions on Y chromosome were detected in four patients, predominantly in AZFc region (four of total six deletions. Mutations in the CFTR gene were detected on eight out of 66 analyzed chromosomes of infertile men. The most common mutation was F508del (six of total eight mutations. Conclusion. This study confirmed that both Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations played important role in etiology of male infertility in Serbian infertile men. Genetic testing for Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations has been introduced in routine diagnostics and offered to couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques. Considering that both the type of Y chromosome microdeletion and the type of CFTR mutation have a prognostic value, it is recommended that AZF and CFTR genotyping should not only be performed in patients with reduced sperm quality before undergoing assisted reproduction, but also for the purpose of preimplantation and

  2. Introduction of an single nucleodite polymorphism-based "Major Y-chromosome haplogroup typing kit" suitable for predicting the geographical origin of male lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brión, María; Sanchez, Juan J; Balogh, Kinga;

    2005-01-01

    . From more than 200 SNPs compiled in the phylogenetic tree published by the Y-Chromosome Consortium, and looking at the population studies previously published, a package of 29 SNPs has been selected for the identification of major population haplogroups. A "Major Y-chromosome haplogroup typing kit" has...... worldwide populations. The approach takes advantage of the specific geographic distribution of the Y-chromosome haplogroups and demonstrates the utility of binary polymorphisms to infer the origin of a male lineage....

  3. The multiethnic ancestry of Bolivians as revealed by the analysis of Y-chromosome markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Jorge Mario; Heinz, Tanja; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Álvarez-Iglesias, Vanesa; Taboada-Echalar, Patricia; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Carracedo, Ángel; Salas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed the specific male genetic component of 226 Bolivians recruited in five different regions ("departments"), La Paz, Cochabamba, Pando, Beni, and Santa Cruz. To evaluate the effect of geography on the distribution of genetic variability, the samples were also grouped into three main eco-geographical regions, namely, Andean, Sub-Andean, and Llanos. All the individuals were genotyped for 17 Y-STR and 32 Y-SNP markers. The average Y-chromosome Native American component in Bolivians is 28%, and it is mainly represented by haplogroup Q1a3a, while the average Y-chromosome European ancestry is 65%, and it is mainly represented by haplogroup R1b1-P25. The data indicate that there exists significant population sub-division in the country in terms of continental ancestry. Thus, the partition of ancestries in Llanos, Sub-Andean, and Andean regions is as follows (respectively): (i) Native American ancestry: 47%, 7%, and 19%, (ii) European ancestry: 46%, 86%, and 75%, and (iii) African ancestry: 7%, 7%, and 6%. The population sub-structure in the country is also well mirrored when inferred from an AMOVA analysis, indicating that among-population variance in the country reaches 9.74-11.15%. This suggests the convenience of using regional datasets for forensic applications in Bolivia, instead of using a global and single country database. By comparing the Y-chromosome patterns with those previously reported on the same individuals on autosomal SNPs and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), it becomes clear that Bolivians show a strong gender-bias. PMID:25450796

  4. The first peopling of South America: new evidence from Y-chromosome haplogroup Q.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Battaglia

    Full Text Available Recent progress in the phylogenetic resolution of the Y-chromosome phylogeny permits the male demographic dynamics and migratory events that occurred in Central and Southern America after the initial human spread into the Americas to be investigated at the regional level. To delve further into this issue, we examined more than 400 Native American Y chromosomes (collected in the region ranging from Mexico to South America belonging to haplogroup Q - virtually the only branch of the Y phylogeny observed in modern-day Amerindians of Central and South America - together with 27 from Mongolia and Kamchatka. Two main founding lineages, Q1a3a1a-M3 and Q1a3a1-L54(xM3, were detected along with novel sub-clades of younger age and more restricted geographic distributions. The first was also observed in Far East Asia while no Q1a3a1-L54(xM3 Y chromosome was found in Asia except the southern Siberian-specific sub-clade Q1a3a1c-L330. Our data not only confirm a southern Siberian origin of ancestral populations that gave rise to Paleo-Indians and the differentiation of both Native American Q founding lineages in Beringia, but support their concomitant arrival in Mesoamerica, where Mexico acted as recipient for the first wave of migration, followed by a rapid southward migration, along the Pacific coast, into the Andean region. Although Q1a3a1a-M3 and Q1a3a1-L54(xM3 display overlapping general distributions, they show different patterns of evolution in the Mexican plateau and the Andean area, which can be explained by local differentiations due to demographic events triggered by the introduction of agriculture and associated with the flourishing of the Great Empires.

  5. Haplotype diversity of 17 Y-chromosomal STRs in Saraswat Brahmin Community of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bhuvnesh; Raina, Anupuma; Dogra, Tirath Das

    2011-06-01

    In this study, 17 Y-specific STR loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y_GATA_H4) were analyzed in 181 unrelated male individuals from three North Indian states. A total of 157 different 17-loci haplotypes were identified, 145 of which were unique. The most frequent haplotype was detected in nine instances, occurring with a frequency of 4.97%. These results, including the haplotype data at 17 Y-STR loci in the present study, provide useful information for forensic practice in the Saraswat Brahmin population in North India. PMID:20971692

  6. Y-chromosome haplotype distribution in Han Chinese populations and modern human origin in East Asians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE; Yuehai

    2001-01-01

    [1]Cann, R. L., Stoneking, M., Wilson, A. C., Mitochondria DNA and human evolution, Nature, 1987, 325: 31-36.[2]Vigilant, L., Stoneking, M., Harpending, H. et al., African populations and the evolution of human mitochondrial DNA, Science, 1997, 253: 1503-1507.[3]Cavalli-Sforza, L. L., Piazza, M. P., The History and Geography of Human Genes, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994.[4]Brooks, A. S., Wood, B., Paleoanthropology, The Chinese side of the story, Nature, 1990, 344: 288-289.[5]Li, T., Etler, D. A., New middle Pleistocene hominid crania from Yunxian in China, Nature, 1992, 357: 404-407.[6]Wu, X. Z., Poirier, F. E., Human Evolution in China, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995.[7]Etler, D. A., The fossil evidence for human evolution in Asia, Annu. Rev. Anthropol., 1996, 25: 275-301.[8]Wolpoff, M. H., Interpretations of multiregional evolution, Science, 1996, 274: 704-707.[9]Stringer, C. B., Andrew, P., Genetic and fossil evidence for the origin of modern humans, Science ,1988, 239: 1263-1268.[10]Wilson, A. C.,Cann, R. L., The recent African genesis of humans, Scientific American, 1992, (4): 68-75.[11]Weng, Z., Yuan, Y., Du, R., Analysis of the genetic structure of human populations in China, Acta Anthropol. Sin. (in Chi-nese)1989, 8: 261-268.[12]Zhao, T., Zhang, G., Zhu, Y. et al., The distribution of immunoglobulin Gm allotypes in forty Chinese populations, Acta Anthropol. Sin. (in Chinese), 1986, 6: 1-8.[13]Chu, J. Y., Huang, W., Kuang, S. Q. et al., Genetic relationship of populations in China, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 1998, 95: 11763-11768.[14]Jobling, M. A., Tyler-Smith, C., Fathers and sons: the Y chromosome and human evolution, Trends in Genetics,1995, 11: 449-455.[15]Oefner, P. J., Underhill, P. A., Comparative DNA sequencing by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), Am. J. Hum. Genet., 1995, 57: A266.[16]Oefner, P. J., Underhill, P. A., DNA mutation detection

  7. Empirical Evaluation Reveals Best Fit of a Logistic Mutation Model for Human Y-Chromosomal Microsatellites

    OpenAIRE

    Jochens, Arne; Caliebe, Amke; Rösler, Uwe; Krawczak, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The rate of microsatellite mutation is dependent upon both the allele length and the repeat motif, but the exact nature of this relationship is still unknown. We analyzed data on the inheritance of human Y-chromosomal microsatellites in father–son duos, taken from 24 published reports and comprising 15,285 directly observable meioses. At the six microsatellites analyzed (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, and DYS393), a total of 162 mutations were observed. For each locus, we employed a ...

  8. Characterization and evolution of a single-copy sequence from the human Y chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Burk, R D; Ma, P.; Smith, K D

    1985-01-01

    To study the evolution and organization of DNA from the human Y chromosome, we constructed a recombinant library of human Y DNA by using a somatic cell hybrid in which the only cytologically detectable human chromosome is the Y. One recombinant (4B2) contained a 3.3-kilobase EcoRI single-copy fragment which was localized to the proximal portion of the Y long arm. Sequences homologous to this human DNA are present in male gorilla, chimpanzee, and orangutan DNAs but not in female ape DNAs. Unde...

  9. Analysis of 24 Y chromosomal STR haplotypes in a Chinese Han population sample from Henan Province, Central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meisen; Liu, Yaju; Zhang, Juntao; Bai, Rufeng; Lv, Xiaojiao; Ma, Shuhua

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed haplotypes for 24 Y chromosomal STRs (Y-STRs), including 17 Yfiler loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DY438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y-GATA-H4) and 7 additional STRs (DYS388, DYS444, DYS447, DYS449, DYS522 and DYS527a/b) in 1100 unrelated Chinese Han individuals from Henan Province using AGCU Y24 STR kit systems. The calculated average gene diversity (GD) values ranged from 0.4105 to 0.9647 for the DYS388 and DYS385a/b loci, respectively. The discriminatory capacity (DC) was 72.91% with 802 observed haplotypes using 17 Yfiler loci, by the addition of 7 Y-STRs to the Yfiler system, the DC was increased to 79.09% while showing 870 observed haplotypes. Among the additional 7 Y-STRs, DYS449, DYS527a/b, DYS444 and DYS522 were major contributors to enhancing discrimination. In the analysis of molecular variance, the Henan Han population clustered with Han origin populations and showed significant differences from other Non-Han populations. In the present study, we report 24 Y-STR population data in Henan Han population, and we emphasize the need for adding additional markers to the commonly used 17 Yfiler loci to achieve more improved discriminatory capacity in a population with low genetic diversity. PMID:25864156

  10. Genetic polymorphisms and mutation rates of 27 Y-chromosomal STRs in a Han population from Guangdong Province, Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yong-Ji; Zhang, Chu-chu; Li, Ran; Yang, Yang; Ou, Xue-Ling; Tong, Da-yue; Sun, Hong-Yu

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we collected blood samples from 1033 father-son pairs of a Han population from Guangdong Province, Southern China, of which 1007 fathers were unrelated male individuals. All together, 2040 male individuals were analyzed at 27 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) with Yfiler(®) Plus system. A total of 1003 different haplotypes were observed among 1007 unrelated fathers, with the overall haplotype diversity (HD) 0.999992 and discrimination capacity (DC) 0.996. The gene diversity (GD) values for the 27 Y-STR loci ranged from 0.4400 at DYS438 to 0.9597 at DYS385a/b. 11 off-ladder alleles and 25 copy number variants were detected in 1007 males. Population relationships were analyzed by comparison with 19 other worldwide populations. With 27,920 allele transfers in 1033 father-son pairs, 124 mutation events occurred, of which 118 were one-step mutations and 6 were two-step mutations. Eleven father-son pairs were found to have mutations at two loci, while one pair at three loci. The estimated locus-specific mutation rates varied from 0 to 1.74×10(-2), with an average estimated mutation rate 4.4×10(-3) (95%CI: 3.7×10(-3) to 5.3×10(-3)). Mutations were most frequently observed at three rapidly mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs), DYS576, DYS518 and DYS627. However, at DYS570, DYS449 and DYF387S1 loci, which were also described as RM Y-STRs, the mutation rates in Guangdong Han population were not as high as estimated in other populations. PMID:26619377

  11. PCR-based study of the presence of Y-chromosome sequences in patients with Ullrich-Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coto, E.; Menendez, M.J.; Lopez-Larrea, C. [Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1995-07-03

    The presence of Y chromosome sequences in Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS) patients has been suggested in previous work. Karyotype analysis estimated at about 60% of patients with a 45, X constitution and molecular analysis (Southern blot analysis with several Y chromosome probes and PCR of specific sequences) identified the presence of Y chromosome material in about 40% of 45, X patients. We have developed a very sensitive, PCR-based method to detect Y specific sequences in DNA from UTS patients. This protocol permits the detection of a single cell carrying a Y sequence among 10{sup 5} Y-negative cells. We studied 18 UTS patients with 4 Y-specific sequences. In 11 patients we detected a positive amplification for at least one Y sequence. The existence of a simple and sensitive method for the detection of Y sequences has important implications for UTS patients, in view of the risk for some of the females carrying Y chromosome material of developing gonadoblastoma and virilization. Additionally, some of the UTS-associated phenotypes, such as renal anomalies, could be correlated with the presence of Y chromosome-specific sequences. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Male-specific region of the bovine Y chromosome is gene rich with a high transcriptomic activity in testis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ti-Cheng; Yang, Yang; Retzel, Ernest F; Liu, Wan-Sheng

    2013-07-23

    The male-specific region of the mammalian Y chromosome (MSY) contains clusters of genes essential for male reproduction. The highly repetitive and degenerative nature of the Y chromosome impedes genomic and transcriptomic characterization. Although the Y chromosome sequence is available for the human, chimpanzee, and macaque, little is known about the annotation and transcriptome of nonprimate MSY. Here, we investigated the transcriptome of the MSY in cattle by direct testis cDNA selection and RNA-seq approaches. The bovine MSY differs radically from the primate Y chromosomes with respect to its structure, gene content, and density. Among the 28 protein-coding genes/families identified on the bovine MSY (12 single- and 16 multicopy genes), 16 are bovid specific. The 1,274 genes identified in this study made the bovine MSY gene density the highest in the genome; in comparison, primate MSYs have only 31-78 genes. Our results, along with the highly transcriptional activities observed from these Y-chromosome genes and 375 additional noncoding RNAs, challenge the widely accepted hypothesis that the MSY is gene poor and transcriptionally inert. The bovine MSY genes are predominantly expressed and are differentially regulated during the testicular development. Synonymous substitution rate analyses of the multicopy MSY genes indicated that two major periods of expansion occurred during the Miocene and Pliocene, contributing to the adaptive radiation of bovids. The massive amplification and vigorous transcription suggest that the MSY serves as a genomic niche regulating male reproduction during bovid expansion. PMID:23842086

  13. Sequencing of rhesus macaque Y chromosome clarifies origins and evolution of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jennifer F; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2012-12-01

    Studies of Y chromosome evolution often emphasize gene loss, but this loss has been counterbalanced by addition of new genes. The DAZ genes, which are critical to human spermatogenesis, were acquired by the Y chromosome in the ancestor of Old World monkeys and apes. We and our colleagues recently sequenced the rhesus macaque Y chromosome, and comparison of this sequence to human and chimpanzee enables us to reconstruct much of the evolutionary history of DAZ. We report that DAZ arrived on the Y chromosome about 38 million years ago via the transposition of at least 1.1 megabases of autosomal DNA. This transposition also brought five additional genes to the Y chromosome, but all five genes were subsequently lost through mutation or deletion. As the only surviving gene, DAZ experienced extensive restructuring, including intragenic amplification and gene duplication, and has been the target of positive selection in the chimpanzee lineage. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays Should Y stay or should Y go: The evolution of non-recombining sex chromosomes Abstract. PMID:23055411

  14. Evaluating the Relationship between Spermatogenic Silencing of the X Chromosome and Evolution of the Y Chromosome in Chimpanzee and Human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta Achame, Eskeatnaf; Baarends, Willy M.; Gribnau, Joost; Grootegoed, J. Anton

    2010-01-01

    Chimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY), representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural selection acting on the MSY as a unit. Positive selection might involve the performance of the MSY in spermatogenesis. Chimpanzees have a highly polygamous mating behavior, so that sperm competition is thought to provide a strong selective force acting on the Y chromosome in the chimpanzee lineage. In consequence of evolution of the heterologous sex chromosomes in mammals, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) results in a transcriptionally silenced XY body in male meiotic prophase, and subsequently also in postmeiotic repression of the sex chromosomes in haploid spermatids. This has evolved to a situation where MSCI has become a prerequisite for spermatogenesis. Here, by analysis of microarray testicular expression data representing a small number of male chimpanzees and men, we obtained information indicating that meiotic and postmeiotic X chromosome silencing might be more effective in chimpanzee than in human spermatogenesis. From this, we suggest that the remarkable reorganization of the chimpanzee Y chromosome, compared to the human Y chromosome, might have an impact on its meiotic interactions with the X chromosome and thereby on X chromosome silencing in spermatogenesis. Further studies will be required to address comparative functional aspects of MSCI in chimpanzee, human, and other placental mammals. PMID:21179482

  15. 16S rRNA-based bacterial diversity in the organic-rich sediments underlying oxygen-deficient waters of the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Divya, B.; Parvathi, A.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.

    1990; Stramma et al. 2008). The seabed below the OMZ is a region of “large organic food falls” due to the deposition of particulate organic matter from the productive waters above, harbouring enormous and unique microbial biomass. Studying...) and functional gene diversity (Woebken et al. 2008; Ward et al. 2009). However, very little is known about the diversity and phylogenetic affiliation of bacteria in the underlying sediments of the AS-OMZ despite its contribution to the biogeochemical cycles...

  16. Cladistic association analysis of Y chromosome effects on alcohol dependence and related personality traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittles, Rick A.; Long, Jeffrey C.; Bergen, Andrew W.; Eggert, Monica; Virkkunen, Matti; Linnoila, Markku; Goldman, David

    1999-01-01

    Association between Y chromosome haplotype variation and alcohol dependence and related personality traits was investigated in a large sample of psychiatrically diagnosed Finnish males. Haplotypes were constructed for 359 individuals using alleles at eight loci (seven microsatellite loci and a nucleotide substitution in the DYZ3 alphoid satellite locus). A cladogram linking the 102 observed haplotype configurations was constructed by using parsimony with a single-step mutation model. Then, a series of contingency tables nested according to the cladogram hierarchy were used to test for association between Y haplotype and alcohol dependence. Finally, using only alcohol-dependent subjects, we tested for association between Y haplotype and personality variables postulated to define subtypes of alcoholism—antisocial personality disorder, novelty seeking, harm avoidance, and reward dependence. Significant association with alcohol dependence was observed at three Y haplotype clades, with significance levels of P = 0.002, P = 0.020, and P = 0.010. Within alcohol-dependent subjects, no relationship was revealed between Y haplotype and antisocial personality disorder, novelty seeking, harm avoidance, or reward dependence. These results demonstrate, by using a fully objective association design, that differences among Y chromosomes contribute to variation in vulnerability to alcohol dependence. However, they do not demonstrate an association between Y haplotype and the personality variables thought to underlie the subtypes of alcoholism. PMID:10097188

  17. Androgenetic development of X- and Y-chromosome bearing haploid rainbow trout embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, Oliwia; Kowalski, Radosław K; Judycka, Sylwia; Rożyński, Rafał; Dobosz, Stefan; Ocalewicz, Konrad

    2016-09-01

    Haploid fish embryos are important in studies regarding role of the recessive traits during early ontogeny. In fish species with the male heterogamety, androgenetic haploid embryos might be also useful tool in studies concerning role of the sex chromosomes during an embryonic development. Morphologically differentiated X and Y chromosomes have been found in a limited number of fish species including rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum 1792). To evaluate role of the sex chromosomes during rainbow trout embryonic development, survival of the androgenetic haploids in the presence of X or Y sex chromosomes has been examined. Androgenetic haploid rainbow trout were produced by fertilization of X-irradiated eggs with spermatozoa derived from the normal males (XY) and neomales, that is, sex-reversed females (XX) to produce X- and Y-bearing haploids, and all X-bearing haploids, respectively. Survival rates of the androgenetic progenies of normal males and neomales examined during embryogenesis and at hatching did not differ significantly. However, all haploids died within next few days after hatching. Cytogenetic analysis of the androgenetic embryos confirmed their haploid status. Moreover, apart from the intact paternal chromosomes, residues of the irradiated maternal chromosomes observed as chromosome fragments were identified in some of the haploids. Provided results suggested that rainbow trout X and Y chromosomes despite morphological and genetic differences are at the early stage of differentiation and still share genetic information responsible for the proper embryonic development. PMID:27125692

  18. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xueying

    2013-05-24

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  19. Rapid and early determination of sex using trophoblast biopsy specimens and Y chromosome specific DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnaud, G; Kaplan, L; Weissenbach, J; Dumez, Y; Berger, R; Tiollais, P; Guellaen, G

    1984-07-14

    The feasibility of determining sex by analysing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with two probes specific for Y chromosomes was shown using DNA obtained from samples of blood from 30 non-related males and females of different ethnic origin. The DNA was spotted on nitrocellulose filters and hybridised with both a repetitive (P1) and a unique (49f) sequence specific for the human Y chromosome. A strong positive signal with both probes indicated the presence of male DNA. The sex of 12 fetuses was then similarly determined by molecular characterisation of DNA from trophoblast biopsy specimens. Chorionic samples were obtained in seven cases before termination of pregnancy in the first trimester and the aborted embryos subjected to karyotyping and sex chromatin analysis. In the five other cases samples were obtained from placentas obtained during caesarean section. Results of hybridisation were compared with those from cytogenic studies and actual sex at birth. The sex of all 12 fetuses was determined correctly by hybridisation. PMID:6428684

  20. Y chromosome of Aisin Gioro, the imperial house of the Qing dynasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shi; Tachibana, Harumasa; Wei, Lan-Hai; Yu, Ge; Wen, Shao-Qing; Wang, Chuan-Chao

    2015-06-01

    The House of Aisin Gioro is the imperial family of the last dynasty in Chinese history-Qing dynasty (1644-1911). The Aisin Gioro family originated from Jurchen tribes and founded the Manchu people before they conquered China. By investigating the Y chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) of seven modern male individuals who claim to belong to the Aisin Gioro family (three of which have full records of pedigree), we found that three of them (two of which having full pedigree, whose most recent common ancestor is Nurgaci) showed very close relationship (1-2 steps of differences in 17 STRs) and possessed a rare haplotype. We therefore conclude that this haplotype is the Y chromosome of the House of Aisin Gioro. Further tests of single-nucleotide polymorphisms indicate that they belong to haplogroup C3b2b1*-M401(xF5483), although their Y-STR results indicate that they are not a part of the 'star cluster' (once linked to Genghis Khan), which belongs to the same haplogroup. This study forms the base for the pedigree research of the imperial family of Qing dynasty by means of genetics. PMID:25833470

  1. Integrating Y-chromosome, mitochondrial, and autosomal data to analyze the origin of pig breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, O; Ojeda, A; Tomàs, A; Gallardo, D; Huang, L S; Folch, J M; Clop, A; Sánchez, A; Badaoui, B; Hanotte, O; Galman-Omitogun, O; Makuza, S M; Soto, H; Cadillo, J; Kelly, L; Cho, I C; Yeghoyan, S; Pérez-Enciso, M; Amills, M

    2009-09-01

    We have investigated the origin of swine breeds through the joint analysis of mitochondrial, microsatellite, and Y-chromosome polymorphisms in a sample of pigs and wild boars with a worldwide distribution. Genetic differentiation between pigs and wild boars was remarkably weak, likely as a consequence of a sustained gene flow between both populations. The analysis of nuclear markers evidenced the existence of a close genetic relationship between Near Eastern and European wild boars making it difficult to infer their relative contributions to the gene pool of modern European breeds. Moreover, we have shown that European and Far Eastern pig populations have contributed maternal and paternal lineages to the foundation of African and South American breeds. Although West African pigs from Nigeria and Benin exclusively harbored European alleles, Far Eastern and European genetic signatures of similar intensity were detected in swine breeds from Eastern Africa. This region seems to have been a major point of entry of livestock species in the African continent as a result of the Indian Ocean trade. Finally, South American creole breeds had essentially a European ancestry although Asian Y-chromosome and mitochondrial haplotypes were found in a few Nicaraguan pigs. The existence of Spanish and Portuguese commercial routes linking Asia with America might have favored the introduction of Far Eastern breeds into this continent. PMID:19535739

  2. Interspecific Y chromosome variation is sufficient to rescue hybrid male sterility and is influenced by the grandparental origin of the chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araripe, L O; Tao, Y; Lemos, B

    2016-06-01

    Y chromosomes display population variation within and between species. Co-evolution within populations is expected to produce adaptive interactions between Y chromosomes and the rest of the genome. One consequence is that Y chromosomes from disparate populations could disrupt harmonious interactions between co-evolved genetic elements and result in reduced male fertility, sterility or inviability. Here we address the contribution of 'heterospecific Y chromosomes' to fertility in hybrid males carrying a homozygous region of Drosophila mauritiana introgressed in the Drosophila simulans background. In order to detect Y chromosome-autosome interactions, which may go unnoticed in a single-species background of autosomes, we constructed hybrid genotypes involving three sister species: Drosophila simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia. These engineered strains varied due to: (i) species origin of the Y chromosome (D. simulans or D. sechellia); (ii) location of the introgressed D. mauritiana segment on the D. simulans third chromosome, and (iii) grandparental genomic background (three genotypes of D. simulans). We find complex interactions between the species origin of the Y chromosome, the identity of the D. mauritiana segment and the grandparental genetic background donating the chromosomes. Unexpectedly, the interaction of the Y chromosome and one segment of D. mauritiana drastically reduced fertility in the presence of Ysim, whereas the fertility is partially rescued by the Y chromosome of D. sechellia when it descends from a specific grandparental genotype. The restoration of fertility occurs in spite of an autosomal and X-linked genome that is mostly of D. simulans origin. These results illustrate the multifactorial basis of genetic interactions involving the Y chromosome. Our study supports the hypothesis that the Y chromosome can contribute significantly to the evolution of reproductive isolation and highlights the conditional manifestation of infertility in

  3. Sons conceived by assisted reproduction techniques inherit deletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region of the Y chromosome and the DAZ gene copy number

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mau Kai, Claudia; Juul, A; McElreavey, K;

    2008-01-01

    Deletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region of the Y chromosome are frequent in infertile men. The clinical consequences and the mode of inheritance of these deletions are not yet clear.......Deletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region of the Y chromosome are frequent in infertile men. The clinical consequences and the mode of inheritance of these deletions are not yet clear....

  4. A time- and cost-effective strategy to sequence mammalian Y Chromosomes: an application to the de novo assembly of gorilla Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszkiewicz, Marta; Rangavittal, Samarth; Cechova, Monika; Sanchez, Rebeca Campos; Fescemyer, Howard W; Harris, Robert; Ye, Danling; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Chikhi, Rayan; Ryder, Oliver A; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Medvedev, Paul; Makova, Kateryna D

    2016-04-01

    The mammalian Y Chromosome sequence, critical for studying male fertility and dispersal, is enriched in repeats and palindromes, and thus, is the most difficult component of the genome to assemble. Previously, expensive and labor-intensive BAC-based techniques were used to sequence the Y for a handful of mammalian species. Here, we present a much faster and more affordable strategy for sequencing and assembling mammalian Y Chromosomes of sufficient quality for most comparative genomics analyses and for conservation genetics applications. The strategy combines flow sorting, short- and long-read genome and transcriptome sequencing, and droplet digital PCR with novel and existing computational methods. It can be used to reconstruct sex chromosomes in a heterogametic sex of any species. We applied our strategy to produce a draft of the gorilla Y sequence. The resulting assembly allowed us to refine gene content, evaluate copy number of ampliconic gene families, locate species-specific palindromes, examine the repetitive element content, and produce sequence alignments with human and chimpanzee Y Chromosomes. Our results inform the evolution of the hominine (human, chimpanzee, and gorilla) Y Chromosomes. Surprisingly, we found the gorilla Y Chromosome to be similar to the human Y Chromosome, but not to the chimpanzee Y Chromosome. Moreover, we have utilized the assembled gorilla Y Chromosome sequence to design genetic markers for studying the male-specific dispersal of this endangered species. PMID:26934921

  5. Y chromosome specific probes identify breakpoint in a 45,X/46,X,del(Y)(pter----q11.1:) karyotype of an infertile male.

    OpenAIRE

    Beverstock, G C; Macfarlane, J D; Veenema, H; Hoekman, H; Goodfellow, P J

    1989-01-01

    An infertile male patient with a 45,X peripheral blood karyotype and a 45,X/46,X,del(Y)(pter----q11.1:) mosaic skin fibroblast karyotype is described. Steroid sulphatase (STS) activity was normal. Recombinant DNA studies using Y chromosome specific probes suggest that almost the entire long arm of the Y chromosome is deleted.

  6. Y chromosome comparative analysis of Rondônia with other Brazilian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Adriana C S; Silva, Dayse A; Teixeira, Marco A D; Nunes, Dorisvalder D; Lopes, Claudia M S; Netto, Ovídio R Tucunduva; Gusmão, Leonor; Carvalho, Elizeu F; Moura, Maria Manuela F

    2011-05-01

    In the present study, a Brazilian population, located in the Rondônia state, was genetically characterized for a set of Y chromosome specific STRs included in the Applied Biosystems kit (AmpFℓSTR®Yfiler™), which allows the simultaneous amplification of 16 markers: DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS438, DYS439, DYS437, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and GATA H4. The studied population from Rondônia state, in the North of Brazil, included individuals with admixed Native American, African and European ancestry. When comparing Rondônia with other Brazilian populations no significant genetic distances were found. In the comparison with other worldwide populations, although a predominant male European influence could be detected, there were significant differences with some populations from Central and South America and Africa. PMID:21269865

  7. Low-pass DNA sequencing of 1200 Sardinians reconstructs European Y-chromosome phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francalacci, Paolo; Morelli, Laura; Angius, Andrea; Berutti, Riccardo; Reinier, Frederic; Atzeni, Rossano; Pilu, Rosella; Busonero, Fabio; Maschio, Andrea; Zara, Ilenia; Sanna, Daria; Useli, Antonella; Urru, Maria Francesca; Marcelli, Marco; Cusano, Roberto; Oppo, Manuela; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Pitzalis, Maristella; Deidda, Francesca; Porcu, Eleonora; Poddie, Fausto; Kang, Hyun Min; Lyons, Robert; Tarrier, Brendan; Gresham, Jennifer Bragg; Li, Bingshan; Tofanelli, Sergio; Alonso, Santos; Dei, Mariano; Lai, Sandra; Mulas, Antonella; Whalen, Michael B; Uzzau, Sergio; Jones, Chris; Schlessinger, David; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Cucca, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Genetic variation within the male-specific portion of the Y chromosome (MSY) can clarify the origins of contemporary populations, but previous studies were hampered by partial genetic information. Population sequencing of 1204 Sardinian males identified 11,763 MSY single-nucleotide polymorphisms, 6751 of which have not previously been observed. We constructed a MSY phylogenetic tree containing all main haplogroups found in Europe, along with many Sardinian-specific lineage clusters within each haplogroup. The tree was calibrated with archaeological data from the initial expansion of the Sardinian population ~7700 years ago. The ages of nodes highlight different genetic strata in Sardinia and reveal the presumptive timing of coalescence with other human populations. We calculate a putative age for coalescence of ~180,000 to 200,000 years ago, which is consistent with previous mitochondrial DNA-based estimates. PMID:23908240

  8. The origin of Mosuo people as revealed by mtDNA and Y chromosome variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN; Bo; SHI; Hong; REN; Ling; XI; Huifeng; LI; Kaiyuan; ZHA

    2004-01-01

    The Mosuo, living in the Lugu Lake area in northwest Yunnan Province, China, is the only matriarchal population in China. The Mosuo was officially identified as Naxi nationality although its relationship with Naxi remains controversial. We studied the genetic relationship between the Mosuo and five other ethnic groups currently residing in northwest Yunnan, i.e. Naxi, Tibetan, Bai, Yi and Pumi, by typing the genetic variations in mtDNA HVS1 and 21 Y chromosome markers (13 SNPs & 8 STR markers). We showed that the maternal lineages of the Mosuo bear the strongest resemblance with those found in Naxi while its paternal lineages are more similar to those that are prevalent in Yunnan Tibetan. The marked difference between paternal and maternal lineages may be attributable to the genetic history, matriarchal structure, and visiting marriage.

  9. Crossing-over between Y chromosomes: another possible source of phenotypic variability in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata Peters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Valentin Petrescu-Mag

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic linkage acting through crossing-over between X and X chromosomes, X and Y chromosomes, and autosomal gene recombination are the most important sources of color pattern polymorphisms in animals. Variability in male color patterns and fin morphologies in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata, a livebearing fish is an example of extreme pattern polymorphism. We explored the possibility that crossing-over between Y chromosomes can also contribute to the high degree of pattern polymorphism in guppies because YY individuals are easily induced in the boratory. However, note that YY individuals are also produced in natural populations. Our results indicated that YY crossing-over was another important source of phenotypic variability - probably because recombination may be possible ver the entire length of Y chromosomes, and at very high frequencies due to high degrees of homology. Thus, crossing-over between Y chromosomes is yet another mechanism that can contribute to extreme pattern polymorphism in the guppy, a popular aquarium and important research model species.

  10. Loss of the Y-chromosome in the primary metastasis of a male sex cord stromal tumor : Pathogenetic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, WE; van Echten, J; van der Veen, AY; Sleijfer, DT; Timmer, A; de Jong, B; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    1999-01-01

    The first published chromosomal pattern of the retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis of a malignant gonadal stroma cell tumor of the adult testis is presented. Karyotyping showed structural chromosomal abnormalities and loss of the Y-chromosome. This loss was confirmed in primary tumor and metastasi

  11. An ultra-high discrimination Y chromosome short tandem repeat multiplex DNA typing system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K Hanson

    Full Text Available In forensic casework, Y chromosome short tandem repeat markers (Y-STRs are often used to identify a male donor DNA profile in the presence of excess quantities of female DNA, such as is found in many sexual assault investigations. Commercially available Y-STR multiplexes incorporating 12-17 loci are currently used in forensic casework (Promega's PowerPlex Y and Applied Biosystems' AmpFlSTR Yfiler. Despite the robustness of these commercial multiplex Y-STR systems and the ability to discriminate two male individuals in most cases, the coincidence match probabilities between unrelated males are modest compared with the standard set of autosomal STR markers. Hence there is still a need to develop new multiplex systems to supplement these for those cases where additional discriminatory power is desired or where there is a coincidental Y-STR match between potential male participants. Over 400 Y-STR loci have been identified on the Y chromosome. While these have the potential to increase the discrimination potential afforded by the commercially available kits, many have not been well characterized. In the present work, 91 loci were tested for their relative ability to increase the discrimination potential of the commonly used 'core' Y-STR loci. The result of this extensive evaluation was the development of an ultra high discrimination (UHD multiplex DNA typing system that allows for the robust co-amplification of 14 non-core Y-STR loci. Population studies with a mixed African American and American Caucasian sample set (n = 572 indicated that the overall discriminatory potential of the UHD multiplex was superior to all commercial kits tested. The combined use of the UHD multiplex and the Applied Biosystems' AmpFlSTR Yfiler kit resulted in 100% discrimination of all individuals within the sample set, which presages its potential to maximally augment currently available forensic casework markers. It could also find applications in human evolutionary

  12. Genome-Wide Search Identifies 1.9 Mb from the Polar Bear Y Chromosome for Evolutionary Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidon, Tobias; Schreck, Nancy; Hailer, Frank; Nilsson, Maria A; Janke, Axel

    2015-07-01

    The male-inherited Y chromosome is the major haploid fraction of the mammalian genome, rendering Y-linked sequences an indispensable resource for evolutionary research. However, despite recent large-scale genome sequencing approaches, only a handful of Y chromosome sequences have been characterized to date, mainly in model organisms. Using polar bear (Ursus maritimus) genomes, we compare two different in silico approaches to identify Y-linked sequences: 1) Similarity to known Y-linked genes and 2) difference in the average read depth of autosomal versus sex chromosomal scaffolds. Specifically, we mapped available genomic sequencing short reads from a male and a female polar bear against the reference genome and identify 112 Y-chromosomal scaffolds with a combined length of 1.9 Mb. We verified the in silico findings for the longer polar bear scaffolds by male-specific in vitro amplification, demonstrating the reliability of the average read depth approach. The obtained Y chromosome sequences contain protein-coding sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, microsatellites, and transposable elements that are useful for evolutionary studies. A high-resolution phylogeny of the polar bear patriline shows two highly divergent Y chromosome lineages, obtained from analysis of the identified Y scaffolds in 12 previously published male polar bear genomes. Moreover, we find evidence of gene conversion among ZFX and ZFY sequences in the giant panda lineage and in the ancestor of ursine and tremarctine bears. Thus, the identification of Y-linked scaffold sequences from unordered genome sequences yields valuable data to infer phylogenomic and population-genomic patterns in bears. PMID:26019166

  13. AB039. Novel Y-chromosomal microdeletions associated with non-obstructive azoospermia uncovered by high throughput sequencing of sequence-tagged sites (STSs)

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zesong

    2016-01-01

    Y-chromosomal microdeletion (YCM) serves as an important genetic factor in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is routinely used to detect YCMs by tracing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) in the Y chromosome. Here we introduce a novel methodology in which we sequence 1,787 (post-filtering) STSs distributed across the entire male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) in parallel to uncover known and novel YCMs. We validated this approach with 766 Chinese men with NOA...

