WorldWideScience

Sample records for aqueous wastes wet

  1. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1993-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Manganese zinc ferrite nanoparticles as efficient catalysts for wet peroxide oxidation of organic aqueous wastes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manju Kurian; Divya S Nair

    2015-03-01

    Manganese substituted zinc nanoparticles, MnxZn1−xFe2O4 (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0) prepared by sol gel method were found to be efficient catalysts for wet peroxide oxidation of 4-chlorophenol. Complete degradation of the target pollutant occurred within 90 min at 70°C. Zinc substitution enhanced the catalytic efficiency and the unsubstituted ZnFe2O4 oxidized the target compound completely within 45 min. Studies on the effect of reaction variables revealed that only a small amount of the oxidant, H2O2 (3–4 mL) is required for complete degradation of 4-chlorophenol. More than 80% of 4-chlorophenol was removed at catalyst concentrations of 100 mg/L. Direct correlation between the amount of catalyst present and the extent of degradation of 4-chlorophenol was observed, ruling out hesterogeneous-homogeneous mechanism. The catalysts are reusable and complete degradation of target pollutant occurred after five successive runs. The extent of iron leaching was fairly low after five consecutive cycles indicating the mechanism to be heterogeneous.

  3. Aqueous Wetting Films on Fused Quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoco; Wayner

    1999-06-15

    Using an image analyzing interferometer, IAI, the interfacial characteristics of an isothermal constrained vapor bubble, CVB, in a quartz cuvette were studied as a precursor to heat transfer research. The effects of pH and electrolyte concentration on the meniscus properties (curvature and adsorbed film thickness) and the stability of the aqueous wetting films were evaluated. The surface potential in the electric double layer was a function of the cleaning and hydroxylation of the quartz surface. The disjoining pressure isotherm for pure water was very close to that predicted by the Langmuir equation. For aqueous solutions of moderate electrolyte concentration, the Gouy-Chapman theory provided a good representation of the electrostatic effects in the film. The effect of temperature on the film properties of aqueous solutions and pure water was also evaluated: The meniscus curvature decreased with increasing temperature, while Marangoni effects, intermolecular forces, and local evaporation and condensation enhanced waves on the adsorbed film layer. Pure water wetting films were mechanically metastable, breaking into droplets and very thin films (less than 10 nm) after a few hours. Aqueous wetting films with pH 12.4 proved to be stable during a test of several months, even when subjected to temperature and mechanical perturbations. The mechanical stability of wetting films can explain the reported differences between the critical heat fluxes of pure water and aqueous solutions. The IAI-CVB technique is a simple and versatile experimental technique for studying the characteristics of interfacial systems. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Wet oxidation of a spacecraft model waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T.

    1985-01-01

    Wet oxidation was used to oxidize a spacecraft model waste under different oxidation conditions. The variables studied were pressure, temperature, duration of oxidation, and the use of one homogeneous and three heterogeneous catalysts. Emphasis is placed on the final oxidation state of carbon and nitrogen since these are the two major components of the spacecraft model waste and two important plant nutrients.

  5. Aqueous Corrosion Rates for Waste Package Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Arthur

    2004-10-08

    The purpose of this analysis, as directed by ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]), is to compile applicable corrosion data from the literature (journal articles, engineering documents, materials handbooks, or standards, and national laboratory reports), evaluate the quality of these data, and use these to perform statistical analyses and distributions for aqueous corrosion rates of waste package materials. The purpose of this report is not to describe the performance of engineered barriers for the TSPA-LA. Instead, the analysis provides simple statistics on aqueous corrosion rates of steels and alloys. These rates are limited by various aqueous parameters such as temperature (up to 100 C), water type (i.e., fresh versus saline), and pH. Corrosion data of materials at pH extremes (below 4 and above 9) are not included in this analysis, as materials commonly display different corrosion behaviors under these conditions. The exception is highly corrosion-resistant materials (Inconel Alloys) for which rate data from corrosion tests at a pH of approximately 3 were included. The waste package materials investigated are those from the long and short 5-DHLW waste packages, 2-MCO/2-DHLW waste package, and the 21-PWR commercial waste package. This analysis also contains rate data for some of the materials present inside the fuel canisters for the following fuel types: U-Mo (Fermi U-10%Mo), MOX (FFTF), Thorium Carbide and Th/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain [FSVR]), Th/U Oxide (Shippingport LWBR), U-metal (N Reactor), Intact U-Oxide (Shippingport PWR, Commercial), aluminum-based, and U-Zr-H (TRIGA). Analysis of corrosion rates for Alloy 22, spent nuclear fuel, defense high level waste (DHLW) glass, and Titanium Grade 7 can be found in other analysis or model reports.

  6. Wet oxidation as a waste treatment in closed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, B. L.; Wydeven, T.

    1981-01-01

    The chemistry of the wet oxidation process has been investigated in relation to production of plant nutrients from plant and human waste materials as required for a closed life-support system. Hydroponically grown lettuce plants were used as a model plant waste and oxygen gas was used as oxidant. Organic nitrogen content was decreased 88-100% depending on feed material. Production of ammonia and nitrogen gas account for all of the observed decrease in organic nitrogen content. No nitrous oxide (N2O) was detected. The implications of these results for closed life-support systems are discussed.

  7. Wet Oxidation as a Waste Treatment Method in Closed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, B. L.; Wydeven, T.

    1982-01-01

    The chemistry of the wet oxidation process was investigated in relation to production of plant nutrients from plant and human waste materials as required for a closed life support system. Hydroponically grown lettuce plants were used as a model plant waste, and oxygen gas was used as an oxidant. Organic nitrogen content was decreased 88-100%, depending on feed material. Production of ammonia and nitrogen gas accounted for all of the observed decrease in organic nitrogen content. No nitrous oxide (N2O) was detected. The implications of these results for closed life support systems are discussed.

  8. Size distribution of wet crushed waste printed circuit boards

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Zhihai; He Yaqun; Xie Weining; Duan Chenlong; Zhou Enhui; Yu Zheng

    2011-01-01

    A wet impact crusher was used to breakdown waste printed circuit boards (PCB's) in a water medium.The relationship between the yield of crushed product and the operating parameters was established.The crushing mechanism was analyzed and the effects of hammerhead style,rotation speed,and inlet water volume on particle size distribution were investigated.The results show that the highest yield of -1 + 0.75 mm sized product was obtained with an inlet water volume flow rate of 5.97 m3/h and a smooth hammerhead turning at 1246.15 r/min.Cumulative undersize-product yield curves were fitted to a nonlinear function:the fitting correlation coefficient was greater than 0.998.These research results provide a theoretical basis for the highly effective wet crushing of PCB's.

  9. Wet air oxidation of seedcorn wastes containing pesticides and insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, M.; Schlaefer, O.; Onyeche, T.I.; Schroeder, C.; Bormann, H.; Schaefer, S. [CUTEC-Inst. GmbH (Clausthal Environment Technology Inst.), Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Wet air oxidation as an alternative treatment process to pyrolysis and combustion of seedcorn wastes was investigated in lab-scale experiments. Due to solid condition of the seed corn waste, the process has been adapted by repeated spraying of water on the seed corn bulk to avoid the production of sludge and its subsequent dewatering. Original seed corns from industrial production plants were used for a degradation kinetic study under smooth wet air oxidation conditions. The temperatures were between 80 and 150 C, the pressure from 1 to 4.5 bar and the pH at different values from 3 to 13. Degradation rates for five different compounds of pesticides and insecticides, namely Imidacloprid, Thiram, Hymexazol, Carbofuran and Tefluthrin were conducted. These compounds represent the recently used in agricultural seedcorn applications. The degradation rate depends linearly on temperature between 80 and 150 C. At 120 C the lowest degradation rate was found for Tefluthrin by 25 mg/h per L reaction volume while the highest degradation rate to be conducted was for Imidacloprid at 363 mg/h L. (orig.)

  10. Development and testing of a wet oxidation waste processing system. [for waste treatment aboard manned spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzmann, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The wet oxidation process is considered as a potential treatment method for wastes aboard manned spacecraft for these reasons: (1) Fecal and urine wastes are processed to sterile water and CO2 gas. However, the water requires post-treatment to remove salts and odor; (2) the residual ash is negligible in quantity, sterile and easily collected; and (3) the product CO2 gas can be processed through a reduction step to aid in material balance if needed. Reaction of waste materials with oxygen at elevated temperature and pressure also produces some nitrous oxide, as well as trace amounts of a few other gases.

  11. Behavior of suspending and wetting agents in aqueous environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhawale Shashikant

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the changes in viscosity, conductivity, pH, electrical conductivity, dielectric constant, zeta potential, UV, and IR spectra of aqueous solutions/dispersions of sodium carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC, Tween 80, and sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS during aging at different temperatures. Significant reduction in viscosity ofh sodium CMC occurred during aging studies, while relatively small decrease in viscosity was seen with Tween 80 and SLS. Increment in specific conductivity was seen with aging of excipients. Significant increase of zeta potential was also seen with aging of samples. Concomitant shift in IR spectra of samples was observed with aging at 40°C.

  12. Wet-oxidation waste management system for CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Ohya, H.

    1986-01-01

    A wet oxidation system will be useful in the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) as a facility to treat organic wastes and to redistribute inorganic compounds and elements. However at rather higher temperatures needed in this reaction, for instance, at 260 deg C, only 80% of organic in a raw material can be oxidized, and 20% of it will remain in the liquid mainly as acetic acid, which is virtually noncombustible. Furthermore, nitrogen is transformed to ammonium ions which normally cannot be absorbed by plants. To resolve these problems, it becomes necessary to use catalysts. Noble metals such as Ru, Rh and so on have proved to be partially effective as these catalysts. That is, oxidation does not occur completely, and the unexpected denitrification, instead of the expected nitrification, occurs. So, it is essential to develop the catalysts which are able to realize the complete oxidation and the nitrification.

  13. Enhanced Oil Recovery from Oil-wet Carbonate Rock by Spontaneous Imbibition of Aqueous Surfactant Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standnes, Dag Chun

    2001-09-01

    The main theme of this thesis is an experimental investigation of spontaneous imbibition (SI) of aqueous cationic surfactant solution into oil-wet carbonate (chalk- and dolomite cores). The static imbibition process is believed to represent the matrix flow of oil and water in a fractured reservoir. It was known that aqueous solution of C{sub 12}-N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Br (C12TAB) was able to imbibe spontaneously into nearly oil-wet chalk material, but the underlying mechanism was not understood. The present work was therefore initiated, with the following objectives: (1) Put forward a hypothesis for the chemical mechanism underlying the SI of C12TAB solutions into oil-wet chalk material based on experimental data and (2) Perform screening tests of low-cost commercially available surfactants for their ability to displace oil by SI of water into oil-wet carbonate rock material. It is essential for optimal use of the surfactant in field application to have detailed knowledge about the mechanism underlying the SI process. The thesis also discusses some preliminary experimental results and suggests mechanisms for enhanced oil recovery from oil-wet carbonate rock induced by supply of thermal energy.

  14. Biofuels and Bioproducts from Wet and Gaseous Waste Streams: Challenges and Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-01-09

    This report draws together activities related to wet and gaseous waste feedstocks into a single document. It enables an amplified focus on feedstocks in the relevant technology and potential markets category. Also, this report helps to inform and support ongoing wet and gaseous resource recovery activities in the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and in the broader federal space. Historically, the office has identified wet and gaseous waste feedstocks as potentially advantageous, but has not pursued them with a sustained focus. This document seeks to position these waste streams appropriately alongside more traditional feedstocks in BETO efforts.

  15. Aqueous extraction of pectin from sisal waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jener David G; Espeleta, Alexandre F; Branco, Alexsandro; de Assis, Sandra A

    2013-02-15

    In this work, sisal waste was used as a source of pectin. Sisal is known worldwide as a source of hard fibres, and Brazil is the largest producer of sisal, producing more than 246,000 tonnes. However, the process of removing the fibres of the sisal leaf generates 95% waste. This study investigated the effect of the liquid/solid ratio (%), time (min), and temperature (°C) on the yield of the pectin obtained from sisal waste by attractive environmentally friendly process. A statistical Box-Behnken design was applied to determine the important effects and interactions of these independent variables on the yield of pectin, the dependent variable. Significant models were obtained. The yield of the extracted pectin ranged from 4.61 to 19.2%. The conditions that produced the highest yield (19.2%) were a temperature of 85 °C, extraction time of 60 min and a liquid/solid ratio of 2%.

  16. Solid waste management practices in wet coffee processing industries of Gidabo watershed, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulsido, Mihret D; Li, Meng

    2016-07-01

    The financial and social contributions of coffee processing industries within most coffee export-based national economies like Ethiopia are generally high. The type and amount of waste produced and the waste management options adopted by these industries can have negative effects on the environment. This study investigated the solid waste management options adopted in wet coffee processing industries in the Gidabo watershed of Ethiopia. A field observation and assessment were made to identify whether the operational characteristics of the industries have any effect on the waste management options that were practiced. The investigation was conducted on 125 wet coffee processing industries about their solid waste handling techniques. Focus group discussion, structured questionnaires, key informant interview and transect walks are some of the tools employed during the investigation. Two major types of wastes, namely hull-bean-pulp blended solid waste and wastewater rich in dissolved and suspended solids were generated in the industries. Wet mills, on average, released 20.69% green coffee bean, 18.58% water and 60.74% pulp by weight. Even though these wastes are rich in organic matter and recyclables; the most favoured solid waste management options in the watershed were disposal (50.4%) and industrial or household composting (49.6%). Laxity and impulsive decision are the driving motives behind solid waste management in Gidabo watershed. Therefore, to reduce possible contamination of the environment, wastes generated during the processing of red coffee cherries, such as coffee wet mill solid wastes, should be handled properly and effectively through maximisation of their benefits with minimised losses.

  17. Removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution by waste mud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemer, Baris; Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Bulut, Volkan N.; Duran, Celal [Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey); Soylak, Mustafa, E-mail: soylak@erciyes.edu.tr [Erciyes University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2009-09-15

    The present study was carried out to assess the ability of original waste mud (o-WM) and different types of activated waste mud which are acid-activated (a-WM) and precipitated waste mud (p-WM), in order to remove excess of fluoride from aqueous solution by using batch technique. The p-WM exhibited greater performance than the others. Adsorption studies were conducted as a function of pH, contact time, initial fluoride concentration, adsorbent concentration, temperature, etc. Studies were also performed to understand the effect of some co-existing ions present in aqueous solutions. Adsorption process was found to be almost independent of pH for all types of waste mud. Among the kinetic models tested for p-WM, pseudo-second-order model fitted the kinetic data well with a perfect correlation coefficient value of 1.00. It was found that the adequate time for the adsorption equilibrium of fluoride was only 1 h. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy ({Delta}G{sup o}), enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup o}), and entropy ({Delta}S{sup o}) revealed that adsorption of fluoride ions on the p-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic in the temperature range of 0-40 deg. C. Experimental data showed a good fit with the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Results of this study demonstrated the effectiveness and feasibility of WM for removal of fluoride ions from aqueous solution.

  18. Development of a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Method to Produce Feedstock Gases from Waste Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Guerrero-Medina, Karen J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the high cost of space launch, the repurposing of biological and plastic wastes to reduce the need for logistical support during long distance and long duration space missions has long been recognized as a high priority. Described in this paper are the preliminary efforts to develop a wet air oxidation system in order to produce fuels from waste polymers. Preliminary results of partial oxidation in near supercritical water conditions are presented. Inherent corrosion and salt precipitation are discussed as system design issues for a thorough assessment of a second generation wet air oxidation system. This work is currently being supported by the In-Situ Resource Utilization Project.

  19. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D C; Neuenschwander, G G; Baker, E G; Sealock, Jr, L J; Butner, R S

    1991-04-01

    Bench-scale reactor tests are in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for treating a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. This report describes a test program which used a continuous-feed tubular reactor. This test program is an intermediate stage in the process development. The reactor is a laboratory-scale version of the commercial concept as currently envisioned by the process developers. An energy benefit and economic analysis was also completed on the process. Four conceptual commercial installations of the TEES process were evaluated for three food processing applications and one organic chemical manufacturing application. Net energy production (medium-Btu gas) was achieved in all four cases. The organic chemical application was found to be economically attractive in the present situation. Based on sensitivity studies included in the analysis, the three food processing cases will likely become attractive in the near future as waste disposal regulations tighten and disposal costs increase. 21 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. A new low-cost method of reclaiming mixed foundry waste sand based on wet-thermal composite reclamation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zitian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A lot of mixed clay-resin waste sand from large-scale iron foundries is discharged every day; so mixed waste sand reclamation in low cost and high quality has a great realistic significance. In the study to investigate the possibility of reusing two types of waste foundry sands, resin bonded sand and clay bonded sand which came from a Chinese casting factory, a new low-cost reclamation method of the mixed foundry waste sand based on the wet-thermal composite reclamation was proposed. The waste resin bonded sand was first reclaimed by a thermal method and the waste clay bonded sand was reclaimed by a wet method. Then, hot thermal reclaimed sand and the dehydrated wet reclaimed sand were mixed in certain proportions so that the hot thermal reclaimed sand dried the wet reclaimed sand leaving some water. The thermal reclamation efficiency of the waste resin bonded sand was researched at different heat levels. The optimized wet reclamation process of the waste clay bonded sand was achieved by investigating the effects of wet reclamation times, sand-water ratio and pH value on the reclaimed sand characteristics. The composite reclamation cost also was calculated. The research results showed that the properties of the mixed reclaimed sand can satisfy the application requirements of foundries; in which the temperature of the thermal reclamation waste resin bonded sand needs to be about 800 篊, the number of cycles of wet reclamation waste clay bonded sand should reach four to five, the optimal sand-water ratio of wet reclamation is around 1:1.5, and the pH value should be adjusted by adding acid. The mass ratio of hot thermal reclaimed sand to dehydrated wet reclaimed sand is about 1:2.5, and the composite reclaimed sand cost is around 100 yuan RMB per ton.

  1. A new low-cost method of reclaiming mixed foundry waste sand based on wet-thermal composite reclamation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Zitian; Liu Fuchu; Long Wei; Li Guona

    2014-01-01

    A lot of mixed clay-resin waste sand from large-scale iron foundries is discharged every day; so mixed waste sand reclamation in low cost and high quality has a great realistic significance. In the study to investigate the possibility of reusing two types of waste foundry sands, resin bonded sand and clay bonded sand which came from a Chinese casting factory, a new low-cost reclamation method of the mixed foundry waste sand based on the wet-thermal composite reclamation was proposed. The waste resin bonded sand was first reclaimed by a thermal method and the waste clay bonded sand was reclaimed by a wet method. Then, hot thermal reclaimed sand and the dehydrated wet reclaimed sand were mixed in certain proportions so that the hot thermal reclaimed sand dried the wet reclaimed sand leaving some water. The thermal reclamation efficiency of the waste resin bonded sand was researched at different heat levels. The optimized wet reclamation process of the waste clay bonded sand was achieved by investigating the effects of wet reclamation times, sand-water ratio and pH value on the reclaimed sand characteristics. The composite reclamation cost also was calculated. The research results showed that the properties of the mixed reclaimed sand can satisfy the application requirements of foundries; in which the temperature of the thermal reclamation waste resin bonded sand needs to be about 800 ºC, the number of cycles of wet reclamation waste clay bonded sand should reach four to five, the optimal sand-water ratio of wet reclamation is around 1:1.5, and the pH value should be adjusted by adding acid. The mass ratio of hot thermal reclaimed sand to dehydrated wet reclaimed sand is about 1:2.5, and the composite reclaimed sand cost is around 100 yuan RMB per ton.

  2. Measurement of Uncertainty for Aqueous Ethanol Wet-Bath Simulator Solutions Used with Evidential Breath Testing Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Rong-Jen; Beltran, Jada; Rogers, Craig; Barlow, Jeremy; Razatos, Gerasimos

    2016-09-01

    Aqueous ethanol wet-bath simulator solutions are used to perform calibration adjustments, calibration checks, proficiency testing, and inspection of breath alcohol instruments. The Toxicology Bureau of the New Mexico Department of Health has conducted a study to estimate a measurement of uncertainty for the preparation and testing of these wet-bath simulator solutions. The measurand is identified as the mass concentration of ethanol (g/100 mL) determined through dual capillary column headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detector analysis. Three groups were used in the estimation of the aqueous ethanol wet-bath simulator solutions uncertainty: GC calibration adjustment, GC analytical, and certified reference material. The standard uncertainties for these uncertainty sources were combined using the method of root-sum-squares to give uc = 0.8598%. The combined standard uncertainty was expanded to U = 1.7% to reflect a confidence level of 95% using a coverage factor of 2. This estimation applies to all aqueous ethanol wet-bath simulator solution concentrations produced by this laboratory.

  3. Wet etching of InSb surfaces in aqueous solutions: Controlled oxide formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aureau, D., E-mail: damien.aureau@chimie.uvsq.fr [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France); Chaghi, R.; Gerard, I. [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France); Sik, H.; Fleury, J. [Sagem Defense Sécurité, 72-74, rue de la tour Billy, 95101, Argenteuil Cedex (France); Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier UVSQ-CNRS UMR 8180, 45 avenue des Etats Unis, Versailles, 78035 (France)

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the wet etching of InSb surfaces by two different oxidant agents: Br{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the consecutive oxides generation onto the surfaces. The strong dependence between the chemical composition of the etching baths and the nature of the final surface chemistry of this low band-gap III–V semiconductor will be especially highlighted. One aqueous etching solution combined hydrobromic acid and Bromine (HBr–Br{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O) with adjusted concentrations. The other solution combines orthophosphoric and citric acids with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:H{sub 2}O). Depending on its composition, each formulation gave rise to variable etching rate. The dosage of Indium traces in the etching solution by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) gives the kinetic variation of the dissolution process. The variations on etching rates are associated to the properties and the nature of the formed oxides on InSb surfaces. Surface characterization is specifically performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A clear evidence of the differences between the formed oxides is highlighted. Atomic force microscopy is used to monitor the surface morphology and pointed out that very different final morphologies can be reached. This paper presents new results on the strong variability of the InSb oxides in relation with the InSb reactivity toward environment interaction.

  4. Biosorption of arsenic from aqueous solution using dye waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Shubha; Vankar, Padma S; Gopal, Krishna

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine on removal of arsenic from water by biosorption through potential application of herbal dye wastes. Four different flower dye residues (after extraction of natural dye) viz. Hibiscus rosasinensis, Rosa rosa, Tagetes erecta, and Canna indica were utilized successfully for the removal of arsenic from aqueous solution. Batch studies were carried out for various parameters viz. pH, sorbent dose, contact time, initial metal ion concentration, and temperature. Data were utilized for isothermal, kinetic, and thermodynamic studies. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses of biomass were performed. The results showed that 1 g/100 ml for 5.0-5.5 h contact time at pH 6.0-7.5 with agitation rate 150 rpm provided 98, 96, 92, and 85 % maximum absorption of arsenic by R. rosa, H. rosasinensis, T. erecta, and C. indica, respectively, at initial concentration of 500 ppb. Data followed Langmuir isotherm showing sorption to be monolayer on heterogeneous surface of biosorbent. Negative values of ΔG° indicated spontaneous nature, whereas ΔH° indicates exothermic nature of system followed by pseudo-first-order adsorption kinetics. FTIR results showed apparent changes in functional group regions after metal chelation. SEM and EDAX analyses showed the changes in surface morphology of all test biosorbents. Herbal dye wastes, used as biosorbent, exhibited significant (85-98 %) removal of arsenic from aqueous solution. Hence, these biosorbents are cost-effective, easily available, eco-friendly, and comparatively more effective than other biosorbents already in use. These may be used to remove arsenic and other toxic metals from water.

  5. Development of microorganisms during storage of wet brewery waste under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiliane Cristine de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research study was conducted to evaluate, by means of microbiological analyses, the preservation of wet brewery waste stored under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, regarding the development of filamentous fungi, yeasts and lactic-acid bacteria. The following treatments were used: untreated brewery waste, pre-dried brewery waste silage, brewery waste silage with effluent drainage and BW silage without effluent drainage. Silos made of PVC and equipped with Bunsen valves to allow gases to escape were used. Dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP, temperature (°C and pH in the untreated BW, in the stored brewery waste and in the brewery waste silage upon silo opening, after 60 days of ensilage were analyzed. A completely randomized design was used. The data were subjected to analysis of variance, and the means were compared by the Tukey test at the 5% probability level. The preservation of brewery waste packaged under aerobic conditions was not appropriate due to the development of filamentous fungi and yeasts; however, storage under anaerobic conditions proved to be an effective conservation process.

  6. Application of Wet Waste from Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) with or Without Sea Mud to Feeding Sea Cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yanfeng; HU Chaoqun; RENChunhua

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the applicability of the wet waste collected from shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) to the culture of sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus) was determined. The effects of dietary wet shrimp waste on the survival, specific growth rate (SGR), fecal production rate (FPR), ammonia- and nitrite-nitrogen productions of sea cucumber were studied. The total organic matter (TOM) level in the feces of sea cucumber was compared with that in corresponding feeds. Diet C (50% wet shrimp waste and 50% sea mud mash) made sea cucumber grow faster than other diets. Sea cucumber fed with either diet D (25% wet shrimp waste and 75% sea mud mash) or sole sea mud exhibited negative growth. The average lowest total FPR of sea cucumber occurred in diet A (wet shrimp waste), and there was no significant difference in total FPR between diet C and diet E (sea mud mash) (P>0.05). The average ammonia-nitrogen production of sea cucumber in different diet treatments decreased gradually with the decrease of crude protein content in different diets. The average highest nitrite-nitrogen production occurred in diet E treatment, and there was no sig-nificant difference in nitrite-nitrogen production among diet A, diet B (75% wet shrimp waste and 25% sea mud mash) and diet C treatments (P>0.05). In each diet treatment, the total organic matter (TOM) level in feces decreased to different extent compared with that in corresponding feeds.

  7. Application of wet waste from shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) with or without sea mud to feeding sea cucumber ( Stichopus monotuberculatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanfeng; Hu, Chaoqun; Ren, Chunhua

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, the applicability of the wet waste collected from shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) to the culture of sea cucumber ( Stichopus monotuberculatus) was determined. The effects of dietary wet shrimp waste on the survival, specific growth rate (SGR), fecal production rate (FPR), ammonia- and nitrite-nitrogen productions of sea cucumber were studied. The total organic matter (TOM) level in the feces of sea cucumber was compared with that in corresponding feeds. Diet C (50% wet shrimp waste and 50% sea mud mash) made sea cucumber grow faster than other diets. Sea cucumber fed with either diet D (25% wet shrimp waste and 75% sea mud mash) or sole sea mud exhibited negative growth. The average lowest total FPR of sea cucumber occurred in diet A (wet shrimp waste), and there was no significant difference in total FPR between diet C and diet E (sea mud mash) ( P > 0.05). The average ammonia-nitrogen production of sea cucumber in different diet treatments decreased gradually with the decrease of crude protein content in different diets. The average highest nitrite-nitrogen production occurred in diet E treatment, and there was no significant difference in nitrite-nitrogen production among diet A, diet B (75% wet shrimp waste and 25% sea mud mash) and diet C treatments ( P > 0.05). In each diet treatment, the total organic matter (TOM) level in feces decreased to different extent compared with that in corresponding feeds.

  8. Wetting Resistance of Commercial Membrane Distillation Membranes in Waste Streams Containing Surfactants and Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Eykens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Water management is becoming increasingly challenging and several technologies, including membrane distillation (MD are emerging. This technology is less affected by salinity compared to reverse osmosis and is able to treat brines up to saturation. The focus of MD research recently shifted from seawater desalination to industrial applications out of the scope of reverse osmosis. In many of these applications, surfactants or oil traces are present in the feed stream, lowering the surface tension and increasing the risk for membrane wetting. In this study, the technological boundaries of MD in the presence of surfactants are investigated using surface tension, contact angle and liquid entry pressure measurements together with lab-scale MD experiments to predict the wetting resistance of different membranes. Synthetic NaCl solutions mixed with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS were used as feed solution. The limiting surfactant concentration was found to be dependent on the surface chemistry of the membrane, and increased with increasing hydrophobicity and oleophobicity. Additionally, a hexadecane/SDS emulsion was prepared with a composition simulating produced water, a waste stream in the oil and gas sector. When hexadecane is present in the emulsion, oleophobic membranes are able to resist wetting, whereas polytetrafluoretheen (PTFE is gradually wetted by the feed liquid.

  9. Wet Oxidation Pretreatment of Tobacco Stalks and Orange Waste for Bioethanol Production. Preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Carlos; Fernandez, Teresa; Garcia, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) was used as a pretreatment method prior to enzymatic hydrolysis of tobacco stalks and orange waste. The pretreatment, performed at 195 degrees C and an oxygen pressure of 1.2 MPa, for 15 min, in the presence of Na2CO3, increased the cellulose content of the materials and gave...... cellulose recoveries of approximately 90%. The pretreatment enhanced the susceptibility of cellulose to enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest enzymatic convertibility, that of 64.9%, was achieved for pretreated tobacco stalks. The ethanolic fermentation of the WO filtrates, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae...

  10. Wet oxidation treatment of organic household waste enriched with wheat straw for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation into ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Klinke, H.B.; Verstraete, W.;

    2004-01-01

    Organic municipal solid waste enriched with wheat straw was subjected to wet-oxidation as a pre-treatment for subsequent enzymatic conversion and fermentation into bio-ethanol. The effect of tempera (185-195degrees C), oxygen pressure (3-12) and sodium carbonate (0-2 g l(-1)) addition on enzymatic...... cellulose and hemicellulose convertibility was studied at a constant wet oxidation retention time of 10 minutes. An enzyme convertibility assay at high enzyme loading (25 filter paper unit (FPU) g(-1) dry solids (DS) added) showed that up to 78% of the cellulose and up to 68% of the hemicellulose...... in the treated waste could be converted into respectively hexose and pentose sugars compared to 46% for cellulose and 36% for hemicellulose in the raw waste. For all wet oxidation conditions tested, total carbohydrate recoveries were high (> 89%) and 44-66% of the original lignin could be converted into non...

  11. Sorption Potentials of Waste Tyre for Some Heavy Metals (Pb Cd in Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Kanayo ASIAGWU

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available An investigation into the adsorption potential of activated and inactivated waste tyre powders for some heavy metals (Pb2+ and Cd2+ in their aqueous solution has been studied. The result indicated that inactivated waste tyre is a good non-conventional adsorbent for the removal of Cd from aqueous solution. A total of 93.3% of Cadmium contents was removed. The inactivated waste type proved a good adsorbent for the removal of Pb2+ 5g of 500mm activated tyre removed over 86.66% of Pb2+ from solution.

  12. Pretreatment of refinery waste water by wet oxidation. LOPROX {sup registered} procedure: Alternative treatment of sulfidic waste lyes by wet oxidation; Vorbehandlung von Raffinerieabwasser durch Nassoxidation. LOPROX {sup registered} -Verfahren: Alternative Behandlung von sulfidischen Ablaugen durch Nassoxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonhaeuser, Johannes; Weissenberg, Dirk; Birkenbeul, Udo [Bayer Technology Services GmbH (BTS), Leverkusen (Germany). Technology Development and Engineering; Bloecher, Christoph [Currenta (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    The authors of the contribution under consideration report on the treatment of refinery wastewater by means of the wet oxidation. The authors present the LOPROX {sup registered} method as an alternative treatment of sulfidic waste lyes. This method can not only treat successfully organic polluted wastewater from the chemical industry, but also various waste lyes from refinery processes. Based on a customer-specific process optimization in pilot scale, a cost-effective treatment can be achieved.

  13. Operational wastes management - 'wet oxidation' - an innovative process to manage radiological spent resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, F.; Maggini, F.; Mazzoni, C.; Orlandi, S.; Ricci, C. [Nuclear System Engineering Department, Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, 16161 Genova (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    A new system using the wet-oxidation process has been studied for the treatment of the organic radioactive waste such spent ion exchange resins. The purpose of the process is to enable a high degree of volume reduction of the waste and compared with various processes for treating sludge and resin, the wet-oxidation system is rather simple and it works in mild conditions. Verification tests have been performed in a large scale pilot plant with not contaminated ion exchange resin samples similar to those ones used in NPPs. (authors)

  14. Investigations regarding the wet decontamination of fluorescent lamp waste using iodine in potassium iodide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunsu, Cristian, E-mail: tunsu@chalmers.se; Ekberg, Christian; Foreman, Mark; Retegan, Teodora

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • A wet-based decontamination process for fluorescent lamp waste is proposed. • Mercury can be leached using iodine in potassium iodide solution. • The efficiency of the process increases with an increase in leachant concentration. • Selective leaching of mercury from rare earth elements is achieved. • Mercury is furthered recovered using ion exchange, reduction or solvent extraction. - Abstract: With the rising popularity of fluorescent lighting, simple and efficient methods for the decontamination of discarded lamps are needed. Due to their mercury content end-of-life fluorescent lamps are classified as hazardous waste, requiring special treatment for disposal. A simple wet-based decontamination process is required, especially for streams where thermal desorption, a commonly used but energy demanding method, cannot be applied. In this study the potential of a wet-based process using iodine in potassium iodide solution was studied for the recovery of mercury from fluorescent lamp waste. The influence of the leaching agent’s concentration and solid/liquid ratio on the decontamination efficiency was investigated. The leaching behaviour of mercury was studied over time, as well as its recovery from the obtained leachates by means of anion exchange, reduction, and solvent extraction. Dissolution of more than 90% of the contained mercury was achieved using 0.025/0.05 M I{sub 2}/KI solution at 21 °C for two hours. The efficiency of the process increased with an increase in leachant concentration. 97.3 ± 0.6% of the mercury contained was dissolved at 21 °C, in two hours, using a 0.25/0.5 M I{sub 2}/KI solution and a solid to liquid ratio of 10% w/v. Iodine and mercury can be efficiently removed from the leachates using Dowex 1X8 anion exchange resin or reducing agents such as sodium hydrosulphite, allowing the disposal of the obtained solution as non-hazardous industrial wastewater. The extractant CyMe{sub 4}BTBP showed good removal of mercury

  15. Spontaneous and forced imbibition of aqueous wettability altering surfactant solution into an initially oil-wet capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Paul S; Unsal, Evren

    2009-11-03

    Unforced invasion of wettability-altering aqueous surfactant solutions into an initially oil-filled oil-wet capillary tube has been observed to take place very slowly, and because this system is an analogue for certain methods of improved oil recovery from naturally fractured oil-wet reservoirs, it is important to identify the rate-controlling processes. We used a model for the process published by Tiberg et al. ( Tiberg , F. , Zhmud , B. , Hallstensson , K. and Von Bahr , M. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2000 , 2 , 5189 - 5196 ) and modified it for forced imbibitions. We show that when applied pressure differences are not too large invasion rates are controlled at large times by the value of the bulk diffusion coefficient for surfactant in the aqueous phase and at early times by the resistance to transfer of surfactant from the oil-water meniscus onto the walls of the capillary. For realistic values of the bulk diffusion coefficient, invasion rates are indeed slow, as observed. The model also predicts that the oil-water-solid contact angle during unforced displacement is close to pi/2, and so, the displacement occurs in a state of near-neutral wettability with the rate of invasion controlled by the rate of surfactant diffusion rather than a balance between capillary forces and viscous resistance. Under forced conditions, the meniscus moves faster, but the same kinds of dynamical balances between the various processes as were found in the spontaneous case operate. Once the capillary threshold pressure for entry into the initial oil-wet tube is exceeded, the effect of pressure on velocity becomes more significant, there is not sufficient time for the surfactant molecules to transfer in great quantity from the meniscus to the solid surface, and wettability alteration is then no longer important.

  16. Investigations regarding the wet decontamination of fluorescent lamp waste using iodine in potassium iodide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunsu, Cristian; Ekberg, Christian; Foreman, Mark; Retegan, Teodora

    2015-02-01

    With the rising popularity of fluorescent lighting, simple and efficient methods for the decontamination of discarded lamps are needed. Due to their mercury content end-of-life fluorescent lamps are classified as hazardous waste, requiring special treatment for disposal. A simple wet-based decontamination process is required, especially for streams where thermal desorption, a commonly used but energy demanding method, cannot be applied. In this study the potential of a wet-based process using iodine in potassium iodide solution was studied for the recovery of mercury from fluorescent lamp waste. The influence of the leaching agent's concentration and solid/liquid ratio on the decontamination efficiency was investigated. The leaching behaviour of mercury was studied over time, as well as its recovery from the obtained leachates by means of anion exchange, reduction, and solvent extraction. Dissolution of more than 90% of the contained mercury was achieved using 0.025/0.05 M I2/KI solution at 21 °C for two hours. The efficiency of the process increased with an increase in leachant concentration. 97.3 ± 0.6% of the mercury contained was dissolved at 21 °C, in two hours, using a 0.25/0.5M I2/KI solution and a solid to liquid ratio of 10% w/v. Iodine and mercury can be efficiently removed from the leachates using Dowex 1X8 anion exchange resin or reducing agents such as sodium hydrosulphite, allowing the disposal of the obtained solution as non-hazardous industrial wastewater. The extractant CyMe4BTBP showed good removal of mercury, with an extraction efficiency of 97.5 ± 0.7% being achieved in a single stage. Better removal of mercury was achieved in a single stage using the extractants Cyanex 302 and Cyanex 923 in kerosene, respectively.

  17. Measurement and Monte Carlo Calculation of Waste Drum Filled With Radioactive Aqueous Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU; Li-jun; ZHANG; Wei-dong; YE; Hong-sheng; LIN; Min; CHEN; Xi-lin; GUO; Xiao-qing

    2012-01-01

    <正>Theoretically the best calibrating source of gamma scan system (SGS) is a waste drum filled with uniform distribution of medium and radioactive nuclides. However, in reality, waste drums usually full of solid substance, which are difficult to be prepared in a completely uniformly distributed state. To reduce measurement uncertainty of the radioactivity of waste drums prepared using the method of shell source, a waste drum filled with radioactive aqueous solution was prepared. Besides, its radioactivity was measured by a SGS device and calculated using Monte Carlo method to verify the exact geometric model, which

  18. Digital Automation and Real-Time Monitoring of an Original Installation for "Wet Combustion" of Organic Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Yegor; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Saltykov, Mikhail; Trifonov, Sergey V.; Kudenko, D.. Yurii A.

    2016-07-01

    An original method for "wet combustion" of organic wastes, which is being developed at the IBP SB RAS, is a very promising approach for regeneration of nutrient solutions for plants in future spacecraft closed Bioregenerative Life Support Systems (BLSS). The method is quick, ecofriendly, does not require special conditions such as high pressure and temperature, and the resulting nitrogen stays in forms easy for further preparation of the fertilizer. An experimental testbed of a new-generation closed ecosystem is being currently run at the IBP SB RAS to examine compatibility of the latest technologies for accelerating the cycling. Integration of "wet combustion" of organic wastes into the information system of closed ecosystem experimental testbed has been studied as part of preparatory work. Digital automation and real-time monitoring of original "wet combustion" installation operation parameters have been implemented. The new system enabled remotely controlled or automatic work of the installation. Data are stored in standard easily processed formats, allowing further mathematical processing where necessary. During ongoing experiments on improving "wet combustion" of organic wastes, automatic monitoring can notice slight changes in process parameters and record them in more detail. The ultimate goal of the study is to include the "wet combustion" installation into future full-scale experiment with humans, thus reducing the time spent by the crew on life support issues while living in the BLSS. The work was carried out with the financial support of the Russian Scientific Foundation (project 14-14-00599).

  19. Surface tension of polytetrafluoroethylene and its wetting by aqueous solution of some surfactants and their mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mańko, Diana; Zdziennicka, Anna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the contact angle of aqueous solution of rhamnolipid (RL) mixture with n-octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (OGP), Triton X-100 (TX-100) or/and sodium dodecylsulfate (SDDS) on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were made. To this aim there was used a plate whose surface topography was analyzed by means of optical profilometry method. Additionally, plate surface chemistry was studied employing the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The obtained values of contact angle were discussed based on the PTFE surface tension (γSV) as well as the Lifshitz-van der Waals component of the water surface tension (γWLW). The contact angle of aqueous solution of several surfactants and their mixtures on PTFE was also considered on the basis of γSV and γWLW . It occured that by using the values of γSV , γWLW and surface tension of the aqueous solution of surfactants and their mixtures, the contact angle on PTFE can be predicted. It also occured that changes of adhesion tension of aqueous solutions of surfactants as a function of their concentration can be determined by the exponential function of the first or second order. Using such functions Gibbs surface excess concentration of surfactants at the PTFE-water interface, mole fraction of surfactant in the mixed monolayer and fraction of the area occupied by given surfactants in the monolayer were determined. Gibbs surface free energy of adsorption of a given surfactant in the presence of another one and adhesion work of the aqueous solution of surfactants to the PTFE surface were also evaluated.

  20. Modelling aqueous corrosion of nuclear waste phosphate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poluektov, Pavel P.; Schmidt, Olga V.; Kascheev, Vladimir A.; Ojovan, Michael I.

    2017-02-01

    A model is presented on nuclear sodium alumina phosphate (NAP) glass aqueous corrosion accounting for dissolution of radioactive glass and formation of corrosion products surface layer on the glass contacting ground water of a disposal environment. Modelling is used to process available experimental data demonstrating the generic inhibiting role of corrosion products on the NAP glass surface.

  1. Aqueous-Phase Reactions of Isoprene with Sulfoxy Radical Anions as a way of Wet Aerosol Formation in the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznietsova, I.; Rudzinski, K. J.; Szmigielski, R.; Laboratory of the Environmental Chemistry

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols exhibit an important role in the environment. They have implications on human health and life, and - in the larger scale - on climate, the Earth's radiative balance and the cloud's formation. Organic matter makes up a significant fraction of atmospheric aerosols (~35% to ~90%) and may originate from direct emissions (primary organic aerosol, POA) or result from complex physico-chemical processes of volatile organic compounds (secondary organic aerosol, SOA). Isoprene (2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene) is one of the relevant volatile precursor of ambient SOA in the atmosphere. It is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon emitted to the atmosphere as a result of living vegetation. According to the recent data, the isoprene emission rate is estimated to be at the level of 500 TgC per year. While heterogeneous transformations of isoprene have been well documented, aqueous-phase reactions of this hydrocarbon with radical species that lead to the production of new class of wet SOA components such as polyols and their sulfate esters (organosulfates), are still poorly recognized. The chain reactions of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions (SRA) are one of the recently researched route leading to the formation of organosulfates in the aqueous phase. The letter radical species originate from the auto-oxidation of sulfur dioxide in the aqueous phase and are behind the phenomenon of atmospheric acid rain formation. This is a complicated chain reaction that is catalyzed by transition metal ions, such as manganese(II), iron(III) and propagated by sulfoxy radical anions . The presented work addresses the chemical interaction of isoprene with sulfoxy radical-anions in the water solution in the presence of nitrite ions and nitrous acid, which are important trace components of the atmosphere. We showed that nitrite ions and nitrous acid significantly altered the kinetics of the auto-oxidation of SO2 in the presence of isoprene at different solution acidity from 2 to 8

  2. Structural response of phyllomanganates to wet aging and aqueous Mn(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Margaret A. G.; Flynn, Elaine D.; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2016-11-01

    Naturally occurring Mn(IV/III) oxides are often formed through microbial Mn(II) oxidation, resulting in reactive phyllomanganates with varying Mn(IV), Mn(III), and vacancy contents. Residual aqueous Mn(II) may adsorb in the interlayer of phyllomanganates above vacancies in their octahedral sheets. The potential for interlayer Mn(II)-layer Mn(IV) comproportionation reactions and subsequent formation of structural Mn(III) suggests that aqueous Mn(II) may cause phyllomanganate structural changes that alters mineral reactivity or trace metal scavenging. Here we examine the effects of aging phyllomanganates with varying initial vacancy and Mn(III) content in the presence and absence of dissolved Mn(II) at pH 4 and 7. Three phyllomanganates were studied: two exhibiting turbostratic layer stacking (δ-MnO2 with high vacancy content and hexagonal birnessite with both vacancies and Mn(III) substitutions) and one with rotationally ordered layer stacking (triclinic birnessite containing predominantly Mn(III) substitutions). Structural analyses suggest that during aging at pH 4, Mn(II) adsorbs above vacancies and promotes the formation of phyllomanganates with rotationally ordered sheets and mixed symmetries arranged into supercells, while structural Mn(III) undergoes disproportionation. These structural changes at pH 4 correlate with reduced Mn(II) uptake onto triclinic and hexagonal birnessite after 25 days relative to 48 h of reaction, indicating that phyllomanganate reactivity decreases upon aging with Mn(II), or that recrystallization processes involving Mn(II) uptake occur over 25 days. At pH 7, Mn(II) adsorbs and causes limited structural effects, primarily increasing sheet stacking in δ-MnO2. These results show that aging-induced structural changes in phyllomanganates are affected by aqueous Mn(II), pH, and initial solid-phase Mn(III) content. Such restructuring likely alters manganese oxide reactions with other constituents in environmental and geologic systems

  3. Maximum organic loading rate for the single-stage wet anaerobic digestion of food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Norio; Tajima, Nobuyuki; Kawai, Minako; Niwa, Chiaki; Kurosawa, Norio; Matsuyama, Tatsushi; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Toda, Tatsuki

    2012-08-01

    Anaerobic digestion of food waste was conducted at high OLR from 3.7 to 12.9 kg-VS m(-3) day(-1) for 225 days. Periods without organic loading were arranged between the each loading period. Stable operation at an OLR of 9.2 kg-VS (15.0 kg-COD) m(-3) day(-1) was achieved with a high VS reduction (91.8%) and high methane yield (455 mL g-VS-1). The cell density increased in the periods without organic loading, and reached to 10.9×10(10) cells mL(-1) on day 187, which was around 15 times higher than that of the seed sludge. There was a significant correlation between OLR and saturated TSS in the sludge (y=17.3e(0.1679×), r(2)=0.996, P<0.05). A theoretical maximum OLR of 10.5 kg-VS (17.0 kg-COD) m(-3) day(-1) was obtained for mesophilic single-stage wet anaerobic digestion that is able to maintain a stable operation with high methane yield and VS reduction.

  4. Decomposition and Mineralization of Dimethyl Phthalate in an Aqueous Solution by Wet Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Dar-Ren; Chang, Chia-Chi; Chen, Shih-Yun; Chiu, Chun-Yu; Tseng, Jyi-Yeong; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Chiang, Sheng-Wei; Hung, Zang-Sie; Shie, Je-Lueng; Chen, Yi-Hung; Yuan, Min-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl phthalate (DMP) was treated via wet oxygen oxidation process (WOP). The decomposition efficiency η DMP of DMP and mineralization efficiency η TOC of total organic carbons were measured to evaluate the effects of operation parameters on the performance of WOP. The results revealed that reaction temperature T is the most affecting factor, with a higher T offering higher η DMP and η TOC as expected. The η DMP increases as rotating speed increases from 300 to 500 rpm with stirring enhancement of gas liquid mass transfer. However, it exhibits reduction effect at 700 rpm due to purging of dissolved oxygen by overstirring. Regarding the effects of pressure P T, a higher P T provides more oxygen for the forward reaction with DMP, while overhigh P T increases the absorption of gaseous products such as CO2 and decomposes short-chain hydrocarbon fragments back into the solution thus hindering the forward reaction. For the tested P T of 2.41 to 3.45 MPa, the results indicated that 2.41 MPa is appropriate. A longer reaction time of course gives better performance. At 500 rpm, 483 K, 2.41 MPa, and 180 min, the η DMP and η TOC are 93 and 36%, respectively.

  5. Solvent extraction of radionuclides from aqueous tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnesen, P.; Sachleben, R.; Moyer, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop an efficient solvent-extraction and stripping process to remove the fission products {sup 99}Tc, {sup 90}Sr, and {sup 137}Cs from alkaline tank waste, such as those stored at Hanford and Oak Ridge. As such, this task expands on FY 1995`s successful development of a solvent-extraction and stripping process for technetium separation from alkaline tank-waste solutions. This process now includes the capability of removing both technetium and strontium simultaneously. In this form, the process has been named SRTALK and will be developed further in this program as a prelude to developing a system capable of removing technetium, strontium, and cesium.

  6. Development of the Monolith Froth Reactor for Catalytic Wet Oxidation of CELSS Model Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Martin; Fisher, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of acetic acid, used as a model compound for the treatment of CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System) waste, was carried out in the monolith froth reactor which utilizes two-phase flow in the monolith channels. The catalytic oxidation of acetic acid was carried out over a Pt/Al2O3 catalyst, prepared at The University of Tulsa, at temperatures and pressures below the critical point of water. The effect of externally controllable parameters (temperature, liquid flow rate, distributor plate orifice size, pitch, and catalyst distance from the distributor plate) on the rate of acetic acid oxidation was investigated. Results indicate reaction rate increased with increasing temperature and exhibited a maximum with respect to liquid flow rate. The apparent activation energy calculated from reaction rate data was 99.7 kJ/mol. This value is similar to values reported for the oxidation of acetic acid in other systems and is comparable to intrinsic values calculated for oxidation reactions. The kinetic data were modeled using simple power law kinetics. The effect of "froth" feed system characteristics was also investigated. Results indicate that the reaction rate exhibits a maximum with respect to distributor plate orifice size, pitch, and catalyst distance from the distributor plate. Fundamental results obtained were used to extrapolate where the complete removal of acetic acid would be obtained and for the design and operation of a full scale CELSS treatment system.

  7. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1991--1992 interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.; Phelps, M.R.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    A catalytic gasification system operating in a pressurized water environment has been developed and refined at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for over 12 years. Initial experiments were aimed at developing kinetics information for steam gasification of biomass in the presence of catalysts. The combined use of alkali and metal catalysts was reported for gasification of biomass and its components at low temperatures (350{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C). From the fundamental research evolved the concept of a pressurized, catalytic gasification system for converting wet biomass feedstocks to fuel gas. Extensive batch reactor testing and limited continuous reactor system (CRS) testing were undertaken in the development of this system under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. A wide range of biomass feedstocks were tested, and the importance of the nickel metal catalyst was identified. Specific use of this process for treating food processing wastes was also studied. The concept application was further expanded to encompass cleanup of hazardous wastewater streams, and results were reported for batch reactor tests and continuous reactor tests. Ongoing work at PNL focuses on refining the catalyst and scaling the system to long-term industrial needs. The process is licensed as the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) to Onsite*Ofsite, Inc., of Duarte, California. This report is a follow-on to the 1989--90 interim report [Elliott et al. 1991], which reviewed the results of the studies conducted with a fixed-bed, continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The discussion here provides an overview of experiments on the wide range of potential feedstock materials conducted in a batch reactor; development of new catalyst materials; and tests performed in continuous-flow reactors at three scales. The appendices contain the history and background of the process development, as well as more detailed descriptions and results of the recent studies.

  8. Comparison of alkaline industrial wastes for aqueous mineral carbon sequestration through a parallel reactivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Clinton W; Dzombak, David A; Nakles, David V; Hawthorne, Steven B; Heebink, Loreal V; Dando, Neal; Gershenzon, Michael; Ghosh, Rajat S

    2014-10-01

    Thirty-one alkaline industrial wastes from a wide range of industrial processes were acquired and screened for application in an aqueous carbon sequestration process. The wastes were evaluated for their potential to leach polyvalent cations and base species. Following mixing with a simple sodium bicarbonate solution, chemistries of the aqueous and solid phases were analyzed. Experimental results indicated that the most reactive materials were capable of sequestering between 77% and 93% of the available carbon under experimental conditions in four hours. These materials - cement kiln dust, spray dryer absorber ash, and circulating dry scrubber ash - are thus good candidates for detailed, process-oriented studies. Chemical equilibrium modeling indicated that amorphous calcium carbonate is likely responsible for the observed sequestration. High variability and low reactive fractions render many other materials less attractive for further pursuit without considering preprocessing or activation techniques.

  9. Removal of lead from aqueous solution using waste tire rubber ash as an adsorbent

    OpenAIRE

    Mousavi,H. Z.; Hosseynifar,A.; Jahed,V.; S. A. M. Dehghani

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of the utilization of waste tire rubber ash (WTRA) as a low cost adsorbent for removal of lead (II) ion from aqueous solution. The effect of different parameters (such as contact time, sorbate concentration, adsorbent dosage, pH of the medium and temperature) were investigated. The sorption process was relatively fast and equilibrium was reached after about 90 min of contact. The experimental data were analyzed by the Freundlich iso...

  10. Removal and recovery of toxic metal ions from aqueous waste sites using polymer pendant ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the use of polymer pendant ligand technology to remove and recover toxic metal ions from DOE aqueous waste sites. Polymer pendant lgiands are organic ligands, anchored to crosslinked, modified divinylbenzene-polystyrene beads, that can selectively complex metal ions. The metal ion removal step usually occurs through a complexation or ion exchange phenomena, thus recovery of the metal ions and reuse of the beads is readily accomplished.

  11. Wet oxidation pre-treatment of woody yard waste: Parameter optimization and enzymatic digestibility for ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Klinke, H.B.; Verstraete, W.

    2004-01-01

    Woody yard waste with high lignin content (22% of dry matter (DM)) was subjected to wet oxidation pre-treatment for subsequent enzymatic conversion and fermentation. The effects of temperature (185-200 degreesC), oxygen pressure (3-12 bar) and addition of sodium carbonate (0-3.3 g per 100 g DM...... biomass) on enzymatic cellulose and hemicellulose (xylan) convertibility were studied. The enzymatic cellulose conversion was highest after wet oxidation for 15 min at 185 degreesC with addition of 12 bars of oxygen and 3.3 g Na2CO3 per 100g waste. At 25 FPU (filter paper unit) cellulase g(-1) DM added......% conversion efficiency was still reached at 15 FPU g(-1) DM. Total carbohydrate recoveries were high (91-100% for cellulose and 72-100% for hemicellulose) and up to 49% of the original lignin and 79% of the hemicellulose could be solubilized during wet oxidation treatment and converted into carboxylic acids...

  12. Environmental performance of hydrothermal carbonization of four wet biomass waste streams at industry-relevant scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Ryberg, Morten; Renz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of green waste, food waste, organic fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW), and digestate is assessed using life cycle assessment as a potential technology to treat biowaste. Water content of the biowaste and composition of the resulting hydrochar are important...

  13. Immobilization of Rose Waste Biomass for Uptake of Pb(II) from Aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Tariq Mahmood; Hanif, Muhammad Asif; Mahmood, Abida; Ijaz, Uzma; Khan, Muhammad Aslam; Nadeem, Raziya; Ali, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Rosa centifolia and Rosa gruss an teplitz distillation waste biomass was immobilized using sodium alginate for Pb(II) uptake from aqueous solutions under varied experimental conditions. The maximum Pb(II) adsorption occurred at pH 5. Immobilized rose waste biomasses were modified physically and chemically to enhance Pb(II) removal. The Langmuir sorption isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic models fitted well to the adsorption data of Pb(II) by immobilized Rosa centifolia and Rosa gruss an teplitz. The adsorbed metal is recovered by treating immobilized biomass with different chemical reagents (H(2)SO(4), HCl and H(3)PO(4)) and maximum Pb(II) recovered when treated with sulphuric acid (95.67%). The presence of cometals Na, Ca(II), Al(III), Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Cu(II), reduced Pb(II) adsorption on Rosa centifolia and Rosa gruss an teplitz waste biomass. It can be concluded from the results of the present study that rose waste can be effectively used for the uptake of Pb(II) from aqueous streams.