  14. Molecular Analysis of Ring Y Chromosome in a 10-Year-Old Boy with Mixed Gonadal Dysgenesis and Growth Hormone Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Milenkovic, T; Guc-Scekic, M; Zdravkovic, D; Topic, V; Liehr, T.; Joksic, G; Radivojevic, D; Lakic, N

    2011-01-01

    Ring Y chromosome is a very rare chromosomal aberration. The published mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD) patients with a ring Y chromosome are short in stature, but are not growth hormone (GH) deficient. We present the molecular cytogenetic and molecular characterization of ring Y chromosome mosaicism in a 10-year-old boy with MGD whose short stature could be explained by the high percentage of cells monosomic for the X-chromosome, but also by the presence of severe GH deficiency. The ring Y chr...

  15. Prediction of the Y-Chromosome Haplogroups Within a Recently Settled Turkish Population in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Serkan; Doğan, Gŭlşen; Ašić, Adna; Besić, Larisa; Klimenta, Biljana; Hukić, Mirsada; Turan, Yusuf; Primorac, Dragan; Marjanović, Damir

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of Y-chromosome haplogroup distribution is widely used when investigating geographical clustering of different populations, which is why it plays an important role in population genetics, human migration patterns and even in forensic investigations. Individual determination of these haplogroups is mostly based on the analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers located in the non-recombining part of Y-chromosome (NRY). On the other hand, the number of forensic and anthropology studies investigating short tandem repeats on the Y-chromosome (Y-STRs) increases rapidly every year. During the last few years, these markers have been successfully used as haplogroup prediction methods, which is why they have been used in this study. Previously obtained Y-STR haplotypes (23 loci) from 100 unrelated Turkish males recently settled in Sarajevo were used for the determination of haplogroups via 'Whit Athey's Haplogroup Predictor' software. The Bayesian probability of 90 of the studied haplotypes is greater than 92.2% and ranges from 51.4% to 84.3% for the remaining 10 haplotypes. A distribution of 17 different haplogroups was found, with the Y- haplogroup J2a being most prevalent, having been found in 26% of all the samples, whereas R1b, G2a and R1a were less prevalent, covering a range of 10% to 15% of all the samples. Together, these four haplogroups account for 63% of all Y-chromosomes. Eleven haplogroups (E1b1b, G1, I1, I2a, I2b, J1, J2b, L, Q, R2, and T) range from 2% to 5%, while E1b1a and N are found in 1% of all samples. Obtained results indicate that a large majority of the Turkish paternal line belongs to West Asia, Europe Caucasus, Western Europe, Northeast Europe, Middle East, Russia, Anatolia, and Black Sea Y-chromosome lineages. As the distribution of Y-chromosome haplogroups is consistent with the previously published data for the Turkish population residing in Turkey, it was concluded that the analyzed population could also be recognized as

  16. Identity of Arabian Scotophilus (Vespertilionidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vallo, Peter; Benda, P.; Reiter, A.

    Kwaluseni: University of Swaziland, 2011. s. 88. [African Small Mammal Symposium /11./. 03.08.2011-08.08.2011, Kwaluseni] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : bats * Arabian Peninsula Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  17. Arabian Sea oceanography and fisheries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Nair, K.N.V.; Venugopal, P.; Gauns, M.; Haridas, P.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Nair, K.K.C.

    The physical and chemical forcing which drive the Arabian production is now fairly well understood. The main attributes, which contribute to the productivity are (1) the boundary processes which manifest as upwelling during summer monsoon and (2...

  18. Genetic integrity of the human Y chromosome exposed to groundwater arsenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sher

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is a known human carcinogen reported to cause chromosomal deletions and genetic anomalies in cultured cells. The vast human population inhabiting the Ganges delta in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh is exposed to critical levels of arsenic present in the groundwater. The genetic and physiological mechanism of arsenic toxicity in the human body is yet to be fully established. In addition, lack of animal models has made work on this line even more challenging. Methods Human male blood samples were collected with their informed consent from 5 districts in West Bengal having groundwater arsenic level more than 50 μg/L. Isolation of genomic DNA and preparation of metaphase chromosomes was done using standard protocols. End point PCR was performed for established sequence tagged sites to ascertain the status of recombination events. Single nucleotide variants of candidate genes and amplicons were carried out using appropriate restriction enzymes. The copy number of DYZ1 array per haploid genome was calculated using real time PCR and its chromosomal localization was done by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH. Results We studied effects of arsenic exposure on the human Y chromosome in males from different areas of West Bengal focusing on known recombination events (P5-P1 proximal; P5-P1 distal; gr/gr; TSPY-TSPY, b1/b3 and b2/b3, single nucleotide variants (SNVs of a few candidate Y-linked genes (DAZ, TTY4, BPY2, GOLGA2LY and the amplicons of AZFc region. Also, possible chromosomal reorganization of DYZ1 repeat arrays was analyzed. Barring a few microdeletions, no major changes were detected in blood DNA samples. SNV analysis showed a difference in some alleles. Similarly, DYZ1 arrays signals detected by FISH were found to be affected in some males. Conclusions Our Y chromosome analysis suggests that the same is protected from the effects of arsenic by some unknown mechanisms maintaining its structural and functional

  19. An investigation of admixture in an Australian Aboriginal Y-chromosome STR database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Duncan; Nagle, Nano; Ballantyne, Kaye N; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Wilcox, Stephen; Henry, Julianne; Turakulov, Rust; Mitchell, R John

    2012-09-01

    Y-chromosome specific STR profiling is increasingly used in forensic casework. However, the strong geographic clustering of Y haplogroups can lead to large differences in Y-STR haplotype frequencies between different ethnicities, which may have an impact on database composition in admixed populations. Aboriginal people have inhabited Australia for over 40,000 years and until ∼300 years ago they lived in almost complete isolation. Since the late 18th century Australia has experienced massive immigration, mainly from Europe, although in recent times from more widespread origins. This colonisation resulted in highly asymmetrical admixture between the immigrants and the indigenes. A State jurisdiction within Australia has created an Aboriginal Y-STR database in which assignment of ethnicity was by self-declaration. This criterion means that some males who identify culturally as members of a particular ethnic group may have a Y haplogroup characteristic of another ethnic group, as a result of admixture in their paternal line. As this may be frequent in Australia, an examination of the extent of genetic admixture within the database was performed. A Y haplogroup predictor program was first used to identify Y haplotypes that could be assigned to a European haplogroup. Of the 757 males (589 unique haplotypes), 445 (58.8%) were identified as European (354 haplotypes). The 312 non-assigned males (235 haplotypes) were then typed, in a hierarchical fashion, with a Y-SNP panel that detected the major Y haplogroups, C-S, as well as the Aboriginal subgroup of C, C4. Among these 96 males were found to have non-Aboriginal haplogroups. In total, ∼70% of Y chromosomes in the Aboriginal database could be classed as non-indigenous, with only 169 (129 unique haplotypes) or 22% of the total being associated with haplogroups denoting Aboriginal ancestry, C4 and K* or more correctly K(xL,M,N,O,P,Q,R,S). The relative frequencies of these indigenous haplogroups in South Australia (S

  20. Genetic affinities among the lower castes and tribal groups of India: inference from Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy B Mohan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background India is a country with enormous social and cultural diversity due to its positioning on the crossroads of many historic and pre-historic human migrations. The hierarchical caste system in the Hindu society dominates the social structure of the Indian populations. The origin of the caste system in India is a matter of debate with many linguists and anthropologists suggesting that it began with the arrival of Indo-European speakers from Central Asia about 3500 years ago. Previous genetic studies based on Indian populations failed to achieve a consensus in this regard. We analysed the Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA of three tribal populations of southern India, compared the results with available data from the Indian subcontinent and tried to reconstruct the evolutionary history of Indian caste and tribal populations. Results No significant difference was observed in the mitochondrial DNA between Indian tribal and caste populations, except for the presence of a higher frequency of west Eurasian-specific haplogroups in the higher castes, mostly in the north western part of India. On the other hand, the study of the Indian Y lineages revealed distinct distribution patterns among caste and tribal populations. The paternal lineages of Indian lower castes showed significantly closer affinity to the tribal populations than to the upper castes. The frequencies of deep-rooted Y haplogroups such as M89, M52, and M95 were higher in the lower castes and tribes, compared to the upper castes. Conclusion The present study suggests that the vast majority (>98% of the Indian maternal gene pool, consisting of Indio-European and Dravidian speakers, is genetically more or less uniform. Invasions after the late Pleistocene settlement might have been mostly male-mediated. However, Y-SNP data provides compelling genetic evidence for a tribal origin of the lower caste populations in the subcontinent. Lower caste groups might have originated with

  1. Simple quantitative PCR approach to reveal naturally occurring and mutation-induced repetitive sequence variation on the Drosophila Y chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Aldrich

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin is a significant component of the human genome and the genomes of most model organisms. Although heterochromatin is thought to be largely non-coding, it is clear that it plays an important role in chromosome structure and gene regulation. Despite a growing awareness of its functional significance, the repetitive sequences underlying some heterochromatin remain relatively uncharacterized. We have developed a real-time quantitative PCR-based method for quantifying simple repetitive satellite sequences and have used this technique to characterize the heterochromatic Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. In this report, we validate the approach, identify previously unknown satellite sequence copy number polymorphisms in Y chromosomes from different geographic sources, and show that a defect in heterochromatin formation can induce similar copy number polymorphisms in a laboratory strain. These findings provide a simple method to investigate the dynamic nature of repetitive sequences and characterize conditions which might give rise to long-lasting alterations in DNA sequence.

  2. The geographic polymorphisms of Y chromosome at YAP locus among 25 ethnic groups in Yunnan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI; Hong; (石宏); DONG; Yongli; (董永利); LI; Weixiang; (李卫翔); YANG; Jie; (杨洁); LI; Kaiyuan; (李开源); ZAN; Ruiguang; (昝瑞光); XIAO; Chunjie; (肖春杰)

    2003-01-01

    The genetic polymorphisms of Y chromosome at YAP locus in 25 ethnic groups (33 populations) of China were analyzed in a total of 1294 samples. The average YAP+ frequency of the 33 populations was 9.2%, coinciding with published data of Chinese populations. Primi has the highest YAP+ frequency (72.3%), which is also the highest YAP+ among all the eastern Asian populations studied. The YAP+ occurred in 17 populations studied including Tibetan (36.0%), Naxi (37.5% and 25.5%), Zhuang (21.3%), Jingpo (12.5%), Miao (11.8%), Dai (11.4%, 10.0%, 3.3% and 2.0%), Yi (8.0%), Bai of Yunnan (6.7% and 6.0%), Mongol of Inner Mongolia (4.3%), Tujia of Hunan (2.6%), Yao (2.2%) and Nu (1.8%). The other 15 populations are YAP? including Lahu (2 populations), Hani, Achang, Drung, Lisu, Sui, Bouyei, Va, Bulang, Deang, Man and Hui and Mongol of Yunnan and Bai of Hunan. The YAP+ frequencies varied among the different ethnic groups studied, and even different among the same ethnic group living in different geographic locations. Using the genetic information, combined with the knowledge of ethnology, history and archaeology, the origin and prehistoric migrations of the ethnic groups in China, especially in Yunnan Province were discussed.

  3. Study of Y Chromosome Microdeletion in AZF Region in Infertile Males of Isfahan Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Motovali-Bashi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: One of the main genetic factors of infertility is the deletions in the chromosome Y. Accordingly this study was conducted to determine the frequency of microdeletion of AZF region in infertile men of Isfahan, Iran. Methods: In this case-control study, 100 infertile men referred to the Infertility Center of Isfahan and 100 fertile men as controls were randomly selected. Genomic DNA was extracted from their blood and amplified by sequence tagged sites-polymerase chain reaction (STS-PCR method. The presence of microdeletion in AZF locus was diagnosed. Results: No AZFa, AZFb or AZFc deletions were found in the control group. Microdeletions were observed in one patient in AZFb region, eight patients in AZFc region and two patients in AZFa region. Conclusion: The incidence of Yq microdeletions in Iranian population is similar to the international frequency. Our data agree with other studies regarding microdeletions of AZFc, but for microdeletions of AZFa (2% our results show smaller frequency and differ significantly with many studies. Key words: Infertility, Y chromosome, Microdeletion

  4. Empirical evaluation reveals best fit of a logistic mutation model for human Y-chromosomal microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochens, Arne; Caliebe, Amke; Rösler, Uwe; Krawczak, Michael

    2011-12-01

    The rate of microsatellite mutation is dependent upon both the allele length and the repeat motif, but the exact nature of this relationship is still unknown. We analyzed data on the inheritance of human Y-chromosomal microsatellites in father-son duos, taken from 24 published reports and comprising 15,285 directly observable meioses. At the six microsatellites analyzed (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, and DYS393), a total of 162 mutations were observed. For each locus, we employed a maximum-likelihood approach to evaluate one of several single-step mutation models on the basis of the data. For five of the six loci considered, a novel logistic mutation model was found to provide the best fit according to Akaike's information criterion. This implies that the mutation probability at the loci increases (nonlinearly) with allele length at a rate that differs between upward and downward mutations. For DYS392, the best fit was provided by a linear model in which upward and downward mutation probabilities increase equally with allele length. This is the first study to empirically compare different microsatellite mutation models in a locus-specific fashion. PMID:21968190

  5. Novel Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Variants Detected Through the Use of Massively Parallel Sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David H Warshauer; Jennifer D Churchill; Nicole Novroski; Jonathan L King; Bruce Budowle

    2015-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technology is capable of determining the sizes of short tandem repeat (STR) alleles as well as their individual nucleotide sequences. Thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the repeat regions of STRs and variations in the pattern of repeat units in a given repeat motif can be used to differentiate alleles of the same length. In this study, MPS was used to sequence 28 forensically-relevant Y-chromosome STRs in a set of 41 DNA samples from the 3 major U.S. population groups (African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics). The resulting sequence data, which were analyzed with STRait Razor v2.0, revealed 37 unique allele sequence variants that have not been previously reported. Of these, 19 sequences were variations of documented sequences resulting from the presence of intra-repeat SNPs or alternative repeat unit patterns. Despite a limited sampling, two of the most frequently-observed variants were found only in African American samples. The remaining 18 variants represented allele sequences for which there were no published data with which to compare. These findings illustrate the great potential of MPS with regard to increasing the resolving power of STR typing and emphasize the need for sample population characterization of STR alleles.

  6. Gene Duplication, Gene Conversion and the Evolution of the Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connallon, Tim; Clark, Andrew G.

    2010-01-01

    Nonrecombining chromosomes, such as the Y, are expected to degenerate over time due to reduced efficacy of natural selection compared to chromosomes that recombine. However, gene duplication, coupled with gene conversion between duplicate pairs, can potentially counteract forces of evolutionary decay that accompany asexual reproduction. Using a combination of analytical and computer simulation methods, we explicitly show that, although gene conversion has little impact on the probability that duplicates become fixed within a population, conversion can be effective at maintaining the functionality of Y-linked duplicates that have already become fixed. The coupling of Y-linked gene duplication and gene conversion between paralogs can also prove costly by increasing the rate of nonhomologous crossovers between duplicate pairs. Such crossovers can generate an abnormal Y chromosome, as was recently shown to reduce male fertility in humans. The results represent a step toward explaining some of the more peculiar attributes of the human Y as well as preliminary Y-linked sequence data from other mammals and Drosophila. The results may also be applicable to the recently observed pattern of tetraploidy and gene conversion in asexual, bdelloid rotifers. PMID:20551442

  7. EAA/EMQN best practice guidelines for molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions: state-of-the-art 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausz, C; Hoefsloot, L; Simoni, M; Tüttelmann, F

    2014-01-01

    The molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions is a common routine genetic test which is part of the diagnostic workup of azoospermic and severe oligozoospermic men. Since 1999, the European Academy of Andrology (EAA) and the European Molecular Genetics Quality Network (EMQN) have been actively involved in supporting the improvement of the quality of the diagnostic assays by publication of the laboratory guidelines for molecular diagnosis of Y-chromosomal microdeletions and by offering external quality assessment trials. The present revision of the 2004 laboratory guidelines summarizes all the clinical novelties related to the Y chromosome (classic, partial and gene-specific deletions, genotype–phenotype correlations, methodological issues) and provides an update on the results of the quality control programme. These aspects also reflect the consensus of a large group of specialists present at a round table session during the recent Florence-Utah-Symposium on ‘Genetics of male infertility’ (Florence, 19–21 September, 2013). During the last 10 years the gr/gr deletion has been demonstrated as a significant risk factor for impaired sperm production. However, the screening for this deletion type in the routine diagnostic setting is still a debated issue among experts. The original basic protocol based on two multiplex polymerase chain reactions remains fully valid and appropriate for accurate diagnosis of complete AZF deletions and it requires only a minor modification in populations with a specific Y chromosome background. However, in light of novel data on genotype–phenotype correlations, the extension analysis for the AZFa and AZFb deletions is now routinely recommended. Novel methods and kits with excessively high number of markers do not improve the sensitivity of the test, may even complicate the interpretation of the results and are not recommended. Annual participation in an external quality control programme is strongly encouraged. The 12

  8. Achilles, a New Family of Transcriptionally Active Retrotransposons from the Olive Fruit Fly, with Y Chromosome Preferential Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumani, Konstantina T; Drosopoulou, Elena; Bourtzis, Kostas; Gariou-Papalexiou, Aggeliki; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Mathiopoulos, Kostas D

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. The in depth exploration of their structure will improve our understanding of their origin and divergence (degeneration) as well as the evolution of genetic sex determination pathways which, most often are attributed to them. In Tephritids, the structure of Y chromosome, where the male-determining factor M is localized, is largely unexplored and limited data concerning its sequence content and evolution are available. In order to get insight into the structure and organization of the Y chromosome of the major olive insect pest, the olive fly Bactrocera oleae, we characterized sequences from a Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE)-isolated Y chromosome. Here, we report the discovery of the first olive fly LTR retrotransposon with increased presence on the Y chromosome. The element belongs to the BEL-Pao superfamily, however, its sequence comparison with the other members of the superfamily suggests that it constitutes a new family that we termed Achilles. Its ~7.5 kb sequence consists of the 5'LTR, the 5'non-coding sequence and the open reading frame (ORF), which encodes the polyprotein Gag-Pol. In situ hybridization to the B. oleae polytene chromosomes showed that Achilles is distributed in discrete bands dispersed on all five autosomes, in all centromeric regions and in the granular heterochromatic network corresponding to the mitotic sex chromosomes. The between sexes comparison revealed a variation in Achilles copy number, with male flies possessing 5-10 copies more than female (CI range: 18-38 and 12-33 copies respectively per genome). The examination of its transcriptional activity demonstrated the presence of at least one intact active copy in the genome, showing a differential level of expression between sexes as well as during embryonic development. The higher expression was detected in male germline tissues (testes). Moreover, the presence of Achilles-like elements in different species of

  9. Achilles, a New Family of Transcriptionally Active Retrotransposons from the Olive Fruit Fly, with Y Chromosome Preferential Distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina T Tsoumani

    Full Text Available Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. The in depth exploration of their structure will improve our understanding of their origin and divergence (degeneration as well as the evolution of genetic sex determination pathways which, most often are attributed to them. In Tephritids, the structure of Y chromosome, where the male-determining factor M is localized, is largely unexplored and limited data concerning its sequence content and evolution are available. In order to get insight into the structure and organization of the Y chromosome of the major olive insect pest, the olive fly Bactrocera oleae, we characterized sequences from a Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE-isolated Y chromosome. Here, we report the discovery of the first olive fly LTR retrotransposon with increased presence on the Y chromosome. The element belongs to the BEL-Pao superfamily, however, its sequence comparison with the other members of the superfamily suggests that it constitutes a new family that we termed Achilles. Its ~7.5 kb sequence consists of the 5'LTR, the 5'non-coding sequence and the open reading frame (ORF, which encodes the polyprotein Gag-Pol. In situ hybridization to the B. oleae polytene chromosomes showed that Achilles is distributed in discrete bands dispersed on all five autosomes, in all centromeric regions and in the granular heterochromatic network corresponding to the mitotic sex chromosomes. The between sexes comparison revealed a variation in Achilles copy number, with male flies possessing 5-10 copies more than female (CI range: 18-38 and 12-33 copies respectively per genome. The examination of its transcriptional activity demonstrated the presence of at least one intact active copy in the genome, showing a differential level of expression between sexes as well as during embryonic development. The higher expression was detected in male germline tissues (testes. Moreover, the presence of Achilles-like elements in

  10. Temporal differentiation across a West-European Y-chromosomal cline: genealogy as a tool in human population genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Larmuseau, Maarten HD; Ottoni, Claudio; Raeymaekers, Joost AM; Vanderheyden, Nancy; Larmuseau, Hendrik FM; Decorte, Ronny

    2011-01-01

    The pattern of population genetic variation and allele frequencies within a species are unstable and are changing over time according to different evolutionary factors. For humans, it is possible to combine detailed patrilineal genealogical records with deep Y-chromosome (Y-chr) genotyping to disentangle signals of historical population genetic structures because of the exponential increase in genetic genealogical data. To test this approach, we studied the temporal pattern of the ‘autochthon...

  11. On the edge of Bantu expansions: mtDNA, Y chromosome and lactase persistence genetic variation in southwestern Angola

    OpenAIRE

    Beleza Sandra; Luiselli Donata; Sequeira Fernando; Coelho Margarida; Rocha Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Current information about the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples is hampered by the scarcity of genetic data from well identified populations from southern Africa. Here, we fill an important gap in the analysis of the western edge of the Bantu migrations by studying for the first time the patterns of Y-chromosome, mtDNA and lactase persistence genetic variation in four representative groups living around the Namib Desert in southwestern Angola (Ovimbundu, Ganguela, Nyanek...

  12. Ancient Migratory Events in the Middle East: New Clues from the Y-Chromosome Variation of Modern Iranians

    OpenAIRE

    Kivisild, Toomas; Grugni, Viola; Battaglia, Vincenza; Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Parolo, Silvia; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Achilli, Alessandro; OLIVIERI, ANNA; Gandini, Francesca; Houshmand, Massoud; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Torroni, Antonio; Semino, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of high resolution Y-chromosome haplogroup diversification within Iran provides important geographic context regarding the spread and compartmentalization of male lineages in the Middle East and southwestern Asia. At present, the Iranian population is characterized by an extraordinary mix of different ethnic groups speaking a variety of Indo-Iranian, Semitic and Turkic languages. Despite these features, only few studies have investigated the multiethnic components of the Iranian gen...

  13. Y-chromosome descent clusters and male differential reproductive success: young lineage expansions dominate Asian pastoral nomadic populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaresque, Patricia; Poulet, Nicolas; Cussat-Blanc, Sylvain; Gerard, Patrice; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Heyer, Evelyne; Jobling, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    High-frequency microsatellite haplotypes of the male-specific Y-chromosome can signal past episodes of high reproductive success of particular men and their patrilineal descendants. Previously, two examples of such successful Y-lineages have been described in Asia, both associated with Altaic-speaking pastoral nomadic societies, and putatively linked to dynasties descending, respectively, from Genghis Khan and Giocangga. Here we surveyed a total of 5321 Y-chromosomes from 127 Asian populations, including novel Y-SNP and microsatellite data on 461 Central Asian males, to ask whether additional lineage expansions could be identified. Based on the most frequent eight-microsatellite haplotypes, we objectively defined 11 descent clusters (DCs), each within a specific haplogroup, that represent likely past instances of high male reproductive success, including the two previously identified cases. Analysis of the geographical patterns and ages of these DCs and their associated cultural characteristics showed that the most successful lineages are found both among sedentary agriculturalists and pastoral nomads, and expanded between 2100 BCE and 1100 CE. However, those with recent origins in the historical period are almost exclusively found in Altaic-speaking pastoral nomadic populations, which may reflect a shift in political organisation in pastoralist economies and a greater ease of transmission of Y-chromosomes through time and space facilitated by the use of horses. PMID:25585703

  14. Y chromosome evidence of earliest modern human settlement in East Asia and multiple origins of Tibetan and Japanese populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chun-Jie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylogeography of the Y chromosome in Asia previously suggested that modern humans of African origin initially settled in mainland southern East Asia, and about 25,000–30,000 years ago, migrated northward, spreading throughout East Asia. However, the fragmented distribution of one East Asian specific Y chromosome lineage (D-M174, which is found at high frequencies only in Tibet, Japan and the Andaman Islands, is inconsistent with this scenario. Results In this study, we collected more than 5,000 male samples from 73 East Asian populations and reconstructed the phylogeography of the D-M174 lineage. Our results suggest that D-M174 represents an extremely ancient lineage of modern humans in East Asia, and a deep divergence was observed between northern and southern populations. Conclusion We proposed that D-M174 has a southern origin and its northward expansion occurred about 60,000 years ago, predating the northward migration of other major East Asian lineages. The Neolithic expansion of Han culture and the last glacial maximum are likely the key factors leading to the current relic distribution of D-M174 in East Asia. The Tibetan and Japanese populations are the admixture of two ancient populations represented by two major East Asian specific Y chromosome lineages, the O and D haplogroups.

  15. Experimental evidence of a buoyant mass difference between bovine spermatozoa bearing X- and Y-chromosomes using a micromechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Marco; Battaglia, Raffaele; Ferrini, Gianluca; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Flow cytometry is to date the only commercially viable technique for sex preselection of mammalian spermatozoa, measuring the different DNA content in X- and Y-chromosome bearing spermatozoa. Here we present experimental evidence of a measurable difference between bovine spermatozoa bearing X- and Y-chromosomes based on their buoyant mass. Single cells of two populations of flow-cytometrically sorted spermatozoa were analyzed by means of a micromechanical resonator, consisting of a suspended doubly-clamped microcapillary. Spermatozoa buoyant mass is related to the transitory variation in vibration phase lag, caused by the passage through the sensitive area of a single sperm cell suspended in a fluid. Data analysis shows two well-separated distributions and provides evidence of the sensor capabilities to detect the buoyant mass of single cells with such accuracy to distinguish X- and Y-chromosome bearing spermatozoa. These preliminary results suggest the possibility to develop an intriguing technique alternative to flow cytometry in the field of sperm sorting. PMID:24419052

  16. Reproductive deficiency in bulls from synthetic breeds according to the type of crossbreed and the morphology of the Y chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilise M. Horn

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We used 550 Braford and 214 Brangus-Ibagé bulls to study the association between Y chromosome morphology and the evaluation of breeding-soundness, karyotyping and breeding records were used to assess Y chromosome morphology. In general, no direct association was detected between the individual type of Y chromosome and reproductive fitness as previously estimated through breeding soundness examination. The type of breeding strategy used to form the synthetic breeds was also analyzed. The Braford breed is about 3/8 Zebu (Bos taurus indicus and 5/8 Hereford (Bos taurus taurus but when the breeding strategy used 1/4 Zebu animals to produce Braford bulls which were 3/8 Zebu a greater percentage of the bulls had to be culled due to reproductive problems. Our study shows that certain interactions between genotypes can be detrimental to the reproductive efficiency of 3/8 Zebu animals and that breeding strategies avoiding or favoring certain genotypes can be used to reduce the percentage of bulls from synthetic breeds that are culled due to problems with semen quality.

  17. A time- and cost-effective strategy to sequence mammalian Y Chromosomes: an application to the de novo assembly of gorilla Y

    OpenAIRE

    Tomaszkiewicz, Marta; Rangavittal, Samarth; Cechova, Monika; Sanchez, Rebeca Campos; Fescemyer, Howard W.; Harris, Robert; Ye, Danling; O'Brien, Patricia C.M.; Chikhi, Rayan; Ryder, Oliver A.; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A.; Medvedev, Paul; Makova, Kateryna D.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian Y Chromosome sequence, critical for studying male fertility and dispersal, is enriched in repeats and palindromes, and thus, is the most difficult component of the genome to assemble. Previously, expensive and labor-intensive BAC-based techniques were used to sequence the Y for a handful of mammalian species. Here, we present a much faster and more affordable strategy for sequencing and assembling mammalian Y Chromosomes of sufficient quality for most comparative genomics analys...

  18. HIGH GENETIC VARIATION IN Y CHROMOSOME PATTERNS OF THE MOCOVÍ POPULATION / Alta variación genética en los patrones del cromosoma Y de la población Mocoví

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Angela Glesmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In numerically small ethnic groups, the loss of genetic variability in the Y chromosome is frequent, because this genomic compartment is often subjected to selective sweeps. Despite its small size, the Mocoví population retains a significant amount of genetic variation in relation to other native communities, but their Y chromosome diversity is not known in depth. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic variability of the Y chromosome in a sample of Mocoví males from Santa Fe province (Argentina. We genotyped 11 short tandem repeats (STRs and two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: M3 and M346. The diversity observed was high, and the 25 haplotypes obtained were compared to the YHRD database, with 13 of them absent of that database. A comparison with previous data reported from other Gran Chaco native groups showed significant differences between the Mocoví and other populations of different ethnic origin. This result and other studies on molecular markers of the Mocoví prove that this ethnic group retains a high genetic diversity that clearly differentiate them from other Amerindian populations.   Keywords: Haplotypes; genetic diversity; STRs; M3; Amerindians.   Resumen La pérdida de variabilidad genética en el cromosoma Y es frecuente en grupos étnicos reducidos numéricamente, debido a que este cromosoma suele estar sometido a barridos selectivos. A pesar de ser pequeña, la población Mocoví conserva una cantidad significativa de variación genética en relación con otras comunidades nativas, pero su diversidad a nivel del cromosoma Y no se conoce en profundidad. El objetivo de este trabajo fue analizar la variabilidad genética del cromosoma Y en una muestra de varones Mocoví de la provincia de Santa Fe (Argentina. Se tipificaron 11 microsatélites (STRs y dos marcadores bialélicos (SNPs: M3 y M346. La diversidad observada fue elevada, y los 25 haplotipos obtenidos se compararon con la base de datos YHRD, donde 13

  19. Evolution of X-degenerate Y chromosome genes in greater apes: conservation of gene content in human and gorilla, but not chimpanzee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hiroki; Peng, Lei; Makova, Kateryna D

    2009-02-01

    Compared with the X chromosome, the mammalian Y chromosome is considerably diminished in size and has lost most of its ancestral genes during evolution. Interestingly, for the X-degenerate region on the Y chromosome, human has retained all 16 genes, while chimpanzee has lost 4 of the 16 genes since the divergence of the two species. To uncover the evolutionary forces governing ape Y chromosome degeneration, we determined the complete sequences of the coding exons and splice sites for 16 gorilla Y chromosome genes of the X-degenerate region. We discovered that all studied reading frames and splice sites were intact, and thus, this genomic region experienced no gene loss in the gorilla lineage. Higher nucleotide divergence was observed in the chimpanzee than the human lineage, particularly for genes with disruptive mutations, suggesting a lack of functional constraints for these genes in chimpanzee. Surprisingly, our results indicate that the human and gorilla orthologues of the genes disrupted in chimpanzee evolve under relaxed functional constraints and might not be essential. Taking mating patterns and effective population sizes of ape species into account, we conclude that genetic hitchhiking associated with positive selection due to sperm competition might explain the rapid decline in the Y chromosome gene number in chimpanzee. As we found no evidence of positive selection acting on the X-degenerate genes, such selection likely targets other genes on the chimpanzee Y chromosome. PMID:19142680

  20. GROWTH RATE OF ARABIAN FOALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. PIESZKA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Arabian horses are treated as one of the most noble horse breed in the world. It isalso one of the oldest breed known as a root of many other breeds. Opposite toThoroughbred horses Arabian ones are very healthy, easy to keep with low fodderdemand. They are still incredibly resistant to environmental conditions. Growth anddevelopment of foals is also very interesting because it is more similar to growth ofprimitive than to noble foals. The object of this study was to analyse the growth rateof Arabian foals bred in Poland. 382 foals born in Bialka Stud in 1983-2003 weretaken under consideration. The height at withers, girth and cannon circumferencemeasured at 1 day and 6 and 18 months of life were analysed. On this base thegrowth rate was calculated. Horses were divided into different groups accordingtheir year of birth, sex, coat colour and sire and dam lines. The statistical differencesbetween particular groups were evaluated. It was stated that year of birth affectedsignificantly the growth rate of Arabian foals. Colts were characterized bysignificantly higher growth rate of cannon circumference. Horses of different coatcolour did not differ in growth rate of any parameter. Affiliation to particular sireand dam lines had some effects on growth rate of Arabian foals.

  1. Mitochondrial and Y chromosome haplotype motifs as diagnostic markers of Jewish ancestry: a reconsideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofanelli, Sergio; Taglioli, Luca; Bertoncini, Stefania; Francalacci, Paolo; Klyosov, Anatole; Pagani, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Several authors have proposed haplotype motifs based on site variants at the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) and the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) to trace the genealogies of Jewish people. Here, we analyzed their main approaches and test the feasibility of adopting motifs as ancestry markers through construction of a large database of mtDNA and NRY haplotypes from public genetic genealogical repositories. We verified the reliability of Jewish ancestry prediction based on the Cohen and Levite Modal Haplotypes in their “classical” 6 STR marker format or in the “extended” 12 STR format, as well as four founder mtDNA lineages (HVS-I segments) accounting for about 40% of the current population of Ashkenazi Jews. For this purpose we compared haplotype composition in individuals of self-reported Jewish ancestry with the rest of European, African or Middle Eastern samples, to test for non-random association of ethno-geographic groups and haplotypes. Overall, NRY and mtDNA based motifs, previously reported to differentiate between groups, were found to be more represented in Jewish compared to non-Jewish groups. However, this seems to stem from common ancestors of Jewish lineages being rather recent respect to ancestors of non-Jewish lineages with the same “haplotype signatures.” Moreover, the polyphyly of haplotypes which contain the proposed motifs and the misuse of constant mutation rates heavily affected previous attempts to correctly dating the origin of common ancestries. Accordingly, our results stress the limitations of using the above haplotype motifs as reliable Jewish ancestry predictors and show its inadequacy for forensic or genealogical purposes. PMID:25431579

  2. Evolutionary history of novel genes on the tammar wallaby Y chromosome: Implications for sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, Veronica J; O'Meally, Denis; Sankovic, Natasha; Delbridge, Margaret L; Kuroki, Yoko; Boore, Jeffrey L; Toyoda, Atsushi; Jordan, Kristen S; Pask, Andrew J; Renfree, Marilyn B; Fujiyama, Asao; Graves, Jennifer A Marshall; Waters, Paul D

    2012-03-01

    We report here the isolation and sequencing of 10 Y-specific tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) BAC clones, revealing five hitherto undescribed tammar wallaby Y genes (in addition to the five genes already described) and several pseudogenes. Some genes on the wallaby Y display testis-specific expression, but most have low widespread expression. All have partners on the tammar X, along with homologs on the human X. Nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution ratios for nine of the tammar XY gene pairs indicate that they are each under purifying selection. All 10 were also identified as being on the Y in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii; a distantly related Australian marsupial); however, seven have been lost from the human Y. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the wallaby YX genes, with respective homologs from other vertebrate representatives, revealed that three marsupial Y genes (HCFC1X/Y, MECP2X/Y, and HUWE1X/Y) were members of the ancestral therian pseudoautosomal region (PAR) at the time of the marsupial/eutherian split; three XY pairs (SOX3/SRY, RBMX/Y, and ATRX/Y) were isolated from each other before the marsupial/eutherian split, and the remaining three (RPL10X/Y, PHF6X/Y, and UBA1/UBE1Y) have a more complex evolutionary history. Thus, the small marsupial Y chromosome is surprisingly rich in ancient genes that are retained in at least Australian marsupials and evolved from testis-brain expressed genes on the X. PMID:22128133

  3. A genetic basis for a postmeiotic X versus Y chromosome intragenomic conflict in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Cocquet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intragenomic conflicts arise when a genetic element favours its own transmission to the detriment of others. Conflicts over sex chromosome transmission are expected to have influenced genome structure, gene regulation, and speciation. In the mouse, the existence of an intragenomic conflict between X- and Y-linked multicopy genes has long been suggested but never demonstrated. The Y-encoded multicopy gene Sly has been shown to have a predominant role in the epigenetic repression of post meiotic sex chromatin (PMSC and, as such, represses X and Y genes, among which are its X-linked homologs Slx and Slxl1. Here, we produced mice that are deficient for both Sly and Slx/Slxl1 and observed that Slx/Slxl1 has an opposite role to that of Sly, in that it stimulates XY gene expression in spermatids. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency rescues the sperm differentiation defects and near sterility caused by Sly deficiency and vice versa. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency also causes a sex ratio distortion towards the production of male offspring that is corrected by Sly deficiency. All in all, our data show that Slx/Slxl1 and Sly have antagonistic effects during sperm differentiation and are involved in a postmeiotic intragenomic conflict that causes segregation distortion and male sterility. This is undoubtedly what drove the massive gene amplification on the mouse X and Y chromosomes. It may also be at the basis of cases of F1 male hybrid sterility where the balance between Slx/Slxl1 and Sly copy number, and therefore expression, is disrupted. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a competition occurring between X and Y related genes in mammals. It also provides a biological basis for the concept that intragenomic conflict is an important evolutionary force which impacts on gene expression, genome structure, and speciation.

  4. Y-chromosome evidence suggests a common paternal heritage of Austro-Asiatic populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Alla G

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Austro-Asiatic linguistic family, which is considered to be the oldest of all the families in India, has a substantial presence in Southeast Asia. However, the possibility of any genetic link among the linguistic sub-families of the Indian Austro-Asiatics on the one hand and between the Indian and the Southeast Asian Austro-Asiatics on the other has not been explored till now. Therefore, to trace the origin and historic expansion of Austro-Asiatic groups of India, we analysed Y-chromosome SNP and STR data of the 1222 individuals from 25 Indian populations, covering all the three branches of Austro-Asiatic tribes, viz. Mundari, Khasi-Khmuic and Mon-Khmer, along with the previously published data on 214 relevant populations from Asia and Oceania. Results Our results suggest a strong paternal genetic link, not only among the subgroups of Indian Austro-Asiatic populations but also with those of Southeast Asia. However, maternal link based on mtDNA is not evident. The results also indicate that the haplogroup O-M95 had originated in the Indian Austro-Asiatic populations ~65,000 yrs BP (95% C.I. 25,442 – 132,230 and their ancestors carried it further to Southeast Asia via the Northeast Indian corridor. Subsequently, in the process of expansion, the Mon-Khmer populations from Southeast Asia seem to have migrated and colonized Andaman and Nicobar Islands at a much later point of time. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with the linguistic evidence, which suggests that the linguistic ancestors of the Austro-Asiatic populations have originated in India and then migrated to Southeast Asia.

  5. Evolutionary history of novel genes on the tammar wallaby Y chromosome: Implications for sex chromosome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, Veronica J.; O'Meally, Denis; Sankovic, Natasha; Delbridge, Margaret L.; Kuroki, Yoko; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Jordan, Kristen S.; Pask, Andrew J.; Renfree, Marilyn B.; Fujiyama, Asao; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall; Waters, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    We report here the isolation and sequencing of 10 Y-specific tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii) BAC clones, revealing five hitherto undescribed tammar wallaby Y genes (in addition to the five genes already described) and several pseudogenes. Some genes on the wallaby Y display testis-specific expression, but most have low widespread expression. All have partners on the tammar X, along with homologs on the human X. Nonsynonymous and synonymous substitution ratios for nine of the tammar XY gene pairs indicate that they are each under purifying selection. All 10 were also identified as being on the Y in Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii; a distantly related Australian marsupial); however, seven have been lost from the human Y. Maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the wallaby YX genes, with respective homologs from other vertebrate representatives, revealed that three marsupial Y genes (HCFC1X/Y, MECP2X/Y, and HUWE1X/Y) were members of the ancestral therian pseudoautosomal region (PAR) at the time of the marsupial/eutherian split; three XY pairs (SOX3/SRY, RBMX/Y, and ATRX/Y) were isolated from each other before the marsupial/eutherian split, and the remaining three (RPL10X/Y, PHF6X/Y, and UBA1/UBE1Y) have a more complex evolutionary history. Thus, the small marsupial Y chromosome is surprisingly rich in ancient genes that are retained in at least Australian marsupials and evolved from testis–brain expressed genes on the X. PMID:22128133

  6. Ancient migratory events in the Middle East: new clues from the Y-chromosome variation of modern Iranians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugni, Viola; Battaglia, Vincenza; Hooshiar Kashani, Baharak; Parolo, Silvia; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Achilli, Alessandro; Olivieri, Anna; Gandini, Francesca; Houshmand, Massoud; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Torroni, Antonio; Semino, Ornella

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of high resolution Y-chromosome haplogroup diversification within Iran provides important geographic context regarding the spread and compartmentalization of male lineages in the Middle East and southwestern Asia. At present, the Iranian population is characterized by an extraordinary mix of different ethnic groups speaking a variety of Indo-Iranian, Semitic and Turkic languages. Despite these features, only few studies have investigated the multiethnic components of the Iranian gene pool. In this survey 938 Iranian male DNAs belonging to 15 ethnic groups from 14 Iranian provinces were analyzed for 84 Y-chromosome biallelic markers and 10 STRs. The results show an autochthonous but non-homogeneous ancient background mainly composed by J2a sub-clades with different external contributions. The phylogeography of the main haplogroups allowed identifying post-glacial and Neolithic expansions toward western Eurasia but also recent movements towards the Iranian region from western Eurasia (R1b-L23), Central Asia (Q-M25), Asia Minor (J2a-M92) and southern Mesopotamia (J1-Page08). In spite of the presence of important geographic barriers (Zagros and Alborz mountain ranges, and the Dasht-e Kavir and Dash-e Lut deserts) which may have limited gene flow, AMOVA analysis revealed that language, in addition to geography, has played an important role in shaping the nowadays Iranian gene pool. Overall, this study provides a portrait of the Y-chromosomal variation in Iran, useful for depicting a more comprehensive history of the peoples of this area as well as for reconstructing ancient migration routes. In addition, our results evidence the important role of the Iranian plateau as source and recipient of gene flow between culturally and genetically distinct populations. PMID:22815981

  7. Ancient migratory events in the Middle East: new clues from the Y-chromosome variation of modern Iranians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Grugni

    Full Text Available Knowledge of high resolution Y-chromosome haplogroup diversification within Iran provides important geographic context regarding the spread and compartmentalization of male lineages in the Middle East and southwestern Asia. At present, the Iranian population is characterized by an extraordinary mix of different ethnic groups speaking a variety of Indo-Iranian, Semitic and Turkic languages. Despite these features, only few studies have investigated the multiethnic components of the Iranian gene pool. In this survey 938 Iranian male DNAs belonging to 15 ethnic groups from 14 Iranian provinces were analyzed for 84 Y-chromosome biallelic markers and 10 STRs. The results show an autochthonous but non-homogeneous ancient background mainly composed by J2a sub-clades with different external contributions. The phylogeography of the main haplogroups allowed identifying post-glacial and Neolithic expansions toward western Eurasia but also recent movements towards the Iranian region from western Eurasia (R1b-L23, Central Asia (Q-M25, Asia Minor (J2a-M92 and southern Mesopotamia (J1-Page08. In spite of the presence of important geographic barriers (Zagros and Alborz mountain ranges, and the Dasht-e Kavir and Dash-e Lut deserts which may have limited gene flow, AMOVA analysis revealed that language, in addition to geography, has played an important role in shaping the nowadays Iranian gene pool. Overall, this study provides a portrait of the Y-chromosomal variation in Iran, useful for depicting a more comprehensive history of the peoples of this area as well as for reconstructing ancient migration routes. In addition, our results evidence the important role of the Iranian plateau as source and recipient of gene flow between culturally and genetically distinct populations.

  8. Fetal male lineage determination by analysis of Y-chromosome STR haplotype in maternal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Santa Rita, Ticiane Henriques; Chianca, Camilla Figueiredo; Velasco, Lara Francielle Ribeiro; de Sousa, Claudia Ferreira; Nery, Lídia Freire Abdalla; Costa, Sandra Santana Soares

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the fetus Y-STR haplotype in maternal plasma during pregnancy and estimate, non-invasively, if the alleged father and fetus belong to the same male lineage. The study enrolled couples with singleton pregnancies and known paternity. All participants signed informed consent and the local ethics committee approved the study. Peripheral blood was collected in EDTA tubes (mother) and in FTA paper (father). Maternal plasma DNA was extracted by using NucliSens EasyMAG. Fetal gender was determined by qPCR targeting DYS-14 in maternal plasma and it was also confirmed after the delivery. From all included volunteers, the first consecutive 20 mothers bearing male fetuses and 10 mothers bearing female fetuses were selected for the Y-STR analysis. The median gestational age was 12 weeks (range 12-36). All DNA samples were subjected to PCR amplification by PowerPlex Y23, ampFLSTR Yfiler, and two in-house multiplexes, which together accounts for 27 different Y-STR. The PCR products were detected with 3500 Genetic Analyzer and they were analyzed using GeneMapper-IDX. Fetuses' haplotypes (Yfiler format) were compared to other 5328 Brazilian haplotypes available on Y-chromosome haplotypes reference database (YHRD). As a result, between 22 and 27 loci were successfully amplified from maternal plasma in all 20 cases of male fetuses. None of the women bearing female fetuses had a falsely amplified Y-STR haplotype. The haplotype detected in maternal plasma completely matched the alleged father haplotype in 16 out of the 20 cases. Four cases showed single mismatches and they did not configure exclusions; 1 case showed a mutation in the DYS 458 locus due to the loss of one repeat unit and 3 cases showed one DYS 385I/II locus dropout. All mismatches were confirmed after the delivery. Seventeen fetuses' haplotypes were not found in YHRD and one of them had a mutation, which corresponded to the paternity probability of 99.9812% and 95.7028%, respectively

  9. Finding the founder of Stockholm - A kinship study based on Y-chromosomal, autosomal and mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Helena; Vretemark, Maria; Tillmar, Andreas;

    2012-01-01

    -chromosomal and autosomal SNPs and compared the results with haplogroup frequencies of modern Swedes to investigate paternal relations. Possible maternal kinship was investigated by deep FLX-sequencing of overlapping mtDNA amplicons. The authenticity of the sequences was examined using data from independent...... extractions, massive clonal data, the c-statistics, and real-time quantitative data. We show that the males carry the same Y-chromosomal haplogroup and thus we cannot reject a father-son type of relation. Further, as shown by the mtDNA analyses, none of the individuals are maternally related. We conclude that...

  10. Achilles, a New Family of Transcriptionally Active Retrotransposons from the Olive Fruit Fly, with Y Chromosome Preferential Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumani, Konstantina T.; Drosopoulou, Elena; Bourtzis, Kostas; Gariou-Papalexiou, Aggeliki; Mavragani-Tsipidou, Penelope; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Mathiopoulos, Kostas D.

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. The in depth exploration of their structure will improve our understanding of their origin and divergence (degeneration) as well as the evolution of genetic sex determination pathways which, most often are attributed to them. In Tephritids, the structure of Y chromosome, where the male-determining factor M is localized, is largely unexplored and limited data concerning its sequence content and evolution are available. In order to get insight into the structure and organization of the Y chromosome of the major olive insect pest, the olive fly Bactrocera oleae, we characterized sequences from a Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE)-isolated Y chromosome. Here, we report the discovery of the first olive fly LTR retrotransposon with increased presence on the Y chromosome. The element belongs to the BEL-Pao superfamily, however, its sequence comparison with the other members of the superfamily suggests that it constitutes a new family that we termed Achilles. Its ~7.5 kb sequence consists of the 5’LTR, the 5’non-coding sequence and the open reading frame (ORF), which encodes the polyprotein Gag-Pol. In situ hybridization to the B. oleae polytene chromosomes showed that Achilles is distributed in discrete bands dispersed on all five autosomes, in all centromeric regions and in the granular heterochromatic network corresponding to the mitotic sex chromosomes. The between sexes comparison revealed a variation in Achilles copy number, with male flies possessing 5–10 copies more than female (CI range: 18–38 and 12–33 copies respectively per genome). The examination of its transcriptional activity demonstrated the presence of at least one intact active copy in the genome, showing a differential level of expression between sexes as well as during embryonic development. The higher expression was detected in male germline tissues (testes). Moreover, the presence of Achilles-like elements in different

  11. Genetic Variation of 25 Y-Chromosomal and 15 Autosomal STR Loci in the Han Chinese Population of Liaoning Province, Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Wang, Bao-jie

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the genetic characteristics of 25 Y-chromosomal and 15 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci in 305 unrelated Han Chinese male individuals from Liaoning Province using AmpFISTR® Yfiler® Plus and IdentifilerTM PCR amplification kits. Population comparison was performed between Liaoning Han population and different ethnic groups to better understand the genetic background of the Liaoning Han population. For Y-STR loci, the overall haplotype diversity was 0.9997 and the discrimination capacity was 0.9607. Gene diversity values ranged from 0.4525 (DYS391) to 0.9617 (DYS385). Rst and two multi-dimensional scaling plots showed that minor differences were observed when the Liaoning Han population was compared to the Jilin Han Chinese, Beijing Han Chinese, Liaoning Manchu, Liaoning Mongolian, Liaoning Xibe, Shandong Han Chinese, Jiangsu Han Chinese, Anhui Han Chinese, Guizhou Han Chinese and Liaoning Hui populations; by contrast, major differences were observed when the Shanxi Han Chinese, Yunnan Bai, Jiangxi Han Chinese, Guangdong Han Chinese, Liaoning Korean, Hunan Tujia, Guangxi Zhuang, Gansu Tibetan, Xishuangbanna Dai, South Korean, Japanese and Hunan Miao populations. For autosomal STR loci, DP ranged from 0.9621 (D2S1338) to 0.8177 (TPOX), with PE distributing from 0.7521 (D18S51) to 0.2988 (TH01). A population comparison was performed and no statistically significant differences were detected at any STR loci between Liaoning Han, China Dong, and Shaanxi Han populations. The results showed that the 25 Y-STR and 15 autosomal STR loci in the Liaoning Han population were valuable for forensic applications and human genetics, and Liaoning Han was an independent endogenous ethnicity with a unique subpopulation structure. PMID:27483472

  12. Loss of Y-chromosome does not correlate with age at onset of head and neck carcinoma: a case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Veiga, L.C. [Departamento de Genética, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Bérgamo, N.A. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Reis, P.P. [Departamento de Cirurgia e Ortopedia, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Kowalski, L.P. [Departamento de Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço e Otorrinolaringologia, Hospital A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rogatto, S.R. [Laboratório NeoGene, Departamento de Urologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Pesquisa, Hospital A.C. Camargo,Fundação Antônio Prudente, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-01-20

    Loss of Y-chromosome has been correlated with older age in males. Furthermore, current evidence indicates that Y-chromosome loss also occurs in several human tumors, including head and neck carcinomas. However, the association between Y nullisomy and the occurrence of neoplasias in elderly men has not been well established. In the present study, the association between Y-chromosome loss and head and neck carcinomas was evaluated by comparison to cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal mucosa of cancer-free individuals matched for age using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization. Twenty-one patients ranging in age from 28 to 68 years were divided into five-year groups for comparison with 16 cancer-free individuals matched for age. The medical records of all patients were examined to obtain clinical and histopathological data. None of the patients had undergone radiotherapy or chemotherapy before surgery. In all groups, the frequency of Y-chromosome loss was higher among patients than among normal reference subjects (P < 0.0001) and was not age-dependent. These data suggest that Y-chromosome loss is a tumor-specific alteration not associated with advanced age in head and neck carcinomas.

  13. Loss of Y-chromosome does not correlate with age at onset of head and neck carcinoma: a case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss of Y-chromosome has been correlated with older age in males. Furthermore, current evidence indicates that Y-chromosome loss also occurs in several human tumors, including head and neck carcinomas. However, the association between Y nullisomy and the occurrence of neoplasias in elderly men has not been well established. In the present study, the association between Y-chromosome loss and head and neck carcinomas was evaluated by comparison to cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes and normal mucosa of cancer-free individuals matched for age using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization. Twenty-one patients ranging in age from 28 to 68 years were divided into five-year groups for comparison with 16 cancer-free individuals matched for age. The medical records of all patients were examined to obtain clinical and histopathological data. None of the patients had undergone radiotherapy or chemotherapy before surgery. In all groups, the frequency of Y-chromosome loss was higher among patients than among normal reference subjects (P < 0.0001) and was not age-dependent. These data suggest that Y-chromosome loss is a tumor-specific alteration not associated with advanced age in head and neck carcinomas

  14. Dissecting the influence of Neolithic demic diffusion on Indian Y-chromosome pool through J2-M172 haplogroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sakshi; Singh, Ashish; Rajkumar, Raja; Sampath Kumar, Katakam; Kadarkarai Samy, Subburaj; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Singh, Amita; Ahmed Sheikh, Shahnawaz; Peddada, Vidya; Khanna, Vinee; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Pandit, Aridaman; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2016-01-01

    The global distribution of J2-M172 sub-haplogroups has been associated with Neolithic demic diffusion. Two branches of J2-M172, J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 make a considerable part of Y chromosome gene pool of the Indian subcontinent. We investigated the Neolithic contribution of demic dispersal from West to Indian paternal lineages, which majorly consists of haplogroups of Late Pleistocene ancestry. To accomplish this, we have analysed 3023 Y-chromosomes from different ethnic populations, of which 355 belonged to J2-M172. Comparison of our data with worldwide data, including Y-STRs of 1157 individuals and haplogroup frequencies of 6966 individuals, suggested a complex scenario that cannot be explained by a single wave of agricultural expansion from Near East to South Asia. Contrary to the widely accepted elite dominance model, we found a substantial presence of J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 haplogroups in both caste and tribal populations of India. Unlike demic spread in Eurasia, our results advocate a unique, complex and ancient arrival of J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 haplogroups into Indian subcontinent. PMID:26754573

  15. Haplotype data of 23 Y-chromosome markers in Minnan Han Chinese and comparison with those of 12 Y-chromosome markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jie; Hu, Sheng-Ping

    2015-06-01

    We genotyped 23 Y-STR loci (DYS576, DYS389I, DYS448, DYS389II, DYS19, DYS391, DYS481, DYS549, DYS533, DYS438, DYS437, DYS570, DYS635, DYS390, DYS439, DYS392, DYS643, DYS393, DYS458, DYS385a/b, DYS456, and GATA-H4) in a sample of 109 unrelated male Chinese people residing in Minnan area and compared the results with those from our previous study on 12 Y-STR. The haplotype diversity and the discrimination capacity of the 23 Y-STR reached 0.9903 and 0.9725, respectively, and the genetic diversity for each locus ranged from 0.321 (DYS391) to 0.955 (DYS385). Besides, we observed a strong correlation between the number of Y-STR markers and the substantial improvement of forensic parameters used to discriminate between individuals. The results indicated that these highly polymorphic Y-STR markers were useful for human identification in forensic cases and paternity tests within the Minnan Han Chinese population. PMID:26072089

  16. Results of a collaborative study of the EDNAP group regarding the reproducibility and robustness of the Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS389 I and II, DYS390 and DYS393 in a PCR pentaplex format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo, A; Beckmann, A; Bengs, A; Brinkmann, B; Caglia, A; Capelli, C; Gill, P; Gusmão, L; Hagelberg, C; Hohoff, C; Hoste, B; Kihlgren, A; Kloosterman, A; Myhre Dupuy, B; Morling, N; O'Donnell, G; Parson, W; Phillips, C; Pouwels, M; Scheithauer, R; Schmitter, H; Schneider, P M; Schumm, J; Skitsa, I; Stradmann-Bellinghausen, B; Stuart, M; Syndercombe Court, D; Vide, C

    2001-06-01

    A collaborative exercise was carried out by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) in the frame work of the STADNAP program, i.e. standardization of DNA profiling in Europe, in order to evaluate the performance of a Y-chromosome STR pentaplex, which includes the loci DYS19, DYS389 I and II, DYS390 and DYS393 and to determine whether uniformity of results could be achieved among different European laboratories. Laboratories were asked to analyze the five Y-STRs using singleplex and multiplex conditions in three bloodstains and one mixed stain (95% female and 5% male). All the laboratories reported the same results even for the mixed stain included in the exercise. This demonstrates the reproducibility and robustness of Y-chromosome STR typing even with multiplex formats and proves the usefulness of Y-STR systems for analyzing mixed stains with a male component.A total of 930 male samples from 10 different populations from Europe were also analysed for all the loci included in the pentaplex. Eight of these ten populations also included haplotype data. As for single gene analysis, haplotype diversity was higher in Germany and Italy and lower in Western European countries and Finland. Pairwise haplotype analysis shows the Finnish departure from the rest of the populations and a relatively homogeneity in the other European populations with F(ST) estimates lower than 0.05.UPGMA analysis shows an association of Western European population (Ireland, UK, Portugal and Galicia) on the one hand and central European populations on the other. PMID:11348791

  17. Duration of reproductive utilization of mares from Purebred arabian and Shagya-arabian breed

    OpenAIRE

    Maya Popova

    2014-01-01

    An analysis was made of the reproductive utilization of mares from the Purebred Arabian and Shagya-Arabian breed in the only National State Stud Farm Kabiyuk near Shumen. Stud book records and the breeding registers for a 32-year period (1980-2012) were used for the analysis. Thirty-nine Purebred Arabian mares and 52 mares from the Shagya-Arabian breed were included in the study. It was established that the average (LS) age at first covering of the mares of Purebred Arabian breed was 1584,2 ±...

  18. A new physical mapping approach refines the sex-determining gene positions on the Silene latifolia Y-chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Yusuke; Ishii, Kotaro; Aonuma, Wataru; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Kawamoto, Hiroki; Koizumi, Ayako; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Chibalina, Margarita; Bergero, Roberta; Charlesworth, Deborah; Abe, Tomoko; Kawano, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Sex chromosomes are particularly interesting regions of the genome for both molecular genetics and evolutionary studies; yet, for most species, we lack basic information, such as the gene order along the chromosome. Because they lack recombination, Y-linked genes cannot be mapped genetically, leaving physical mapping as the only option for establishing the extent of synteny and homology with the X chromosome. Here, we developed a novel and general method for deletion mapping of non-recombining regions by solving “the travelling salesman problem”, and evaluate its accuracy using simulated datasets. Unlike the existing radiation hybrid approach, this method allows us to combine deletion mutants from different experiments and sources. We applied our method to a set of newly generated deletion mutants in the dioecious plant Silene latifolia and refined the locations of the sex-determining loci on its Y chromosome map.

  19. Enzymatic amplification of a Y chromosome repeat in a single blastomere allows identification of the sex of preimplantation mouse embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been adapted to identify the sex of preimplantation mouse embryos rapidly. PCR was used to amplify a specific repeated DNA sequence on the Y chromosome from a single isolated blastomere in under 12 hr. The remainder of the biopsied embryo was then transferred to a pseudopregnant female and carried to term. Using this technique, 72% of embryos can be classed as potentially either male or female. Transfers of such embryos have produced pregnancies with 8/8 fetuses (100%) being of the predicted sex. Variations of the technique have demonstrated certain limitations to the present procedure as well as indicated possible strategies for improvement of the assay. The PCR technique may have wide application in the genetic analysis of preimplantation embryos

  20. Improving global and regional resolution of male lineage differentiation by simple single-copy Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Vermeulen (Mark); A. Wollstein (Andreas); K. van der Gaag (Kristiaan); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); Y. Xue (Yali); Q. Wang (Qiuju); L. Roewer (Lutz); H. Knoblauch (Hans); C. Tyler-Smith (Chris); P. de Knijff (Peter); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe analyzed 67 short tandem repeat polymorphisms from the non-recombining part of the Y-chromosome (Y-STRs), including 49 rarely studied simple single-copy (ss)Y-STRs and 18 widely used Y-STRs, in 590 males from 51 populations belonging to 8 worldwide regions (HGDP-CEPH panel). Although

  1. The prevalence of azoospermia factor microdeletion on the Y chromosome of Chinese infertile men detected by multi-analyte suspension array technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Jian Zhu; Si-Yao Liu; Huan Wang; Ping Wei; Xian-Ping Ding

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To develop a high-throughput multiplex, fast and simple assay to scan azoospermia factor (AZF) region microdeletions on the Y chromosome and establish the prevalence of Y chromosomal microdeletions in Chinese infertile males with azoospermia or oligozoospermia. Methods: In total, 178 infertile patients with azoospemua (non-obstructed), 134 infertile patients with oligozoospermia as well as 40 fertile man controls were included in the present study. The samples were screened for AZF microdeletion using optimized multi-analyte suspension array (MASA) technology. Results: Of the 312 patients, 36 (11.5%) were found to have deletions in the AZF region. The microdeletion frequency was 14% (25/178) in the azoospermia group and 8.2% (11/134) in the oligospennia group. Among 36 patients with microdeletions, 19 had deletions in the AZFc region, seven had deletions in AZFa and six had deletions in AZFb. In addition, four patients had both AZFb and AZFc deletions. No deletion in the AZF region was found in the 40 fertile controls. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of Y chromosomal microdeletions in Chinese infertile males with azoospermia or oligozoospermia. The MASA technology, which has been established in the present study,provides a sensitive and high-throughput method for detecting the deletion of the Y chromosome. And the results suggest that genetic screening should be advised to infertile men before starting assisted reproductive treatments.

  2. Novel Y-chromosomal microdeletions associated with non-obstructive azoospermia uncovered by high throughput sequencing of sequence-tagged sites (STSs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Li, Zesong; Su, Zheng; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Honggang; Xie, Jun; Xu, Hanshi; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Liya; Zhang, Ruifang; Zeng, Xiaojing; Xu, Huaiqian; Huang, Yi; Mou, Lisha; Hu, Jingchu; Qian, Weiping; Zeng, Yong; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xiong, Chengliang; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Cai, Zhiming; Wang, Jun; Gui, Yaoting

    2016-01-01

    Y-chromosomal microdeletion (YCM) serves as an important genetic factor in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is routinely used to detect YCMs by tracing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) in the Y chromosome. Here we introduce a novel methodology in which we sequence 1,787 (post-filtering) STSs distributed across the entire male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) in parallel to uncover known and novel YCMs. We validated this approach with 766 Chinese men with NOA and 683 ethnically matched healthy individuals and detected 481 and 98 STSs that were deleted in the NOA and control group, representing a substantial portion of novel YCMs which significantly influenced the functions of spermatogenic genes. The NOA patients tended to carry more and rarer deletions that were enriched in nearby intragenic regions. Haplogroup O2* was revealed to be a protective lineage for NOA, in which the enrichment of b1/b3 deletion in haplogroup C was also observed. In summary, our work provides a new high-resolution portrait of deletions in the Y chromosome. PMID:26907467

  3. AB039. Novel Y-chromosomal microdeletions associated with non-obstructive azoospermia uncovered by high throughput sequencing of sequence-tagged sites (STSs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zesong

    2016-01-01

    Y-chromosomal microdeletion (YCM) serves as an important genetic factor in non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is routinely used to detect YCMs by tracing sequence-tagged sites (STSs) in the Y chromosome. Here we introduce a novel methodology in which we sequence 1,787 (post-filtering) STSs distributed across the entire male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) in parallel to uncover known and novel YCMs. We validated this approach with 766 Chinese men with NOA and 683 ethnically matched healthy individuals and detected 481 and 98 STSs that were deleted in the NOA and control group, representing a substantial portion of novel YCMs which significantly influenced the functions of spermatogenic genes. The NOA patients tended to carry more and rarer deletions that were enriched in nearby intragenic regions. Haplogroup O2* was revealed to be a protective lineage for NOA, in which the enrichment of b1/b3 deletion in haplogroup C was also observed. In summary, our work provides a new high-resolution portrait of deletions in the Y chromosome.

  4. Human migration through bottlenecks from Southeast Asia into East Asia during Last Glacial Maximum revealed by Y chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Cai

    Full Text Available Molecular anthropological studies of the populations in and around East Asia have resulted in the discovery that most of the Y-chromosome lineages of East Asians came from Southeast Asia. However, very few Southeast Asian populations had been investigated, and therefore, little was known about the purported migrations from Southeast Asia into East Asia and their roles in shaping the genetic structure of East Asian populations. Here, we present the Y-chromosome data from 1,652 individuals belonging to 47 Mon-Khmer (MK and Hmong-Mien (HM speaking populations that are distributed primarily across Southeast Asia and extend into East Asia. Haplogroup O3a3b-M7, which appears mainly in MK and HM, indicates a strong tie between the two groups. The short tandem repeat network of O3a3b-M7 displayed a hierarchical expansion structure (annual ring shape, with MK haplotypes being located at the original point, and the HM and the Tibeto-Burman haplotypes distributed further away from core of the network. Moreover, the East Asian dominant haplogroup O3a3c1-M117 shows a network structure similar to that of O3a3b-M7. These patterns indicate an early unidirectional diffusion from Southeast Asia into East Asia, which might have resulted from the genetic drift of East Asian ancestors carrying these two haplogroups through many small bottle-necks formed by the complicated landscape between Southeast Asia and East Asia. The ages of O3a3b-M7 and O3a3c1-M117 were estimated to be approximately 19 thousand years, followed by the emergence of the ancestors of HM lineages out of MK and the unidirectional northward migrations into East Asia.

  5. Validation of a combined autosomal/Y-chromosomal STR approach for analyzing typical biological stains in sexual-assault cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purps, Josephine; Geppert, Maria; Nagy, Marion; Roewer, Lutz

    2015-11-01

    DNA testing is an established part of the investigation and prosecution of sexual assault. The primary purpose of DNA evidence is to identify a suspect and/or to demonstrate sexual contact. However, due to highly uneven proportions of female and male DNA in typical stains, routine autosomal analysis often fails to detect the DNA of the assailant. To evaluate the forensic efficiency of the combined application of autosomal and Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) markers, we present a large retrospective casework study of probative evidence collected in sexual-assault cases. We investigated up to 39 STR markers by testing combinations of the 16-locus NGMSElect kit with both the 23-locus PowerPlex Y23 and the 17-locus Yfiler kit. Using this dual approach we analyzed DNA extracts from 2077 biological stains collected in 287 cases over 30 months. To assess the outcome of the combined approach in comparison to stand-alone autosomal analysis we evaluated informative DNA profiles. Our investigation revealed that Y-STR analysis added up to 21% additional, highly informative (complete, single-source) profiles to the set of reportable autosomal STR profiles for typical stains collected in sexual-assault cases. Detection of multiple male contributors was approximately three times more likely with Y-chromosomal profiling than with autosomal STR profiling. In summary, 1/10 cases would have remained inconclusive (and could have been dismissed) if Y-STR analysis had been omitted from DNA profiling in sexual-assault cases. PMID:26280567

  6. A pedigree-based study of mitochondrial D-loop DNA sequence variation among Arabian horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowling, A T; Del Valle, A; Bowling, M

    2000-02-01

    Through DNA sequence comparisons of a mitochondrial D-loop hypervariable region, we investigated matrilineal diversity for Arabian horses in the United States. Sixty-two horses were tested. From published pedigrees they traced in the maternal line to 34 mares acquired primarily in the mid to late 19th century from nomadic Bedouin tribes. Compared with the reference sequence (GenBank X79547), these samples showed 27 haplotypes with altogether 31 base substitution sites within 397 bp of sequence. Based on examination of pedigrees from a random sampling of 200 horses in current studbooks of the Arabian Horse Registry of America, we estimated that this study defined the expected mtDNA haplotypes for at least 89% of Arabian horses registered in the US. The reliability of the studbook recorded maternal lineages of Arabian pedigrees was demonstrated by haplotype concordance among multiple samplings in 14 lines. Single base differences observed within two maternal lines were interpreted as representing alternative fixations of past heteroplasmy. The study also demonstrated the utility of mtDNA sequence studies to resolve historical maternity questions without access to biological material from the horses whose relationship was in question, provided that representatives of the relevant female lines were available for comparison. The data call into question the traditional assumption that Arabian horses of the same strain necessarily share a common maternal ancestry. PMID:10690354

  7. Afghanistan's ethnic groups share a y-chromosomal heritage structured by historical events

    OpenAIRE

    Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel E; Ashrafian Bonab, Maziar; Youhanna, Sonia C.; Soria-Hernanz, David F; Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Douaihy, Bouchra; Ghassibe-Sabbagh, Michella; Rafatpanah, Hoshang; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Whale, John; Balanovsky, Oleg; Wells, R. Spencer; Comas, David; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Afghanistan has held a strategic position throughout history. It has been inhabited since the Paleolithic and later became a crossroad for expanding civilizations and empires. Afghanistan's location, history, and diverse ethnic groups present a unique opportunity to explore how nations and ethnic groups emerged, and how major cultural evolutions and technological developments in human history have influenced modern population structures. In this study we have analyzed, for the first time, the...