  14. Corrosion behavior of technetium waste forms exposed to various aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolman, David Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mausolf, Edward [UNIV OF NEVADA; Czerwinski, Ken [UNIV OF NEVADA; Poineau, Frederic [UNIV OF NEVADA

    2009-01-01

    Technetium is a long-lived beta emitter produced in high yields from uranium as a waste product in spent nuclear fuel and has a high degree of environmental mobility as pertechnetate. It has been proposed that Tc be immobilized into various metallic waste forms to prevent Tc mobility while producing a material that can withstand corrosion exposed to various aqueous medias to prevent the leachability of Tc to the environment over long periods of time. This study investigates the corrosion behavior of Tc and Tc alloyed with 316 stainless steel and Zr exposed to a variety of aqueous media. To date, there is little investigative work related to Tc corrosion behavior and less related to potential Tc containing waste forms. Results indicate that immobilizing Tc into stainless steel-zirconium alloys can be a promising technique to store Tc for long periods of time while reducing the need to separately store used nuclear fuel cladding. Initial results indicate that metallic Tc and its alloys actively corrode in all media. We present preliminary corrosion rates of 100% Tc, 10% Tc - 90% SS{sub 85%}Zr{sub 15%}, and 2% Tc - 98% SS{sub 85%}Zr{sub 15%} in varying concentrations of nitric acid and pH 10 NaOH using the resistance polarization method while observing the trend that higher concentrations of Tc alloyed to the sample tested lowers the corrosion rate of the proposed waste package.

  15. Recovery of uranium and plutonium from Redox off-standard aqueous waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, C.H.; Matheson, A.R.

    1949-12-31

    In the operation of countercurrent extraction columns as in the Redox process, it is possible, and probable, that from unexpected behaviour of a column, operator error, colloid formation, etc., there will result from time to time excessive losses of uranium and plutonium in the overall process. These losses will naturally accumulate in the waste streams, particularly in the aqueous waste streams. If the loss is excessively high, and such lost material can be recovered by some additional method, then if economical and within reason, the recovered materials ran be returned to a ISF column for further processing. The objective of this work has been to develop such a method to recover uranium and plutonium from such off-standard waste streams in a form whereby the uranium send plutonium can be returned to the process line and subsequently purified and separated.

  16. Tea Wastes Efficiency on Removal of Cd(II From Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Cheraghi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Heavy metals, such as cadmium (Cd(II, enter into the environment and cause health hazard due to their toxicity and bioaccumulation in the human body. Therefore, they must be removed from water. In recent years, much attention has been focused on the use of material residues as low-cost adsorbents for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. The aim of this paper is the assessment of tea wastes efficiency on removal of Cd(II from aqueous solutions. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted in experimental scale. In this paper, tea wastes were prepared and used as an adsorbent for the removal of Cd(II ions from water. In batch tests, the effect of parameters like pH (1.0-8.0, initial metal concentration (100-800 mg L-1, contact time (15-120 min, adsorbent dose (1.0-5.0 g and temperature (25-55 °C on the adsorption process was studied. Results: The results demonstrated that the maximum percentage of Cd(II adsorption was found at pH 6.0 and the equilibrium was achieved after 60 min with 3.0 g tea wastes. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed, using the Langmuir and Freundlich models and it was found that the removal process followed the Langmuir isotherm. In addition, the adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The maximum adsorption capacity calculated by Langmuir fitting was 71.4 mg g−1. Conclusion: The results suggest that tea wastes could be employed as an effective material for the removal of Cd(II ions from aqueous solutions and the maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 71.4 mg g−1.

  17. Effect of Na2O on aqueous dissolution of nuclear waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqi, Rahmat Ullah; Hrma, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    Sodium oxide is present in the majority of commercial and waste glasses as a viscosity-reducing component. In some nuclear waste glasses, its source is the waste itself. As such, it can limit the waste loading because of its deleterious effect on the resistance of the glass to attack by aqueous media. The maximum tolerable content of Na2O in glass depends on the presence and concentration of components that interact with it. To assess the acceptability limits of Na2O in the composition region of nuclear waste glasses, we formulated 11 baseline compositions by varying the content of oxides of Si, B, Al, Ca, Zr, and Li. In each of these compositions, we varied the Na2O fraction from 8-16 mass% to 23-30 mass%. To each of 146 glasses thus formulated, we applied the seven-day Product Consistency Test (PCT) to determine normalized B and Na releases (ri, where i ≡ B or Na). Fitting approximation functions ln(ri/gm-2) = Σbijgj to ri data (gj is the j-th component mass fraction and bij the corresponding component coefficient), we showed that the rB (and, consequently, the initial glass alteration rate) was proportional to the glass component mass fractions in the order Al2O3role that PCT data may play in understanding the evolution of the glass alteration process is discussed.

  18. Adsorption of phenol and reactive dye from aqueous solution on activated carbons derived from solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kyuya; Namba, Akio; Mukai, Shin R; Tamon, Hajime; Ariyadejwanich, Pisit; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut

    2004-04-01

    Activated carbons were produced from several solid wastes, namely, waste PET, waste tires, refuse derived fuel and wastes generated during lactic acid fermentation from garbage. Activated carbons having various pore size distributions were obtained by the conventional steam-activation method and via the pre-treatment method (i.e., mixture of raw materials with a metal salt, carbonization and acid treatment prior to steam-activation) that was proposed by the authors. The liquid-phase adsorption characteristics of organic compounds from aqueous solution on the activated carbons were determined to confirm the applicability of these carbons, where phenol and a reactive dye, Black5, were employed as representative adsorbates. The hydrophobic surface of the carbons prepared was also confirmed by water vapor adsorption. The characteristics of a typical commercial activated carbon were also measured and compared. It was found that the activated carbons with plentiful mesopores prepared from PET and waste tires had quite high adsorption capacity for large molecules. Therefore they are useful for wastewater treatment, especially, for removal of bulky adsorbates.

  19. Aqueous nitrate waste treatment: Technology comparison, cost/benefit, and market analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate the practical utility of the Nitrate to Ammonia and Ceramic or Glass (NAC/NAG/NAX) process, which is under development in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The NAC/NACx/NAX process can convert aqueous radioactive nitrate-laden waste to a glass, ceramic, or grout solid waste form. The tasks include, but are not limited to, the following: Identify current commercial technologies to meet hazardous and radiological waste disposal requirements. The technologies may be thermal or non-thermal but must be all inclusive (i.e., must convert a radionuclide-containing nitrate waste with a pH around 12 to a stable form that can be disposed at permitted facilities); evaluate and compare DOE-sponsored vitrification, grouting, and minimum additive waste stabilization projects for life-cycle costs; compare the technologies above with respect to material costs, capital equipment costs, operating costs, and operating efficiencies. For the NAC/NAG/NAX process, assume aluminum reactant is government furnished and ammonia gas may be marketed; compare the identified technologies with respect to frequency of use within DOE for environmental management applications with appropriate rationale for use; Assess the potential size of the DOE market for the NAC/NAG/NAX process; assess and off-gas issues; and compare with international technologies, including life-cycle estimates.

  20. Research program on development of advanced treatment technology for americium-containing aqueous waste in NUCEF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineo, Hideaki; Matsumura, Tatsuro; Tsubata, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-10-01

    A research program was prepared on the development of an advanced treatment process for the americium-containing concentrated aqueous waste in NUCEF, than allows americium recovery for the reuse and the reduction of TRU waste generation. A preliminary analysis was conducted on the separation requirements based on the components estimated for the waste. An R and D strategy was proposed from the view to reduce TRU waste generated in the processing that the highest priority is given on the control of TRU leakage such as americium into the effluent stream after americium recovery and the minimization of salt used in the separation over the decontamination of impurities from americium. The extraction chromatographic method was selected as a candidate technology for americium separation under the principle to use reagents that are functional in acidic conditions such as bidentate extractants of DHEDECMP, CMPO or diamides, considering the larger flexibilities in process modification and possible multi-component separation with compact equipment and the past achievements on the recovery of kg quantities of americium. Major R and D items extracted are screening and evaluation of extractants for americium and plutonium, optimization of separation conditions, selection of denitration method, equipment developments and development of solidification methods of discarded americium after reuse and of various kinds of separation residues. In order to cope these items, four steps of R and D program were proposed, i.e., fundamental experiment in beaker-scale on screening and evaluation of extractants, flowsheet study in bench-scale using simulated and small amount of americium aqueous waste solution to evaluate candidate process, americium recovery test in iron-shielded cell to be installed in NUCEF. It is objected to make recovery of 100g orders of americium used for research on fundamental TRU fuel properties. (J.P.N.)

  1. Removal of Pb (II from Aqueous Solutions Using Waste Tea Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Cheraghi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The presence of lead in natural waters has become an important issue around the world. Lead has been identified as a highly toxic metal that can cause severe environmental and public health problems and its decontamination is of utmost importance. The aim of this work was to evaluate the adsorption of lead (Pb(II on waste tea leaves as a cheap purification method. Methods: In this experimental study, prepared waste tea leaves were used as adsorbent for the removal of Pb (II from aqueous solutions. Adsorption experiments were carried out as batch studies at different contact time, pH, amount of adsorbent, initial metal concentration and temperature. Results: The results showed that maximum removal efficiency was observed at pH 6. Also the adsorption of Pb (II ions increased with decreasing initial metal concentration. The Langmuir isotherm model fits well with the equilibrium adsorption isotherm data and its calculated maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was 166.6 mg g-1 at a temperature of 25±0.1˚C. The kinetic data obtained have been analyzed using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. The best fitted kinetic model was found to be pseudo-second-order. Conclusion: The results suggest that tea wastes could be employed as cheap material for the removal of lead from aqueous solutions.

  2. Removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution using cotton stalk, cotton waste and cotton dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertas, Murat [Department of Forest Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Forestry, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, 46060 Kahramanmaras (Turkey); Acemioglu, Bilal, E-mail: acemioglu@kilis.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Arts, Kilis 7 Aralik University, 79000 Kilis (Turkey); Alma, M. Hakki [Department of Forest Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Forestry, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, 46060 Kahramanmaras (Turkey); Usta, Mustafa [Department of Forest Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Forestry, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2010-11-15

    In this study, cotton stalk (CS), cotton waste (CW) and cotton dust (CD) was used as sorbents to remove methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution by batch sorption technique. Effects of initial dye concentration, solution pH, solution temperature and sorbent dose on sorption were studied. It was seen that the removal of methylene blue increased with increasing initial dye concentration (from 25 to 100 mg/l), solution pH (from 5 to 10), solution temperature (from 20 to 50 deg. C) and sorbent dose (from 0.25 to 1.50 g/50 ml). The maximum dye removal was reached at 90 min. Sorption isotherms were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich models at different temperatures of 20, 30, 40 and 50 deg. C, and the results were discussed in detail. Moreover, the thermodynamics of sorption were also studied. It was found that the values of standard free energy ({Delta}G{sup o}) were positive for cotton stalk and negative for cotton waste and cotton dust. The values of standard enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup o}) and entropy ({Delta}S{sup o}) were found to be positive, and the obtained results were interpreted in detail. The results of this study showed that cotton stalk, cotton waste and cotton dust could be employed as effective and low-cost materials for the removal of dyes from aqueous solution.

  3. Removal of lead from aqueous solution using waste tire rubber ash as an adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Z. Mousavi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of the utilization of waste tire rubber ash (WTRA as a low cost adsorbent for removal of lead (II ion from aqueous solution. The effect of different parameters (such as contact time, sorbate concentration, adsorbent dosage, pH of the medium and temperature were investigated. The sorption process was relatively fast and equilibrium was reached after about 90 min of contact. The experimental data were analyzed by the Freundlich isotherm and the Langmuir isotherm. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model with maximum adsorption capacity of 22.35 mg/g. The adsorption kinetics was investigated and the best fit was achieved by a first-order equation. The results of the removal process show that the Pb (II ion adsorption on WTRA is an endothermic and spontaneous process. The procedure developed was successfully applied for the removal of lead ions in aqueous solutions.

  4. Usefulness of Activated Carbon Prepared from Industrial Wastes in the Removal of Nickel from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rajalakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Elimination of heavy metals like nickel from waste water is an important subject in view of public health. In the present study, an attempt has been made to study the applicability of industrial by-products as potential metal adsorbents to remove nickel from aqueous solutions and polluted water. A direct proportionality between the percentage of Ni(II removal and adsorbent dosage was noted. Maximum removal ⁄ recovery of nickel was achieved at pH range of 10-12 for all adsorbents. An optimum temperature of 40 °C for efficient removal of Ni(II was observed. The effect of nickel adsorption was affected by salinity. The adsorption isotherm data confirmed to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. Conformation of data to the Lagergren᾽s rate equation indicated first order kinetics. The suitability of the industrial by-products in the successful removal of nickel from aqueous solution is quite obvious from the study.

  5. Production of furfural from waste aqueous hemicellulose solution of hardwood over ZSM-5 zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongling; Liu, Haitang; Pang, Bo; Yu, Guang; Du, Jian; Zhang, Yuedong; Wang, Haisong; Mu, Xindong

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to produce furfural from waste aqueous hemicellulose solution of a hardwood kraft-based dissolving pulp production processing in a green method. The maximum furfural yield of 82.4% and the xylose conversion of 96.8% were achieved at 463K, 1.0g ZSM-5, 1.05g NaCl and organic solvent-to-aqueous phase ratio of 30:15 (V/V) for 3h. The furfural yield was just 51.5% when the same concentration of pure xylose solution was used. Under the optimized condition, furfural yield was still up to 67.1% even after the fifth reused of catalyst. Catalyst recycling study showed that ZSM-5 has a certain stability and can be efficiently reused.

  6. Design, fabrication and testing of a wet oxidation waste processing system. [for manned space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The wet oxidation of sewage sludge during space flight was studied for water and gas recovery, and the elimination of overboard venting. The components of the system are described. Slurry and oxygen supply modules were fabricated and tested. Recommendations for redesign of the equipment are included.

  7. Magnetic Adsorption Method for the Treatment of Metal Contaminated Aqueous Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. B. Cotten (Parsons); J. D. Navratil (INEEL); H. B. Eldredge (U of Idaho)

    1999-03-01

    There have been many recent developments in separation methods used for treating radioactive and non-radioactive metal bearing liquid wastes. These methods have included adsorption, ion exchange, solvent extraction and other chemical and physical techniques. To date very few, if any, of these processes can provide a low cost and environmentally benign solution. Recent research into the use of magnetite for wastewater treatment indicates the potential for magnetite both cost and environment drivers. A brief review of recent work in using magnetite as a sorbent is presented as well as recent work performed in our laboratory using supported magnetite in the presence of an external magnetic field. The application to groundwater and other aqueous waste streams is discussed. Recent research has focused on supporting magnetite in an economical (as compared to the magnetic polymine-epichlorohydrine resin) and inert (non-reactive, chemically or otherwise) environment that promotes both adsorption and satisfactory flow characteristics.

  8. Removal of arsenate and arsenite from aqueous solution by waste cast iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nag-Choul; Kim, Song-Bae; Kim, Soon-Oh; Lee, Jae-Won; Park, Jun-Boum

    2012-01-01

    The removal of As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solution was investigated using waste cast iron, which is a byproduct of the iron casting process in foundries. Two types of waste cast iron were used in the experiment: grind precipitate dust (GPD) and cast iron shot (CIS). The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the presence of Feo on GPD and CIS. Batch experiments were performed under different concentrations of As(III) and As(V) and at various initial pH levels. Results showed that waste cast iron was effective in the removal of arsenic. The adsorption isotherm study indicated that the Langmuir isotherm was better than the Freundlich isotherm at describing the experimental result. In the adsorption of both As(IH) and As(V), the adsorption capacity of GPD was greater than CIS, mainly due to the fact that GPD had higher surface area and weight percent of Fe than CIS. Results also indicated the removal of As(III) and As(V) by GPD and CIS was influenced by the initial solution pH, generally decreasing with increasing pH from 3.0 to 10.5. In addition, both GPD and CIS were more effective at the removal of As(III) than As(V) under given experimental conditions. This study demonstrates that waste cast iron has potential as a reactive material to treat wastewater and groundwater containing arsenic.

  9. Degradation of H-acid in aqueous solution by microwave assisted wet air oxidation using Ni-loaded GAC as catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yao-bin; QUAN Xie; ZHAO Hui-min; CHEN Shuo; YANG Feng-lin

    2005-01-01

    A novel process, microwave assisted catalytic wet air oxidation(MW-CWO), was applied for the degradation of H-acid( 1-amino8-naphthol-3, 6-disulfonic acid) in aqueous solution. Ni-loaded granular activated carbon (GAG), prepared by immersion-calcination method, was used as catalyst. The results showed that the MW-CWO process was very effective for the degradation of H-acid in aqueous solution under atmospheric pressure with 87.4% TOC (total organic carbon) reduction in 20 min. Ni on GAC existed in the form of NiO as specified by XRD. Loss of Ni was significant in the initial stage, and then remained almost constant after 20 min reaction. BET surface area results showed that the surface property of GAC after MW-CWO process was superior to that of blank GAC.

  10. Wet and dry cooling systems optimization applied to a modern waste-to-energy cogeneration heat and power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barigozzi, G.; Perdichizzi, A.; Ravelli, S. [Department of Industrial Engineering, Bergamo University (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    In Brescia, Italy, heat is delivered to 70% of 200.000 city inhabitants by means of a district heating system, mainly supplied by a waste to energy plant, utilizing the non recyclable fraction of municipal and industrial solid waste (800,000 tons/year, otherwise landfilled), thus saving annually over 150,000 tons of oil equivalent and over 400,000 tons of CO{sub 2} emissions. This study shows how the performance of the waste-to-energy cogeneration plant can be improved by optimising the condensation system, with particular focus on the combination of wet and dry cooling systems. The analysis has been carried out using two subsequent steps: in the first one a schematic model of the steam cycle was accomplished in order to acquire a knowledge base about the variables that would be most influential on the performance. In the second step the electric power output for different operating conditions was predicted and optimized in a homemade program. In more details, a thermodynamic analysis of the steam cycle, according to the design operating condition, was performed by means of a commercial code (Thermoflex {sup copyright}) dedicated to power plant modelling. Then the off-design behaviour was investigated by varying not only the ambient conditions but also several parameters connected to the heat rejection rate, like the heat required from district heating and the auxiliaries load. Each of these parameters has been addressed and considered in determining the overall performance of the thermal cycle. After that, a complete prediction of the cycle behaviour was performed by simultaneously varying different operating conditions. Finally, a Matlab {sup copyright} computer code was developed in order to optimize the net electric power as a function of the way in which the condensation is operated. The result is an optimum set of variables allowing the wet and dry cooling system to be regulated in such a way that the maximum power is achieved. The best strategy consists in

  11. Assessment of TEES reg sign applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

  12. A wetting experiment as a tool to study the physicochemical processes accompanying the contact of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic materials with aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boinovich, Ludmila; Emelyanenko, Alexandre

    2012-11-01

    In most fields of technological application of superhydrophobic materials, such as protection against corrosion, icing, and capillary condensation, or micro fluidics applications, a superhydrophobic surface has to operate in contact with aggressive aqueous media. Therefore, the peculiarities of behaviour of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces on prolonged contact with water and the mechanisms of possible degradation of superhydrophobicity need to be discussed. In this study, a consideration of the physicochemical processes accompanying the contact of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic materials with water, acid, alkaline and saline aqueous solutions is presented on the basis of experimental data on three-phase equilibrium obtained by the sessile drop method. It is shown that simultaneous analysis of the contact angle and contact diameter of the sessile drop and liquid/vapour surface tension allows one to attribute degradation of the superhydrophobic and hydrophobic state to reversible and irreversible processes such as hydrolysis of hydrophobic molecules, growth of an oxide layer and so on. A method for estimating both the portion of wetted area and the intrinsic wettability state (hydrophobic versus hydrophilic) of texture elements for a heterogeneous wetting regime is proposed and discussed.

  13. Electrochemical treatment of 2,4-dinitrophenol aqueous wastes using boron-doped diamond anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canizares, P. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Saez, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Lobato, J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Rodrigo, M.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Campus Universitario s/n, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]. E-mail: manuel.rodrigo@uclm.es

    2004-10-15

    The electrochemical oxidation of 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) aqueous wastes has been studied using both, bulk electrolysis and voltammetric techniques. To carry out the bulk electrolysis, a bench-scale plant with a single compartment electrochemical flow cell was used. Boron-doped diamond (BDD) materials were used as the anode and stainless steel (AISI 304) as the cathode. According to the obtained results, a simple mechanistic model has been proposed. The oxidation of 2,4-DNP leads to the appearance of phenol and quinonic compounds and to the release of the nitro groups from the aromatic ring, in a first step. In a second step, these organics are transformed into carboxylic acids (mainly maleic and oxalic acid). The process ends with the formation of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The effects of the waste characteristics (composition and pH) and of the operation parameters of the process (temperature and current density) have also been studied in this work. The complete removal of the organic compounds contained in the waste has been obtained in all essays.

  14. Oxidation of anthracene using waste Mn oxide minerals: the importance of wetting and drying sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Catherine; Tourney, Janette; Johnson, Karen

    2012-02-29

    PAHs are a common problem in contaminated urban soils due to their recalcitrance. This study presents results on the oxidation of anthracene on synthetic and natural Mn oxide surfaces. Evaporation of anthracene spiked Mn oxide slurries in air results in the oxidation of 30% of the anthracene to anthraquinone. Control minerals, quartz and calcite, also oxidised a small but significant proportion of the anthracene (4.5% and 14% conversion, respectively) when spiked mineral slurries were evaporated in air. However, only Mn oxide minerals showed significant anthracene oxidation (5-10%) when evaporation took place in the absence of oxygen (N2 atmosphere). In the fully hydrated systems where no drying took place, natural Mn oxides showed an increase in anthracene oxidation with decreasing pH, with a conversion of 75% anthracene at pH 4. These results show both acidification and drying favor the oxidation of anthracene on Mn oxide mineral surfaces. It has also been demonstrated that non-redox active mineral surfaces, such as calcite, may play a role in contaminant breakdown during wetting and drying sequences. Given that climate changes suggest that wetting and drying sequences are likely to become more significant these results have important implications for contaminated land remediation technologies.

  15. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1993--1994 interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Deverman, G.S.; Werpy, T.A.; Phelps, M.R.; Baker, E.G.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Process development research is continuing on a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system that has been demonstrated to convert organics in water (dilute or concentrated) to useful and environmentally safe gases. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEESO), treats a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from hazardous organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of continuous-feed, tubular reactors systems for testing catalysts and feedstocks in the process. A range of catalysts have been tested, including nickel and other base metals, as well as ruthenium and other precious metals. Results of extensive testing show that feedstocks, ranging from 2% para-cresol in water to potato waste and spent grain, can be processed to > 99% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD). The product fuel gas contains from 40% up to 75% methane, depending on the feedstock. The balance of the gas is mostly carbon dioxide with < 5% hydrogen and usually < 1% ethane and higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics from 10 to 1,000 mg/l COD, depending on the feedstock. The level of development of TEES has progressed to the initial phases of industrial process demonstration. Testing of industrial waste streams is under way at both the bench scale and engineering scale of development.

  16. Adsorption of Halogenated Hydrocarbons from Aqueous Solutions by Wetted and Nonwetted Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Sorbents:  Equilibria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rexwinkel, G.; Heesink, A.B.M.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1999-01-01

    Single-solute adsorption equilibria of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, trichloroethene, trans-1,2-dichloroethene, chloroform, 2,4-dichorophenol, and dichloromethane dissolved in water have been measured, using both wetted and nonwetted hydrophobic Amberlite XAD-4 resin at 20 °C. The re

  17. Catalytic wet-oxidation of a mixed liquid waste: COD and AOX abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goi, D; de Leitenburg, C; Trovarelli, A; Dolcetti, G

    2004-12-01

    A series of catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) reactions, at temperatures of 430-500 K and in a batch bench-top pressure vessel were carried out utilizing a strong wastewater composed of landfill leachate and heavily organic halogen polluted industrial wastewater. A CeO2-SiO2 mixed oxide catalyst with large surface area to assure optimal oxidation performance was prepared. The catalytic process was examined during batch reactions controlling Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and Adsorbable Organic Halogen (AOX) parameters, resulting AOX abatement to achieve better effect. Color and pH were also controlled during batch tests. A simple first order-two stage reaction behavior was supposed and verified with the considered parameters. Finally an OUR test was carried out to evaluate biodegradability changes of wastewater as a result of the catalytic reaction.

  18. Removal of arsenate and arsenite from aqueous solution by waste cast iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nag-Choul Choi; Song-Bae Kim; Soon-Oh Kim; Jae-Won Lee; Jun-Boum Park

    2012-01-01

    The removal of As(Ⅲ) and As(Ⅴ) from aqueous solution was investigated using waste cast iron,which is a byproduct of the iron casting process in foundries.Two types of waste cast iron were used in the experiment:grind precipitate dust (GPD) and cast iron shot (CIS).The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the presence of Fe0 on GPD and CIS.Batch experiments were performed under different concentrations of As(Ⅲ) and As(Ⅴ) and at various initial pH levels.Results showed that waste cast iron was effective in the removal of arsenic.The adsorption isotherm study indicated that the Langmuir isotherm was better than the Freundlich isotherm at describing the experimental result.In the adsorption of both As(Ⅲ) and As(Ⅴ),the adsorption capacity of GPD was greater than CIS,mainly due to the fact that GPD had higher surface area and weight percent of Fe than CIS.Results also indicated the removal of As(Ⅲ) and As(Ⅴ)by GPD and CIS was influenced by the initial solution pH,generally decreasing with increasing pH from 3.0 to 10.5.In addition,both GPD and CIS were more effective at the removal of As(Ⅲ) than As(Ⅴ) under given experimental conditions.This study demonstrates that waste cast iron has potential as a reactive material to treat wastewater and groundwater containing arsenic.

  19. Electrochemical decomposition of fluorinated wetting agents in plating industry waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, Andreas; Sacher, Frank; McCaskie, John E

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical decomposition of fluorinated surfactants (PFAS, perfluorinated alkyl substances) used in the plating industry was analyzed and the decomposition process parameters optimized at the laboratory scale and production scale of a 500-liter reactor using lead electrodes. The method and system was successfully demonstrated under production conditions to treat PFAS) with up to 99% efficiency in the concentration range of 1,000-20,000 μg/l (1 ppm-20 ppm). The treatment also reduced hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) ions to trivalent chromium (Cr(3+)) ions in the wastewater. If the PFAS-containing wastewater is mixed with other wastewater streams, specifically from nickel plating drag out solution or when pH values >5, the treatment process is ineffective. For the short chain PFAS, (perfluorobutylsulfonate) the process was less efficient than C6-C8 PFAS. The process is automated and has safety procedures and controls to prevent hazards. The PFAS were decomposed to hydrogen fluoride (HF) under the strong acid electrochemical operating conditions. Analytical tests showed no evidence of organic waste products remaining from the process. Conventional alternative PFAS removal systems were tested on the waste streams and compared with each other and with the-E-destruct (electrochemical oxidation) process. For example, ion exchange resin (IX resin) treatment of wastewater to complex and remove PFAS was found to be seven times more efficient when compared to the conventional activated carbon absorption (C-treat) process. However, the E-destruct process is higher in capacity, exhibits longer service life and lower operating costs than either IX or C-treat methods for elimination of PFAS from these electroplating waste streams.

  20. Alkali treated Foumanat tea waste as an efficient adsorbent for methylene blue adsorption from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Ebrahimian Pirbazari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of methylene blue (MB from aqueous solution by alkali treated Foumanat tea waste (ATFTW from agriculture biomass was investigated. The adsorbent was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR and nitrogen physisorption. FTIR results showed complexation and ion exchange appear to be the principle mechanism for MB adsorption. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted to Langmuir, Sips, Redlich-Peterson and Freundlich equations, and the Langmuir adsorption capacity, Qmax was found to be 461 mgg−1. It was found that the adsorption of MB increases by increasing temperature from 303 to 323 K and the process is endothermic in nature. The removal of MB by ATFTW followed pseudo-second order reaction kinetics based on Lagergren equations. Mechanism studies indicated that the adsorption of MB on the ATFTW was mainly governed by external mass transport where particle diffusion was the rate limiting step.

  1. Removal of Lead (II Ions from Aqueous Solutions onto Activated Carbon Derived from Waste Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Erdem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of lead (II ions from aqueous solutions was carried out using an activated carbon prepared from a waste biomass. The effects of various parameters such as pH, contact time, initial concentration of lead (II ions, and temperature on the adsorption process were investigated. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS analysis after adsorption reveals the accumulation of lead (II ions onto activated carbon. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to analyze equilibrium data. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity of activated carbon was found to be 476.2 mg g−1. The kinetic data were evaluated and the pseudo-second-order equation provided the best correlation. Thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process is endothermic and spontaneous.

  2. A Novel Agricultural Waste Adsorbent, Watermelon Shell for the Removal of Copper from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koel Banerjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the application of Watermelon Shell, an agricultural waste, for the adsorptive removal of Cu(II from its aqueous solutions. This paper incorporates the effects of time, dose,temperature, concentration, particle size, agitation speed and pH. Analytical techniques have been employed to find pore properties and characteristics of adsorbent materials. Batch kinetic and isotherm studies have also been performed to understand the ability of the adsorbents. The adsorption behavior of the Cu(II has beenstudied using Freundlich, Langmuir and Tempkin adsorption isotherm models. The monolayer adsorption capacity determined from the Langmuir adsorption equation has been found as 111.1 mg/g. Kineticmeasurements suggest the involvement of pseudo-second-order kinetics in adsorptions and is controlled by a particle diffusion process. Adsorption of Cu(II on adsorbents was found to increase on decreasing initial concentration, increasing pH up to 8, increasing temperature, increasing agitation speed and decreasing particlesize. Overall, the present findings suggest that watermelon outer shell is environmentally friendly, efficient and low-cost biosorbent which is useful for the removal of Cu(II from aqueous media.

  3. Removal of lead(II) from aqueous solutions using carbonate hydroxyapatite extracted from eggshell waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Dexiang; Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiaoming; Yang, Qi; Yue, Xiu; Guo, Liang; Zeng, Guangming

    2010-05-15

    Carbonate hydroxyapatite (CHAP) synthesized from eggshell waste was used for removing lead ion from aqueous solutions. The effects of pH, contact time and initial concentration were studied in batch experiments. The maximum uptake of lead ion was obtained at pH 6.0. Adsorption equilibrium was established by 60 min. The pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models were applied to study the kinetics of the sorption processes. The pseudo-second order kinetic model provided the best correlation (R(2)>0.9991) of the used experimental data compared to the pseudo-first order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models. The adsorption of lead ion by CHAP increased as the initial concentration of lead ion increased in the medium. The maximum lead ion adsorbed was found to be 101 mg g(-1). It was found that the adsorption of Pb(II) on CHAP was correlated well (R(2)=0.9995) with the Langmuir equation as compared to Freundlich isotherm equation under the concentration range studied. This study indicated that CHAP could be used as an efficient adsorbent for removal of lead ion from aqueous solution.

  4. Adsorption of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) from aqueous solution using agricultural solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, A; Sivakumar, P; Sujatha, M; Palanisamy, P N

    2009-04-01

    Areca nut shell, an agricultural solid waste by-product, has been studied for the removal of heavy metals Cr(VI) and Pb(II) from aqueous solution. Parameters, such as equilibrium time, effect of initial metal ion concentration, effect of pH on the removal, were analyzed. An initial pH of 4.0 was found most favourable for Cr(VI) removal and 5.0 for Pb(II) removal. Two theoretical isotherm models, namely Langmuir and Freundlich, were analyzed for the applicability of the experimental data. The Langmuir adsorption capacity (Q0) was calculated. The results of thermodynamic parameters suggest the exothermic nature of the adsorption. The desorption studies were carried out using dilute hydrochloric acid. Maximum desorption of 88% for Cr(VI) and 91% for Pb(II) were achieved. Areca nut shell waste, the low cost adsorbent is found to be effective in the removal of Cr(VI) and Pb(II) ions, and hence it can be applied for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewater.

  5. Purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from waste potato peel by aqueous two-phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niphadkar, Sonali S; Vetal, Mangesh D; Rathod, Virendra K

    2015-01-01

    Potato peel from food industrial waste is a good source of polyphenol oxidase (PPO). This work illustrates the application of an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) for the extraction and purification of PPO from potato peel. ATPS was composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and potassium phosphate buffer. Effect of different process parameters, namely, PEG, potassium phosphate buffer, NaCl concentration, and pH of the system, on partition coefficient, purification factor, and yield of PPO enzyme were evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized as a statistical tool for the optimization of ATPS. Optimized experimental conditions were found to be PEG1500 17.62% (w/w), potassium phosphate buffer 15.11% (w/w), and NaCl 2.08 mM at pH 7. At optimized condition, maximum partition coefficient, purification factor, and yield were found to be 3.7, 4.5, and 77.8%, respectively. After partial purification of PPO from ATPS, further purification was done by gel chromatography where its purity was increased up to 12.6-fold. The purified PPO enzyme was characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), followed by Km value 3.3 mM, and Vmax value 3333 U/mL, and enzyme stable ranges for temperature and pH of PPO were determined. These results revealed that ATPS would be an attractive option for obtaining purified PPO from waste potato peel.

  6. Removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto orange waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Marin, A.B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain); Zapata, V. Meseguer [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain)]. E-mail: vzapata@um.es; Ortuno, J.F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain); Aguilar, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain); Saez, J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain); Llorens, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Murcia, 30071 Murcia (Spain)

    2007-01-02

    The use of orange wastes, generated in the orange juice industry, for removing cadmium from aqueous solutions has been investigated. The material was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and batch experiments were conducted to determine the adsorption capacity of the biomass. A strong dependence of the adsorption capacity on pH was observed, the capacity increasing as pH value rose. Kinetics and adsorption equilibrium were studied at different pH values (4-6). The adsorption process was quick and the equilibrium was attained within 3 h. The maximum adsorption capacity of orange waste was found to be 0.40, 0.41 and 0.43 mmol/g at pH 4-6, respectively. The kinetic data were analysed using various kinetic models - pseudo-first order equation, pseudo-second order equation, Elovich equation and intraparticle diffusion equation - and the equilibrium data were tested using four isotherm models - Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips and Redlich-Peterson. The data were fitted by non-linear regression and five error analysis methods were used to evaluate the goodness of the fit. The Elovich equation provides the greatest accuracy for the kinetic data and the Sips model the closest fit for the equilibrium data.

  7. Evaluating Transport and Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in the Vadose Zone for Aqueous Waste Disposal Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Oostrom, Martinus [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tartakovsky, Guzel D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    An approach was developed for evaluating vadose zone transport and attenuation of aqueous wastes containing inorganic (non-volatile) contaminants that were disposed of at the land surface (i.e., directly to the ground in cribs, trenches, tile fields, etc.) and their effect on the underlying groundwater. The approach provides a structured method for estimating transport of contaminants through the vadose zone and the resulting temporal profile of groundwater contaminant concentrations. The intent of the approach is also to provide a means for presenting and explaining the results of the transport analysis in the context of the site-specific waste disposal conditions and site properties, including heterogeneities and other complexities. The document includes considerations related to identifying appropriate monitoring to verify the estimated contaminant transport and associated predictions of groundwater contaminant concentrations. While primarily intended for evaluating contaminant transport under natural attenuation conditions, the approach can also be applied to identify types of, and targets for, mitigation approaches in the vadose zone that would reduce the temporal profile of contaminant concentrations in groundwater, if needed.

  8. Production of coconut protein powder from coconut wet processing waste and its characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Aduja; Raghavendra, S N; Raghavarao, K S M S

    2012-07-01

    Virgin coconut oil (VCO) has been gaining popularity in recent times. During its production, byproducts such as coconut skim milk and insoluble protein are obtained which are underutilized or thrown away to the environment at present. This study deals with utilization of these byproducts to obtain a value-added product, namely, coconut protein powder. When coconut milk was subjected to centrifugation, three phases, namely, fat phase (coconut cream), aqueous phase (coconut skim milk), and solid phase (insoluble protein) were obtained. The coconut skim milk and insoluble protein were mixed and homogenized before spray drying to obtain a dehydrated protein powder. The proximate analysis of the powder showed high protein content (33 % w/w) and low fat content (3 % w/w). Protein solubility was studied as a function of pH and ionic content of solvent. Functional properties such as water hydration capacity, fat absorption capacity, emulsifying properties, wettability, and dispersibility of coconut protein powder were evaluated along with morphological characterization, polyphenol content, and color analysis. Coconut protein powder has shown to have good emulsifying properties and hence has potential to find applications in emulsified foods. Sensory analysis showed high overall quality of the product, indicating that coconut protein powder could be a useful food ingredient.

  9. Vine-shoot waste aqueous extract applied as foliar fertilizer to grapevines: Effect on amino acids and fermentative volatile content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, R; Garde-Cerdán, T; Zalacain, A; Garcia, R; Cabrita, M J; Salinas, M R

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this work was to study the influence of foliar applications of different wood aqueous extracts on the amino acid content of musts and wines from Airén variety; and to study their relationship with the volatile compounds formed during alcoholic fermentation. For this purpose, the foliar treatments proposed were a vine-shoot aqueous extract applied in one and two times, and an oak extract which was only applied once. Results obtained show the potential of Airén vine-shoot waste aqueous extracts to be used as foliar fertilizer, enhancing the wine amino acid content especially when they were applied once. Similar results were observed with the aqueous oak extract. Regarding wine fermentative volatile compounds, there is a close relationship between musts and their wines amino acid content allowing us to discuss about the role of proline during the alcoholic fermentation and the generation of certain volatiles.

  10. Bench-scale reactor tests of low-temperature, catalytic gasification of wet, industrial wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J.

    1990-04-01

    Bench-scale reactor tests are under way at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for to a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of a continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The catalyst is nickel metal on an inert support. Typical results show that feedstocks such as solutions of 2% para-cresol or 5% and 10% lactose in water or cheese whey can be processed to >99% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) at a rate of up to 2 L/hr. The estimated residence time is less than 5 min at 360{degree}C and 3000 psig, not including 1 to 2 min required in the preheating zone of the reactor. The liquid hourly space velocity has been varied from 1.8 to 2.9 L feedstock/L catalyst/hr depending on the feedstock. The product fuel gas contains 40% to 55% methane, 35% to 50% carbon dioxide, and 5% to 10% hydrogen with as much as 2% ethane, but less than 0.1% ethylene or carbon monoxide, and small amounts of higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics amounting to less than 500 mg/L COD. 9 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  11. Degradation of acid red 97 dye in aqueous medium using wet oxidation and electro-Fenton techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayan, Berkant; Gözmen, Belgin; Demirel, Muhammet; Gizir, A Murat

    2010-05-15

    Degradation of the acid red 97 dye using wet oxidation, by different oxidants, and electro-Fenton systems was investigated in this study. The oxidation effect of different oxidants such as molecular oxygen, periodate, persulfate, bromate, and hydrogen peroxide in wet oxidation system was compared. Mineralization of AR97 with periodate appeared more effective when compared with that of the other oxidants at equal initial concentration. When 5 mM of periodate was used, at the first minute of the oxidative treatment, the decolorization percentage of AR97 solution at 150 and 200 degrees C reached 88 and 98%, respectively. The total organic carbon removal efficiency at these temperatures also reached 60 and 80%. The degradation of AR97 was also studied by electro-Fenton process. The optimal current value and Fe(2+) concentration were found to be 300 mA and 0.2 mM, respectively. The results showed that electro-Fenton process can lead to 70 and 95% mineralization of the dye solution after 3 and 5h giving carboxylic acids and inorganic ions as final end-products before mineralization. The products obtained from degradation were identified by GC/MS as 1,2-naphthalenediol, 1,1'-biphenyl-4-amino-4-ol, 2-naphthalenol diazonium, 2-naphthalenol, 2,3-dihydroxy-1,4-naphthalenedion, phthalic anhydride, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, phthaldehyde, 3-hydroxy-1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, 4-amino-benzoic acid, and 2-formyl-benzoic acid.

  12. Considerations affecting deep-well disposal of tritium-bearing low-level aqueous waste from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevorrow, L. E.; Warner, D. L.; Steindler, M. J.

    1977-03-01

    Present concepts of disposal of low-level aqueous wastes (LLAW) that contain much of the fission-product tritium from light water reactors involve dispersal to the atmosphere or to surface streams at fuel reprocessing plants. These concepts have been challenged in recent years. Deep-well injection of low-level aqueous wastes, an alternative to biospheric dispersal, is the subject of this presentation. Many factors must be considered in assessing its feasibility, including technology, costs, environmental impact, legal and regulatory constraints, and siting. Examination of these factors indicates that the technology of deep-well injection, extensively developed for other industrial wastes, would require little innovation before application to low-level aqueous wastes. Costs would be low, of the order of magnitude of 10/sup -4/ mill/kWh. The environmental impact of normal deep-well disposal would be small, compared with dispersal to the atmosphere or to surface streams; abnormal operation would not be expected to produce catastrophic results. Geologically suitable sites are abundant in the U.S., but a well would best be co-located with the fuel-reprocessing plant where the LLAW is produced. Legal and regulatory constraints now being developed will be the most important determinants of the feasibility of applying the method.

  13. Biological conversion of the aqueous wastes from hydrothermal liquefaction of algae and pine wood by Rhodococci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yucai; Li, Xiaolu; Xue, Xiaoyun; Swita, Marie S.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Yang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, R. opacus PD630, R. jostii RHA1, R. jostii RHA1 VanA-, and their co-culture were employed to convert hydrothermal liquefaction aqueous waste (HTLAW) into lipids. After 11 days, the COD reduction of algal-HTLAW reached 93.4% and 92.7% by R. jostii RHA1 and its mutant VanA-, respectively. Woody-HTLAW promoted lipid accumulation of 0.43 g lipid/g cell dry weight in R. opacus PD630 cells. Additionally, the total number of chemicals in HTLAW decreased by over 1/3 after 7 days of coculture, and 0.10 g/L and 0.46 g/L lipids were incrementally accumulated in the cellular mass during the fermentation of wood- and algal-HTLAW, respectively. The GC-MS data supported that different metabolism pathways were followed when these Rhodococci strains degraded algae- and woody-HTLAW. These results indicated promising potential of bioconversion of under-utilized carbon and toxic compounds in HTLAW into useful products by selected Rhodococci.

  14. Commercial Coffee Wastes as Materials for Adsorption of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Z. Kyzas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study the removal of Cu(II and Cr(VI from aqueous solutions with commercial coffee wastes. Materials with no further treatment such as coffee residues from café may act as adsorbents for the removal of Cu(II and Cr(VI. Equilibrium data were successfully fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich model (L-F. The maximum adsorption capacity of the coffee residues can reach 70 mg/g for the removal of Cu(II and 45 mg/g for Cr(VI. The kinetic data were fitted to pseudo-first, -second and -third order equations. The equilibrium was achieved in 120 min. Also, the effect of pH on adsorption and desorption was studied, as well as the influence of agitation rate. Ten cycles of adsorption-desorption were carried out revealing the strong reuse potential of these low-cost adsorbents; the latter was confirmed from a brief economic approach.

  15. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies for sorption of Ni (II) from aqueous solution using formaldehyde treated waste tea leaves

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The sorption characteristic of Ni (II) from aqueous solution using formaldehyde treated waste tea leaves as a low cost sorbent has been studied. The effect of pH, contact time, sorbent dose, initial metal ion concentration and temperature were investigated in batch experiments. The equilibrium data were fitted into four most common isotherm models; Freundlich, Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R). The Langmuir model described the sorption isotherm best with maximum monolayer sorpt...

  16. Chemical and toxicological evaluation of an emerging pollutant (enrofloxacin) by catalytic wet air oxidation and ozonation in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Feifang; Liang, Xinmiao; Yediler, Ayfer

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the degradation efficiency of enrofloxacin (ENR) by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) and ozonation. Results obtained by CWAO experiments show that 99.5% degradation, 37.0% chemical oxidation demand (COD) removal and 51.0% total organic carbon (TOC) conversion were obtained when 100 mol% FeCl(3) and 25 mol% NaNO(2) at 150 °C under 0.5 MPa oxygen pressure after 120 min are used. The degradation products are identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ion chromatography (IC). The oxidation end products, F(-), NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+) were determined by IC. The BOD(5)/COD ratio as a measure of the biodegradability of the parent compound increased from 0.01 to 0.12 after 120 min of reaction time, indicating an improved biodegradability of the parent compound. The inhibition of bioluminescence of the marine bacteria V. fischeri decreased from 43% to 12% demonstrating a loss in toxicity of ENR during CWAO. Ozonation of 0.2 mM ENR was carried out with an ozone concentration of 7.3 g m(-3) at pH 7. ENR decomposition with a degradation rate of 87% was obtained corresponding to the reaction time. Moderate changes in COD (18%) and TOC (17%) removal has been observed. The bioluminescence inhibition increased from 8% to 50%, due to the generation of toxic degradation products during ozonation. In comparison to the widely use of well developed method of ozonation CWAO exhibits better performance in terms of COD, TOC removals and generates less toxic products.

  17. Lignocellulosic-derived modified agricultural waste: development, characterisation and implementation in sequestering pyridine from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Md Juned K; Ahmaruzzaman, M; Reza, Ruhul A

    2014-08-15

    The development and characterisation of modified agricultural waste (MAW) by H3PO4 activation is addressed in this study for sequestering pyridine from aqueous solutions. The adsorbent is characterised by carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen content of 55.53%, 3.28% and 0.98% respectively. The adsorbent also shows acidic (carboxylic, lactonic, phenolic groups) and basic carbon surface functionalities, functional groups viz. hydroxyl, carboxylic acid and bounded water molecules, BET surface area of 1254.67 m(2) g(-1), heterogeneous surface morphology and graphite like XRD patterns. Adsorption of pyridine is executed to evaluate the adsorptive uptake in batch (q(e)=107.18 mg g(-1)) as well as in column system (q(e)=140.94 mg g(-1)). The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics with the Langmuir isotherm best representing the equilibrium adsorption data. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH(o)=9.39 kJ mol(-1), ΔG(o)=-5.99 kJ mol(-1), ΔS(o)=50.76 J K(-1) mol(-1)) confirm the endothermic and spontaneous nature of the adsorption process with increase in randomness at solid/solution interface. The adsorption mechanism is governed by electrostatic and π-π dispersive interactions as well as by a two stage diffusion phenomena. Thermally regenerated spent MAW exhibited better adsorption efficiency for five adsorption-desorption cycles than chemically regenerated. The low-cost of MAW (USD 10.714 per kg) and favourable adsorption parameters justifies its use in the adsorptive removal of pyridine.

  18. Factors influencing catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of maleic acid in aqueous phase over copper/micelle templated silica-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Lilian; Katima, Jamidu H Y

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of initial maleic acid feed concentration (0.005 to 0.03 M) was carried out in a temperature range of 20-50 degrees Celsius, on micelle templated silica-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (MTS-AMP) supported copper catalyst. The influence of various operating parameters such as initial feed concentration of maleic acid, temperature, catalyst loading and the stability of the catalyst were investigated. CWPO reactions were performed in a stirred batch reactor at an atmospheric pressure in the presence of H(2)O(2) as an oxidant. Total conversion of maleic acid into acetic acid was obtained under mild conditions (i.e. atmospheric pressure and 40 degrees Celsius). Blank experiments showed no measurable maleic acid conversion (i.e. only approximately 0.5% conversion of initial maleic acid), indicating that a significant oxidation reaction of maleic acid is enhanced by the presence of a catalyst. Copper on micelle templated silica-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane catalyst therefore was found to be suitable for aqueous phase oxidation of maleic acid with 100% of maleic acid conversion.

  19. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution using activated tea waste: Adsorption on a fixed-bed column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, M K

    2009-08-01

    An inexpensive and effective adsorbent was developed from waste tea leaves for the dynamic uptake of Pb(II). Characterization of the adsorbents showed a clear change between physico-chemical properties of activated tea waste and simply tea waste. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the potential of activated tea waste in continuous flow removal of Pb(II) ions from synthetic aqueous effluents. The performance of the system was evaluated to assess the effect of various process variables, viz., of bed height, hydraulic loading rate and initial feed concentration on breakthrough time and adsorption capacity. The shape of the breakthrough curves was determined for the adsorption of Pb(II) by varying different operating parameters like hydraulic loading rate (2.3-9.17m(3)/hm(2)), bed height (0.3-0.5m) and feed concentration (2-10mg/l). An attempt has also been made to model the data generated from column studies using the empirical relationship based on the Bohart-Adams model. There was an acceptable degree of agreement between the data for breakthrough time calculated from the Bohart-Adams model and the present experimental study with average absolute deviation of less than 5.0%. The activated tea waste in this study showed very good promise as compared with the other adsorbents available in the literature. The adsorbent could be suitable for repeated use (for more than four cycles) without noticeable loss of capacity.

  20. Utilization of TiO2 deposited on glass plates for removal of metals from aqueous wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmi; Luong; Nguyen

    1999-02-01

    Glass plates coated with TiO2 were used in a photocatalytic process to collect mercury, lead, copper and cadmium from aqueous solutions containing individual metals and mixtures. Stripping voltammetry, verified to achieve 1-10 ppb detection limits, was used to show that individual metals at concentrations of 1000 to 5200 ppb were reduced to undetectable levels in 3 to 55 min. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) with 8-hydroxyquinoline-5-sulfonic acid as complexing agent was used when appropriate, since it could quantitate all four metals under study in one run although it was less sensitive. It was demonstrated that 100 mL solutions containing 10 ppm of each of the four metals could be treated with a 10 cm2 TiO2-coated plate to leave undetectable metal concentrations in one hour. Stripping voltammetry using carbon electrodes coated with mercury films was estimated to generate daily about 1.1 L of aqueous waste containing 0.1 ppm of each metal. The results indicate the feasibility of assembling an apparatus capable of treating the waste generated by stripping voltammetry to render the latter suitable for routine on-site analyses without environmental concern. Data were also obtained to show the effectiveness in treating silver containing solutions, indicating suitability of the photocatalytic process in treating photographic processing wastes.

  1. A Comparative Study of Cellulose Agricultural Wastes (Almond Shell, Pistachio Shell, Walnut Shell, Tea Waste And Orange Peel for Adsorption of Violet B Dye from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Hashemian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of violet B azo dye from aqueous solutions was studied by different cellulose agriculturalwaste materials (almond shell (AS, pistachio shell (PS, walnut shell (WS, Tea waste (TW and orange peel (OP. Cellulose agricultural waste sorbents characterized by FTIR and SEM methods. The effects of different parameters such as contact time, pH, adsorbent dosage and initial dye concentration were studied.Maximum removal of dye was obtained at contact time of 90 min and pH 11.The adsorption of violet B was fitted by pseudo-second-order kinetic model.The Langmuir isotherm model was better fitted than Freundlichmodel. The results showed that the adsorption efficiency of violet B by cellulose agricultural waste materials is as followed: Almond shell > Orange peel > Pistachio shell > Tea waste> Walnut shell.The maximum adsorption capacity was obtained 96, 82, 71.4, 55.5 and 48.7 mg g−1 for AS, OP, PS, TW and WS, respectively.

  2. Effective removal of tetracycline from aqueous solution using activated carbon prepared from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) industrial processing waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayğılı, Hasan; Güzel, Fuat

    2016-09-01

    Activated carbon (TAC) prepared under optimized conditions with ZnCl2 activation from a new precursor; tomato industrial processing waste (TW), was applied as an adsorbent to remove tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solution. The factors (TAC dosage, initial TC concentration, contact time, ionic strength and solution temperature) affecting the adsorption process were examined at natural pH (5.7) of TAC-TC system in aqueous solution. Kinetic data was found to be best complied by the pseudo-second order model. The isotherm analysis indicated that the equilibrium data could be represented by the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity was identified as 500.0mgg(-1) at 308K.

  3. Climate accounting for waste management, Phase I and II. Summary: Phase 1: Glass Packaging, Metal packaging, paper, cardboard, plastic and wet organic waste. Phase 2: Wood waste and residual waste from households; Klimaregnskap for avfallshaandtering, Fase I og II. Sammendrag: Fase 1: Glassemballasje, metallemballasje, papir, papp, plastemballasje og vaatorganisk avfall. Fase 2: Treavfall og restavfall fra husholdninger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raadal, Hanne Lerche; Modahl, Ingunn Saur; Lyng, Kari-Anne

    2009-09-15

    Background. On the basis of an increased focus on emissions of greenhouse gases in general, Waste Norway wanted to prepare a climate accounting for waste management in Norway. Oestfoldforskning was engaged to undertake the project. The aim of the project has been to develop a model for the calculation of net greenhouse gas emissions from different waste types of waste glass containers, metal containers, paper, cardboard, plastic, wet organic waste, wood waste and residual waste. The model is based on life cycle methodology and is used to calculate the net greenhouse gas emissions per kg of waste for the various waste management options and waste types, as well as to calculate the net greenhouse gas emissions for waste management for including waste types and quantities of 2006. There is an emphasis on developing a model so that municipalities / waste companies or regions can develop their own climate accounting for waste management in their region, based on site-specific conditions associated with types and amounts of waste, transport distances, type of treatment, exploitation and use of waste generated energy etc. The model can also be used as the basis for the preparation of useful documentation as the basis for information about waste systems utility in general, and as a basis for strategic reviews for Waste Norway and the waste sector in particular. Conclusions: The main conclusions from the project can be summarized as follows: 1. The results of the study clearly shows that to consider only one environmental indicator is too narrow approach to form the basis for decision making for selection of waste management solutions. 2. Net greenhouse gas emissions for waste management varies greatly, both between the different types of waste and treatment methods which are reviewed. The main results of the ranking of management methods in relation to the net greenhouse effect associated with the waste types and treatment methods are as follows: Recycling of materials

  4. Uptake of Pb(II) ion From Aqueous Solution Using Silk Cotton Hull Carbon: An Agricultural Waste Biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugavalli, R.; P. S. Syed Shabudeen; R. Venckatesh; K. Kadirvelu; S. Madhavakrishnan; S. Pattabhi

    2006-01-01

    Activated carbon prepared from silk cotton hull (SCH) was used for the adsorptive removal of Pb(II) ion from aqueous solution. The raw material used for the preparation of activated carbon is the waste of agricultural product; the production of this carbon is expected to be economically feasible. Parameters such as agitation time, metal ion concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and Particle size were studied. Adsorption equilibrium was reached within 80 min for 10, 20, 30 and 40mg/l of Pb(II) ion...

  5. EVALUATION OF THE REMOVAL OF ARSENIC AND CADMIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING NATURAL RHYOLITIC SEDIMENTS AND METALLURGICAL WASTES

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Gerardo MARTÍNEZ JARDINES; Francisco MARTÍN ROMERO; Margarita Eugenia GUTIÉRREZ RUIZ; Águeda Elena CENICEROS GÓMEZ

    2012-01-01

    The use of natural materials abundant, efficient and inexpensive for use in stabilization of contaminants is in development, so some sorbent materials for removal of Cd (II) on aqueous solutions in the range of 10-100 mg/L and for As (III) and As (V) in the range of 1-500 mg/L have been investigated. The sorbent materials studied are indigenous rhyolitic sediments and metallurgical wastes from San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Mineralogical analysis showed that rhyolitic sediments are characterized by...

  6. Standard practice for analysis of aqueous leachates from nuclear waste materials using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice is applicable to the determination of low concentration and trace elements in aqueous leachate solutions produced by the leaching of nuclear waste materials, using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). 1.2 The nuclear waste material may be a simulated (non-radioactive) solid waste form or an actual solid radioactive waste material. 1.3 The leachate may be deionized water or any natural or simulated leachate solution containing less than 1 % total dissolved solids. 1.4 This practice should be used by analysts experienced in the use of ICP-AES, the interpretation of spectral and non-spectral interferences, and procedures for their correction. 1.5 No detailed operating instructions are provided because of differences among various makes and models of suitable ICP-AES instruments. Instead, the analyst shall follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer of the particular instrument. This test method does not address comparative accuracy of different devices...