  8. Genetic polymorphisms of 17 Y chromosomal STRs in She and Manchu ethnic populations from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Rufeng; Liu, Yaju; Lv, Xiaojiao; Shi, Meisen; Ma, Shuhua

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the utility of Yfiler haplotype for DNA testing in two ethnic populations of China, a sample of 413 unrelated individuals (152 Shes and 261 Manchus) was determined. In the She and Manchu populations, the haplotype diversity was 0.9990 and 0.9988, respectively, and the discrimination capacity was 0.9474 and 0.9080, respectively. Research results will be valuable for human identification and paternity tests in the two minority regions and for Chinese population genetic study in the future. PMID:26896052

  9. Allele frequencies and population data for 11 Y-chromosome STRs in samples from Eastern Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrejčíková, Eva; Soták, Miroslav; Bernasovská, Jarmila; Bernasovský, Ivan; Rębała, Krzysztof; Sovičová, Adriana; Boroňová, Iveta; Bôžiková, Alexandra; Gabriková, Dana; Svíčková, Petra; Mačeková, Soňa; Carnogurská, Jana; Lohaj, Roman; Vlček, Dávid

    2011-06-01

    Haplotype data of 11 Y-STR loci (DYS391, DYS389I, DYS439, DYS389II, DYS438, DYS437, DYS19, DYS392, DYS393, DYS390 and DYS385) was obtained from 629 Slovak Caucasian men living in Eastern Slovakia. A total of 474 haplotypes were identified, of which 395 were unique. The haplotype diversity value was 0.9982. Pairwise haplotype distances showed that the Eastern Slovak Caucasian population is not significantly different from the Slavs populations and is separated from the Balkan nations and the German speaking populations. PMID:20837407

  10. Continent-wide decoupling of Y-chromosomal genetic variation from language and geography in native South Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Roewer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies of human populations in Europe and Asia have revealed a concordance between their extant genetic structure and the prevailing regional pattern of geography and language. For native South Americans, however, such evidence has been lacking so far. Therefore, we examined the relationship between Y-chromosomal genotype on the one hand, and male geographic origin and linguistic affiliation on the other, in the largest study of South American natives to date in terms of sampled individuals and populations. A total of 1,011 individuals, representing 50 tribal populations from 81 settlements, were genotyped for up to 17 short tandem repeat (STR markers and 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs, the latter resolving phylogenetic lineages Q and C. Virtually no structure became apparent for the extant Y-chromosomal genetic variation of South American males that could sensibly be related to their inter-tribal geographic and linguistic relationships. This continent-wide decoupling is consistent with a rapid peopling of the continent followed by long periods of isolation in small groups. Furthermore, for the first time, we identified a distinct geographical cluster of Y-SNP lineages C-M217 (C3* in South America. Such haplotypes are virtually absent from North and Central America, but occur at high frequency in Asia. Together with the locally confined Y-STR autocorrelation observed in our study as a whole, the available data therefore suggest a late introduction of C3* into South America no more than 6,000 years ago, perhaps via coastal or trans-Pacific routes. Extensive simulations revealed that the observed lack of haplogroup C3* among extant North and Central American natives is only compatible with low levels of migration between the ancestor populations of C3* carriers and non-carriers. In summary, our data highlight the fact that a pronounced correlation between genetic and geographic/cultural structure can only be expected under

  11. Continent-Wide Decoupling of Y-Chromosomal Genetic Variation from Language and Geography in Native South Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmão, Leonor; Gomes, Veronica; González, Miguel; Corach, Daniel; Sala, Andrea; Alechine, Evguenia; Palha, Teresinha; Santos, Ney; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea; Geppert, Maria; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Zweynert, Sarah; Baeta, Miriam; Núñez, Carolina; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; González-Andrade, Fabricio; Fagundes de Carvalho, Elizeu; da Silva, Dayse Aparecida; Builes, Juan José; Turbón, Daniel; Lopez Parra, Ana Maria; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Toscanini, Ulises; Borjas, Lisbeth; Barletta, Claudia; Ewart, Elizabeth; Santos, Sidney; Krawczak, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies of human populations in Europe and Asia have revealed a concordance between their extant genetic structure and the prevailing regional pattern of geography and language. For native South Americans, however, such evidence has been lacking so far. Therefore, we examined the relationship between Y-chromosomal genotype on the one hand, and male geographic origin and linguistic affiliation on the other, in the largest study of South American natives to date in terms of sampled individuals and populations. A total of 1,011 individuals, representing 50 tribal populations from 81 settlements, were genotyped for up to 17 short tandem repeat (STR) markers and 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs), the latter resolving phylogenetic lineages Q and C. Virtually no structure became apparent for the extant Y-chromosomal genetic variation of South American males that could sensibly be related to their inter-tribal geographic and linguistic relationships. This continent-wide decoupling is consistent with a rapid peopling of the continent followed by long periods of isolation in small groups. Furthermore, for the first time, we identified a distinct geographical cluster of Y-SNP lineages C-M217 (C3*) in South America. Such haplotypes are virtually absent from North and Central America, but occur at high frequency in Asia. Together with the locally confined Y-STR autocorrelation observed in our study as a whole, the available data therefore suggest a late introduction of C3* into South America no more than 6,000 years ago, perhaps via coastal or trans-Pacific routes. Extensive simulations revealed that the observed lack of haplogroup C3* among extant North and Central American natives is only compatible with low levels of migration between the ancestor populations of C3* carriers and non-carriers. In summary, our data highlight the fact that a pronounced correlation between genetic and geographic/cultural structure can only be expected under very specific

  12. The nitrogen cycle in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bange, H.W.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Codispoti, L.A.

    Despite their importance for the global oceanic nitrogen (N) cycle, estimates of N fluxes in the Arabian Sea remain in considerable uncertainty. In this report, we summarize current knowledge of important processes, including denitrification, N sub...

  13. Salinity extrema in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S; Shetye, S; Gouveia, A.D.; Michael, G.S

    Levitus (1982) climatology has been used to identify four extrema, three maxima and one minimum, in the vertical salinity profiles in the Arabian Sea. Their geographical distribution, depths, theta-S characteristics, and seasonal variability...

  14. Primary productivity of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pant, A.

    Reversal of surface circulation during the monsoons, patchy nutrient distributions and high light intensity drive phytoplankton production processes in the tropical Arabian Sea. Available data are discussed in the light of these driving phenomena...

  15. Living coccolithophorids from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Mohan, R.; Muralinath, A.S.

    Coccolithophorids collected from the euphotic zone in the Arabian Sea during the tail end of summer monsoon (Sept. 20 to Oct. 06, 1992) were studied. Nineteen species were recorded, most abundant among them were, Emiliania buxleyi, Umbellosphaera...

  16. Submarine physiography off Lakshadweep Islands, Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chauhan, O.S; Chaubey, A

    Analysis of echosoundings, side scan sonar and shallow seismic data, supplementEd. by 152 sediment samples, collected along 150 km around Lakshadweep Islands, Arabian Sea, revealed that the islands have a very narrow shelf, and an abrupt, shelf...

  17. Travelers' Health: MERS in the Arabian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arabian Peninsula View Larger Map Cases of MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) have been identified in multiple countries ... 7100). Additional Information: MERS Health Advisory Poster CDC Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) ...

  18. Travelers' Health: MERS in the Arabian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Travelers’ Health website for more information on healthy travel. Health care workers People who are traveling to provide health care services in the Arabian Peninsula should review CDC’s recommendations for infection control of confirmed or ...

  19. Presentation of 17 Y-chromosomal STRs in the population of the Sverdlovsk region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trynova, Elena G; Tsitovich, Tamara N; Vylegzhanina, Elena Ya; Bandurenko, Natalija A; Parson, Walther

    2011-06-01

    We established a data set of 17 Y-STRs (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS438, DYS439, DYS437, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y-GATA-H4) of 832 unrelated males from the Sverdlovsk region, Russian Federation. In total we observed 773 different haplotypes of which 732 were unique and 41 occurred between two and nine times in the investigated population. The haplotype diversity was 0.9981 and the discrimination capacity was 0.9291. This study represents the Y-STR reference data set for forensic applications in the Sverdlovsk region. PMID:21277273

  20. The development on polymorphism of Y-chromosome in human%人类Y染色体基因多态性研究初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李林洁; 单可人; 杨明; 官志忠

    2011-01-01

    Y chromosome is the only human chromosome which is paternally inherited. Its haplogroup is almost fully conserved, and is easy to be identified and to be used, which has resulted in more and more academic studies related to Y chromosomes. In this article , we will review its genetic characteristics, genetic markers, and its application in anthropology and association with human diseases.%Y染色体作为人类惟一的父系遗传的染色体,单倍群保存完整并且易于鉴定和使用,在基因多态性的研究中的重要性日益受到人们的关注.本文就Y染色体的遗传特征、现在常用的遗传标记以及在人类学和疾病相关性的应用作一综述.

  1. Experimental population genetics of meiotic drive systems. I. Pseudo-Y chromosomal drive as a means of eliminating cage populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental population genetics of Y-chromosome drive in Drosophila melanogaster is approximated by studying the behavior of T(Y;2),SD lines. These exhibit ''pseudo-Y'' drive through the effective coupling of the Y chromosome to the second chromosome meiotic drive locus, segregation distorter (SD). T(Y;2),SD males consequently produce only male offspring. When such lines are allowed to compete against structurally normal SD+ flies in population cages, T(Y;2),SD males increase in frequency according to the dynamics of a simple haploid selection model until the cage population is eliminated as a result of a deficiency in the number of adult females. Cage population extinction generally occurs within about seven generations

  2. Population data for 17 Y-chromosome STRs in a sample from Apulia (Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piglionica, M; Baldassarra, S Lonero; Giardina, E; Stella, A; D'Ovidio, F D; Frati, P; Lenato, G M; Resta, N; Dell'Erba, A

    2013-01-01

    The 17 Y-STR loci included in the AmpFLSTR Yfiler PCR Amplification Kit were analyzed in 98 unrelated healthy males from Apulia (Southern Italy). A total of 97 different haplotypes were identified, of which 96 haplotypes were unique and 1 occurred twice. Allele frequencies for each Y-STR locus in pooled sample and estimated value of gene diversity (GD) were evaluated. The lowest value of GD was observed for DYS392 (0.126) and the highest one (0.936) for DYS385. The HD (haplotype diversity) for the studied Y-STR set showed a value of 0.9994, with an HMP (haplotype match probability) value of 0.0006, while the overall DC was 98.98%. Microvariant alleles were found for the DYS458 and DYS385 markers and sequenced. Furthermore, Φ(st)-based genetic distance computation and pair-wise analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) test were carried out. When comparing our population with the Apulia sample previously investigated, the AMOVA analysis detected no evidence for significant differentiation. The comparison with all Italian populations submitted to the YHRD website showed no relevant differences with all Southern Italian populations (San Giorgio La Molara, Belvedere, Trapani and Catania) and significant genetic deviation with all Northern Italian populations (Udine, Biella, La Spezia, Modena, Ravenna, Marche and North Sardinia). Moreover, the other populations and meta-populations belonging to the whole Mediterranean area (Croatia, Macedonia, Albania, Greece, Turkey, Israel, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco and Spain) were different from our Apulia sample. The data were submitted to YHRD. PMID:22960096

  3. Characterisation of novel and rare Y-chromosome short tandem repeat alleles in self-declared South Australian Aboriginal database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Tegan E; Ottens, Renee; Ballantyne, Kaye N; Nagle, Nano; Henry, Julianne; Taylor, Duncan; Gardner, Michael G; Fitch, Alison J; Goodman, Amanda; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Mitchell, R John; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Y-chromosome short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are used in forensic science laboratories all over the world, as their application is wide and often vital in solving casework. Analysis of an in-house database of South Australian self-declared Aboriginal males held by Forensic Science South Australia (FSSA) using the Applied Biosystem's AmpFℓSTR® Yfiler™ PCR Amplification Kit revealed 43 variant Y-STR alleles at 6 of the 17 loci. All variant alleles were sequenced to determine the exact repeat structure for each. As a high level of admixture has previously been found within the SA Aboriginal database, samples were haplogrouped using Y-SNPs to determine their likely geographical origin. Although a number of variant alleles were associated with non-Aboriginal Y-haplogroups, a high frequency was observed within the Australian K-M9 lineage. Detailed knowledge of these variant alleles may have further application in the development of new DNA markers for identification purposes, and in population and evolutionary studies of Australian Aborigines. PMID:24048501

  4. The testis and ovary transcriptomes of the rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus: A bony fish with a unique neo Y chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The rock bream (Oplegnathus fasciatus is considerably one of the most economically important marine fish in East Asia and has a unique neo-Y chromosome system that is a good model to study the sex determination and differentiation in fish. In the present study, we used Illumina sequencing technology (HiSeq2000 to sequence, assemble and annotate the transcriptome of the testis and ovary tissues of rock bream. A total of 40,004,378 (NCBI SRA database SRX1406649 and 53,108,992 (NCBI SRA database SRX1406648 high quality reads were obtained from testis and ovary RNA sequencing, respectively, and 60,421 contigs (with average length of 1301 bp were obtained after de novo assembling with Trinity software. Digital gene expression analysis reveals 14,036 contigs that show gender-enriched expressional profile with either testis-enriched (237 contigs or ovary-enriched (581 contigs with RPKM >100. There are 237 male- and 582 female-abundant expressed genes that show sex dimorphic expression. We hope that the gonad transcriptome and those gender-enriched transcripts of rock bream can provide some insight into the understanding of genome-wide transcriptome profile of teleost gonad tissue and give useful information in fish gonad development.

  5. Genetic investigation of biological materials from patients after stem cell transplantation based on autosomal as well as Y-chromosomal markers

    OpenAIRE

    Jacewicz, Renata; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Rupa-Matysek, Joanna; Jedrzejczyk, Maciej; Komarnicki, Mieczysław; Berent, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    The authors presented the results of DNA polymorphism investigation of blood, buccal swabs and hair follicles originating from patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The real-time and multiplex assays based on polymerase chain reaction within the range of autosomal as well as Y-chromosomal markers were applied to assess the possible dangers arising from investigation of these materials in forensic genetics. The results revealed that not only post-transplant blood a...

  6. Y-Chromosome and mtDNA Genetics Reveal Significant Contrasts in Affinities of Modern Middle Eastern Populations with European and African Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Badro, Danielle A.; Haber, Marc; Soria-Hernanz, David F

    2013-01-01

    The Middle East was a funnel of human expansion out of Africa, a staging area for the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution, and the home to some of the earliest world empires. Post LGM expansions into the region and subsequent population movements created a striking genetic mosaic with distinct sex-based genetic differentiation. While prior studies have examined the mtDNA and Y-chromosome contrast in focal populations in the Middle East, none have undertaken a broad-spectrum survey including Nor...

  7. Similar Distributions of Dupuytren's Contracture and Y-Chromosome Haplogroup I Among Modern Europeans Suggest Simultaneous Spreading of These Traits Some 40 to 10 KYA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Sven; Samarzija, Zdenko

    2016-04-01

    A proposition is made that when two independent traits show similar regional patterns of incidence among modern European regions, a plausible expectation is that these two, otherwise unrelated traits, have simultaneously been spread by migration of our ancestors. As a potential example for the proposed concept, distribution of patients with Dupuytren's contracture is here compared with the reported European distribution of Y-Chromosome Haplogroup I, a genetic marker linked to the last glaciation period. PMID:27301240

  8. Pasture names with Romance and Slavic roots facilitate dissection of Y chromosome variation in an exclusively German-speaking alpine region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Niederstätter

    Full Text Available The small alpine district of East Tyrol (Austria has an exceptional demographic history. It was contemporaneously inhabited by members of the Romance, the Slavic and the Germanic language groups for centuries. Since the Late Middle Ages, however, the population of the principally agrarian-oriented area is solely Germanic speaking. Historic facts about East Tyrol's colonization are rare, but spatial density-distribution analysis based on the etymology of place-names has facilitated accurate spatial mapping of the various language groups' former settlement regions. To test for present-day Y chromosome population substructure, molecular genetic data were compared to the information attained by the linguistic analysis of pasture names. The linguistic data were used for subdividing East Tyrol into two regions of former Romance (A and Slavic (B settlement. Samples from 270 East Tyrolean men were genotyped for 17 Y-chromosomal microsatellites (Y-STRs and 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs. Analysis of the probands' surnames revealed no evidence for spatial genetic structuring. Also, spatial autocorrelation analysis did not indicate significant correlation between genetic (Y-STR haplotypes and geographic distance. Haplogroup R-M17 chromosomes, however, were absent in region A, but constituted one of the most frequent haplogroups in region B. The R-M343 (R1b clade showed a marked and complementary frequency distribution pattern in these two regions. To further test East Tyrol's modern Y-chromosomal landscape for geographic patterning attributable to the early history of settlement in this alpine area, principal coordinates analysis was performed. The Y-STR haplotypes from region A clearly clustered with those of Romance reference populations and the samples from region B matched best with Germanic speaking reference populations. The combined use of onomastic and molecular genetic data revealed and mapped the marked structuring of the distribution

  9. Y-chromosome STRs DYS385, DYS19, DYS389-I and II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392 and DYS393 in five African populations

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, V; Carvalho, M; Antunes, S.; Anjos, M. J.; Andrade, L.; Santos, M. V.; Corte-Real, F.; Vieira, D. N.; Gamero, J. J.; Vide, M. C.

    2003-01-01

    Background: The Y chromosome has been used to compare the relationship between populations, representing a rich source of potential information to trace paternal lineages and providing a record of our relatedness. Among different population groups, African populations seem to be very interesting to study, considering the theory of the origin of modern humans and the ethnic variability usually existing. Methods: Five male populations from Angola (n=48), Cap Verde (n=47), Guinea-Bissau (n=32), ...

  10. The Low Prevalence of Y Chromosomal Microdeletions is Observed in the Oligozoospermic Men in the Area of Mato Grosso State and Amazonian Region of Brazilian Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gleice Cristina dos Santos Godoy; Bianca Borsatto Galera; Claudinéia Araujo; Jacklyne Silva Barbosa; Max Fernando de Pinho; Marcial Francis Galera; Sebastião Freitas de Medeiros

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions on Y chromosome in infertile patients with oligozoospermia or azoospermia in Mato Grosso state, Brazil. METHODS This cross-sectional study enrolled 94 men from infertile couples. Karyotype analysis was performed by lymphocyte culture technique. DNA from each sample was extracted using non-enzymatic method. Microdeletions were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). RESULTS With the use of cytogeneti...

  11. X- and Y-chromosome specific variants of the amelogenin gene allow sex determination in sheep (Ovis aries and European red deer (Cervus elaphus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenig B

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simple and precise methods for sex determination in animals are a pre-requisite for a number of applications in animal production and forensics. However, some of the existing methods depend only on the detection of Y-chromosome specific sequences. Therefore, the abscence of a signal does not necessarily mean that the sample is of female origin, because experimental errors can also lead to negative results. Thus, the detection of Y- and X-chromosome specific sequences is advantageous. Results A novel method for sex identification in mammals (sheep, Ovis aries and European red deer, Cervus elaphus is described, using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing of a part of the amelogenin gene. A partial sequence of the amelogenin gene of sheep and red deer was obtained, which exists on both X and Y chromosomes with a deletion region on the Y chromosome. With a specific pair of primers a DNA fragment of different length between the male and female mammal was amplified. Conclusion PCR amplification using the amelogenin gene primers is useful in sex identification of samples from sheep and red deer and can be applied to DNA analysis of micro samples with small amounts of DNA such as hair roots as well as bones or embryo biopsies.

  12. Analysis of Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism in an Iranian Sadat population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, M R; Sokhansanj, A; Naghizadeh, M A; Farazmand, A

    2009-08-01

    The molecular genotyping of individuals and reconstruction of kinship through short and highly polymorphic DNA markers, so called short tandem repeats (STR), has become one of the important and efficient methods in anthropology studies and forensic science. Although many populations have been analyzed, no study has yet been carried out on Sadat populations who are putative descendents of Prophet Mohammad (peace be upon him). Polymorphisms of 6 Y-STR loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS392, and DYS393) have been studied in an unrelated population of Sadat males. The aim of this study was to find possible similarities within Sadat males, resided in Iran. Among Sadat, DYS385b was proved to be the most polymorphic (GD = 0.8588), and DYS392 showed the lowest polymorphism (GD = 0.3527). In 50 samples, 45 different haplotypes were found, of which 39 haplotypes were unique. In the study, three samples had multi-allelic patterns. Haplotype diversity, in regard to these 7 markers was 0.9942. PMID:19769300

  13. Distribution of Y chromosomal STRs loci in Mayan and Mestizo populations from Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Luis J; Saiz, María; Alvarez-Cubero, María J; Gómez-Martín, Antonio; Alvarez, Juan C; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Lorente, José A

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a sample of 225 Guatemalan males, comprising 115 Mestizo-Guatemalan and 110 Mayan-Guatemalan, was typed for 17 Y-short tandem repeats (STRs) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, YGATA_H4.1 and DYS385a/b). The haplotype diversity (H=1) and discrimination capacity (96.86%) were calculated. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) demonstrated a low but significant interpopulation differentiation when compared with the results obtained when we confront the Mestizo and Mayan populations with the European populations. Furthermore, the genetic variability and differences among the American, African, Asian, and European populations were analyzed with the software Statistica 9.1. In addition, the genetic distances were also calculated using other published data. Reynolds and Slatkińs genetic distance was visualized using the multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis. All the analysis performed locates the Mayan population next to the Native American population, while Guatemalan-Mestizo population was found to be between these populations and the European population, similar to other Mestizo one. The implementation of the estimation of individual ancestry proportions of the whole population sample showed the presence of two well-differentiated population groups. PMID:21565570

  14. 广西仫佬族Y染色体和mtDNA的遗传结构分析%Genetic analysis of Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA polymorphism of Mulam ethnic group in Guangxi, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓庆; 王传超; 邓琼英; 李辉

    2013-01-01

    文章对我国广西仫佬族91 个无关男性个体Y-STR、Y-SNP、mtDNA HVS-Ⅰ和mtDNA-SNP 等进行检测分型,探索仫佬族的分子遗传结构.结果显示:Y 染色体单倍群O1a1-P203 和O2a1*-M95 在仫佬族中为高频单倍群,利用Y-STR 构建的N-J 树中仫佬族与侗族聚类,说明在父系遗传上仫佬族与侗族遗传关系较近;mtDNA 中F1a、M*、B4a、B5a 等4 类单倍群高频出现,体现出仫佬族在母系遗传方面具有典型的东亚南方群体特征.17 个Y-STR 位点和mtDNA HVS-Ⅰ具有丰富的遗传多态性,在群体遗传学和法医学方面具有应用前景.%In order to study the molecular genetic structure of Mulam ethnic group in Guangxi, China, Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA)polymorphisms were genotyped. High frequencies of the Y chromosome haplogroups Olal-P203 and O2al*-M95 were found in Mulam, exhibiting a pattern similar to the neighboring indigenous populations, especially the Daic populations. MtDNA lineages Fla, M*, B4a, B5a, M7b, and N9a were found in Mulam, which always present at high frequencies among the populations of East Asia. Mulam exhibits genetic characteristics of southern Chinese in both paternal and maternal lineages. Multiplex detection of the 17 Y-STR loci and mtDNA HVS-I revealed the distribution of highly genetic diversity in Mulam, which would have potential application in population genetics and forensic practice.

  15. 中国西北部5个民族群体Y染色体遗传分析%Genetic analysis of Y-chromosomes in five ethnic groups from Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨亚军; 安黎哲; 谢小冬; 徐玖瑾

    2008-01-01

    Variations of seventeen Y-chromosomal DNA polymorphisms, one microsatellite (DYSig),and sixteen biallelic markers were studied in 403 males from Northwest China.133 individuals from Dongxiang, 56 males from Yugu and 78 individuals from Bao'an were selected to evaluate the degree of differentiation in this region, and males from neighboring areas such as the Hui (66 males) and Han (70 males) populations were also typed. For single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, a method using the RFLP technology was applied. In addition to these 15 SNPs, the Y-chromosomal biallelic Alu repeat insertion DYS287 (YAP) was tested by agarose gel electrophoresis. The result shows that, among the 16 biallelic SNP/Alu systems, only seven markers, including Mg, 92R7, SRY1532, RPS4Y, 12F2, L1Y and DYS287 (YAP) were found to be polymorphic in the five population samples except tat, LLY22g, M20,SRY+465, Apt, SRY8299, SYS1, 47z, and SRY2627, for their diversities were absent in the five popula-tions. A total number of nine different haplogroups (1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 13, 16 and 26) for Y-chromosomal biallelic polymorphisms were identified among the five populations studied. Of these, nine haplogroups were present in Hui's, eight in Dongxiangs and Han respectively, seven in Bao'ans and Yugns respectively.%研究了来自中国西北部甘肃省的5个民族群体的403个男性个体的Y染色体遗传特征,其中3个为甘肃省特有少数民族:东乡族(133人)、裕固族(56人)、保安族(78人).另外,还有回族(66人)和汉族(70人).研究共涉及Y染色体上的17个遗传多态位点,其中1个是微卫星(DYS19).另外,有16个位点是单核苷酸多态位点,包括M9,92R7,SRY1532,Tat,LLY22g,SRY2627,RPS4Y,12F2,SRY8299,SY81,M20, L1Y,SRY+465,47Z,APT和DYS287(YAP).除了插入片段多态位点DYS287(YAP)使用琼脂糖直接检测外,其余位点均采用PCR-RFLP方法研究.在所研究的5个群体中,仅有7个单核苷酸M9,92R7,SRY1532,RPS4Y,12F2,L1Y和DYS287(YAP

  16. Fetal sex determination in the first trimester of pregnancy using a Y chromosome-specific DNA probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Y.; Huang, S.; Chen, M.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, M.; Dong, J.; Ku, A.; Xu, S.

    1987-05-01

    Prenatal determination of fetal sex is important for the prevention of X-linked disorders such as hemophilia, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The complex procedures of prenatal diagnosis for X-linked disorders are unnecessary if the fetus is female, because usually no clinical symptoms ever appear in female. pY 3.4 probe used in this work for sex determination is a 3.4 kilobase human repeat sequence. The probe is specific for the Y chromosome of males and can be used for sex determination. The other prove pBLUR used in this paper as control is a widely dispersed, highly repeated human Alu family DNA sequence, represented equally in male and female DNA. On the basis of the relative densities of the autoradiographic spots produced by hybridization of fetal DNA with pY3.4 and pBLUR, the sex of fetus can be clearly identified. Further the authors can determine the radioactive intensity (cpm) of the hybridized DNA spots and the ratio of hybridization with Y3.4 to pBLUR (Y3.4/pBLUR x 10). Results show that the hybridization ratio of DNA from chorionic villi of male (1.03 +/- 0.24) is significantly higher than that of female (0.16 +/- 0.09). Therefore, sex determination of the fetus can be made, based on the ratio of pY3.4/pBLUR x 10. If necessary they can also use Southern hybridization with pY 3.4 probe of DNA isolated from chorionic villi to confirm the result of dot hybridization.

  17. Sex ratio in normal and disomic sperm: Evidence that the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, D.K.; Millie, E.A.; Hassold, T.J. [Case Western Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)]|[Univ. Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    In humans, deviations from a 1:1 male:female ratio have been identified in both chromosomally normal and trisomic live births: among normal newborns there is a slight excess of males, among trisomy 18 live borns a large excess of females, and among trisomy 21 live borns an excess of males. These differences could arise from differential production of or fertilization by Y- or X-bearing sperm or from selection against male or female conceptions. To examine the proportion of Y- and X- bearing sperm in normal sperm and in sperm disomic for chromosomes 18 or 21, we used three-color FISH (to the X and Y and either chromosome 18 or chromosome 21) to analyze > 300,000 sperm from 24 men. In apparently normal sperm, the sex ratio was nearly 1:1 (148,074 Y-bearing to 148,657 X-bearing sperm), and the value was not affected by the age of the donor. Certain of the donors, however, had significant excesses of Y- or X-bearing sperm. In disomy 18 sperm, there were virtually identical numbers of Y- and X-bearing sperm; thus, the excess of females in trisomy 18 presumably is due to selection against male trisomic conceptions. In contrast, we observed 69 Y-bearing and 44 X-bearing sperm disomic for chromosome 21. This is consistent with previous molecular studies, which have identified an excess of males among paternally derived cases of trisomy 21, and suggests that some of the excess of males among Down syndrome individuals is attributable to a nondisjunctional mechanism in which the extra chromosome 21 preferentially segregates with the Y chromosome. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Fluoride exposure changed the structure and the expressions of Y chromosome related genes in testes of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jinling; Chen, Yan; Chen, Jianjie; Yan, Hanghang; Li, Meiyan; Wang, Jundong

    2016-10-01

    It is known that during spermatogenesis, pluripotent germ cells differentiate to become efficient delivery vehicles to the oocyte of paternal DNA, and the process is easily damaged by external poison. In this study, the effects of fluoride on the body weight, fluoride content in femur, testosterone levels in serum and testis, sperm quality, and the expressions of Y chromosome microdeletion genes and protein levels were examined in testes of Kunming male mice treated with different concentrations of 0, 25, 50, 100 mg/L of NaF in drinking water for 11 weeks, respectively. The results showed that compared with the control group, fluoride contents in three treatment groups were significantly increased and the structure of testes was seriously injured. The testosterone contents and the sperm count were decreased. Sperm malformation ratio was distinctly elevated. The expressions of Sly and HSF2 mRNA were markedly reduced in 100 mg/L NaF group and Ssty2 mRNA expression was dramatically decreased in 50 and 100 mg/L NaF groups. Meanwhile, the protein levels of Ssty2 and Sly were significantly reduced in 50 and 100 mg/L NaF groups and HSF2 protein levels were significantly decreased in 100 mg/L NaF group. These studies indicated that fluoride had toxic effects on male reproductive system by reducing the testosterone and sperm count, and increasing the sperm malformation ratio, supported by the damage of testicular structure, as a consequence of depressed HSF2 level, which resulted in the down-regulation of Ssty2 and Sly mRNA and protein. PMID:27441988

  19. Genetic differences among North African Berber and Arab-speaking populations revealed by Y-STR diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaibar, Maria; Esteban, Esther; Harich, Nourdin; Kandil, Mostafa; Fernández-Santander, Ana

    2011-03-01

    Y-chromosome STR polymorphisms are inherited in a haploid state which makes them a powerful tool for easy tracing of paternal lineage and for use in human population evolutionary studies. North-African Y chromosomal diversity has traditionally been studied in order to find genetic and geographic associations as well as to test how natural and cultural barriers have affected the degree of genetic flow not only within North Africa but also in a wider Mediterranean context. The degree of Berber/Arab genetic differentiation in the Moroccan population has been tested for a complete set of forensic markers as sixteen Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) (DYS19, DYS385, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and GATA H4.1). The results suggest considerable population heterogeneity in North Africa. PMID:20854231

  20. Temporally invariable bacterial community structure in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jain, A.; Bandekar, M.; Gomes, J.; Shenoy, D.M.; Meena, R.M.; Naik, H.; Khandeparkar, R.; Ramaiah, N.

    matter hydrolysis. As Strom (2008) suggested, knowledge of bacterial community composition and their spatial and temporal variation is important for understanding their role in marine biogeochemistry. Intermediate layers in some of the most productive... occurring within the OMZ, phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of the microorganisms inhabiting therein are poorly known (Riemann et al 1999; Fuchs et al 2005, Stevens and Ulloa, 2008). The Arabian Sea is an intensely dynamic region modulated seasonally...

  1. Potential uranium provinces in some arabian countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work represents an attempt to delineate potential uranium provinces in some Arabian countries using various related recognition criteria. Definition of these provinces is based on the available geologic and tectonic setting beside geochronological sequence and some geochemical characteristics. This trial would be of a great help for interchanging the ideas and necessary data for the development in the fields of uranium exploration and production. As a result of this study, a number of promising potential uranium provinces are recommended in some arabian countries. 5 figs

  2. Metagenomic analysis of nitrogen and methane cycling in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kox, Martine A.R.; Villanueva, Laura; Jetten, Mike S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) are areas in the global ocean where oxygen concentrations drop to below one percent. Low oxygen concentrations allow alternative respiration with nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptor to become prevalent in these areas, making them main contributors to oceanic nitrogen loss. The contribution of anammox and denitrification to nitrogen loss seems to vary in different OMZs. In the Arabian Sea, both processes were reported. Here, we performed a metagenomics study of the upper and core zone of the Arabian Sea OMZ, to provide a comprehensive overview of the genetic potential for nitrogen and methane cycling. We propose that aerobic ammonium oxidation is carried out by a diverse community of Thaumarchaeota in the upper zone of the OMZ, whereas a low diversity of Scalindua-like anammox bacteria contribute significantly to nitrogen loss in the core zone. Aerobic nitrite oxidation in the OMZ seems to be performed by Nitrospina spp. and a novel lineage of nitrite oxidizing organisms that is present in roughly equal abundance as Nitrospina. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA) can be carried out by yet unknown microorganisms harbouring a divergent nrfA gene. The metagenomes do not provide conclusive evidence for active methane cycling; however, a low abundance of novel alkane monooxygenase diversity was detected. Taken together, our approach confirmed the genomic potential for an active nitrogen cycle in the Arabian Sea and allowed detection of hitherto overlooked lineages of carbon and nitrogen cycle bacteria. PMID:27077014

  3. Startling mosaicism of the Y-chromosome and tandem duplication of the SRY and DAZ genes in patients with Turner Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Premi

    Full Text Available Presence of the human Y-chromosome in females with Turner Syndrome (TS enhances the risk of development of gonadoblastoma besides causing several other phenotypic abnormalities. In the present study, we have analyzed the Y chromosome in 15 clinically diagnosed Turner Syndrome (TS patients and detected high level of mosaicisms ranging from 45,XO:46,XY = 100:0% in 4; 45,XO:46,XY:46XX = 4:94:2 in 8; and 45,XO:46,XY:46XX = 50:30:20 cells in 3 TS patients, unlike previous reports showing 5-8% cells with Y- material. Also, no ring, marker or di-centric Y was observed in any of the cases. Of the two TS patients having intact Y chromosome in >85% cells, one was exceptionally tall. Both the patients were positive for SRY, DAZ, CDY1, DBY, UTY and AZFa, b and c specific STSs. Real Time PCR and FISH demonstrated tandem duplication/multiplication of the SRY and DAZ genes. At sequence level, the SRY was normal in 8 TS patients while the remaining 7 showed either absence of this gene or known and novel mutations within and outside of the HMG box. SNV/SFV analysis showed normal four copies of the DAZ genes in these 8 patients. All the TS patients showed aplastic uterus with no ovaries and no symptom of gonadoblastoma. Present study demonstrates new types of polymorphisms indicating that no two TS patients have identical genotype-phenotype. Thus, a comprehensive analysis of more number of samples is warranted to uncover consensus on the loci affected, to be able to use them as potential diagnostic markers.

  4. Long-Read Single Molecule Sequencing to Resolve Tandem Gene Copies: The Mst77Y Region on the Drosophila melanogaster Y Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsticevic, Flavia J; Schrago, Carlos G; Carvalho, A Bernardo

    2015-06-01

    The autosomal gene Mst77F of Drosophila melanogaster is essential for male fertility. In 2010, Krsticevic et al. (Genetics 184: 295-307) found 18 Y-linked copies of Mst77F ("Mst77Y"), which collectively account for 20% of the functional Mst77F-like mRNA. The Mst77Y genes were severely misassembled in the then-available genome assembly and were identified by cloning and sequencing polymerase chain reaction products. The genomic structure of the Mst77Y region and the possible existence of additional copies remained unknown. The recent publication of two long-read assemblies of D. melanogaster prompted us to reinvestigate this challenging region of the Y chromosome. We found that the Illumina Synthetic Long Reads assembly failed in the Mst77Y region, most likely because of its tandem duplication structure. The PacBio MHAP assembly of the Mst77Y region seems to be very accurate, as revealed by comparisons with the previously found Mst77Y genes, a bacterial artificial chromosome sequence, and Illumina reads of the same strain. We found that the Mst77Y region spans 96 kb and originated from a 3.4-kb transposition from chromosome 3L to the Y chromosome, followed by tandem duplications inside the Y chromosome and invasion of transposable elements, which account for 48% of its length. Twelve of the 18 Mst77Y genes found in 2010 were confirmed in the PacBio assembly, the remaining six being polymerase chain reaction-induced artifacts. There are several identical copies of some Mst77Y genes, coincidentally bringing the total copy number to 18. Besides providing a detailed picture of the Mst77Y region, our results highlight the utility of PacBio technology in assembling difficult genomic regions such as tandemly repeated genes. PMID:25858959

  5. The coming of the Greeks to Provence and Corsica: Y-chromosome models of archaic Greek colonization of the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novelletto Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of Greek colonization of the central and western Mediterranean during the Archaic and Classical Eras has been understudied from the perspective of population genetics. To investigate the Y chromosomal demography of Greek colonization in the western Mediterranean, Y-chromosome data consisting of 29 YSNPs and 37 YSTRs were compared from 51 subjects from Provence, 58 subjects from Smyrna and 31 subjects whose paternal ancestry derives from Asia Minor Phokaia, the ancestral embarkation port to the 6th century BCE Greek colonies of Massalia (Marseilles and Alalie (Aleria, Corsica. Results 19% of the Phokaian and 12% of the Smyrnian representatives were derived for haplogroup E-V13, characteristic of the Greek and Balkan mainland, while 4% of the Provencal, 4.6% of East Corsican and 1.6% of West Corsican samples were derived for E-V13. An admixture analysis estimated that 17% of the Y-chromosomes of Provence may be attributed to Greek colonization. Using the following putative Neolithic Anatolian lineages: J2a-DYS445 = 6, G2a-M406 and J2a1b1-M92, the data predict a 0% Neolithic contribution to Provence from Anatolia. Estimates of colonial Greek vs. indigenous Celto-Ligurian demography predict a maximum of a 10% Greek contribution, suggesting a Greek male elite-dominant input into the Iron Age Provence population. Conclusions Given the origin of viniculture in Provence is ascribed to Massalia, these results suggest that E-V13 may trace the demographic and socio-cultural impact of Greek colonization in Mediterranean Europe, a contribution that appears to be considerably larger than that of a Neolithic pioneer colonization.