  7. A review on applicability of naturally available adsorbents for the removal of hazardous dyes from aqueous waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Kaur, Harleen; Sharma, Monika; Sahore, Vishal

    2011-12-01

    The effluent water of many industries, such as textiles, leather, paper, printing, cosmetics, etc., contains large amount of hazardous dyes. There is huge number of treatment processes as well as adsorbent which are available for the processing of this effluent water-containing dye content. The applicability of naturally available low cast and eco-friendly adsorbents, for the removal of hazardous dyes from aqueous waste by adsorption treatment, has been reviewed. In this review paper, we have provided a compiled list of low-cost, easily available, safe to handle, and easy-to-dispose-off adsorbents. These adsorbents have been classified into five different categories on the basis of their state of availability: (1) waste materials from agriculture and industry, (2) fruit waste, (3) plant waste, (4) natural inorganic materials, and (5) bioadsorbents. Some of the treated adsorbents have shown good adsorption capacities for methylene blue, congo red, crystal violet, rhodamine B, basic red, etc., but this adsorption process is highly pH dependent, and the pH of the medium plays an important role in the treatment process. Thus, in this review paper, we have made some efforts to discuss the role of pH in the treatment of wastewater.

  8. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies for sorption of Ni (II from aqueous solution using formaldehyde treated waste tea leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Shah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The sorption characteristic of Ni (II from aqueous solution using formaldehyde treated waste tea leaves as a low cost sorbent has been studied. The effect of pH, contact time, sorbent dose, initial metal ion concentration and temperature were investigated in batch experiments. The equilibrium data were fitted into four most common isotherm models; Freundlich, Langmuir, Tempkin and Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R. The Langmuir model described the sorption isotherm best with maximum monolayer sorption capacity of 120.50 mg g−1. Four kinetic models, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intraparticle diffusion and Elovich were employed to explain the sorption mechanism. The kinetics of sorption data showed that the pseudo-second-order model is the best with correlation coefficient of 0.9946. The spontaneous and exothermic nature of the sorption process was revealed from thermodynamic investigations. The effect of some common alkali and alkaline earth metal ions were also studied which showed that the presence of these ions have no effect on the sorption of Ni (II. The results showed that waste tea leaves have the potential to be used as a low cost sorbent for the removal of Ni (II from aqueous solutions.

  9. Investigation and development of liquid-liquid extraction systems for the removal of pertechnetate from aqueous nuclear waste stream simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansle, Kristina Marie Rohal

    1998-11-01

    The solvent extraction behavior of perrhenate (ReO 4-) and pertechnetate (TcO4- ) from aqueous nuclear waste stream simulants was examined using the anion-exchange reagent Aliquat-336 nitrate. The extraction tendencies of ReO 4- followed those of TcO4- from both acidic and basic media, demonstrating that ReO4 - was a suitable nonradioactive surrogate for TcO4 -. For ICP-AES analysis of Re in high salt solutions, a V-groove nebulizer and 1:1 dilution of the sample and standards with 0.1% Triton X-100 surfactant reduced deposition of solids within the sample introduction system, thus minimizing memory effects. A new approach to waste remediation technology, Redox-Recyclable Extraction and Recovery (R2ER), was also studied. The redox-active species 1,1',3,3'-tetrakis(2-methyl-2-hexyl)ferrocene (HEP) was oxidized to its cationic form for extraction of TcO4 - or ReO4- from aqueous waste and reduced to its neutral form for recovery of the anion. The thermodynamics of liquid-liquid interfacial electron transfer for the oxidation/activation of HEP were shown to be controlled by three factors: the reduction potentials of the redox-active species in the aqueous and organic phases and the transfer of an ion across the liquid-liquid interface. The deactivation/reduction rate of HEP+NO3- by iron was affected by organic solvent diluent and improved by treating the iron with hexanes and 1 M HCl. The volume of solid secondary-waste in the R2ER cycle was reduced by a factor of 3000. In complete extraction/recovery cycles, HEP+NO3- in 2-nonanone removed greater than 99% TcO4- from the 101-SY, 103-SY, 1 M HCl and 1 M NaOH/1.5 M NaNO3 Hanford Tank waste simulants. Another redox-active extractant, bis(hydridotris(1-pyrazolyl)borato)iron(III) nitrate (FeTp2+NO3-), was also selective for ReO4- remediation from simulated aqueous waste. Organic solutions of the alkyl substituted ferricenium extractants were not stable in the presence of nucleophilic anions and/or reducing agents. HEP+NO3

  10. Use of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid as a Scavenger for Chromium from “Wet Blue” Leather Waste: Thermodynamic and Kinetics Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. Resende

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One serious consequence of the current consumer society is the transformation of the environment into a waste receptacle arising from human activities. Because of the potential toxic effects of chromium solid waste containing this metal there are grounds for serious concern for the tanning and leather processing industry. The application of tannery waste as organic fertilizer has led to extensive contamination by chromium in agricultural areas and may cause the accumulation of this metal in soils and plants. This work evaluated the extraction of Cr+3 and Cr+6 contained in solid waste from the leather industry through density functional theory (DFT calculations. The Gibbs free energy calculations reveal that the chelator ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA forms more stable complexes with metal ions of chromium compared with the structures of the complexes [Cr(NTA(H2O2] and [Cr-collagen], the latter used to simulate the protein bound chrome leather.

  11. Recovery and characterization of Balanites aegyptiaca Del. kernel proteins. Effect of defatting, air classification, wet sieving and aqueous ethanol treatment on solubility, digestibility, amino acid composition and sapogenin content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, A M; Wolf, W; Spiess, W E

    2000-02-01

    In order to find alternative protein sources in African regions where protein deficiency in nutrition is prevailing, solubility, in-vitro digestibility, amino acid composition and chemical score of Balanites aegyptiaca Del. kernel proteins were investigated as a function of different processing steps including defatting, air classification, wet sieving and aqueous ethanol treatment. Air classification delivered a fine fraction of 58.1% of the total protein. Applying a wet sieving process, a protein concentrate of 72.9% protein content was achieved but the recovery was very low (35.6%). However, in case of isoelectric precipitation followed by aqueous ethanol treatment both protein content (78.2%) and recovery (53.7%) were high. Data concerning the chemical score revealed, that lysine content of the defatted kernel flour amounted to 74.2% of the recommended FAO/WHO standard level. In-vitro protein digestibility was found to be higher than of legume proteins. The digestible protein of the full fat flour, defatted flour, air classified and wet sieved fine fractions and protein concentrate were 91.9, 93.7, 82.0, 86.4 and 94.2%, respectively. The sapogenin content per 100 g protein of the investigated protein preparations was significantly lower (46% to 62%) than of the initial material (oilcake).

  12. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a

  13. Assessment of TEES{reg_sign} applications for Wet Industrial Wastes: Energy benefit and economic analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.; Scheer, T.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fundamental work is catalyzed biomass pyrolysis/gasification led to the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) concept, a means of converting moist biomass feedstocks to high-value fuel gases such as methane. A low-temperature (350{degrees}C), pressurized (3100 psig) reaction environment and a nickel catalyst are used to reduce volumes of very high-moisture wastes such as food processing byproducts while producing useful quantities of energy. A study was conducted to assess the economic viability of a range of potential applications of the process. Cases examined included feedstocks of cheese whey, grape pomace, spent grain, and an organic chemical waste stream. The analysis indicated that only the organic chemical waste process is economically attractive in the existing energy/economic environment. However, food processing cases will become attractive as alternative disposal practices are curtailed and energy prices rise.

  14. Actinide recovery using aqueous biphasic extraction: Initial developmental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mensah-Biney, R.; Mertz, C.J.; Rollins, A.N.

    1992-08-01

    Aqueous biphasic extraction systems are being developed to treat radioactive wastes. The separation technique involves the selective partitioning of either solutes or colloid-size particles between two scible aqueous phases. Wet grinding of plutonium residues to an average particle size of one micron will be used to liberate the plutonium from the bulk of the particle matrix. The goal is to produce a plutonium concentrate that will integrate with existing and developing chemical recovery processes. Ideally, the process would produce a nonTRU waste stream. Coupling physical beneficiation with chemical processing will result in a substantial reduction in the volume of mixed wastes generated from dissolution recovery processes. As part of this program, we will also explore applications of aqueous biphasic extraction that include the separation and recovery of dissolved species such as metal ions and water-soluble organics. The expertise and data generated in this work will form the basis for developing more cost-effective processes for handling waste streams from environmental restoration and waste management activities within the DOE community. This report summarizes the experimental results obtained during the first year of this effort. Experimental efforts were focused on elucidating the surface and solution chemistry variables which govern partitioning behavior of plutonium and silica in aqueous biphasic extraction systems. Additional efforts were directed toward the development of wet grinding methods for producing ultrafine particles with diameters of one micron or less.

  15. Utilization of various agricultural wastes for activated carbon preparation and application for the removal of dyes and metal ions from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadirvelu, K; Kavipriya, M; Karthika, C; Radhika, M; Vennilamani, N; Pattabhi, S

    2003-03-01

    Activated carbons were prepared from the agricultural solid wastes, silk cotton hull, coconut tree sawdust, sago waste, maize cob and banana pith and used to eliminate heavy metals and dyes from aqueous solution. Adsorption of all dyes and metal ions required a very short time and gave quantitative removal. Experimental results show all carbons were effective for the removal of pollutants from water. Since all agricultural solid wastes used in this investigation are freely, abundantly and locally available, the resulting carbons are expected to be economically viable for wastewater treatment.

  16. Removal of phenol from aqueous solution and resin manufacturing industry wastewater using an agricultural waste: rubber seed coat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengaraj, S; Moon, Seung-Hyeon; Sivabalan, R; Arabindoo, Banumathi; Murugesan, V

    2002-01-28

    Activated carbon prepared from rubber seed coat (RSCC), an agricultural waste by-product, has been used for the adsorption of phenol from aqueous solution. In this work, adsorption of phenol on rubber seed coat activated carbon has been studied by using batch and column studies. The equilibrium adsorption level was determined to be a function of the solution pH, adsorbent dosage and contact time. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of rubber seed coat activated carbon for phenol removal was obtained by using linear Freundlich isotherm. The adsorption of phenol on rubber seed coat activated carbon follows first order reversible kinetics. The suitability of RSCC for treating phenol based resin manufacturing industry wastewater was also tested. A comparative study with a commercial activated carbon (CAC) showed that RSCC is 2.25 times more efficient compared to CAC based on column adsorption study for phenolic wastewater treatment.

  17. Simultaneous production of high-quality water and electrical power from aqueous feedstock’s and waste heat by high-pressure membrane distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, N.J.M.; Hanemaaijer, J.H.; Brouwer, H.; Medevoort, J. van; Jansen, A.; Altena, F.; Vleuten, P. van der; Bak, H.

    2015-01-01

    A new membrane distillation (MD) concept (MemPower) has been developed for the simultaneous production of high-quality water from various aqueous feedstocks with cogeneration of mechanical power (electricity). Driven by low-grade heat (waste, solar, geothermal, etc.) a pressurized distillate can be

  18. Nano-cerium vanadate: A novel inorganic ion exchanger for removal of americium and uranium from simulated aqueous nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Chayan; Dudwadkar, Nilesh [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tripathi, Subhash Chandra, E-mail: sctri001@gmail.com [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gandhi, Pritam Maniklal [Fuel Reprocessing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Grover, Vinita [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kaushik, Chetan Prakash [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tyagi, Avesh Kumar, E-mail: aktyagi@barc.gov.in [Waste Management Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Template free, low temperature synthesis of CeVO{sub 4} nanopowders. • Thermodynamically and kinetically favourable uptake of Am(III) and U(VI) exhibited. • K{sub d} and ΔG° values for Am(III) and U(VI) uptake in pH 1–6 are reported. • Interdiffusion coefficients and zeta potential values in pH 1–6 are reported. • Possible application in low level aqueous nuclear waste remediation. - Abstract: Cerium vanadate nanopowders were synthesized by a facile low temperature co-precipitation method. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and found to consist of ∼25 nm spherical nanoparticles. The efficiency of these nanopowders for uptake of alpha-emitting radionuclides {sup 233}U (4.82 MeV α) and {sup 241}Am (5.49 MeV α, 60 keV γ) has been investigated. Thermodynamically and kinetically favorable uptake of these radionuclides resulted in their complete removal within 3 h from aqueous acidic feed solutions. The uptake capacity was observed to increase with increase in pH as the zeta potential value decreased with the increase in pH but effect of ionic strength was insignificant. Little influence of the ions like Sr{sup 2+}, Ru{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, etc., in the uptake process indicated CeVO{sub 4} nanopowders to be amenable for practical applications. The isotherms indicated predominant uptake of the radioactive metal ions in the solid phase of the exchanger at lower feed concentrations and linear Kielland plots with positive slopes indicated favorable exchange of the metal ions with the nanopowder. Performance comparison with the other sorbents reported indicated excellent potential of nano-cerium vanadate for removing americium and uranium from large volumes of aqueous acidic solutions.

  19. Removal of Cu(II Ions from Aqueous Solutions by Adsorption Onto Activated Carbon Derived From Olive Waste Cakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham G. Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper studied the ability of using local activated carbon (LAC derived from olive waste cakes as an adsorbent for the removal of Cu(II ions from aqueous solution by batch operation. Various operating parameters such as solution pH, adsorbent dosage, initial metal ions concentration, and equilibrium contact time have been studied. The results indicated that the adsorption of Cu(II increased with the increasing pH, and the optimum solution pH for the adsorption of Cu(II was found to be 5. The adsorption process increases with increasing dosage of LAC, also the amount of Cu(II removed changes with Cu(II initial concentration and contact time. Adsorption was rapid and occurred within 25 min. for Cu(II concentration range from 60 to 120 mg/l isothermally at 30±1 oC. Maximum adsorption occurs at Cu(II initial concentration lesser than 100 mg/l by using adsorbent dosage (1.2 g/l. The equilibrium adsorption data for Cu(II were fitted well with the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The maximum adsorption capacity of LAC was found to be 106.383 mg/g. So, the results indicated the suitability use of the activated carbon derived from olive waste cakes (LAC as low cost and natural material for reliable removal of Cu(II from water and wastewater effluents.

  20. Utilization of waste phosphogypsum to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and its application towards removal of fluoride from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deyi; Luo, Heming; Zheng, Liwen; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hongxia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Huixia

    2012-11-30

    In the present study, waste phosphogypsum (PG) was utilized firstly to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAp) via microwave irradiation technology. The nHAp derived from PG exhibited a hexagonal structure with the particle size about 20 nm × 60 nm and high purity. Meanwhile, the adsorption behaviour of fluoride onto the nHAp derived from PG was investigated to evaluate the potential application of this material for the treatment of the wastewater polluted with fluoride. The results indicate that the nHAp derived from PG can be used as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir-Freundlich model were 19.742, 26.108, 36.914 and 40.818 mg F(-)/g nHAp for 298, 308, 318 and 328 K, respectively. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was found to provide the best correlation of the used experimental data compared to the pseudo-first order and the adsorption isotherm could be well defined by Langmuir-Freundlich equation. The adsorption mechanism investigation shows that electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond are the main driving force for fluoride uptake onto nHAp derived from waste PG.

  1. Utilization of waste phosphogypsum to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and its application towards removal of fluoride from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Deyi, E-mail: xixizhang@lut.cn [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); State Key Laboratory of Gansu Advanced Non-ferrous Metal Materials, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Luo, Heming; Zheng, Liwen; Wang, Kunjie; Li, Hongxia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Huixia [College of Petrochemical Technology, Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou 730050 (China)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel approach on recycle of waste phosphogypsum was exploited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphogypsum was utilized to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with high purity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer nHAp derived from PG exhibits excellent adsoprtion capacity for fluoride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluoride adsorbs onto nHAp mainly by electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond. - Abstract: In the present study, waste phosphogypsum (PG) was utilized firstly to prepare hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAp) via microwave irradiation technology. The nHAp derived from PG exhibited a hexagonal structure with the particle size about 20 nm Multiplication-Sign 60 nm and high purity. Meanwhile, the adsorption behaviour of fluoride onto the nHAp derived from PG was investigated to evaluate the potential application of this material for the treatment of the wastewater polluted with fluoride. The results indicate that the nHAp derived from PG can be used as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. The maximum adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir-Freundlich model were 19.742, 26.108, 36.914 and 40.818 mg F{sup -}/g nHAp for 298, 308, 318 and 328 K, respectively. The pseudo-second order kinetic model was found to provide the best correlation of the used experimental data compared to the pseudo-first order and the adsorption isotherm could be well defined by Langmuir-Freundlich equation. The adsorption mechanism investigation shows that electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond are the main driving force for fluoride uptake onto nHAp derived from waste PG.

  2. Valorisation of Vietnamese Rice Straw Waste: Catalytic Aqueous Phase Reforming of Hydrolysate from Steam Explosion to Platform Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Huong Giang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A family of tungstated zirconia solid acid catalysts were synthesised via wet impregnation and subsequent thermochemical processing for the transformation of glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF. Acid strength increased with tungsten loading and calcination temperature, associated with stabilisation of tetragonal zirconia. High tungsten dispersions of between 2 and 7 W atoms·nm−2 were obtained in all cases, equating to sub-monolayer coverages. Glucose isomerisation and subsequent dehydration via fructose to HMF increased with W loading and calcination temperature up to 600 °C, indicating that glucose conversion to fructose was favoured over weak Lewis acid and/or base sites associated with the zirconia support, while fructose dehydration and HMF formation was favoured over Brönsted acidic WOx clusters. Aqueous phase reforming of steam exploded rice straw hydrolysate and condensate was explored heterogeneously for the first time over a 10 wt% WZ catalyst, resulting in excellent HMF yields as high as 15% under mild reaction conditions.

  3. Thermodynamic study of the adsorption of chromium ions from aqueous solution on waste corn cobs material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Fonseca-Correa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the results of a study obtaining activated carbon from corn cobs and determining its use as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr3+ from aqueous solutions. The finely ground precursor was subjected to pyrolysis at 600 and 900 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere and chemical activation with H2O2 and HNO3. The effects of pyrolysis conditions and activation method on the physicochemical properties of the materials obtained were tested. The samples were characterised chemically and texturally. Were obtained microporous activated carbons of well-developed surface area varying from 337 to 1213 m2/g and exhibited differences acid-base character of the surface. The results obtained shows that a suitable good option of the activation procedure for corncobs permits the production of economic adsorbents with high sorption capacity for Cr3+ from aqueous solutions. A detailed study of immersion calorimetry was performed with carbons prepared from corn cobs to establish possible relationships with these materials between the enthalpies of immersion and textural and chemical parameters.

  4. Reactive dye house wastewater treatment. Use of hybrid technology: Membrane, sonication followed by wet oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhale, A.D.; Mahajani, V.V. [Univ. of Mumbai (India)

    1999-05-01

    To address problems associated with treatment of an aqueous waste stream from a reactive dye house, a model dye, turquoise blue CI25, was studied. A hybrid technology, membrane separation followed by sonication and wet oxidation, has been demonstrated to treat the wastewater for reuse and discharge. Experiments were first performed with the reactive dye solution in water. A nanofiltration membrane (MPT 30) was found to be suitable to concentrate the dye. The concentrate was then treated with a wet oxidation process. Kinetics studies were performed with and without catalyst, in the temperature range of 170--215 C. The color destruction achieved was > 99%. After process parameters were fixed, studies were conducted with the actual dye waste stream. The actual waste stream was found to be refractory for wet oxidation under the above conditions. Sonication of the concentrate obtained after membrane filtration, in the presence of CuSO{sub 4}, made the waste stream amenable to wet oxidation. Sonication followed by wet oxidation was found to be more effective at near neutral conditions as compared to basic conditions.

  5. Adsorption of dissolved Reactive red dye from aqueous phase onto activated carbon prepared from agricultural waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumaar, S; Kalaamani, P; Porkodi, K; Varadarajan, P R; Subburaam, C V

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of Reactive red dye (RR) onto Coconut tree flower carbon (CFC) and Jute fibre carbon (JFC) from aqueous solution was investigated. Adsorption studies were carried out at different initial dye concentrations, initial solution pH and adsorbent doses. The kinetic studies were also conducted; the adsorption of Reactive red onto CFC and JFC followed pseudosecond-order rate equation. The effective diffusion coefficient was evaluated to establish the film diffusion mechanism. Quantitative removal of Reactive red dye was achieved at strongly acidic conditions for both the carbons studied. The adsorption isotherm data were fitted well to Langmuir isotherm and the adsorption capacity were found to be 181.9 and 200 mg/g for CFC and JFC, respectively. The overall rate of dye adsorption appeared to be controlled by chemisorption, in this case in accordance with poor desorption studies.

  6. Statistical optimization of aqueous extraction of pectin from waste durian rinds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maran, J Prakash

    2015-02-01

    The objectives of this present study was to investigate and optimize the aqueous extraction conditions such as solid-liquid (SL) ratio (1:5-1:15 g/ml), pH (2-3), extraction time (20-60 min) and extraction temperature (75-95 °C) on maximum extraction of pectin from durian rinds using four factors, three levels Box-Behnken response design. The experimental data obtained were fitted to a second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis and analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA). The optimum extraction condition was found to be as follows: SL ratio of 1:10 g/ml, pH of 2.8, extraction time of 43 min and extraction temperature of 86 °C respectively. Under the optimal conditions, the experimental pectin yield (9.1%) was well correlated with predicted yield (9.3%).

  7. Sorption of copper(II) from aqueous phase by waste biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagendra Rao, C.R. (Government Polytechnic, Anantapur (India)); Iyengar, L.; Venkobachar, C. (Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India))

    The objective of the present investigation is to compare three biomasses for copper uptake under different experimental conditions so as to choose the most suitable one for scaleup purposes. Ganoderma lucidum is a macrofungi, growing widely in tropical forests. Sorbent preparation requires its collection from the field. Asperigillus niger is obtained as a waste biomass from the fermentation industry. Activated sludge biomass is available from the biological waste treatment plants. The results of their potential to remove copper are presented. The copper uptake by biosorbents though, varied significantly, showed an increased trend in the range of pH 4 to 6. The increase in metal binding after alkali treatment was marginal for G. lucidum, significant for A. niger, and dramatic for sludge. Copper sorption capacities of M and M[sub c] were much higher than for other sorbents at pH 5.0. The effect of anionic ligands, like acetate and tartrate on copper uptake by raw and alkali treated biosorbents, was negligible as the predominant species in the presence of these ligands is divalent copper ion. Pyrophosphate, citrate, and EDTA had varying degrees of adverse effects on metal uptake. Thus, among the sorbents G. lucidum in its raw form is best suited for the practical application of copper removal from industrial effluents.

  8. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of organic, wet wastes for carbon cycling in regenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Lasseur, Christophe; Rebeyre, Pierre; Clauwaert, Peter; Luther, Amanda; Rabaey, Korneel; Zhang, Dong Dong; López Barreiro, Diego; Prins, Wolter; Brilman, Wim

    2016-07-01

    For long-term human spaceflight missions, one of the major requirements is the regenerative life support system which has to be capable of recycling carbon, nutrients and water from both solid and liquid wastes generated by the crew and by the local production of food through living organisms (higher plants, fungi, algae, bacteria, …). The European Space Agency's Life Support System, envisioned by the MELiSSA project, consists of a 5 compartment artificial ecosystem, in which the waste receiving compartment (so-called compartment I or briefly 'CI') is based on thermophilic fermentation. However, as the waste generated by the crew compartment and food production compartment contain typical plant fibres (lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose), these recalcitrant fibres end up largely unaffected in the digestate (sludge) generated in the C-I compartment. Therefore, the C-I compartment has to be supplemented with a so-called fibre degradation unit (in short, FDU) for further oxidation or degradation of said plant fibres. A potential solution to degrading these plant fibres and other recalcitrant organics is their oxidation, by means of subcritical or supercritical water, into reusable CO2 while retaining the nutrients in an organic-free liquid effluent. By taking advantage of the altered physicochemical properties of water above or near its critical point (647 K, 22.1 MPa) - including increased solubility of non-polar compounds and oxygen, ion product and diffusivity - process conditions can be created for rapid oxidation of C into CO2. In this research, the oxidizer is provided as a hydrogen peroxide solution which, at elevated temperature, will dissociated into O2. The purpose of this study is to identify ideal process conditions which (a) ensure complete oxidation of carbon, (b) retaining the nutrients other than C in the liquid effluent and (c) require as little oxidizer as possible. Experiments were conducted on a continuous, tubular heated reactor and on batch

  9. Kinetics of wet air oxidation of glyoxalic acid and oxalic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, R.V.; Mahajani, V.V. (Univ. of Bombay (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology)

    1994-12-01

    Oxidation of lower molecular weight monobasic and dibasic acids such as formic acid, acetic acid, glyoxalic acid, and oxalic acid is often the rate-controlling step during wet air oxidation (WAO) of an aqueous waste stream exhibiting very high chemical oxygen demand (COD). The kinetics of WAO of glyoxalic acid and oxalic acid was studied in absence and presence of a cupric sulfate catalyst in the temperature range of 120--245 C and oxygen partial pressure of 0.345--1.380 MPa. The wet oxidation of oxalic acid was found to require more severe conditions as compared to glyoxalic acid. The reaction mechanism and kinetic model have been discussed.

  10. Efficiency Study of Nickel (II and Cadmium (II Biosorption by Powder of Waste Activated Sludge from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A Ebrahimi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "n "n "nBackground and Objective: Nickel (II and cadmium (II are important in environmental pollutant. Biosorption of heavy metals can be an effective process for the removal and recovery of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions because of the decrease in sludge problems, economical issues, high efficiency and compatibility with the environment."nMaterials and Methods: power of wasted activated sludge have been contact with nickel (II and cadmium (II solutions in 0.25 and 0.75 milli molar invarious pHs and mixing pace, at 24-26 0C temperature on batch reactor system .After two hours (continuously 5-420 min in kinetic study samples were analyzed with atomic absorption spectrophotometer."nResults:The kinetic study results show that equilibrium adsorption time for nickel (II and cadmium"n(II reached within 2 hr, but the profile curve of cadmium (II biosorption was smoother than nickel (II biosorption. Both metals adsorption followed the Langmuir model and the maximum adsorption capacity (qmax for nickel (II and cadmium (II was 0.195 and 0.37 milli mole per gram respectively. The increase in pH resulted in adsorption increase for both metals. For cadmium (II at 0.25 and 0.75 mMinitial concentration there was no adsorption at pH 2 where as nickel (0.25 mM adsorption was observed at the same pH. The optimum mixing rate for both metals was 200 rpm and this effect was more obviously in greater concentration."nConclusion: Like othe biosorbents ,wasted activated sludge showed greater capacity for cadmium(II biosorption than nickel (II. Cadmium (II in modeling and biosorption characteristics study had more conformity than nickel (II.

  11. Influence of aqueous electrolytes on the wetting behavior of hydrophobic solid polymers-low-rate dynamic liquid/fluid contact angle measurements using axisymmetric drop shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, Petra B; Rauwolf, Cordula; Yudin, Olexandr; Grundke, Karina

    2002-07-01

    The interaction of inorganic ions with low-energy hydrophobic surfaces was examined using model systems of solid polymers without ionizable functional surface groups in aqueous electrolyte solutions. Low-rate dynamic contact angle measurements with captive bubbles in conjunction with axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) were performed to study the influence of electrolyte ions (in the aqueous test solutions) on the wettability of the polymers. When various types of ions were used, no significant change in advancing and receding contact angles was observed. The contact angle hysteresis was small. The zeta potential of the model polymers in aqueous electrolyte solutions was determined from streaming potential measurements. The variation of the zeta potential at different pH levels indicates preferential adsorption of hydroxyl ions at this interface. However, the presence of electrolytes at the interface between water and the different model polymers did not influence the macroscopic contact angle. The results may suggest the absence of any specific interaction between the ions and the solid polymer, as this should result in changes of hydrophobicity. Similar to the air/water interface, the composition and the potential of the polymer/water interface are obviously determined predominantly by the aqueous phase with only slight influence from the solid phase.

  12. Potential Malaysia agricultural waste materials for the biosorption of cadmium(II) from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foo, L.P.Y.; Tee, C.Z.; Raimy, N.R.; Hassell, D.G.; Lee, L.Y. [University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Semenyih, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-04-15

    Biosorption of cadmium(II) ions (Cd{sup 2+}) onto Ananas comosus (AC) peel, Parkia speciosa (PS) pods and Psidium guajava (PG) peel were investigated in this study. Batch sorption experiments were performed by investigating the effect of initial pH. It was found that Cd{sup 2+} uptake was highly dependent on the initial pH and Cd{sup 2+} removal efficiency was highest for PG peel, followed by AC peel and PS pods. Biosorption experiments were carried out using different initial Cd{sup 2+} concentration and the experimental data obtained was fitted to both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The experimental data was found to best fit the Langmuir isotherm, and adsorption capacities of 18.21 mg/g (AC peel), 25.64 mg/g (PS pods) and 39.68 mg/g (PG peel) were obtained. Comparison with published adsorption capacities for other low-cost biosorbents indicates that PS pods and PG peel have potential as low-cost biosorbent materials for the removal of Cd{sup 2+} from aqueous solution. (orig.)

  13. Usefulness of ANN-based model for copper removal from aqueous solutions using agro industrial waste materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Marija S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the adsorption properties of locally available lignocelluloses biomaterials as biosorbents for the removal of copper ions from aqueous solution. Materials are generated from juice production (apricot stones and from the corn milling process (corn cob. Such solid wastes have little or no economic value and very often present a disposal problem. Using batch adsorption techniques the effects of initial Cu(II ions concentration (Ci, amount of biomass (m and volume of metal solution (V, on biosorption efficiency and capacity were studied for both materials, without any pre-treatments. The optimal parameters for both biosorbents were selected depending on a highest sorption capability of biosorbent, in removal of Cu(II. Experimental data were compared with second order polynomial regression models (SOPs and artificial neural networks (ANNs. SOPs showed acceptable coefficients of determination (0.842 - 0.997, while ANNs performed high prediction accuracy (0.980-0.986 in comparison to experimental results. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31003, TR 31055

  14. The Predisposition of Iraqi Rice Husk to Remove Heavy Metals from Aqueous Solutions and Capitalized from Waste Residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nsaif

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is deal with study the potential of Iraqi Rice Husk (IRH on the removal of three heavy metals pollutant which were (Mg, Mn and Mo ions from industrial wastewater using different design parameters by adsorption process. Results show that the removal efficiency were (93.95, 97.18 and 95.26 % for heavy metal (Mg, Mn and Mo respectively from aquatic solution decreased with increasing of initial concentration and flow rate while the removal efficiency increased with increasing absorbance material bed height, pH and feeding temperature. Statistical model is achieved to find an expression relates the overall operating parameters with the removal efficiency for each metal ions used in this investigation in a general equation (each one alone. The samples of (IRH remaining after using it in the removal of (Mg, Mn and Mo heavy metal ions above from Simulated Synthetic Aqueous Solutions (SSAS to investigate the capitalized of it in different methods. Different benefits possess which are: remove the three toxic heavy metals ions contaminated the water, get rid of agricultural waste (IRH, in the same time, produce light and more benefit hydrocarbons from n-heptane isomerization using a type Y-zeolite catalyst synthesis from remaining (IRH and prepare a cheap and active rodenticide.

  15. Uptake of Pb(II ion From Aqueous Solution Using Silk Cotton Hull Carbon: An Agricultural Waste Biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shanmugavalli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon prepared from silk cotton hull (SCH was used for the adsorptive removal of Pb(II ion from aqueous solution. The raw material used for the preparation of activated carbon is the waste of agricultural product; the production of this carbon is expected to be economically feasible. Parameters such as agitation time, metal ion concentration, adsorbent dose, pH and Particle size were studied. Adsorption equilibrium was reached within 80 min for 10, 20, 30 and 40mg/l of Pb(II ion with 50mg of carbon per mL of solution. Adsorption parameters were determined using both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The adsorption efficiency reached 100% for 20, 30 and 40mg/l of Pb(II ion with 120, 140 and 150mg of carbon. Pb(II ion removal increased as the pH increased from 2 to 5 and remains constant up to pH 10. Desorption studies were also carried out with dilute hydrochloric acid to know the mechanism of adsorption. Quantitative desorption of Pb(II ion from carbon indicates that adsorption of metal ion is by ion-exchange. Efficiency of the adsorption of SCH was also studied with Pb containing industrial wastewater by varying pH and carbon concentration.

  16. Application of potato (Solanum tuberosum plant wastes for the removal of methylene blue and malachite green dye from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Gupta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dye pollutants from the textile, paper, and leather industries are important sources of environmental contamination. In the present study an agricultural waste from potato plant (potato stem powder, PSP and potato leaves powder, PLP was used as an adsorbent for removal of the methylene blue (MB and malachite green (MG dyes from aqueous solution. The adsorbent materials were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Batch experiments were performed to investigate the effect of physico-chemical parameters, such as pHpzc, ionic strength, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial dyes concentration and temperature. The kinetics of adsorption was studied by applying the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models. The pseudo-second order model better represented the adsorption kinetics and the mechanism was controlled by surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion. Equilibrium data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The thermodynamic parameters such as change in enthalpy (ΔH°, entropy (ΔS° and Gibb’s free energy (ΔG° of adsorption systems were also determined and evaluated.

  17. Optimization of Aqueous Extraction Conditions for Recovery of Phenolic Content and Antioxidant Properties from Macadamia (Macadamia tetraphylla Skin Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Dailey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The macadamia is native to Australia and is now grown commercially around the world. Macadamia skin, known as waste, has been generated abundantly, but this ample source has had limited uses as a byproduct. The aim of this study was to develop optimal aqueous extraction conditions for the recovery of phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties from macadamia skin using Response Surface Methodology (RSM. Water was selected for optimizing the extraction conditions because it is a cheap, safe, and environmentally friendly solvent. The results showed that the RSM models were reliable for the prediction and evaluation of the tested variables. Within the tested ranges, temperature (°C, time (min, and sample-to-solvent ratio (g/100 mL, and their interactions, did not significantly affect phenolic compound (TPC, flavonoid, proanthocyanidin, CUPRAC, and FRAP contents. However, the time and the sample-to-solvent ratio significantly affected DPPH antioxidant activity and the ratio significantly affected ABTS antioxidant capacity. The optimal extraction conditions for the recovery of phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties were predicted and validated at a temperature of 90 °C, a time of 20 min, and a sample-to-solvent ratio of 5 g/100 mL. At these conditions, an extract with TPC of 86 mg GAE/g, flavonoids of 30 mg RUE/g, and proanthocyanidins of 97 mg CAE/g could be prepared with potent antioxidant capacity.

  18. Sustainable High Quality Recycling of Aggregates from Waste-to-Energy, Treated in a Wet Bottom Ash Processing Installation, for Use in Concrete Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Van den Heede

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, more efforts towards sustainability are required from the concrete industry. Replacing traditional aggregates by recycled bottom ash (BA from municipal solid waste incineration can contribute to this goal. Until now, only partial replacement has been considered to keep the concrete workability, strength and durability under control. In this research, the feasibility of a full aggregate replacement was investigated for producing prefabricated Lego bricks. It was found that the required compressive strength class for this purpose (C20/25 could be achieved. Nevertheless, a thorough understanding of the BA properties is needed to overcome other issues. As BA is highly absorptive, the concrete’s water demand is high. This workability issue can be dealt with by subjecting the fine BA fraction to a crushing operation to eliminate the porous elements and by pre-wetting the fine and coarse BA fractions in a controlled manner. In addition, a reactive NaOH washing is needed to avoid formation of longitudinal voids and the resulting expansion due to the metallic aluminum present in the BA. Regarding the long-term behavior, heavy metal leaching and freeze-thaw exposure are not problematic, though there is susceptibility to acetic and lactic acid attack and maybe increased sensitivity to alkali-silica reaction.

  19. Environmentally friendly lycopene purification from tomato peel waste: enzymatic assisted aqueous extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccolini, Stefano; Aldini, Antonio; Visai, Livia; Daglia, Maria; Ferrari, Davide

    2013-02-27

    The antioxidant and anticancer properties of lycopene make it an ideal component for daily food supplements. For this reason this study investigated the possibility of extracting lycopene from tomato waste peels using a green chemistry protocol devoid of organic solvent. Cells are lysed thanks to a combination of pH changes and hydrolytic enzyme treatments. The lycopene-containing chromoplasts are then precipitated by lowering the pH and isolated through a centrifugation step. At this stage the lycopene content of the isolated chromoplasts shows a 10-fold increase (3-5% w/w, dry basis) with respect to untreated tomato peels. A further improvement in lycopene concentration is obtained by a second enzymatic treatment using a protease cocktail. This catalytic step eliminates unwanted proteins, bound to the chromoplasts, but not essential for their stability. The final product shows a lycopene content around 8-10% (w/w, dry basis), which represents a 30-fold increase with respect to the lycopene concentration of the untreated peels.

  20. Removal of heavy metals from aqueous phases using chemically modified waste Lyocell fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediako, John Kwame; Wei, Wei; Kim, Sok; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2015-12-15

    In this study, an outstanding performance of chemically modified waste Lyocell for heavy metals treatment is reported. The sorbent, which was prepared by a simple and concise method, was able to bind heavy metals such as Pb(II), Cu(II) and Cd(II), with very high efficiencies. The binding mechanisms were studied through adsorption and standard characterization tests such as scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. Adsorption kinetics was very fast and attained equilibrium within 5 min in all metals studied. The maximum single metal uptakes were 531.29±0.28 mg/g, 505.64±0.21 mg/g, and 123.08±0.26 mg/g for Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II), respectively. In ternary metal systems, Cu(II) selectivity was observed and the underlying factors were discussed. The sorbent by its nature, could be very effective in treating large volumes of wastewater with the contact of very little amount.

  1. REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM AN AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY PRETREATED WASTE TEA FUNGAL BIOMASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mamisahebei , Gh. R. Jahed Khaniki, A. Torabian, S. Nasseri, K. Naddafi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination in water poses a serious threat on human health. The tea fungus known as Kombucha is a waste produced during black tea fermentation. The objective of this study was to examine the main aspect of a possible strategy for the removal of arsenates employing tea fungal biomass. The pretreatment of biomass with FeCl3 was found to improve the biosorption efficiency. Arsenics uptake was found to be rapid for all concentrations and reached to 79% of equilibrium capacity of biosorption in 20 min and reached equilibrium in 90 min. The pseudo second-order and first-order models described the biosorption kinetics of As (V with good correlation coefficient (R2>0.93 and better than the other equations. The data obtained from the experiment of biosorption isotherm were analyzed using the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The equation described the isotherm of As (V biosorption with relatively high correlation coefficient (R2>0.93. According to the Langmuir model, the maximum uptake capacities (qm of tea fungal biomass for As (V were obtained 3.9810-3 mmol/gr. The effect of Na+, K+, Mg+2 and Ca+2 on equilibrium capacities of As was not significant. The variation of sorption efficiency with pH showed that optimum biosorption takes place in the pH ranges of 6 to 8. Promising results were obtained in laboratory experiments and effective As (V removals were observed.

  2. Application of coals as sorbents for the removal of Cr from aqueous waste streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, J.; Brown, S.D.; Snape, C.E. [University of Miskolc, Miskolc (Hungary). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    2001-09-01

    The study reported further understanding of how various electron transfer processes operate for Cr(VI) with a view to using coals for the removal of Cr(VI) from waste streams. Skye peat, Spanish and German lignites, UK high and low volatility bituminous coals and an activated carbon were used. After treatment to remove exchangeable cations, ion exchange experiments were conducted in 0.1 M acetic acid-sodium acetate (1:1) buffer and 0.05 M sulphuric acid solutions and the slurries were agitated once a day. The ion concentrations in the solutions were determined by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. The Cr(VI) renaming in solution was determined by the standard calorimetric 1,5-diphenylcarbazide method. Peat and low rank (Spanish Mequinenza) coal exhibited a larger capacity for Cr(VI) removal than bituminous coal. Redox mechanisms are operative coupled with the oxidation of the coal and peat surfaces. Desorption of Cr(III) formed by reduction which occurs in strongly acidic media also needs to be considered. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  3. Kinetics of wet oxidation of formic acid and acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, R.V.; Mahajani, V.V. [Univ. of Mumbai (India). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    1997-11-01

    Oxidation of lower molecular weight carboxylic acids such as formic, acetic, glyoxalic, and oxalic acids is often the rate-controlling step during wet oxidation (WO) of an aqueous waste stream exhibiting very high chemical oxygen demand (COD). The kinetics of WO of formic acid was studied in the absence and presence of a cupric sulfate as catalyst in the temperature range 150--240 C and oxygen partial pressure range 0.345--1.380 MPa. Wet oxidation of acetic acid was carried out in the presence of cupric sulfate in the temperature range 215--235 C. Homogeneous copper sulfate was found to be a very good catalyst for oxidation of formic acid and acetic acid.

  4. System evaluation and microbial analysis of a sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment process for Co-treatment of simple wet flue gas desulfurization wastes with freshwater sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Liu, Rulong; Wei, Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2015-09-01

    A sulfur cycle-based wastewater treatment process, namely the Sulfate reduction, Autotrophic denitrification and Nitrification Integrated process (SANI(®) process) has been recently developed for organics and nitrogen removal with 90% sludge minimization and 35% energy reduction in the biological treatment of saline sewage from seawater toilet flushing practice in Hong Kong. In this study, sulfate- and sulfite-rich wastes from simple wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) were considered as a potential low-cost sulfur source to achieve beneficial co-treatment with non-saline (freshwater) sewage in continental areas, through a Mixed Denitrification (MD)-SANI process trialed with synthetic mixture of simple WFGD wastes and freshwater sewage. The system showed 80% COD removal efficiency (specific COD removal rate of 0.26 kg COD/kg VSS/d) at an optimal pH of 7.5 and complete denitrification through MD (specific nitrogen removal rate of 0.33 kg N/kg VSS/d). Among the electron donors in MD, organics and thiosulfate could induce a much higher denitrifying activity than sulfide in terms of both NO3(-) reduction and NO2(-) reduction, suggesting a much higher nitrogen removal rate in organics-, thiosulfate- and sulfide-based MD in MD-SANI compared to sulfide alone-based autotrophic denitrification in conventional SANI(®). Diverse sulfate/sulfite-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera dominated in the bacterial community of sulfate/sulfite-reducing up-flow sludge bed (SRUSB) sludge without methane producing bacteria detected. Desulfomicrobium-like species possibly for sulfite reduction and Desulfobulbus-like species possibly for sulfate reduction are the two dominant groups with respective abundance of 24.03 and 14.91% in the SRB genera. Diverse denitrifying genera were identified in the bacterial community of anoxic up-flow sludge bed (AnUSB) sludge and the Thauera- and Thiobacillus-like species were the major taxa. These results well explained the successful operation of the lab

  5. Catalytic wet oxidation of aqueous methylamine: comparative study on the catalytic performance of platinum-ruthenium, platinum, and ruthenium catalysts supported on titania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Aiying; Lu, Gongxuan

    2015-01-01

    Promotion of the dispersion of Ru species supported on TiO2 was achieved by introduction of Pt component and the role of Pt in enhancing the catalytic performances of Pt-Ru was investigated with catalytic wet air oxidation of methylamine used as a probing reaction. It was found that Pt-Ru/TiO2 displayed a much better catalytic performance compared with Pt/TiO2 and Ru/TiO2 catalysts due to having the highest dispersion of active species. Both high total organic carbon conversion and nitrogen selectivity (∼100%) over Pt-Ru/TiO2 catalyst were achieved at low temperature (200 °C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization indicated that there were strong interactions between metal particles and the support, which may increase the catalytic performance of catalysts.

  6. Making Activated Carbon by Wet Pressurized Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John W.; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.; Moran, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A wet pressurized pyrolysis (wet carbonization) process has been invented as a means of producing activated carbon from a wide variety of inedible biomass consisting principally of plant wastes. The principal intended use of this activated carbon is room-temperature adsorption of pollutant gases from cooled incinerator exhaust streams. Activated carbon is highly porous and has a large surface area. The surface area depends strongly on the raw material and the production process. Coconut shells and bituminous coal are the primary raw materials that, until now, were converted into activated carbon of commercially acceptable quality by use of traditional production processes that involve activation by use of steam or carbon dioxide. In the wet pressurized pyrolysis process, the plant material is subjected to high pressure and temperature in an aqueous medium in the absence of oxygen for a specified amount of time to break carbon-oxygen bonds in the organic material and modify the structure of the material to obtain large surface area. Plant materials that have been used in demonstrations of the process include inedible parts of wheat, rice, potato, soybean, and tomato plants. The raw plant material is ground and mixed with a specified proportion of water. The mixture is placed in a stirred autoclave, wherein it is pyrolized at a temperature between 450 and 590 F (approximately between 230 and 310 C) and a pressure between 1 and 1.4 kpsi (approximately between 7 and 10 MPa) for a time between 5 minutes and 1 hour. The solid fraction remaining after wet carbonization is dried, then activated at a temperature of 500 F (260 C) in nitrogen gas. The activated carbon thus produced is comparable to commercial activated carbon. It can be used to adsorb oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, and trace amounts of hydrocarbons, any or all of which can be present in flue gas. Alternatively, the dried solid fraction can be used, even without the activation treatment, to absorb

  7. Microwave assisted catalytic wet air oxidation of H-acid in aqueous solution under the atmospheric pressure using activated carbon as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Shuo; Zhao, Yazhi; Yang, Fenglin

    2006-09-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) is a promising method for the treatment of heavily contaminated wastewater. However, its application is restricted due to severe operation conditions (high pressure and high temperature). A microwave (MW) assisted oxidation method was investigated aiming to treat heavily contaminated wastewater under milder conditions. H-acid (1-amino-8-naphthol-3, 6-disulfonic acid) was selected as target compound to evaluate the performance of this novel process. The removal of H-acid and TOC (total organic carbon) for H-acid solution of 3000 mg/L reached as high as 92.6% in 20 min and 84.2% in 60 min, respectively under optimal conditions. The existence of activated carbon and oxygen proved to be critical for effective treatment. The activated carbon acted not only as a catalyst for H-acid decomposition, but also as a special material for the absorption of MW energy. Air was supplied to the reactor as an oxygen source at constant flows. The amino group in H-acid was converted ultimately into nitrate, and sulfonic group into sulfate. This observation gave an evidence of H-acid mineralization although other organic intermediates were unable to be determined. The value of BOD(5)/COD (ratio of 5d biochemical oxygen demand to chemical oxygen demand) increased from 0.008 to 0.467 indicating a significant improvement of biodegradability for the solution, which is beneficial for the further biological treatment of the wastewater.

  8. Removal kinetics for gaseous NO and SO2by an aqueous NaClO2solution mist in a wet electrostatic precipitator

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Hyun-Woo

    2016-07-26

    Removal kinetics for NO and SO2 by NaClO2 solution mist were investigated in a wet electrostatic precipitator. By varying the molar concentrations of NO, SO2, and NaClO2, the removal rates of NO and SO2 confirmed to range from 34.8 to 72.9 mmol/m3 s and 36.6 to 84.7 mmol/m3 s, respectively, at a fixed gas residence time of 0.25 s. The rate coefficients of NO and SO2 were calculated to be 0.679 (mmol/m3)−0.33 s−1 and 1.401 (mmol/m3)−0.1 s−1 based on the rates of the individual removal of NO and SO2. Simultaneous removal of NO and SO2 investigated after the evaluation of removal rates for their individual treatment was performed. At a short gas residence time, SO2 gas removed more quickly by a mist of NaClO2 solution than NO gas in simultaneous removal experiments. This is because SO2 gas, which has a relatively high solubility in solution, was absorbed more rapidly at the gas–liquid interface than NO gas. NO and SO2 gases were absorbed as nitrite (Formula presented.) and sulfite (Formula presented.) ions, respectively, by the NaClO2 solution mist at the gas–liquid interface. Then, (Formula presented.) and (Formula presented.) were oxidized to nitrate (Formula presented.) and sulfate (Formula presented.), respectively, by reactions with (Formula presented.), ClO2, HClO, and ClO in the liquid phase. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  9. A novel bio-adsorbent of mint waste for dyes remediation in aqueous environments: study and modeling of isotherms for removal of methylene Blue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Ainane

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the possibility of using mint waste as a bioadsorbent for the removal of dye (Methylen Blue from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies were carried out by monitoring the pH, the bio-adsorbent dose and the initial dye concentration. Attempts have also been made to monitor the adsorption process through Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, and Temkin adsorption isotherm models. These results have demonstrated the immense potential of mint waste as a bioadsorbent for dyes remediation in polluted water and wastewater. Finally followed by the process of adsorption phenomenon was achieved by fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR, the results shows that the adsorption is mechanical trapping.

  10. Mechanisms of Copper Corrosion in Aqueous Environments. A report from the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste's scientific workshop, on November 16, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-07-01

    In 2010 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKB, plans to submit its license application for the final repository of spent nuclear fuel. The proposed method is the so-called KBS-3 method and implies placing the spent nuclear fuel in copper canisters, surrounded by a buffer of bentonite clay, at 500 m depth in the bedrock. The site selected by SKB to host the repository is located in the municipality of Oesthammar on the Swedish east coast. The copper canister plays a key role in the design of the repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The long-term physical and chemical stability of copper in aqueous environments is fundamental for the safety evolution of the proposed disposal concept. However, the corrosion resistance of copper has been questioned by results obtained under anoxic conditions in aqueous solution. These observations caused some head-lines in the Swedish newspapers as well as public and political concerns. Consequently, the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste organized a scientific workshop on the issue 'Mechanisms of Copper Corrosion in Aqueous Environments'. The purpose of the workshop was to address the fundamental understanding of the corrosion characteristics of copper regarding oxygen-free environments, and to identify what additional information is needed to assess the validity of the proposed corrosion mechanism and its implication on the containment of spent nuclear fuel in a copper canister. This seminar report is based on the presentations and discussions at the workshop. It also includes written statements by the members of the expert panel

  11. Adsorption of Reactive Red 198 Azo Dye fromAqueous Solution onto theWaste Coagulation Sludge of theWater Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mahmoudi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives:Much attention has been recently paid on using waste materials as adsorbents for removal of contaminants from water and wastewater. A new low cost waste was examined for its capacity to adsorb RR198, an azo reactive model dye, from an aqueous solution."nMaterials andMethods: The waste was dried, powdered and characterized before being used as an adsorbent. The effects of pH (3-10, adsorbent dose (0.2-3 g, dye concentration and contact time on the adsorption efficiency were investigated. Equilibrium study data were modeled using Langmuir and Freundlich models."nResults: The characterization analysis indicated that itwas composedmainly of ferric hydroxide. The powder had a BET and average pore size of 107 m2/g and 4.5 nm, respectively. The results showed that dye removal was highest at a solution pH of 7 to 8 and a powder dose of 2 g/L. The RR198 removal percentage decreased from 100& to 43& at 140 min contact time when the concentration of dye was increased from 25 mg/L to 100 mg/L, at optimum pH and dosage. The Langmuir equation provided the best fit for the experimental data. The maximum adsorption capacity was calculated to be 34.4 mg/g."nConclusion: According to the obtained results, the water coagulation waste sludge appears to be a suitable low cost and effcient adsorbent for removing reactive azo dyes from waste streams.

  12. Wastes disposal on board a ship. Apparatus to decompose and annihilate wet refuses bionically; Senjo no haikibutsu shori. Namagomi no bio bunkai shometsuki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, S.

    1996-07-25

    A bionic refuse disposing and annihilating apparatus for wet refuses produced on board a ship was developed, and introduced in this paper. This apparatus uses a system that biomass as a decomposing medium is maintained dry in a disposal tank, and wet refuses are decomposed and annihilated by the biomass working only with water contained in the wet refuses themselves. The system uses a decomposing medium composed of a mixture of different kinds of organic matters mixed with various nutrients, and automatically controls absorption and exhalation of decomposing water without using a heater. Almost all of wet refuses decomposes and annihilates in twelve hours after having been charged in their original forms. The decomposing medium can be used continuously for six months to a year. Because of complete annihilation by the bionic effect, no residue is created. This system uses a normal-temperature decomposing and annihilating bionic technology, whose minimum temperature required for decomposition and annihilation is 10{degree}C or higher, and the highest permissible temperature is 75{degree}C. Dry and cool environment at about 20{degree}C is most suitable. Deodorizing function of the biomass itself as the decomposing medium suppresses odor generation. 3 figs.

  13. Sequestering Potential of Peach Nut Shells as an Efficient Sorbent for Sequestering Some Toxic Metal Ions from Aqueous Waste: A Kinetic and Thermodynamic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ashraf Shaheen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The peach nut shells potential as a low cost biosorbent for separation of certain metal ions from aqueous media was investigated. The effects of different parameters such as pH, shaking speed, initial metal ions concentration and their contact time with adsorbent on sorption efficiency of biosorbent was investigated to optimize the parameters for maximum sorption. The FT–IR spectroscopy and TGA were used to characterize the biosorbent. A significant increase in sorption was noted with rise in pH of metal ions solution and maximum sorption was observed at pH 6. The isothermal data was fitted to Langmuir, Dubinin–Radushkevich (D–R, Freundlich isotherms and equilibrium process was best fitted to Langmuir isotherm. The removal efficiency of chemically activated samples was found to be ~35 to 45% greater than raw sample. The results showed that peach nut shell was an effective biosorbent for the remediation of the contaminated water with lead (II, Nickle (II and Chromium (III ions. Being low cost material, PNS has a potential to be exploited in waste water treatment technologies. This study shows that activated PNS exhibited appreciable sorption for Pb, Cr and Ni metals ions (97%, 95% and 94% respectively from aqueous solution even at very low concentration of sorbent. The chemical and thermal activation of peach nut shells enhances the removal efficiency for all the metal ions and from the reported data; it was found that the adsorption ability of Pb ions was greater than nickel and chromium.

  14. Purification of pectinase from mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Chokanan) waste using an aqueous organic phase system: a potential low cost source of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amid, Mehrnoush; Abdul Manap, Mohd Yazid; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2013-07-15

    As a novel method of purification, an aqueous organic phase system (AOPS) was employed to purify pectinase from mango waste. The effect of different parameters, such as the alcohol concentration (ethanol, 1-propanol, and 2-propanol), the salt type and concentration (ammonium sulfate, potassium phosphate and sodium citrate), the feed stock crude load, the aqueous phase pH and NaCl concentration, were investigated in the recovery of pectinase from mango peel. The partition coefficient (K), selectivity (S), purification factor (PF) and yield (Y, %) were investigated in this study as important parameters for the evaluation of enzyme recovery. The desirable partition efficiency for pectinase purification was achieved in an AOPS of 19% (w/w) ethanol and 22% (w/w) potassium phosphate in the presence of 5% (w/w) NaCl at pH 7.0. Based on the system, the purification factor of pectinase was enhanced 11.7, with a high yield of 97.1%.

  15. Removal of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution by a waste mud from copper mine industry: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdes, Duygu; Gundogdu, Ali; Kemer, Baris; Duran, Celal; Senturk, Hasan Basri; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-07-30

    The objective of this study was to assess the adsorption potential of a waste mud (WM) for the removal of lead (Pb(II)) ions from aqueous solutions. The WM was activated with NaOH in order to increase its adsorption capacity. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch system as a function of solution pH, contact time, initial Pb(II) concentration, activated-waste mud (a-WM) concentration, temperature, etc. Optimum pH was specified as 4.0. The adsorption kinetic studies indicated that the overall adsorption process was best described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of a-WM was obtained by using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and both models fitted well. Adsorption capacity for Pb(II) was found to be 24.4 mg g(-1) for 10 g L(-1) of a-WM concentration. Thermodynamic parameters including the Gibbs free energy (Delta G degrees), enthalpy (Delta H degrees), and entropy (DeltaS degrees) indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) ions on the a-WM was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic, at temperature range of 0-40 degrees C. Desorption studies were carried out successfully with diluted HCl solutions. The results indicate that a-WM can be used as an effective and no-cost adsorbent for the treatment of industrial wastewaters contaminated with Pb(II) ions.