  6. An investigation of ring and dicentric chromosomes found in three Turner's syndrome patients using DNA analysis and in situ hybridisation with X and Y chromosome specific probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, C; Crolla, J. A.; Laister, C; Johnston, D I; Cooke, P.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied three patients with features of Turner's syndrome, two with a 45,X/46,X,r(?) and the third with a 45,X/46,X,dic?(Y) karyotype. Because Turner's syndrome patients with a mosaic karyotype containing a Y chromosome are known to have a high risk of developing gonadal tumours, we used DNA analysis and in situ hybridisation with X and Y specific probes to identify the chromosomal origin of the rings and dicentric chromosomes in the three index patients. Both ring chromosomes were sh...

  7. Winter cooling in the northern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Prasad, T.G.

    forcing that leads to the observed high productivity during winter in the northern Arabian Sea. The weak northerly winds and increased solar insolation during the inter-monsoon period, led to the development of a highly stratified upper layer with warm sea...

  8. Nitrous oxide in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W; Noronha, R.J

    Measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O) at 16 stations in the Arabian Sea reveal high degrees of surface saturation (186 plus or minus 37%) and consequently large atmospheric fluxes of N2O (4.46 plus or minus 2.60 mu mol m-2day-1). Vertical distribution...

  9. The role of sex chromosomes in mammalian germ cell differentiation: can the germ cells carrying X and Y chromosomes differentiate into fertile oocytes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruko Taketo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The sexual differentiation of germ cells into spermatozoa or oocytes is strictly regulated by their gonadal environment, testis or ovary, which is determined by the presence or absence of the Y chromosome, respectively. Hence, in normal mammalian development, male germ cells differentiate in the presence of X and Y chromosomes, and female germ cells do so in the presence of two X chromosomes. However, gonadal sex reversal occurs in humans as well as in other mammalian species, and the resultant XX males and XY females can lead healthy lives, except for a complete or partial loss of fertility. Germ cells carrying an abnormal set of sex chromosomes are efficiently eliminated by multilayered surveillance mechanisms in the testis, and also, though more variably, in the ovary. Studying the molecular basis for sex-specific responses to a set of sex chromosomes during gametogenesis will promote our understanding of meiotic processes contributing to the evolution of sex determining mechanisms. This review discusses the fate of germ cells carrying various sex chromosomal compositions in mouse models, the limitation of which may be overcome by recent successes in the differentiation of functional germ cells from embryonic stem cells under experimental conditions.

  10. Síndrome de Turner: el riesgo de tumores gonadales en pacientes con secuencias del cromosoma Y Turner Syndrome: Gonadal Tumor Risk in Patients with Y Chromosome Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SB Copelli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En esta revisión, se muestra que la existencia de secuencias del cromosoma Y en las mujeres con síndrome de Turner es un factor de riesgo para el desarrollo de gonadoblastoma, sobre todo si está presente en el cariotipo de las pacientes en forma de mosaico y/o como secuencias del Y ocultas. En la literatura, se han encontrado en los estudios epidemiológicos de cáncer, resultados controversiales en los casos que presentan gonadoblastoma u otros tumores malignos de ovario, en el síndrome de Turner. Algunas mujeres tienen Y pero no desarrollan tumores gonadales. En una población argentina de 282 mujeres con síndrome de Turner se evaluó la presencia de material del cromosoma Y en mosaico por PCR y en 8 de estos pacientes (2,83 % con secuencias del Y, se halló gonadoblastoma luego de extirpar la gónada. En la literatura, la frecuencia de material "escondido" de cromosoma Y (en mosaico es alta en el síndrome de Turner, pero la aparición de gonadoblastoma entre los pacientes con estas secuencias parece ser baja. Las secuencias del gen SRY solo pueden estudiarse como un marcador de mosaicismo, en pacientes con síndrome de Turner, porque el locus para gonadoblastoma/disgerminoma, probablemente se encuentra cerca del centrómero del Y lejos de SRY. Publicaciones recientes, sugieren que la evaluación del riesgo real de desarrollo de tumores gonadales en pacientes con ST con secuencias derivadas del Y, en su constitución cromosómica puede requerir un estudio histopatológico específico, tal como la inmunohistoquímica con OCT4. Por lo tanto, es evidente que la exéresis de las gónadas sigue siendo una herramienta importante para la prevención en pacientes con síndrome de Turner, con sospecha de cromosoma Y ¨escondido¨ o en mosaico, hasta que sea posible aislar los genes implicados en el gonadoblastoma. La autora declara no poseer conflictos de interés.In this review, we show that the existence of Y chromosome sequences in women with

  11. Application of multiplex PCR in detection of Y chromosomal microdeletions%多重PCR在Y染色体微缺失检测中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨欢利; 毛英姿; 诸溢扬; 陈辉波; 陆文浩; 李真法

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To set up multiplex PCR systems for detection of Y chromosomal microdeletions. Methods: Six specific sequence tagged sites were selected according to the laboratory guideline supported by European Academy of Andrology( EAA) and European Molecular Genetics Quality Net Work(EMQN) and nine specific sequence tagged sites were added up on this base. The primers were designed according to 15 STS of Y chromosome. The multiplex PCR systems were set up using the gene of sex determining region Y(SRY) as the internal control. The detection of Y chromosomal microdeletions was carried out on azoospermia group, oligzoospermia group, normal group and other group (at least one of results of semen was below the reference values). Results: Y chromosomal microdeletions were found 5.9% in azoospermia group and 17. 2% in oligzoospermic group by using the multiplex PCR systems construced with 15 STS. No microdeletions were seen in normal group and other group. The specificity of multiplex PCR was found to be 100% and no false positive or false negative was found. Conclusion: Multiplex PCR is suitable for screening Y chromosomal microdeletions and the operation is simple, shortcut and has reliable results, good reproducibility and important appliciation value in assisted reproductive examination.%目的:建立检测Y染色体微缺失的多重PCR体系.方法:参照欧洲男科协会和欧洲分子遗传实验室质控网推荐的6个特异性序列标签(STS),并在此基础上增加9个STS,依据Y染色体上15个STS设计引物,以性别决定基因(SRY)为内参建立多重PCR体系;对无精症组、严重少精症组、精液正常组及其它组(精液参数至少一项低于参考值)进行Y染色体微缺失检测.结果:建立的15个STS多重PCR体系检测到无精子症组缺失率为5.9%,严重少精子症组缺失率为17.2%,精液正常组及其它组中未发现缺失.多重PCR检测的特异性为100%,未发现假阳性或假阴性结果.结论:多

  12. Analysis of Y-chromosomal biallelic potymorphisms in Sichuan Han of Chinese population%中国四川汉族人群Y染色体单核苷酸多态性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋晓红; 张海军; 云力兵; 高爽; 王玉; 吴谨; 彦静; 李英碧; 侯一平

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the forensic utility of Y-single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) markers.Methods Allele-specffic PCR,restriction enzyme digestion or direct PCR were performed to examine 10 different SNP loci on Y chromosome,namely M9,M15,M45,M89,M95,M122, M134, M145,M173 and P25 in 161 Chinese Han males.Results A total of 8 of the 10 SNIPs are reported to be polymorphic in Chincse.The gene diversity for the loci showing polymorphism ranged from 0.988/0.012-0.752/0.248,with a power of discrimination 0.094-0.373.Loci M122 and M134 were the most polymorphic markers in Chinese Hans.Nine different haplogroups with frequencies from 1.2%tO 51.6% were observed and 3 of the haplogroups-K * (x 02a,03,P),03 *(x 03e) and 03e were found in 75.2%of Chinese Hans.Conclusion A comprehensive gene diversity data of Y chromosome and haplogroups were obtained in Sichuan Han population.which will be served as the base for using these Y-SNP markers in forensic medicine and individual identification in Sichuan Hans.%目的 评估Y染色体单核苷酸多态性(single nucleotide polymorphisms,SNPs)遗传标记的法医学应用价值.方法 用等位基因特异性PCR,限制性酶切和直接扩增法检测了161名中国四川汉族人Y染色体上10个SNPs位点M9,M15,M45,M89,M95,M122,M134,M145,M173和P25的多态性.结果 有8个位点发现遗传多态性,多态性频率0.988/0.012~0.752/0.248.个人识别能力0.094~0.373,累积个人识别能力为0.8308,M122和M134在中国四川汉族人群中的多态性最高.按照国际Y染色体学会的命名原则,10个位点命名了9种单倍组型,单倍组型频率1.2%~52.2%,其中75.2%的中国四川汉族人主要是K*(XO2a,O3,P),O3*(XO3e)和O3e 3种单倍组型.结论 该研究获得了中国四川汉族人群Y染色体的10个SNPs位点的多态性频率分布及其构建的9种单倍组型,为Y-SNPs做为法医遗传学个人识别和亲子鉴定的遗传标记奠定了基础.

  13. Climate oscillations reflected in the Arabian Sea subseafloor microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, William; Coolen, Marco; He, Lijun; Wuchter, Cornelia; Irigoien, Xabier; Chust, Guillem; Johnson, Carl; Hemingway, Jordon; Lee, Mitchell; Galy, Valier; Giosan, Liviu

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediment contains a vast microbial biosphere that influences global biogeochemical cycles over geological timescales. However, the environmental factors controlling the stratigraphy of subseafloor microbial communities are poorly understood. We studied a sediment core directly underlying the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), which exhibits organic carbon rich sapropelic laminae deposited under low oxygen conditions. Consistent with several other cores from the same location, age dating revealed the sapropelic layers coincide with warm North Atlantic millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger events, indicating a direct link between the strength of the OMZ and paleoclimate. A total of 214 samples spanning 13 m and 52 Kyr of deposition were selected for geochemical analyses and paleoclimate proxy measurements, as well as high-throughput metagenomic DNA sequencing of bacteria and archaea. A novel DNA extraction protocol was developed that allowed for direct (unamplified) metagenomic sequencing of DNA from each sample. This dataset represents the highest resolved sedimentary metagenomic sampling profile to date. Analysis of these data together with multiple paleoceanographic proxies show that millennial-scale paleoenvironmental conditions correlate with the metabolism and diversity of bacteria and archaea over the last glacial-interglacial cycle in the Arabian Sea. The metabolic potential for bacterial denitrification correlates with climate-driven OMZ strength and concomitant nitrogen stable isotope fractionation, whereas catabolic potential reflects changing marine organic matter sources across the Last Glacial Maximum. These results indicate that the subsisting microbial communities had been stratified to a large extent by paleoceanographic conditions at the time of deposition. Paleoenvironmental conditions should thus be considered as a mechanism that can help explain microbiome stratigraphy in marine sediment.

  14. Wind resource characterization in the Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Yip, Chak Man Andrew

    2015-12-28

    Wind energy is expected to contribute to alleviating the rise in energy demand in the Middle East that is driven by population growth and industrial development. However, variability and intermittency in the wind resource present significant challenges to grid integration of wind energy systems. These issues are rarely addressed in the literature of wind resource assessment in the Middle East due to sparse meteorological observations with varying record lengths. In this study, the wind field with consistent space–time resolution for over three decades at three hub heights (50m, 80m, 140m) over the whole Arabian Peninsula is constructed using the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) dataset. The wind resource is assessed at a higher spatial resolution with metrics of temporal variations in the wind than in prior studies. Previously unrecognized locations of interest with high wind abundance and low variability and intermittency have been identified in this study and confirmed by recent on-site observations. In particular, the western mountains of Saudi Arabia experience more abundant wind resource than most Red Sea coastal areas. The wind resource is more variable in coastal areas along the Arabian Gulf than their Red Sea counterparts at a similar latitude. Persistent wind is found along the coast of the Arabian Gulf.

  15. In search of the genetic footprints of Sumerians: a survey of Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation in the Marsh Arabs of Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivieri Anna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For millennia, the southern part of the Mesopotamia has been a wetland region generated by the Tigris and Euphrates rivers before flowing into the Gulf. This area has been occupied by human communities since ancient times and the present-day inhabitants, the Marsh Arabs, are considered the population with the strongest link to ancient Sumerians. Popular tradition, however, considers the Marsh Arabs as a foreign group, of unknown origin, which arrived in the marshlands when the rearing of water buffalo was introduced to the region. Results To shed some light on the paternal and maternal origin of this population, Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA variation was surveyed in 143 Marsh Arabs and in a large sample of Iraqi controls. Analyses of the haplogroups and sub-haplogroups observed in the Marsh Arabs revealed a prevalent autochthonous Middle Eastern component for both male and female gene pools, with weak South-West Asian and African contributions, more evident in mtDNA. A higher male than female homogeneity is characteristic of the Marsh Arab gene pool, likely due to a strong male genetic drift determined by socio-cultural factors (patrilocality, polygamy, unequal male and female migration rates. Conclusions Evidence of genetic stratification ascribable to the Sumerian development was provided by the Y-chromosome data where the J1-Page08 branch reveals a local expansion, almost contemporary with the Sumerian City State period that characterized Southern Mesopotamia. On the other hand, a more ancient background shared with Northern Mesopotamia is revealed by the less represented Y-chromosome lineage J1-M267*. Overall our results indicate that the introduction of water buffalo breeding and rice farming, most likely from the Indian sub-continent, only marginally affected the gene pool of autochthonous people of the region. Furthermore, a prevalent Middle Eastern ancestry of the modern population of the marshes of

  16. Isoform-Level Gene Expression Profiles of Human Y Chromosome Azoospermia Factor Genes and Their X Chromosome Paralogs in the Testicular Tissue of Non-Obstructive Azoospermia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Rastegar, Diba; Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Alikhani, Mehdi; Parsamatin, Pouria; Sahraneshin Samani, Fazel; Sabbaghian, Marjan; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Mohammad Ahadi, Ali; Mohseni Meybodi, Anahita; Piryaei, Abbas; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Gourabi, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    The human Y chromosome has an inevitable role in male fertility because it contains many genes critical for spermatogenesis and the development of the male gonads. Any genetic variation or epigenetic modification affecting the expression pattern of Y chromosome genes may thus lead to male infertility. In this study, we performed isoform-level gene expression profiling of Y chromosome genes within the azoospermia factor (AZF) regions, their X chromosome counterparts, and few autosomal paralogues in testicular biopsies of 12 men with preserved spermatogenesis and 68 men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) (40 Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) and 28 premiotic maturation arrest (MA)). This was undertaken using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) at the transcript level and Western blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) at the protein level. We profiled the expression of 41 alternative transcripts encoded by 14 AZFa, AZFb, and AZFc region genes (USP9Y, DDX3Y, XKRY, HSFY1, CYORF15A, CYORF15B, KDM5D, EIF1AY, RPS4Y2, RBMY1A1, PRY, BPY2, DAZ1, and CDY1) as well as their X chromosome homologue transcripts and a few autosomal homologues. Of the 41 transcripts, 18 were significantly down-regulated in men with NOA when compared with those of men with complete spermatogenesis. In contrast, the expression of five transcripts increased significantly in NOA patients. Furthermore, to confirm the qPCR results at the protein level, we performed immunoblotting and IHC experiments (based on 24 commercial and homemade antibodies) that detected 10 AZF-encoded proteins. In addition, their localization in testis cell types and organelles was determined. Interestingly, the two missing proteins, XKRY and CYORF15A, were detected for the first time. Finally, we focused on the expression patterns of the significantly altered genes in 12 MA patients with successful sperm retrieval compared to those of 12 MA patients with failed sperm retrieval to predict the success of sperm retrieval in

  17. A small supernumerary marker chromosome present in a Turner syndrome patient not derived from X- or Y-chromosome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeesch Joris

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC can be present in numerically abnormal karyotypes like in a 'Turner-syndrome karyotype' mos 45,X/46,X,+mar. Results Here we report the first case of an sSMC found in Turner syndrome karyotypes (sSMCT derived from chromosome 14 in a Turner syndrome patient. According to cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic characterization the karyotype was 46,X,+del(14(q11.1. The present case is the third Turner syndrome case with an sSMCT not derived from the X- or the Y-chromosome. Conclusion More comprehensive characterization of such sSMCT might identify them to be more frequent than only ~0.6% in Turner syndrome cases according to available data.

  18. Discovery of Western European R1b1a2 Y chromosome variants in 1000 genomes project data: an online community approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Richard A; Magoon, Gregory; Reynolds, David F; Krahn, Thomas; Tilroe, Vincent O; Op den Velde Boots, Peter M; Grierson, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    The authors have used an online community approach, and tools that were readily available via the Internet, to discover genealogically and therefore phylogenetically relevant Y-chromosome polymorphisms within core haplogroup R1b1a2-L11/S127 (rs9786076). Presented here is the analysis of 135 unrelated L11 derived samples from the 1000 Genomes Project. We were able to discover new variants and build a much more complex phylogenetic relationship for L11 sub-clades. Many of the variants were further validated using PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The identification of these new variants will help further the understanding of population history including patrilineal migrations in Western and Central Europe where R1b1a2 is the most frequent haplogroup. The fine-grained phylogenetic tree we present here will also help to refine historical genetic dating studies. Our findings demonstrate the power of citizen science for analysis of whole genome sequence data. PMID:22911832

  19. Results of a collaborative study of the EDNAP group regarding the reproducibility and robustness of the Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS389 I and II, DYS390 and DYS393 in a PCR pentaplex format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carracedo, A; Beckmann, A; Bengs, A;

    2001-01-01

    A collaborative exercise was carried out by the European DNA Profiling Group (EDNAP) in the frame work of the STADNAP program, i.e. standardization of DNA profiling in Europe, in order to evaluate the performance of a Y-chromosome STR pentaplex, which includes the loci DYS19, DYS389 I and II, DYS...

  20. The world's most isolated and distinct whale population? Humpback whales of the Arabian Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Pomilla

    Full Text Available A clear understanding of population structure is essential for assessing conservation status and implementing management strategies. A small, non-migratory population of humpback whales in the Arabian Sea is classified as "Endangered" on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, an assessment constrained by a lack of data, including limited understanding of its relationship to other populations. We analysed 11 microsatellite markers and mitochondrial DNA sequences extracted from 67 Arabian Sea humpback whale tissue samples and compared them to equivalent datasets from the Southern Hemisphere and North Pacific. Results show that the Arabian Sea population is highly distinct; estimates of gene flow and divergence times suggest a Southern Indian Ocean origin but indicate that it has been isolated for approximately 70,000 years, remarkable for a species that is typically highly migratory. Genetic diversity values are significantly lower than those obtained for Southern Hemisphere populations and signatures of ancient and recent genetic bottlenecks were identified. Our findings suggest this is the world's most isolated humpback whale population, which, when combined with low population abundance estimates and anthropogenic threats, raises concern for its survival. We recommend an amendment of the status of the population to "Critically Endangered" on the IUCN Red List.

  1. In vivo identification, survival, and functional efficacy of transplanted hepatocytes in acute liver failure mice model by FISH using Y-chromosome probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Vanaja, D; Sivakumar, B; Jesudasan, R A; Singh, L; Janardanasarma, M K; Habibullah, C M

    1998-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has excited much interest in lending temporary metabolic support to a failing liver following acute liver injury. The exact site from which they act and the clinical, biochemical, and histological changes in the recipient body following hepatocyte transplantation is yet to be worked out. The present study is an attempt to delineate location and function of transplanted hepatocytes and also the overall survival of these cells with a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique using a Y-chromosome-specific probe in a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced mice model of fulminant hepatic failure. Fifty-five syngenic adult Swiss female mice of approximately the same age and body weight were divided into three groups. Group-1 (n = 15), which received mineral oil, served as a negative control. Group-II (n = 15) received CCl4 (3 mL/kg) 40% vol/vol in mineral oil, by gavage served as positive control for hepatic failure. Group-III (n = 25) received intrasplenic transplantation of syngenic single cell suspension of hepatocytes in Hanks medium, after 30 h of CCl4 administration. Male Swiss adult mice (n = 15) served as donors of hepatocytes. The overall survival of animals in groups I to III was 100, 0, and 70%, respectively, by 2 wk of the study period. Transplanted hepatocytes were identified by Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining and confirmed with a FISH technique using the Y-chromosome probe. The majority of exogenously transplanted hepatocytes were found in the liver and spleen sections even after 1 wk of hepatocyte transplantation. Transplanted cells were mostly found to be translocated into the sinusoids of the liver. Transplanted hepatocytes were found to be beneficial as a temporary liver support in a failing liver, significantly improving the survival of the animals. In the present study, the FISH technique was used to unequivocally distinguish the transplanted cells from the host, and thus describes a model for studying the

  2. Processes controlling carbon components in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.; Rajendran, R.; Somasundar, K.; Ittekkot, V.; Desai, B.N.

    production in the western Arabian Sea, relatively low CaCO sub(3) dissolution (approximately 100 mol dm/3 near and below 3000m) is attributed to skeletal material incorporation into faecal material and the subsequent faster deposition rates. Arabian Sea water...

  3. The climatology of dust aerosol over the arabian peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shalaby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dust storms are considered to be a natural hazard over the Arabian Peninsula, since they occur all year round with maximum intensity and frequency in Spring and Summer. The Regional Climate Model version 4 (RegCM4 has been used to study the climatology of atmospheric dust over the Arabian Peninsula from 1999 to 2012. This relatively long simulation period samples the meteorological conditions that determine the climatology of mineral dust aerosols over the Arabian Peninsula. The modeled Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD has been compared against ground-based observations of three Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET stations that are distributed over the Arabian Peninsula and daily space based observations from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR, the Moderate resolution Imaging SpectroRadimeter (MODIS and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. The large scale atmospheric circulation and the land surface response that lead to dust uplifting have been analyzed. While the modeled AOD shows that the dust season extends from March to August with two pronounced maxima, one over the northern Arabian Peninsula in March with AOD equal to 0.4 and one over the southern Arabian Peninsula in July with AOD equal to 0.7, the observations show that the dust season extends from April to August with two pronounced maxima, one over the northern Arabian Peninsula in April with AOD equal to 0.5 and one over the southern Arabian Peninsula in July with AOD equal to 0.5. In spring a high pressure dominates the Arabian Peninsula and is responsible for advecting dust from southern and western part of the Arabian Peninsula to northern and eastern part of the Peninsula. Also, fast developed cyclones in northern Arabian Peninsula are responsible for producing strong dust storms over Iraq and Kuwait. However, in summer the main driver of the surface dust emission is the strong northerly wind ("Shamal" that transport dust from the northern Arabian Peninsula toward south parallel

  4. Phytoplankton community characteristics in the coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea Phytoplankton community characteristics in the coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MINU P; SHAJU S S; MUHAMED ASHRAF P; MEENAKUMARI B

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing applications are important in the fisheries sector and efforts were on to improve the predic-tions of potential fishing zones using ocean color. The present study was aimed to investigate the phyto-plankton dynamics and their absorption properties in the coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea in different seasons during the year 2010 to 2011. The region exhibited 73 genera of phytoplankton from 19 orders and 41 families. The numerical abundance of phytoplankton varied from 14.235×103 to 55.075×106 cells/L. Centric diatoms dominated in the region and the largest family identified was Thalassiosiraceae with main genera asSkeletonemaspp.,Planktionellaspp.andThalassiosiraspp. Annual variations in abun-dance of phytoplankton showed a typical one-peak cycle, with the highest recorded during premonsoon season and the lowest during monsoon season. The species diversity index of phytoplankton exhibited low diversity during monsoon season. Phytoplankton with pigments Chlorophylla, Chlorophyllb, Chlorophyll c, peridinin, diadinoxanthin, fucoxanthin,β-carotene and phycoerythrobilin dominated in these waters. The knowledge on phytoplankton dynamics in coastal waters of the southeastern Arabian Sea forms a key parameter in bio-optical models of pigments and productivity and for the interpretation of remotely sensed ocean color data.

  5. Sediment sound velocities from sonobuoys: Arabian fan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, R.T.; Hamilton, E.L.

    1980-02-10

    Eight variable-angle seismic reflection stations in the Arabian Fan, Northwestern Indian Ocean, provided 40 determinations of sound velocity in sediment and sedimentary rock. Sound velocity in the homogeneous, largely terrigenous fan increases smoothly with depth. Regression analysis yielded the velocity-time relationship V (km/s)=1.510+1.863t, where V is instantaneous velocity and t is one-way travel time below the sea floor to 1 s. The velocity-depth function is V (km/s)=1.510+1.200h-0.253h/sup 2/+ 0.034h/sup 3/, where h is subbottom depth in km.

  6. Colour vision screening among Saudi Arabian children

    OpenAIRE

    O. Matthew Oriowo; Abdullah Z. Alotaibi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of congenital red-green colour vision defects among Saudi Arabian male and female children.Methods: The study involved 1638 elementary and high school participants (838 males, and 800 females), who were randomly selected and screened for red-green colour vision defects using the Ishihara (pseudo-isochromatic plates) test. Inclusion criteria were Snellen VA 20/20 or better and absence of known ocular pathologies.Among the females, 0.75% of the 800 participa...

  7. The impact of the Austronesian expansion: Evidence from mtDNA and Y chromosome diversity in the Admiralty Islands of melanesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Kayser (Manfred); Y. Choi (Ying); M. van Oven (Mannis); S. Mona (Stefano); S. Brauer (Silke); R.J. Trent (Ronald); D. Suarkia (Dagwin); W. Schiefenhövel (Wulf); M. Stoneking (Mark)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic ancestry of Polynesians can be traced to both Asia and Melanesia, which presumably reflects admixture occurring between incoming Austronesians and resident non-Austronesians in Melanesia before the subsequent occupation of the greater Pacific; however, the genetic impact of t

  8. Tracing Arab-Islamic inheritance in Madagascar: study of the Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA in the Antemoro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Capredon

    Full Text Available Madagascar is located at the crossroads of the Asian and African worlds and is therefore of particular interest for studies on human population migration. Within the large human diversity of the Great Island, we focused our study on a particular ethnic group, the Antemoro. Their culture presents an important Arab-Islamic influence, but the question of an Arab biological inheritance remains unresolved. We analyzed paternal (n=129 and maternal (n=135 lineages of this ethnic group. Although the majority of Antemoro genetic ancestry comes from sub-Saharan African and Southeast Asian gene pools, we observed in their paternal lineages two specific haplogroups (J1 and T1 linked to Middle Eastern origins. This inheritance was restricted to some Antemoro sub-groups. Statistical analyses tended to confirm significant Middle Eastern genetic contribution. This study gives a new perspective to the large human genetic diversity in Madagascar.

  9. Distinctiveness of Saudi Arabian EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manssour Habbash

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In view of the increasing concern among English language teachers dealing with students from Saudi Arabia, as it manifests in TESOL community discussions, about the uniqueness of Saudi Arabian EFL learners, this paper attempts to document the outcome of a study of their distinctiveness from the perspective of expatriate teachers working for PYPs (Preparatory Year Programs in Saudi Arabia. This study examines the distinctiveness with regard to the learning attitudes of Saudi students that are often cultivated by the culture and academic environment in their homeland. Employing an emic approach for collecting the required data an analysis was carried out in light of the other studies on ‘education’ in Saudi Arabia that have particular reference to the factors that can positively influence student motivation, student success and the academic environment. The findings were used in constructing the rationale behind such distinctiveness. Assuming that the outcome of the discussion on the findings of this exploration can be helpful for teachers in adapting their teaching methodology and improving their teacher efficacy in dealing with students both from the kingdom and in the kingdom, some recommendations are made.Keywords: China Distinctiveness, Saudi Arabian University context, Expatriate teachers’ perspective, Distinctiveness Theory 

  10. Comparative Profiling of coral symbiont communities from the Caribbean, Indo-Pacific, and Arabian Seas

    KAUST Repository

    Arif, Chatchanit

    2014-12-01

    Coral reef ecosystems are in rapid decline due to global and local anthropogenic factors. Being among the most diverse ecosystems on Earth, a loss will decrease species diversity, and remove food source for people along the coast. The coral together with its symbionts (i.e. Symbiodinium, bacteria, and other microorganisms) is called the ‘coral holobiont’. The coral host offers its associated symbionts suitable habitats and nutrients, while Symbiodinium and coral-associated bacteria provide the host with photosynthates and vital nutrients. Association of corals with certain types of Symbiodinium and bacteria confer coral stress tolerance, and lack or loss of these symbionts coincides with diseased or bleached corals. However, a detailed understanding of the coral holobiont diversity and structure in regard to diseases and health states or across global scales is missing. This dissertation addressed coral-associated symbiont diversity, specifically of Symbiodinium and bacteria, in various coral species from different geographic locations and different health states. The main aims were (1) to expand the scope of existing technologies, (2) to establish a standardized framework to facilitate comparison of symbiont assemblages over coral species and sites, (3) to assess Symbiodinium diversity in the Arabian Seas, and (4) to elucidate whether coral health states have conserved bacterial footprints. In summary, a next generation sequencing pipeline for Symbiodinium diversity typing of the ITS2 marker is developed and applied to describe Symbiodinium diversity in corals around the Arabian Peninsula. The data show that corals in the Arabian Seas are dominated by a single Symbiodinium type, but harbor a rich variety of types in low abundant. Further, association with different Symbiodinium types is structured according to geographic locations. In addition, the application of 16S rRNA gene microarrays to investigate how differences in microbiome structure relate to

  11. 原发无精子症患者Y染色体AZF微缺失研究%Study on Primary Azoospermia of Y Chromosome AZF Microdeletions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆国芳; 孙丰涛; 任晨春; 张海霞; 田野; 梁玥宏

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究原发无精子症患者Y染色体无精子症因子(AZF)基因微缺失频率,为细胞质内单精子注射(ICSI)辅助生育治疗前的临床检验及不育症的遗传咨询提供方法和依据.方法:采用多重PCR法,对天津地区染色体核型均正常的正常生育者30例(正常组)和68例原发无精子症患者(患者组)进行Y染色体AZF区6个位点微缺失检测.结果:患者组存在AZF区微缺失共12例(17.65%).其中缺失位点在AZFa的sY84者3例(4.41%),AZFb的sY127有1例(1.47%),AZFc的sY254或sY254和sY255共6例(8.82%),AZFb+c的sY134和sY254有1例,sY127、sY254和sY255的1例.正常组各位点均无缺失,2组微缺失率差异有统计学意义(x2=6.033,P< 0.05).结论:天津地区原发无精子症患者AZF区6位点微缺失检测,缺失率较高.%Objective: To investigate the frequency of Y chromosome azoospermia factor (AZF) microdeletions in primary azoospermia, and to provide pre-treatment method and basis of clinical examination for intracytoplasraic sperm injection (ICSI) techniques of assisted reproduction and genetic counseling of male infertility. Methods: Six loci microdeletions of Y chromosome AZF region were detected by multiple PCR in 68 cases of primary azoospermia patients and 30 cases with normal birth in Tianjin area. Results: There were a total of 12 patients with AZF micro deletion area, the total loss frequency was 17.65%. There were 3 cases of sY84 in AZFa deletions (4.41%), 1 cases of sY127 in AZFb (1.47%), 6 cases of sY254 or sY254 and sY255 in AZFc (8.82%), 1 case of sY134 and sY254 in AZFb+c and 1 case of sY127 and sY254 with sY255 in AZFb+c (2.94%). There was no lack of the loci in normal group. Chi-square analysis indicated that there were significant differences in rates of microdeletions between two groups (X2 = 6.033, P < 0.05). Conclusion: There was a high frequency of lack in Y chromosome AZF region 6 loci microdeletion in primary azoospermia.

  12. Biodiversity of Deep Sea Prawns in the Upper Continental Slope of Arabian Sea, off Kerala (south west India): A Comparison Between Depths and Years

    OpenAIRE

    R., Radhika Rajasree S.

    2011-01-01

    Univariate diversity indices and multivariate cluster analysis were performed in order to evaluate the year wise and depth wise bio diversity of deep sea prawns between 150-650m in the upper continental slope of Arabian Sea, off Kerala, South India. Data were collected from both exploratory surveys as well as commercial deep sea -to fishery off Kerala coast between latitudes 7to 13oN. Biodiversity and species assemblage are discussed considering the different environmental characters as well ...

  13. Characteristics of humic and fulvic acids in Arabian Sea sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.

    Humic and fulvic acids isolated from some of the shelf, slope and offshore sediments of the Arabian Sea were studied. The molecular weight, functional groups, elemental composition and infrared spectra were examined. Humic substances, dominated...

  14. Marine magnetic anomalies in the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattacharya, G.C.; Chaubey, A; Murty, G.P.S.; Rao, D.G.; Scherbakov, V.S.; Lygin, V.A; Philipenko, A; Bogomyagkov, A

    Based on the analysis of some additional magnetic profiles, an updated correlation and identification of the sea-floor spreading type magnetic lineations in the northeastern Arabian Sea is presented. The anomaly 24 A-B sequence, characteris...

  15. Measurement of inherent optical properties in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Kurian, J.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.

    Inherent optical properties, absorption and began attenuation were measured in situ using a reflective tube absorption meter at nint wavelength, 412, 440, 488, 510, 555, 630, 650, 676 and 715 nm, in the Arabian Sea during March. Since inherent...

  16. 新疆巴州维吾尔族17个Y-STR位点遗传多态性%Genetic polymorphism of seventeen Y-chromosomeal STR loci in XinJiang Bazhou Uygur population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈慧锦; 蒲红伟; 胡佳; 王伟; 张丽萍

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the allelic and haplotype frequency distribution of seventeen short tandem repeat loci of Y chromosome in Xinjiang Uygur population in Bazhou. Methods:The template DNAs were extracted from blood samples of 149 unrelated Uygur male individuals,and seventeen Y-STR loci were amplified by the AmpFlSTR YfilerTM.The PCR products were analyzed and genotyped with ABI3130XL Sequencer. Results:The values of genetic diversity of DYS456,DYS389 Ⅰ /Ⅱ ,DYS390,DYS458,DYS19, DYS385a/b,DYS393,DYS391,DYS439,DYS635,DYS392,Y-GATA-H4,DYS437,DYS438,and DYS448 were between 0.4 982 and 0.9 485.A total of 148 different haplotypes were observed,and the value of genetic diversity of haplotypes was 0.99 986. Conclusion: The 17 Y-STR loci in Xinjiang Uygur population in Bazhou are highly polymorphic and suitable for paternity testing and paternal genetic lineage evolution.%目的:调查17个Y染色体短串联重复序列(Y-Short tandem repeat,Y-STR)基因座及其单倍型在新疆巴州维吾尔族人群中的分布情况.方法:应用AmpFlSTR YfilerTM荧光标记复合扩增系统,对149名维吾尔族无关男性个体血样进行17个Y-STR位点的复合扩增,用ABI 3130XL遗传分析仪对扩增产物进行检测分析.结果:DYS456、DYS389 Ⅰ/Ⅱ、DYS390、DYS458、DYS19、DYS385a/b、DYS393、DYS391、DYS439、DYS635、DYS392、Y-GATA-H4、DYS437、DYS438、DYS448各位点遗传多样性(Genetic diversity,GD)值分布在0.498 2~0.948 5之间;17个Y-STR位点共观察到单倍型148种,其单倍型多样性(Haplotype diversity,HD)值为0.999 86.结论:新疆巴州维吾尔族17个Y-STR位点具有丰富的遗传多样性,可为父权鉴定和父系进化研究提供有价值的遗传学资料.

  17. Investigating the prehistory of Tungusic peoples of Siberia and the Amur-Ussuri region with complete mtDNA genome sequences and Y-chromosomal markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana T Duggan

    Full Text Available Evenks and Evens, Tungusic-speaking reindeer herders and hunter-gatherers, are spread over a wide area of northern Asia, whereas their linguistic relatives the Udegey, sedentary fishermen and hunter-gatherers, are settled to the south of the lower Amur River. The prehistory and relationships of these Tungusic peoples are as yet poorly investigated, especially with respect to their interactions with neighbouring populations. In this study, we analyse over 500 complete mtDNA genome sequences from nine different Evenk and even subgroups as well as their geographic neighbours from Siberia and their linguistic relatives the Udegey from the Amur-Ussuri region in order to investigate the prehistory of the Tungusic populations. These data are supplemented with analyses of Y-chromosomal haplogroups and STR haplotypes in the Evenks, Evens, and neighbouring Siberian populations. We demonstrate that whereas the North Tungusic Evenks and Evens show evidence of shared ancestry both in the maternal and in the paternal line, this signal has been attenuated by genetic drift and differential gene flow with neighbouring populations, with isolation by distance further shaping the maternal genepool of the Evens. The Udegey, in contrast, appear quite divergent from their linguistic relatives in the maternal line, with a mtDNA haplogroup composition characteristic of populations of the Amur-Ussuri region. Nevertheless, they show affinities with the Evenks, indicating that they might be the result of admixture between local Amur-Ussuri populations and Tungusic populations from the north.

  18. Discovery of Western European R1b1a2 Y chromosome variants in 1000 genomes project data: an online community approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Rocca

    Full Text Available The authors have used an online community approach, and tools that were readily available via the Internet, to discover genealogically and therefore phylogenetically relevant Y-chromosome polymorphisms within core haplogroup R1b1a2-L11/S127 (rs9786076. Presented here is the analysis of 135 unrelated L11 derived samples from the 1000 Genomes Project. We were able to discover new variants and build a much more complex phylogenetic relationship for L11 sub-clades. Many of the variants were further validated using PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. The identification of these new variants will help further the understanding of population history including patrilineal migrations in Western and Central Europe where R1b1a2 is the most frequent haplogroup. The fine-grained phylogenetic tree we present here will also help to refine historical genetic dating studies. Our findings demonstrate the power of citizen science for analysis of whole genome sequence data.

  19. High-resolution analysis of Y-chromosomal polymorphisms reveals signatures of population movements from Central Asia and West Asia into India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Namita Mukherjee; Almut Nebel; Ariella Oppenheim; Partha P. Majumder

    2001-12-01

    Linguistic evidence suggests that West Asia and Central Asia have been the two major geographical sources of genes in the contemporary Indian gene pool. To test the nature and extent of similarities in the gene pools of these regions we have collected DNA samples from four ethnic populations of northern India, and have screened these samples for a set of 18 Y-chromosome polymorphic markers (12 unique event polymorphisms and six short tandem repeats). These data from Indian populations have been analysed in conjunction with published data from several West Asian and Central Asian populations. Our analyses have revealed traces of population movement from Central Asia and West Asia into India. Two haplogroups, HG-3 and HG-9, which are known to have arisen in the Central Asian region, are found in reasonably high frequencies (41.7% and 14.3% respectively) in the study populations. The ages estimated for these two haplogroups are less in the Indian populations than those estimated from data on Middle Eastern populations. A neighbour-joining tree based on Y-haplogroup frequencies shows that the North Indians are genetically placed between the West Asian and Central Asian populations. This is consistent with gene flow from West Asia and Central Asia into India.

  20. Colour vision screening among Saudi Arabian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Matthew Oriowo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the prevalence of congenital red-green colour vision defects among Saudi Arabian male and female children.Methods: The study involved 1638 elementary and high school participants (838 males, and 800 females, who were randomly selected and screened for red-green colour vision defects using the Ishihara (pseudo-isochromatic plates test. Inclusion criteria were Snellen VA 20/20 or better and absence of known ocular pathologies.Among the females, 0.75% of the 800 participants showed CVD, with 0.25% and 0.5% demonstratingprotan and deutan defects, respectively.Conclusion: The results show that the prevalence of red-green colour deficiency among the female children from central Saudi Arabia is not significantly different from that of female populations inwestern countries.  The current prevalence among the males is higher than previously reported for central Saudi Arabia, but less than for Caucasian populations. 

  1. A revised nitrogen budget for the Arabian Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Bange, Hermann W.; T. Rixen; Johansen, A. M.; Siefert, R. L.; Ramesh, R.; Ittekott, V.; Hoffmann, M. R.; Andreae, M. O.

    2000-01-01

    Despite its importance for the global oceanic nitrogen (N) cycle, considerable uncertainties exist about the N fluxes of the Arabian Sea. On the basis of our recent measurements during the German Arabian Sea Process Study as part of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) in 1995 and 1997, we present estimates of various N sources and sinks such as atmospheric dry and wet depositions of N aerosols, pelagic denitrification, nitrous oxide (N_2O) emissions, and advective N input from the south...

  2. Sex-determining region of Y-chromosome (Sry) : master switch of sex determination%Y染色体性别决定区(Sry):性别决定关键开关

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴开颜; 王介东

    2012-01-01

    性发育异常在人类遗传性疾病中很常见,因此性别决定在临床和生物学研究中非常重要.Y染色体性别决定区(sex-determining region of Y-chromosome,Sry)即哺乳动物Y染色体上的睾丸决定基因片段,与性别决定密切相关.本文对Sry基因的结构功能和表达调节及其相关的性别决定分子机制进行了综述.%Sex determination is very important in clinical and biological medicine because sex development disorders are the most common genetic diseases in humans. Sex-determining region of Y-chromosome (Sry) is the mammalian Y-chromosomal testis-determining gene. It is bound up with sex determination. In this paper, we consider issues related to Sry structure and function, its expression and regulation, and relevant molecular mechanisms of sex determination.

  3. 壮族Y染色体分型及其内部遗传结构%Y-chromosome Genotyping and Genetic Structure of Zhuang Populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晶; 李辉; 覃振东; 刘文泓; 林伟雄; 尹瑞兴; 金力; 潘尚领

    2006-01-01

    Zhuang, the largest ethnic minority population in China, is one of the descendant groups of the ancient Bai-Yue.Linguistically, Zhuang languages are grouped into northern and southern dialects. To characterize its genetic structure, 13 East Asian-specific Y-chromosome biallelic markers and 7 Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) markers were used to infer the haplogroups of Zhuang populations. Our results showed that O*, O2a, and O1 are the predominant haplogroups in Zhuang.Frequency distribution and principal component analysis showed that Zhuang was closely related to groups of Bai-Yue origin and therefore was likely to be the descendant of Bai-Yue. The results of principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis contradicted the linguistically derived north-south division. Interestingly, a west-east clinal trend of haplotype frequency changes was observed, which was supported by AMOVA analysis that showed that between-population variance of east-west division was larger than that of north-south division. O* network suggested that the Hongshuihe branch was the center of Zhuang.Our study suggests that there are three major components in Zhuang. The O* and O2a constituted the original component; later, O1was brought into Zhuang, especially eastern Zhuang; and fmally, northern Han population brought O3 into the Zhuang populations.%壮族是中国最大的少数民族,与东南亚的泰老族群关系密切,在东亚人群的遗传结构研究中地位非常特殊.本研究调查了壮族各个支系的Y染色体多样性,通过主成分分析、聚类分析和分子方差分析,揭示壮族的内部父系遗传结构.结果发现,壮族的主要Y染色体单倍群为O*,O2a,O1.传统的对壮族按方言分为南北二组的分类方法在遗传上并没有依据,壮族支系体现出从东往西的梯度变化过程.这说明壮族的结构中有几个层次,最早的成分普遍出现在各个支系中,第二层是由东部来的百越核心成

  4. Reproductive Performance of Arabian and Thoroughbred Mares under Subtropical Conditions of Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Warriach, H. M.; Memon, M. A.; Ahmad, N; Norman, S. T.; Ghafar, A.; Arif, M.

    2014-01-01

    Breeding records of 57 Arabian and 66 Thoroughbred mares were analysed to assess their reproductive performance under the subtropical conditions of Pakistan. The Arabian mares showed significantly higher conception rates (p

  5. State of oil pollution in the northern Arabian Sea after the 1991 Gulf oil spill

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sengupta, R.; Fondekar, S.P.; Alagarsamy, R.

    Following the enormous oil spills resulting from the 1990-91 military conflict in the Gulf, fears were expressed concerning dissipation of oil from the Gulf into the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean. To investigate contamination of the northern Arabian...

  6. Mechanism of the biological response to winter cooling in the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; DileepKumar, M.; Raghukumar, S.; Nair, K.K.C.; Ramaiah, N.

    The Arabian Sea is one of the most biologically productive ocean regions, mainly due to the upwelling of nutrients during the summer (southwest) monsoon. But the northern Arabian Sea continues to sustain fairly high biological production after...

  7. No influence of parental origin of intact X chromosome and/or Y chromosome sequences on three-year height response to growth hormone therapy in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Jin; Jung, Hae Woon; Lee, Gyung Min; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Jae Hyun; Lee, Sun Hee; Kim, Ji Hyun; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Whether parental origin of the intact X chromosome and/or the presence of Y chromosome sequences (Yseq) play a role in three-year height response to growth hormone (GH) were investigated. Methods Paternal (Xp) or maternal (Xm) origin of X chromosome was assessed by microsatellite marker analysis and the presence of hidden Yseq was analyzed. The first-, second-, and third-year GH response was measured as a change in height z-score (Z_Ht) in Turner syndrome (TS) patients with 45,Xp (n=10), 45,Xm (n=15), and 45,X/46,X,+mar(Y) (Xm_Yseq) (n=8). Results The mean baseline Z_Ht did not differ according to Xp or Xm origin, however the mean baseline Z_Ht was higher in the Xm_Yseq group than in Xm group, after adjusting for bone age delay and midparental Z_Ht (P=0.04). There was no difference in the height response to GH between the 3 groups. The height response to GH decreased progressively each year (P<0.001), such that the third-year increase in Z_Ht was not significant. This third-year decrease in treatment response was unaffected by Xp, Xm, and Xm_Yseq groups. Increasing GH dosage from the second to third-year of treatment positively correlated with the increase in Z_Ht (P=0.017). Conclusion There was no evidence of X-linked imprinted genes and/or Yseq affecting height response to 3 years of GH therapy. Increasing GH dosages may help attenuate the decrease in third-year GH response in TS patients with 45,X and/or 46,X/+mar(Y). PMID:25346916

  8. Total integrated slidable and valveless solid phase extraction-polymerase chain reaction-capillary electrophoresis microdevice for mini Y chromosome short tandem repeat genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Dohwan; Heo, Hyun Young; Sim, Jeong Eun; Woo, Kwang Man; Kim, Do Hyun; Im, Sung Gap; Seo, Tae Seok

    2016-04-15

    A fully integrated slidable and valveless microsystem, which performs solid phase DNA extraction (SPE), micro-polymerase chain reaction (μPCR) and micro-capillary electrophoresis (μCE) coupled with a portable genetic analyser, has been developed for forensic genotyping. The use of a slidable chip, in which a 1 μL-volume of the PCR chamber was patterned at the center, does not necessitate any microvalves and tubing systems for fluidic control. The functional micro-units of SPE, μPCR, and μCE were fabricated on a single glass wafer by conventional photolithography, and the integrated microdevice consists of three layers: from top to bottom, a slidable chip, a channel wafer in which a SPE chamber, a mixing microchannel, and a CE microchannel were fabricated, and a Ti/Pt resistance temperature detector (RTD) wafer. The channel glass wafer and the RTD glass wafer were thermally bonded, and the slidable chip was placed on the designated functional unit. The entire process from the DNA extraction using whole human blood sample to identification of target Y chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci was serially carried out with simply sliding the slidable chamber from one to another functional unit. Monoplex and multiplex detection of amelogenin and mini Y STR loci were successfully analysed on the integrated slidable SPE-μPCR-μCE microdevice by using 1 μL whole human blood within 60 min. The proposed advanced genetic analysis microsystem is capable of point-of-care DNA testing with sample-in-answer-out capability, more importantly, without use of complicated microvalves and microtubing systems for liquid transfer. PMID:26657593

  9. Male ancestry structure and interethnic admixture in African-descent communities from the Amazon as revealed by Y-chromosome Strs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palha, Teresinha de Jesus Brabo Ferreira; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Elzemar Martins; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Andrea; Guerreiro, João Farias; de Moura, Luciene Soraya Souza; Santos, Sidney

    2011-03-01

    Some genetic markers on both the Y chromosome and mtDNA are highly polymorphic and population-specific in humans, representing useful tools for reconstructing the past history of populations with poor historical records. Such lack of information is usually true in the case of recent African-descent populations of the New World founded by fugitive slaves throughout the slavery period in the Americas, particularly in Brazil, where those communities are known as quilombos. Aiming to recover male-derived ethnic structure of nine quilombos from the Brazilian Amazon, a total of 300 individuals, belonging to Mazagão Velho (N = 24), Curiaú (N = 48), Mazagão (N = 36), Trombetas (N = 20), Itacoã (N = 22), Saracura (N = 46), Marajó (N = 58), Pitimandeua (N = 26), and Pontal (N = 20), were investigated for nine Y-STRs (DYS393, DYS19, DYS390, DYS389 I, DYS389 II, DYS392, DYS391, DYS385 I/II). From the 169 distinct haplotypes obtained, 120 were singletons. The results suggest the West African coast as the main origin of slaves brought to Brazil (54% of male contribution); the European contribution was high (41%), while the Amerindian's was low (5%). Those results contrast with previous mtDNA data that showed high Amerindian female contribution (46.6%) in African-descent populations. AMOVA suggests that the genetic differentiation among the quilombos is mainly influenced by admixture with European. However, when restricting AMOVA to African-specific haplotypes, low differentiation was detected, suggesting great genetic homogeneity of the African founding populations and/or a later homogenization by intense slave trade inside Brazil. PMID:21302273

  10. 新疆昌吉维吾尔族17个Y-STR基因座遗传多态性%Genetic polymorphisms of seventeen Y-chromosomeal STR loci in XinJiang Changji Uygur Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽萍; 陈健刚; 蒲红伟; 付志敏; 杨昊

    2012-01-01

    目的 调查17个Y染色体短串联重复序列(Y-STR)基因座及其单倍型在新疆昌吉地区维吾尔族人群中的分布情况.方法 采用AmpFlSTR YfilerTM荧光标记复合扩增系统,对154名维吾尔族无关男性个体血样进行17个Y-STR位点的复合扩增,用ABI 3130XL遗传分析仪对扩增产物进行检测分析.结果 DYS456、DYS389Ⅰ、DYS390、DYS389Ⅱ、DYS458、DYS19、DYS385a/b、DYS393、DYS391、DYS439、DYS635、DYS392、Y-GATA-H4、DYS437、DYS438、DYS448各位点遗传多样性(GD值)分布在0.529 7~0.959 9之间;17个Y-STR位点共观察到单倍型151种,其单倍型多样性GD值为0.999 7.结论 新疆昌吉地区维吾尔族17个Y-STR位点具有丰富的遗传多样性,可为父权鉴定和父系进化研究提供有价值的遗传学资料.%Objective To investigate the allelic and haplotype frequency distribution of seventeen short tandem repeat loci of Y chromosome in Xinjiang Uygur population in Changji. Methods Seventeen Y-STR loci of which the template DNAs were extracted from blood samples of 154 unrelated male individuals in Uygur population, were amplified by using the AmpFlSTR YfilerTM. The PCR products were analyzed and genotyped with ABI3130XL Sequencer. Results The gene diversity ranged from 0. 529 7 to 0. 959 9 at DYS456,DYS389 I ,DYS390,DYS389 II ,DYS458,DYS19 ,DYS385a/b,DYS393,DYS391 ,DYS439 ,DYS635 ,DYS392, Y-G∧T∧-H4,DYS4 37,DYS438, and DYS448. A total of 151 different haplotypes were observed. The haplotype diversity value calculated from all 17 loci was 0. 999 7. Conclusion The 17th Y-STR loci in Xinjiang Uygur population in Changji are highly affluent genetic polymorphic and can offer valuable genetic datas for paternity testing and paternal genetic lineages evolution.

  11. Salinity pathways between Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Kailasam, Muni

    2016-07-01

    Surface as well as subsurface salinity are highly heterogeneous in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal. Due to the strong seasonal reversal of currents in the two seas tremendous salt exchange occurred. The present study focuses on the exchange of salt between the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal by using remote sensing observations like SMOS and Aquarius. Inflow of high salinity water from the central Arabians Sea into the south Bay of Bengal is significant and occurs during August-September. Freshwater transport out of the Bay of Bengal is southward throughout the year along the along the east coast of the Indian sub-continent. Only a small fraction of low salinity water is advected into the eastern Arabian Sea from the Bay of Bengal. The pathways of salinity between the two seas are also examined using SODA data. It shows that relatively low salinity Bay of Bengal water is transported southward across the equator throughout the year. A considerable southward cross-equatorial exchange of Arabian Sea water occurs during the southwest monsoon season.

  12. Abundance of Thraustochytrid fungi in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, S.; Raghukumar, C.; Rajendran, A

    to 13 July 1987 during the monsoon period-61 samples from 23 stations in the upwelling parts of the south-eastern Arabian Sea. Surface and 30 m depth were sampled in the eight shallower, nearshore stations,A2, B2, Cl,Dl,El, Fl, Gl andH1 withdepthsnot... Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science (1990) 31,351-358 Abundance of Thraustochytrid Fungi in the Arabian Sea S. Raghukumar, Chandralata Raghukumar and A. Rajendran National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India Received 24 April...

  13. A Tandem Duplicate of Anti-Müllerian Hormone with a Missense SNP on the Y Chromosome Is Essential for Male Sex Determination in Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghui; Sun, Yunlv; Zhao, Jiue; Shi, Hongjuan; Zeng, Sheng; Ye, Kai; Jiang, Dongneng; Zhou, Linyan; Sun, Lina; Tao, Wenjing; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Kocher, Thomas D; Wang, Deshou

    2015-11-01

    Variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway is emerging as an important mechanism by which gonadal sex determination is controlled in teleosts. Here we show that amhy, a Y-specific duplicate of the anti-Müllerian hormone (amh) gene, induces male sex determination in Nile tilapia. amhy is a tandem duplicate located immediately downstream of amhΔ-y on the Y chromosome. The coding sequence of amhy was identical to the X-linked amh (amh) except a missense SNP (C/T) which changes an amino acid (Ser/Leu92) in the N-terminal region. amhy lacks 5608 bp of promoter sequence that is found in the X-linked amh homolog. The amhΔ-y contains several insertions and deletions in the promoter region, and even a 5 bp insertion in exonVI that results in a premature stop codon and thus a truncated protein product lacking the TGF-β binding domain. Both amhy and amhΔ-y expression is restricted to XY gonads from 5 days after hatching (dah) onwards. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of amhy in XY fish resulted in male to female sex reversal, while mutation of amhΔ-y alone could not. In contrast, overexpression of Amhy in XX fish, using a fosmid transgene that carries the amhy/amhΔ-y haplotype or a vector containing amhy ORF under the control of CMV promoter, resulted in female to male sex reversal, while overexpression of AmhΔ-y alone in XX fish could not. Knockout of the anti-Müllerian hormone receptor type II (amhrII) in XY fish also resulted in 100% complete male to female sex reversal. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the duplicated amhy with a missense SNP is the candidate sex determining gene and amhy/amhrII signal is essential for male sex determination in Nile tilapia. These findings highlight the conserved roles of TGF-β signaling pathway in fish sex determination. PMID:26588702

  14. A Tandem Duplicate of Anti-Mullerian Hormone with a Missense SNP on the Y Chromosome Is Essential for Male Sex Determination in Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Variation in the TGF-β signaling pathway is emerging as an important mechanism by which gonadal sex determination is controlled in teleosts. Here we show that amhy, a Y-specific duplicate of the anti-Müllerian hormone (amh gene, induces male sex determination in Nile tilapia. amhy is a tandem duplicate located immediately downstream of amhΔ-y on the Y chromosome. The coding sequence of amhy was identical to the X-linked amh (amh except a missense SNP (C/T which changes an amino acid (Ser/Leu92 in the N-terminal region. amhy lacks 5608 bp of promoter sequence that is found in the X-linked amh homolog. The amhΔ-y contains several insertions and deletions in the promoter region, and even a 5 bp insertion in exonVI that results in a premature stop codon and thus a truncated protein product lacking the TGF-β binding domain. Both amhy and amhΔ-y expression is restricted to XY gonads from 5 days after hatching (dah onwards. CRISPR/Cas9 knockout of amhy in XY fish resulted in male to female sex reversal, while mutation of amhΔ-y alone could not. In contrast, overexpression of Amhy in XX fish, using a fosmid transgene that carries the amhy/amhΔ-y haplotype or a vector containing amhy ORF under the control of CMV promoter, resulted in female to male sex reversal, while overexpression of AmhΔ-y alone in XX fish could not. Knockout of the anti-Müllerian hormone receptor type II (amhrII in XY fish also resulted in 100% complete male to female sex reversal. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the duplicated amhy with a missense SNP is the candidate sex determining gene and amhy/amhrII signal is essential for male sex determination in Nile tilapia. These findings highlight the conserved roles of TGF-β signaling pathway in fish sex determination.

  15. The Role of the Y-Chromosome in the Establishment of Murine Hybrid Dysgenesis and in the Analysis of the Nucleotide Sequence Organization, Genetic Transmission and Evolution of Repeated Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallaseth, Ferez Soli

    The Y-chromosome presents a unique cytogenetic framework for the evolution of nucleotide sequences. Alignment of nine Y-chromosomal fragments in their increasing Y-specific/non Y-specific (male/female) sequence divergence ratios was directly and inversely related to their interspersion on these two respective genomic fractions. Sequence analysis confirmed a direct relationship between divergence ratios and the Alu, LINE-1, Satellite and their derivative oligonucleotide contents. Thus their relocation on the Y-chromosome is followed by sequence divergence rather than the well documented concerted evolution of these non-coding progenitor repeated sequences. Five of the nine Y-chromosomal fragments are non-pseudoautosomal and transcribed into heterogeneous PolyA^+ RNA and thus can be retrotransposed. Evolutionary and computer analysis identified homologous oligonucleotide tracts in several human loci suggesting common and random mechanistic origins. Dysgenic genomes represent the accelerated evolution driving sequence divergence (McClintock, 1984). Sex reversal and sterility characterizing dysgenesis occurs in C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos} derivative strains. High frequency, random, multi-locus deletion products of the feral Y^{ rm Pos}-chromosome are generated in the germlines of F1(C57BL/6J X 129/SvY^{ rm Pos})(male) and C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos}(male) but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos}(male). Equal, 10^{-1}, 10^ {-2}, and 0 copies (relative to males) of Y^{rm Pos}-specific deletion products respectively characterize C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} (HC), (LC), (T) and (F) females. The testes determining loci of inactive Y^{rm Pos}-chromosomes in C57BL/6JY^{rm Pos} HC females are the preferentially deleted/rearranged Y ^{rm Pos}-sequences. Disruption of regulation of plasma testosterone and hepatic MUP-A mRNA levels, TRD of a 4.7 Kbp EcoR1 fragment suggest disruption of autosomal/X-chromosomal sequences. These data and the highly repeated progenitor (Alu, GATA, LINE-1

  16. A model describing the effect of sex-reversed YY fish in an established wild population: The use of a Trojan Y chromosome to cause extinction of an introduced exotic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Juan B; Teem, John L

    2006-07-21

    A novel means of inducing extinction of an exotic fish population is proposed using a genetic approach to shift the ratio of male to females within a population. In the proposed strategy, sex-reversed fish containing two Y chromosomes are introduced into a normal fish population. These YY fish result in the production of a disproportionate number of male fish in subsequent generations. Mathematical modeling of the system following introduction of YY fish at a constant rate reveals that female fish decline in numbers over time, leading to eventual extinction of the population. PMID:16406425

  17. Homogeneity of coral reef communities across 8 degrees of latitude in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, May B; Jones, Geoffrey P; McCormick, Mark I; Munday, Philip L; Neale, Stephen; Thorrold, Simon; Robitzch, Vanessa S N; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-04-30

    Coral reef communities between 26.8 °N and 18.6 °N latitude in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea were surveyed to provide baseline data and an assessment of fine-scale biogeography of communities in this region. Forty reefs along 1100 km of coastline were surveyed using depth-stratified visual transects of fish and benthic communities. Fish abundance and benthic cover data were analyzed using multivariate approaches to investigate whether coral reef communities differed with latitude. A total of 215 fish species and 90 benthic categories were recorded on the surveys. There were no significant differences among locations in fish abundance, species richness, or among several diversity indices. Despite known environmental gradients within the Red Sea, the communities remained surprisingly similar. The communities do, however, exhibit subtle changes across this span of reefs that likely reflect the constrained distributions of several species of reef fish and benthic fauna. PMID:26608504

  18. Homogeneity of coral reef communities across 8 degrees of latitude in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Roberts, May B.

    2015-11-20

    Coral reef communities between 26.8°N and 18.6°N latitude in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea were surveyed to provide baseline data and an assessment of fine-scale biogeography of communities in this region. Forty reefs along 1100 km of coastline were surveyed using depth-stratified visual transects of fish and benthic communities. Fish abundance and benthic cover data were analyzed using multivariate approaches to investigate whether coral reef communities differed with latitude. A total of 215 fish species and 90 benthic categories were recorded on the surveys. There were no significant differences among locations in fish abundance, species richness, or among several diversity indices. Despite known environmental gradients within the Red Sea, the communities remained surprisingly similar. The communities do, however, exhibit subtle changes across this span of reefs that likely reflect the constrained distributions of several species of reef fish and benthic fauna.

  19. Coccolithophores from the central Arabian Sea: Sediment trap results

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lina P Mergulhao; Rahul Mohan; V S N Murty; M V S Guptha; D K Sinha

    2006-08-01

    Sediment trap samples collected from a depth of 1018 m in the Central Arabian Sea Trap (CAST) at 14° 28.2′N, 64° 35.8′E were analyzed for temporal variation of coccolithophore fluxes from October 1993 to August 1994.Out of the twenty species of coccolithophores encountered, \\tetit {Gephyrocapsa oceanica,Emiliania huxleyi,Umbilicosphaera sibogae} and Umbellosphaera irregularis were the most abundant.The total coccolithophore fluxes ranged from 28.5 × 106 m−2 d−1 to 50.3 × 106 m−2 d−1 showing seasonality with higher fluxes during the northeast (NE) monsoon and lower fluxes during the spring intermonsoon. The higher fluxes were attributed to the enhancement of primary production in the central Arabian Sea due to southward extent of nutrients from the northeast Arabian Sea by the prevailing surface currents. Similarly, the occurrences of relatively lower coc-colithophore fluxes during the spring intermonsoon and southwest (SW) monsoon were attributed to the low nutrients in the warm, shallow surface mixed layer and downwelling to the south of Findlater Jet respectively in the central Arabian Sea.Some of the coccolithophore species such as E.huxleyi, G.oceanica, Calcidiscus leptoporus and Umbellosphaera tenuis showed signs of dissolution.

  20. Hydrography of the eastern Arabian Sea during summer monsoon 2002

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Shankar; S S C Shenoi; R K Nayak; P N Vinayachandran; G Nampoothiri; A M Almeida; G S Michael; M R Ramesh Kumar; D Sundar; O P Sreejith

    2005-10-01

    Hydrographic observations in the eastern Arabian Sea (EAS)during summer monsoon 2002 (during the first phase of the Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiment (ARMEX))include two approximately fortnight-long CTD time series.A barrier layer was observed occasionally during the two time series. These ephemeral barrier layers were caused by in situ rainfall,and by advection of low-salinity (high-salinity)waters at the surface (below the surface mixed layer).These barrier layers were advected away from the source region by the West India Coastal Current and had no discernible effect on the sea surface temperature.The three high-salinity water masses,the Arabian Sea High Salinity Water (ASHSW),Persian Gulf Water (PGW),and Red Sea Water (RSW),and the Arabian Sea Salinity Minimum also exhibited intermittency:they appeared and disappeared during the time series.The concentration of the ASHSW,PGW,and RSWdecreased equatorward,and that of the RSW also decreased offshore.The observations suggest that the RSW is advected equatorward along the continental slope off the Indian west coast.

  1. Modeling of Regional Climate over Red Sea and Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Stenchikov, Georgiy L.

    2011-04-09

    Observations, re-analyses, and climate model simulations show strong surface temperature trends in Middle East and Arabian Peninsula in the last 30 years. Trends are especially pronounced in summer exceeding +1K/decade. However, some regions, e.g., the So

  2. On Selected Morphemes in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carla; Schneider, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Following a year of study of Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL), we are documenting our findings to provide a grammatical sketch of the language. This paper represents one part of that endeavor and focuses on a description of selected morphemes, both manual and non-manual, that have appeared in the course of data collection. While some of the…

  3. Observations on Word Order in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Kristen; Mathur, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the syntactic level of the grammar of Saudi Arabian Sign Language by exploring some word orders that occur in personal narratives in the language. Word order is one of the main ways in which languages indicate the main syntactic roles of subjects, verbs, and objects; others are verbal agreement and nominal case morphology.…

  4. Selected Lexical Patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lesa; Palmer, Jeffrey Levi; Reynolds, Wanette

    2012-01-01

    This combined paper will focus on the description of two selected lexical patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL): metaphor and metonymy in emotion-related signs (Young) and lexicalization patterns of objects and their derivational roots (Palmer and Reynolds). The over-arcing methodology used by both studies is detailed in Stephen and…

  5. On Selected Phonological Patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Nozomi; Kozak, Viola

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on two selected phonological patterns that appear unique to Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL). For both sections of this paper, the overall methodology is the same as that discussed in Stephen and Mathur (this volume), with some additional modifications tailored to the specific studies discussed here, which will be expanded…

  6. Nitrous oxide emissions from the Arabian Sea: A synthesis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bange, H.W.; Andreae, M.O.; Lal, S.; Law, C.S.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Patra, P.K.; Rixen, P.K.; Upstill-Goddard, R.C.

    monsoons. Our revised estimate for the annual N sub(2)O flux from the Arabian Sea is much more tightly constrained than the previous consensus derived using averaged in-situ data from a smaller number of studies. However, the tendency to focus...

  7. Sebaceous adenitis in a 7-year-old Arabian gelding

    OpenAIRE

    Osborne, Christina

    2006-01-01

    A 7-year-old Arabian gelding was presented with a 9-month history of progressive patches of nonpruritic scaling, crusting, alopecia, and leukoderma of the periocular areas and muzzle, becoming generalized over time. Sebaceous adenitis was diagnosed on histopathologic examination. Lesions resolved without treatment, coinciding with regression of a sarcoid on the neck.

  8. "Going Mobile" in Business Communication at an Arabian Gulf University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapanta, Chrysi; Nickerson, Catherine; Goby, Valerie Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe a project in which undergraduate business seniors at a university in the Arabian Gulf created or evaluated the chapters of an iBook as part of their final course in business communication. Students were surveyed throughout the project, and they also participated in a focus group discussion at the end. The aim was to…

  9. The genus Nervilia (Orchidaceae) in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettersson, Börge

    1991-01-01

    The orchidaceous genus Nervilia Comm. ex Gaud, is revised for Africa, including Madagascar and other islands, and the Arabian peninsula. Sixteen species are recognized, two of which are each subdivided into two varieties. Keys are presented for all taxa. Lectotypes or neotypes are given for all rele

  10. Insect drift over the northern Arabian Sea in early summer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pathak, S.C.; Kulshrestha, V.; Choubey, A.K.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Air borne insects, mostly carried by wind currents, were trapped over the northern Arabian Sea (16 degrees to 20 degrees N; 68 degrees to 72 degrees E), in the course of cruise No. 111, ORV Sagar Kanya (March 14 to April 7, 1996). A total of 2...

  11. Some aspects of the nitrogen cycling in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Noronha, R.J.; Shailaja, M.S.; Somasundar, K.; SenGupta, R.

    in the intensity of the oxygen-deficient conditions is providEd. by data on the nitrogen system as well as the activity of the electron transport system (ETS). The results imply a quick renewal of the oxygen-depleted waters. Denitrification in the Arabian Sea...

  12. Spreading history of the Arabian Sea: Some new constraints

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A.K.; Bhattacharya, G.C.; Murty, G.P.S.; Desa, M.

    Based on a new identification of magnetic anomalies, additional constraints are provided on the two episodes of spreading history of the Arabian Sea. Commencing at A27, the older phase ended at A21 and sprading of the younger phase started shortly...

  13. Nitrogen cycling in the suboxic waters of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Devol, A.H.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Codispoti, L.A.

    due to nitrogen fixation either in the Arabian Sea or in the ODZ source waters, anammox, or sedimentary denitrification. Nitrate deficit based estimates of overall denitrification rate are about 40 Tg N a sup(-1), but if the larger excess nitrogen gas...

  14. Coccolithophores from the central Arabian Sea: Sediment trap results

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mergulhao, L.P.; Mohan, R.; Murty, V.S.N.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Sinha, D.K.

    Sediment trap samples collected from a depth of 1018m in the Central Arabian Sea Trap (CAST) at 14 degrees 28.2 minutes N, 64 degrees 35.8 minutes E were analyzed for temporal variation of coccolithophore fluxes from October 1993 to August 1994. Out...

  15. Indian Ocean dipole modulated wave climate of eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anoop, T.R.; SanilKumar, V.; Shanas, P.R.; Glejin, J.; Amrutha, M.M.

    climate of the eastern Arabian Sea (AS). Using measured, modeled and reanalysis wave data and reanalysis wind data, we show that the IOD plays a major role in the variability of wave climate of the study region. Due to the IOD-induced changes in equatorial...

  16. The Arabian Sea: Physical environment, zooplankton and myctophid abundance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, K.K.C.; Madhupratap, M.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Haridas, P.; Gauns, M.

    tunicates which are able to feed on very small particles. It would seem that the Arabian Sea sustains a large biomass of mesopelagic fishes (about 100 million tonnes), mainly myctophids. They mostly live in the core of oxygen minimum layer and ascend...

  17. Nitrogen isotopic studies in the suboxic Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A; Yoshinari, T.; Brandes, J.A; Devol, A; Jayakumar, D.A; Narvekar, P.V.; Altabet, M.A; Codispoti, L.A.

    sub(2) and oxygen (O sub(2)), respectively] have been made in water column at several locations in the Arabian Sea, a region with one of the thickest and most intense O sub(2) minima observed in the open ocean. Microbially-mediated reduction of NO sub...

  18. Five years MIQE guidelines: the case of the Arabian countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afif M Abdel Nour

    Full Text Available The quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR has become a key molecular enabling technology with an immense range of research, clinical, forensic as well as diagnostic applications. Its relatively moderate instrumentation and reagent requirements have led to its adoption by numerous laboratories, including those located in the Arabian world, where qPCR, which targets DNA, and reverse transcription qPCR (RT-qPCR, which targets RNA, are widely used for region-specific biotechnology, agricultural and human genetic studies. However, it has become increasingly apparent that there are significant problems with both the quality of qPCR-based data as well as the transparency of reporting. This realisation led to the publication of the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE guidelines in 2009 and their more widespread adoption in the last couple of years. An analysis of the performance of biomedical research in the Arabian world between 2001-2005 suggests that the Arabian world is producing fewer biomedical publications of lower quality than other Middle Eastern countries. Hence we have analysed specifically the quality of RT-qPCR-based peer-reviewed papers published since 2009 from Arabian researchers using a bespoke iOS/Android app developed by one of the authors. Our results show that compliance with 15 essential MIQE criteria was low (median of 40%, range 0-93% and few details on RNA quality controls (22% compliance, assays design (12%, RT strategies (32%, amplification efficiencies (30% and the normalisation process (3%. These data indicate that one of the reasons for the poor performance of Arabian world biomedical research may be the low standard of any supporting qPCR experiments and identify which aspects of qPCR experiments require significant improvements.