  16. Cauliflower Leave, an Agricultural Waste Biomass Adsorbent, and Its Application for the Removal of MB Dye from Aqueous Solution: Equilibrium, Kinetics, and Thermodynamic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Seraj Anwar; Khan, Fauzia

    2016-01-01

    Cauliflower leaf powder (CLP), a biosorbent prepared from seasonal agricultural crop waste material, has been employed as a prospective adsorbent for the removal of a basic dye, methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution by the batch adsorption method under varying conditions, namely, initial dye concentration, adsorbent dose, solution pH, and temperature. Characterization of the material by FTIR and SEM indicates the presence of functional groups and rough coarse surface suitable for the adsorption of methylene blue over it. Efforts were made to fit the isotherm data using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equation. The experimental data were best described by Freundlich isotherm model, with an adsorption capacity of 149.22 mg/g at room temperature. To evaluate the rate of methylene blue adsorption onto CLP, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models were employed. The experimental data were best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Evaluation of thermodynamic parameters such as changes in enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs' free energy showed the feasible, spontaneous, and exothermic nature of the adsorption process. On the basis of experimental results obtained, it may be concluded that the CLP prepared from agricultural waste has considerable potential as low-cost adsorbent in wastewater treatment for the removal of basic dye, MB. PMID:27974892

  17. Extraction of Theanine from Waste Liquid of Tea Polyphenol Production in Aqueous Two-phase Systems with Cationic and Anionic Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Junwei; WANG Yan; PENG Qijun

    2013-01-01

    Extraction of theanine from waste liquid of tea polyphenol production was studied in aqueous surfactant two-phase system (ASTP) with cationic suffactant (CTAB) and anionic surfactant (SDS).Results indicate that the region of ASTP is narrow and there is only a two-phase region of cationic surfactant.The increase in concentrations of NaBr and Na2SO4 are beneficial to the formation of ASTP.Theanine concentration in the bottom phase increases with increasing concentration of theanine,whereas the partition coefficient and extraction rate only change a little when the concentration of theanine is above 0.2 g· L-1.With the increase of SDS concentration,the phase ratio and the partition coefficient decrease,while the extraction efficiency of theanine increases and the concentration of theaninc changes a little in the range from 2.4/7.5 to 2.8/7.2 for SDS/CTAB ratio.The temperature has a notable effect on the concentration of theanine in the bottom phase,partition coefficient and extraction rate of theanine.The increase of waste liquid decreases the phase ratio,increases the concentration and extraction rate of theanine in the bottom phase,since the protein and the saccharide enter the bottom phase with theanine.

  18. Nano-cerium vanadate: a novel inorganic ion exchanger for removal of americium and uranium from simulated aqueous nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Chayan; Dudwadkar, Nilesh; Tripathi, Subhash Chandra; Gandhi, Pritam Maniklal; Grover, Vinita; Kaushik, Chetan Prakash; Tyagi, Avesh Kumar

    2014-09-15

    Cerium vanadate nanopowders were synthesized by a facile low temperature co-precipitation method. The product was characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and found to consist of ∼25 nm spherical nanoparticles. The efficiency of these nanopowders for uptake of alpha-emitting radionuclides (233)U (4.82 MeV α) and (241)Am (5.49 MeV α, 60 keV γ) has been investigated. Thermodynamically and kinetically favorable uptake of these radionuclides resulted in their complete removal within 3h from aqueous acidic feed solutions. The uptake capacity was observed to increase with increase in pH as the zeta potential value decreased with the increase in pH but effect of ionic strength was insignificant. Little influence of the ions like Sr(2+), Ru(3+), Fe(3+), etc., in the uptake process indicated CeVO4 nanopowders to be amenable for practical applications. The isotherms indicated predominant uptake of the radioactive metal ions in the solid phase of the exchanger at lower feed concentrations and linear Kielland plots with positive slopes indicated favorable exchange of the metal ions with the nanopowder. Performance comparison with the other sorbents reported indicated excellent potential of nano-cerium vanadate for removing americium and uranium from large volumes of aqueous acidic solutions.

  19. Environmental impact of rejected materials generated in organic fraction of municipal solid waste anaerobic digestion plants: Comparison of wet and dry process layout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colazo, Ana-Belén; Sánchez, Antoni; Font, Xavier; Colón, Joan

    2015-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion of source separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste is an increasing waste valorization alternative instead of incineration or landfilling of untreated biodegradable wastes. Nevertheless, a significant portion of biodegradable wastes entering the plant is lost in pre-treatments and post-treatments of anaerobic digestion facilities together with other improper materials such as plastics, paper, textile materials and metals. The rejected materials lost in these stages have two main implications: (i) less organic material enters to digesters and, as a consequence, there is a loss of biogas production and (ii) the rejected materials end up in landfills or incinerators contributing to environmental impacts such as global warming or eutrophication. The main goals of this study are (i) to estimate potential losses of biogas in the rejected solid materials generated during the pre- and post-treatments of two full-scale anaerobic digestion facilities and (ii) to evaluate the environmental burdens associated to the final disposal (landfill or incineration) of these rejected materials by means of Life Cycle Assessment. This study shows that there is a lost of potential biogas production, ranging from 8% to 15%, due to the loss of organic matter during pre-treatment stages in anaerobic digestion facilities. From an environmental point of view, the Life Cycle Assessment shows that the incineration scenario is the most favorable alternative for eight out of nine impact categories compared with the landfill scenario. The studied impact categories are Climate Change, Fossil depletion, Freshwater eutrophication, Marine eutrophication, Ozone depletion, Particulate matter formation, Photochemical oxidant formation, Terrestrial acidification and Water depletion.

  20. 湿法脱除垃圾焚烧飞灰重金属的研究%Using of Wet Process to Remove of Heavy Metals from Waste Incineration Fly Ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛中建; 王中页; 罗津晶; 张杰儒; 季喆

    2013-01-01

    Taking the fly ash samples obtained from Fujian and Hubei waste incineration plants as the research subjects, the effects of water washing and wash+acid washing for heavy metal extraction from fly ash were compared. The changes of leachimg toxicity of heavy metals from fly ash were investigated under different acid washing conditions. The results showed that the effect of water washing was best when the ratio of water to fly ash was 10 : 1 (L/kg). Water+acid washing process can effectively reduce the leachimg toxicity of heavy metals. Part of fly ash can be disposed as ordinary waste after treated by wet-extraction process.%以福建和湖北垃圾焚烧发电厂采集的飞灰为研究对象,比较了单独水洗、水洗结合酸洗等工艺对飞灰重金属的洗脱效果,考察了不同酸洗工艺条件下飞灰重金属浸出毒性的变化.结果表明:在水灰比为10时水洗效果最佳,水洗结合酸洗处理可有效降低飞灰重金属浸出毒性,部分飞灰经湿法脱除后可作为普通废物排放.

  1. Recovery Technology of DMF from Wet Type Polyurethane Synthetic Leather Waste Gas%聚氨酯合成革湿法生产废气中DMF的回收工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵舜华; 宋锡瑾; 裴宁; 张景铸; 刘书庆

    2008-01-01

    A new recovery technology is developed to recycle N, N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) in waste gas from wet type polyurethane synthetic leather industry. Given that the concentration of DMF in waste gas was as low as 325.6-688.3mg·m3, it was necessary to make sure two phases contact adequately and strengthen the mass transfer by increasing contact area and enhancing the turbulence. Therefore, two-stage countercurrent absorption and two-stage fog removing system were introduced into the technology. The top section of the absorption column was filled with structured wire-ripple stainless steel packing BX500, while the lower section with sting-ripple packing CB250Y. Total height of packing material was 6m. In addition, there were both two-stage fog removing layer and high efficiency liquid distributor at the column top. All the operating parameters, including temperature, pressure, flow rate and liquid position, could be controlled by computers without manual operation, making sure the outlet gas achieved the national emission standard that the DMF concentration should be below 40mg·m3. The whole equipment could recover 237.6t of DMF each year, with the profit up to CNY 521×103.

  2. Adsorption-desorption characteristics of phenol and reactive dyes from aqueous solution on mesoporous activated carbon prepared from waste tires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanthapanichakoon, W; Ariyadejwanich, P; Japthong, P; Nakagawa, K; Mukai, S R; Tamon, H

    2005-04-01

    Liquid-phase adsorption-desorption characteristics and ethanol regeneration efficiency of an activated carbon prepared from waste tires and a commercial activated carbon were investigated. Water vapor adsorption experiments reveal that both activated carbons showed hydrophobic surface characteristics. Adsorption experiments reveal that the prepared activated carbon possessed comparable phenol adsorption capacity as the commercial one but clearly larger adsorption capacity of two reactive dyes, Black 5 and Red 31. It was ascertained that the prepared activated carbon exhibited less irreversible adsorption of phenol and the two dyes than its commercial counterpart. Moreover, ethanol regeneration efficiency of the prepared AC saturated with either dye was higher than that of the commercial AC. Because of its superior liquid-phase adsorption-desorption characteristics as well as higher ethanol regeneration efficiency, the prepared activated carbon is more suitable for wastewater treatment, especially for adsorbing similarly bulky adsorbates.

  3. Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunyoto, Nimas M S; Zhu, Mingming; Zhang, Zhezi; Zhang, Dongke

    2016-11-01

    Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates was studied using bench-scale bioreactors. The cultures with biochar additions were placed in 100ml reactors and incubated at 35°C and pH 5 for hydrogen production. The residual cultures were then used for methane production, incubated at 35°C and pH 7. Daily yields of hydrogen and methane and weekly yield of volatile fatty acids (VFA) were measured. The hydrogen and methane production potentials, rate and lag phases of the two phases were analysed using the Gompertz model. The results showed that biochar addition increased the maximum production rates of hydrogen by 32.5% and methane 41.6%, improved hydrogen yield by 31.0% and methane 10.0%, and shortened the lag phases in the two phases by 36.0% and 41.0%, respectively. Biochar addition also enhanced VFA generation during hydrogen production and VFA degradation in methane production.

  4. Synthesis of Activated Carbon Mesoporous from Coffee Waste and Its Application in Adsorption Zinc and Mercury Ions from Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Giraldo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain activated carbons with high portion of meso pores using coffee residues as precursor for the application of adsorption of large adsorbates. Because of its natural properties, the coffee residue exhibited a large pore size. In this work, the coffee residue were impregnated with ZnCl2 and KOH, and then carbonized under the nitrogen conditions and activated with CO2 respectively. Obtained activated carbons are used in the adsorption of ions Hg(II and Zn(II. These adsorbents are efficacious to remove these ions from aqueous solution, with monocomponent equilibrium adsorption capacities ranging from from 0.002 to 0.380 mmol∙g-1 for Hg on ACK3 and from 0.002 to 0.330 mmol∙g-1 for ACZ3. For Zn(II on ACK2 from 0.002 to 0.300 mmol∙g-1, and from 0.001 to 0.274 mmol∙g-1 for ACZ2.

  5. Utilization of activated carbon produced from fruit juice industry solid waste for the adsorption of Yellow 18 from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Dilek

    2014-09-01

    The use of activated carbon obtained from sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.) stones for the removal of a basic textile dye, which is Yellow 18, from aqueous solutions at different contact times, pH values and solution temperatures was investigated. The surface area and micropore volume of chemically modified activated carbon were 1704 m(2) g(-1) and 0.984 cm(3) g(-1), respectively. The experimental data indicated that the adsorption isotherms were well described by the Langmuir equilibrium isotherm equation and the calculated adsorption capacity was 75.76 mg g(-1) at 318 K. The adsorption kinetic of Yellow 18 obeys the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters were calculated to estimate the nature of adsorption. The activation energy of the system was calculated as 0.71-2.36 kJ/mol. According to these results, prepared activated carbon could be used as a low-cost adsorbent to compare with the commercial activated carbon for the removal of Yellow 18 from wastewater.

  6. Evaluation of an adsorbent based on agricultural waste (corn cobs) for removal of tyrosine and phenylalanine from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Cibele C O; Franca, Adriana S; Oliveira, Leandro S

    2013-01-01

    Adsorption of phenolic amino acids, such as phenylalanine and tyrosine, is quite relevant for the production of protein hydrolysates used as dietary formulations for patients suffering from congenital disorders of amino acid metabolism, such as phenylketonuria. In this study, an adsorbent prepared from corn cobs was evaluated for the removal of tyrosine (Tyr) from both a single component solution and a binary aqueous solution with phenylalanine (Phe). The adsorption behavior of tyrosine was similar to that of phenylalanine in single component solutions, however, with a much lower adsorption capacity (14 mg g(-1) for Tyr compared to 109 mg g(-1) for Phe). Tyr adsorption kinetics was satisfactorily described by a pseudosecond-order model as it was for Phe. In adsorption equilibrium studies for binary mixtures, the presence of Tyr in Phe solutions favored Phe faster adsorption whereas the opposite behavior was observed for the presence of Phe in Tyr solutions. Such results indicate that, in binary systems, Phe will be adsorbed preferably to Tyr, and this is a welcome feature when employing the prepared adsorbent for the removal of Phe from protein hydrolysates to be used in dietary formulations for phenylketonuria treatment.

  7. Evaluation of an Adsorbent Based on Agricultural Waste (Corn Cobs for Removal of Tyrosine and Phenylalanine from Aqueous Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele C. O. Alves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of phenolic amino acids, such as phenylalanine and tyrosine, is quite relevant for the production of protein hydrolysates used as dietary formulations for patients suffering from congenital disorders of amino acid metabolism, such as phenylketonuria. In this study, an adsorbent prepared from corn cobs was evaluated for the removal of tyrosine (Tyr from both a single component solution and a binary aqueous solution with phenylalanine (Phe. The adsorption behavior of tyrosine was similar to that of phenylalanine in single component solutions, however, with a much lower adsorption capacity (14 mg g−1 for Tyr compared to 109 mg g−1 for Phe. Tyr adsorption kinetics was satisfactorily described by a pseudosecond-order model as it was for Phe. In adsorption equilibrium studies for binary mixtures, the presence of Tyr in Phe solutions favored Phe faster adsorption whereas the opposite behavior was observed for the presence of Phe in Tyr solutions. Such results indicate that, in binary systems, Phe will be adsorbed preferably to Tyr, and this is a welcome feature when employing the prepared adsorbent for the removal of Phe from protein hydrolysates to be used in dietary formulations for phenylketonuria treatment.

  8. Utilization of Sago Waste as an Adsorbent for the Removal of Pb(II from Aqueous Solution: Kinetic and Isotherm Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.KARTHIKA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a carbonaceous sorbent prepared from sago waste for the removal of Pb (II ions from aqueous solution and industrial effluent was studied as a function of agitation time, adsorbent dosage, particle size and pH. Through Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, X-ray Photo electron Spectroscopy (XPS and Fourier TransformInfra-red (FTIR spectroscopy analysis, the surface properties of the adsorbent were studied. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich Peterson, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations. The maximum adsorption capacity (Q0 was found to be 14.35 mg g-1 at an initial pH of 3.5. The Lagergren rate constant for adsorption was found to be constant for various initial concentrations of Pb(II ions which implies that adsorption follows first order kinetics. Since the raw material used in the preparation of activated carbon is available abundantly, the resulting carbon is expected to be economically viable.

  9. Textile dyes removal from aqueous solution using Opuntia ficus-indica fruit waste as adsorbent and its characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez-Cid, A A; Velázquez-Ugalde, I; Herrera-González, A M; García-Serrano, J

    2013-11-30

    For this research, three different adsorbents, one untreated and two chemically activated, were prepared from Opuntia ficus-indica fruit waste. By the construction of adsorption isotherms, its adsorption capabilities and the viability of its use in the removal of textile basic and direct type dyes were determined. It was found that the adsorbent with the most adsorption capacity for basic dyes was the one activated with NaClO, and, for direct dyes, it was the one activated with NaOH. Langmuir and Freundlich equations isotherms were applied for the analysis of the experimental data. It was found that the Freundlich model best described the adsorption behavior. The adsorption capacity was improved when the pH of the dye solution had an acid value. The specific surface area of the adsorbents was calculated by means of methylene blue adsorption at 298 K to stay within a range between 348 and 643 m(2) g(-1). The FTIR spectroscopic characterization technique, the SEM, the point of zero charge, and the elemental analysis show the chemical and physical characteristics of the studied adsorbents, which confirm the adsorption results obtained.

  10. Single-metalloprotein wet biotransistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrini, Andrea; Salerno, Marco; Frabboni, Stefano; Facci, Paolo

    2005-03-01

    Metalloproteins are redox molecules naturally shuttling electrons with high efficiency between molecular partners. As such, they are candidates of choice for bioelectronics. In this work, we have used bacterial metalloprotein azurin, hosted in a nanometer gap between two electrically biased gold electrodes, to demonstrate an electrochemically gated single-molecule transistor operating in an aqueous environment. Gold-chemisorbed azurin shows peaks in tunneling current upon changing electrode potential and a related variation in tunneling barrier transparency which can be exploited to switch an electron current through it. These results suggest the wet approach to molecular electronics as a viable method for exploiting electron transfer of highly specialized biomolecules.

  11. 湿法分解-AAS法测定废钯碳催化剂中的钯%Determination of the palladium in the waste palladium on carbon catalyst by wet method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖红新; 岳伟; 庄艾春; 林海山; 赖心; 李颖; 杨勇

    2013-01-01

    用湿法处理样品,以H2 SO4+ HNO3冒烟硝化除碳,甲酸还原、王水溶解样品,在盐酸介质中用空气-乙炔火焰原子吸收光谱法测定废钯碳催化剂中的钯。结果表明,本法的回收率在98%~102%之间,相对标准偏差小于3%,与灼烧还原法、火试金法的测定结果一致。%Palladium in the waste palladium on carbon catalys was examined by air acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrometry in hydrochloric acid medium through wet processing samples ,removing carbon u-sing H2 SO4 + HNO3 smoking from samples ,reduction by methane acid and dissolving samples by chloro-azotic acid .The results show that the recovery ratio is between 98% and 102% and the relative standard deviation is less than 3% ,which are consistent with the results of fire restoring and the fire assay .

  12. Evaluation of radwaste minimization program of dry and wet active waste in the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant; Evolucion del programa de minimizacion de desechos solidos secos y humedos en la Central Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna-Garza, Hector [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Veracruz (Mexico). Central Nucleoeletrica Laguna Verde; Zarate-Montoya, Norma [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    A growing rate of radwaste volume production combined with an increase of both, costs and associated dose involved in its treatment and disposition processes have created a serious problem to the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant (BWR, two Units, 682 Mwe each) in Mexico. Due the lack of a Final Repository in the country, the solution in the short or long terms relies on the success of a continuous and aggressive minimization program mainly based on modifications and upgrades applied to these processes. Technical and administrative strategies adopted by LVNPP for the reduction of Liquid Effluents and Dry and Wet Active Waste in the next three years are described. Based on the results of the LVNPP current radwaste process systems, an estimated accumulation of 11,502 m{sup 3} by the year 2035 will exceed the actual on-site storage capacity. If the strategies succeed, this production would fall to an expected manageable volume of 4067 m{sup 3}. (author)

  13. Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

  14. Application of an aqueous two-phase micellar system to extract bromelain from pineapple (Ananas comosus) peel waste and analysis of bromelain stability in cosmetic formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spir, Lívia Genovez; Ataide, Janaína Artem; De Lencastre Novaes, Letícia Celia; Moriel, Patrícia; Mazzola, Priscila Gava; De Borba Gurpilhares, Daniela; Silveira, Edgar; Pessoa, Adalberto; Tambourgi, Elias Basile

    2015-01-01

    Bromelain is a set of proteolytic enzymes found in pineapple (Ananas comosus) tissues such as stem, fruit and leaves. Because of its proteolytic activity, bromelain has potential applications in the cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and food industries. The present study focused on the recovery of bromelain from pineapple peel by liquid-liquid extraction in aqueous two-phase micellar systems (ATPMS), using Triton X-114 (TX-114) and McIlvaine buffer, in the absence and presence of electrolytes CaCl2 and KI; the cloud points of the generated extraction systems were studied by plotting binodal curves. Based on the cloud points, three temperatures were selected for extraction: 30, 33, and 36°C for systems in the absence of salts; 40, 43, and 46°C in the presence of KI; 24, 27, and 30°C in the presence of CaCl2 . Total protein and enzymatic activities were analyzed to monitor bromelain. Employing the ATPMS chosen for extraction (0.5 M KI with 3% TX-114, at pH 6.0, at 40°C), the bromelain extract stability was assessed after incorporation into three cosmetic bases: an anhydrous gel, a cream, and a cream-gel formulation. The cream-gel formulation presented as the most appropriate base to convey bromelain, and its optimal storage conditions were found to be 4.0 ± 0.5°C. The selected ATPMS enabled the extraction of a biomolecule with high added value from waste lined-up in a cosmetic formulation, allowing for exploration of further cosmetic potential.

  15. Aqueous alteration in CR chondrites: Meteorite parent body processes as analogue for long-term corrosion processes relevant for nuclear waste disposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlok, Andreas; Libourel, Guy

    2013-02-01

    Aqueous alteration of carbonaceous chondrites is one of the fundamental processes on accreting planetesimals that changes pristine materials from the formation of the Solar System. The study of mineralogical, petrological and chemical changes resulting from this alteration provides insight into the physical and chemical setting of forming planetesimals. CR chondrites provide samples for all stages of aqueous alteration, from type 3 to 1 (entirely hydrated), and are thus suited to study the alteration of pristine materials in a coherent sequence. Vitrification is a common way to store and stabilize fission products and minor actinides resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear spent fuel in a nuclear boro-silica glass in steel containers. The waste material has to be stored safely for a period of at least 105-106 years in a clay-rich geological repository. Laboratory experiments being too short to follow the long-term evolution of these materials, we analyzed the mineralogical, petrological and chemical changes in a series of CR chondrites (Renazzo CR2, Al Rais CR2, and GRO 95577 CR1) to serve as analogues. Rims of secondary materials around metal grains in contact to the fine-grained matrix serve as analogue to the interface between steel containment and the surrounding clay-rich geological layer, while chondrule glassy mesostasis is used as a proxy of the nuclear glass. With increasing degree of aqueous alteration in the sequence, Renazzo → Al Rais → GRO 95577, the size of the rims increase. Fe-rich alteration rims are ˜10 μm in thickness around metal grains in the fine-grained matrix in Renazzo. In Al Rais, multi-layered structures of interchanging Fe, S and P/Ca-rich layers appear, with a thickness of up to ˜30 μm. In the highly altered GRO 95577, extensive inner and external rims of secondary phases reach up to ˜200 μm into the surrounding matrix. In chondrules, metal in contact with the altered mesostasis shows similar trends, but with thinner

  16. Thermal wet oxidation improves anaerobic biodegradability of raw and digested biowaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lissens, G.; Thomsen, Anne Belinda; De Baere, L.;

    2004-01-01

    profits. The objective of this research was to enhance the anaerobic biodegradability and methane yields from different biowastes (food waste, yard waste, and digested biowaste already treated in a full-scale biogas plant (DRANCO, Belgium)) by assessing thermal wet oxidation. The biodegradability...... of the waste was evaluated by using biochemical methane potential assays and continuous 3-L methane reactors. Wet oxidation temperature and oxygen pressure (T, 185-220 degreesC; O-2 pressure, 0-12 bar; t, 15 min) were varied for their effect on total methane yield and digestion kinetics of digested biowaste....... Measured methane yields for raw yard waste, wet oxidized yard waste, raw food waste, and wet oxidized food waste were 345, 685, 536, and 571 mL of CH4/g of volatile suspended solids, respectively. Higher oxygen pressure during wet oxidation of digested biowaste considerably increased the total methane...

  17. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  18. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    The sensation of wetness is well-known but barely investigated. There are no specific wetness receptors in the skin, but the sensation is mediated by temperature and pressure perception. In our study, we have measured discrimination thresholds for the haptic perception of wetness of three di erent t

  19. Chelating fibers prepared with a wet spinning technique using a mixture of a viscose solution and a polymer ligand for the separation of metal ions in an aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagaya, Shigehiro; Miyazaki, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Yoshinori; Kato, Toshifumi; Yanai, Hideyuki; Kamichatani, Waka; Kajiwara, Takehiro; Saito, Mitsuru; Tohda, Koji

    2012-02-15

    Chelating fibers containing polymer ligands such as carboxymethylated polyallylamine, carboxymethylated polyethyleneimine, and a copolymer of diallylamine hydrochloride/maleic acid were prepared with a wet spinning technique using mixtures of a viscose solution and the polymer ligands. The chelating fibers obtained effectively adsorbed various metal ions, including Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Ni(II), Pb(II), Ti(IV), and Zn(II). The metal ions adsorbed could be readily desorbed using 0.1 or 0.5 mol L(-1) HNO(3). The chelating fiber containing carboxymethylated polyallylamine was available for the separation of some metal ions in synthetic wastewater containing a large amount of Na(2)SO(4). The wet spinning technique using a solution containing a base polymer and a polymer ligand was quite simple and effective and would be applicable for preparing various chelating fibers.

  20. Hydrodynamics of a Multistage Wet Scrubber Incineration Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, M. M.; Manyele, S. V.; Raphael, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the hydrodynamics of the two stage counter-current cascade wet scrubbers used during incineration of medical waste. The dependence of the hydrodynamics on two main variables was studied: Inlet air flow rate and inlet liquid flow rate. This study introduces a new wet scrubber operating features, which are…

  1. 催化湿式氧化技术处理苯并三氮唑生产废水的研究%Study on Adopting Catalytic Wet-type Oxidation Technology to Dispose Benzotriazole Production Waste Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常建勇; 刘伟

    2011-01-01

    Adopting catalytic wet-type Oxidation to dispose the high concentrated organic waste water produced during the production process of benzotriazole.The experiment demonstrates that the preparation of composite supported catalysts CuO-Co3O4-MnO2/ZrO2-CeO2 have better catalytic activity when disposing the waste water.Through the study of increasing the catalyst investment,reaction temperature,oxygen tension and the PH value of wastewater and other technological conditions,we obtain the optimum technological condition: When catalyst dosing quantity is 10 g/L,reaction temperature is 220℃,oxygen tension is 2.5MPa,the initial PH value of wastewater is 10.5,to react for 120 min under these conditions,CODcr removal rate can reach to 98.2%.%采用催化湿式氧化技术处理在生产苯并三氮唑(BTA)过程中产生的高浓度有机废水。实验证明:制备的复合负载型催化剂CuO-Co3O4-MnO2/ZrO2-CeO2在处理该废水时具有较好的催化活性。通过对催化剂投入增加、反应温度、氧气分压和废水pH值等工艺条件的考察,得出的最佳工艺条件为:催化剂投加量为10g/L,反应温度为220℃,氧气分压为2.5MPa,废水初始pH值为10.5,在此条件下反应120min,CODcr去除率达到98.2%。

  2. pH effects on the removal of Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} from aqueous solution by waste brewery biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, P.A.S.S.; Rosa, M.F. [Departamento de Energias Renovaveis, Inst. Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, Lisboa (Portugal); Pinheiro, H.M. [Centro de Engenharia Biologica e Quimica, Inst. Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2000-08-01

    An industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae collected from the waste of a brewing industry was used to remove lead, cadmium and copper from aqueous solutions (1 mm).Metal removal efficiency by using either biomass suspension directly diluted into the metal solutions or biomass previously incubated and washed in distilled water was compared. In all experiments with unwashed biomass a shift in the medium pH from 4.5 to a final value in the 7.0-8.0 range occurred. This pH increase was responsible for a metal precipitation effect associated to the metal biosorption. A very different pH profile was observed when washed biomass was used leading to different removal profiles for Cd{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} and a similar one for Cu{sup 2+}. In the absence of biomass, medium components and/or the excreted intracellular products proved to interfere in the metal removal and to be responsible for 80% Pb{sup 2+} precipitation, in the pH 4.5-5.0 range.To initial metal solution pH, leading to the lowest residual ion concentrations, after 96 h of contact with unwashed biomass and in the absence of pH adjustment, was 4.5-5.0. Continuous or stepwise adjustment of medium pH to this range during the process was unfavourable for metal removal, being the continuous adjustment the worst procedure. In this case, Cd{sup 2+} was not biosorbed and Cu{sup 2+} removal decreased from 76 to 33%. However, Pb{sup 2+} was always extensively removed (89%) and only slightly affected by pH control.The global results suggest different removal mechanisms for each cation. Cu{sup 2+} was removed by both metal sorption and precipitation, due to the pH shift that occurred during the process, while Cd{sup 2+} removal showed to be completely dependent of this pH shift. Pb{sup 2+} was totally and quickly removed, by precipitation, in the presence of the biomass suspension and at pH 4.5.Moreover, the biosorbent changes occurring during the process played an important role in the metal removal when non

  3. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... time was less important within the range studied. Nitrifying bacteria were used to measure the inhibition from wet oxidative-treated samples to study the effect of the (wet oxidation) reaction conditions. Wet oxidation made quinoline more toxic to Nitrosomonas. This was observed for Nitrobacter as well....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  4. Chloride interference in the analysis of dissolved organic carbon by the wet oxidation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, G.R.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of Cl- in concentrations greater than 0.02 M is shown to interfere with the analysis of aqueous DOC concentrations by the wet oxidation method of analysis when a reaction time of 5 min is employed. Chloride competes with DOC for S2O82-, lowering the overall oxidation efficiency. The resulting HOCl from the oxidation of Cl- reacts with DOC, producing significant amounts of chlorinated intermediate compounds in addition to CO2. These compounds were found in the waste effluent from the reaction chamber and in the gas stream transporting CO2 to the detector. While a possible Cl- effect has been noted for DOC measurements in the past, it has not previously been demonstrated to be a source of error at the concentrations reported in this paper. The interference can be overcome either by increasing the digestion time or by diluting samples to contain less than 0.02 M Cl-.

  5. WetVegEurope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landucci, Flavia; Řezníčková, Marcela; Šumberová, Kateřina; Hennekens, S.M.; Schaminée, J.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    WetVegEurope is a research project (http://www.sci.muni.cz/botany/vegsci/wetveg) whose goal is to provide a synthesized formalized classification of the aquatic and marsh vegetation across Europe at the level of phytosociological associations. In order to achieve the project objective, a WetVegEu

  6. Composition of municipal solid waste in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe

    the comparison of waste data with various objectives. Analysis revealed that Danish residual household waste constitutes mainly food waste (42 – 45% mass per wet basis). Misplaced recyclable materials in residual waste bins, such as paper, board, glass, metal and plastic, amounted to 20% (mass per wet basis...... on the environment when they are not disposed of appropriately. Statistical analysis indicated that separating food waste residue from packaging during waste sorting was unnecessary, because this separation did not significantly influence overall waste composition, the percentage of food waste or packaging waste...... scheme), although socio-economic aspects between municipalities were not analysed. Food waste consists of avoidable and unavoidable food waste. Here, “avoidable” food waste is defined as food that could be eaten but instead was thrown away regardless of the reason, whereas “unavoidable” food waste...

  7. Wet Work and Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartasch, Manigé

    2016-01-01

    Wet work defined as unprotected exposure to humid environments/water; high frequencies of hand washing procedures or prolonged glove occlusion is believed to cause irritant contact dermatitis in a variety of occupations. This review considers the recent studies on wet-work exposure and focuses on its influence on barrier function. There are different methods to study the effect of wet work on barrier function. On the one hand, occupational cohorts at risk can be monitored prospectively by skin bioengineering technology and clinical visual scoring systems; on the other hand, experimental test procedures with defined application of water, occlusion and detergents are performed in healthy volunteers. Both epidemiological studies and the results of experimental procedures are compared and discussed. A variety of epidemiological studies analyze occupational cohorts at risk. The measurement of transepidermal water loss, an indicator of the integrity of the epidermal barrier, and clinical inspection of the skin have shown that especially the frequencies of hand washing and water contact/contact to aqueous mixtures seem to be the main factors for the occurrence of barrier alterations. On the other hand, in a single cross-sectional study, prolonged glove wearing (e.g. occlusion for 6 h per shift in clean-room workers) without exposure to additional hazardous substances seemed not to affect the skin negatively. But regarding the effect of occlusion, there is experimental evidence that previously occluded skin challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate leads to an increased susceptibility to the irritant with an aggravation of the irritant reaction. These findings might have relevance for the real-life situation in so far as after occupational glove wearing, the skin is more susceptible to potential hazards to the skin even during leisure hours.

  8. Wetting and adsorption modification in the system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Bogdanova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Regularities of wetting and adsorption modification of surfaces of continual membranes made from highly permeable glassy polymers poly[1-(trimethylsilyl-1-propyne] (PTMSP and poly(4-methyl-2-pentyn (PMP with aqueous ethanol solutions and alcohol solutions containing organic dyes (Solvent Blue 35 and Remazol Brilliant Blue were investigated. Isotherms of stress wetting of polymer membrane surface by etanol solutions were found out to have maximums in the range of concentrations corresponding to the beginning of liquid sorption into the membrane and polymer swelling. Thus, the principal possibility of optimization of nanofiltration experiments by liquid wetting angle measurements on continuous polymer membrane surfaces was shown. The presence of the dye was shown not to affect PMP wetting. But in the case of PTMSP, it leads to shear of the maximum of stress wetting isotherms to the range of higher concentrations. It was found out the effectiveness of the adsorption surface modification of continuous polymer membrane surfaces by ethanol solutions containing dyes does not dependent on chemical nature of the dye. At the same time, there are different trends in the energy characteristics of the membrane surface.

  9. Copper on activated carbon for catalytic wet air oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Dolores Martínez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is an important source of water contamination. Some of the organic contaminants cannot be eliminated by nature in a reasonable period. Heterogeneous catalytic wet air oxidation is one of the most effective methods to purify wastewater with organic contaminants. In this work, catalysts based on copper supported on activated carbon were synthesized. The activated carbons were obtained from industrial wastes (apricot core and grape stalk of San Juan, Argentina. These were impregnated with a copper salt and thermically treated in an inert atmosphere. Analysis of specific surface, pore volume, p zc, acidity, basicity and XRD patterns were made in order to characterize the catalysts. The catalytic activity was tested in the oxidation of methylene blue (MB and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA in aqueous phase with pure oxygen. Reaction tests were carried out in a Parr batch reactor at different temperatures, with a 0.2 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. The amount of unconverted organics was measured by spectrophotometry. Higher temperatures were necessary for the degradation of PVA compared to those for methylene blue.

  10. USING WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY TO DESTROY TETRAPHENYLBORATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Daniel McCabe, D; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-04

    A bench-scale feasibility study on the use of a Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) process to destroy a slurry laden with tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds has been undertaken. WAO is an aqueous phase process in which soluble and/or insoluble waste constituents are oxidized using oxygen or oxygen in air at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 C and 1 MPa to 320 C and 22 MPa. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). Test results indicate WAO is a feasible process for destroying TPB, its primary daughter products [triphenylborane (3PB), diphenylborinic acid (2PB), and phenylboronic acid (1PB)], phenol, and most of the biphenyl byproduct. The required conditions are a temperature of 300 C, a reaction time of 3 hours, 1:1 feed slurry dilution with 2M NaOH solution, the addition of CuSO{sub 4}.5H{sub 2}O solution (500 mg/L Cu) as catalyst, and the addition of 2000 mL/L of antifoam. However, for the destruction of TPB, its daughter compounds (3PB, 2PB, and 1PB), and phenol without consideration for biphenyl destruction, less severe conditions (280 C and 1-hour reaction time with similar remaining above conditions) are adequate.

  11. Wetting Transition in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, S. R.; Khalil, M.; Taborek, P.

    2013-11-01

    Optical images were used to study the wetting behavior of water on graphite, sapphire, and quartz along the liquid vapor coexistence curve from room temperature to 300°C. Wetting transitions were identified by the temperature at which the contact angle decreased to zero and also by the disappearance of dropwise condensation. These two methods yielded consistent values for the wetting temperatures, which were 185°C, 234°C, and 271°C for water on quartz, sapphire, and graphite, respectively. We compare our results with the theoretical predictions based on a simplified model of the water-substrate potential and sharp interfaces.

  12. Pitch Wetting on Model Basal and Edge-Plane Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-04

    spin coating and then utilize the films as model substrates for pitch wetting studies. Experimental Films from indanthrone disulfonate (Optiva...Inc. South San Francisco) were formed on quartz from 7.5 wt% aqueous solution either by spin coating (rotation rate: 500 rmp for 20 seconds and then...formed by spin coating (Figs. 3,4) and Meyer-bar-coating (Fig. 5) of indanthrone disulfonate aqueous solutions followed by drying and direct

  13. Adsorption and wetting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlangen, L.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Adsorption and wetting are related phenomena. In order to improve knowledge of both and their relations, experiments, thermodynamics and a theoretical interpretation have been connected, starring n-alkanes.Starting from the Gibbs adsorption equation thermodynamic relations between vapour adsorption

  14. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  15. WET STRENGTH PAPER REPULPING:LABORATORY EVALUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nishi K. Bhardwaj; Vikas Rajan; A.G. Kulkarni

    2004-01-01

    The recycling of wet strength papers in a normal recycling mill is often troublesome due to the severe operating conditions required to defibre wet strength papers. The various methods are presented which will quickly allow mills to determine the most effective pulping aids to use when repulping wet strength papers. The repulping of wet strength paper with inorganic chemicals was investigated in the laboratory. The effects of major variables, that is,repulping time, pulp consistency, soaking time,temperature, and reactant concentration in the repulping stage were examined using Plackett-Burman design. The repulping time was the most crucial & influential process variable affecting repulping characteristic and formation related properties. The more significant repulping process variables affecting pulp yield were repulping time,soaking temperature and pulp consistency whereas for formation index and feature size, repulping time,pulp consistency, soaking temperature and time were the more important variables. The formation index is increased by an increase in repulping time, pulp consistency and soaking time whereas the feature size is decreased by an increase in repulping time,soaking temperature and pulp consistency. The formation index and the rejects were more sensitive to changes in process variables than were the feature size or the pulp yield. The pulp recycled from wet strength waste paper had good physical strength properties.

  16. Hydrothermal carbonization of biomass residuals: A comparative review of the chemistry, processes and applications of wet and dry pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reviews chemistry, processes and application of hydrothermcally carbonized biomass wastes. Potential feedstock for the hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) includes variety of the non-traditional renewable wet agricultural and municipal waste streams. Pyrolysis and HTC show a comparable calor...

  17. Wrinkling of wet paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Jungchul; Mahadevan, L.

    2011-11-01

    It is a mundane experience that paper stained with water wrinkles. It is because a wetted portion of paper, which swells due to the hygroexpansive nature of the cellulose fiber network, deforms out of its original plane. Here we quantify the dynamics of wrinkling of wet paper coupled to the capillary imbibition of water into paper using a combination of experiment and theory. While supplying water from a capillary tube that touches the center of a paper strip, we measure the spreading rate of the wet area, wait time for the out-of-plane buckling, and temporal growth of a wrinkling magnitude. Using a theoretical model assuming a linear increase of the strain and an exponential decay of the elastic modulus with the water concentration, we construct scaling laws to predict the simultaneous capillary imbibition and wrinkling rates. This work was supported by the Wyss Institute of Harvard University.

  18. Stable, Electroinactive Wetting Agent For Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Surya G.; Olah, George A.; Narayanan, Sekharipuram R.; Surampudi, Subbarao; Halpert, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Straight-chain perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (C8 acid) identified as innocuous and stable wetting agent for use with polytetrafluoroethylene-containing electrodes in liquid-feed direct-oxidation fuel cells suggested for use in vehicles and portable power supplies. C8 acid in small concentrations in aqueous liquid solutions of methanol, trimethoxymethane, dimethoxymethane, and trioxane enables oxidation of these substances by use of commercially available electrodes of type designed originally for use with gases. This function specific to C8 acid molecule and not achieved by other related perfluorolkanesulfonic acids.

  19. Treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewater by wet air oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Luan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wet air oxidation (WAO is one of the most economical and environmentally-friendly advanced oxidation processes. It makes a promising technology for the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters. In wet air oxidation aqueous waste is oxidized in the liquid phase at high temperatures (125–320 °C and pressures (0.5–20 MPa in the presence of an oxygen-containing gas (usually air. The advantages of the process include low operating costs and minimal air pollution discharges. The present review is concerned about the literature published in the treatment of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters, such as dyes. Phenolics were taken as model pollutants in most cases. Reports on effect of treatment for the WAO of refractory organic pollutants in industrial wastewaters are reviewed, such as emulsified wastewater, TNT red water, etc. Discussions are also made on the mechanism and kinetics of WAO and main technical parameters influencing WAO. Finally, development direction of WAO is summed up.

  20. Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (NZVI) supported on sineguelas waste for Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution: kinetics, thermodynamic and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi, M; Soleymanzadeh, M; Salvacion, J W L; SalimiVahid, F

    2014-07-15

    In this study, the synthesis and characterization of a new adsorbent containing nanoscale zerovalent iron particles (NZVI) decorated sineguelas waste (S-NaOH-NZVI) from agriculture biomass was investigated for the adsorption/reduction of inorganic pollution such as Pb(II) ions. The combination of ZVI particles on the surface of sineguelas waste can help to overcome the disadvantage of ultra-fine powders which may have strong tendency to agglomerate into larger particles, resulting in an adverse effect on both effective surface area and catalyst performance. The synthesized materials were characterized with different methods such as FT-IR, BET, XRD, TEM and pHPZC. Good dispersion of NZVI particles (ca. 10-70nm) on the sineguelas waste was observed. The effects of various parameters, such as contact time, pH, concentration, adsorbent dosage and temperature were studied. The adsorption of Pb(II) ions has been studied in terms of pseudo-first- and second-order kinetics, and the Freundlich, Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherms models have also been used to the equilibrium adsorption data. The adsorption kinetics followed the mechanism of the pseudo-second-order equation. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔG, ΔH and ΔS) indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) ions were feasible, spontaneous and endothermic at 25-80°C. XRD analysis indicated the presence of Pb(0) on the S-NaOH-NZVI surface. This study suggests that the modified sineguelas waste by NZVI particles can be prepared at low cost and the materials are environmentally benign for the removal of Pb(II) ions, and likely many other heavy metal ions, from water.

  1. Use of waste materials--Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya, as potential adsorbents for the removal of Amaranth from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Alok; Kurup Krishnan, Lisha; Gupta, Vinod K

    2005-01-31

    Bottom Ash, a power plan t waste material and De-Oiled Soya, an agriculture waste product were successfully utilized in removing trisodium 2-hydroxy-1-(4-sulphonato-1-naphthylazo)naphthalene-3,6-disulphonate--a water-soluble hazardous azo dye (Amaranth). The paper incorporates thermodynamic and kinetic studies for the adsorption of the dye on these two waste materials as adsorbents. Characterization of each adsorbent was carried out by I.R. and D.T.A. curves. Batch adsorption studies were made by measuring effects of pH, adsorbate concentration, sieve size, adsorbent dosage, contact time, temperature etc. Specific rate constants for the processes were calculated by kinetic measurements and a first order adsorption kinetics was observed in each case. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were applied to calculate thermodynamic parameters. The adsorption on Bottom Ash takes place via film diffusion process at lower concentrations and via particle diffusion process at higher concentrations, while in the case of De-Oiled Soya process only particle diffusion takes place in the entire concentration range.

  2. Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1993-08-01

    High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

  3. High removal efficacy of Hg(II) and MeHg(II) ions from aqueous solution by organoalkoxysilane-grafted lignocellulosic waste biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saman, Norasikin; Johari, Khairiraihanna; Song, Shiow-Tien; Kong, Helen; Cheu, Siew-Chin; Mat, Hanapi

    2017-03-01

    An effective organoalkoxysilanes-grafted lignocellulosic waste biomass (OS-LWB) adsorbent aiming for high removal towards inorganic and organic mercury (Hg(II) and MeHg(II)) ions was prepared. Organoalkoxysilanes (OS) namely mercaptoproyltriethoxylsilane (MPTES), aminopropyltriethoxylsilane (APTES), aminoethylaminopropyltriethoxylsilane (AEPTES), bis(triethoxysilylpropyl) tetrasulfide (BTESPT), methacrylopropyltrimethoxylsilane (MPS) and ureidopropyltriethoxylsilane (URS) were grafted onto the LWB using the same conditions. The MPTES grafted lignocellulosic waste biomass (MPTES-LWB) showed the highest adsorption capacity towards both mercury ions. The adsorption behavior of inorganic and organic mercury ions (Hg(II) and MeHg(II)) in batch adsorption studies shows that it was independent with pH of the solutions and dependent on initial concentration, temperature and contact time. The maximum adsorption capacity of Hg(II) was greater than MeHg(II) which respectively followed the Temkin and Langmuir models. The kinetic data analysis showed that the adsorptions of Hg(II) and MeHg(II) onto MPTES-LWB were respectively controlled by the physical process of film diffusion and the chemical process of physisorption interactions. The overall mechanism of Hg(II) and MeHg(II) adsorption was a combination of diffusion and chemical interaction mechanisms. Regeneration results were very encouraging especially for the Hg(II); this therefore further demonstrated the potential application of organosilane-grafted lignocellulosic waste biomass as low-cost adsorbents for mercury removal process.

  4. Wet chemical synthesis of soluble gold nanogaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Titoo; Tang, Qingxin; Bjørnholm, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    NRs) in aqueous solution. Through controlled end-to-end assembly of the AuNRs into dimers or chains, facilitated via target molecules, they can be used as electrical contacts. In this way, the preparation of AuNR-molecule-AuNR junctions by wet chemical methods may afford a large number of identical devices...... with little variation in the interface between molecule and electrode (AuNR). In this Account, we highlight recent progress in using chemically synthesized AuNRs as building blocks for molecular electronic applications. We outline the general synthesis and properties of AuNRs and describe the aqueous growth...... in the nanogaps lets us spectroscopically characterize the molecules via surface-enhanced Raman scattering. We discuss the incorporation of oligopeptides functionalized with acetylene units having uniquely identifiable vibrational modes. This acetylene moiety allows chemical reactions to be performed in the gaps...

  5. Removal of organic dyes using Cr-containing activated carbon prepared from leather waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luiz C A; Coura, Camila Van Zanten; Guimarães, Iara R; Gonçalves, Maraisa

    2011-09-15

    In this work, hydrogen peroxide decomposition and oxidation of organics in aqueous medium were studied in the presence of activated carbon prepared from wet blue leather waste. The wet blue leather waste, after controlled pyrolysis under CO(2) flow, was transformed into chromium-containing activated carbons. The carbon with Cr showed high microporous surface area (up to 889 m(2)g(-1)). Moreover, the obtained carbon was impregnated with nanoparticles of chromium oxide from the wet blue leather. The chromium oxide was nanodispersed on the activated carbon, and the particle size increased with the activation time. It is proposed that these chromium species on the carbon can activate H(2)O(2) to generate HO radicals, which can lead to two competitive reactions, i.e. the hydrogen peroxide decomposition or the oxidation of organics in water. In fact, in this work we observed that activated carbon obtained from leather waste presented high removal of methylene blue dye combining the adsorption and oxidation processes.

  6. Wetting of real surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward Yu

    2013-01-01

    The problem of wetting and drop dynamics on various surfaces is very interesting from both the scientificas well as thepractical viewpoint, and subject of intense research.The results are scattered across papers in journals, sothis workwill meet the need for a unifying, comprehensive work.

  7. Wet Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... macular degeneration Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Wet macular degeneration is a chronic eye disease that causes blurred vision or a blind spot in your visual field. It's generally caused by abnormal blood vessels that leak fluid or blood into ... macular degeneration is one of two types of age-related ...

  8. A Comparative Study of Chromium and Cadmium Removal from Their Common Aqueous Solution by Batch Operation Using Tea Factory Waste as Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibesh Datta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of adsorption is a powerful tool for the treatment of industrial wastewater. In the recent years many studies have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of various locally available economical adsorbents for the removal of various heavy metals from the waste water. In the present study tea factory waste is used as adsorbent and its capacity to remove toxic heavy metals chromium and cadmium from their combined solution is investigated. Batch adsorption study is conducted to find the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent and the effect of the three important process parameters, i.e. agitation rate, adsorbent dose and initial metal ion concentration is evaluated. The maximum adsorption capacity of 24.88 mg/g and 23.92 mg/g is observed in case of cadmium and chromium respectively. It is also found that the removal efficiency of cadmium is higher than that of chromium in all cases. The experimental results are also found to be well fitted in the Langmuir and Freundlich Isotherm model.

  9. An effective adsorbent developed from municipal solid waste and coal co-combustion ash for As(V) removal from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yun; Zhang, Fu-Shen; Feng, Yinan

    2008-11-30

    A new adsorbent was developed from waste ash resulting from municipal solid waste and coal co-combustion power plant. The ash was firstly subjected to hydrothermal treatment for zeolite synthesis, and then modified with iron(II) ions by agitation (ISZ) or ultrasonic (UISZ) treatment. The effect of operating factors such as pH, contact time, initial As(V) concentration and adsorbent dosage was investigated and the optimum operating conditions were established. The adsorption capacity for As(V) onto UISZ and ISZ were 13.04 and 5.37 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorption isotherm data could be well described by Langmuir isotherm model. The optimum initial pH values for As(V) removal were 2.5 and 2.5-10.0 by ISZ and UISZ, respectively. The results indicated that ultrasound treatment scattered the particles of the adsorbent uniformly, which was in favor of impregnating iron ions into pores. Leaching of hazardous elements from the used adsorbents was very low. Accordingly, it is believed that the adsorbents developed in this study are environmentally acceptable and industrially applicable for utilization in arsenic-containing wastewater treatment.

  10. Preliminary Evaluation of Cesium Distribution for Wet Sieving Process Planned for Soil Decontamination in Japan - 13104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enokida, Y.; Tanada, Y.; Hirabayashi, D. [Graduate School of Engineering, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan); Sawada, K. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, 1 Furo-cho Nagoya-shi, Aichi-ken, 4648603 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    For the purpose of decontaminating radioactive cesium from a huge amount of soil, which has been estimated to be 1.2x10{sup 8} m{sup 3} by excavating to a 5-cm depth from the surface of Fukushima Prefecture where a severe nuclear accident occurred at TEPCO's power generating site and has emitted a significant amount of radioactive materials, mainly radioactive cesium, a wet sieving process was selected as one of effective methods available in Japan. Some private companies have demonstrated this process for soil treatment in the Fukushima area by testing at their plants. The results were very promising, and a full-fledged application is expected to follow. In the present study, we spiked several aqueous samples containing soil collected from an industrial wet sieving plant located near our university for the recycling of construction wastes with non-radioactive cesium hydroxide. The present study provides scientific data concerning the effectiveness in volume reduction of the contaminated soil by a wet sieving process as well as the cesium distribution between the liquid phase and clay minerals for each sub-process of the full-scale one, but a simulating plant equipped with a process of coagulating sedimentation and operational safety fundamentals for the plant. Especially for the latter aspect, the study showed that clay minerals of submicron size strongly bind a high content of cesium, which was only slightly removed by coagulation with natural sedimentation (1 G) nor centrifugal sedimentation (3,700 G) and some of the cesium may be transferred to the effluent or recycled water. By applying ultracentrifugation (257,000 G), most of submicron clay minerals containing cesium was removed, and the cesium amount which might be transferred to the effluent or recycled water, could be reduced to less than 2.3 % of the original design by the addition of a cesium barrier consisting of ultracentrifugation or a hollow fiber membrane. (authors)

  11. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-03-25

    The yield locus, tensile strength and fracture mechanisms of wet granular materials were studied. The yield locus of a wet material was shifted to the left of that of the dry specimen by a constant value equal to the compressive isostatic stress due to pendular bridges. for materials with straight yield loci, the shift was computed from the uniaxial tensile strength, either measured in a tensile strength tester or calculated from the correlation, and the angle of internal friction of the material. The predicted shift in the yield loci due to different moisture contents compare well with the measured shift in the yield loci of glass beads, crushed limestone, super D catalyst and Leslie coal. Measurement of the void fraction during the shear testing was critical to obtain the correct tensile strength theoretically or experimentally.

  12. Writing on wet paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridrich, Jessica; Goljan, Miroslav; Lisonek, Petr; Soukal, David

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we show that the communication channel known as writing in memory with defective cells is a relevant information-theoretical model for a specific case of passive warden steganography when the sender embeds a secret message into a subset C of the cover object X without sharing the selection channel C with the recipient. The set C could be arbitrary, determined by the sender from the cover object using a deterministic, pseudo-random, or a truly random process. We call this steganography "writing on wet paper" and realize it using low-density random linear codes with the encoding step based on the LT process. The importance of writing on wet paper for covert communication is discussed within the context of adaptive steganography and perturbed quantization steganography. Heuristic arguments supported by tests using blind steganalysis indicate that the wet paper steganography provides improved steganographic security for embedding in JPEG images and is less vulnerable to attacks when compared to existing methods with shared selection channels.

  13. Corrosion of copper containers prior to saturation of a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F.; Kolar, M

    1997-12-01

    The buffer material surrounding the containers in a Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal vault will partially desiccate as a result of the elevated temperature at the container surface. This will lead to a period of corrosion in a moist air atmosphere. Corrosion will either take the form of slow oxidation if the container surface remains dry or aqueous electrochemical corrosion if the surface is wetted by a thin liquid film. The relevant literature is reviewed, from which it is concluded that corrosion should be uniform in nature, except if the surface is wetted, in which case localized corrosion is a possibility. A quantitative analysis of the extent and rate of uniform corrosion during the unsaturated period is presented. Two bounding cases are considered: first, the case of slow oxidation in moist air following either logarithmic or parabolic oxide-growth kinetics and, second, the case of electrochemically based corrosion occurring in a thin liquid film uninhibited by the growth of corrosion products. (author)

  14. 40 CFR 227.30 - High-level radioactive waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-level radioactive waste. 227.30...-level radioactive waste. High-level radioactive waste means the aqueous waste resulting from the operation of the first cycle solvent extraction system, or equivalent, and the concentrated waste...

  15. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  16. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M. [Delphi Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials.

  17. Biosorption of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by Solanum melongena leaf powder as a low-cost biosorbent prepared from agricultural waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvaraja, Gutha; Krishnaiah, Nettem; Subbaiah, Munagapati Venkata; Krishnaiah, Abburi

    2014-02-01

    Solanum melongena leaves are relatively galore and used as inexpensive material. This paper presents the characterization and evaluation of potential of S. melongena leaf powder (SMLP) for removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution as a function of pH, biomass dosage, initial metal ion concentration, contact time and temperature. Experimental data were analyzed in terms of three kinetic models such as the pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models and the results showed that the biosorption processes of Pb(II) followed well pseudo-second-order kinetics. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were applied to describe the biosorption process. Langmuir isotherm described the equilibrium data very well, with a maximum monolayer sorption capacity of 71.42 mg/g for Pb(II) ions at 323 K. The biosorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature with negative ΔG° (-8.746, -8.509 and -7.983 kJ/mol) and positive value for ΔH° (3.698 kJ/mol).

  18. Utilization of waste product (tamarind seeds) for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions: equilibrium, kinetics, and regeneration studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Suresh; Babu, B V

    2009-07-01

    In the present study, an adsorbent was prepared from tamarind seeds and used after activation for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The tamarind seeds were activated by treating them with concentrated sulfuric acid (98% w/w) at a temperature of 150 degrees C. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was found to be maximum at low values of initial pH in the range of 1-3. The adsorption process of Cr(VI) was tested with Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Koble-Corrigan, Tempkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Generalized isotherm models. Application of the Langmuir isotherm to the system yielded a maximum adsorption capacity of 29.7 mg/g at an equilibrium pH value ranging from 1.12 to 1.46. The adsorption process followed second-order kinetics and the corresponding rate constants obtained were 2.605 x 10(-3), 0.818 x 10(-3), 0.557 x 10(-3) and 0.811 x 10(-3) g/mg min(-1) for 50, 200, 300 and 400 mg/L of initial Cr(VI) concentration, respectively. The regenerated activated tamarind seeds showed more than 95% Cr(VI) removal of that obtained using the fresh activated tamarind seeds. A feasible solution is proposed for the disposal of the contaminants (acid and base solutions) containing high concentrations of Cr(VI) obtained during the regeneration (desorption) process.