  19. Potentially active copies of the gypsy retroelement are confined to the Y chromosome of some strains of Drosophila melanogaster possibly as the result of the female-specific effect of the flamenco gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalvet, F; di Franco, C; Terrinoni, A; Pelisson, A; Junakovic, N; Bucheton, A

    1998-04-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus present in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. This element is mobilized only in the progeny of females which contain active gypsy elements and which are homozygous for permissive alleles of a host gene called flamenco (flam). Some data strongly suggest that gypsy elements bearing a diagnostic HindIII site in the central region of the retrovirus body represent a subfamily that appears to be much more active than elements devoid of this site. We have taken advantage of this structural difference to assess by the Southern blotting technique the genomic distribution of active gypsy elements. In some of the laboratory Drosophila stocks tested, active gypsy elements were found to be restricted to the Y chromosome. Further analyses of 14 strains tested for the permissive vs. restrictive status of their flamenco alleles suggest that the presence of permissive alleles of flam in a stock tends to be associated with the confinement of active gypsy elements to the Y chromosome. This might be the result of the female-specific effect of flamenco on gypsy activity. PMID:9541538

  20. Genetic polymorphism of twelve Y chromosomal short tandem repeat loci in Chinese Hui ethnic group%宁夏回族群体12个Y染色体短串联重复序列基因座多态性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱永生; 霍正浩; 余兵; 张洪波; 王玉炯; 赵巍; 焦海燕; 党洁; 李生斌

    2007-01-01

    目的 获得12个Y染色体短串联重复序列(Y chromosome short tandem repeat,Y-STR)位点(DYS19、DYS389Ⅰ、DYS389Ⅱ、DYS390、DYS391、DYS392、DYS393、DYS385a、DYS385b、DYS437、DYS438、DYS439)在宁夏回族群体的多态性分布.方法 应用PowerPlex(R)Y荧光标记复合扩增试剂盒,对宁夏回族群体150名无关健康男性个体基因组DNA进行复合扩增,用ABI377测序仪对扩增产物进行检测,统计12个Y-STRs位点群体遗传学参数.结果 12个基因座共检测出75个等位基因,频率分布在0.0067~0.7067之间,基因多样性(gene diversity,GD)分布在0.4446~0.8877之间.在150名无关个体中,共有148种不同的单倍型,其中只有两种单倍型分别为两名个体共有,12个Y-STRs位点联合构成的单倍型多样性为0.9864.结论 12个Y-STRs基因座在宁夏回族群体具有较强的个体识别能力,可应用于群体遗传学及法医学研究.

  1. DNA polymorphism of Arabian, thoroughbred and Anglo-Arabian Horses in Morocco: Application to identification of individual horses and parentage verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: New techniques of molecular biology used in analyzing DNA polymorphism give access to the whole genetic variability of a given individual while the traditional blood typing (red cell typing and biochemical polymorphisms) gives access only to the transcribed fraction which is then translated to protein. In addition, this fraction represents only a very small part (5-10%) of the genome's incoding fraction. One of the newer testing methods in identifying horses is a DNA-based test using microsatellite marker analysis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of this new technology in the identification and parentage verification of Arabian, Thoroughbred and Anglo-Arabian horses in Morocco. Anglo-Arabian horse is a crossbreed between Arabian and Thoroughbred. Three samples from the three breeds were analyzed for 12 microsatellites (HMS2, HMS3, HMS6, HMS7, HTG4, HTG6, HTG7, AHT4, AHT5, VHL20, HTG10 and ASB2). A total of 1541 horses were used: 804 Arabians, 559 Thoroughbreds and 178 Anglo-Arabians. Allelic frequencies of the 12 studied systems were calculated in the three groups. The results allowed the determination of intra-population genetic parameters: heterozygosity ratio (H), probability of identification (PI) and probability of exclusion (PE). Based on average heterozygosity ratio, variability was relatively lower in Thoroughbred horse (.7036), while it was almost the same in Arabian and Anglo-Arabian horses (respectively .7217 and .7232). Probabilities of exclusion obtained with the 12 systems were higher than 99.9% for the three studied populations and probabilities of identification of individual horses were 15 x 10-12, 4 x 10-12 and 20 x 10-12 in Thoroughbred, Arabian and Anglo-Arabian horses respectively. These results indicate that the test using microsatellite marker analysis constitute a highly efficient and reliable alternative for the identification of individual horses and parentage verification and is a useful tool for horse

  2. 不育男性Y染色体长度异常的精液质量%Effect of abnormality Y chromosome and sperm quality on the result of insisted reproductive techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢伟; 秦雯; 莫定敢; 陈美佳; 吕福通; 覃爱平

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of abnormality Y chromosome and sperm quality on the clinical result of insisted reproductive technique (ART). Methods We retrospectively analyzed the effect of ab-normality Y chromosome and sperm quality on embryo quality/result of pregnancy of patients undergoing ART. In-fertile men with normality Y chromosome (n=436) and with abnormality Y chromosome (n =146) from Jan 2010 to Dec 2010 were enrolled in this study. The infertile men were divided into four groups: the normality Y chromo-some plus teratozoospermia group , the normality Y chromosome plus normal sperm quality group , the abnormality Y chromosome plus teratozoospermia group, the abnormality Y chromosome plus normal sperm quality group. Embryo quality and the results of clinic pregnancy outcome were analyzed among the four groups. Results Fertilization rate of the four groups was 73.4%, 69.0%, 70.9% and 68%, respectively (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found in thecleavage rate, optimal embryo rate and pregnancy outcome among the four groups. Conclusions Both abnormality Y chromosome length and teratozoospermia may be affect the fertility rate of the infertile men undergoing IVF/ICSI.%目的:了解在辅助生殖技术(insisted reproductive techniques,ART)中 Y 染色体长度异常患者的精液质量情况,并按不同精液质量分组,讨论其胚胎质量、临床妊娠结局及意义。方法:通过回顾性分析2010年1月1日至2010年12月31日在中心进行辅助生殖助孕的患者共2739周期,染色体检查682例,其中染色体正常436(63.93%),合并畸形精子症196例,染色体长度异常共146例(Y =22,139例;Y =18,7例),占5.33%,合并畸形精子症73例。将患者分为染色体长度正常组和染色体长度异常组,再分精子形态正常组、精子形态异常组2个亚组,共4组,即染色体长度正常且精子形态正常组(组1),染色体长度正

  3. Remotely Searching for Noctiluca Miliaris in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdell, P. Jeremy; Roesler, Collin S.; Goes, Joaquim I.

    2014-01-01

    Reversing monsoonal winds in the Arabian Sea result in two seasons with elevated biological activity, namely the annual summer Southwest Monsoon (SWM; June to September) and winter Northeast Monsoon (NEM; November to March) [Wiggert et al., 2005]. Generally speaking, the SWM and NEM create two geographically distinct blooms [Banse and English, 2000; Levy et al., 2007]. In the summer, winds from the southwest drive offshore Ekman transport and coastal upwelling along the northwestern coast of Africa, which brings nutrient-rich water to the surface from below the permanent thermocline [Bauer et al., 1991]. In the winter, cooling of the northern Arabian Sea causes surface waters to sink, which generates convective mixing that injects nutrients throughout the upper mixed layer [Madhupratap et al., 1996]. This fertilization of otherwise nutrient-deplete surface waters produces one of the most substantial seasonal extremes of phytoplankton biomass and carbon flux anywhere in the world [Smith, 2005].

  4. Nitrous oxide emissions from the Arabian Sea: A synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. W. Bange

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available We computed high-resolution (1o latitude × 1o longitude seasonal and annual nitrous oxide (N2O concentration fields for the Arabian Sea surface layer using a database containing more than 2400 values measured between December 1977 and July 1997. N2O concentrations are highest during the southwest (SW monsoon along the southern Indian continental shelf. Annual emissions range from 0.33 to 0.70 Tg N2O and are dominated by fluxes from coastal regions during the SW and northeast monsoons. However, the tendency to focus on measurements in locally restricted features in combination with insufficient seasonal data coverage leads to considerable uncertainties of the concentration fields and thus in the flux estimates, especially in the coastal zones of the northern and eastern Arabian Sea.

  5. The relationship between Arabian Sea upwelling and Indian monsoon revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, X; B. Hünicke; N. Tim; E. Zorita

    2015-01-01

    Studies based on upwelling indices (sediment records, sea-surface temperature and wind) suggest that upwelling along the western coast of Arabian Sea is strongly affected by the Indian summer monsoon (ISM). In order to examine this relationship directly, we employ the vertical water mass transport produced by the eddy-resolving global ocean simulation STORM driven by meteorological reanalysis over the last 61 years. With its very high spatial resolution (10 ...

  6. Nitrogen isotopic studies in the suboxic Arabian sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of 15N/14N in dissolved molecular nitrogen (N2), nitrate (NO3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) and 18O/16O in N2O [expressed as δ15N and δ18O, relative to atmospheric N2 and oxygen (O2), respectively] have been made in water column at several locations in the Arabian sea, a region with one of the thickest and most intense O2 minima observed in the open ocean

  7. Evaluation of foaling heat in Arabian mares in Ninevah province

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Rahawy

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to study the relationship between breeding season of Arabian mares at first estrous afterfoaling and pregnancy rate. Thirty six mares were divided in to two groups according to foaling heat in breeding season,transitional periods. Animals included in this study were maintained with the same management and conditions in the specialbreeding stables. This study was performed in a farm located in Nineveh province during the period from June 2008 to June2010. The ma...

  8. The Neolithic origins of seafaring in the Arabian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Carter

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The inhabitants of the Arabian Gulf were among the world’s earliest maritime traders. Their ships sailed regularly between the Bronze Age civilizations of Mesopotamia, Bahrain and the Indus Valley, and they reached China by sea in the eighth century AD, thus bypassing the long and perilous overland Silk Road route across Central Asia. Now excavations at a coastal site in Kuwait by a team from the Institute have revealed even earlier evidence of maritime activity in the Gulf.

  9. Guidelines to classification and nomenclature of Arabian felsic plutonic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, C.R.; Stoeser, D.B.; Drysdall, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    Well-defined procedures for classifying the felsic plutonic rocks of the Arabian Shield on the basis of petrographic, chemical and lithostratigraphic criteria and mineral-resource potential have been adopted and developed in the Saudi Arabian Deputy Ministry for Mineral Resources over the past decade. A number of problems with conventional classification schemes have been identified and resolved; others, notably those arising from difficulties in identifying precise mineral compositions, continue to present difficulties. The petrographic nomenclature used is essentially that recommended by the International Union of Geological Sciences. Problems that have arisen include the definition of: (1) rocks with sodic, zoned or perthitic feldspar, (2) trondhjemites, and (3) alkali granites. Chemical classification has been largely based on relative molar amounts of alumina, lime and alkalis, and the use of conventional variation diagrams, but pilot studies utilizing univariate and multivariate statistical techniques have been made. The classification used in Saudi Arabia for stratigraphic purposes is a hierarchy of formation-rank units, suites and super-suites as defined in the Saudi Arabian stratigraphic code. For genetic and petrological studies, a grouping as 'associations' of similar and genetically related lithologies is commonly used. In order to indicate mineral-resource potential, the felsic plutons are classed as common, precursor, specialized or mineralized, in order of increasing exploration significance. ?? 1986.

  10. 精索静脉曲张男性不育患者Y染色体微缺失检测%Screening of Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile males with varicocele

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高佃军; 李江松; 孙宝刚; 柳港; 祝增军; 刘伟光

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between Y chromosome microdeletions and human spermatogenesis in infertile men with varicocele (VC). Methods: We divided 174 infertile VC patients into groups A (with azoospermia, n = 47) , B (with severe oligozoospermia, n =57) and C (with mild oligozoospermia, n = 70) , and enlisted 28 fertile males and 26 fertile females as normal controls. We collected DNA from the peripheral blood, amplified 6 sequence tagged sites in AZFa, AZFb and AZFc using multiplex PCR technique. Then we separated and scanned the amplified products by agarose gel electrophoresis to identify microdeletions and their types in comparison with the controls. Results: Y chromosome microdeletions were observed in 12. 64% of the patients (22/174) , 11 cases in group A and the other 11 in group B, but none in group C and the normal controls. The differences were statistically significant (P <0. 05) . In group A, 6 of the microdeletion cases were in the AZFc region, 1 in the AZFa region, 2 in the AZFb region and 2 in both AZFb and AZFc regions, while in group B, 8 cases were in the AZFc region, 2 in the AZFb region and 1 in both AZFb and AZFc regions. Conclusion: Infertility is correlated to Y chromosome microdeletions in VC patients. Y chromosome mi-crodeletion screening should be performed for infertile VC patients, especially for those with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia.%目的:探讨精索静脉曲张(varicocele,VC)不育患者Y染色体微缺失特点及其与临床表型的关系,为评价VC不育患者是否行手术治疗或ICSI提供依据. 方法:VC不育患者174例,分为3组,A组:无精子症47例;B组:严重少精子症57例;C组:轻度少精子症70例;设立正常生育的健康志愿者男性28例作为对照组(D组).抽取外周血提取DNA,选取Y染色体上AZFa、AZFb、AZFc区共6个序列标签位点,应用多重PCR进行扩增;已生育女性26例作为阴性对照,分别运用琼脂糖凝胶电泳分离,对照阅读扩增产

  11. Chromosome abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in patients with the azoospermia and cryptozoospermia%无精症及隐匿精子症患者染色体核型与Y染色体微缺失分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘兴章; 唐运革; 郑立新; 周冰燚; 刘晃; 李铭臻; 唐立新; 文任乾

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究无精症和隐匿精子症染色体核型与Y染色体无精因子(azoospermia factor,AZF)微缺失的发生频率及其关系.方法 对997例无精症和隐匿精子症患者进行常规染色体核型分析及多重聚合酶链反应技术检测AZF位点.结果 在997例无精症和隐匿精子症患者中,染色体核型异常检出率28.4%,异常核型包括47,XXY、46,XY(Y<G)、46,XX、嵌合体及相互易位等.AZF微缺失总检出率17.4%.常见于46,XY及46,XY(Y<G)等核型.结论 染色体核型异常是无精症和隐匿精子症的重要遗传病因.正常核型与Y<G患者中存在较高的AZF微缺失率,对这些患者进行AZF微缺失检查有助于明确病因,避免一些不必要的临床治疗及遗传缺陷的垂直传递.%Objective To study the incidence of the chromosome abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in Chinese patients with azoospermia and cryptozoospermia. Methods Conventional chromosomal karyotyping was used to analyze the chromosome abnormalities. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples and multiplex polymerase chain reactions (PCR) analyses were performed using specific primers to confirm the presence or absence of Y chromosome microdeletions. A total of 997 patients with azoospermia and cryptozoospermia were enrolled in the study. Results The incidence of chromosome abnormalities in the patient with azoospermia and cryptozoospermia was 28.4%. The major abnormal karyotypes included 47, XXY, 46, XY (Y < G), 46, XX, chimera and translocations. The incidence of the Y chromosome microdeletions was 17.4%. They were mainly found in the karyotypes of 46,XY and 46, XY (Y< G). Conclusion Chromosome abnormalities were the most common hereditary causes of the patients with azoospermia and cryptozoospermia. The incidence of Y chromosome microdeletion was higher in the patients with karyotype of 46 ,XY and 46 ,XY (Y<G). Therefore, detection of the AZF microdeletion in these patients is

  12. Arabian killifish (Aphanius dispar) embryos: A model organism for the risk assessment of the Arabian Gulf coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Suhur; Al-Naema, Nayla; Butler, Josh D; Febbo, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Fish embryos are excellent models for studies aimed at understanding toxic mechanisms and indications of possible acute and chronic effects. For the past 3 yr, an Arabian killifish (Aphanius dispar) fish embryo test has been developed in the authors' laboratory as a routine ecotoxicological test that can be used to support risk assessment of potential contaminants in Arabian Gulf coastal waters. Tests were conducted with 3 reference toxicants (3,4-dichloroaniline [DCA], sodium dodecyl sulfate, and zinc sulfate [Zn]) and chlorine, a disinfectant used widely in industrial cooling systems around the Arabian Gulf region. The 50% effect concentration (EC50) for DCA was 0.47 mg/L and 1.89 mg/L for embryos exposed before 6 hpf and after 168 hpf, respectively. Sublethal effects were mainly observed at concentrations above 2.5 mg/L, the effects included severe pericardial edema and tail shortage. The sodium dodecyl sulfate ionic surfactant caused mortality at both early and late stages of embryo development; it caused coagulation, severe deformity, and hemolysis. Both the EC50 and the 50% lethal concentration (LC50) for sodium dodecyl sulfate were 9.37 mg/L. Salinity influenced the toxicity of Zn to killifish embryos: at 40 psu Zn was found not to be toxic, whereas at 20 psu toxicity had increased significantly (p experiment. The LC50 for chlorine was determined to be 0.08 mg/L. Examination of the existing literature showed similar results to the present study's findings. The results suggest a more comparable sensitivity of killifish embryos to that of other fish embryo test recommended species. The present study's findings support the ability of killifish to be an indicator organism for environmental risk assessments of Arabian Gulf waters. Benefits include sensitivity to a wide range of substances and conditions, animal alternative, ease of fish breeding, and clarity of the embryos. PMID:26184573

  13. 泰国少精无精不育男性中Y染色体微缺失和染色体异常的发病率%Frequency of Y chromosome microdeletions and chromosomal abnormalities in infertile Thai men with oligozoospermia and azoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Vutyavanich; W.Piromlertamorn; W.Sirirungsi; S.Sirisukkasem

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the possible causes of oligozoospermia and azoospermia in infertile Thai men, and to find the frequencies of Y chromosome microdeletions and cytogenetic abnormalities in this group. Methods: From June 2003 to November 2005, 50 azoospermic and 80 oligozoospermic men were enrolled in the study. A detailed history was taken for each man, followed by general and genital examinations. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using 11 gene-specific primers that covered all three regions of the azoospermic factor (AZFa, AZFb and AZFc). Fifty men with normal semen analysis were also studied. Karyotyping was done with the standard G- and Q-banding. Serum concentrations of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL) and testosterone were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassays (ECLIA). Results: Azoospermia and oligozoospermia could be explained by previous orchitis in 22.3%, former bilateral cryptorchidism in 19.2%, abnormal karyotypes in 4.6% and Y chromosome microdeletions in 3.8% of the subjects. The most frequent deletions were in the AZFc region (50%), followed by AZFb (33%) and AZFbc (17%).No significant difference was detected in hormonal profiles of infertile men, with or without microdeletions.Conclusion: The frequencies of Y chromosome microdeletions and cytogenetic abnormalities in oligozoospermic and azoospermic Thai men are comparable with similarly infertile men from other Asian and Western countries.

  14. Active NE-SW Compressional Strain Within the Arabian Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, M. A.; ArRajehi, A.; King, R. W.; McClusky, S.; Reilinger, R. E.; Douad, M.; Sholan, J.; Bou-Rabee, F.

    2012-12-01

    Motion of the Arabian plate with respect to Eurasia has been remarkably steady over more than 25 Myr as revealed by comparison of geodetic and plate tectonic reconstructions (e.g., McQuarrie et al., 2003, GRL; ArRajehi et al., 2010, Tectonics). While internal plate deformation is small in comparison to the rate of Arabia-Eurasia convergence, the improved resolution of GPS observations indicate ~ NE-SW compressional strain that appears to affect much of the plate south of latitude ~ 30°N. Seven ~ NE-SW oriented inter-station baselines all indicated shortening at rates in the range of 0.5-2 mm/yr, for the most part with 1-sigma velocity uncertainties < 0.4 mm/yr. Plate-scale strain rates exceed 2×10-9/yr. The spatial distribution of strain can not be resolved from the sparse available data, but strain appears to extend at least to Riyadh, KSA, ~ 600 km west of the Zagros Fold and Thrust Belt that forms the eastern, collisional boundary of the Arabian plate with Eurasia (Iran). Geodetic velocities in the plate tectonic reference frame for Arabia, derived from magnetic anomalies in the Red Sea (Chu and Gordon, 1998, GJI), show no significant E-W motion for GPS stations located along the Red Sea coast (i.e., geodetic and plate tectonic spreading rates across the Red Sea agree within their resolution), in contrast to sites in the plate interior and along the east side of the plate that indicate east-directed motions. In addition, NE-SW contraction is roughly normal to ~ N-S striking major structural folds in the sedimentary rocks within the Arabian Platform. These relationships suggest that geodetically observed contraction has characterized the plate for at least the past ~ 3 Myr. Broad-scale contraction of the Arabian plate seems intuitively reasonable given that the east and north sides of the plate are dominated by active continental collision (Zagros, E Turkey/Caucasus) while the west and south sides are bordered by mid-ocean ridge spreading (Red Sea and Gulf of

  15. Response of the Arabian Sea to global warming and associated regional climate shift

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Roshin, R.P.; Narvekar, J.; DineshKumar, P.K.; Vivekanandan, E.

    The response of the Arabian Sea to global warming is the disruption in the natural decadal cycle in the sea surface temperature (SST) after 1995, followed by a secular warming. The Arabian Sea is experiencing a regional climate-shift after 1995...

  16. Why is Bay of Bengal warmer than Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Shetye, S.R.

    The near-surface Bay of Bengal remains significantly warmer than the Arabian Sea during summer monsoon (June-September). Analysis of the heat budgets of the near-surface Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal shows significant differences between them during...

  17. Sound speed structure in the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Murty, T.V.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Murty, C.S.

    Sound speed computed from annual mean temperature and salinity data of Levitus reveals that spatial variation in the Arabian Sea is greater than that in the Bay of Bengal. Maximum spatial variation of sound speed in the Arabian Sea noticed between...

  18. Genetic Diversity in the Lesser Antilles and Its Implications for the Settlement of the Caribbean Basin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jada Benn Torres

    Full Text Available Historical discourses about the Caribbean often chronicle West African and European influence to the general neglect of indigenous people's contributions to the contemporary region. Consequently, demographic histories of Caribbean people prior to and after European contact are not well understood. Although archeological evidence suggests that the Lesser Antilles were populated in a series of northward and eastern migratory waves, many questions remain regarding the relationship of the Caribbean migrants to other indigenous people of South and Central America and changes to the demography of indigenous communities post-European contact. To explore these issues, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome diversity in 12 unrelated individuals from the First Peoples Community in Arima, Trinidad, and 43 unrelated Garifuna individuals residing in St. Vincent. In this community-sanctioned research, we detected maternal indigenous ancestry in 42% of the participants, with the remainder having haplotypes indicative of African and South Asian maternal ancestry. Analysis of Y-chromosome variation revealed paternal indigenous American ancestry indicated by the presence of haplogroup Q-M3 in 28% of the male participants from both communities, with the remainder possessing either African or European haplogroups. This finding is the first report of indigenous American paternal ancestry among indigenous populations in this region of the Caribbean. Overall, this study illustrates the role of the region's first peoples in shaping the genetic diversity seen in contemporary Caribbean populations.

  19. Purkinje cell apoptosis in arabian horses with cerebellar abiotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, A; Moyano, R; Vivo, J; Flores-Acuña, R; Molina, A; Blanco, C; Monterde, J G

    2006-08-01

    Purkinje cerebellar cells were studied in three Arabian horses aged between 6 and 8 months with clinical disorders in their movements, tremors and ataxia; the occurrence of apoptosis in this cell population was investigated by the (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) method. Both optical and electron microscopical images showed a scant number of Purkinje cells, most of them with morphological features of apoptosis such as condensation of the nucleus and cytoplasm as well as segregation and fragmentation of the nucleus into apoptotic bodies. The TUNEL technique revealed a substantial number (65%) of positive immunoreactive Purkinje cells. PMID:16901270

  20. Oscillating environmental responses of the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gerson, V.J.; Madhu, N.V.; Jyothibabu, R.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, M.; Revichandran, C.

    Journal of Geo-Marine Sciences Vol. 43(1), January 2014, pp. 67-75 Oscillating environmental responses of the eastern Arabian Sea Vijay John Gerson1*, Madhu N V2, Jyothibabu R2, Balachandran K K2, Maheswari Nair2 & Revichandran C2 1St.Albert’s College... upwelling effects yet to reach the surface (Figures 3d, 3e & 3f). The vertical distribution of NO3- and SiO44- revealed high concentrations at the surface layers along south west coast of India (Fig. 3). Horizontal distribution of NO3- at the depths of 0, 10...

  1. On the distribution of pelagic cephalopods in the Arabian Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Piatkowski, Uwe; Welsch, Wolfgang

    1991-01-01

    From April to June of 1987 R/V Meteor collected zooplankton and micronekton samples in the northeastern part of the Arabian Sea. One hundred and fifty-seven cephalopod specimens were captured by oblique IKMT hauls through water depths from 1,000 to 0 m and identified to the lowest possible taxon. Thirteen species of nine families were recorded. The majority of the specimens were early life stages of pelagic oceanic species. The cranchiid squid Liocranchia reinhardti was the dominant form (108...

  2. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.

    ; Prabhakara Rao et al., 1987; Rao et al., 1983). Since the feature is having a transient nature, a good data coverage both in time and space scale is required to study. The BT traces collected onboard RV. Gaveshani and ORV. Sagarkanya from this area form... is provided to examine the magnitude of the forcing mechanisms. 2. Material and Methods BT traces collected at 1132 stations from the south eastern Arabian Sea during different cruises of RV. Gaveshani (1976–1986) and ORV. Sagarkanya (1983–1986) have been...

  3. Biogeochemical ocean-atmosphere transfers in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Bange, H.W.; Gibb, S.W.; Goyet, C.; Hatton, A.D.; Upstill-Goddard, R.C.

    , 2001; Upstill-Goddard, Barnes, Frost, Punshon, & Owens, 2000). Based on the only major study of CH 4 carried out in the Arabian Sea prior to JGOFS (Owens, Law, Mantoura, Burkill, & Llewellyn, 1991), it was thought that this region could be of key...–186%) in surface waters (Law & Owens, 1990; Naqvi & Noronha, 1991). This prompted additional, more-detailed investigations under JGOFS and other contemporary programs. In this section we provide a synthesis of the ensuing data, focusing primarily on the surface N 2...

  4. XY male pseudohermaphroditism in a captive Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Luis R; Dutton, Christopher J; Bauman, Joan; Duncan, Mary

    2005-09-01

    A 2-yr-old Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) was presented for evaluation of abnormal genitalia and infantile behavior. The oryx had a penis and a scrotum, but testes were not palpable within the scrotum or inguinal canal. The total serum testosterone for the individual was lower than in age-matched males of the same species. Surgical exploration showed markedly hypoplastic intra-abdominal gonads, which demonstrated both testicular and uterine tissue on histologic examination. After karyotype analysis, the individual was classified as an XY male pseudohermaphrodite. This condition resembles two human intersex syndromes: embryonic testicular regression syndrome and partial gonadal dysgenesis syndrome, which occur in familial lines. PMID:17312771

  5. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction by Aspergillus terreus isolated from the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Fuchs-Ocklenburg, Silvia; Kamp, Anja; Manohar, Cathrine Sumathi; Houbraken, Jos; Boekhout, Teun; De Beer, Dirk; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Background: A wealth of microbial eukaryotes is adapted to life in oxygen-deficient marine environments. Evidence is accumulating that some of these eukaryotes survive anoxia by employing dissimilatory nitrate reduction, a strategy that otherwise is widespread in prokaryotes. Here, we report on the...... anaerobic nitrate metabolism of the fungus Aspergillus terreus (isolate An-4) that was obtained from sediment in the seasonal oxygen minimum zone in the Arabian Sea, a globally important site of oceanic nitrogen loss and nitrous oxide emission. Results: Axenic incubations of An-4 in the presence and absence...... dissimilatory nitrate reduction when oxygen is absent. In the currently spreading oxygen-deficient zones in the ocean, an as yet unexplored diversity of fungi may recycle nitrate to ammonium and nitrite, the substrates of the major nitrogen loss process anaerobic ammonium oxidation, and the potent greenhouse...

  6. 摩洛哥男性Y染色体的AZF微缺失和AZFc区域的部分缺失%AZF microdeletions and partial deletions of AZFc region on the Y chromosome in Moroccan men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Imken; M.Hassar; K. McElreavey; A.Barakat; H.Rouba; B.El Houate; A.Chafik; H. Nahili; R.Boulouiz; O.Abidi; E.Chadli; N.Louanjli; A.Elfath

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate for the first time the frequency of Y chromosome microdeletions and the occurrence of the partial deletions of AZFc region in Moroccan men, and to discuss the clinical significance of AZF deletions. Methods: We screened Y chromosome microdeletions and partial deletions of the AZFc region of a consecutive group of infertile men (n = 149) and controls (100 fertile men, 76 normospermic men). AZFa, AZFb, AZFc and partial deletions of the AZFc region were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) according to established protocols. Results: Among the 127 infertile men screened for microdeletion, four subjects were found to have microdeletions: two AZFc deletions and two AZFb+AZFc deletions. All the deletions were found only in azoospermic subjects (4/48, 8.33%). The overall AZFc deletion frequency was low (4/127, 3.15%). AZF microdeletions were not observed in either oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OATS) or the control. Partial deletions of AZFc (gr/gr) were observed in a total of 7 of the 149 infertile men (4.70%) and 7 partial AZFc deletions (gr/gr) were found in the control group (7/176, 3.98%).In addition, two b2/b3 deletions were identified in two azoospermic subjects (2/149, 1.34%) but not in the control group. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the frequency of Y chromosome AZF microdeletions is elevated in individuals with severe spermatogenic failure and that gr/gr deletions are not associated with spermatogenic failure.(Asian J Androl 2007 Sep; 9: 674-678)%目的:首次评价摩洛哥男性Y染色体微缺失和部分AZFc部分缺失的发生频率并讨论AZF缺失的临床意义.方法:我们筛选了不育组(n=149)和对照组(100名可育男性,76名精子正常男性)的Y染色体微缺失和AZFc区部分缺失的情况.根据已建立的方法用PCR分析AZFa、AZFb、AZFc和AZFc部分缺失的区域.结果:在127名不孕男性中进行了微缺失的筛选,其中4例有微缺失:二例AZFc缺失,二例AZFb+AZFc

  7. Carbon fluxes in the Arabian Sea: Export versus recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixen, Tim; Gaye, Birgit; Ramaswamy, Venkitasubramani

    2016-04-01

    The organic carbon pump strongly influences the exchange of carbon between the ocean and the atmosphere. It is known that it responds to global change but the magnitude and the direction of change are still unpredictable. Sediment trap experiments carried out at various sites in the Arabian Sea between 1986 and 1998 have shown differences in the functioning of the organic carbon pump (OCP). An OCP driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton operated in the upwelling region off Oman and during the spring bloom in the northern Arabian Sea. Cyanobacteria capable of fixing nitrogen seem to dominate the phytoplankton community during all other seasons. The export driven by cyanobacteria was much lower than the export driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton. Productivity and nutrient availability seems to be a main factor controlling fluxes during blooms of eukaryotic phytoplankton. The ballast effect caused by inputs of dust into the ocean and its incorporation into sinking particles seems to be the main factor controlling the export during times when cyanobacteria dominate the phytoplankton community. C/N ratios of organic matter exported from blooms dominated by nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria are enhanced and, furthermore, indicate a more efficient recycling of nutrients at shallower water depth. This implies that the bacterial-driven OCP operates more in a recycling mode that keeps nutrients closer to the euphotic zone whereas the OCP driven by eukaryotic phytoplankton reduces the recycling of nutrients by exporting them into greater water-depth.

  8. Analysis of the spatio-temporal variability of seawater quality in the southeastern Arabian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezhoud, Nahla; Temimi, Marouane; Zhao, Jun; Al Shehhi, Maryam Rashed; Ghedira, Hosni

    2016-05-15

    In this study, seawater quality measurements, including salinity, sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), Secchi disk depth (SDD), pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO), were made from June 2013 to November 2014 at 52 stations in the southeastern Arabian Gulf. Significant variability was noticed for all collected parameters. Salinity showed a decreasing trend, and Chl-a, DO, pH, and SDD demonstrated increasing trends from shallow onshore stations to deep offshore ones, which could be attributed to variations of ocean circulation and meteorological conditions from onshore to offshore waters, and the likely effects of desalination plants along the coast. Salinity and temperature were high in summer and low in winter while Chl-a, SDD, pH, and DO indicated an opposite trend. The CTD profiles showed vertically well-mixed structures. Qualitative analysis of phytoplankton showed a high diversity of species without anomalous species found except in Ras Al Khaimah stations where diatoms were the dominating ones. PMID:27012536

  9. A taxonomic survey of Saudi Arabian Red Sea octocorals (Cnidaria: Alcyonacea)

    KAUST Repository

    Haverkort-Yeh, Roxanne D.

    2013-05-04

    A preliminary survey of Saudi Arabian Alcyonacea is presented, which combines classical taxonomy, multilocus molecular barcodes, and in situ photographs. We explored 14 locations along the west coast of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to assess the regional taxonomic diversity of non-gorgonian alcyonaceans. We collected samples from a total of 74 colonies, distributed among four families: 18 colonies of Alcyoniidae, 14 of Nephtheidae, 9 of Tubiporidae, and 33 of Xeniidae. We sequenced the octocorals using multiple nuclear [ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacers (ITS) and ATP Synthetase Subunit α (ATPSα)] and mitochondrial [MutS homolog (mtMutS) and Cytochrome C Oxidase subunit one (COI)] loci, providing molecular barcodes which will: (1) allow direct comparison of biodiversity from this location to others for which molecular data are available, and (2) facilitate future identifications of these taxa. Finally, this preliminary phylogeny of sampled taxa provides insights on the resolution of mitochondrial versus nuclear loci, and highlights octocoral taxa that require further taxonomic attention. © 2013 Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  10. Coral-Associated Actinobacteria: Diversity, Abundance, and Biotechnological Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud, Huda M.; Kalendar, Aisha A.

    2016-01-01

    Marine Actinobacteria, particularly coral-associated Actinobacteria, have attracted attention recently. In this study, the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria associated with three types of coral thriving in a thermally stressed coral reef system north of the Arabian Gulf were investigated. Coscinaraea columna, Platygyra daedalea and Porites harrisoni have been found to harbor equivalent numbers of culturable Actinobacteria in their tissues but not in their mucus. However, different cul...

  11. Seasonal controls on surface pCO2 in the central and eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, V.V.S.S.; DileepKumar, M.; Gauns, M.; Madhupratap, M.

    is to understand the seasonal variability in the surface pCO2 abundance and its control by physical and biological factors in the central and eastern Arabian Sea. 2. Methods Five cruises (figure 1) were undertaken on board ORV Sagar Kanya during April -- May 1994... in the Arabian Sea. In: A Voyage of Discovery (ed) M Angel, (Oxford: Pergamon Press) pp. 291--304 Somasunder K, Rajendran A, Kumar M D and Sen Gupta R 1990 Carbon and nitrogen budgets of the Arabian Sea; Mar. Chem. 30 363--377 Swallow J C 1984 Some aspects...

  12. Qualitative Hoof Characteristics in Anglo-Arabian Horses and Monterufoli Ponies Reared in the Same Farm

    OpenAIRE

    R. TOCCI; C. Sargentini; Martini, A.; A. Giorgetti

    2015-01-01

    This work aims the hof morphological, physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics in Anglo Arabian horses, and Monterufoli ponies reared in Tuscany. 28 nail samples from wal and sole of hof were analysed. Al fet were healthy and wel conformed. The hof of Monterufoli Pony was more cylindrical, and the Anglo Arabian hof was harder (H 12.8±4.9, and H 19.4±2.7 in sole and in wal respectively). The percentage of dry mater (83.03±0.67) was greater in Anglo-Arabian hof, w...