  19. Removal of hazardous azopyrazole dye from an aqueous solution using rice straw as a waste adsorbent: Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bindary, Ashraf A; El-Sonbati, Adel Z; Al-Sarawy, Ahmad A; Mohamed, Khaled S; Farid, Mansour A

    2015-02-05

    In this research, activated carbonmade from rice straw (ACRS) was synthesized simply by a low cost and nontoxic procedure and used for the adsorption of hazardous azopyrazole dye. The effect of different variables in the batch method as a function of solution pH, contact time, concentration of adsorbate, adsorbent dosage and temperature were investigated and optimal experimental conditions were ascertaine. Surface modification of ACRS using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was obtained. More than 75% removal efficiency was obtained within 75min at adsorbent dose of 0.5g for initial dye concentration of 30-100mgL(-1) at pH 3. The experimental equilibrium data were tested by the isotherm models namely, Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption and the isotherm constants were determined. The kinetic data obtained with different initial concentration and temperature were analyzed using a pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order equations. The activation energy of adsorption was also evaluated and found to be +13.25kJmol(-1) indicating that the adsorption is physisorption. The thermodynamics of the adsorption indicated spontaneous and exothermic nature of the process. The results indicate that ACRS could be employed as low-cost material for the removal of acid dyes from aqueous solution.

  20. Droplet activation of wet particles: development of the Wet CCN approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nakao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Relationships between critical supersaturation required for activation and particle dry diameter have been the primary means for experimentally characterizing cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity; however, use of the dry diameter inherently limits the application to cases where the dry diameter can be used to accurately estimate solute volume. This study challenges the requirement and proposes a new experimental approach, Wet CCN, for studying CCN activity without the need for a drying step. The new approach directly measures Köhler curves under sub-saturated conditions. The experimental setup consists of a humidity-controlled differential mobility analyzer and a CCN counter; wet diameter equilibrated at known relative humidity is used to characterize CCN activity instead of the dry diameter. The experimental approach was validated against ammonium sulfate, glucose and non-spherical ammonium oxalate monohydrate. Further, the approach was applied to a mixture of non-spherical iodine oxide particles. The Wet CCN approach successfully determined the hygroscopicity of non-spherical particles by collapsing them into spherical, deliquesced droplets. We further show that the Wet CCN approach offers unique insights to the physical and chemical impacts of the aqueous phase on CCN activity; a potential application is to investigate the impact of evaporation/co-condensation of water-soluble semi-volatile species on CCN activity.

  1. Droplet activation of wet particles: development of the Wet CCN approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, S.; Suda, S. R.; Camp, M.; Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2014-07-01

    Relationships between critical supersaturation required for activation and particle dry diameter have been the primary means for experimentally characterizing cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity; however, use of the dry diameter inherently limits the application to cases where the dry diameter can be used to accurately estimate solute volume. This study challenges the requirement and proposes a new experimental approach, Wet CCN, for studying CCN activity without the need for a drying step. The new approach directly measures the subsaturated portion of the Köhler curves. The experimental setup consists of a humidity-controlled differential mobility analyzer and a CCN counter; wet diameter equilibrated at known relative humidity is used to characterize CCN activity instead of the dry diameter. The experimental approach was validated against ammonium sulfate, glucose, and nonspherical ammonium oxalate monohydrate. Further, the approach was applied to a mixture of nonspherical iodine oxide particles. The Wet CCN approach successfully determined the hygroscopicity of nonspherical particles by collapsing them into spherical, deliquesced droplets. We further show that the Wet CCN approach offers unique insights into the physical and chemical impacts of the aqueous phase on CCN activity; a potential application is to investigate the impact of evaporation/co-condensation of water-soluble semivolatile species on CCN activity.

  2. Wetting in Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ian Bruce

    Colorimetric litmus tests such as pH paper have enjoyed wide commercial success due to their inexpensive production and exceptional ease of use. However, expansion of colorimetry to new sensing paradigms is challenging because macroscopic color changes are seldom coupled to arbitrary differences in the physical/chemical properties of a system. In this thesis I present in detail the development of Wetting in Color Technology, focusing primarily on its application as an inexpensive and highly selective colorimetric indicator for organic liquids. The technology exploits chemically-encoded inverse-opal photonic crystals to control the infiltration of fluids to liquid-specific spatial patterns, projecting minute differences in liquids' wettability to macroscopically distinct, easy-to-visualize structural color patterns. It is shown experimentally and corroborated with theoretical modeling using percolation theory that the high selectivity of wetting, upon-which the sensitivity of the indicator relies, is caused by the highly symmetric structure of our large-area, defect-free SiO2 inverse-opals. The regular structure also produces a bright iridescent color, which disappears when infiltrated with liquid - naturally coupling the optical and fluidic responses. Surface modification protocols are developed, requiring only silanization and selective oxidation, to facilitate the deterministic design of an indicator that differentiates a broad range of liquids. The resulting tunable, built-in horizontal and vertical chemistry gradients allow the wettability threshold to be tailored to specific liquids across a continuous range, and make the readout rely only on countable color differences. As wetting is a generic fluidic phenomenon, Wetting in Color technology could be suitable for applications in authentication or identification of unknown liquids across a broad range of industries. However, the generic nature of the response also ensures chemical non-specificity. It is shown

  3. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Removal of reactive dyes from aqueous solutions by a non-conventional and low cost agricultural waste: adsorption on ash of Aloe Vera plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dyes are an important class of pollutants and disposal of them in precious water resources must be avoided. Among various methods adsorption occupies a prominent place in dye removal. The aim of this study is to evaluate adsorption of dye Reactive Red 198 and Blue 19 (RR-198 & RB-19 (on to Aloe Vera plant ash from aqueous solutions. In this research Aloe Vera ash was prepared at laboratory conditions and then after shredding, screened by ASTM standard sieve with 60 -200 mesh sizes and the effects of pH (3-12, adsorbent dose (0.1-1 g/L, contact time (10-60 min, initial dye concentration (10-160 mg/L and temperature were investigated in the experiment. In different samples Dye concentration was measured by spectrophotometer at 592 nm and 520 nm wavelength for RR198 and RB19 respectively. Also the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were determined in order to describe the relations between the colored solutions and the adsorbent. The results of this study showed that acidic conditions were more conducive to enhance the hydrolysis rate than basic ones as the decomposition was optimum at pH 3. The adsorption rate of RR-198 and RB-19 dyes was increased by increasing of initial dye concentration, increasing of adsorbent dose in 0.1 to 0.4 mg/L. Dye solution was decolorized in a relatively short time (20 min. The efficiencies for RR-198 and RB- 19 reactive dyes were 82.68% and 90.42% respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax has been found to be 80.152 mg/g for RR-198 reactive dye and 88.452 mg/g for Blue 19 reactive dye. Adsorption isotherms were examined by Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm that finally showed the Freundlich multilayer isotherm has better accordance with dates. The results indicate that Aloe Vera ash plant as a natural and inexpensive adsorbent is a suitable adsorbent for the adsorption of textile dyes.

  6. Management of agricultural waste for removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution: adsorption behaviors, adsorption mechanisms, environmental protection, and techno-economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhafez, S E Abd; Hamad, H A; Zaatout, A A; Malash, G F

    2017-01-01

    In the last decades, Egypt has been suffering from the phenomenon of black cloud resulting from burning rice husk and increasing the demand for water leading to the water crisis. An alternative, low-value and surplus agricultural byproduct (rice husk, RH) has an enormous potential for the removal of Cu(II) ions from water. The present study focuses on the chance of the use of rice husk as a bio-adsorbent without any chemical treatment instead of burning it and soiling the environment. The elemental, structural, morphological, surface functional, thermal, and textural characteristics of RH are determined by XRF, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, TGA, and BET surface area, respectively, and contributed to the understanding of the adsorption mechanism of Cu(II) ions in aqueous solution. Also, the performance analysis, adsorption mechanism, influencing factors, favorable conditions, etc. are discussed in this article. The results obtained from optimization by batch mode are achieved under the following conditions: initial concentration, 150 ppm; amount of rice husk, 1 g; average particle size, 0.25 mm; temperature, 25 °C; pH, 4; agitation rate, 180 rpm; and contact time, 60 min. RH exhibits a high degree of selectivity for Cu(II) adsorption. The adsorption isotherm is fitted well with Langmuir and Freundlich models with R (2) 0.998 and 0.997, respectively. The adsorption is well governed by the pseudo-second-order kinetics. It is observed that the rate of adsorption improves with decreasing temperature, and the process is exothermic and non-spontaneous. Particular attention has being paid to factors as production processes, fixed/operational cost, production cost, and profit. The techno-economical analysis is presented in this study that provides precise demands on capital for a fixed investment, provisions for operational capital, and finally provisions for revenue. The social, economical, and environmental benefits by industrial point of view using low-cost adsorbent are also

  7. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Kolovratník Michal; Bartoš Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  8. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolovratník Michal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  9. Wetting and Minimal Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bachas, C; Wiese, K J; Bachas, Constantin; Doussal, Pierre Le; Wiese, Kay Joerg

    2006-01-01

    We study minimal surfaces which arise in wetting and capillarity phenomena. Using conformal coordinates, we reduce the problem to a set of coupled boundary equations for the contact line of the fluid surface, and then derive simple diagrammatic rules to calculate the non-linear corrections to the Joanny-de Gennes energy. We argue that perturbation theory is quasi-local, i.e. that all geometric length scales of the fluid container decouple from the short-wavelength deformations of the contact line. This is illustrated by a calculation of the linearized interaction between contact lines on two opposite parallel walls. We present a simple algorithm to compute the minimal surface and its energy based on these ideas. We also point out the intriguing singularities that arise in the Legendre transformation from the pure Dirichlet to the mixed Dirichlet-Neumann problem.

  10. Wet solids flow enhancemant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caram, H.S.; Foster, N.; Wildman, D.J. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    WE used glass beads of different sizes as.a model system to study the flow enhancing properties of Octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS). 0TS provides Si(CH{sub 2}){sub 17}CH{sub 3} groups that bind with the surface hydrox groups to make it hydrophobic. Experimental data showed, indeed, that surface hydrophobicity promotes the flow of wet granular materials. Mixtures of different percentage of silanized/unsilanized particles were prepared for tensile strength measurements. The tensile strength decreased as more silanized particles were added to the samples. The relationship between dimensionless tensile strength and void fraction followed the correlation found by Pierrat (1994). Contact angles were larger for the silanized particles, as compared with unsilanized ones.

  11. Wet and Dry Anaerobic Digestion of Biowaste and of Co-substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chaoran

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of municipal solid waste by anaerobic digestion can solve the environmental problems caused by this organic solid waste and also supply biogas as renewable energy for a sustainable development. In this study the improvement of wet anaerobic digestion by addition of co-substrates and the effect of moisture on dry anaerobic digestion were investigated.

  12. Sorption of Cd2+ Ions From Aqueous Solutions on Organic Wastes / Sorpcja Jonów Cd2+ Z Roztworów Wodnych Na Odpadach Organicznych

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bożęcka, Agnieszka; Sanak-Rydlewska, Stanisława

    2015-09-01

    This article presents the results of research on the Cd2+ ions sorption from model aqueous solutions on sunflower hulls, walnut shells and plum stones. The effect of various factors, such as mass of the natural sorbent, the pH, the time and the temperature was studied. The process of Cd2+ ions sorption on studied sorbents was described by the Langmuir model. The best sorption capacity has been achieved for sunflower hulls. The maximum sorption capacity for this material was 19.93 mg/g. W artykule przedstawiono wyniki badań, które dotyczyły usuwania jonów Cd2+ z modelowych roztworów wodnych za pomocą odpadów organicznych, takich jak: łuski słonecznika, łupiny orzecha włoskiego i pestki śliwek. Wykazano, iż badane materiały mogą być skutecznie wykorzystywane do usuwania jonów Cd2+ z modelowych roztworów wodnych w układach jednoskładnikowych. Dla badanego zakresu stężeń i przyjętych warunków procesu sorpcji w układach jednoskładnikowych, największą wydajność sorpcji jonów Cd2+, osiągnięto dla łuszczyn słonecznika. Wyniosła ona 81,75-93,02%. Dla pozostałych materiałów sorpcja jest nieco niższa, ale również zadowalająca. W pracy podano interpretację otrzymanych wyników w oparciu o jeden z najpopularniejszych modeli izoterm adsorpcji - Langmuira, który potwierdził, iż najlepszym sorbentem jonów Cd2+, spośród badanych, są łuszczyny słonecznika. Materiał ten cechuje się największą wartością parametrów qmax i b izotermy Langmuira. W tym przypadku stała qmax, wyrażająca pojemność monowarstwy, przyjęła wartość 19,93 mg/g, a parametr b, określający powinowactwo do usuwanych jonów wynosi 0,2264 dm3/mg (Rys. 5, Tab. 1). Udowodniono również, że proces sorpcji jonów Cd2+ na badanych sorbentach organicznych zależy od masy sorbentu. Dla wszystkich materiałów stopień usunięcia jonów Cd2+ z roztworów wodnych rośnie ze wzrostem masy sorbentu, aż do uzyskania maksimum przy naważce 0,5 g (Rys. 1

  13. Closed Loop Waste Processing Dryer (DRYER) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this proposal is to develop a gravity-independent pasteurization and hot air drying process suitable for stabilization of ALS wet cabin waste,...

  14. BERYLLIUM MEASUREMENT IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE WET WIPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youmans-Mcdonald, L.

    2011-02-18

    Analysis for beryllium by fluorescence is now an established method which is used in many government-run laboratories and commercial facilities. This study investigates the use of this technique using commercially available wet wipes. The fluorescence method is widely documented and has been approved as a standard test method by ASTM International and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The procedure involves dissolution of samples in aqueous ammonium bifluoride solution and then adding a small aliquot to a basic hydroxybenzoquinoline sulfonate fluorescent dye (Berylliant{trademark} Inc. Detection Solution Part No. CH-2) , and measuring the fluorescence. This method is specific to beryllium. This work explores the use of three different commercial wipes spiked with beryllium, as beryllium acetate or as beryllium oxide and subsequent analysis by optical fluorescence. The effect of possible interfering metals such as Fe, Ti and Pu in the wipe medium is also examined.

  15. Liquid secondary waste. Waste form formulation and qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hill, K. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nichols, R. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) currently treats aqueous waste streams generated during Site cleanup activities. When the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) begins operations, a liquid secondary waste (LSW) stream from the WTP will need to be treated. The volume of effluent for treatment at the ETF will increase significantly. Washington River Protection Solutions is implementing a Secondary Liquid Waste Immobilization Technology Development Plan to address the technology needs for a waste form and solidification process to treat the increased volume of waste planned for disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility IDF). Waste form testing to support this plan is composed of work in the near term to demonstrate the waste form will provide data as input to a performance assessment (PA) for Hanford’s IDF.

  16. Evaluation of the adsorption potential of eco-friendly activated carbon prepared from cherry kernels for the removal of Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Ni(2+) from aqueous wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pap, Sabolč; Radonić, Jelena; Trifunović, Snežana; Adamović, Dragan; Mihajlović, Ivana; Vojinović Miloradov, Mirjana; Turk Sekulić, Maja

    2016-12-15

    Development, characterization and evaluation of the efficiency of cost-effective medium for the removal of Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Ni(2+) from aqueous systems, as a novel, eco-friendly solution for wastewater remediation were done. The precursors for low-cost adsorbent were lignocellulosic raw materials (sweet/sour cherry kernels), as industrial byproducts and components of organic solid waste. Activated carbon synthesis was carried out by thermochemical conversion (H3PO4, 500 °C) in the complete absence of inert atmosphere. Characterization of the activated carbon was performed by elemental analysis, FTIR, SEM, EDX and BET. BET surface area corresponds to 657.1 m(2) g(-1). The evaluation also included the influence of pH, contact time, solute concentration and adsorbent dose on the separation efficiency in the batch operational mode. The equilibrium and kinetic studies of adsorption were done. The maximum adsorption capacity of the activated carbon for Cd(2+) ions was calculated from the Langmuir isotherm and found to be 198.7 mg g(-1). Adsorption of Pb(2+) and Ni(2+) were better suitable to Freundlich model with the maximum adsorption capacity of 180.3 mg g(-1) and 76.27 mg g(-1), respectively. The results indicate that the pseudo-second-order model best describes adsorption kinetic data. Based on desorption study results, activated carbon was successfully regenerated with HNO3 for 3 cycles. In order to provide the results for basic cost-effective analysis, competing ion-effects in a real sample have been evaluated.

  17. Wetting front instability in an initially wet unsaturated fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J.; Nguyen, H.A.

    1992-12-31

    Experimental results exploring gravity-driven wetting front instability in a pre-wetted, rough-walled analog fracture are presented. Initial conditions considered include a uniform moisture field wetted to field capacity of the analog fracture and the structured moisture field created by unstable infiltration into an initially dry fracture. As in previous studies performed under dry initial conditions, instability was found to result both at the cessation of stable infiltration and at flux lower than the fracture capacity under gravitational driving force. Individual fingers were faster, narrower, longer, and more numerous than observed under dry initial conditions. Wetting fronts were found to follow existing wetted structure, providing a mechanism for rapid recharge and transport.

  18. Metal separations using aqueous biphasic partitioning systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, D.J.; Zaslavsky, B.; Rollins, A.N.; Vojta, Y.; Gartelmann, J.; Mego, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1996-05-01

    Aqueous biphasic extraction (ABE) processes offer the potential for low-cost, highly selective separations. This countercurrent extraction technique involves selective partitioning of either dissolved solutes or ultrafine particulates between two immiscible aqueous phases. The extraction systems that the authors have studied are generated by combining an aqueous salt solution with an aqueous polymer solution. They have examined a wide range of applications for ABE, including the treatment of solid and liquid nuclear wastes, decontamination of soils, and processing of mineral ores. They have also conducted fundamental studies of solution microstructure using small angle neutron scattering (SANS). In this report they review the physicochemical fundamentals of aqueous biphase formation and discuss the development and scaleup of ABE processes for environmental remediation.

  19. Photochemical organonitrate formation in wet aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yong Bin; Kim, Hwajin; Kim, Jin Young; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-10-01

    Water is the most abundant component of atmospheric fine aerosol. However, despite rapid progress, multiphase chemistry involving wet aerosols is still poorly understood. In this work, we report results from smog chamber photooxidation of glyoxal- and OH-containing ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid particles in the presence of NOx and O3 at high and low relative humidity. Particles were analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS). During the 3 h irradiation, OH oxidation products of glyoxal that are also produced in dilute aqueous solutions (e.g., oxalic acids and tartaric acids) were formed in both ammonium sulfate (AS) aerosols and sulfuric acid (SA) aerosols. However, the major products were organonitrogens (CHNO), organosulfates (CHOS), and organonitrogen sulfates (CHNOS). These were also the dominant products formed in the dark chamber, indicating non-radical formation. In the humid chamber (> 70 % relative humidity, RH), two main products for both AS and SA aerosols were organonitrates, which appeared at m / z- 147 and 226. They were formed in the aqueous phase via non-radical reactions of glyoxal and nitric acid, and their formation was enhanced by photochemistry because of the photochemical formation of nitric acid via reactions of peroxy radicals, NOx and OH during the irradiation.

  20. Phase formation and chemical phase equilibria in aqueous-based systems pertinent to waste-management: calcium oxide-alluminum oxide-borate-water, calcium oxide-lead oxide-phosphate-water and calcium oxide-arsenate-water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, James Vincent, Jr.

    This thesis explores three aqueous-based systems that have importance in the area of waste-management: (1) CaO-Alsb2Osb3-Bsb2Osb3-Hsb2O, (2) CaO-PbO-Psb2Osb5-Hsb2O and (3) CaO-Assb2Osb5-Hsb2O. More specifically, the objective of this research is to identify various precipitated compounds that can effectively immobilize certain elements that either directly or indirectly have an adverse effect on the environment. In the first quaternary system, CaO-Alsb2Osb3-Bsb2Osb3-Hsb2O, boron is the element desired to be ``fixed'' because ``free'' boron is the cause of delayed hardening in cement paste intended for the encapsulation of nuclear waste. Soluble boron also causes the cement paste to prematurely set, a phenomenon called ``flash-set.'' Isothermal calorimetry was used to track the progress of tricalcium aluminate hydration in the presence of boric acid and Ca(OH)sb2 and revealed the presence of a pronounced induction period, the length of which varied with both temperature and boric acid concentration. It was determined that a diffusion barrier, most likely an amorphous calcium borate, deposited onto the active anhydrous tricalcium aluminate grains inhibiting further hydration. Also, under certain conditions, the precipitation of crystalline 4CaO{*}Alsb2Osb3{*}1/2Bsb2Osb3{*}12Hsb2O may be responsible for the observed flash-set due to its flat, plate-like morphology. Another quaternary hydrate, 6CaO{*}Alsb2Osb3{*}2Bsb2Osb3{*}39Hsb2O (boro-ettringite) was also synthesized during this research and crystallized as hexagonal prisms. In contrast to the fast crystallization of 4CaO{*}Alsb2Osb3{*}1/2Bsb2Osb3{*}12Hsb2O, boro-ettringite was observed to form slowly and in stages with the precipitation of the transient phase CaO-Bsb2Osb3{*}6Hsb2O preceding it. Further investigation of these two hydrates lead to the construction of a quaternary phase diagram and to the determination of their solubility products (pKsp = -logKsp), which were determined to be 44.23 for boro

  1. 漂白废报纸脱墨浆AKD施胶过程的湿部化学环境分析%Wet Chemical Environment Analysis of Alkyl Ketene Dimmers (AKD) Sizing of Bleached Waste Newspaper Deinked Pulp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦黎; 曹云峰; 熊林根

    2011-01-01

    An L9(34)orthogonal test was designed to study the effects of AKD (alkyl ketene dimmers) charge, CS (cationic starch) charge, PCC (precipitated calcium carbonate) charge and CPAM (cationic polyacrylamide) charge on AKD sizing of bleached waste newspaper deinked pulp. And the optimal conditions were as follows: AKD dosage 0.4%, CS dosage 0.6%, PCC dosage 5% and CPAM dosage 0.03%. The variation tendency of sizing performance was essentially consistent with the Zeta potential value and cationic demand of furnish. In sizing process, Zeta potential and cationic demand of pulp was also an important factor, which was influential in the AKD sizing performance.%对漂白废报纸脱墨浆AXeD(烷基烯酮二聚物)施胶过程中AKD用量、CS(阳离子淀粉)用量、PCC(沉淀碳酸钙)用量和CPAM(阳离子聚丙烯酰胺)用量进行四因素三水平方差分析,当AKD用量为0.2%~0.4%(质量分数),CS用量为0.6%~1.0%,PCC用量为5%~15%,CPAM用量为0.03%-0.09%时,AKD施胶较为适宜工艺条件为:AKD用量0.4%,CS用量0.6%,PCC用量5%,CPAM用量0.03%。对纸浆动电特性的研究表明,成纸的施胶度基本与纸浆中的Zeta电位、浆料溶解电荷需求量的变化趋势一致。在施胶过程中,控制Zeta电位、浆料溶解电荷需求量也是影响AKD施胶效果的重要因素。

  2. Effect of Substrate-Water Interaction on the Wetting Behavior in Water-Oil and Substrate-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yin-quan; Zou Xian-wu; Jin Zhun-zhi

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the substrate-water interaction on the wetting behavior in water-oil and surfactant-water-oil systems confined by one substrate which has the preferential interaction to one species of particles have been investigated by using the free energy analysis and discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. As the preferential interaction between the substrate and water particles varies from small repulsion to large attraction, the partial drying, partial wetting and complete wetting state are observed in sequence. In addition, the wetting behavior of surfactant aqueous solution on the substrate is not only dependent on the interaction, but also limited by the maximum equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface.

  3. Effect of Substrate-Water Interaction on the Wetting Behavior in Water-Oil and Substrate-Water-Oil Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuanYin-quan; ZouXian-wu; JinZhun-zhi

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the substrate-water interaction on the wetting behavior in water-oil and surfactant-water-oil systerns confined by one substrate which has the preferential interaction to one species of particles have been investigated by using the free energy analysis and discontinuous molecular dynamic simulations. As the preferential interaction between the substrate and water particles varies from small repulsion to large attraction, the partial drying, partial wetting and complete wetting state are observed in sequence. In addition, the wetting behavior of surfactant aqueous solution on the substrate is not only dependent on the interaction, but also limited by the maximum equilibrium concentration of surfactants at the interface.

  4. Lyophilization -Solid Waste Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwiller, Eric; Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Reinhard, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a solid waste treatment system that has been designed for a Mars transit exploration mission. The technology described is an energy-efficient lyophilization technique that is designed to recover water from spacecraft solid wastes. Candidate wastes include feces, concentrated brines from water processors, and other solid wastes that contain free water. The system is designed to operate as a stand-alone process or to be integrated into the International Space Station Waste Collection System. In the lyophilization process, water in an aqueous waste is frozen and then sublimed, separating the waste into a dried solid material and liquid water. The sublimed water is then condensed in a solid ice phase and then melted to generate a liquid product. In the subject system the waste solids are contained within a 0.2 micron bio-guard bag and after drying are removed from the system and stored in a secondary container. This technology is ideally suited to applications such as the Mars Reference Mission, where water recovery rates approaching 100% are desirable but production of CO2 is not. The system is designed to minimize power consumption through the use of thermoelectric heat pumps. The results of preliminary testing of a prototype system and testing of the final configuration are provided. A mathematical model of the system is also described.

  5. Precipitation of neptunium dioxide from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, K E

    1999-12-01

    Tens of thousands of metric tons of highly radioactive, nuclear waste have been generated in the US. Currently, there is no treatment or disposal facility for these wastes. Of the radioactive elements in high-level nuclear waste, neptunium (Np) is of particular concern because it has a long half-life and may potentially be very mobile in groundwaters associated with a proposed underground disposal site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Aqueous Np concentrations observed in previous, short-term solubility experiments led to calculated potential doses exceeding proposed long-term regulatory limits. However, thermodynamic data for Np at 25 C showed that these observed aqueous Np concentrations were supersaturated with respect to crystalline NpO{sub 2}. It was hypothesized that NpO{sub 2} is the thermodynamically stable solid phase in aqueous solution, but it is slow to form in an aqueous solution of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} on the time scale of previous experiments. The precipitation of NpO{sub 2} would provide significantly lower aqueous Np concentrations leading to calculated doses below proposed regulatory limits. To test this hypothesis, solubility experiments were performed at elevated temperature to accelerate any slow precipitation kinetics. Ionic NpO{sub 2}{sup +} (aq) was introduced into very dilute aqueous solutions of NaCl with initial pH values ranging from 6 to 10. The reaction vessels were placed in an oven and allowed to react at 200 C until steady-state aqueous Np concentrations were observed. In all cases, aqueous Np concentrations decreased significantly from the initial value of 10{sup {minus}4} M. The solids that formed were analyzed by x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The solids were determined to be high-purity crystals of NpO{sub 2}. This is the first time that crystalline NpO{sub 2} has been observed to precipitate from NpO{sub 2}{sup +}(aq) in near-neutral aqueous solutions. The results obtained

  6. SETAC-U.S. EPA WET INITIATIVES: ALL WET AND NOTHING BUT WET

    Science.gov (United States)

    To ensure that sould scientific principles and sound science are applied to the challenging issues in t he Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) process, the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Foundation for Environmental Education was awarded a cooperative agreem...

  7. Municipal solid waste composition: Sampling methodology, statistical analyses, and case study evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edjabou, Vincent Maklawe Essonanawe; Jensen, Morten Bang; Götze, Ramona;

    2015-01-01

    from one municipality was sorted at "Level III", e.g. detailed, while the two others were sorted only at "Level I"). The results showed that residual household waste mainly contained food waste (42 +/- 5%, mass per wet basis) and miscellaneous combustibles (18 +/- 3%, mass per wet basis). The residual...... household waste generation rate in the study areas was 3-4 kg per person per week. Statistical analyses revealed that the waste composition was independent of variations in the waste generation rate. Both, waste composition and waste generation rates were statistically similar for each of the three...

  8. Chemical Remediation of Nickel(II) Waste: A Laboratory Experiment for General Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, K. Blake; Rood, Brian E.; Trogden, Bridget G.

    2011-01-01

    This project involved developing a method to remediate large quantities of aqueous waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment. Aqueous Ni(II) waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment was converted into solid nickel hydroxide hydrate with a substantial decrease in waste volume. The remediation method was developed for a…

  9. A study of low-cost adsorbent materials for removing Cr(VI from aqueous waste effluent Estudio de materiales adsorbentes de bajo costo para remover Cr(VI de efluentes acuosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Serna Elianna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available  

    The present paper shows very high potential for two types of solid (a commercial alumina and material obtained by composting, i.e. matured compost on Cr(VI adsorption/elimination in aqueous solution using a concentration range close to those previously detected in waste-water from Colombian industries. Both had important properties for eliminating Cr(VI, the compost being more important as it represents low-cost material. Optimal conditions for chromium adsorption on alumina and compost were established. Initial Cr(VI alumina concentration was 10 mgL-1, with 100 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.0, 1 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. For compost, initial Cr(VI concentration was = 3 mg L-1, 50 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.5, 3 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. The experiments showed that compost adsorption properties could be enhanced by adding small quantities of alumina. Compost could thus be chosen as a promising material for use in bioremediation chromium-containing waste water in a management programme for using solid waste in for minimising environmental impact.

     

     

    Removal of ammonia solutions used in catalytic wet oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang Mao; Lou, Jie Chung; Lin, Chia Hua

    2003-08-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is an important product used in the chemical industry, and is common place in industrial wastewater. Industrial wastewater containing ammonia is generally either toxic or has concentrations or temperatures such that direct biological treatment is unfeasible. This investigation used aqueous solutions containing more of ammonia for catalytic liquid-phase oxidation in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) based on Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts, prepared by co-precipitation of Cu(NO(3))(2), La(NO(3))(2), and Ce(NO(3))(3) at 7:2:1 molar concentrations. The experimental results indicated that the ammonia conversion of the wet oxidation in the presence of the Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts was determined by the Cu/La/Ce catalyst. Minimal ammonia was removed from the solution by the wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 91% ammonia removal was achieved by wet oxidation over the Cu/La/Ce catalyst at 230 degrees C with oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effluent streams were conducted at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes, and a reaction pathway was found linking the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen and water. The solution contained by-products, including nitrates and nitrites. Nitrite selectivity was minimized and ammonia removal maximized when the feed ammonia solution had a pH of around 12.0.

  10. Semi-wet peptide/protein array using supramolecular hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Sada, Kazuki; Yoshimura, Ibuki; Shinkai, Seiji; Kato, Nobuo; Hamachi, Itaru

    2004-01-01

    The protein microarray is a crucial biomaterial for the rapid and high-throughput assay of many biological events where proteins are involved. In contrast to the DNA microarray, it has not been sufficiently established because of protein instability under the conventional dry conditions. Here we report a novel semi-wet peptide/protein microarray using a supramolecular hydrogel composed of glycosylated amino acetate. The spontaneous gel-formation and amphiphilic properties of this supramolecular hydrogel have been applied to a new type of peptide/protein gel array that is compatible with enzyme assays. Aqueous cavities created in the gel matrix are a suitable semi-wet reaction medium for enzymes, whereas the hydrophobic domains of the fibre are useful as a unique site for monitoring the reaction. This array system overcomes several drawbacks of conventional protein chips, and thus can have potential applications in pharmaceutical research and diagnosis.

  11. Microwave assisted wet oxidation of p-nitrophenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BO; Longli; CHEN; Shuo; QUAN; Xie; LIU; Xitao; ZHAO; Huimin

    2005-01-01

    Aqueous solution of p-nitrophenol (PNP) was treated continuously by microwave assisted wet oxidation while flowing through a granular activated carbon (GAC) fixed bed. PNP was pre-adsorbed onto GAC prior to being put into the reactor so as to prevent PNP adsorption on GAC during microwave irradiation. PNP solutions with different initial concentration (218.6 mg/L and 1200 mg/L) were treated under conditions of microwave power 500 W, liquid flow 6.4 mL/min and air flow 40 mL/min or 60 mL/min. The results indicated that the removal of PNP was higher than 90% and more than 65% PNP was mineralized. Phenol, nitrobenzene, hydroquinone and benzoquinone occurred as course products during the operation process, which were degraded further. The biodegradability of the outflow was improved greatly by microwave assisted wet oxidation.

  12. Treatability study of absorbent polymer waste form for mixed waste treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, S. D.; Lehto, M. A.; Stewart, N. A.; Croft, A. D.; Kern, P. W.

    2000-02-10

    A treatability study was performed to develop and characterize an absorbent polymer waste form for application to low level (LLW) and mixed low level (MLLW) aqueous wastes at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W). In this study absorbent polymers proved effective at immobilizing aqueous liquid wastes in order to meet Land Disposal Restrictions for subsurface waste disposal. Treatment of aqueous waste with absorbent polymers provides an alternative to liquid waste solidification via high-shear mixing with clays and cements. Significant advantages of absorbent polymer use over clays and cements include ease of operations and waste volume minimization. Absorbent polymers do not require high-shear mixing as do clays and cements. Granulated absorbent polymer is poured into aqueous solutions and forms a gel which passes the paint filter test as a non-liquid. Pouring versus mixing of a solidification agent not only eliminates the need for a mixing station, but also lessens exposure to personnel and the potential for spread of contamination from treatment of radioactive wastes. Waste minimization is achieved as significantly less mass addition and volume increase is required of and results from absorbent polymer use than that of clays and cements. Operational ease and waste minimization translate into overall cost savings for LLW and MLLW treatment.

  13. Squeezing wetting and nonwetting liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilov, V N; Persson, B N J

    2004-01-22

    We present molecular-dynamics results for the squeezing of octane (C8H18) between two approaching solid elastic walls with different wetting properties. The interaction energy between the octane bead units and the solid walls is varied from a very small value (1 meV), corresponding to a nonwetting surface with a very large contact angle (nearly 180 degrees), to a high value (18.6 meV) corresponding to complete wetting. When at least one of the solid walls is wetted by octane we observe well defined molecular layers develop in the lubricant film when the thickness of the film is of the order of a few atomic diameters. An external squeezing-pressure induces discontinuous, thermally activated changes in the number n of lubricant layers (n-->n-1 layering transitions). With increasing interaction energy between the octane bead units and the solid walls, the transitions from n to n-1 layers occur at higher average pressure. This results from the increasing activation barrier to nucleate the squeeze-out with increasing lubricant-wall binding energy (per unit surface area) in the contact zone. Thus, strongly wetting lubricant fluids are better boundary lubricants than the less wetting ones, and this should result in less wear. We analyze in detail the effect of capillary bridge formation (in the wetting case) and droplets formation (in the nonwetting case) on the forces exerted by the lubricant on the walls. For the latter case small liquid droplets may be trapped at the interface, resulting in a repulsive force between the walls during squeezing, until the solid walls come into direct contact, where the wall-wall interaction may be initially attractive. This effect is made use of in some practical applications, and we give one illustration involving conditioners for hair care application.

  14. Wet-Etch Figuring Optical Figuring by Controlled Application of Liquid Etchant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britten, J

    2001-02-13

    WET-ETCH FIGURING (WEF) is an automated method of precisely figuring optical materials by the controlled application of aqueous etchant solution. This technology uses surface-tension-gradient-driven flow to confine and stabilize a wetted zone of an etchant solution or other aqueous processing fluid on the surface of an object. This wetted zone can be translated on the surface in a computer-controlled fashion for precise spatial control of the surface reactions occurring (e.g. chemical etching). WEF is particularly suitable for figuring very thin optical materials because it applies no thermal or mechanical stress to the material. Also, because the process is stress-free the workpiece can be monitored during figuring using interferometric metrology, and the measurements obtained can be used to control the figuring process in real-time--something that cannot be done with traditional figuring methods.

  15. Activity of Cu-activated carbon fiber catalyst in wet oxidation of ammonia solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2009-07-30

    Aqueous solutions of 200-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor using Cu-activated carbon fiber (ACF) catalysts, which were prepared by incipient wet impregnation with aqueous solutions of copper nitrate that was deposited on ACF substrates. The results reveal that the conversion of ammonia by wet oxidation in the presence of Cu-ACF catalysts was a function of the metal loading weight ratio of the catalyst. The total conversion efficiency of ammonia was 95% during wet oxidation over the catalyst at 463 K at an oxygen partial pressure of 3.0 MPa. Moreover, the effect of the initial concentration of ammonia and the reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid space velocity of less than 3.0 h(-1).

  16. Wet flue gas desulfurization processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayrunnisa Çavuşoğlu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The wet flue gas desulfurization process is widely used for the treatment of exhaust gases in power stations. Due to its high level of effectiveness over the already available processes, it has also been the mostly preferred method by industry. Its high SO2 removal efficiency, wide applicability of absorption chemicals and the ease of the chemical process handling which does not require comprehensive konowledge are among the main advantages of this process. In this article, various wet flue gas desulfurization processes such as lime/limestone have beendiscussed.

  17. Aqueous foam toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Aqueous foams are aggregates of bubbles mechanically generated by passing air or other gases through a net, screen, or other porous medium that is wetted by an aqueous solution of surface-active foaming agents (surfactants). Aqueous foams are important in modem fire-fighting technology, as well as for military uses for area denial and riot or crowd control. An aqueous foam is currently being developed and evaluated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a Less-Than-Lethal Weapon for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the aqueous foam developed for the NIJ and to determine whether there are any significant adverse health effects associated with completely immersing individuals without protective equipment in the foam. The toxicity of the aqueous foam formulation developed for NIJ is determined by evaluating the toxicity of the individual components of the foam. The foam is made from a 2--5% solution of Steol CA-330 surfactant in water generated at expansion ratios ranging from 500:1 to 1000:1. SteoI CA-330 is a 35% ammonium laureth sulfate in water and is produced by Stepan Chemical Company and containing trace amounts (<0.1%) of 1,4-dioxane. The results of this study indicate that Steol CA-330 is a non-toxic, mildly irritating, surfactant that is used extensively in the cosmetics industry for hair care and bath products. Inhalation or dermal exposure to this material in aqueous foam is not expected to produce significant irritation or systemic toxicity to exposed individuals, even after prolonged exposure. The amount of 1,4-dioxane in the surfactant, and subsequently in the foam, is negligible and therefore, the toxicity associated with dioxane exposure is not significant. In general, immersion in similar aqueous foams has not resulted in acute, immediately life-threatening effects, or chronic, long-term, non-reversible effects following exposure.

  18. Modeling Non-aqueous Phase Liquid Displacement Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhenqing; Shao Changjin; Zhou Guanggang; Qiu Chao

    2007-01-01

    A pore-network model physically based on pore level multiphase flow was used to study the water-non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) displacement process, especially the effects of wettability, water-NAPL interfacial tension, the fraction of NAPL-wet pores, and initial water saturation on the displacement. The computed data show that with the wettability of the mineral surfaces changing from strongly water-wet to NAPL-wet, capillary pressure and the NAPL relative permeability gradually decrease, while water-NAPL interfacial tension has little effect on water relative permeability, but initial water saturation has a strong effect on water and NAPL relative permeabilities. The analytical results may help to understand the micro-structure displacement process of non-aqueous phase liquid and to provide the theoretical basis for controlling NAPL migration.

  19. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2009-06-11

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2008 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report.

  1. Inhibiting Wet Oxidation of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, D. B. L.

    1985-01-01

    Simple modification of wet-oxidation process for treating organicwaste reduces loss of fixed nitrogen, potentially valuable byproduct of process. Addition of sufficient sulfuric acid to maintain reaction pH below 3 greatly reduces oxidation of ammonia to free nitrogen. No equipment modification required.

  2. Residential Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    twice a year or bringing their used furniture to the flea markets organized by charity clubs. Thus, much of the data available on residential waste represents collected waste and not necessarily all generated waste. The latter can only be characterized by careful studies directly at the source......Residential waste comes from residential areas with multi-family and single-family housing and includes four types of waste: household waste, garden waste, bulky waste and household hazardous waste. Typical unit generation rates, material composition, chemical composition and determining factors...... are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing residential waste is faced with the problem that many residences already divert some waste away from the official collection systems, for example performing home composting of vegetable waste and garden waste, having their bundled newspaper picked up by the scouts...

  3. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

  4. Hazardous waste status of discarded electronic cigarettes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Max J.; Townsend, Timothy G., E-mail: ttown@ufl.edu

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Electronic cigarettes were tested using TCLP and WET. • Several electronic cigarette products leached lead at hazardous waste levels. • Lead was the only element that exceeded hazardous waste concentration thresholds. • Nicotine solution may cause hazardous waste classification when discarded unused. - Abstract: The potential for disposable electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) to be classified as hazardous waste was investigated. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was performed on 23 disposable e-cigarettes in a preliminary survey of metal leaching. Based on these results, four e-cigarette products were selected for replicate analysis by TCLP and the California Waste Extraction Test (WET). Lead was measured in leachate as high as 50 mg/L by WET and 40 mg/L by TCLP. Regulatory thresholds were exceeded by two of 15 products tested in total. Therefore, some e-cigarettes would be toxicity characteristic (TC) hazardous waste but a majority would not. When disposed in the unused form, e-cigarettes containing nicotine juice would be commercial chemical products (CCP) and would, in the United States (US), be considered a listed hazardous waste (P075). While household waste is exempt from hazardous waste regulation, there are many instances in which such waste would be subject to regulation. Manufactures and retailers with unused or expired e-cigarettes or nicotine juice solution would be required to manage these as hazardous waste upon disposal. Current regulations and policies regarding the availability of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes worldwide were reviewed. Despite their small size, disposable e-cigarettes are consumed and discarded much more quickly than typical electronics, which may become a growing concern for waste managers.

  5. Novel applications of biomass wet pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sillanpaa, M. [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland)], email: mika.sillanpaa@lut.fi

    2012-07-01

    Production of carbonaceous material from unconventional wet biomass sources by thermal processing offers interesting novel opportunities and application possibilities in different fields. Thermal treatment at low temperatures refers to torrefication in general. Disadvantage in this technique is that biomass has to be dried first which consumes a lot energy and time and limits use of biomass materials widely. In wetpyrolysis (hydrothermal carbonization, HTC), biomass source can be wetter, like wood, household wastes, manure or industrial wastewater sludge. Reaction takes place in water environment at higher temperature (180-250 deg C) and pressure which is self-generated. Typically reaction system is high pressure reactor also called autoclave. Comparing to torrefaction HTC produces more solid yield, water soluble organic compounds but formation is low during reaction. Properties of the product can be easily modified by changing reaction conditions, utilization of additives or catalysts. Novel materials obtained by this technique will be used in different applications in water treatment and it will be also interesting to compare purification efficiency of these materials to activated carbon.

  6. Combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis of polyvinylchloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, E.; Bjerre, A.B.

    1992-01-01

    In view of the widespread aversion to burning polyvinylchloride (PVC) together with municipal waste, we have attempted an alternative approach to its decomposition. This paper describes a combined wet oxidation/alkaline hydrolysis yielding water soluble, biodegradable products. Experiments were...... carried out at temperatures from 180-260 degree C and reaction times of 8-24 min. The chloride liberated provides information on the rate constants. Considering the measured Cl- and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) values, we find hydrolysis and oxidation processes to be interdependent. The main products...

  7. Wet water glass production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant of a capacity of 75,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE, Italy, in 1997. and 1998, increasing detergent zeolite production, from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate dissolution plant. The main goal was increasing the detergent zeolite production. The technological cycle of NaOH was closed, and no effluents emitted, and there is no pollution (except for the filter cake. The wet water glass production process is fully automatized, and the product has uniform quality. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start - up, and repairs. By installing additional process equipment (centrifugal pumps and heat exchangers technological bottlenecks were overcome, and by adjusting the operation of autoclaves, and water glass filters and also by optimizing the capacities of process equipment.

  8. Wetting hysteresis induced by nanodefects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomello, Alberto; Schimmele, Lothar; Dietrich, Siegfried

    2016-01-19

    Wetting of actual surfaces involves diverse hysteretic phenomena stemming from ever-present imperfections. Here, we clarify the origin of wetting hysteresis for a liquid front advancing or receding across an isolated defect of nanometric size. Various kinds of chemical and topographical nanodefects, which represent salient features of actual heterogeneous surfaces, are investigated. The most probable wetting path across surface heterogeneities is identified by combining, within an innovative approach, microscopic classical density functional theory and the string method devised for the study of rare events. The computed rugged free-energy landscape demonstrates that hysteresis emerges as a consequence of metastable pinning of the liquid front at the defects; the barriers for thermally activated defect crossing, the pinning force, and hysteresis are quantified and related to the geometry and chemistry of the defects allowing for the occurrence of nanoscopic effects. The main result of our calculations is that even weak nanoscale defects, which are difficult to characterize in generic microfluidic experiments, can be the source of a plethora of hysteretical phenomena, including the pinning of nanobubbles.

  9. Wetting of flexible fibre arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprat, C; Protière, S; Beebe, A Y; Stone, H A

    2012-02-23

    Fibrous media are functional and versatile materials, as demonstrated by their ubiquity both in natural systems such as feathers and adhesive pads and in engineered systems from nanotextured surfaces to textile products, where they offer benefits in filtration, insulation, wetting and colouring. The elasticity and high aspect ratios of the fibres allow deformation under capillary forces, which cause mechanical damage, matting self-assembly or colour changes, with many industrial and ecological consequences. Attempts to understand these systems have mostly focused on the wetting of rigid fibres or on elastocapillary effects in planar geometries and on a fibre brush withdrawn from an infinite bath. Here we consider the frequently encountered case of a liquid drop deposited on a flexible fibre array and show that flexibility, fibre geometry and drop volume are the crucial parameters that are necessary to understand the various observations referred to above. We identify the conditions required for a drop to remain compact with minimal spreading or to cause a pair of elastic fibres to coalesce. We find that there is a critical volume of liquid, and, hence, a critical drop size, above which this coalescence does not occur. We also identify a drop size that maximizes liquid capture. For both wetting and deformation of the substrates, we present rules that are deduced from the geometric and material properties of the fibres and the volume of the drop. These ideas are applicable to a wide range of fibrous materials, as we illustrate with examples for feathers, beetle tarsi, sprays and microfabricated systems.

  10. 49 CFR 173.159 - Batteries, wet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Batteries, wet. 173.159 Section 173.159... Batteries, wet. (a) Electric storage batteries, containing electrolyte acid or alkaline corrosive battery fluid (wet batteries), may not be packed with other materials except as provided in paragraphs (g)...

  11. European wet deposition maps based on measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen EP van; Erisman JW; Draaijers GPJ; Potma CJM; Pul WAJ van; LLO

    1995-01-01

    To date, wet deposition maps on a European scale have been based on long-range transport model results. For most components wet deposition maps based on measurements are only available on national scales. Wet deposition maps of acidifying components and base cations based on measurements are needed

  12. Toluene removal by oxidation reaction in spray wet scrubber: experimental, modeling and optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumporn Nikom

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Toluene, an important volatile organic compound (VOC, is used in many kinds of industries, such as painting, printing, coating, and petrochemical industries. The emission of toluene causes serious air pollution, odor problem, flammability problem and affects human health. This paper proposes the removal of toluene from waste air using a spray wet scrubber combining the absorption and oxidation reaction. Aqueous sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl solution was used as the scrubbing liquid in the system. NaOCl, the strongest oxidative agent, presents an effective toluene removal. As the scrubbed toluene is reacted, recirculation of the scrubbing liquid could be operated with a constant removal efficiency throughout the operting time. The investigated variables affecting the removal efficiency were air flow rate, inlet toluene concentration, NaOCl concentration, scrubbing liquid flow rate and size of spray nozzle. Influence of the scrubbing parameters was experimentally studied to develop a mathematical model of the toluene removal efficiency. The removal model reveals that the increase of scrubbing liquid flow rate, toluene concentration, and NaOCl concentration together with the decrease of air flow rate and size of spray nozzle can increase the toluene removal efficiency. Optimization problem with an objective function and constraints was set to provide the maximum toluene removal efficiency and solved by Matlab optimization toolbox. The optimization constraints were formed from the mathematical model and process limitation. The solution of the optimization was an air flow rate of 100 m3/h, toluene concentration of 1500 ppm, NaOCl concentration of 0.02 mol/l, NaOCl solution feed rate of 0.8 m3/h, and spray nozzle size of 0.5 mm. Solution of the optimization gave the highest toluene removal efficiency of 91.7%.

  13. Time-varying wetting behavior on copper wafer treated by wet-etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Sheng-Hung; Wu, Chuan-Chang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wu, Hsing-Chen [Advanced Technology Materials Inc, Hsinchu 310, Taiwan, ROC (China); Cheng, Shao-Liang [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane, E-mail: yjsheng@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong, E-mail: hktsao@cc.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A thin oxide layer always remains on surfaces of Cu wafers after aqueous etching. • A pure Cu wafer is obtained by the HAc treatment and the water CA is about 45°. • The oxide layer and CA grow with time after the Cu wafer is exposed to air. • Surface roughness and hydrophobicity of pure Cu wafers grow rapidly in vacuum. - Abstract: The wet cleaning process in semiconductor fabrication often involves the immersion of the copper wafer into etching solutions and thereby its surface properties are significantly altered. The wetting behavior of a copper film deposited on silicon wafer is investigated after a short dip in various etching solutions. The etchants include glacial acetic acid and dilute solutions of nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, and tetramethylammonium hydroxide. It was found that in most cases a thin oxide layer still remains on the surface of as-received Cu wafers when they are subject to etching treatments. However, a pure Cu wafer can be obtained by the glacial acetic acid treatment and its water contact angle (CA) is about 45°. As the pure Cu wafer is placed in the ambient condition, the oxide thickness grows rapidly to the range of 10–20 Å within 3 h and the CA on the hydrophilic surface also rises. In the vacuum, it is surprising to find that the CA and surface roughness of the pure Cu wafer can grow significantly. These interesting results may be attributed to the rearrangement of surface Cu atoms to reduce the surface free energy.

  14. Hazardous waste status of discarded electronic cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Max J; Townsend, Timothy G

    2015-05-01

    The potential for disposable electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) to be classified as hazardous waste was investigated. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was performed on 23 disposable e-cigarettes in a preliminary survey of metal leaching. Based on these results, four e-cigarette products were selected for replicate analysis by TCLP and the California Waste Extraction Test (WET). Lead was measured in leachate as high as 50mg/L by WET and 40mg/L by TCLP. Regulatory thresholds were exceeded by two of 15 products tested in total. Therefore, some e-cigarettes would be toxicity characteristic (TC) hazardous waste but a majority would not. When disposed in the unused form, e-cigarettes containing nicotine juice would be commercial chemical products (CCP) and would, in the United States (US), be considered a listed hazardous waste (P075). While household waste is exempt from hazardous waste regulation, there are many instances in which such waste would be subject to regulation. Manufactures and retailers with unused or expired e-cigarettes or nicotine juice solution would be required to manage these as hazardous waste upon disposal. Current regulations and policies regarding the availability of nicotine-containing e-cigarettes worldwide were reviewed. Despite their small size, disposable e-cigarettes are consumed and discarded much more quickly than typical electronics, which may become a growing concern for waste managers.

  15. TASK TECHNICAL AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN FOR OUT-OF-TANK DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE VIA WET AIR OXIDATION TECHNOLOGY: PHASE I - BENCH SCALE TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K

    2006-03-31

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at Savannah River Site (SRS). Liquid Waste Disposition (LWD) management has the goal of returning Tank 48H to routine service by January 2010 or as soon as practical. Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains {approx}240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with about 2 wt % potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). The main radioactive component in Tank 48H is {sup 137}Cs. The waste also contains {approx}0.15 wt % Monosodium Titanate (MST) which has adsorbed {sup 90}Sr, U, and Pu isotopes. A System Engineering Evaluation of technologies/ideas for the treatment of TPB identified Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) as a leading alternative technology to the baseline aggregation approach. Over 75 technologies/ideas were evaluated overall. Forty-one technologies/ideas passed the initial screening evaluation. The 41 technologies/ideas were then combined to 16 complete solutions for the disposition of TPB and evaluated in detail. Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is an aqueous phase process in which soluble or suspended waste components are oxidized using molecular oxygen contained in air. The process operates at elevated temperatures and pressures ranging from 150 to 320 C and 7 to 210 atmospheres, respectively. The products of the reaction are CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and low molecular weight oxygenated organics (e.g. acetate, oxalate). The basic flow scheme for a typical WAO system is as follows. The waste solution or slurry is pumped through a high-pressure feed pump. An air stream containing sufficient oxygen to meet the oxygen requirements of the waste stream is

  16. Wetting properties of nanostructured surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos-Canut, S. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee et Nanostructures (UMR CNRS 5586), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: ramos@lpmcn.univ-lyon1.fr

    2006-04-15

    Swift heavy ion irradiation is a powerful tool to tailor surfaces under controlled conditions at a nanometric scale. The growing importance of nanostructured surfaces for a wide variety of applications and fundamental investigations is now well established. In this paper I will mainly discuss the interest of such surfaces for investigations concerning solid-liquid interfaces. The role played by topographical defects on wetting properties of solid surfaces, and both the dissipative and the confinement effects on the interface will be demonstrated by simple examples.

  17. Cooling tower waste reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, S.J.; Celeste, J.; Chine, R.; Scott, C.

    1998-05-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the two main cooling tower systems (central and northwest) were upgraded during the summer of 1997 to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. In 1996, these two tower systems generated approximately 135,400 lbs (61,400 kg) of hazardous sludge, which is more than 90 percent of the hazardous waste for the site annually. At both, wet decks (cascade reservoirs) were covered to block sunlight. Covering the cascade reservoirs reduced the amount of chemical conditioners (e.g. algaecide and biocide), required and in turn the amount of waste generated was reduced. Additionally, at the northwest cooling tower system, a sand filtration system was installed to allow cyclical filtering and backflushing, and new pumps, piping, and spray nozzles were installed to increase agitation. the appurtenance upgrade increased the efficiency of the cooling towers. The sand filtration system at the northwest cooling tower system enables operators to continuously maintain the cooling tower water quality without taking the towers out of service. Operational costs (including waste handling and disposal) and maintenance activities are compared for the cooling towers before and after upgrades. Additionally, the effectiveness of the sand filter system in conjunction with the wet deck covers (northwest cooling tower system), versus the cascade reservoir covers alone (south cooling tower south) is discussed. the overall expected return on investment is calculated to be in excess of 250 percent. this upgrade has been incorporated into the 1998 DOE complex-wide water conservation project being led by Sandia National Laboratory/Albuquerque.

  18. Validated Test Method 5030C: Purge-and-Trap for Aqueous Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    This method describes a purge-and-trap procedure for the analysis of volatile organic compoundsin aqueous samples & water miscible liquid samples. It also describes the analysis of high concentration soil and waste sample extracts prepared in Method 5035.

  19. Mold management of wetted carpet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kee-Hean; Dixit, Anupma; Lewis, Roger D; MacDonald Perkins, Maureen; Backer, Denis; Condoor, Sridhar; Emo, Brett; Yang, Mingan

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the growth and removal of fungi on wetted carpet using newly designed technologies that rely on physical principles of steam, heat, and fluid flow. Sixty samples of carpet were embedded with heat-treated house dust, followed by embedding, wearing with a hexapod, and wetting. Samples were inoculated using a liquid suspension of Cladosporium sphaerospermum prior to placement over a water-saturated foam pad. Incubation times were 24 hr, 7 days, and 30 days. Cleaning was performed using three methods; high-flow hot water extraction, hot water and detergent, and steam. Fungal loading increased from approximately 1500 colony forming units per area (CFU/cm(2)) in 24 hr to a maximum of approximately 10,200 CFU/cm(2) after 7 days with a slight decline to 9700 CFU/cm(2) after 30 days incubation. Statistically significant differences were found among all three methods for removal of fungi for all three time periods (p Steam-vapor was significantly better than the alternative methods (p steam has a consistent fungal removal rate, the detergent and high-flow, hot water methods decline in efficiency with increasing incubation time.