  13. 'Shamal' swells in the Arabian Sea and their influence along the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aboobacker, V.M.; Vethamony, P.; Rashmi, R.

    off Ratnagiri and Dwarka, and at 3 hours interval off Goa with a sampling period of 20 minutes. The wave rider buoy has an accuracy of 3% for wave height and within 0.5 - 2° for wave direction. Wind sea and swell parameters were calculated from..., especially in the north- western Arabian Sea and in the Arabian Peninsula. These winds are associated with shamal events (active shamal area is marked in Figure 1a). Typical wind vectors in the Arabian Sea during NE monsoon and during shamal events...

  14. Tracing the origin and geographic distribution of an ancestral form of the modern human Y chromosome Reconstrucción del origen y distribución geográfica de una forma ancestral del cromosoma Y del hombre moderno

    OpenAIRE

    Bravi, Claudio M.; GRACIELA BAILLIET; VERÓNICA L MARTÍNEZ-MARIGNAC; Bianchi, Nestor O.

    2001-01-01

    We screened a total of 841 Y chromosomes representing 36 human populations of wide geographical distribution for the presence of a Y-specific Alu insert (YAP+ chromosomes). The Alu element was found in 77 cases. We tested five biallelic and eight polyallelic markers in 70 out of the 77 YAP+ chromosomes. We could identify the existence of a hierarchical and chronological structuring of ancestral and derived YAP+ lineages giving rise to four haplogroups, 14 subhaplogroups and 60 haplotypes. Mor...

  15. Map Service Showing Geology and Geologic Provinces of the Arabian Peninsula

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The geology data set for this map includes arcs, polygons, and labels that outline and describe the general geologic age and type of bedrock of the Arabian...

  16. Geographical extent of denitrification in the Arabian Sea in relation to some physical processes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    . This provides a mechanism for the injection of appreciable quantities of labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into the oxygen-minimum layer and, in conjunction with the high horizontal diffusivity in the Arabian Sea, could account for the observed lack...

  17. Seasonal spreading of the Persian Gulf water mass in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, T.G.; Ikeda, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    accounts for changes in the characteristics of PGW along these paths. Associated with the Findlater Jet during summer, the entire thermohaline structure is vertically displaced along the coasts of Somalia and Arabia. Ekman convergence in the central Arabian...

  18. Bedrock geology of the Arabian Peninsula and selected adjacent areas (geo2bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The data set for this coverage includes arcs, polygons, and polygon labels that outline and describe the general geologic age and type of bedrock of the Arabian...

  19. Phytoplankton production and chlorophyll distribution in the eastarn and central Arabian Sea in 1994-1995

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattathiri, P.M.A.; Pant, A.; Sawant, S.S.; Gauns, M.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Mahanraju, R.

    Measurements of primary production, chlorophyll a, particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON) were carried out during the inter-monsoon winter monsoon and summer monsoon seasons of 1994-95 in the central and eastern Arabian Sea...

  20. Bacterial abundance and production in the central and eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Raghukumar, S.; Gauns, M.

    Seasonal and spatial variations in bacterial and picoplankton abundances and bacterial production (thymidine incorporation rates) were determined in the water column up to 150 m in several stations in the central and eastern Arabian Sea. Higher...

  1. Arabian Sea Biogeochemistry from 27 August 1994 to 19 December 1994 (NODC Accession 0000064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Arabesque was a multidisciplinary oceanographic research project focused on the Arabian Sea and Northwest Indian Ocean during the monsoon and intermonsoon season in...

  2. Abrupt climate-induced changes in carbonate burial in the Arabian Sea: Causes and consequences.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.; Singh, A.D.; Ganeshram, R.S.; Bharti, S.K.

    experienced large declines in monsoon-driven productivity and greater penetration of Antarctica Intermediate Water (AAIW). Thus, pteropod preservation in the Arabian Sea appears to be linked to rapid climate change through atmospheric and oceanic...

  3. Monsoon induced cobalt enrichment in Porites (coral) from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.A.S.; Nath, B.N.

    Cobalt concentrations in growth bands of a reef building coral (Porites sp.) collected from Kalpeni Atoll of the Lakshadweep group of islands (Arabian Sea), rvealed that cobalt concentrations and Co/Ca ratios exhibit similar trend. Study indicates...

  4. A first report on a bloom of the marine prymnesiophycean, Phaeocystis globosa from the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Sawant, S.S.; Gauns, M.

    A thick bloom of the marine prymnesiophycean, Phaeocystis globosa was observed in the central Arabian Sea during the summer monsoon period (July-August, 1996). The cells were mostly in colonial form, embedded in gelatinous matrics. The cell diameter...

  5. Penaeoid and sergestoid shrimps from the deep scattering layer (DSL) in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Karuppasamy, P.K.; Menon, N.G.

    Results of a preliminary study on the occurrence and distribution of seventeen species of Penaeoid and Sergestoid shrimps from the deep scattering layer (DSL) of the Indian EEZ of Arabian Sea are presented here based on the IKMT samples collected...

  6. Elemental (C, H, N) composition of zooplankton from north Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Matondkar, S.G.P.; Bhat, K.L.; Ansari, Z.A.; Parulekar, A.H.

    found to be much lower than the values presently used in routine conversion factors. Such factors are now essentially needed for accounting role of zooplankton in sediment trap collections in Arabian Sea region...

  7. Directionality and spread of shallow water waves along the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Anoop, T.R.

    The directional characteristics of shallow water waves are described based on measured data during 2011 at two locations spaced at 350 km along the eastern Arabian Sea. Study shows that, for high swells (significant wave height > 1 m) approaching...

  8. Early tertiary seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies and paleo-propagators in the northern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A.K.; Bhattacharya, G.C.; Murty, G.P.S.; Srinivas, K.; Ramprasad, T.; Rao, D.G.

    Study of closely spaced new marine magnetic profiles, in conjunction with published magnetic data, provide an updated identification of linear magnetic anomalies in the northern Arabian Sea from the Owen Fracture Zone in the west to the Laxmi...

  9. Numerical experimentation of a diagnostic model of 3-D circulation in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shaji, C.; Bahulayan, N.; Dube, S.K.; Rao, A.D

    Climatic circulation in the upper levels of the Arabian Sea and western equatorial Indian Ocean are computed using a 3-dimensional, 33 level diagnostic circulation model. A steady state solution is obtained within 30 days of model integration. Model...

  10. Marine sediments and palaeoclimatic variations since the Late Pleistocene: An overview for the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    in the total assemblage in addition to oxygen isotope variations in planktonic foraminifera. Using sub-surface sediments as the source, and the above techniques as tools, a number of palaeoclimatic reconstructions have been made for the Arabian Sea Region...

  11. On the spectra and coherence of some surface meteorological parameters in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Fernandes, A.A.

    Spectra and cross-spectra of monthly time series of the surface meteorological parameters, sea surface temperature, air temperature, cloudiness, wind speed and sea level pressure were computed for the period 1948-1972 over the Arabian Sea...

  12. Seafloor characterisation using echo peak amplitudes of multibeam hydrosweep system - A preliminary study at Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.; Sudhakar, T.

    In this paper an interface to acquire 59-beams echo peak amplitudes of the Hydrosweep Multibeam system is established. The echo peak amplitude values collected at varying seabed provinces of Arabian sea are presented. The study reveals...

  13. Secchi depth analysis using bio-optical parameters measured in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Naik, P.; Bandishte, M.; Desa, E.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    Secchi depth provides the oceanographer with the first hand information about transparency and penetration of light in the water. Results of the Secchi depth and the optical properties measured in the Arabian Sea is presented. Our analyses show...

  14. Seasonal changes in the denitrification regime of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A; Noronha, R.J.; Somasundar, K.; SenGupta, R.

    NO ~mol dm -3) 294.23 299.59 Denitrification in the Arabian Sea 601 I0 \\[ '' zx, . ,.339 zx,,,-o.99 / .., / 2! / il / ,o,. /. f.- . o l (tS*N) / ." J * J (16"30') / f AK(tS"N) / _ /~ +M(21"N)

  15. Surface buoyancy flux in Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Anitha

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal variation of thermal, haline, net surface buoyancy flux, the Monin-Obukhov length (M-O length, L and stability parameter, i.e. the ratio of M-O length to mixed layer depth (h were studied in the Bay of Bengal (BoB and the Arabian Sea (AS for the years 2003 and 2004 using Argo temperature and salinity profiles. The relative quantitative influence of winds to surface buoyancy and the applicability of scaling mixed layer using M-O length in BoB and AS was brought out. Rotation and light penetration modify the mixed layer depth from M-O length during shoaling in spring giving L/h<1.

  16. Target revenue theory and Saudi Arabian oil policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifts in Saudi Arabian oil policy are explained by using data covering public revenues and expenditures plus the balance of payments. It is concluded that, according to the target revenue theory, Saudi Arabia only for a very short time after the first and second oil crises was on the backward sloping part of the supply curve. Perhaps Saudi Arabia cut oil production during the two oil crises because it wanted big oil price increases to prevent budget cuts. In any case, it started to increase oil production in the middle of 1985 when its economy was in great imbalance. Furthermore, calculations for the period 1989-2000 reveal that Saudi Arabia will probably face economic problems in the 1990s so that it will not again be OPEC's swing producer. On the contrary, Saudi Arabia will probably increase its share of OPEC's oil production in the 1990s. (author)

  17. Response of the Arabian Sea to global warming and associated regional climate shift

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, S. Prasanna; Roshin, Raj P.; Narvekar, Jayu; Kumar, P.K. Dinesh; Vivekanandan, E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The response of the Arabian Sea to global warming is the disruption in the natural decadal cycle in the sea surface temperature (SST) after 1995, followed by a secular warming. The Arabian Sea is experiencing a regional climate-shift after 1995, which is accompanied by a 5-fold increase in the occurrence of ?most intense cyclones?. Signatures of this climate-shift are also perceptible over the adjacent landmass of India as: (1) progressively warmer winters, and (2) decreas...

  18. Water vapour flux divergence over the Arabian Sea during 1987 summer monsoon using satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vinayachandran, P.N.; RameshKumar, M.R.

    WATERVAPOURFLUXDIVERGENCEOVERTHE ARABIAN SEA DURING 1987 SUMMER MONSOON USING SATELLITE DATA (Research Note) P. N. VINAYACHANDRAN and M. R. RAMESH KUMAR Physical Oceanography Division, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula 403004, Goa, India (Received in final form... 19 September, 1989) Abstract. The evaporation rates over the Arabian Sea (AS) for the summer monsoon months (June to September) of 1987 have been computed using the bulk-aerodynamic formula. The satellite derived precipitation from the INSAT-1B...

  19. Haplogroup diversity of 8 biallelic markers on human Y chromosome in Wuhan Han population%武汉汉族8个Y染色体双等位基因标记遗传多态性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄代新; 王功跃; 杨庆恩

    2006-01-01

    目的筛选汉族群体中具有多态性的Y染色体双等位基因标记并研究其等位基因及单体群频率分布,为法医学应用和群体进化研究提供基础数据.方法采用片段长度差异等位基因特异性PCR和PAGE技术对武汉地区160名男性汉族无关个体的8个Y染色体双等位基因标记(M9、M89、M111、M119、M122、M134、IMS-JST003305和SRY+465)进行分型.结果8个双等位基因标记在武汉汉族群体中均具有遗传多态性,其基因多样性(GD)范围为0.0126~0.4830,共检出9种不同单体群(Hg1~9),其单体群多样性(HD)为0.7776.结论8个Y染色体双等位基因标记组成的单体群在法医学应用和群体进化研究中具有一定的实用价值,可作为Y-STRs标记的有效补充.

  20. Carbonate and carbon fluctuations in the Eastern Arabian Sea over 140 ka: Implications on productivity changes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guptha, M. V. S.; Naidu, P. Divakar; Haake, Birgit Gaye; Schiebel, Ralf

    2005-07-01

    Biological productivity in the western Arabian Sea was higher during interglacial than glacial times. In the eastern Arabian Sea productivity was higher during the glacials compared to interglacials, which is in sharp contrast to the southwest monsoon intensity variations. To examine temporal changes in productivity in the eastern Arabian Sea over the last 140 ka, oxygen isotopes, calcium carbonate and organic carbon on three cores (SL-1 & 4 and SK 129-CR05) were analyzed. Oxygen isotope records display distinct glacial and interglacial transitions. In the northeastern (Core SL-1) and eastern Arabian Sea (Core SL-4) both calcium carbonate and organic carbon variations show no significant systematic relationship with glacial and interglacials periods. In the southeastern Arabian Sea (Core SK-129-CR05) calcium carbonate shows high and low values during interglacial and glacials, respectively, and temporal changes in organic carbon concentration are significant only during MIS 5. Differential variation of calcium carbonate and organic carbon concentration at the northeastern and southeastern Arabian Sea, and between glacials and interglacials, are attributed to regional differences in sedimentation rates, dilution and preservation, which modify the signal of carbonate and carbon production.

  1. Global change in marine ecosystems: implications for semi-enclosed Arabian seas

    KAUST Repository

    Duarte, Carlos M.

    2015-12-07

    Global Change has been defined as the impact of human activities on the key processes that determine the functioning of the Biosphere. Global Change is a major threat for marine ecosystems and includes climate change as well as other global impacts such as inputs of pollutants, overfishing and coastal sprawl. The Semi-enclosed Arabian Seas, including the Arabian Gulf and the Red Sea, have supported human livelihoods in the Arabian Peninsula over centuries and continue to do so, but are also threatened by Global Change. These threats are particularly severe as Semi-enclosed Arabian Seas already present rather extreme conditions, in terms of temperature, salinity and oxygen concentration. The vulnerability of the unique marine ecosystems of the Semi-enclosed Arabian Seas to Global Change vectors is largely unknown, but predictions based on first principles suggest that they may be at or near the tipping point for many pressures, such as warming and hypoxia. There is an urgent need to implement international collaborative research programs to accelerate our understanding of the vulnerability of Semi-enclosed Arabian Seas to Global Change vectors in order to inform conservation and management plans to ensure these Seas continue to support the livelihoods and well-being of the Arab nations.

  2. Tomographic Imaging of Upper Mantle P- and S-wave Velocity Heterogeneity Beneath the Arabian Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y; Nyblade, A; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2005-08-30

    We report the estimates of three-dimensional P- and S-wave velocity structure beneath the Arabian Peninsula estimated from travel time delay tomography. We have completed travel time measurements and inversion of a partial data set provided by King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). This study builds on previous work by Benoit et al. (2003) following the methods of VanDecar and Crosson (1990) and VanDecar (1991). Data were collected from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network (SANDSN) operated by KACST. The network consists of 38 stations (27 broadband and 11 short-period). We augmented the KACST data with delay times measured from permanent Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) stations in the region (RAYN, EIL and MRNI) and the 1996 Saudi Arabian PASSCAL Experiment. This study shows the inverted P- and S-wave models computed with the combined data with all three different seismic networks (KASCST, IRIS, and the 1996 Saudi Arabian PASSCAL experiment) with best coverage beneath the Arabian Shield. Tomographic images reveal low velocity features in the upper mantle along a north-south line from the southern Asir region to the northeastern portion of the Arabian Shield.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms of seventeen Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats loci in She nationality of Fujian province%福建畲族17个染色体短串联重复序列基因座遗传多态性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕少康; 曹林枝; 林燕燕; 陈桐君; 郭月丽

    2012-01-01

    目的:调查Y染色体17个短串联重复序列(Y-STR)基因座的多态性及其单倍型在福建畲族人群的分布情况.方法:应用AmpFlSTR(@)YfilerTM荧光标记复合扩增系统,对福建畲族152名无关男性个体血液样本进行17个Y-STR位点的复合扩增,应用ABI PRISM 310遗传分析仪对扩增产物进行检测分析.结果:DYS456、DYS389 Ⅰ、DYS390、DYS389Ⅱ、DYS458、DYS19、DYS385a\\b、DYS393、DYS391、DYS439、DYS635、DYS392、Y-GATA-H4、DYS437、DYS438、DYS448各位点遗传多样性(gene diversity,GD值)分布在0.419 6~0.944 7之间.17个Y-STR位点共同构成的单倍型150种,其单倍型多样性为0.999 825 7.结论:福建畲族17个Y-STR位点具有丰富的遗传多样性,可为父权鉴定和父系进化研究提供有价值的遗传学资料.%Objective: To investigate the Allelic and haplotype frequency distribution of seventeen short tandem repeat (STR) loci of Y chromosome in She nationality in Fujian province. Methods: Seventeen Y-STR loci, of which the template DNAs were extracted from blood samples of 152 unrelated male individuals in She population of Fujian province, were amplified by using the AmpFlSTR(R) Yfiler TM. The PCR products were genotyped with ABI PRISM 310 genetic analyzer. Results: The Gene diversity ranged from 0. 419 6-0. 944 7 at DYS456, DYS389 Ⅰ , DYS390, DYS389 Ⅱ , DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a\\b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635, DYS392, Y-GATA-H4, DYS437, DYS438, DYS448. A total of 150 different hap-lotypes were observed. The haplotype diversity value calculated from all 17 loci combined was 0. 999 825 7. Conclusion: The 17 Y-STR loci in She population of Fujian province are highly affluent genetic polymorphic and can offer valuable genetic data for paternity testing and paternal genetic lineages evolution.

  4. Monsoon control on trace metal fluxes in the deep Arabian Sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T M Balakrishnan Nair

    2006-08-01

    Particulate fluxes of aluminium,iron,magnesium and titanium were measured using six time-series sediment traps deployed in the eastern, central and western Arabian Sea. Annual Al fluxes at shallow and deep trap depths were 0.47 and 0.46 gm−2 in the western Arabian Sea,and 0.33 and 0.47 g m−2 in the eastern Arabian Sea. There is a difference of about 0.9-1.8gm−2 y−1 in the lithogenic fluxes determined analytically (residue remaining after leaching out all biogenic particles) and estimated from the Al fluxes in the western Arabian Sea. This arises due to higher fluxes of Mg (as dolomite) in the western Arabian Sea (6-11 times higher than the eastern Arabian Sea). The estimated dolomite fluxes at the western Arabian Sea site range from 0.9 to 1.35gm−2 y−1. Fe fluxes in the Arabian Sea were less than that of the reported atmospheric fluxes without any evidence for the presence of labile fraction/excess of Fe in the settling particles. More than 75% of Al, Fe, Ti and Mg fluxes occurred during the southwest (SW) monsoon in the western Arabian Sea. In the eastern Arabian Sea, peak Al, Fe, Mg and Ti fluxes were recorded during both the northeast (NE) and SW monsoons. During the SW monsoon, there exists a time lag of around one month between the increases in lithogenic and dolomite fluxes. Total lithogenic fluxes increase when the southern branch of dust bearing northwesterlies is dragged by the SW monsoon winds to the trap locations. However, the dolomite fluxes increase only when the northern branch of the northwesterlies (which carries a huge amount of dolomite accounting 60% of the total dust load) is dragged, from further north, by SW monsoon winds. The potential for the use of Mg/Fe ratio as a paleo-monsoonal proxy is examined.

  5. The detection and clinical application of human sex determination gene on Y chromosome by PCR%人类性别决定基因(SRY)的检测及其临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈勇; 周华蓉; 林晓容

    2013-01-01

      目的 探讨SRY基因与两性性别发育的关系。 方法 提取40例健康人外周血总DNA,加入SRY基因的特异性扩增引物和内参引物,运用聚合酶链式反应(PCR)技术进行SRY基因扩增,后经琼脂糖凝胶电泳进行检测。 结果 40例的基因组DNA经 PCR扩增后在500 bp和600 bp之间出现β-actin条带,与预期的大小为517 bp的β-actin片段相吻合,说明本实验的实验条件的可靠性和准确性。其中20例男性在600 bp至700 bp之间出现条带,与预期的SRY的677 bp片段大致相符,而20例女性则无677 bp片段产生。用该方法检测一例外生殖器异常,染色体为46,XY社会性别为女性的患者,其SRY检测结果为阳性。 结论 SRY基因阳性是雄性决定基因,用PCR技术扩增SRY 基因能快速准确检出Y染色体。SRY基因的检测对性连锁遗传性疾病和单基因突变病的无创性产前诊断有重要意义。%Objective To investigate the relationship between sex determination gene on Y chromosome (SRY) gene and sexual development. Methods Peripheral blood total DNA were extracted in 40 cases of healthy persons, which adding SRY gene-specific amplification primers and internal control primers. Then the SRY gene were amplificated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology and detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Results 40 cases of genomic DNA appearedβ-actin bands between 500 bp and 600 bp after PCR amplification, which coincided with the expected size of 517 bp ofβ-actin fragment, showed that the experimental conditions were reliable and accurate. 20 cases of male appeared bands between 600 bp and 700 bp, which coincided with the expected size of 677 bp fragment, while 20 cases of female without 677 bp fragment. A case of genital abnormalities patient was detected by this method, which chromosome as 46, XY, gender female, and the SRY test result was positive. Conclusion SRY gene was male-determining gene, which

  6. Zooplankton standing stock, community structure and diversity in the northern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.; Srivastava, Y.

    station (lat. 22 degrees 07'N and long. 67 degrees 03'E) and was due to swarm of gammarid amphipods and shoal of sergestid shrimp Acetes johni. Herbivores dominated the zooplankton community and copepods were most abundant (36.9 to 71.7%). The other...

  7. Y-STR haplotype diversity and population data for Central Brazil: implications for environmental forensics and paternity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, T C; Gigonzac, M A D; Silva, D M; Rodovalho, R G; Santos, G S; da Cruz, A D

    2014-01-01

    The central region of Brazil was colonized by internal migration of individuals of different origins, who contributed to the genetic diversity existing in this population. This study determined the allele frequencies and haplotype diversity of Y-STRs in Goiás State, Central Brazil, and compared the data obtained with a sample of the Brazilian population, consisting of individuals from the five geographical regions of Brazil. A total of 353 males were typed for 12 Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR) markers. We selected males who had no degree of relatedness, from the five mesoregions of Goiás State. DNA was extracted from blood samples followed by the amplification of the 12 Y-chromosome loci. The products were analyzed to obtain the allele profiles on an ABI3500 automated sequencer using the Gene Mapper software. Allele frequencies and haplotype diversity were estimated by direct counting, and gene diversity for each locus was computed using the Arlequin software. The results are consistent with the history of miscegenation of the population of Central Brazil, in which we observed 321 different haplotypes. The average gene diversity at the 12 loci was 0.645. DYS385b and DYS389I showed the highest (0.704) and lowest (0.520) genetic diversity values, respectively. The FST value between the Brazilian and Goiás populations was 0.00951, showing no statistical significance. The results of this study allowed the establishment of haplotypes found in the forensic samples of Goiás State serving as a reference in the elucidation of criminal cases and paternity tests, as well as population and evolutionary inferences. PMID:24841785

  8. 广西毛南族17个Y染色体短串联重复序列基因座遗传多态性%Genetic polymorphisms of seventeen Y-chromosomeal short tandem repeats loci in Maonan nationality in Guangxi province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕少康; 曹林枝; 黄世宁; 黄昌盛; 侯一平

    2009-01-01

    目的:调查17个Y染色体短串联重复序列(Y-STR)基因座及其单倍型在广西毛南族人群中的分布情况.方法:应用AmpFlSTR~((R)) Yfiler~(TM)荧光标记复合扩增系统,对毛南族208名无关男性个体血样进行17个Y-STR位点的复合扩增,用ABI PRISM310遗传分析仪对扩增产物进行检测分析.结果:DYS456、 DYS389Ⅰ、 DYS390、 DYS389Ⅱ、 DYS458、 DYS19、 DYS385a\\b、 DYS393、 DYS391、 DYS439、 DYS635、 DYS392、 Y-GATA-H4、 DYS437、 DYS438、 DYS448各位点遗传多样性(GD值)分布在0 5852~0 9770之间.17个Y-STR位点共同构成的单倍型205种,其单倍型多样性为0 999785.广西毛南族与其他群体的Y-STR位点等位基因分布差异具有统计学意义.结论:广西毛南族17个Y-STR位点具有丰富的遗传多样性,可为父权鉴定和父系进化研究提供有价值的遗传学资料.%Objective:To investigate the Allelic and haplotype frequency distribution of seventeen short tandem repeat loci of Y chromosome in Maonan nationality in Guangxi province. Methods:Seventeen Y-STR loci, of which the template DNAs were extracted from blood samples of 184 unrelated male individuals in Maonan population, were amplified by using the AmpFISTR~((R)) Yfiler~(TM) The PCR products were genotyped with ABI PRISM 310 genetic analyzer. Results:The gene diversity ranged from 0.585 2 to 0.977 0 at DYS456, DYS389 Ⅰ , DYS390, DYS389 Ⅱ , DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a\\b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635, DYS392, Y-GATA-H4, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS448. A total of 205 different haplotypes were observed. The haplotype diversity value calculated from all 17 loci combined was 0. 999 785. The significant difference of the allelic frequency distribution in Y-STR loci was observed between Maonan population and other observed populations. Conclusion:The 17 Y-STR loci in Maonan population of Guangxi province are highly affluent genetic polymorphic and can offer valuable genetic data for paternity testing and

  9. The stratigraphic evolution of the Indus Fan and the history of sedimentation in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Peter; Gaedicke, Christoph; Edwards, Rosemary; Il Lee, Jae; Hildebrand, Peter; Amjad, Shahid; White, Robert S.; Schlüter, Hans-Ulrich

    The Indus Fan records the erosion of the western Himalayas and Karakoram since India began to collide with Asia during the Eocene, ~50 Ma. Multi-channel seismic reflection data from the northern Arabian Sea correlated to industrial well Indus Marine A-1 on the Pakistan Shelf show that sedimentation patterns are variable through time, reflecting preferential sedimentation in deep water during periods of lower sea-level (e.g., middle Miocene, Pleistocene), the diversion of sediment toward the east following uplift of the Murray Ridge, and the autocyclic switching of fan lobes. Individual channel-levee systems are estimated to have been constructed over periods of 105-106 yr during the Late Miocene. Sediment velocities derived from sonobuoys and multi-channel stacking velocities allow sections to be time-depth converted and then backstripped to calculate sediment budgets through time. The middle Miocene is the period of most rapid accumulation, probably reflecting surface uplift in the source regions and strengthening of the monsoon at that time. Increasing sedimentation during the Pleistocene, after a late Miocene-Pliocene minimum, is apparently caused by faster erosion during intense glaciation. The sediment-unloaded geometry of the basement under the Pakistan Shelf shows a steep gradient, similar to the continent-ocean transition seen at other rifted volcanic margins, with basement depths on the oceanward side indistinguishable from oceanic crust. Consequently we suggest that the continent-ocean transition is located close to the present shelf break, rather than >350 km to the south, as previously proposed.

  10. Nitrogen Uptake in the Northeastern Arabian Sea during Winter Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of dissolved inorganic nitrogen by phytoplankton is an important aspect of the nitrogen cycle of oceans. Here, we present nitrate (NO3- and ammonium (NH4+ uptake rates in the northeastern Arabian Sea using 15N tracer technique. In this relatively underexplored region, productivity is high during winter due to supply of nutrients by convective mixing caused by the cooling of the surface by the northeast monsoon winds. Studies done during different months (January and late February-early March of the northeast monsoon 2003 revealed a fivefold increase in the average euphotic zone integrated NO3- uptake from January (2.3 mmolN m−2d−1 to late February-early March (12.7 mmolN m−2d−1. The f-ratio during January appeared to be affected by the winter cooling effect and increased by more than 50% from the southernmost station to the northern open ocean stations, indicating hydrographic and meteorological control. Estimates of NO3- residence time suggested that NO3- entrained in the water column during January contributed to the development of blooms during late February-early March.

  11. Evaluation of foaling heat in Arabian mares in Ninevah province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Rahawy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to study the relationship between breeding season of Arabian mares at first estrous afterfoaling and pregnancy rate. Thirty six mares were divided in to two groups according to foaling heat in breeding season,transitional periods. Animals included in this study were maintained with the same management and conditions in the specialbreeding stables. This study was performed in a farm located in Nineveh province during the period from June 2008 to June2010. The mares were observed for the first estrous after foaling and the duration between foaling and first estrous after foaling(foaling heat in breeding season or transitional period and the estrous signs were recorded by exposing the mares to a teasersstallion. The results of this study showed that the foaling heat in the first group was 8-9 days in 26 mares in breeding seasonobserve first estrous while the pregnancy rate in 8 mares was 30.76%. However, results the second group of the first estroussign after foaling was 8-10 days in the 10 mares observe the first estrous in, transitional period without pregnancy. It could beconcluded that the detected foaling heat duration 8-10 days after normal foaling in breeding season and natural mating in spiteof decreased pregnancy rate at foaling heat.

  12. Oil-consuming microbial consortia floating in the Arabian Gulf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picocyanobacteria floating on the surface of the water body in the Arabian Gulf were found associated with heterotrophic bacteria. Haemocytometer counting of fresh 1 -cm surface water revealed 107 - 108 bacterial cells ml-1, but only 102 - 103 cells ml-1 in 10-cm deep water samples. The heterotrophic bacteria comprised hydrocarbon utilizers that could grow on a mineral medium containing crude oil as sole carbon and energy source. Three-week liquid cultures of the picocyanobacteria Synechococcus, Synechocystis, Pleurocapsa and Dermocarpella were found by dilution plating to contain 106 - 1013 oil-utilizing bacteria ml-1. These were members of the genera Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Acinetobacter and nocardioforms. Growth and hydrocarbon consumption potential of individual types of oil-utilizing bacteria in culture were higher in the presence of the picocyanobacteria than in their absence. Evidence was presented that picocyanobacterial cells may accumulate hydrocarbons from the medium, and subsequently make those compounds available to the associated hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria. It was concluded that this microbial consortium, which is apparently of cosmopolitan occurrence, could be active in controlling marine oil-pollution. (author)

  13. Sousse, Tunisia: tumultuous history and high Y-STR diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadhlaoui-Zid, Karima; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Zemni, Ramzi; Grinberg, Sagy; Herrera, Rene J; Benammar-Elgaaied, Amel

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, 17 Y-chromosomal STR (Y-STR) loci were typed in 218 unrelated males from Sousse, Central-East Tunisia, to evaluate forensic and population genetic applications of the data. A total of 154 different haplotypes were identified, 127 (82.5%) of which were unique, with the most frequent haplotype occurring in 14 individuals (6.4%). The locus diversity ranged from 0.2050 at DYS392 to 0.8760 at DYS385. The haplotype diversity at the 17-loci resolution was calculated to be 0.9916, while the corresponding values for the extended (11 loci) and minimal (9 loci) haplotypes were estimated at 0.9735 and 0.9710, respectively. Comparison with 29 regional and global populations using correspondence analysis, neighbor joining (NJ) tree, and Rst genetic distance revealed that the Sousse population is highly diverse. This finding is consistent with historical data. Furthermore, the results of this study indicate a distinct genetic substructure among Tunisian populations. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the 17 Y-STRs analyzed are highly informative for individual identification, parentage analysis, and population genetic studies. PMID:23160959

  14. The Arabian Sea as a high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll region during the late southwest monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Moffett, J.W.; Gauns, M.; Narvekar, P.V.; Pratihary, A.K.; Naik, H.; Shenoy, D.M.; Jayakumar, D.A.; Goepfert, T.J.; Patra, P.K.; Al-Azri, A.; Ahmed, S.I.

    primary production (PP) in the Arabian Sea, focussing on the role of iron. Our results do not support an intensification of upwelling in the western Arabian Sea, reported to have been caused by the decline in the winter/spring Eurasian snow cover since...

  15. Differences in heat budgets of the near-surface Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal: Implications for the summer monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Shetye, S.R.

    An analysis of the heat budgets of the near-surface Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal shows significant differences between them during the summer monsoon (June-September). In the Arabian Sea the winds associated with the summer monsoon are stronger...

  16. Hydrography and biogeochemistry of the north western Bay of Bengal and the north eastern Arabian Sea during winter monsoon

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Laluraj, C.M.; Jyothibabu, R.; Madhu, N.V.; Muraleedharan, K.R.; Vijay, J.G.; Maheswaran, P.A.; Ashraf, T.T.M.; Nair, K.K.C.; Achuthankutty, C.T.

    in the Arabian Sea is driven by net heat loss from the ocean, whereas the Bay of Bengal does not contribute to such large heat loss to the atmosphere. It appears that the subduction of high saline Arabian Sea water mass is the mechanism behind the formation of a...

  17. Managing diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epting, L A; Glover, S H; Boyd, S D

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. work force is becoming increasingly diverse as the 20th century approaches. Statistics prove that most organizations are experiencing gender, culture, and age diversity within their labor forces. All managers and leaders must accept this diversity and work to handle it effectively. This article examines the current literature concerning management of diversity and its implications for the health care profession. Gender, culture, and age diversity and the potential problems that may arise with each are also addressed. Reasons to manage diversity are offered, as well as methods of managing diversity for both the manager and the chief executive officer. PMID:10134144

  18. Turner Syndrome with Pseudodicentric Y Chromosome Mosaicism

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Yao-Yuan; Lin, Wu-Chou; Chang, Chi-Chen; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Yu, Ming-Tsung; Tsai, Horng-Der; Tsai, Chang-Hai

    2002-01-01

    The objective was to compare the impact of gonadal cell line upon the phenotype of a Turner syndrome patient with mosaic karyotypes. A 10-year-old female presented with typical Turner syndrome. Chromosomal analysis of lymphocytes revealed 45,X (16%)/46,X,pseudodicentric Y (p ter→q12::q12→p ter) (84%). Karyotype of the gonads revealed 45,X (85%)/46,X,pseudodicentric Y (p ter→q12::q12→p ter) (15%). Discrepancy of the individual cell lines between the lymphocytes and the tissue might exist. The ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a condition that affects the production of sperm , making it difficult or impossible for affected men ... children. An affected man's body may produce no sperm cells (azoospermia), a smaller than usual number of ...

  20. 成都地区汉族人群17个Y短串联重复序列基因座遗传多态性分析%Analysis of the genetic polymorphism of 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat loci in the Han population in Chengdu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋兴勃; 范红; 应斌武; 陆小军; 王军; 叶远馨

    2009-01-01

    Objective To obtain the population genetic data of 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (Y-STR) in the Han population in Chengdu of Sichuan Province. Methods The 17 Y-STR loci were amplified from the blood samples of 111 unrelated Chengdu Han individuals using the AmpF1STR~(R)Yfiler~(TM) system. The PCR products were genotyped with an ABI 3130 genetic analyzer. Results In the loci of in DYS456, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS389II, DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635, DYS392, Y-GATA-H4, DYS437, DYS438, and DYS448, 3 to 8 alleles were detected in the Han population in Chengdu, and 36 alleles were detected in the locus DYS385a/b, with the minimal gene diversity (GD) value of 0.3970 (DYS391) and maximal value of 0.9561 (DYS385a/b). The DNA samples of 16 women and 7 different species of animals were amplified, but no specific products were found for the 17 Y-STR loci. No mutations of the 17 Y-STR alleles were observed in 20 father-son pairs as confirmed by autosomal STR analysis. Conclusion The 17 Y-STR loci are highly polymorphic and are suitable for personal identification, paternity testing, population genetics and anthropology studies.%目的 获得17个Y染色体短串联重复序列(Y-STR)基因座在成都汉族人群中的群体遗传学数据.方法 应用AmpFISTR(R)Yfiler~(TM)荧光标记复合扩增系统,对成都地区111名无关男性个体血样进行17个Y-STR基因座的复合扩增,用ABl3130遗传分析仪对扩增产物进行检测分析.结果 DYS456、DYS389 Ⅰ、DYS390、DYS389 Ⅱ、DYS458、DYS19、DYS385a/b、DYS393、DYS391、DYS439、DYS635、DYS392、Y-GATA-H4、DYS437、DYS438、DYS448基因座在成都地区汉族群体分别检出3~8个等位基因,DYS385a/b检出36个等位基因组,各基因座基因多样性最低为0.3970(DYS391),最高为0.9561(DYS385a/b).检测16例女性血样和7种动物血样,17个Y-STR基因座均无扩增产物.另对20个二代父性家系调查显示同一家系成员17个Y-STR基因座单倍