  20. Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

  1. Procedure to use phosphogypsum industrial waste for mineral CO{sub 2} sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas-Escudero, C. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Seville (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-US), Av. Americo Vespucio, 49, 41092 Seville (Spain); Morales-Florez, V., E-mail: victor.morales@icmse.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-US), Av. Americo Vespucio, 49, 41092 Seville (Spain); Perez-Lopez, R. [Departamento de Geologia, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Huelva, Campus Universitario Campus del Carmen, Avenida de las Fuerzas Armadas, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Instituto de Diagnostico Ambiental y Estudios del Agua (IDAeA-CSIC), Jordi Girona 18, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Santos, A. [Departamento de Ciencias de la Tierra, Universidad de Cadiz, Campus del Rio San Pedro, Av. Republica Saharaui s/n, 11510 Puerto Real (Spain); Esquivias, L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Seville (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-US), Av. Americo Vespucio, 49, 41092 Seville (Spain)

    2011-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphogypsum wastes are proposed to reduce CO{sub 2} greenhouse gas emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphogypsum dissolution with NaOH results in Ca(OH){sub 2} precipitation and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aqueous carbonation of Ca(OH){sub 2} with CO{sub 2} results in the CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metals contained in the phosphogypsum are transferred to the final calcite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Applications of CaCO{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} by-products are proposed to improve viability. - Abstract: Industrial wet phosphoric acid production in Huelva (SW Spain) has led to the controversial stockpiling of waste phosphogypsum by-products, resulting in the release of significant quantities of toxic impurities in salt marshes in the Tinto river estuary. In the framework of the fight against global climate change and the effort to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, a simple and efficient procedure for CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration is presented in this work, using phosphogypsum waste as a calcium source. Our results demonstrate the high efficiency of portlandite precipitation by phosphogypsum dissolution using an alkaline soda solution. Carbonation experiments performed at ambient pressure and temperature resulted in total conversion of the portlandite into carbonate. The fate of trace elements present in the phosphogypsum waste was also investigated, and trace impurities were found to be completely transferred to the final calcite. We believe that the procedure proposed here should be considered not only as a solution for reducing old stockpiles of phosphogypsum wastes, but also for future phosphoric acid and other gypsum-producing industrial processes, resulting in more sustainable production.

  2. Secondary Waste Cementitious Waste Form Data Package for the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Serne, R Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cozzi, Alex D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-05-16

    A review of the most up-to-date and relevant data currently available was conducted to develop a set of recommended values for use in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) performance assessment (PA) to model contaminant release from a cementitious waste form for aqueous wastes treated at the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). This data package relies primarily upon recent data collected on Cast Stone formulations fabricated with simulants of low-activity waste (LAW) and liquid secondary wastes expected to be produced at Hanford. These data were supplemented, when necessary, with data developed for saltstone (a similar grout waste form used at the Savannah River Site). Work is currently underway to collect data on cementitious waste forms that are similar to Cast Stone and saltstone but are tailored to the characteristics of ETF-treated liquid secondary wastes. Recommended values for key parameters to conduct PA modeling of contaminant release from ETF-treated liquid waste are provided.

  3. Wetting and Non-Wetting Models of Black Carbon Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, B. F.; Laura, S.

    2006-12-01

    We present the results of recent modeling studies on the activation of black carbon (BC) aerosol to form cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). We use a model of BC activation based on a general modification of the Koehler equation for insoluble activation in which we introduce a term based on the activity of water adsorbed on the particle surface. We parameterize the model using the free energy of adsorption, a parameter directly comparable to laboratory measurements of water adsorption on carbon. Although the model of the water- surface interaction is general, the form of the activation equation that results depends upon a further model of the distribution of water on the particle. One possible model involves the symmetric growth of a water shell around the isoluble particle core (wetting). This model predicts upper and lower bounding curves for the activation supersaturation given by the range of water interaction energies from hydrophobic to hydrophilic which are in agreement with a large body of recent activation data. The resulting activation diameters are from 3 to 10 times smaller than activation of soluble particles of identical dry diameter. Another possible model involves an exluded liquid droplet growing in contact with the particle (non-wetting). The geometry of this model much more resembles classic assumptions of heterogeneous nucleation theory. This model can yield extremely high activation supersaturation as a function of diameter, as has been observed in some experiments, and enables calculations in agreement with some of these results. We discuss these two geometrical models of water growth, the different behaviors predicted by the resulting activation equation, and the means to determine which model of growth is appropriate for a given BC particle characterized by either water interaction energy or morphology. These simple models enable an efficient and physically reasonable means to calculate the activation of BC aerosol to form CCN based upon a

  4. Experimental study on the separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas using hollow fiber membrane contactors without wetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Shui-ping; Fang, Meng-Xiang; Zhang, Wei-Feng; Luo, Zhong-Yang; Cen, Ke-Fa [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wang, Shu-Yuan; Xu, Zhi-Kang [Institute of Polymer Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2007-05-15

    Experiments on CO{sub 2} removal from flue gas using polypropylene (PP) hollow fiber membrane contactors were conducted in this study. Absorbents including aqueous potassium glycinate (PG) solution, aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA) and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) were used to absorb CO{sub 2} in the experiments. Based on the wetting experimental results, aqueous PG solution can offer a higher surface tension than water, aqueous MEA and MDEA solutions. Aqueous PG solution has a lower potential of membrane wetting after a continuously steady operation for 40 h to maintain CO{sub 2} removal efficiency of about 90%. Under moderate operating conditions, effects of the temperature, flow rate, and concentration of absorbents, and the flow rate of flue gas as well as the volumetric concentration of carbon dioxide in the flue gas on the mass transfer rate of CO{sub 2} were studied on a pilot-scale test facility. Unlike conventional absorbents, the mass transfer decreases with an increasing liquid temperature when using aqueous PG solution. Results show that CO{sub 2} removal efficiency was above 90% and the mass transfer rate was above 2.0 mol/(m{sup 2} h) using the PG aqueous solution. It indicates that the hollow fiber membrane contactor has a great potential in the area of CO{sub 2} separation from flue gas when absorbent's concentration and liquid-gas pressure difference are designed elaborately. (author)

  5. Drop splashing is independent of substrate wetting

    CERN Document Server

    Latka, Andrzej; Nagel, Sidney R; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    A liquid drop impacting a dry solid surface with sufficient kinetic energy will splash, breaking apart into numerous secondary droplets. This phenomenon shows many similarities to forced wetting, including the entrainment of air at the contact line. Because of these similarities and the fact that forced wetting has been shown to depend on the wetting properties of the surface, existing theories predict splashing to depend on wetting properties as well. However, using high-speed interference imaging we observe that wetting properties have no effect on splashing for various liquid-surface combinations. Additionally, by fully resolving the Navier-Stokes equations at length and time scales inaccessible to experiments, we find that the shape and motion of the air-liquid interface at the contact line are independent of wettability. We use these findings to evaluate existing theories and to compare splashing with forced wetting.

  6. Glycerol-based carbon materials for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation process

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Rui S.; Silva, Adrián; Pinho, Maria; Figueiredo,José; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2013-01-01

    It is known that metal-free carbon materials can act as catalysts for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) process to treat organic pollutants in aqueous solutions [I]. On the other hand, crude glycerol, such as resulting from biodiesel production, is being offered as an abundant and low cost feedstock [2]. In the present work, glycerol-based carbon materials (OBCMs) with distinct properties were produced and tested as catalysts for CWPO, using 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) as a ...

  7. Enzyme-Assisted Extraction of Oil from Wet Microalgae Scenedesmus sp. G4

    OpenAIRE

    Shuhao Huo; Zhongming Wang; Fengjie Cui; Bin Zou; Pengxiang Zhao; Zhenhong Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme-assisted aqueous extraction of oil from wet microalgae was employed to avoid the energy consumption of a dewatering process. In this paper, oil-rich microalgae Scenedesmus sp. G4 was hydrolyzed by enzyme mixtures for oil extraction. The results showed that the algae concentration had the greatest influence on yield of extracted oil, and the temperature and the ratio of enzyme mixtures affected the results as follows: the maximum yield of oil extracted from Scenedesmus sp. G4 reache...

  8. Assessing the emission sources of atmospheric mercury in wet deposition across Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratz, Lynne E; Keeler, Gerald J; Morishita, Masako; Barres, James A; Dvonch, J Timothy

    2013-03-15

    From August 4, 2007 to August 31, 2009, we collected event-based precipitation samples for mercury (Hg) and trace element analyses at four sites in Illinois (IL), USA. The objectives of these measurements were to quantify Hg wet deposition across the state, and to assess the contributions to Hg in precipitation from major local and regional emission sources. Monitoring sites were located, from north to south, in Chicago, Peoria, Nilwood, and Carbondale, IL. Measurements from these four sites demonstrated that a clear spatial gradient in Hg wet deposition was not evident across the state. Each site received>10μgm(-2) of Hg wet deposition annually, and these observed values were comparable to annual Hg wet deposition measurements from other event-based precipitation monitoring sites in source-impacted areas of the Midwestern U.S. We applied the multivariate statistical receptor model, Positive Matrix Factorization (EPA PMF v3.0), to the measured Hg and trace element wet deposition amounts at the four sites. Results suggested that 50% to 74% of total Hg wet deposition at each site could be attributed to coal combustion emissions. The other source signatures identified in the precipitation compositions included cement manufacturing, mixed metal smelting/waste incineration, iron-steel production, and a phosphorus source. We also applied a hybrid receptor model, Quantitative Transport Bias Analysis (QTBA), to the Hg wet deposition datasets to identify the major source regions associated with the measured values. The calculated QTBA probability fields suggested that transport from urban/industrial areas, such as Chicago/Gary, St. Louis, and the Ohio River Valley, resulted in some of the highest estimated event-based Hg wet deposition amounts at the four sites (potential mass transfer of up to 0.32μgm(-2)). The combined application of PMF and QTBA supported the hypothesis that local and regional coal combustion was the largest source of Hg wet deposition in Illinois.

  9. MIPs in Aqueous Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ying-chun; Ma, Hui-ting; Lu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    When organic solvent-compatible molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are used in aqueous environment, how to reduce nonspecific binding is a major challenge. By modifying the binding solvents and introducing appropriate washing and elution steps, even relatively hydrophobic MIPs can gain optimal rebinding selectivity in aqueous conditions. Furthermore, water-compatible MIPs that can be used to treat aqueous samples directly have been prepared. The use of hydrophilic co-monomers, the controlled surface modification through controlled radical polymerization, and the new interfacial molecular imprinting methods are different strategies to prepare water-compatible MIPs. By combining MIPs with other techniques, both organic solvent-compatible and water-compatible MIPs can display better functional performances in aqueous conditions. Intensive studies on MIPs in aqueous conditions can provide new MIPs with much-improved compatibilities that will lead to more interesting applications in biomedicine and biotechnology.

  10. Optimized wet clutches:simulation and tribotesting

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Wet clutches are used in a variety of different machinery. Wet clutches and brakes are frequently used to distribute torque in vehicle drive-trains. The clutches can be located in e.g. automatic transmissions or limited slip differentials. Their frictional behavior is of great importance for the overall vehicle behavior and has to be thoroughly investigated when designing new wet clutch applications. Frictional behavior is normally investigated in test rigs where complete friction discs are t...

  11. Fluctuating confinement of water in aqueous organic nanodroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilemski, Gerald; Hrahsheh, Fawaz

    2013-03-01

    Supercooled and nano-confined water occurs frequently as nanometer-sized aqueous-organic aerosol droplets that are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and in many industrial processes. Nanodroplet structure is important because it influences droplet growth and evaporation rates, heterogeneous reaction rates, and radiative properties. We use classical molecular dynamic simulations to study the structure of ternary water-butanol-nonane nanodroplets for several temperatures and droplet sizes. We study the effects of butanol on the wetting of the water/butanol core-shell droplet by the nonane lens. At low concentrations, butanol acts as a surfactant to significantly enhance the wetability of the water droplet by nonane. At 250 K, with sufficient butanol and nonane, perfect wetting (thin film formation by nonane) occurs. Perfect wetting also occurs at higher temperatures, 270 K to 300 K, but this wetting state is progressively destabilized at higher temperature. All of the nanodroplets studied undergo distinct transitions between partial dewetting and perfect wetting states due to isothermal fluctuations in the local distribution of butanol on the surface of the water core. These fluctuations favor the wetted state at lower temperatures and the dewetted state at higher temperatures. Supported by NSF Grant CBET 1033387

  12. Externally Wetted Ionic Liquid Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, P.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Lopez-Urdiales, J. M.

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents initial developments of an electric propulsion system based on ionic liquid ion sources (ILIS). Propellants are ionic liquids, which are organic salts with two important characteristics; they remain in the liquid state at room temperature and have negligible vapor pressure, thus allowing their use in vacuum. The working principles of ILIS are similar to those of liquid metal ion sources (LMIS), in which a Taylor cone is electrostatically formed at the tip of an externally wetted needle while ions are emitted directly from its apex. ILIS have the advantage of being able to produce negative ions that have similar masses than their positive counterparts with similar current levels. This opens up the possibility of achieving plume electrical neutrality without electron emitters. The possible multiplexing of these emitters is discussed in terms of achievable thrust density for applications other than micro-propulsion.

  13. Wet granular walkers and climbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Z S; Steinberger, A; Seemann, R; Herminghaus, S, E-mail: audrey.steinberger@ens-lyon.fr [Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Bunsenstrasse 10, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Mechanisms of locomotion in microscopic systems are of great interest not only for technological applications but also for the sake of understanding, and potentially harnessing, processes far from thermal equilibrium. Downscaling is a particular challenge and has led to a number of interesting concepts, including thermal ratchet systems and asymmetric swimmers. Here we present a granular ratchet system employing a particularly robust mechanism that can be implemented in various settings. The system consists of wetted spheres of different sizes that adhere to each other, and are subject to a symmetric oscillating, zero average external force field. An inherent asymmetry in the mutual force network leads to force rectification and hence to locomotion. We present a simple model that accounts for the observed behaviour, underscores its robustness and suggests a potential scalability of the concept.

  14. The Wet-Dog Shake

    CERN Document Server

    Dickerson, Andrew; Bauman, Jay; Chang, Young-Hui; Hu, David

    2010-01-01

    The drying of wet fur is a critical to mammalian heat regulation. In this fluid dynamics video, we show a sequence of films demonstrating how hirsute animals to rapidly oscillate their bodies to shed water droplets, nature's analogy to the spin cycle of a washing machine. High-speed videography and fur-particle tracking is employed to determine the angular position of the animal's shoulder skin as a function of time. X-ray cinematography is used to track the motion of the skeleton. We determine conditions for drop ejection by considering the balance of surface tension and centripetal forces on drops adhering to the animal. Particular attention is paid to rationalizing the relationship between animal size and oscillation frequency required to self-dry.

  15. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  16. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  17. Military Wastes-to-Energy Applications,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    percent) Pyrolysis characterization Protein nitrogen Toxicity Phosphorus Corrosivity Lipids Explosivity Starches Other safety factors Sugars Biological...synthetics. Leather, rubber Shoes, tires , toys. Food waste Wet garbage, unidentifiable mixture. Yards and grounds Twigs and green branches, grass and...61). The following conversion process categories will be described and ana- lyzed: combustion, pyrolysis , and bioconversion. Appropriate systems within

  18. Frozen soil barriers for hazardous waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, J.G.; Leger, R. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Fu, H.Y. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Laboratory and full field measurements have demonstrated the effectiveness of artificial ground freezing for the containment of subsurface hazardous and radioactive wastes. Bench tests and a field demonstration have shown that cryogenic barriers are impenetrable to aqueous and non aqueous liquids. As a result of the successful tests the US Department of Energy has designated frozen ground barriers as one of its top ten remediation technologies.

  19. Pyrochlore as nuclear waste form. Actinide uptake and chemical stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkeldei, Sarah Charlotte

    2015-07-01

    with pyrochlore and defect crystal structure were synthesised via a wet-chemical coprecipitation route to obtain highly homogeneous ceramics. Their structure-properties relationships were studied by a combination of different characterisation techniques, e.g. powder X-Ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and luminescence spectroscopy. These complementary techniques were chosen to gain insight into the radionuclide uptake and order-disorder transition from a bulk to a local structural level. The transition of pyrochlore to the less ordered defect fluorite phase was examined by XRD and TEM and recognized to be a gradual transition. This transition was proven to have no significant impact on the aqueous durability under acidic conditions. In addition to their high radiation tolerance ZrO{sub 2} based pyrochlores are therefore expected to ensure high long-term durability even during the decay of embedded radionuclides. The radionuclide uptake on well-defined lattice positions within the pyrochlore crystal structure was probed by luminescence spectroscopy (time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy, TRLFS) of Cm and Eu doped La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 2} pyrochlores and defect fluorite samples. TRLFS is an ideal method to unravel the lattice site by probing the local environment of the dopant. According to TRLFS results Eu and Cm adopt the A site within the pyrochlore crystal structure and regular cation lattice sites in the defect fluorite. In addition, a minor species is present in the pyrochlore which was identical to the major species observed in the defect fluorite. Vice versa, the defect fluorite contains a minor species which has adopted the pyrochlore environment. This is in good agreement with the TEM findings. Due to the different pyrochlore and defect fluorite species, TRLFS could be used as a tool to quantify radiation damage in ZrO{sub 2} based pyrochlore nuclear waste forms. In order to more closely

  20. Coffee-stain growth dynamics on dry and wet surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Boulogne, François; Stone, Howard A

    2016-01-01

    The drying of a drop containing particles often results in the accumulation of the particles at the contact line. In this work, we investigate the drying of an aqueous colloidal drop surrounded by a hydrogel that is also evaporating. We combine theoretical and experimental studies to understand how the surrounding vapor concentration affects the particle deposit during the constant radius evaporation mode. In addition to the common case of evaporation on an otherwise dry surface, we show that in a configuration where liquid is evaporating from a flat surface around the drop, the singularity of the evaporative flux at the contact line is suppressed and the drop evaporation is homogeneous. For both conditions, we derive the velocity field and we establish the temporal evolution of the number of particles accumulated at the contact line. We predict the growth dynamics of the stain and the drying timescales. Thus, dry and wet conditions are compared with experimental results and we highlight that only the dynamic...

  1. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics and column operations for the removal of hazardous dye, Tartrazine from aqueous solutions using waste materials--Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya, as adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Alok; Mittal, Jyoti; Kurup, Lisha

    2006-08-25

    Adsorbents, Bottom Ash (a power plant waste) and De-Oiled Soya (an agricultural waste) exhibit good efficacy to adsorb a highly toxic dye, Tartrazine. Through the batch technique equilibrium uptake of the dye is observed at different concentrations, pH of the solution, dosage of adsorbents and sieve size of adsorbents. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms are successfully employed on both the adsorbents and on the basis of these models the thermodynamic parameters are evaluated. Kinetic investigations reveal that more than 50% adsorption of dye is achieved in about 1h in both the cases, whereas, equilibrium establishment takes about 3-4h. The linear plots obtained in rate constant and mass transfer studies further confirm the applicability of first order rate expression and mass transfer model, respectively. The kinetic data treated to identify rate controlling step of the ongoing adsorption processes indicate that for both the systems, particle diffusion process is predominant at higher concentrations, while film diffusion takes place at lower concentrations. The column studies reveal that about 96% saturation of both the columns is attained during their exhaustion, while about 88 and 84% of the dye material is recovered by eluting dilute NaOH solution through exhausted Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya columns, respectively.

  2. Adsorption isotherms, kinetics and column operations for the removal of hazardous dye, Tartrazine from aqueous solutions using waste materials-Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya, as adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Alok [Department of Applied Chemistry, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal 462 007 (India)]. E-mail: aljymittal@yahoo.co.in; Mittal, Jyoti [Department of Applied Chemistry, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal 462 007 (India); Kurup, Lisha [Department of Applied Chemistry, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal 462 007 (India)

    2006-08-25

    Adsorbents, Bottom Ash (a power plant waste) and De-Oiled Soya (an agricultural waste) exhibit good efficacy to adsorb a highly toxic dye, Tartrazine. Through the batch technique equilibrium uptake of the dye is observed at different concentrations, pH of the solution, dosage of adsorbents and sieve size of adsorbents. Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms are successfully employed on both the adsorbents and on the basis of these models the thermodynamic parameters are evaluated. Kinetic investigations reveal that more than 50% adsorption of dye is achieved in about 1 h in both the cases, whereas, equilibrium establishment takes about 3-4 h. The linear plots obtained in rate constant and mass transfer studies further confirm the applicability of first order rate expression and mass transfer model, respectively. The kinetic data treated to identify rate controlling step of the ongoing adsorption processes indicate that for both the systems, particle diffusion process is predominant at higher concentrations, while film diffusion takes place at lower concentrations. The column studies reveal that about 96% saturation of both the columns is attained during their exhaustion, while about 88 and 84% of the dye material is recovered by eluting dilute NaOH solution through exhausted Bottom Ash and De-Oiled Soya columns, respectively.

  3. Substrate-induced coagulation (SIC) of nano-disperse alumina in non-aqueous media: The dispersibility and stability of alumina in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone

    OpenAIRE

    Basch, Angelika; Strnad, Simona

    2011-01-01

    This work investigated colloidal properties such as the zeta-potential, the electrophoretic mobilities and the wetting behaviour of alumina dispersed in non-aqueous media. Non-aqueous dispersions of alumina were prepared in the solvent N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP). The wetting behaviour of alumina in NMP was characterized by the powder contact angle method and the Wilhemy plate method. The behaviour of the dispersion should provide information for the development of a substrate-induced coag...

  4. Laboratory evidence of organic peroxide and peroxyhemiacetal formation in the aqueous phase and implications for aqueous OH

    OpenAIRE

    Y. B. Lim; B. J. Turpin

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous chemistry in atmospheric waters (e.g., cloud droplets or wet aerosols) is considered a potentially important atmospheric pathway to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOAaq). Water-soluble organic compounds with small carbon numbers (C2–C3) are precursors for SOAaq; products include organic acids, organic sulfates, and high-molecular-weight compounds/oligomers. Fenton reactions and the uptake of gas-phase OH radicals are considered to be the major oxidant sources for...

  5. Technology for safe treatment of radioisotope organic wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Jin; Park, Chong Mook; Choi, W. K.; Lee, K. W.; Moon, J. K.; Yang, H. Y.; Kim, B. T.; Park, S. C

    1999-12-01

    An examination of chemical and radiological characteristics of RI organic liquid waste, wet oxidation by Fenton reaction and decomposition liquid waste treatment process were studied. These items will be applied to develop the equipment of wet oxidation and decomposition liquid waste treatment mixed processes for the safe treatment of RI organic liquid waste which is consisted of organic solvents such as toluene, alcohol and acetone. Two types of toluene solutions were selected as a candidate decomposition material. As for the first type, the concentration of toluene was above 20 vol percent. As for the second type, the solubility of toluene was considered. The decomposition ration by Fenton reaction was above 95 percent for both of them. From the adsorption equilibrium tests, a -Na{sup +} substituted/acid treated activated carbon and Zeocarbon mixed adsorbent was selected for the fixed adsorption column. This mixed adsorbent will be used to obtain the basic design data of liquid waste purification equipment for the treatment of decomposition liquid waste arising from the wet oxidation process. Solidification and degree of strength tests were performed with the simulated sludge/spent adsorbent of MgO as an oxide type and KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. From the test results, the design and fabrication of wet oxidation and liquid waste purification process equipment was made, and a performance test was carried out. (author)

  6. Influence of wet activation of used inorganic binder on cyclically refreshed water glass moulding sands hardened by microwaves

    OpenAIRE

    Mateusz Stachowicz; Kazimierz Granat

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the research results of using an innovative method to reclaim the waste moulding sands containing water glass. Two of the examined processes are connected with "dry" or "wet" activation of inorganic binder in waste moulding sand mixtures physically hardened by microwave radiation. The sand mixtures consisting of high-silica sand and water-glass with average molar module 2.5, were subjected to the following cyclical process: mixing the components, compacting, microwave heati...

  7. Curvature controlled wetting in two dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Tamir; Mikheev, Lev V.

    1995-01-01

    . As the radius of the substrate r0→∞, the leading effect of the curvature is adding the Laplace pressure ΠL∝r0-1 to the pressure balance in the film. At temperatures and pressures under which the wetting is complete in planar geometry, Laplace pressure suppresses divergence of the mean thickness of the wetting...

  8. 7 CFR 29.2570 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.2570 Section 29.2570 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2570 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco...

  9. 7 CFR 29.3567 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.3567 Section 29.3567 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3567 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is...

  10. 7 CFR 29.2316 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.2316 Section 29.2316 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2316 Wet...

  11. 7 CFR 29.3077 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.3077 Section 29.3077 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is in an unsafe...

  12. 7 CFR 29.1083 - Wet (W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet (W). 29.1083 Section 29.1083 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1083 Wet (W). Any sound tobacco containing excessive moisture to the extent that it is...

  13. Evolution of toxicity upon wet catalytic oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A; Yustos, P; Quintanilla, A; García-Ochoa, F; Casas, J A; Rodríguez, J J

    2004-01-01

    This work reports on the evolution of the toxicity of phenol-containing simulated wastewater upon catalytic wet oxidation with a commercial copper-based catalyst (Engelhard Cu-0203T). The results of the study show that this catalyst enhances detoxification, in addition to its effect on the oxidation rate. The EC50 values of the intermediates identified throughout the oxidation route of phenol have been determined and used to predict the evolution of toxicity upon oxidation. The predicted values have been compared with the ones measured directly from the aqueous solution during the oxidation process. To learn about the evolution of toxicity through out the routes of phenol oxidation, experiments have been performed with simulated wastewaters containing separately phenol, catechol, and hydroquinone as original pollutants. The significant increase of toxicity observed during the early stages of phenol oxidation is not directly related to the development of the brown color that derives mainly from catechol oxidation. This increase of toxicity is caused by the formation of hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone as intermediates, the former showing the highest toxicity. Furthermore, synergistic effects, giving rise to a significant increase of toxicity, have been observed. These effects derive from the interactions among copper leached from the catalyst and catechol, hydroquinone, and p-benzoquinone and demand that close attention be paid to this potential problem in catalytic wet oxidation.

  14. Combined wet and dry cleaning of SiGe(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Wook; Kaufman-Osborn, Tobin; Kim, Hyonwoong [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Siddiqui, Shariq; Sahu, Bhagawan [TD Research, GLOBALFOUNDRIES USA, Inc., 257 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Yoshida, Naomi; Brandt, Adam [Applied Materials, Inc., Santa Clara, California 95054 (United States); Kummel, Andrew C., E-mail: akummel@ucsd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Combined wet and dry cleaning via hydrofluoric acid (HF) and atomic hydrogen on Si{sub 0.6}Ge{sub 0.4}(001) surface was studied at the atomic level using ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to understand the chemical transformations of the surface. Aqueous HF removes native oxide, but residual carbon and oxygen are still observed on Si{sub 0.6}Ge{sub 0.4}(001) due to hydrocarbon contamination from post HF exposure to ambient. The oxygen contamination can be eliminated by shielding the sample from ambient via covering the sample in the HF cleaning solution until the sample is introduced to the vacuum chamber or by transferring the sample in an inert environment; however, both processes still leave carbon contaminant. Dry in-situ atomic hydrogen cleaning above 330 °C removes the carbon contamination on the surface consistent with a thermally activated atomic hydrogen reaction with surface hydrocarbon. A postdeposition anneal at 550 °C induces formation of an atomically flat and ordered SiGe surface observed by STM. STS verifies that the wet and dry cleaned surface has an unpinned Fermi level with no states between the conduction and valence band edge comparable to sputter cleaned SiGe surfaces.

  15. Combined Waste Form Cost Trade Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirk Gombert; Steve Piet; Timothy Trickel; Joe Carter; John Vienna; Bill Ebert; Gretchen Matthern

    2008-11-01

    A new generation of aqueous nuclear fuel reprocessing, now in development under the auspices of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), separates fuel into several fractions, thereby partitioning the wastes into groups of common chemistry. This technology advance enables development of waste management strategies that were not conceivable with simple PUREX reprocessing. Conventional wisdom suggests minimizing high level waste (HLW) volume is desirable, but logical extrapolation of this concept suggests that at some point the cost of reducing volume further will reach a point of diminishing return and may cease to be cost-effective. This report summarizes an evaluation considering three groupings of wastes in terms of cost-benefit for the reprocessing system. Internationally, the typical waste form for HLW from the PUREX process is borosilicate glass containing waste elements as oxides. Unfortunately several fission products (primarily Mo and the noble metals Ru, Rh, Pd) have limited solubility in glass, yielding relatively low waste loading, producing more glass, and greater disposal costs. Advanced separations allow matching the waste form to waste stream chemistry, allowing the disposal system to achieve more optimum waste loading with improved performance. Metals can be segregated from oxides and each can be stabilized in forms to minimize the HLW volume for repository disposal. Thus, a more efficient waste management system making the most effective use of advanced waste forms and disposal design for each waste is enabled by advanced separations and how the waste streams are combined. This trade-study was designed to juxtapose a combined waste form baseline waste treatment scheme with two options and to evaluate the cost-benefit using available data from the conceptual design studies supported by DOE-NE.

  16. Closed Fuel Cycle Waste Treatment Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Collins, E. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Crum, J. V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ebert, W. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frank, S. M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garn, T. G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gombert, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jones, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jubin, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Maio, V. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Marra, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Matyas, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Nenoff, T. M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Riley, B. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sevigny, G. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Soelberg, N. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strachan, D. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thallapally, P. K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, J. H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the existing waste management approaches for nuclear fuel cycle facilities in comparison to the objectives of implementing an advanced fuel cycle in the U.S. under current legal, regulatory, and logistical constructs. The study begins with the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) Integrated Waste Management Strategy (IWMS) (Gombert et al. 2008) as a general strategy and associated Waste Treatment Baseline Study (WTBS) (Gombert et al. 2007). The tenets of the IWMS are equally valid to the current waste management study. However, the flowsheet details have changed significantly from those considered under GNEP. In addition, significant additional waste management technology development has occurred since the GNEP waste management studies were performed. This study updates the information found in the WTBS, summarizes the results of more recent technology development efforts, and describes waste management approaches as they apply to a representative full recycle reprocessing flowsheet. Many of the waste management technologies discussed also apply to other potential flowsheets that involve reprocessing. These applications are occasionally discussed where the data are more readily available. The report summarizes the waste arising from aqueous reprocessing of a typical light-water reactor (LWR) fuel to separate actinides for use in fabricating metal sodium fast reactor (SFR) fuel and from electrochemical reprocessing of the metal SFR fuel to separate actinides for recycle back into the SFR in the form of metal fuel. The primary streams considered and the recommended waste forms include; Tritium in low-water cement in high integrity containers (HICs); Iodine-129: As a reference case, a glass composite material (GCM) formed by the encapsulation of the silver Mordenite (AgZ) getter material in a low-temperature glass is assumed. A number of alternatives with distinct advantages are also considered including a fused silica waste form

  17. Wetting behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, A.; Coulombe, S.; Kietzig, A. M.

    2017-03-01

    Nanofluids—engineered colloidal suspensions in base liquids—have captivated the interest of researchers over the last two decades for various existing as well as emerging technological applications. The main impetus for the synthesis of such novel nanocomposite liquids is the potential to alter properties of the base liquid, such as its viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension, and to introduce specific optical and magnetic properties. Numerous studies suggest trends and explanations for the effects associated with the addition of nanoparticles, and that deviation from the base liquid properties are dependent on nanoparticle concentration. However, there remains a certain ambiguity in the available literature. The wetting behavior and surface tension of nanofluids are particular examples where highly conflicting results exist. In this study, we used multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by plasma treatment and dispersed in reverse osmosis water and 99% anhydrous ethanol. Our observations reveal that the surface tension and wetting behavior of the stable aqueous and ethanol-based nanofluids containing plasma functionalized MWCNTs are unaffected by the MWCNT loading up to 120 (0.012) and ∼210 (0.021) ppm (vol%), respectively. The ethanol-based MWCNT nanofluids allowed us to extend the study to higher loadings, and a linear increase of the surface tension past ∼200 ppm was observed. Conversely, nanofluids containing non-functionalized or surfactant-stabilized MWCNTs show drastically different contact angle values when compared to the base liquids even at very low concentrations (less than 100 ppm). We demonstrate that the stability of nanofluid and method of stabilization are crucial parameters in determining the wetting behavior of nanofluids.

  18. Wetting behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotube nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, A; Coulombe, S; Kietzig, A M

    2017-03-10

    Nanofluids-engineered colloidal suspensions in base liquids-have captivated the interest of researchers over the last two decades for various existing as well as emerging technological applications. The main impetus for the synthesis of such novel nanocomposite liquids is the potential to alter properties of the base liquid, such as its viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension, and to introduce specific optical and magnetic properties. Numerous studies suggest trends and explanations for the effects associated with the addition of nanoparticles, and that deviation from the base liquid properties are dependent on nanoparticle concentration. However, there remains a certain ambiguity in the available literature. The wetting behavior and surface tension of nanofluids are particular examples where highly conflicting results exist. In this study, we used multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by plasma treatment and dispersed in reverse osmosis water and 99% anhydrous ethanol. Our observations reveal that the surface tension and wetting behavior of the stable aqueous and ethanol-based nanofluids containing plasma functionalized MWCNTs are unaffected by the MWCNT loading up to 120 (0.012) and ∼210 (0.021) ppm (vol%), respectively. The ethanol-based MWCNT nanofluids allowed us to extend the study to higher loadings, and a linear increase of the surface tension past ∼200 ppm was observed. Conversely, nanofluids containing non-functionalized or surfactant-stabilized MWCNTs show drastically different contact angle values when compared to the base liquids even at very low concentrations (less than 100 ppm). We demonstrate that the stability of nanofluid and method of stabilization are crucial parameters in determining the wetting behavior of nanofluids.

  19. Physical-chemical bases of the recovery of surface active materials from aqueous solutions and waste water. Fiziko-Khimicheskie osnovy izvlecheniya poverkhnostno-aktivnykh veshchestv izvodnykh rastvorov i stochnykh vod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koganovskii, A.M.; Klimenko, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    Contemporary data are given on the adsorption of surfactants on adsorbents of various chemical makeup, on the effect of the structure of their solutions, and the presence of strong electrolytes. An examination is made of the connection between the chemical structure of surfactants, their state in solution, and the structure of the adsorption layers. Data are presented for the first time on the joint adsorption of components from solubilized systems and the products resulting from the interaction between surfactants and dissolved dyes. Physico-chemical substantiation is offered for the absorption technology of removing surfactants and concomitant organic matter from industrial waste. Fundamental technological systems are presented for the sorption purification of sewage polluted by surfactants, and the conditions for their most effective utilization are substantiated. The book is intended for specialists engaged in the physical chemistry of surface phenomena as well as for investigators and planning personnel who are developing the technology of purifying industrial sewage. 81 figures, 53 tables.

  20. Assessing the Emission Sources of Atmospheric Mercury in Wet Deposition Across Illinois, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gratz L. E.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available From August 2007 to August 2009, we collected event-based precipitation samples for mercury (Hg and trace element analysis at four sites in Illinois, USA. The objectives of these measurements were to quantify the levels of Hg wet deposition across the state, and to assess the contributions to Hg in precipitation from major local and regional emission sources. The measurement sites were located in Chicago, Peoria, Nilwood, and Carbondale, IL. We were not able to identify a clear spatial gradient in Hg wet deposition among the sites. At all four locations we frequently observed Hg concentrations in precipitation > 25 ng/L, while each site received > 10 μg/m2 of Hg wet deposition annually, suggesting a substantial impact from local and regional anthropogenic emission sources. We applied the multivariate statistical receptor model Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF to the measured Hg and trace element wet deposition amounts at the four sites. The results suggested that 60-83% of total Hg deposition at each site could be attributed to coal combustion emissions. Although we identified other source signatures in the precipitation composition, including cement manufacturing, metal smelting / waste incineration, and iron-steel production, these sources contributed substantially less to the measured amounts of Hg wet deposition. We also applied the hybrid receptor model Quantitative Transport Bias Analysis (QTBA to the Hg wet deposition data from each site to identify the major source regions associated with the measured values. Results suggested that sources in the Chicago/Gary, St. Louis, and Ohio River Valley urban/industrial areas had a substantial impact on Hg wet deposition, strongly supporting the conclusion that local and regional coal combustion was the largest source of Hg wet deposition in Illinois.

  1. Effects of biodrying process on municipal solid waste properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambone, F; Scaglia, B; Scotti, S; Adani, F

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of biodrying process on municipal solid waste (MSW) properties was studied. The results obtained indicated that after 14d, biodrying reduced the water content of waste, allowing the production of biodried waste with a net heating value (NHV) of 16,779±2,074kJ kg(-1) wet weight, i.e. 41% higher than that of untreated waste. The low moisture content of the biodried material reduced, also, the potential impacts of the waste, i.e. potential self-ignition and potential odors production. Low waste impacts suggest to landfill the biodried material obtaining energy via biogas production by waste re-moistening, i.e. bioreactor. Nevertheless, results of this work indicate that biodrying process because of the partial degradation of the organic fraction contained in the waste (losses of 290g kg(-1) VS), reduced of about 28% the total producible biogas.

  2. Waste survey - landfill disposability of furniture industrial wastes from varnishing processes; Huonekaluteollisuuden maalaamokaappijaetteiden kaatopaikkakelpoisuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaajasaari, K.; Kulovaara, M.; Joutti, A.; Schulz, E. [Pirkanmaan Ympaeristoekeskus, Tampere (Finland)

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this study was to screen the environmental hazard of eight different furniture industrial wastes in context of their landfill disposal. These wastes are resulting from the varnishing process of furniture manufacture. Four of these materials were collected from a dry varnishing processes and the other four residues from a wet varnishing processes. We wanted to classify these industrial wastes according to their leaching and ecotoxicological properties to evaluate if these kind of materials could be disposed off to a non-hazardous landfill. Leaching properties of residues were determined with European standard draft prEN 12457-2 method. The toxicity measurement of the leaching tests eluates from furniture industrial residues was carried out with a plant (the onion Allium cepa root elongation test), bacteria (the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri assay) and enzyme inhibition (the reverse electron transport, RET, assay). Chemical concentrations of TOC, formaldehyde and solvents in solid wastes and their leaching test eluates were measured simultaneously. The results showed that dry residues contained high amount of formaldehyde which will leach out from the wastes a long time period if wastes are in contact with water at landfill conditions. Furthermore, the water leachable substances in dry residues resulted very high acute toxicity. Toxicity test results confirmed the conclusions drawn from the chemical data as well in wet residues. Two of the wet residues with the highest solvent concentrations were clearly toxic, while the other two wet residues had the smallest concentrations of the harmful substances and only slight acute toxicity. The biggest problems in context of landfill disposability are connected to a high liquid content of wet residues (over 70 %). (orig.)

  3. Aqueous Computing:A Survey with an Invitation to Participate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tom Head; Xia Chen; Masayuki Yamamura; Susannah Gal

    2002-01-01

    The concept of aqueous computing is presented here, first in full generality,and afterward, using an implementation in a specific enzymatic technology. Aqueous computingarose in the context of biomolecular (DNA) computing, but the concept is independent ofthe specifics of its biochemical origin. Alternate technologies for realizing aqueous computingare being considered for future implementation. A solution of an instance of the Booleansatisfiability problem, (SAT), is reported here that provides a new example of an aqueouscomputation that has been carried out successfully. This small instance of the SAT problemis sufficiently complex to allow our current enzymatic technology to be illustrated in detail.The reader is invited to participate in the rich interdisciplinary activity required by wet labcomputing. A project is suggested to the reader for determining the three-colorings of a graph.The basic operations required for this project are exhibited in the solution of the SAT examplereported here.

  4. Mobile fission and activation products in nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeki, H.; Evans, N.; Czervinski, K.; Bruggeman, Ch.; Poineau, F.; Breynaert, A.; Reiler, P.; Pablo, J. de; Pipon, Y.; Molnar, M.; Nishimura, T.; Kienzler, B.; Van Iseghem, P.; Crovisier, J.L.; Wieland, E.; Mace, N.; Pablo, J. de; Spahiu, K.; Cui, D.; Lida, Y.; Charlet, L.; Liu, X.; Sato, H.; Goutelard, F.; Savoye, S.; Glaus, M.; Poinssot, C.; Seby, F.; Sato, H.; Tournassat, Ch.; Montavon, G.; Rotenberg, B.; Spahiu, K.; Smith, G.; Marivoet, J.; Landais, P.; Bruno, J.; Johnson, H.; Umeki, L.; Geckeis, H.; Giffaut, E.; Grambow, B.; Dierckx, A

    2007-07-01

    This document gathers 33 oral presentations that were made at this workshop dedicated to the mobility of some radionuclides in nuclear waste disposal. The workshop was organized into 6 sessions: 1) performance assessment, 2) speciation/interaction in aqueous media, 3) radioactive wastes, 4) redox processes at interfaces, 5) diffusion processes, and 6) retention processes.

  5. Forced wetting of a reactive surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, T D

    2012-11-01

    The dynamic wetting of water on gelatin-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (GC-PET) has been investigated by forced wetting over a wide speed range and compared with earlier data obtained with unmodified PET. The results were analysed according to the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting (MKT). Both substrates show complex behaviour, with separate low- and high-speed modes. For the GC-PET, this is attributed to a rapid change in the wettability of the substrate on contact with water, specifically a surface molecular transformation from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. This results in a smooth wetting transition from one mode to the other. For the PET, the bimodal behaviour is attributed to surface heterogeneity, with the low-speed dynamics dominated by interactions with polar sites on the substrate that become masked at higher speeds. In this case, the transition is discontinuous. The study has general ramifications for the investigation of any wetting processes in which a physicochemical transformation takes place at the solid surface on contact with the liquid. In particular, it shows how forced wetting, combined with the MKT, can reveal subtle details of the processes involved. It is unlikely that similar insight could be gained from spontaneous wetting studies, such as spreading drops.

  6. Preliminary Test of the Wet Oxidation of Organics in Basin F Wastewater at Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    unless other costs such as heating and compression become prohibitive. It is particularly suitable for first-stage treatment of waste source containing...pressures lead to requirements for heavy walled vessels and high pressure pumps . j (2) Wet oxidation tends to produce oxygenated organic compounds of...From Table III, DIMP disappears during the first 10 or 20 percent of the COD reduction. Contrary to our experience with carbon adsorbtion , DIMP is not

  7. On the gasification of wet biomass in supercritical water : over de vergassing van natte biomassa in superkritiek water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Withag, J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is a challenging thermo-chemical conversion route for wet biomass and waste streams into hydrogen and/or methane. At temperatures and pressures above the critical point the physical properties of water differ strongly from liquid water or steam. Because of the

  8. 40 CFR 60.2680 - What if I do not use a wet scrubber to comply with the emission limitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions Guidelines and Compliance Times for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units that... air pollution control device other than a wet scrubber, or limit emissions in some other manner, to... comply with the emission limitations? 60.2680 Section 60.2680 Protection of Environment...

  9. Cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT and Köhler theory (KT to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Wet generated regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Wet generated clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (from low solubility compounds like calcite present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method.

    Based on the method of threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to

  10. Cloud condensation nuclei activity and droplet activation kinetics of wet processed regional dust samples and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Sokolik, I. N.; Nenes, A.

    2011-08-01

    This study reports laboratory measurements of particle size distributions, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity, and droplet activation kinetics of wet generated aerosols from clays, calcite, quartz, and desert soil samples from Northern Africa, East Asia/China, and Northern America. The dependence of critical supersaturation, sc, on particle dry diameter, Ddry, is used to characterize particle-water interactions and assess the ability of Frenkel-Halsey-Hill adsorption activation theory (FHH-AT) and Köhler theory (KT) to describe the CCN activity of the considered samples. Wet generated regional dust samples produce unimodal size distributions with particle sizes as small as 40 nm, CCN activation consistent with KT, and exhibit hygroscopicity similar to inorganic salts. Wet generated clays and minerals produce a bimodal size distribution; the CCN activity of the smaller mode is consistent with KT, while the larger mode is less hydrophilic, follows activation by FHH-AT, and displays almost identical CCN activity to dry generated dust. Ion Chromatography (IC) analysis performed on regional dust samples indicates a soluble fraction that cannot explain the CCN activity of dry or wet generated dust. A mass balance and hygroscopicity closure suggests that the small amount of ions (from low solubility compounds like calcite) present in the dry dust dissolve in the aqueous suspension during the wet generation process and give rise to the observed small hygroscopic mode. Overall these results identify an artifact that may question the atmospheric relevance of dust CCN activity studies using the wet generation method. Based on the method of threshold droplet growth analysis, wet generated mineral aerosols display similar activation kinetics compared to ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Finally, a unified CCN activity framework that accounts for concurrent effects of solute and adsorption is developed to describe the CCN activity of aged or hygroscopic dusts.

  11. Effects of aqueous-soluble organic compounds on the removal of selected radionuclides from high-level waste part I: Distribution of Sr, Cs, and Tc onto 18 absorbers from an irradiated, organic-containing leachate simulant for Hanford Tank 101-SY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Many of the radioactive waste storage tanks at U.S. Department of Energy facilities contain organic compounds that have been degraded by radiolysis and chemical reactions. In this investigation, we measured the effect of some aqueous-soluble organic compounds on the sorption of strontium, cesium, and technetium onto 18 absorbers that offer high sorption of strontium from organic-free solutions. For our test solution we used a leachate from a simulated slurry for Hanford Tank 101-SY that initially contained ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and then was gamma-irradiated to 34 Mrads. We measured distribution coefficients (Kds) for each element/absorber combination for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. To facilitate comparisons, we include Kd values for these same element/absorber combinations from three organic-free simulant solutions. The Kd values for strontium sorption from the simulant that contained the degraded organics usually decreased by large factors, whereas the Kd values for cesium and technetium sorption were relatively unaffected.

  12. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part...... of the system industry has to inform at the planning stage and afterwards in yearly reports on their waste arising and how the waste is managed. If available such information is very helpful in obtaining information about that specific industry. However, in many countries there is very little information...... available about industrial waste – maybe also influenced by the policy of the industry as to making information publicly available. The data presented in this chapter is scarce and maybe not fully representative for the industrial sectors and hence should be used with caution only....

  13. Wetting transitions at soft, sliding interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A.; Clain, J.; Buguin, A.; Brochard-Wyart, F.

    2002-03-01

    We observe (by optical interferometry) the contact of a rubber cap squeezing a nonwetting liquid against a plate moving at velocity U. At low velocities, the contact is dry. It becomes partially wet above a threshold velocity Vc1, with two symmetrical dry patches on the rear part. Above a second velocity Vc2, the contact is totally wet. This regime U>Vc2 corresponds to the hydroplaning of a car (decelerating on a wet road). We interpret the transitions at Vc1, Vc2 in terms of a competition between (a) liquid invasion induced by shear (b) spontaneous dewetting of the liquid (between nonwettable surfaces).

  14. Catalytic wet oxidation of black liquor

    OpenAIRE

    Viader Riera, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    The major aspects of wet air oxidation and catalytic wet air oxidation have been reviewed in this work paying special attention to the reaction mechanisms, kinetics and the industrial process. In the experimental section a set of heterogeneous catalysts have been tested in the wet oxidation of non-wood black liquor. The oxidation runs were performed batchwise in a laboratory-scale mechanically stirred slurry reactor for 1 h at a temperature of 170°C and total pressure of 12 bar. Pure oxygen w...

  15. Waste indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall, O.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E. [Cowi A/S, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  16. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29

    The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble

  17. Linear polymer aqueous solutions in soft lubrication:From boundary to mixed lubrication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; ShuHai; TAN; GuiBin; WANG; DeGuo

    2013-01-01

    In order to better understand linear polymer aqueous solutions in soft lubrication from boundary to mixed lubrication,poly(ethylene glycol) and sodium hyaluronateare used as model polymers were investigated by using UMT-2 tribometer with the ball-on-disk mode. The relationship between the master Stribeck curves of the polymer aqueous solutions and the influence factors were investigated. Experimental results indicated that soft lubrication is determined by lubricant rheological properties and surface-lubricant interactions, e.g., wetting behavior of polymer aqueous solution on tribological surfaces.

  18. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William j. Weber; Lumin Wang; Jonathan Icenhower

    2004-07-09

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials.

  19. Annual Radioactive Waste Tank Inspection Program - 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNatt, F.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1998-05-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1997 to evaluate these vessels, and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report.

  20. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program: 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNatt, F.G. Sr.

    1996-04-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1995 to evaluate these vessels and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed are the subject of this report

  1. Annual radioactive waste tank inspection program - 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1997-04-01

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 1996 to evaluate these vessels, and evaluations based on data accrued by inspections performed since the tanks were constructed, are the subject of this report.

  2. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29

    compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in greatest abundance in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are low but are also expected to be in measurable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. These are present due to their partial volatility and some entrainment in the off-gas system. This report discusses results of optimized {sup 99}Tc decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc. Testing focused on minimizing the quantity of sorbents/reactants added, and minimizing mixing time to reach the decontamination targets in this simulant formulation. Stannous chloride and ferrous sulfate were tested as reducing agents to determine the minimum needed to convert soluble pertechnetate

  3. Subcritical hydrothermal liquefaction of barley straw in fresh water and recycled aqueous phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Zhe; Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse;

    2014-01-01

    This project focuses on the investigation of addition of aqueous phase in the production of biofuel from biomass through hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) technology. Hydrothermal liquefaction is a wet thermal conversion process, which can convert all kinds of biomass to fuels. In this study, barle...

  4. Kinetics of absorption of carbon dioxide into aqueous potassium salt of proline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Subham; Thomsen, Kaj

    2012-01-01

    The absorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) into aqueous solution of potassium prolinate (KPr) are studied at 303, 313, and 323K within the salt concentration range of 0.5–3.0kmolm−3 using a wetted wall column absorber. The experimental results are used to interpret the kinetics of the reaction of CO2...

  5. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  6. Adult Bed-Wetting: A Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D. Bed-wetting that starts in adulthood (secondary enuresis) is uncommon and requires medical evaluation. Causes of ... Erik P. Castle, M.D. References Adult nocturnal enuresis. National Association for Continence. http://www.nafc.org/ ...

  7. Wetting behavior of alternative solder alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Vianco, P.T.; Hernandez, C.L.; Rejent, J.A.

    1993-07-01

    Recent economic and environmental issues have stimulated interest in solder alloys other than the traditional Sn-Pb eutectic or near eutectic composition. Preliminary evaluations suggest that several of these alloys approach the baseline properties (wetting, mechanical, thermal, and electrical) of the Sn-Pb solders. Final alloy acceptance will require major revisions to existing industrial and military soldering specifications. Bulk alloy and solder joint properties are consequently being investigated to validate their producibility and reliability. The work reported in this paper examines the wetting behavior of several of the more promising commercial alloys on copper substrates. Solder wettability was determined by the meniscometer and wetting balance techniques. The wetting results suggest that several of the alternative solders would satisfy pretinning and surface mount soldering applications. Their use on plated through hole technology might be more difficult since the alloys generally did not spread or flow as well as the 60Sn-40Pb solder.

  8. National Ignition Facility wet weather construction plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, A N

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a wet weather construction plan for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction project. Construction of the NIF commenced in mid- 1997, and excavation of the site was completed in the fall. Preparations for placing concrete foundations began in the fall, and above normal rainfall is expected over the tinter. Heavy rainfall in late November impacted foundation construction, and a wet weather construction plan was determined to be needed. This wet weather constiction plan recommends a strategy, techniques and management practices to prepare and protect the site corn wet weather effects and allow construction work to proceed. It is intended that information in this plan be incorporated in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) as warranted.

  9. Wet granular matter a truly complex fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Herminghaus, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    This is a monograph written for the young and advanced researcher who is entering the field of wet granular matter and keen to understand the basic physical principles governing this state of soft matter. It treats wet granulates as an instance of a ternary system, consisting of the grains, a primary, and a secondary fluid. After addressing wetting phenomena in general and outlining the basic facts on dry granular systems, a chapter on basic mechanisms and their effects is dedicated to every region of the ternary phase diagram. Effects of grain shape and roughness are considered as well. Rather than addressing engineering aspects such as existing books on this topic do, the book aims to provide a generalized framework suitable for those who want to understand these systems on a more fundamental basis. Readership: For the young and advanced researcher entering the field of wet granular matter.

  10. Tualatin River - Wet Prairie Restoration Phase III

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Forty five acres of wet prairie and 11 acres of adjacent lands were treated for reed canarygrass in this ongoing project. Federally threatened Nelson’s...

  11. Critical point wetting drop tower experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Tcherneshoff, L. M.; Straits, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results for the Critical Point Wetting CPW Drop Tower Experiment are produced with immiscible systems. Much of the observed phenomena conformed to the anticipated behavior. More drops will be needed to test the CPW theory with these immiscible systems.

  12. ROE Wet Sulfate Deposition 2009-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet sulfate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2009 to 2011. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  13. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  14. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  15. A WET TALE: TOXICITY OF COMPLEX EFFLUENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This course covers standards, regulations, policy, guidance and technical aspects of implementing the whole effluent toxicity program. The curriculum incorporates rationale and information on WET test requirements from USEPA documents, such as the Technical Support Document for W...

  16. Waste Treatment Technology Process Development Plan For Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.

    2013-08-29

    The purpose of this Process Development Plan is to summarize the objectives and plans for the technology development activities for an alternative path for disposition of the recycle stream that will be generated in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility (LAW Recycle). This plan covers the first phase of the development activities. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to recycle it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be concentrated by evaporation and returned to the LAW vitrification facility. Because this stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are also problematic for the glass waste form, they accumulate in the Recycle stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and reducing the halides in the Recycle is a key component of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, this stream does not have a proven disposition path, and resolving this gap becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and to develop a process that will remove radionuclides from this stream and allow its diversion to another disposition path, greatly decreasing the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. The origin of this LAW Recycle stream will be from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover or precipitates of scrubbed components (e.g. carbonates). The soluble

  17. Assessment of a dry and a wet route for the production of biofuels from microalgae: energy balance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lixian; Wim Brilman, Derk W F; Withag, Jan A M; Brem, Gerrit; Kersten, Sascha

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the energy balance of two microalgae-to-biofuel concepts, one via a so called "dry route" (oil extraction from dried algae) and one via a "wet route" (oil extraction in the water phase), are assessed. Both routes are intended to convert the chemical energy contained in the microalgae into high-value biofuels with minimal fossil energy consumption. The analysis shows that the drying process in the dry route and the oil extraction process in the wet route consume a significant amount of energy. By coupling waste heat from a nearby power plant to the process, the energy balance can be improved and a potential fossil energy ratio (FER) up to 2.38 and 1.82 can be reached for the dry and wet route, respectively. The results indicate that based on current available technologies, the dry route has higher FER and the wet route has more potential in producing high valuable biofuels.

  18. Food waste or wasted food

    OpenAIRE

    van Graas, Maaike Helene

    2014-01-01

    In the industrialized world large amounts of food are daily disposed of. A significant share of this waste could be avoided if different choices were made by individual households. Each day, every household makes decisions to maximize their happiness while balancing restricted amounts of time and money. Thinking of the food waste issue in terms of the consumer choice problem where households can control the amount of wasted food, we can model how households can make the best decisions. I...

  19. Biodegradation of wet-white leather

    OpenAIRE

    Ollé Otero, Lluís; Jorba Rafart, Montse; Font Vallès, Joaquim; Shendrik, Alexander; Bacardit Dalmases, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the physical, chemical and biological processes associated with the deterioration of wet-white leather. The samples of leather were exposed for eight months to outdoor weathering and then their properties were subsequently evaluated. The results indicate that resistance and dimensional stability of wet-white (THPS-syntan) leather is higher than that of chrometanned leather. The comparative work with chrome leather was described earlier.

  20. Wetting and phase separation at surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay Puri; Kurt Binder

    2005-06-01

    We study the problem of surface-directed spinodal decomposition, viz., the dynamical interplay of wetting and phase separation at surfaces. In particular, we focus on the kinetics of wetting-layer growth in a semi-infinite geometry for arbitrary surface potentials and mixture compositions. We also present representative results for phase separation in confined geometries, e.g., cylindrical pores, thin films, etc.

  1. Advantages of dry hardened cask storage over wet storage for spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanato, Luiz Sergio, E-mail: romanato@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. da Qualidade

    2011-07-01

    Pools are generally used to store and maintain spent nuclear fuel assemblies for cooling, after removed from reactors. After three to five years stored in the pools, spent fuel can be reprocessed or sent to a final disposition in a geological repository and handled as radioactive waste or sent to another site waiting for future solution. Spent fuel can be stored in dry or wet installations, depending on the method adopted by the nuclear plant. If this storage were exclusively wet, at the installation decommissioning in the future, another solution for storage will need to be found. Today, after a preliminary cooling, the spent fuel assemblies can be removed from the pool and sent to dry hardened storage installations. This kind of storage does not need complex radiation monitoring and it is safer than wet storage. Brazil has two nuclear reactors in operation, a third reactor is under construction and they use wet spent fuel storage . Dry hardened casks use metal or both metal and concrete for radiation shielding and they are safe, especially during an earthquake. An earthquake struck Japan on March 11, 2011 damaging Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The occurrence of earthquakes in Brazil is very small but dry casks can resist to other events, including terrorist acts, better than pools. This paper shows the advantages of dry hardened cask storage in comparison with the wet storage (water pools) for spent nuclear fuel. (author)

  2. Performance and Analysis of Floating dome Anaerobic Digester with Wet and Dry Feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, S.; Parthiban, A.; Venugopal, S.; Jothi Prakash, V. M.

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of anaerobic digestion to generate biogas yield and it’s performed using wet and dry feed stock. The laboratory experiment is conducted in a floating dome type anaerobic digester with 1m3 capacity. It is made up of fibre material at continues process. The starter cowdung used as an inoculum of the anaerobic digester. Then raw materials feeded as a wet type wheat straw and dry type wheat straw is the ratio of 1:1 waste/water in both the experiments wet and dry wheat straw. In this experiments are fermented at 30ºC to 35ºC temperature is maintained. The daily biogas yield, cumulative biogas yield, pH, CH4, and hydro retention time these parameters is studied and analysed. The maximum daily biogas is 25liters and 42% of methane is achieved in dry wheat straw at 15th day of digestion. The highest gas yield obtained in dry condition compare to wet condition and acid level also decreased in wet digestion.

  3. Modeling early in situ wetting of a compacted bentonite buffer installed in low permeable crystalline bedrock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessirier, B.; Frampton, A.; Fransson, Å.; Jarsjö, J.

    2016-08-01

    The repository concept for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Sweden and Finland is planned to be constructed in sparsely fractured crystalline bedrock and with an engineered bentonite buffer to embed the waste canisters. An important stage in such a deep repository is the postclosure phase following the deposition and the backfilling operations when the initially unsaturated buffer material gets hydrated by the groundwater delivered by the natural bedrock. We use numerical simulations to interpret observations on buffer wetting gathered during an in situ campaign, the Bentonite Rock Interaction Experiment, in which unsaturated bentonite columns were introduced into deposition holes in the floor of a 417 m deep tunnel at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. Our objectives are to assess the performance of state-of-the-art flow models in reproducing the buffer wetting process and to investigate to which extent dependable predictions of buffer wetting times and saturation patterns can be made based on information collected prior to buffer insertion. This would be important for preventing insertion into unsuitable bedrock environments. Field data and modeling results indicate the development of a de-saturated zone in the rock and show that in most cases, the presence or absence of fractures and flow heterogeneity are more important factors for correct wetting predictions than the total inflow. For instance, for an equal open-hole inflow value, homogeneous inflow yields much more rapid buffer wetting than cases where fractures are represented explicitly thus creating heterogeneous inflow distributions.

  4. Improvement of Heating Method for Measuring the Wetness of Flowing Wet Steam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    In this paper,an improvement of heating method for measuring wetness of the flowing wet steam is developed,the basic principle of the heating method is presented and the mathematical model has been built for analyzing the thermodynamics problems during the process of heating,Moreover,an instrument for measuring wetness of wet steam flow was designed and made out.This instument has been used for measuring wetness of the wet steam flow at the outlet of the nozzle rig in Thermal Turbine Laboratory,Xi'an Jiaotong University,By analyzing the relative error of the result,it was found that this instrument has fairly high accuracy,it can be used as the prototype of practical instrument and has an important applicable value in engineering.

  5. Processing method for molten salt waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Shuichi; Sawa, Toshio; Hoshikawa, Tadahiro; Suzuoki, Akira

    1999-01-06

    The present invention concerns a processing method for selectively adsorbing and removing radioactive metal ingredients contained in high temperature molten salts by an inorganic ion exchanger and separating radioactive metal ingredients from the molten salts as high level radioactive wastes upon reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels by using molten salts. The molten salts occluded in the inorganic ion exchanger are desorbed with highly purified water. Successively, saturation adsorbed radioactive metal ingredients are desorbed by an aqueous solution of alkali metal salt or an aqueous solution of alkaline earth metal salt. The desorbed molten salts and radioactive metal ingredients are formed into at least two kinds of radioactive waste solidification materials depending on each of radioactivity level. As the inorganic ion exchanger, at least one of aluminosilicate and hydroxides is used. Then, molten salt wastes generated upon a dry-type reprocessing can be processed as a stable borosilicate glass solidification material or as a similar homogeneous solid material. (T.M.)

  6. Ru decorated carbon nanotubes - a promising catalyst for reforming bio-based acetic acid in the aqueous phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieger, de D.J.M.; Lefferts, L.; Seshan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic reforming of biomass derived waste streams in the aqueous phase is a promising process for the production of sustainable hydrogen. Acetic acid will be a major component (up to 20 wt%) in many anticipated gasification feed streams (e.g. the aqueous fraction of pyrolysis oil). Conventional s

  7. Treatment of Aqueous Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Spronsen, J.; Witkamp, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the recovery or removal of one or more crystallizable compounds from an aqueous solution containing, apart from the said crystallizable compounds, one or more organic or inorganic scale- forming or scale-inducing materials having a lower solubility in water

  8. Use of a sentinel system for field measurements of Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst inactivation in soil and animal waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M B; Walker, M J; Bowman, D D; Anthony, L C; Ghiorse, W C

    1999-05-01

    A small-volume sentinel chamber was developed to assess the effects of environmental stresses on survival of sucrose-Percoll-purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil and animal wastes. Chambers were tested for their ability to equilibrate with external chemical and moisture conditions. Sentinel oocysts were then exposed to stresses of the external environment that affected their viability (potential infectivity), as indicated by results of a dye permeability assay. Preliminary laboratory experiments indicated that temperatures between 35 and 50 degrees C and decreases in soil water potential (-0.003 to -3.20 MPa) increased oocyst inactivation rates. The effects of two common animal waste management practices on oocyst survival were investigated on three dairy farms in Delaware County, N.Y., within the New York City watershed: (i) piling wastes from dairy youngstock (including neonatal calves) and (ii) spreading wastes as a soil amendment on an agricultural field. Sentinel containers filled with air-dried and sieved (2-mm mesh) youngstock waste or field soil were wetted and inoculated with 2 million oocysts in an aqueous suspension and then placed in waste piles on two different farms and in soil within a cropped field on one farm. Controls consisted of purified oocysts in either phosphate-buffered saline or distilled water contained in sealed microcentrifuge tubes. Two microdata loggers recorded the ambient temperature at each field site. Sentinel experiments were conducted during the fall and winter (1996 to 1997) and winter (1998). Sentinel containers and controls were removed at 2- to 4-week intervals, and oocysts were extracted and tested by the dye permeability assay. The proportions of potentially infective oocysts exposed to the soil and waste pile material decreased more rapidly than their counterpart controls exposed to buffer or water, indicating that factors other than temperature affected oocyst inactivation in the waste piles and soil. The

  9. State-of-the-art report on low-level radioactive waste treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kibbey, A.H.; Godbee, H.W.

    1980-09-01

    An attempt is made to identify the main sources of low-level radioactive wastes that are generated in the United States. To place the waste problem in perspective, rough estimates are given of the annual amounts of each generic type of waste that is generated. Most of the wet solid wastes arise from the cleanup of gaseous and liquid radioactive streams prior to discharge or recycle. The treatment of the process streams and the secondary wet solid wastes thus generated is described for each type of government or fuel cycle installation. Similarly, the institutional wet wastes are also described. The dry wastes from all sources have smilar physical and chemical characteristics in that they can be classified as compactible, noncompactible, combustible, noncombustible, or combinations thereof. The various treatment options for concentrated or solid wet wastes and for dry wastes are discussed. Among the dry-waste treatment methods are compaction, baling, and incineration, as well as chopping, cutting, and shredding. Organic materials can usually be incinerated or, in some cases, biodegraded. The filter sludges, spent resins, incinerator ashes, and concentrated liquids are usually solidified in cement, urea-formaldehyde, or unsaturated polyester resins prior to burial. Asphalt has not yet been used as a solidificaton agent in the United States, but it probably will be used in the near future. The treatment of radioactive medical and bioresearch wastes is described, but the waste from radiochenmical, pharmaceutical, and other industries is not well defined at the present time. Recovery of waste metals and treatment of hazardous contaminated wastes are discussed briefly. Some areas appearing to need more research, development, and demonstration are specifically pointed out.

  10. Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, David J; Shi, Liming; Kremer, Gregory; Stuart, Ben J; Reynolds, James; Caine, John

    2005-06-01

    Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or water-based) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with approximately 15% less collecting area.

  11. Performance of some surfactants as wetting agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalaby, M.N.; El-Shanny, O.A.A. [Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute (EPRI), Cairo (Egypt). Evaluation and Analysis Dept.

    2005-12-01

    The wetting power of anionic surfactant: sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and nonionic surfactants: polyoxyethelene(14)monolaurate [La(EO){sub 14}] and polyoxyethelene(14)monoeleate [OI(EO){sub 14}] has been studied to determine their performance as wetting agents. The study reveals that the nonionic compound with a long hydrophobic chain exhibits higher wettability than the shorter one when used at very low cocentrations (below CMC) and the reverse is shown with high concentrations (above CMC). the wetting power of the investigated surfactants increases as the CMC values increases. In case of the nonionic compounds and at surfactant concentrations equal their CMC values, OI(EO){sub 14} shows a higher wetting power than La(EO){sub 14} while is possesses a lower HLB value. The anionic surfactant shows an optimum wetting in comparison with the tested nonionic one. The wettability of all the investigated samples increases as the surface tension of their solutions increases to the allowed limit that can be reached in the presence of surfactant. (orig.)

  12. Epimacular brachytherapy for wet AMD: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Alforja, Socorro; Giralt, Joan; Farah, Michel E

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is considered the most common cause of blindness in the over-60 age group in developed countries. There are basically two forms of presentation: geographic (dry or atrophic) and wet (neovascular or exudative). Geographic atrophy accounts for approximately 85%-90% of ophthalmic frames and leads to a progressive degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium and the photoreceptors. Wet AMD causes the highest percentage of central vision loss secondary to disease. This neovascular form involves an angiogenic process in which newly formed choroidal vessels invade the macular area. Today, intravitreal anti-angiogenic drugs attempt to block the angiogenic events and represent a major advance in the treatment of wet AMD. Currently, combination therapy for wet AMD includes different forms of radiation delivery. Epimacular brachytherapy (EMBT) seems to be a useful approach to be associated with current anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, presenting an acceptable efficacy and safety profile. However, at the present stage of research, the results of the clinical trials carried out to date are insufficient to justify extending routine use of EMBT for the treatment of wet AMD.

  13. Tunable Reactive Wetting of Sn on Microporous Cu Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingquan Lai; Lei Zhang; Cai Chen; J.K. Shang

    2012-01-01

    Wetting of microporous Cu layer by liquid Sn resulted in contact angles from 0 to 33 deg., tunable by varying wetting temperature and porous microstructure. The wetting was dominated by the interracial metallurgical reaction, which can lead to pore closure phenomenon, as the liquid infiltration facilitating the wetting process.

  14. Evaporation from rain-wetted forest in relation to canopy wetness, canopy cover, and net radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    2001-01-01

    Evaporation from wet canopies is commonly calculated using E-PM, the Penman-Monteith equation with zero surface resistance. However, several observations show a lower evaporation from rain-wetted forest. Possible causes for the difference between E-PM and experiments are evaluated to provide rules f

  15. Produção de carvão a partir de resíduo de erva-mate para a remoção de contaminantes orgânicos de meio aquoso Production of charcoal from maté waste to remove organic contaminants from aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maraísa Gonçalves

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, apresenta-se um novo material adsorvente, obtido a partir da pirólise de resíduos da erva-mate. O carvão resultante demonstrou elevada área superficial específica quando comparado com outros materiais pirolisados e elevada capacidade de remoção de contaminantes orgânicos de soluções aquosas. Os valores de área específica apresentados pelos materiais foram de 344, 191 e ~0,5 m² g-1, para o carvão Mate 1, Mate 2 e Mate 3, respectivamente. As isotermas de adsorção mostraram que os carvões apresentam potencial para utilização como adsorvente para compostos orgânicos, tais como: o corante têxtil vermelho reativo, o corante azul de metileno e para o herbicida atrazina, sendo que os máximos de adsorção utilizando o carvão Mate 1 foram de 16, 230 e 30 mg g-1, respectivamente.In this work we present a new adsorbent material, obtained by maté waste pyrolisis. The resulting charcoal presented high specific area when compared with other pyrolized materials and also high capacity to remove organic contaminants from aqueous solution. The charcoal showed specific area of 344, 191 and ~0.3 m² g-1 for sample Mate 1, Mate 2 and Mate 3, respectively. According to the corresponding adsorption isotherm these materials present good adsorption capacity for reactive textile and methylene blue dyes and the herbicide atrazine. Adsorption maxima were respectively 16, 230 and 35 mg g-1 for such substances, when sample Mate 1 was used.

  16. 茶废料中提取茶单宁并用于水中Cu^(2+)的吸附去除%Preparation of Tannin from Tea Waste and Its Application in Adsorptive Removing of Cu2+ in Aqueous Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高仁金

    2012-01-01

    Tannin was prepared from tea waste by using a microwave method, and characterized by infrared spectra. The as-obtained tannin was proposed to be an adsorbent to remove Cu2+ in aqueous solutions. The effects of the pH value of the solution, the adsorption time and the adsorption temperature on the adsorption efficiency were studied. According to the investigation, the optimal pH value was determined to be 6, and the optimal adsorption time and temperature were of 25 min at 40℃, Under this condition, adding 0.0250g tannin into 20 mL Cu2+-contained solution (100 mg/L), its adsorption capacity to Cu2+ was 47.73mg/g.%采用微波法从茶叶废料中提取茶单宁,并进行红外光谱表征。探讨了溶液pH值、吸附时间、吸附温度等条件对茶单宁吸附去除水体中Cu2+的影响。结果表明,pH为6,温度40℃,时间25min,20mLCu2+初始浓度为100mg/L溶液中加入茶单宁0.0250g,此时茶单宁对Cu2+吸附去除较为有利,吸附容量可达47.73mg/g。

  17. Experimental investigation of the link between static and dynamic wetting by forced wetting of nylon filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, M J; Gouttière, C; Seveno, D; Blake, T D; Voué, M; De Coninck, J; Clarke, A

    2007-10-09

    Forced wetting experiments with various liquids were conducted to study the dynamic wetting properties of nylon filament. The molecular-kinetic theory of wetting (MKT) was used to interpret the dynamic contact angle data and evaluate the contact-line friction zeta0 at the microscopic scale. By taking account of the viscosity of the liquid, zeta0 could be related exponentially to the reversible work of adhesion. This clearly establishes an experimental link between the static and dynamic wetting properties of the material. Moreover, statistical analysis of the equilibrium molecular displacement frequency K0 and the length of the displacements lambda reveals that these two fundamental parameters of the MKT are strongly correlated, not only in the linearized form of the theory (valid close to equilibrium) but also when the nonlinear form of the equations has to be considered at higher wetting speeds.

  18. Secondary Waste Simulant Development for Cast Stone Formulation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rinehart, Donald E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Swanberg, David J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States); Mahoney, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) funded Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a waste form testing program to implement aspects of the Secondary Liquid Waste Treatment Cast Stone Technology Development Plan (Ashley 2012) and the Hanford Site Secondary Waste Roadmap (PNNL 2009) related to the development and qualification of Cast Stone as a potential waste form for the solidification of aqueous wastes from the Hanford Site after the aqueous wastes are treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The current baseline is that the resultant Cast Stone (or grout) solid waste forms would be disposed at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Data and results of this testing program will be used in the upcoming performance assessment of the IDF and in the design and operation of a solidification treatment unit planned to be added to the ETF. The purpose of the work described in this report is to 1) develop simulants for the waste streams that are currently being fed and future WTP secondary waste streams also to be fed into the ETF and 2) prepare simulants to use for preparation of grout or Cast Stone solid waste forms for testing.

  19. Hanford Waste Physical and Rheological Properties: Data and Gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Kurath, Dean E.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Onishi, Yasuo; Huckaby, James L.; Cooley, Scott K.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Tingey, Joel M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Anderson, K. K.

    2011-08-01

    The Hanford Site in Washington State manages 177 underground storage tanks containing approximately 250,000 m3 of waste generated during past defense reprocessing and waste management operations. These tanks contain a mixture of sludge, saltcake and supernatant liquids. The insoluble sludge fraction of the waste consists of metal oxides and hydroxides and contains the bulk of many radionuclides such as the transuranic components and 90Sr. The saltcake, generated by extensive evaporation of aqueous solutions, consists primarily of dried sodium salts. The supernates consist of concentrated (5-15 M) aqueous solutions of sodium and potassium salts. The 177 storage tanks include 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double -hell tanks (DSTs). Ultimately the wastes need to be retrieved from the tanks for treatment and disposal. The SSTs contain minimal amounts of liquid wastes, and the Tank Operations Contractor is continuing a program of moving solid wastes from SSTs to interim storage in the DSTs. The Hanford DST system provides the staging location for waste feed delivery to the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s (ORP) Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP is being designed and constructed to pretreat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Sheared Wet Granular Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Schaber, Marc; Karmakar, Somnath; Hippler, Anna-Lena; Scheel, Mario; di Michiel, Marco; Brinkmann, Martin

    2015-03-01

    The mechanical properties of dry and wet granulates are explored when being sheared with a parabolic profile at constant shear volume. The dissipated energy increase linearly with external pressure both for a wet and a dry granulate. However, the dissipated energy for wet a granulate has a finite value for the limiting case of vanishing external pressure and increases slower with external pressure compared to the dry granulate. Using a down sized version of the shear cell the reorganization of a granulate and liquid is additionally imaged in real time using x-ray micro-tomography. With the insight from x-ray tomography the contribution of the breaking capillary bridges to the dissipated energy can be analyzed. We could also shed light on the influence of dilatation effects on the dissipated energy upon inverting the shear direction.

  1. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Predicting Surface Wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of wetting of a solid surface by a liquid provides important insights; the contact angle of a liquid droplet on a surface provides a quantitative measurement of this interaction and the degree of attraction or repulsion of that liquid type by the solid surface. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations are a useful way to examine the behavior of liquids on solid surfaces on a nanometer scale. Thus, we surveyed the state of this field, beginning with the fundamentals of wetting calculations to an examination of the different MD methodologies used. We highlighted some of the advantages and disadvantages of the simulations, and look to the future of computer modeling to understand wetting and other liquid-solid interaction phenomena.

  2. Handling of wet residues in industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Alejandro

    , to remove from it the substances which presence impedes reusing the water. These substances accumulate in a by-product called wet residue. An integral part of water recycling projects in the industry is the handling and disposal of the wet residues generated. The treatment, utilisation and disposal of wet...... residues depend totally on the industrial sector of origin and the composition of the water to be recycled. Treatment is more problematic in some cases than in others, but in all water recycling applications it is an issue of concern. The present study addresses this concern by providing a package...... to water bodies and uses of such bodies, distance to available agricultural land, characteristics of the local wastewater treatment plant, local and national legislation, or availability of subsidies. This study uses as example the geographical, legislative, economic and social boundary conditions...

  3. Using wet FGD systems to absorb mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renninger, S.A.; Farthing, G.A.; Ghorishi, S.B. (and others) [Babcock and Wilcox Co. (US)

    2004-10-01

    For the past 12 years, the Babcock and Wilcox Company has been striving to develop mercury-reduction techniques that utilize, whenever possible, existing plant pollution control devices. This article discusses one such technique, which has demonstrated the potential for removing more than 95% of oxidized mercury in a wet flue gas desulfurization system at a low incremental cost and with little or no impact on the system's operation or SO{sub 2} removal performance. B & W's techniques enhance the mercury control ability of wet FGD systems using sodium hydrosulfide injection. This has been tested in a combined air quality control system at Mt. Storm Power Station in West Virginia comprising an SCR system and ESP with a wet FGD system. 6 figs.

  4. NANOFILLERS FOR PAPERMAKING WET END APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The papermaking industry can benefit a lot from nanotechnology. This versatile technology can also be used in the area of fillers for papermaking wet end applications. In such applications the main technological examples currently available include wet end addition of commercially available nanofillers, formation of nanofiller/fiber or nanofiller/fibril hybrids, development of novel categories of nanofillers such as high aspect ratio nanofillers, and combination of microfillers with nanostructures by specially controlled routes to obtain composite nanofillers. It is worth noting that there are certain challenges associated with nanofillers, such as high cost, difficulty in structure and performance control, poor dispersability and retention, possible severe negative effects on paper strength, possible detrimental interactions between nanofillers with some wet end additives, and the industry-related limitations. However, in the long run, the research and development in the area of nanofillers will surely create many fruitful results.

  5. Dynamics of oil film spreading and dewetting on aqueous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Shardt, Orest; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-11-01

    The spreading and dewetting dynamics of liquids on substrates has been studied intensively in recent years because of their fundamental role in nature and fluid dynamics, as well as practical relevance to many technological processes, such as coating flows. However, little is known about the wetting dynamics in a state called pseudo-partial wetting, which can contribute to efficient interfacial emulsification by bubble bursting. Here we describe the dynamics of the rim that forms when an oil film dewets in a pseudo-partial wetting state on an aqueous substrate. We observe that the rim around the expanding hole displays an instability which leads to the rim break-up into a series of humps. By using confocal microscopy and systematically manipulating the parameters of the multi-phase system, we quantify the dynamics of the oil rim and the formation of humps. We further study the mechanism underlying the break-up of the retracting oil rim. In particular, we theoretically explain the critical conditions at which humps form and highlight the roles of competing time scales during hole expansion and the growth of oil humps. Our work not only contributes to the fundamental understanding of film dynamics in pseudo-partial wetting but also may help improve the understanding and utilization of liquid film flows in industrial processes.

  6. Organic peroxide and OH formation in aerosol and cloud water: laboratory evidence for this aqueous chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. B. Lim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous chemistry in atmospheric waters (e.g., cloud droplets or wet aerosols is well accepted as an atmospheric pathway to produce secondary organic aerosol (SOAaq. Water-soluble organic compounds with small carbon numbers (C2-C3 are precursors for SOAaq and products include organic acids, organic sulfates, and high molecular weight compounds/oligomers. Fenton reactions and the uptake of gas-phase OH radicals are considered to be the major oxidant sources for aqueous organic chemistry. However, the sources and availability of oxidants in atmospheric waters are not well understood. The degree to which OH is produced in the aqueous phase affects the balance of radical and non-radical aqueous chemistry, the properties of the resulting aerosol, and likely its atmospheric behavior. This paper demonstrates organic peroxide formation during aqueous photooxidation of methylglyoxal using ultra high resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS. Organic peroxides are known to form through gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds. They contribute secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation directly by forming peroxyhemiacetals, and epoxides, and indirectly by enhancing gas-phase oxidation through OH recycling. We provide simulation results of organic peroxide/peroxyhemiacetal formation in clouds and wet aerosols and discuss organic peroxides as a source of condensed-phase OH radicals and as a contributor to aqueous SOA.

  7. Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2012-08-07

    We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

  8. Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, J. O.; Vakarelski, I. U.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2012-08-01

    We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

  9. Traction of Pneumatic Tires on Wet Runways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Walter B.; Joyner, Upshur T.

    1965-01-01

    Recent work on the traction of pneumatic tires on wet runways is discussed, and it is shown that a loss of tire traction adversely affects cross-wind landings. The effect of runway surface texture is discussed,, and a simple method for measuring surface texture is described. A preliminary correlation of tire traction with surface texture is shown. Results of work at Langley Research Center on the use of air jets to improve tire traction on wet or flooded runways indicate that this is a promising approach for alleviating the large losses in tire braking and sideways traction that occur when tire hydroplaning occurs on a flooded runway.

  10. Grain boundary wetness of partially molten dunite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, S.; Faul, U.

    2013-12-01

    The grain scale melt distribution plays a key role for physical properties of partially molten regions in Earth's upper mantle, but our current understanding of the distribution of basaltic melt at the grain scale is still incomplete. A recent experimental study shows that wetted two-grain boundaries are a common feature of partially molten dunite at small melt fractions (Garapic et al., G3, 2013). In early ideal models which assume isotropic surface energy, the grain scale melt distribution is uniquely determined by knowing the melt fraction and the dihedral angle between two crystalline grains and the melt (von Bargen and Waff, JGR, 1986). Olivine is anisotropic in surface energy, hence the grain scale melt distribution at given melt fraction cannot be characterized by the dihedral angle alone. The grain boundary wetness, which is defined as the ratio of solid-liquid boundary area over the total interfacial area (Takei, JGR, 1998), is a more objective measure of the grain scale melt distribution. The aim of this study is to quantify the relationship between grain size, melt fraction, temperature and grain boundary wetness of partially molten dunite under dry conditions. We annealed olivine-basalt aggregates with melt fractions from 0.03% to 6% at a range of temperatures and 1 GPa in a piston cylinder for 1 to 336 hours, with resulting mean grain sizes of 10 to 60 μm. The samples were sectioned, polished and imaged at high resolution by using a field emission SEM. Each image had a size of 2048 x 1536 pixels with a resolution of 0.014 to 0.029 μm/pixel, depending on magnification. For each sample, depending on grain sizes, we made mosaics of 3 x 3 or 6 x 6 overlapping images. Measurements of melt fraction, grain boundary wetness and grain size were carried out on these high resolution mosaics by using ImageJ software. Analyses of mosaics show that grain boundary wetness increases with increasing melt fraction at constant grain size to values well above those

  11. Phytochemical Screening and Antibacterial Activity of Globimetulla browni Extracts During Wet Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Inuwa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the phytochemical composition of Globimetulla browni for it’s ascribed folkloric medicinal uses as an antidiabetic and to establish its Antibacterial potency (if any. A comparative investigation was carried out and season did not have any effect on the phytochemical/Antibacterial potency of this plant. The ethanolic and aqueous extracts significantly affected both gram-negative and gram- positive microorganisms during wet season (May - September. Globimetulla browni is a specie of African mistletoe and is hemi-parasitic in nature growing on many trees e.g., Eukalyptus and has ascribed medicinal uses. Phytochemical screening showed the presence of carbohydrates, alkaloids, tannins and flavonoids. The ethanolic and aqueous extracts inhibited the growth of Klebsiella aerogenes, Proteus spp., Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Gentamycin and Cloxacillin did not exhibit any activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  12. Environmental and health impacts of using food waste as animal feed: a comparative analysis of food waste management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salemdeeb, Ramy; Zu Ermgassen, Erasmus K H J; Kim, Mi Hyung; Balmford, Andrew; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2017-01-01

    The disposal of food waste is a large environmental problem. In the United Kingdom (UK), approximately 15 million tonnes of food are wasted each year, mostly disposed of in landfill, via composting, or anaerobic digestion (AD). European Union (EU) guidelines state that food waste should preferentially be used as animal feed though for most food waste this practice is currently illegal, because of disease control concerns. Interest in the potential diversion of food waste for animal feed is however growing, with a number of East Asian states offering working examples of safe food waste recycling - based on tight regulation and rendering food waste safe through heat treatment. This study investigates the potential benefits of diverting food waste for pig feed in the UK. A hybrid, consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted to compare the environmental and health impacts of four technologies for food waste processing: two technologies of South Korean style-animal feed production (as a wet pig feed and a dry pig feed) were compared with two widespread UK disposal technologies: AD and composting. Results of 14 mid-point impact categories show that the processing of food waste as a wet pig feed and a dry pig feed have the best and second-best scores, respectively, for 13/14 and 12/14 environmental and health impacts. The low impact of food waste feed stems in large part from its substitution of conventional feed, the production of which has substantial environmental and health impacts. While the re-legalisation of the use of food waste as pig feed could offer environmental and public health benefits, this will require support from policy makers, the public, and the pig industry, as well as investment in separated food waste collection which currently occurs in only a minority of regions.

  13. Assessing the addition of mineral processing waste to green waste-derived compost: an agronomic, environmental and economic appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D L; Chesworth, S; Khalid, M; Iqbal, Z

    2009-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the benefit of mixing two large volume wastes, namely mineral processing waste and source-segregated green waste compost, on the growth performance of plants targeted towards high (horticulture/agriculture) and low (amenity/restoration) value markets. The secondary aims were to evaluate the influence of mineral waste type on plant growth performance and to undertake a simple economic analysis of the use of mineral-compost mixtures in land restoration. Our results showed that in comparison to organic wastes, mineral wastes contained a low available nutrient content which reduces compost quality. This is supported by growth trials with tomato, wheat and grass which showed that, irrespective of mineral source, plants performed poorly in compost blended with mineral waste in comparison to those grown in green waste or peat-based compost alone. In terms of consumer confidence, unlike other wastes (e.g. biosolids and construction/demolition waste) the mineral quarry wastes can be expected to be free of potentially toxic elements, however, the production costs of compost-mineral waste mixtures and subsequent transport costs may limit its widespread use. In addition, handling of the material can be difficult under wet conditions and effective blending may require the purchase of specialist equipment. From our results, we conclude that mineral fines may prove useful for low quality, low value landscaping activities close to the source of production but are unsuited to high value markets.

  14. Surfactant controlled switching of water-in-oil wetting behaviour of porous silica films grown at oil-water interfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish M Kulkarni; Rajdip Bandyopadhyaya; Ashutosh Sharma

    2008-11-01

    Selective permeation of oil and water across a porous medium, as in oil recovery operations, depends on the preferential wetting properties of the porous medium. We show a profound influence of surfactants in wetting of porous media and thus demonstrate a new route for the control of water-in-oil wetting of porous substrates by changing the concentration of surfactants in an aqueous sub-phase below the substrate. This strategy is employed to engineer partial reversible wetting transitions on a porous silica film. The film itself is grown and stabilized on a flat, macroscopic interface between an oil phase and an aqueous sub-phase. On increasing the surfactant (CTAB) concentration in the sub-phase, contact angle of a water drop (placed on the oil side of the film) changes from 140° to 16° in 25 min by diffusion of the surfactant across the porous film. On further replacement of the sub-phase with pure water, diffusion of the surfactant from the water drop back to the sub-phase was slower, increasing the contact angle in the process from 16° to 90° in 2 h. Wettability control by a cationic surfactant (CTAB) was found to be much faster (6 deg/min) than that offered by an anionic surfactant, SDS (0.05 deg/min). Switching of the surface wettability due to the surfactant diffusion may have implications in oil-water separation, chemical bed reactors and microfluidic devices.

  15. Release to the gas phase of metals, S and Cl during combustion of dedicated waste fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Frandsen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    wood, shoes, automotive shredder waste and PVC (poly-vinyl-chloride). The waste fractions were characterized by use of wet chemical analysis, and, based on the chemical composition of the initial fuel sample and the ash residue after the experiments; the release of inorganic elements was quantified...

  16. Calculation of combustible waste fraction (CWF) estimates used in organics safety issue screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, P.G.; Gao, F.; Toth, J.J.

    1998-08-01

    This report describes how in-tank measurements of moisture (H{sub 2}O) and total organic carbon (TOC) are used to calculate combustible waste fractions (CWF) for 138 of the 149 Hanford single shell tanks. The combustible waste fraction of a tank is defined as that proportion of waste that is capable of burning when exposed to an ignition source. These CWF estimates are used to screen tanks for the organics complexant safety issue. Tanks with a suitably low fraction of combustible waste are classified as safe. The calculations in this report determine the combustible waste fractions in tanks under two different moisture conditions: under current moisture conditions, and after complete dry out. The first fraction is called the wet combustible waste fraction (wet CWF) and the second is called the dry combustible waste fraction (dry CWF). These two fractions are used to screen tanks into three categories: if the wet CWF is too high (above 5%), the tank is categorized as unsafe; if the wet CWF is low but the dry CWF is too high (again, above 5%), the tank is categorized as conditionally safe; finally, if both the wet and dry CWF are low, the tank is categorized as safe. Section 2 describes the data that was required for these calculations. Sections 3 and 4 describe the statistical model and resulting fit for dry combustible waste fractions. Sections 5 and 6 present the statistical model used to estimate wet CWF and the resulting fit. Section 7 describes two tests that were performed on the dry combustible waste fraction ANOVA model to validate it. Finally, Section 8 presents concluding remarks. Two Appendices present results on a tank-by-tank basis.

  17. Bioprocessing of a stored mixed liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfram, J.H.; Rogers, R.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Finney, R. [Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development and results of a demonstration for a continuous bioprocess for mixed waste treatment. A key element of the process is an unique microbial strain which tolerates high levels of aromatic solvents and surfactants. This microorganism is the biocatalysis of the continuous flow system designed for the processing of stored liquid scintillation wastes. During the past year a process demonstration has been conducted on commercial formulation of liquid scintillation cocktails (LSC). Based on data obtained from this demonstration, the Ohio EPA granted the Mound Applied Technologies Lab a treatability permit allowing the limited processing of actual mixed waste. Since August 1994, the system has been successfully processing stored, {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} LSC waste. The initial LSC waste fed into the system contained 11% pseudocumene and detectable quantities of plutonium. Another treated waste stream contained pseudocumene and tritium. Data from this initial work shows that the hazardous organic solvent, and pseudocumene have been removed due to processing, leaving the aqueous low level radioactive waste. Results to date have shown that living cells are not affected by the dissolved plutonium and that 95% of the plutonium was sorbed to the biomass. This paper discusses the bioprocess, rates of processing, effluent, and the implications of bioprocessing for mixed waste management.

  18. Wet oxidation of salicylic acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Sergio; Garrido, Laura; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2010-11-15

    Salicylic acid is a frequent pollutant in several industrial wastewaters. Uncatalyzed wet air oxidation, which is a promising technique for the treatment of phenolic effluents, has not been analyzed yet for the removal of salicylic acid. The effect of different conditions of pH (1.3-12.3), pressure (1.0-4.1 MPa), temperature (413-443 K), and initial concentrations (1.45-14.50 mM) on the wet oxidation of salicylate/salicylic acid solutions have here been investigated. The pH value of the reaction media was found to be a key parameter for the rate of the oxidation process with an optimum at pH 3.1, when the concentrations of salicylic acid and salicylate were similar. The oxidation reaction followed pseudofirst-order kinetics with respect to salicylic acid and 0.82 order with respect to dissolved oxygen. Additionally, the evolution of the color during the wet oxidation was analyzed and discussed in relation with the formation of intermediate compounds. Then, a reaction pathway for the noncatalytic wet oxidation of the salicylic acid was proposed.

  19. Towards hydrodynamic simulations of wet particle systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, S.; Luding, S.; Weinhart, T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the rheology of weakly wetted granular materials in the slow frictional regime, using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations. In a split-bottom ring shear cell geometry a slow, quasi-static deformation leads to wide shear bands away from the walls. Dry non-cohesive and cohesiv

  20. Wet oxidation kinetics of refractory low molecular mass carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shende, R.V.; Levec, J.

    1999-10-01

    Wet oxidation kinetics of aqueous solutions of formic, acetic, oxalic, and glyoxalic acids was studied in a titanium autoclave at a temperature range of 150--320 C and oxygen partial pressures between 8 and 60 bar. Oxidation reactions obeyed a first-order kinetics with respect to concentration of all substrates. On the basis of acid concentration decay, the activation energy for acetic, oxalic, and glyoxalic acid oxidation was 178, 137, and 97 kJ/mol, respectively; whereas on the total organic carbon (TOC) conversion basis, these values were slightly higher, namely 182, 141, and 104 kJ/mol. The activation energy for formic acid took a unique value of 149 kJ/mol regardless of the type of concentration used. The rate of oxidation was proportional to a square root of oxygen concentration (partial pressure) for acetic, formic, and oxalic acids, whereas it was linearly proportional for glyoxalic acid. When sufficiently high oxygen partial pressure was applied ({ge}22 bar), the individual acid conversion in a mixture of these acids was well predicted by the rate expression derived for that acid. The lumped TOC concentration of mixtures did not obey a first-order kinetic behavior, although underlying TOC kinetics for each individual acid was linear. The oxidation results are also discussed in a view of speculated reaction pathways and the reactor material.

  1. Surface wrinkling on polydimethylsiloxane microspheres via wet surface chemical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Han, Xue; Cao, Yanping; Lu, Conghua

    2014-07-16

    Here we introduce a simple low-cost yet robust method to realize spontaneously wrinkled morphologies on spherical surfaces. It is based on surface chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase-synthesized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microspheres in the mixed H2SO4/HNO3/H2O solution. Consequently, curvature and overstress-sensitive wrinkles including dimples and labyrinth patterns are successfully induced on the resulting oxidized PDMS microspheres. A power-law dependence of the wrinkling wavelength on the microsphere radius exists. The effects of experimental parameters on these tunable spherical wrinkles have been systematically investigated, when the microspheres are pre-deposited on a substrate. These parameters include the radius and modulus of microspheres, the mixed acid solution composition, the oxidation duration, and the water washing post-treatment. Meanwhile, the complicated chemical oxidation process has also been well studied by in-situ optical observation via the microsphere system, which represents an intractable issue in a planar system. Furthermore, we realize surface wrinkled topographies on the whole microspheres at a large scale, when microspheres are directly dispersed in the mixed acid solution for surface oxidation. These results indicate that the introduced wet surface chemical oxidation has the great potential to apply to other complicated curved surfaces for large-scale generation of well-defined wrinkling patterns, which endow the solids with desired physical properties.

  2. Coffee-stain growth dynamics on dry and wet surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulogne, François; Ingremeau, François; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-02-01

    The drying of a drop containing particles often results in the accumulation of the particles at the contact line. In this work, we investigate the drying of an aqueous colloidal drop surrounded by a hydrogel that is also evaporating. We combine theoretical and experimental studies to understand how the surrounding vapor concentration affects the particle deposit during the constant radius evaporation mode. In addition to the common case of evaporation on an otherwise dry surface, we show that in a configuration where liquid is evaporating from a flat surface around the drop, the singularity of the evaporative flux at the contact line is suppressed and the drop evaporation is homogeneous. For both conditions, we derive the velocity field and we establish the temporal evolution of the number of particles accumulated at the contact line. We predict the growth dynamics of the stain and the drying timescales. Thus, dry and wet conditions are compared with experimental results and we highlight that only the dynamics is modified by the evaporation conditions, not the final accumulation at the contact line.

  3. Epimacular brachytherapy for wet AMD: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casaroli-Marano RP

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ricardo P Casaroli-Marano,1,2 Socorro Alforja,1 Joan Giralt,1 Michel E Farah2 1Instituto Clínic de Oftalmología (Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is considered the most common cause of blindness in the over-60 age group in developed countries. There are basically two forms of presentation: geographic (dry or atrophic and wet (neovascular or exudative. Geographic atrophy accounts for approximately 85%–90% of ophthalmic frames and leads to a progressive degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium and the photoreceptors. Wet AMD causes the highest percentage of central vision loss secondary to disease. This neovascular form involves an angiogenic process in which newly formed choroidal vessels invade the macular area. Today, intravitreal anti-angiogenic drugs attempt to block the angiogenic events and represent a major advance in the treatment of wet AMD. Currently, combination therapy for wet AMD includes different forms of radiation delivery. Epimacular brachytherapy (EMBT seems to be a useful approach to be associated with current anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, presenting an acceptable efficacy and safety profile. However, at the present stage of research, the results of the clinical trials carried out to date are insufficient to justify extending routine use of EMBT for the treatment of wet AMD. Keywords: macular degeneration, radiation, vascular endothelial growth factor, combined therapy, intravitreal therapy, vitrectomy

  4. Landfills - Municipal Waste Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A Municipal Waste Operation is a DEP primary facility type related to the Waste Management Municipal Waste Program. The sub-facility types related to Municipal Waste...

  5. Aqueous organic chemistry in the atmosphere: sources and chemical processing of organic aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, V Faye

    2015-02-03

    Over the past decade, it has become clear that aqueous chemical processes occurring in cloud droplets and wet atmospheric particles are an important source of organic atmospheric particulate matter. Reactions of water-soluble volatile (or semivolatile) organic gases (VOCs or SVOCs) in these aqueous media lead to the formation of highly oxidized organic particulate matter (secondary organic aerosol; SOA) and key tracer species, such as organosulfates. These processes are often driven by a combination of anthropogenic and biogenic emissions, and therefore their accurate representation in models is important for effective air quality management. Despite considerable progress, mechanistic understanding of some key aqueous processes is still lacking, and these pathways are incompletely represented in 3D atmospheric chemistry and air quality models. In this article, the concepts, historical context, and current state of the science of aqueous pathways of SOA formation are discussed.

  6. A Study of Investigation-Derived Waste Management Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Chloroform 72 Nickel 72 Mercury 71 Vinyl Chloride 71 Acetone 67 Chromium (III) 66 Trichloroethane, 1,1,1- 65 In general, characteristics of IDW fall into...substances (e.g., container specimen waste, light or dense non-aqueous phase liquids [LNAPL, DNAPL ], etc.), the DRMO method may provide a feasible means of...Environmental Restoration Account DERP -- Defense Environmental Restoration Program DNAPL -- Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids DOD -- Department of Defense

  7. Accumulation of Heavy Metal Ions from Tanneries Wastes: An Approach For Chromium Removal Using Activated Charcoal

    OpenAIRE

    Tahir, H; 1G. Yasmeen; Akhtar, N; Sultan, M.; 1M. Qadri

    2012-01-01

    The environment is under increasing pressure from solid and liquid wastes emanating from the leather industry. These are inevitable by-products of the leather manufacturing process and causes significant pollution unless treated in some way prior to discharge. The tanneries wastes samples were collected from Lahore Pakistan. The samples were digested by wet oxidation method and the concentrations of metals: Cr, Co, Cu, Cd, Mn, Zn, Ni and Pb were estimated in sediments and liquid waste samples...

  8. A double stage dry-wet-fermentation process for a fast and safe digestion of different kinds of organic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busch, G.; Sieber, M.; Buschmann, J.; Burkhardat, M.

    2009-07-01

    The fermentation of organic material is a four-step-process. It is admissible to merge the first two steps (hydrolysis and acidification) to hydrolysis in general and the last two steps (aceto genesis and methano genesis) to methano genesis. The Brandenburg University of Technology in Cottbus has devised a double stage dry-wet-fermentation process for fast and safe anaerobic degradation. Using these processes, it is possible to decompose different kinds of organic material like renewable material (e. g. maize silage), waste (e. g. household-waste) and industrial material (e. g. glycerine). (Author)

  9. A Hybrid Dry and Aqueous Fractionation Method to Obtain Protein-Rich Fractions from Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avila Ruiz, Geraldine; Arts, Anke; Minor, Marcel; Schutyser, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Combination of dry and aqueous fractionation is investigated to obtain protein-rich fractions from quinoa in a milder and more sustainable way compared to conventional wet fractionation. Dry fractionation of quinoa involved milling and subsequent air classification, generating a protein-enriched

  10. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container. type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3). nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.). building concerned. details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting o...

  11. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container; type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3); nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.); building concerned; details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting...

  12. Wetting films stabilized by block-copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eliseeva, O.V.

    2006-01-01

    Thin aqueous films formed on a solid surface play an important role in adhesion, spreading, and colloidal stability. These phenomena are all relevant for paint systems. Measuring surface forces in these films is an experimental challenge, and over the years several techniques have been developed to

  13. Compaction dynamics of wet granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewalle, Nicolas; Ludewig, Francois; Fiscina, Jorge E.; Lumay, Geoffroy

    2013-03-01

    The extremely slow compaction dynamics of wet granular assemblies has been studied experimentally. The cohesion, due to capillary bridges between neighboring grains, has been tuned using different liquids having specific surface tension values. The characteristic relaxation time for compaction τ grows strongly with cohesion. A kinetic model, based on a free volume kinetic equations and the presence of a capillary energy barrier (due to liquid bridges), is able to reproduce quantitatively the experimental curves. This model allows one to describe the cohesion in wet granular packing. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on the extremely slow compaction dynamics of a granular assembly has also been investigated in the range 20 % - 80 % . Triboelectric and capillary condensation effects have been introduced in the kinetic model. Results confirm the existence of an optimal condition at RH ~ 45 % for minimizing cohesive interactions between glass beads.

  14. Versatile wetting measurement of microplate wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Enoch Ming Wei; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Yu, Yang; Liew, Oi Wah; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2016-11-01

    A method to measure the contact angle, which is indicative of wetting, using small liquid volumes dispensed directly on microplate wells is described and demonstrated. Experiments with enhanced green protein samples of volumes 4.4-6 μl showed no measured variance in the contact angle. Experiments with phosphate buffer solution with varied concentrations of a non-ionic detergent (Tween 20) dissolved, however, revealed smaller contact angles with increased detergent concentration. It is experimentally shown that drops can be located up to 7° from the lowest position of the well without affecting the accuracy of contact angle measurements. Numerical simulations confirm the ability of the drops to manifest the correct contact angle despite the lack of axis-symmetry in their shape while residing on a circular surface. This method offers a convenient means to determine the wetting characteristics of different liquid samples in different microplates.

  15. Progress of catalytic wet air oxidation technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolin Jing

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO is one of the most economical and environmental-friendly advanced oxidation process for high strength, toxic, hazardous and non-biodegradable contaminants under milder conditions, which is developed on the basic of wet air oxidation. Various heterogeneous catalysts including noble metals and metal oxides have been extensively studied to enhance the efficiency of CWAO. The advances in the research on wastewater treatment by CWAO process are summarized in aspects of reaction mechanism investigation, reaction kinetics study and catalyst development. It is pointed out that the preparation of active and stable catalysts, the investigation on reaction mechanisms and the study on reaction kinetics models are very important for the promotion of CWAO application.

  16. Wet electron microscopy with quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timp, Winston; Watson, Nicki; Sabban, Alon; Zik, Ory; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-09-01

    Wet electron microscopy (EM) is a new imaging method with the potential to allow higher spatial resolution of samples. In contrast to most EM methods, it requires little time to perform and does not require complicated equipment or difficult steps. We used this method on a common murine macrophage cell line, IC-21, in combination with various stains and preparations, to collect high resolution images of the actin cytoskeleton. Most importantly, we demonstrated the use of quantum dots in conjunction with this technique to perform light/electron correlation microscopy. We found that wet EM is a useful tool that fits into a niche between the simplicity of light microscopy and the high spatial resolution of EM.

  17. A novel method for "Wet" SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshack, Iris; Kopolovic, Juri; Chowers, Yehuda; Gileadi, Opher; Vainshtein, Anya; Zik, Ory; Behar, Vered

    2004-01-01

    Progress in the processing of wet tissues, without the need of fixation and complex preparation procedures, may facilitate the microscopic examination of tissues and cells. Microscopic examination of tissues is a central tool in clinical diagnosis as well as in diverse areas of research. The authors present the application of Wet SEM, a technology for imaging fully hydrated samples at atmospheric pressure in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The technique is based on 2 principles. First, samples are imaged in sealed specimen capsules and are separated from the evacuated interior of the electron microscope by a thin, electron-transparent partition membrane that is strong enough to sustain a 1-atm pressure difference. Second, imaging is done in a SEM, based on detection of backscattered electrons, which penetrate a few microns into the specimen and thus give information on the cellular level.

  18. Wet flue gas desulphurization and new fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiil, S.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Michelsen, M.L.

    1998-04-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FDG plants is presented. The mechanism underlying the rate of dissolution of finely grained limestone particles was examined in a laboratory batch apparatus using acid titration. Three Danish limestones of different origin were tested. A transient, mass transport controlled, mathematical model was developed to describe the dissolution process. Model predictions were found to be qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data. Empirical correlations for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients in a pilot plant (falling-film column) were determined. The presence of inert particles in the liquid phase was found to decrease the rate of gas phase mass transport with up to 15%, though the effect could not be correlated. A detailed model for a wet FGD pilot plant, based on the falling film principle, was developed. All important rate determining steps, absorption of SO{sub 2}, oxidation of HSO{sub 3}{sup -}, dissolution of limestone, and crystallisation of gypsum were included. Model predictions were compared to experimental data such as gas phase concentration profiles of SO{sub 2}, slurry pH-profiles, solids contents of slurry, liquid phase concentrations, and residual limestone in the gypsum. The possibility of co-firing straw and coal was investigated in a full-scale power plant. No effects on the overall performance of the wet FGD plant were observed, though laboratory experiments with fine dust and fly ash from the full-scale experiments showed a decrease in limestone reactivity. (EG) EFP-95. 45 refs.; Also ph.d. thesis of Soeren Kiil

  19. STUDY ON ULTRASONIC DEGREASING OF SHEEPSKIN WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BĂLĂU MÎNDRU Tudorel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Leather industry is a relatively large source of waste from raw material, so skin waste recovery is a goal of clean technologies. Capitalization of skin waste aims to obtain: chemical auxiliaries, technical articles, hydrolyzed protein, artificial leather, composite building materials, heat sources and collagen biomaterials with applications in medicine, cosmetics, etc. A first step in the recovery of skin waste is the degreasing operation. Ultrasound is an effective tool to improve the efficiency of the conventional degreasing affecting the chemical substances as well as the treated skin. In addition, the processing time is reduced. Ultrasound is known to enhance the emulsification and dispersion of oils/fat. The usual degreasing methods requires more emulsifier/solvent ratio and process time for emulsification and additional solvent for washing out the emulsified fat. This paper investigates the possibility of recovery through ecological processes of leather waste from finishing operations for further capitalization. The present study aims emulsification and subsequent removal of the fat present in the chamois powder waste from polishing operation with the aid of ultrasound by an aqueous ecofriendly method. The study also took into account the ultrasonic treatment of the leather waste using trichlorethylene as a medium of propagation-degreasing, and realized a comparative analysis of efficiency of fat extraction by Soxhlet method and via ultrasonication. IR-ATR and optical microscopy highlight both morphological and chemical-structural changes of treated materials by different degreasing methods

  20. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2012-06-21

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2011 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2011 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2011-00026, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2011, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2011 met the requirements of C-ESR-G-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 25, 26 and 34 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00495, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2011, Waste Tanks 25, 26, 34 and 41. A total of 5813 photographs were made and 835 visual and video inspections were performed during 2011. A potential leaksite was discovered at Tank 4 during routine annual inspections performed in 2011. The new crack, which is above the allowable fill level, resulted in no release to the environment or tank annulus. The location of the crack is documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.6.

  1. Lyophilization for Water Recovery From Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael; Litwiller, Eric; Reinhard, Martin

    2003-01-01

    This abstract describes the development of a solid waste treatment system designed for a near term human exploration mission. The technology being developed is an energy- efficient lyophilization technique that recovers water from spacecraft solid waste. In the lyophilization process water in an aqueous waste is frozen and then sublimed, resulting in the separation of the waste into a dried solid material and liquid water. This technology is ideally suited to applications where water recovery rates approaching 100% are desirable but production of CO, is not. Water contained within solid wastes accounts for approximately 3% of the total water balance. If 100% closure of the water loop is desired the water contained within this waste would need to be recovered. To facilitate operation in microgravity thermoelectric heat pumps have be used in place of traditional fluid cycle heat pumps. A mathematical model of a thermoelectric lyophilizer has been developed and used to generate energy use and processing rate parameters. The results of laboratory investigations and discussions with ALS program management have been used to iteratively arrive at a prototype design. This design address operational limitations which were identified in the laboratory studies and handling and health concerns raised by ALS program management. The current prototype design is capable of integration into the ISS Waste Collection System.

  2. Design Aspects of Wet Scrubber System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun-Chul; Bang, Young-suk; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Doo-Yong [FNC Technology Co. Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The water pool in the wet scrubber system has advantage to cope with decay heat based on the thermal hydraulic balance such as condensation and evaporation inside it. This study focuses on the design aspects of the wet scrubber system to estimate the required water pool mass during the mission time and size of the scrubbing tank including inner structures. The design of the wet scrubber system include the estimation of the required water mass during the mission time and sizing of the scrubber vessel to contain the water pool. The condensation due to the inlet steam and evaporation due to the steam and non-condensable gas superheat and decay heat from filtered fission products should be considered to estimate the water mass required to maintain its function during the mission time. On the other hand, the level swelling due to the noncondensable gas is another important design aspect on the sizing of the scrubber vessel and determination of the entry elevation of the filtration components such as the droplet separator or filter. The minimum water level based on the minimum collapsed water level should be higher than the exit of scrubber nozzle.

  3. Study of polycaprolactone wet electrospinning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kostakova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wet electrospinning is a useful method for 3-dimensional structure control of nanofibrous materials. This innovative technology uses a liquid collector instead of the metal one commonly used for standard electrospinning. The article compares the internal structural features of polycaprolactone (PCL nanofibrous materials prepared by both technologies. We analyze the influence of different water/ethanol compositions used as a liquid collector on the morphology of the resultant polycaprolactone nanofibrous materials. Scanning electron micro-photographs have revealed a bimodal structure in the wet electrospun materials composed of micro and nanofibers uniformly distributed across the sample bulk. We have shown that the full-faced, twofold fiber distribution is due to the solvent composition and is induced and enhanced by increasing the ethanol weight ratio. Moreover, the comparison of fibrous layers morphology obtained by wet and dry spinning have revealed that beads that frequently appeared in dry spun materials are created by Plateau-Rayleigh instability of the fraction of thicker fibers. Theoretical conditions for spontaneous and complete immersion of cylindrical fibers into a liquid collector are also derived here.

  4. Fluidization of wet granulates under shear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbari, S H Ebrahimnazhad; Vollmer, J; Herminghaus, S; Brinkmann, M

    2010-12-01

    Small amounts of a wetting liquid render sand a stiff and moldable material. The cohesive forces between the sand grains are caused by capillary bridges at the points of contact. Due to the finite strength of these bridges wet sand undergoes a transition from an arrested (i.e., solidified) to a fluidized state under an externally applied shear force. The transition between these two dynamic states is studied in a MD-type simulation of a two-dimensional assembly of bidisperse frictionless disks under the action of a cosine force profile. In addition to soft core repulsion the disks interact through a hysteretic and short ranged attractive force modeling the effect of the capillary bridges. In this model the transition between the fluidized and the arrested state is discontinuous and hysteretic. The parameter dependence of the critical force for solidification is modeled by combining theoretical arguments with a detailed numerical exploration of the transition. We address a range of densities from slightly below close packing until slightly above densities where the system approaches a shear-banded state. Differences and similarities of the transition in wet granulates to the jamming transition are also addressed.

  5. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr; Lísal, Martin

    2015-09-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel's law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  6. STUDY ON WET STRENGTH PERFORMANCE OF KENAF MULCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghui Zhou; Xinge Wu; Hongwei Zhu

    2004-01-01

    Optimum applied technical conditions of wet strength agent for kenaf mulch were studied in this article. Breaking length, wet-dry strength ratio, tear index and burst index of kenaf mulch were measured and optimum wet strength agent was selected. The aim is to make mulch have properties of heat preservation, humidity preservation, growth prompting, biodegradation and maximum wet strength and to improve impact resistance of mulch to rainwater so as to assure growth of plant and replace plastic film.

  7. Chemical species of plutonium in Hanford radioactive tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barney, G.S.

    1997-10-22

    Large quantities of radioactive wastes have been generated at the Hanford Site over its operating life. The wastes with the highest activities are stored underground in 177 large (mostly one million gallon volume) concrete tanks with steel liners. The wastes contain processing chemicals, cladding chemicals, fission products, and actinides that were neutralized to a basic pH before addition to the tanks to prevent corrosion of the steel liners. Because the mission of the Hanford Site was to provide plutonium for defense purposes, the amount of plutonium lost to the wastes was relatively small. The best estimate of the amount of plutonium lost to all the waste tanks is about 500 kg. Given uncertainties in the measurements, some estimates are as high as 1,000 kg (Roetman et al. 1994). The wastes generally consist of (1) a sludge layer generated by precipitation of dissolved metals from aqueous wastes solutions during neutralization with sodium hydroxide, (2) a salt cake layer formed by crystallization of salts after evaporation of the supernate solution, and (3) an aqueous supernate solution that exists as a separate layer or as liquid contained in cavities between sludge or salt cake particles. The identity of chemical species of plutonium in these wastes will allow a better understanding of the behavior of the plutonium during storage in tanks, retrieval of the wastes, and processing of the wastes. Plutonium chemistry in the wastes is important to criticality and environmental concerns, and in processing the wastes for final disposal. Plutonium has been found to exist mainly in the sludge layers of the tanks along with other precipitated metal hydrous oxides. This is expected due to its low solubility in basic aqueous solutions. Tank supernate solutions do not contain high concentrations of plutonium even though some tanks contain high concentrations of complexing agents. The solutions also contain significant concentrations of hydroxide which competes with other

  8. Municipal solid waste composition: Sampling methodology, statistical analyses, and case study evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edjabou, Maklawe Essonanawe, E-mail: vine@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Jensen, Morten Bang; Götze, Ramona; Pivnenko, Kostyantyn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Petersen, Claus [Econet AS, Omøgade 8, 2.sal, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Scheutz, Charlotte; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Tiered approach to waste sorting ensures flexibility and facilitates comparison of solid waste composition data. • Food and miscellaneous wastes are the main fractions contributing to the residual household waste. • Separation of food packaging from food leftovers during sorting is not critical for determination of the solid waste composition. - Abstract: Sound waste management and optimisation of resource recovery require reliable data on solid waste generation and composition. In the absence of standardised and commonly accepted waste characterisation methodologies, various approaches have been reported in literature. This limits both comparability and applicability of the results. In this study, a waste sampling and sorting methodology for efficient and statistically robust characterisation of solid waste was introduced. The methodology was applied to residual waste collected from 1442 households distributed among 10 individual sub-areas in three Danish municipalities (both single and multi-family house areas). In total 17 tonnes of waste were sorted into 10–50 waste fractions, organised according to a three-level (tiered approach) facilitating comparison of the waste data between individual sub-areas with different fractionation (waste from one municipality was sorted at “Level III”, e.g. detailed, while the two others were sorted only at “Level I”). The results showed that residual household waste mainly contained food waste (42 ± 5%, mass per wet basis) and miscellaneous combustibles (18 ± 3%, mass per wet basis). The residual household waste generation rate in the study areas was 3–4 kg per person per week. Statistical analyses revealed that the waste composition was independent of variations in the waste generation rate. Both, waste composition and waste generation rates were statistically similar for each of the three municipalities. While the waste generation rates were similar for each of the two housing types (single

  9. Treatment of aqueous phase of bio-oil by granular activated carbon and evaluation of biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Saravanan R; Adhikari, Sushil; Wang, Zhouhang; Shakya, Rajdeep

    2017-01-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction of wet biomass such as algae is a promising thermochemical process for the production of bio-oil. Bio-oil aqueous phase generated during liquefaction process is rich in complex organics and can be utilized for biogas production following its pre-treatment with granular activated carbon. In our study, use of 30% activated carbon resulted in higher chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction (53±0.3%) from aqueous phase. Higher CH4 production (84±12mL/gCOD) was also observed in 30% carbon-treated aqueous phase fed cultures, whereas only 32±6mLCH4/gCOD was observed in control (non-carbon treated) cultures. The results from this study indicate that almost 67±0.3% initial COD of aqueous phase can be reduced using a combination of both carbon treatment and biogas production. This study shows that aqueous phase can be utilized for CH4 production.

  10. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2010-06-21

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2009 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2009 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per LWO-LWE-2008-00423, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2009, were completed. All Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2009 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 1, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.4. UT inspections were performed on Tank 29 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00559, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2009, Waste Tank 29. Post chemical cleaning UT measurements were made in Tank 6 and the results are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00560, Tank Inspection NDE Results Tank 6, Including Summary of Waste Removal Support Activities in Tanks 5 and 6. A total of 6669 photographs were made and 1276 visual and video inspections were performed during 2009. Twenty-Two new leaksites were identified in 2009. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.4. Fifteen leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Five leaksites at Tank 6 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Two new leaksites were identified at Tank 19 during waste removal activities. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tanks 5 and 12 during waste removal activities. Also, a very small amount of additional leakage from a previously identified leaksite at Tank 14 was observed.

  11. SRNL CRP progress report [Development of Melt Processed Ceramics for Nuclear Waste Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Marra, J. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-10-02

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multiphase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing.

  12. Catalytic wet oxidation of o-chlorophenol at mild temperatures under alkaline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yoshihiro; Fukuta, Tadashi; Yamada, Takehisa; Onyango, Maurice S; Bernardo, Eileen C; Matsuda, Hitoki; Yagishita, Kohichi

    2005-01-01

    Wet oxidation of a 100 ppm aqueous solution of o-chlorophenol (o-CP) was performed in a lab-scale batch reactor using 3% Ru/TiO(2) catalyst at 373 and 413 K, and a partial oxygen pressure of 0.1 MPa. The experiments were conducted by varying the initial pH values of o-CP solution from pH 6.3 to 9.8 and 11.8. From the results, it was revealed that the catalytic decomposition of o-CP occurred most effectively at 413 K and at the initial pH of 9.8. Complete decomposition and dechlorination of o-CP were almost achieved within 1h, and about 85% of TOC was removed in 3.0 h. On the other hand, the catalytic wet oxidation of o-CP at a higher pH value of 11.8 was not effective in the removal of TOC. The incomplete removal of TOC at the initial pH of 11.8 is likely attributed to a low pK(a) of carboxylic acids formed during the wet oxidation of o-CP.

  13. Structural Modification of Cobalt Catalysts: Effect of Wetting Studied by X-Ray and Infrared Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodakov A.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of wetting on the structure and localisation of cobalt species on various supports (Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, HZSM-5 zeolite was studied using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with CO as a molecular probe, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis. Aqueous impregnation to incipient wetness of reduced and passivated cobalt catalysts results, even in the absence of any promoter, in a considerable decrease in the concentration of Co crystalline phases and modifies the surface sites. The decrease in the concentration of Co3O4 crystallites was especially pronounced on silica supported catalysts prepared via impregnation of cobalt and on a mixture of Co3O4 and HZSM-5 zeolite. Saturation with water of the passivated Co/SiO2 sample results in an amorphous solid with a local structure close to that of Co2SiO4. For Co/Al2O3 and Co/TiO2 catalysts, the effect of wetting on the concentration of Co3O4 crystalline phase was considerably smaller.

  14. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets

  15. Thermocatalytic conversion of food processing wastes: Topical report, FY 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

    1989-01-01

    The efficient utilization of waste produced during food processing operations is a topic of growing importance to the industry. While incineration is an attractive option for wastes with relatively low ash and moisture contents (i.e., under about 50 wt % moisture), it is not suitable for wastes with high moisture contents. Cheese whey, brewer's spent grain, and fruit pomace are examples of food processing wastes that are generally too wet to burn efficiently and cleanly. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a thermocatalytic conversion process that can convert high-moisture wastes (up to 98 wt % moisture) to a medium-Btu fuel gas consisting primarily of methane and carbon dioxide. At the same time, the COD of these waste streams is reduced by 90% to 99%, Organic wastes are converted by thermocatalytic treatment at 350/degree/C to 400/degree/C and 3000 to 4000 psig. The process offers a relatively simple solution to waste treatment while providing net energy production from wastes containing as little as 2 wt % organic solids (this is equivalent to a COD of approximately 25,000 mg/L). This report describes continuous reactor system (CRS) experiments that have been conducted with food processing wastes. The purpose of the CRS experiments was to provide kinetic and catalyst lifetime data, which could not be obtained with the batch reactor tests. These data are needed for commercial scaleup of the process.

  16. Scrubber-Integrated Wet Electrostatic Precipitator; Skrubberintegrerat vaatt elektrofilter, WESP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Sven; Baefver, Linda; Davidsson, Kent; Pettersson, Jens; Schmidt, Hans; Strand, Michael; Yngvesson, Johan

    2011-07-01

    Combustion processes for heat and power production are an important source of sub-micron particle emissions, which cause enhanced health risks and premature deaths. To meet future requirements of economical and robust dust cleaning equipment, the Wet Electrostatic Precipitation (WESP) technology has been further developed in this project. A pilot scale slip stream WESP unit, installed by Goetaverken Miljoe, has been successfully installed and tested at the Renova Waste-to-Energy plant in Goeteborg, Sweden. The particles in the gas are charged by an ionizing electrode and collected in a concentric cylinder geometry. The WESP pilot consists of a unique combination of several existing technologies: it is integrated with a packed bed scrubber which means an ideally uniformly distributed gas flow in the WESP inlet. Furthermore, the WESP unit has a water cooled condensing collector, which facilitates continuous formation of a water film. The downward flowing water film transports the collected dust counter current to the upward flowing flue gas in order to minimize particle re-entrainment. The WESP is equipped with a high frequency transformer for stable voltage output and is fabricated in electrically conductive corrosion resistant Fibre Reinforced Plastic (FRP). The concentration of dust upstream of the WESP unit varied between 6.2 and 28 mg/Nm{sup 3} dry gas. All measured outlet dust concentrations were below 0.3 mg/Nm{sup 3} (dry gas, 11% O{sub 2}), which equals 3% of the applicable emission limit. The dust removal efficiency has been higher than 97% in all the dust measurements. The mean value of all the dust measurements was 15.2 mg/Nm{sup 3} upstream and 0.14 mg/Nm{sup 3} in downstream (both as dry gas, 11% O{sub 2}), which gives an average removal efficiency of slightly more than 99%. The removal efficiency increased with increasing inlet dust concentration, SO{sub 2} concentration and {Delta}T of the collector cooling. Chlorine, potassium, sodium, silicon and

  17. Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-02-13

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

  18. Design of a static mixer reactor for copper recovery from waste streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wageningen, W.F.C.

    2005-01-01

    The main goal of the project was the development of a plug flow reactor for the reduction of heavy metals (Cu2+) from industrial waste streams. Potential application of the reduction process inside The Netherlands lies in the IC and galvanic industry, where small waste streams containing aqueous co

  19. Method for the removal of ultrafine particulates from an aqueous suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, David J. (Naperville, IL); Kopasz, John P. (Bolingbrook, IL); Ellison, Adam J. G. (Corning, NY)

    2000-01-01

    A method of separating ultra-fine particulates from an aqueous suspension such as a process stream or a waste stream. The method involves the addition of alkali silicate and an organic gelling agent to a volume of liquid, from the respective process or waste stream, to form a gel. The gel then undergoes syneresis to remove water and soluble salts from the gel containing the particulates, thus, forming a silica monolith. The silica monolith is then sintered to form a hard, nonporous waste form.

  20. Method for the Removal of Ultrafine Particulates from an Aqueous Suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiko, David J.; Kopasz, John P.; Ellison, Adam J.G.

    1999-03-05

    A method of separating ultra-fine particulate from an aqueous suspension such as a process stream or a waste stream. The method involves the addition of alkali silicate and an organic gelling agent to a volume of liquid, from the respective process or waste stream, to form a gel. The gel then undergoes syneresis to remove water and soluble salts from the gel-containing the particulate, thus, forming a silica monolith. The silica monolith is then sintered to form a hard, nonporous waste form.

  1. Properties of dry film lubricants prepared by spray application of aqueous starch-oil composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqueous dispersions of starch-soybean oil (SBO) and starch-jojoba oil (JO) composites, prepared by excess steam jet cooking, form effective dry film lubricants when applied as thick coatings to metal surfaces by doctor blade. This application method necessitates long drying times, is wasteful, requ...

  2. Aqueous solubility, dispersibility and toxicity of biodiesels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollebone, B.P.; Fieldhouse, B.; Lumley, T.C.; Landriault, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). ; Doe, K.; Jackman, P. [Environment Canada, Moncton, NB (Canada). Toxicology Laboratory, Environmental Science Centre

    2007-07-01

    The renewed interest in the use of biological fuels can be attributed to that fact that feedstocks for fatty-acid ester biodiesels are renewable and can be reclaimed from waste. Although there are significant benefits to using biodiesels, their increased use leaves potential for accidental release to the environment. Therefore, their environmental behaviours and impacts must be evaluated along with the risk associated with their use. Biodiesel fuels may be made from soy oil, canola oil, reclaimed restaurant grease, fish oil and animal fat. The toxicological fate of biofuel depends on the variability of its chemical composition. This study provided an initial assessment of the aqueous fate and effects of biodiesel from a broad range of commonly available feedstocks and their blends with petroleum diesels. The study focused primarily on the fate and impact of these fuels in fresh-water. The use of chemical dispersion as a countermeasure for saltwater was also investigated. The exposure of aquatic ecosystems to biodiesels and petroleum diesel occurs via the transfer of material from the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) into the aqueous phase, as both soluble and dispersed components. The aqueous solubilities of the fuels were determined from the equilibrium water-accommodated fraction concentrations. The acute toxicities of many biodiesels were reported for 3 test species used by Environment Canada for toxicological evaluation, namely rainbow trout, the water flea and a luminescent bacterium. This study also evaluated the natural potential for dispersion of the fuels in the water column in both low and high-energy wave conditions. Chemical dispersion as a potential countermeasure for biodiesel spills was also evaluated using solubility testing, acute toxicity testing, and dispersibility testing. It was shown that biodiesels have much different fates and impacts from petroleum diesels. The compounds partitioning into the water column are also very different for each

  3. Exfoliation Dynamics of Laponite Clay in Aqueous Suspensions Studied by NMR Relaxometry

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between Laponite and other constituents in complex systems greatly depends on its available surface area. We report a study of exfoliation dynamics of Laponite in aqueous suspensions by NMR relaxometry. It showed that Laponite particles exfoliate to the same extent in a concentration range of 0.5-3% w/w. Faster increase of specific wetted surface area of Laponite particles in more concentrated suspensions suggests faster exfoliation of disc-shaped Laponite platelets from the i...

  4. Wetting heterogeneity in mixed-wet porous media controls flow dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Murison, Julie; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Herminghaus, Stephan; Schröter, Matthias; Brinkmann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Wettability is crucial for multiphase flow in porous media. However, the effect of spatial distribution of wetting domains has previously only been dealt with by averaging contact angles over several pores. By preparing tailored bead packings with the same average surface wettability, but differing in the typical spatial extension of the same-type wetting domains, we show that models based solely on averages do not capture the dynamics of two phase flow in such systems. Using X-ray tomography we measure the typical length scale xi of the wetting domains in our samples. In capillary pressure saturation (CPS) experiments we find that xi controls the width of the hysteresis loop for xi <= d, d being the bead diameter. X-Ray tomography of the samples during both water and oil invasion shows that the front morphology is smoothened at small values of xi. Both observations are consistent with an increase of dissipation for small correlation length.

  5. Wetting films stabilized by block-copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Eliseeva, O.V.

    2006-01-01

    Thin aqueous films formed on a solid surface play an important role in adhesion, spreading, and colloidal stability. These phenomena are all relevant for paint systems. Measuring surface forces in these films is an experimental challenge, and over the years several techniques have been developed to measure the interaction forces as a function of the thickness of the film, the so-called disjoining pressure isotherms. A thin film balance technique (TFB) in combination with an ellipsometer offer...

  6. Household hazardous waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelsted, Lotte; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2007-01-01

    incinerated. Allowing household paint waste to be collected with ordinary household waste is expected to reduce the cost of handling household hazardous waste, since paint waste in Denmark comprises the major fraction of household hazardous waste.......'Paint waste', a part of the 'household hazardous waste', amounting to approximately 5 tonnes was collected from recycling stations in two Danish cities. Sorting and analyses of the waste showed paint waste comprised approximately 65% of the mass, paint-like waste (cleaners, fillers, etc...... and the paint waste was less contaminated with heavy metals than was the ordinary household waste. This may suggest that households no longer need to source-segregate their paint if the household waste is incinerated, since the presence of a small quantity of solvent-based paint will not be harmful when...

  7. Rethinking the waste hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, C.; Vigsoe, D. (eds.)

    2005-03-01

    There is an increasing need to couple environmental and economic considerations within waste management. Consumers and companies alike generate ever more waste. The waste-policy challenges of the future lie in decoupling growth in waste generation from growth in consumption, and in setting priorities for the waste management. This report discusses the criteria for deciding priorities for waste management methods, and questions the current principles of EU waste policies. The basis for the discussion is the so-called waste hierarchy which has dominated the waste policy in the EU since the mid-1970s. The waste hierarchy ranks possible methods of waste management. According to the waste hierarchy, the very best solution is to reduce the amount of waste. After that, reuse is preferred to recycling which, in turn, is preferred to incineration. Disposal at a landfill is the least favourable solution. (BA)

  8. Other Special Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    separately from MSW. Some of these other special wastes are briefly described in this chapter with respect to their definition, quantity and composition, and management options. The special wastes mentioned here are batteries, tires, polyvinylchloride (PVC) and food waste.......In addition to the main types of special waste related to municipal solid waste (MSW) mentioned in the previous chapters (health care risk waste, WEEE, impregnated wood, hazardous waste) a range of other fractions of waste have in some countries been defined as special waste that must be handled...

  9. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  10. Solid surface wetting and the deployment of drops in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Depew, J.

    1994-02-01

    The complete or partial deployment of liquid samples in low gravity is primarily influenced by the interfacial properties of the specific liquid and solid materials used because the overwhelming bias of the Earth gravitational acceleration is removed. This study addresses the engineering aspects of injecting and deploying drops of prescribed volume into an acoustic positioning chamber in microgravity. The specific problems of interest are the design, testing, and implementation of injector tips to be used in a simultaneously retracting dual-injector system in the Drop Physics Module microgravity experiment facility. Prior to release, the liquid to be deployed must be retained within a restricted area at the very end of the injectors under dynamic stimuli from the continuous injection flow as well as from the stepped motion of the injectors. The final released drop must have a well determined volume and negligible residual linear or angular momentum. The outcome of Earth-based short-duration low gravity experiments had been the selection of two types of injector tips which were flown as back-up parts. They were successfully utilized during the USML-1 Spacelab mission as the primary tips. The combination of a larger contact surface, liquid pinning with a sharp edge, and selective coating of strategic tip surfaces with a non-wetting compound has allowed a significant increase in the success rate of deployment of simple and compound drops of aqueous solutions of glycerol and silicone oil. The diameter of the samples studied in the Drop Physics Module range between 0.3 and 2.7 cm. The tests conducted on-orbit with a manually operated small device have allowed the calibration of the volume deployed for a few drop sizes. The design for improved tips to be used during the next USML flight is based on these results.

  11. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  12. Lubrication, adsorption, and rheology of aqueous polysaccharide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Jason R; Macakova, Lubica; Chojnicka-Paszun, Agnieszka; de Kruif, Cornelis G; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2011-04-05

    Aqueous lubrication is currently at the forefront of tribological research due to the desire to learn and potentially mimic how nature lubricates biotribological contacts. We focus here on understanding the lubrication properties of naturally occurring polysaccharides in aqueous solution using a combination of tribology, adsorption, and rheology. The polysaccharides include pectin, xanthan gum, gellan, and locus bean gum that are all widely used in food and nonfood applications. They form rheologically complex fluids in aqueous solution that are both shear thinning and elastic, and their normal stress differences at high shear rates are found to be characteristic of semiflexible/rigid molecules. Lubrication is studied using a ball-on-disk tribometer with hydrophobic elastomer surfaces, mimicking biotribological contacts, and the friction coefficient is measured as a function of speed across the boundary, mixed, and hydrodynamic lubrication regimes. The hydrodynamic regime, where the friction coefficient increases with increasing lubricant entrainment speed, is found to depend on the viscosity of the polysaccharide solutions at shear rates of around 10(4) s(-1). The boundary regime, which occurs at the lowest entrainment speeds, depends on the adsorption of polymer to the substrate. In this regime, the friction coefficient for a rough substrate (400 nm rms roughness) is dependent on the dry mass of polymer adsorbed to the surface (obtained from surface plasmon resonance), while for a smooth substrate (10 nm rms roughness) the friction coefficient is strongly dependent on the hydrated wet mass of adsorbed polymer (obtained from quartz crystal microbalance, QCM-D). The mixed regime is dependent on both the adsorbed film properties and lubricant's viscosity at high shear rates. In addition, the entrainment speed where the friction coefficient is a minimum, which corresponds to the transition between the hydrodynamic and mixed regime, correlates linearly with the ratio

  13. Aqueous humor changes after experimental filtering surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Herschler, J; Claflin, A; Fiorentino, G

    1980-02-01

    We studied aqueous humor of rhesus and owl monkeys for its effect on the growth of subconjunctival fibroblasts in tissue culture. Aqueous humor samples obtained before glaucoma surgery inhibited the initiation of growth of fibroblasts. However, postoperative aqueous humor samples supported growth of fibroblasts. The change in aqueous humor physiology lasted for up to two months after glaucoma surgery. Our study indicated that possibly material added to the postoperative aqueous humor inactivates an inhibitor normally present in primary aqueous humor. An alternative explanation would be that primary aqueous humor, in contrast to secondary aqueous humor, lacks sufficient nutrient material to support fibroblast growth in tissue culture.

  14. Phoenix Carries Soil to Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the lander's Robotic Arm scoop positioned over the Wet Chemistry Lab delivery funnel on Sol 29, the 29th Martian day after landing, or June 24, 2008. The soil will be delivered to the instrument on Sol 30. This image has been enhanced to brighten the scene. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Microwave emission from dry and wet snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, T. C.; Gloersen, P.

    1975-01-01

    A microscopic model was developed to study the microwave emission from snow. In this model, the individual snow particles are considered to be the scattering centers. Mie scattering theory for spherical particles is then used to compute the volume scattering and extinction coefficients of the closely packed scattering spheres, which are assumed not to interact coherently. The results of the computations show significant volume scattering effects in the microwave region which result in low observed emissivities from cold, dry snow. In the case of wet snow, the microwave emissivities are increased considerably, in agreement with earlier experimental observations in which the brightness temperatures have increased significantly at the onset of melting.

  16. Influence of wet activation of used inorganic binder on cyclically refreshed water glass moulding sands hardened by microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Stachowicz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research results of using an innovative method to reclaim the waste moulding sands containing water glass. Two of the examined processes are connected with "dry" or "wet" activation of inorganic binder in waste moulding sand mixtures physically hardened by microwave radiation. The sand mixtures consisting of high-silica sand and water-glass with average molar module 2.5, were subjected to the following cyclical process: mixing the components, compacting, microwave heating, cooling-down, thermally loading the mould to 800 °C, cooling-down to ambient temperature, and knocking-out. After being knocked-out, the waste moulding sands were subjected to either dry or wet activation of the binder. To activate thermally treated inorganic binder, each of the examined processes employed the surface phenomenon usually associated to mechanical reclamation. The study also covered possible use of some elements of wet reclamation to rehydrate waste binder. To evaluate the effectiveness of the two proposed methods of waste binder activation, selected strength and technological parameters were measured. After each subsequent processing cycle, the permeability, tensile strength and bending strength were determined. In addition, the surface of activated sand grains was examined with a scanning electron microscope. Analysis of the results indicates that it is possible to re-activate the used binder such as sodium silicate, and to stabilize the strength parameters in both activation processes. Permeability of the refreshed moulding sands strongly depends on the surface condition of high-silica grains. The wet activation process by wetting and buffering knocked-out moulding sands in closed humid environment makes it possible to reduce the content of refreshing additive in water-glass. The moulding sands cyclically prepared in both processes do not require the addition of fresh high-silica sand. The relatively high quality achieved in the

  17. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2011-06-23

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2010 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2010 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2009-00138, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2010, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2010 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 30, 31 and 32 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2010-00533, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2010, Waste Tanks 30, 31 and 32. A total of 5824 photographs were made and 1087 visual and video inspections were performed during 2010. Ten new leaksites at Tank 5 were identified in 2010. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.5. Ten leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. None of these new leaksites resulted in a release to the environment. The leaksites were documented during wall cleaning activities and the waste nodules associated with the leaksites were washed away. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tank 12 during waste removal activities.

  18. Argonne National Laboratory`s photooxidation organic mixed-waste treatment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, T.L.; Torres, T.; Conner, C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes the installation and startup testing of the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) photo-oxidation organic mixed-waste treatment system. This system will treat organic mixed (i.e., radioactive and hazardous) waste by oxidizing the organics to carbon dioxide and inorganic salts in an aqueous media. The residue will be treated in the existing radwaste evaporators. The system is installed in the waste management facility at the ANL-E site in Argonne, Illinois.

  19. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ELLEFSON, M.D.

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  20. Glass Ceramic Waste Forms for Combined CS+LN+TM Fission Products Waste Streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2010-09-23

    In this study, glass ceramics were explored as an alternative waste form for glass, the current baseline, to be used for immobilizing alkaline/alkaline earth + lanthanide (CS+LN) or CS+LN+transition metal (TM) fission-product waste streams generated by a uranium extraction (UREX+) aqueous separations type process. Results from past work on a glass waste form for the combined CS+LN waste streams showed that as waste loading increased, large fractions of crystalline phases precipitated upon slow cooling.[1] The crystalline phases had no noticeable impact on the waste form performance by the 7-day product consistency test (PCT). These results point towards the development of a glass ceramic waste form for treating CS+LN or CS+LN+TM combined waste streams. Three main benefits for exploring glass ceramics are: (1) Glass ceramics offer increased solubility of troublesome components in crystalline phases as compared to glass, leading to increased waste loading; (2) The crystalline network formed in the glass ceramic results in higher heat tolerance than glass; and (3) These glass ceramics are designed to be processed by the same melter technology as the current baseline glass waste form. It will only require adding controlled canister cooling for crystallization into a glass ceramic waste form. Highly annealed waste form (essentially crack free) with up to 50X lower surface area than a typical High-Level Waste (HLW) glass canister. Lower surface area translates directly into increased durability. This was the first full year of exploring glass ceramics for the Option 1 and 2 combined waste stream options. This work has shown that dramatic increases in waste loading are achievable by designing a glass ceramic waste form as an alternative to glass. Table S1 shows the upper limits for heat, waste loading (based on solubility), and the decay time needed before treatment can occur for glass and glass ceramic waste forms. The improvements are significant for both combined waste

  1. Mechanisms leading to oligomers and SOA through aqueous photooxidation: insights from OH radical oxidation of acetic acid and methylglyoxal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous experiments have demonstrated that the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal produces low volatility products including pyruvate, oxalate and oligomers. These products are found predominantly in the particle phase in the atmosphere, suggesting that methylglyoxal is a precursor of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Acetic acid plays a central role in the aqueous oxidation of methylglyoxal and it is a ubiquitous product of gas phase photochemistry, making it a potential "aqueous" SOA precursor in its own right. However, the fate of acetic acid upon aqueous-phase oxidation is not well understood. In this research, acetic acid (20 μM–10 mM was oxidized by OH radicals, and pyruvic acid and methylglyoxal experimental samples were analyzed using new analytical methods, in order to better understand the formation of SOA from acetic acid and methylglyoxal. Glyoxylic, glycolic, and oxalic acids formed from acetic acid and OH radicals. In contrast to the aqueous OH radical oxidation of methylglyoxal, the aqueous OH radical oxidation of acetic acid did not produce succinic acid and oligomers. This suggests that the methylgloxal-derived oligomers do not form through the acid catalyzed esterification pathway proposed previously. Using results from these experiments, radical mechanisms responsible for oligomer formation from methylglyoxal oxidation in clouds and wet aerosols are proposed. The importance of acetic acid/acetate as an SOA precursor is also discussed. We hypothesize that this and similar chemistry is central to the daytime formation of oligomers in wet aerosols.

  2. Waste remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2017-01-17

    A system including a steam generation system and a chamber. The steam generation system includes a complex and the steam generation system is configured to receive water, concentrate electromagnetic (EM) radiation received from an EM radiation source, apply the EM radiation to the complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, and transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the water to steam. The chamber is configured to receive the steam and an object, wherein the object is of medical waste, medical equipment, fabric, and fecal matter.

  3. Wenzel Wetting on Slippery Rough Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogin, Birgitt; Dai, Xianming; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2015-11-01

    Liquid repellency is an important surface property used in a wide range of applications including self-cleaning, anti-icing, anti-biofouling, and condensation heat transfer, and is characterized by apparent contact angle (θ*) and contact angle hysteresis (Δθ*). The Wenzel equation (1936) predicts θ* of liquids in the Wenzel state, and is one of the most fundamental equations in the wetting field. However, droplets in the Wenzel state on conventional rough surfaces exhibit large Δθ* , making it difficult to experimentally verify the model with precision. As a result, precise verification of the Wenzel wetting model has remained an open scientific question for the past 79 years. Here we introduce a new class of liquid-infused surfaces called slippery rough surfaces -- surfaces with significantly reduced Δθ* compared to conventional rough surfaces--and use them to experimentally assess the Wenzel equation with the highest precision to date. We acknowledge the funding support by National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award #: 1351462 and Office of Navy Research MURI Award #: N00014-12-1-0875. Stogin acknowledges the support from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (Grant No. DGE1255832).

  4. Wet sipping system at Wolsong-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.Y.; Shin, J.C.; Kim, Y.C.; Park, C.H.; Choi, T.Y.; Park, C.J., E-mail: jyoulpark@knfc.co.kr [Korea Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd. (KNF), Yousong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Manger, A.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    After many years of operation, the on-power failed fuel detection and location systems along with alarm area gamma monitors at Wolsong-1 have successfully demonstrated that most, if not all, defective and suspect fuel bundles can be located before discharge to the fuel bay. Today, discharged bundles are now being transferred from the fuel bay to the AECL designed Modular Air-Cooled Storage (MACSTOR) canister facilities. Since these canisters are licensed for storing intact fuel bundles only, a procedure was needed at Wolsong-1 to separate any suspect or defective bundles that do not release fission products in detectable quantities. Therefore, KNF designed and built a wet sipper to enclose an irradiated bundle inside a sealed container at the bottom of the fuel bay. Various techniques were then used to enhance the release of water soluble fission products from defective fuel elements before circulating water samples from the immediate vicinity of an irradiated fuel bundle to an inspection station located at the top of the fuel bay. Any water samples with elevated levels of gamma activity were direct indications of a fuel cladding breach. The presence of defective fuel elements were then verified by visual inspection. The system performance test was performed in the Wolsong-1 nuclear power plant on March 2009.This paper describes the results of the wet sipping tests. (author)

  5. A wetting and drying scheme for ROMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, John C.; Defne, Zafer; Haas, Kevin; Arango, Hernan G.

    2013-01-01

    The processes of wetting and drying have many important physical and biological impacts on shallow water systems. Inundation and dewatering effects on coastal mud flats and beaches occur on various time scales ranging from storm surge, periodic rise and fall of the tide, to infragravity wave motions. To correctly simulate these physical processes with a numerical model requires the capability of the computational cells to become inundated and dewatered. In this paper, we describe a method for wetting and drying based on an approach consistent with a cell-face blocking algorithm. The method allows water to always flow into any cell, but prevents outflow from a cell when the total depth in that cell is less than a user defined critical value. We describe the method, the implementation into the three-dimensional Regional Oceanographic Modeling System (ROMS), and exhibit the new capability under three scenarios: an analytical expression for shallow water flows, a dam break test case, and a realistic application to part of a wetland area along the Georgia Coast, USA.

  6. The Underlying Physics in Wetted Particle Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Carly; Hrenya, Christine; Davis, Robert

    2008-11-01

    Wetted granular particles are relevant in many industries including the pharmaceutical and chemical industries and has applications to granulation, filtration, coagulation, spray coating, drying and pneumatic transport. In our current focus, we investigate the dynamics of a three-body normal wetted particle collision. In order to conduct collisions we use an apparatus called a ``Stokes Cradle,'' similar to the Newton's Cradle (desktop toy) except that the target particles are covered with oil. Here, we are able to vary the oil thickness, oil viscosity, and material properties. With a three particle collision there are four possible outcomes: fully agglomerated (FA); Newton's Cradle (NC), the striker and the first target ball are agglomerated and the last target ball is separated; Reverse Newton's Cradle (RNC), the striker is separated and the two targets are agglomerated; and fully separated (FS). Varying the properties of the collisions, we have observed all four outcomes. We use elastohydrodynamics as a theoretical basis for modeling the system. We also have considered the glass transition of the oil as the pressure increases upon impact and the cavitation of the oil as the pressure drops below the vapor pressure upon rebound. A toy model has been developed where the collision is modeled as a series of two-body collisions. A qualitative agreement between the toy model and experiments gives insight into the underlying physics.

  7. Spreading of aqueous SDS solutions over nitrocellulose membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, S A; Starov, V M; Sobolev, V D; Velarde, M G

    2003-08-15

    Experimental investigations were carried out on the spreading of small drops of aqueous SDS solutions over dry thin porous substrates (nitrocellulose membranes) in the case of partial wetting. The time evolution was monitored of the radii of both the drop base and the wetted area inside the porous substrate. The total duration of the spreading process was subdivided into three stages: the first stage: the drop base expands until the maximum value of the drop base is reached, the contact angle rapidly decreases during this stage; the second stage: the radius of the drop base remains constant and the contact angle decreases linearly with time; the third stage: the drop base shrinks and the contact angle remains constant. The wetted area inside the porous substrate expends during the whole spreading process. Appropriate scales were used with a plot of the dimensionless radii of the drop base, of the wetted area inside the porous substrate and the dynamic contact angle on the dimensionless time. Our experimental data show: the overall time of the spreading of drops of SDS solution over dry thin porous substrates decreases with the increase of surfactant concentration; the difference between advancing and hydrodynamic receding contact angles decreases with the surfactant concentration increase; the constancy of the contact angle during the third stage of spreading has nothing to do with the hysteresis of contact angle, but determined by the hydrodynamic reasons. It is shown using independent spreading experiments of the same drops on nonporous nitrocellulose substrate that the static receding contact angle is equal to zero, which supports our conclusion on the hydrodynamic nature of the hydrodynamic receding contact angle on porous substrates.

  8. Deployed Force Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-01

    Granath J., Baky A., Thhyselius L., (2004). Municipal Solid Waste Management from a Systems Perspective. Journal of Cleaner Production , forthcoming...Municipal Solid Waste Management from a Systems Perspective. Journal of Cleaner Production , forthcoming article In this paper different waste

  9. Laboratory optimization tests of technetium decontamination of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant low activity waste melter off-gas condensate simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable simplified operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste.

  10. WetLab-2: Wet Lab RNA SmartCycler Providing PCR Capability on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Macarena; Schonfeld, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The WetLab-2 system will provide sample preparation and qRT-PCR analysis on-board the ISS, a capability to enable using the ISS as a real laboratory. The system will be validated on SpX-7, and is planned for its first PI use on SpX-9.

  11. Study of the {sup 60}Co speciation in the aqueous radioactive waste of the la Hague nuclear reprocessing plant; environmental behaviour after discharges in the waters of the channel; Etude de la speciation du {sup 60}Co dans les effluents de l'usine de retraitement de combustibles irradies de la Hague; devenir apres rejet dans les eaux de la Manche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudaire, J.M

    1999-07-01

    {sup 60}Co is produced as an activation product and is present in the low-level aqueous radioactive waste released from the La Hague plant. At present, the concentration in the sea (non filtered at 0.45 {mu}m) at the Goury site are close to or even below, the detection limit: 0.2 mBq.l{sup -1}. The {sup 60}Co speciation depends on the type of effluent considered: in the effluent A ('active'), the cobalt is in the form of a stable trivalent complex; in the effluent V (to be checked), the cobalt is in majority (50% of the activity release) in the form of particles (>0.45 {mu}m), and then in the form of two soluble species: ionic divalent (Co{sup 2+}) and some stable complexes. The evolution of the reprocessing techniques used does not affect the speciation. So, since the nuclear reprocessing plant started at the La Hague plant in 1966, the chemical species discharged in the sea shows time variation related to the evolution of the type of effluent discharged. Thus, since 1994, the particles of cobalt are the main species discharged in the Channel (the V effluents represent more than 85% of the total {sup 60}Co activity released). The effect of instantaneous dilution into the marine conditions involving a variation of pH, oxido-reduction, ionic strength, a gradient of salinity, does not interfere with the evolution of the chemical species discharged. Nevertheless, during the discharge of the V effluent, the main constituents of the sea water (Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}) go through a precipitation. This comes with the coprecipitation of the ion Co{sup 2+} and with the particles of cobalt (complexes are not affected), and it can be responsible for an increase in the concentration in the particles. The chemical behaviour of the cobalt in the Channel is different from those of conservative element such as antimony. The ionic cobalt and the particles have a small dispersion in the water (cobalt has a very high particle/dissolved distribution factor, it is a non

  12. Wet reclamation of sodium silicate used sand and biological treatment of its wastewater by Nitzschia palea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Shaoqiang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The massive amount of sodium silicate in the used sand was a pollution source, especially in the waste water from the wet reclamation of used sand. A new process of wet reclamation by biologically treating the waste water produced during the wet reclamation process of used sand was studied in the paper. In the work, the pre-cultivation of N. palea was performed firstly, and three different scrubbing solutions: (1 tap water, (2 modified medium for N. palea, and (3 filtrate of the broth treated by N. palea for 15 days, were used. The results of the primary investigation show that a de-skinning ratio of 90% is obtained when using the scrubbing solution containing modified medium for N. palea at the ratio 1:2 of sand and scrubbing solution, and the maximal concentrations of Na+ and SiO3? are 1.49 g稬-1 and 0.51 g稬-1, respectively. The results of the optimal biomass, pH value decrease and Na+ and SiO32- consumption indicate the optimal incubation conditions are at the irradiance of 5,000 lux and 25 篊. Using the filtrate of the broth treated by N. palea for 15 days as the scrubbing solution directly, a de-skinning ratio of 93% is the highest compared to the results of the tap water and the modified medium for N. palea. In the biological process using N. palea, less water is used and little wastewater is produced, which is advantageous to the purpose of green manufacturing and environmental protection.

  13. Mars Aqueous Processing System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mars Aqueous Processing System (MAPS) is an innovative method to produce useful building materials from Martian regolith. Acids and bases produced from the regolith...

  14. Mars Aqueous Processing System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Aqueous Processing System (MAPS) is a novel technology for recovering oxygen, iron, and other constituents from lunar and Mars soils. The closed-loop...

  15. Waste Characterization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Naranjo, Felicia Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-02

    This report discusses ways to classify waste as outlined by LANL. Waste Generators must make a waste determination and characterize regulated waste by appropriate analytical testing or use of acceptable knowledge (AK). Use of AK for characterization requires several source documents. Waste characterization documentation must be accurate, sufficient, and current (i.e., updated); relevant and traceable to the waste stream’s generation, characterization, and management; and not merely a list of information sources.

  16. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF POLYMER MICROENCAPSULATION OF MIXED WASTE USING KINETIC MIXER PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LAGERAAEN,P.R.; KALB,P.D.; MILIAN,L.W.; ADAMS,J.W.

    1997-11-01

    Thermokinetic mixing was investigated as an alternative processing method for polyethylene microencapsulation, a technology well demonstrated for treatment of hazardous, low-level radioactive and low-level mixed wastes. Polyethylene encapsulation by extrusion has been previously shown to be applicable to a wide range of waste types but often pretreatment of the wastes is necessary due to process limitations regarding the maximum waste moisture content and particle size distribution. Development testing was conducted with kinetic mixing in order to demonstrate technology viability and show improved process applicability in these areas. Testing to establish process capabilities and relevant operating parameters was performed with waste surrogates including an aqueous evaporator concentrate and soil. Using a pilot-scale kinetic mixer which was installed and modified for this program, the maximum waste moisture content and particle size was determined. Following process development with surrogate wastes, the technology was successfully demonstrated at BNL using actual mixed waste.

  17. Round table part 5 : Identification of the key technologies and collaboration for waste management and recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasseur, Christophe; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Wheeler, Raymond

    2016-07-01

    Any manned missions will produce solid waste with or without on board food production. Of course in case of high food production, the percentage of waste of plant origin will be much higher and may pass the 80 %. Consequently the ultimate objective of a closed loop system is not achievable without an efficient waste r4cycling system. Over the years, a large panel of investigations of technologies have been performed form microbial degradation to wet oxidation. These part 5 is aiming to be a platform of discussion on the current world wide investigations related to solid waste treatment and to allow synergies and collaborations.

  18. Potentials for food waste minimization and effects on potential biogas production through anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Anna Bernstad Saraiva; Vukicevic, Sanita; Bohn, Irene; Andersson, Tova

    2013-08-01

    Several treatment alternatives for food waste can result in both energy and nutrient recovery, and thereby potential environmental benefits. However, according to the European Union waste management hierarchy, waste prevention should be the prioritized strategy to decrease the environmental burdens from all solid waste management. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the potential for food waste minimization among Swedish households through an investigation of the amount of avoidable food waste currently disposed of. A further aim was to investigate the effect on the national biogas production potential through anaerobic digestion of food waste, considering minimization potentials. A method for waste composition analyses of household food waste, where a differentiation between avoidable and unavoidable food waste is made, was used in a total of 24 waste composition analyses of household waste from Swedish residential areas. The total household food waste generation reached 3.4 kg (household and week)(-1), on average, of which 34% is avoidable. The theoretical methane (CH4) potential in unavoidable food waste reached 442 Ndm(3) (kg VS)(-1) or 128 Nm(3) tonne(-1) wet waste, while the measured (mesophilic CH4 batch tests) CH4 production reached 399 Ndm(3) (kg VS)(-1), which is lower than several previous assessments of CH4 production from household food waste. According to this study the combination of a decrease in food waste generation-in case of successful minimization-and decreased CH4 production from unavoidable food waste will thus result in lower total potential energy recovery from household food waste through anaerobic digestion CH4 potential than previously stated.

  19. Fluorescence of aqueous solutions of commercial humic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosteva, O. Yu.; Izosimov, A. A.; Patsaeva, S. V.; Yuzhakov, V. I.; Yakimenko, O. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the spectral luminescence characteristics of aqueous solutions of humic products obtained from different raw material sources, and their behavior as the excitation wavelength increases from 270 nm to 355 nm. We have identified differences in the spectral properties of industrial humic products from coalified materials, lignin-containing organic waste, and humic products from plant raw material (peat, sapropel, vermicompost). We have shown that humic products from plant raw material have spectral properties closer to those for humic substances in natural water or soil than humic products from coalified materials.

  20. Adsorption of Copper from Aqueous Solution Using Mango Seed Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiksha V. Ashtikar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was the removal of copper metal ions from aqueous solution using mango seed powder as low cost adsorbent. The influences of contact time, adsorbent doses & temperature were studied in batch experiments at room temperature. The results showed that with increase in the contact time percent removal of copper increases. The adsorption was rapid during first 45 minutes & equilibrium was reached in 90 minutes. The results also showed that with increase in the adsorbent doses & temperature percent removal of copper increases. Thus mango seeds have the potential to be applied as alternative low-cost biosorbent in the remediation of heavy metal contamination in waste water.

  1. Valuable compounds from sewage sludge by thermal hydrolysis and wet oxidation. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Iglesias, Octavio; Urrea, José Luis; Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Díaz, Mario

    2017-04-15

    Sewage sludge is considered a costly waste, whose benefit has received a lot of attention for decades. In this sense, a variety of promising technologies, such as thermal hydrolysis and wet oxidation, are currently employed. Thermal hydrolysis is used as a pretreatment step ahead of anaerobic digestion processes and wet oxidation is intended for the solubilization and partial oxidation of the sludge. Such processes could be utilized for solubilizing polysaccharides, lipids, fragments of them and phosphorus (thermal hydrolysis) or for generating carboxylic acids (wet oxidation). This article compiles the available information on the production of valuable chemicals by these techniques and comments on their main features. Temperature, reaction duration times and sludge characteristics influence the experimental results significantly, but only the first two variables have been thoroughly studied. For thermal hydrolysis, a rise of temperature led to an increase in the solubilized biomolecules, but also to a greater decomposition of proteins and undesirable reactions of carbohydrates with themselves or with proteins. At constant temperature, the amounts of substances that can be recovered tend to become time independent after several minutes. Diluted and activated sludges seem to be more readily hydrolyzable than the thickened and primary ones. For wet oxidation, the dependence of the production of carboxylic acids with temperature and time is not simple: their concentration can increase, decrease or go through a maximum. At high temperatures, acetic acid is the main carboxylic acid obtained. Concentrated, fermented and secondary sludge seem to be more suitable for yielding higher amounts of acid than diluted, undigested and primary ones.

  2. Wetting failure of hydrophilic surfaces promoted by surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Qing

    2014-06-01

    Wetting failure is of vital importance to many physical phenomena, such as industrial coating and drop emission. Here we show when and how the surface roughness promotes the destabilization of a moving contact line on a hydrophilic surface. Beyond the balance of the driving force and viscous resistance where a stable wetting interface is sustained, wetting failure occurs and is modified by the roughness of the surface. The promoting effect arises only when the wetting velocity is high enough to create a gas-liquid-solid composite interface in the vicinity of the moving contact line, and it is a function of the intrinsic contact angle and proportion of solid tops. We propose a model to explain splashes of rough solid spheres impacting into liquids. It reveals a novel concept that dynamic wetting on hydrophilic rough surfaces can be similar to that on hydrophobic surfaces, and brings a new way to design surfaces with specific wetting properties.

  3. Mathematical model and general laws of wet compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永青; 刘铭; 廉乐明; 何健勇; 严家騄

    2002-01-01

    Wet compression is an effective way to enhance the performance of gas turbines and it has attracted a good deal of attention in recent years. The one-sidedness and inaccuracy of previous studies,which took concentration gradient as mass transfer potential are discussed. The mass transfer process is analyzed from the viewpoint of non-equilibrium thermodynamics,by taking generalized thermodynamic driving force as mass transfer potential,and the corresponding mass-transfer coefficient is obtained using the heat and mass transfer equilibrium occurring between moist air and water droplets at wet-bulb temperature for the sake of avoiding complex tests and providing more accurate formulas. A mathematical model of wet compression is therefore established,and the general laws of wet compression are investigated. The results show that the performance of atomizer is critical for wet compression and wet compression is more suitable for compressors with higher pressure ratio and longer compression time.

  4. Dynamic wetting with viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Rame, E; Walker, L M; Garoff, S

    2009-11-18

    We examine various aspects of dynamic wetting with viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Rather than concentrating on the mechanisms that relieve the classic contact line stress singularity, we focus on the behavior in the wedge flow near the contact line which has the dominant influence on wetting with these fluids. Our experiments show that a Newtonian polymer melt composed of highly flexible molecules exhibits dynamic wetting behavior described very well by hydrodynamic models that capture the critical properties of the Newtonian wedge flow near the contact line. We find that shear thinning has a strong impact on dynamic wetting, by reducing the drag of the solid on the fluid near the contact line, while the elasticity of a Boger fluid has a weaker impact on dynamic wetting. Finally, we find that other polymeric fluids, nominally Newtonian in rheometric measurements, exhibit deviations from Newtonian dynamic wetting behavior.

  5. Co-composting of horticultural waste with fruit peels, food waste, and soybean residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Sing Ying; Wang, Ke; Qi, Wei; Wang, Ben; Chen, Chia-Lung; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Horticultural waste was co-composted with fruit peels, food waste, and soybean residues individually to evaluate the effects of these easily available organic wastes in Singapore on the composting process and product quality. Each co-composting material was mixed with horticultural waste in the wet weight ratio of 1:1 and composted for 46 days. Results showed that all co-composting materials accelerated the degradation of total carbon and resulted in higher nutrients of nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and potassium (K) in the final product compared with horticultural waste alone. Mixture with fruit peels achieved the fastest total carbon loss; however, did not reach the minimum required temperature for pathogen destruction. The end product was found to be the best source for K and had a higher pH that could be used for the remediation of acidic soil. Food waste resulted in the highest available nitrate (NO3-N) content in the end product, but caused high salt content, total coliforms, and slower total carbon loss initially. Soybean residues were found to be the best co-composting material to produce compost with high N, P, and K when compared with other materials due to the highest temperature, fastest total carbon loss, fastest reduction in C/N ratio, and best conservation of nutrients.

  6. Frequent Questions About Universal Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frequent questions such as Who is affected by the universal waste regulations? What is “mercury-containing equipment”? How are waste batteries managed under universal waste? How are waste pesticides managed under universal waste?

  7. Introduction to Waste Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Solid waste management is as old as human civilization, although only considered an engineering discipline for about one century. The change from the previous focus on public cleansing of the cities to modern waste management was primarily driven by industrialization, which introduced new materials...... and chemicals, dramatically changing the types and composition of waste, and by urbanization making waste management in urban areas a complicated and costly logistic operation. This book focuses on waste that commonly appears in the municipal waste management system. This chapter gives an introduction to modern...... waste management, including issues as waste definition, problems associated with waste, waste management criteria and approaches to waste management. Later chapters introduce aspects of engineering (Chapter 1.2), economics (Chapter 1.3) and regulation (Chapter 1.4)....

  8. Wetting and evaporation studies on molecularly modified surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Soolaman, Dinah Michele

    2007-01-01

    Wetting and evaporation of liquid microdroplets on solid surfaces are ubiquitous in nature. Two of the many important factors that influence how a droplet wets and “escapes”, are the chemical composition and roughness of the solid surface. In order to gain a better understanding of these processes as a whole, a systematic study on the factors that influence wetting/evaporation behaviour, including the liquid’s composition, the liquid-solid interface, and the substrate morphology has been carr...

  9. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  10. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  11. Wick wetting for water condensation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, Susanne Vera; Spielman, Steven Russel; Lewis, Gregory Stephen; Kreisberg, Nathan Michael

    2017-04-04

    A system and method for particle enlargement with continuously wetted wicks includes a container into which a flow of particle-laden air is introduced in a laminar manner through an inlet and to an outlet. The container has a first section, a second section and a third section though which the particle-laden air flows between the inlet and the outlet. The temperature of the second section is warmer than that of the first section at the inlet and the third section at the outlet. In one embodiment, a continuous wick spanning an interior wall of the first second, second section and third section, said wick being capable of internally transporting liquid water along its length is provided.

  12. Flow studies in a wet steam turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D. H.; Pouchot, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    The design and test results of a four stage wet vapor turbine operating with slightly superheated inlet steam and expanding to 10% exit moisture are presented. High speed movies at 3000 frames per second of liquid movement on the pressure side and along the trailing edge of the last stator blade are discussed along with back lighted photographs of moisture drops as they were torn from the stator blade trailing edge. Movies at lower framing rates were also taken of the exit of the last rotating blade and the casing moisture removal slot located in line with the rotor blade shroud. Also moisture removal data are presented of casing slot removal at the exit of the third and fourth rotor blades and for slots located in the trailing edge of the last stator blade. Finally, the degradation of turbine thermodynamic performance due to condensation formation and movement is discussed.

  13. Textile UWB Antenna Bending and Wet Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai A. R. Osman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The vision and ideas of wearable computing systems describe future electronic systems as an integral part of our everyday clothing that provides the wearer with such intelligent personal assistants. Recently, there has been growing interest in the antenna community to merge between wearable systems technology, ultrawideband (UWB technology and textile technology. This work aimed to make closer steps towards real wearability by investigating the possibilities of designing wearable UWB antenna where textile materials are used for the substrate as well as the conducting parts of the designed antenna. Two types of conducting materials have been used for conducting parts, while a nonconducting fabric has been used as antenna substrate material. A set of comparative results of the proposed design were presented and discussed. Moreover, effects on the return loss by means of measurements for each fabricated antenna prototype under bent and fully wet conditions were discussed in more details.

  14. Wetting dynamics of a collapsing fluid hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Dijksman, Joshua; Shearer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    An axisymmetric fluid cavity at the bottom of a rotating bucket bound by vertical sidewalls is studied, as it is filled in by the wetting fluid. Lubrication theory is applied to reduce the governing equations to a single evolution equation for the film thickness. In the quasi-static regime the contact-line motion is governed by a constitutive law relating the effective contact angle to the contact-line speed. The dependence of the collapse time on the initial hole size is calculated. For small holes, surface tension dominates the dynamics, leading to a universal power law that compares favorably to experiments in the literature. Further verification of the model is obtained through comparison of volume dependence with experimental results.

  15. The geometry and wetting of capillary folding

    CERN Document Server

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Capillary forces are involved in a variety of natural phenomena, ranging from droplet breakup to the physics of clouds. The forces from surface tension can also be exploited in industrial application provided the length scales involved are small enough. Recent experimental investigations showed how to take advantage of capillarity to fold planar structures into three-dimensional configurations by selectively melting polymeric hinges joining otherwise rigid shapes. In this paper we use theoretical calculations to quantify the role of geometry and fluid wetting on the final folded state. Considering folding in two and three dimensions, studying both hydrophilic and hydrophobic situations with possible contact angle hysteresis, and addressing the shapes to be folded to be successively infinite, finite, curved, kinked, elastic, we are able to derive an overview of the geometrical parameter space available for capillary folding.

  16. Ensuring message embedding in wet paper steganography

    CERN Document Server

    Augot, Daniel; Fontaine, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Syndrome coding has been proposed by Crandall in 1998 as a method to stealthily embed a message in a cover-medium through the use of bounded decoding. In 2005, Fridrich et al. introduced wet paper codes to improve the undetectability of the embedding by nabling the sender to lock some components of the cover-data, according to the nature of the cover-medium and the message. Unfortunately, almost all existing methods solving the bounded decoding syndrome problem with or without locked components have a non-zero probability to fail. In this paper, we introduce a randomized syndrome coding, which guarantees the embedding success with probability one. We analyze the parameters of this new scheme in the case of perfect codes.

  17. Modeling of AC arc inside wet snow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmatjou, H.

    2006-07-01

    Overhead transmission lines cover long distances over a broad range of topographic relief, climates, and environments. As such, the high voltage equipment is subject to pollution, wet snow and atmospheric icing. Each of these factors have been the source of power outages recorded on power transmission lines. Electric arcs can develop on outdoor insulators until they cause a total flashover. This study involved the modeling of flashover in snow-covered insulators to better understand how electric discharges initiate inside snow and how they develop into flashover. The main objective of this thesis was to develop a mathematical model to predict the flashover voltage of snow-covered insulator surfaces and to ultimately design adequate insulators for cold regions. The results obtained through mathematical modeling were in good agreement with those obtained in experiments.

  18. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  19. Wetting dynamics of a collapsing fluid hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J. B.; Dijksman, J. A.; Shearer, M.

    2017-01-01

    The collapse dynamics of an axisymmetric fluid cavity that wets the bottom of a rotating bucket bound by vertical sidewalls are studied. Lubrication theory is applied to the governing field equations for the thin film to yield an evolution equation that captures the effect of capillary, gravitational, and centrifugal forces on this converging flow. The focus is on the quasistatic spreading regime, whereby contact-line motion is governed by a constitutive law relating the contact-angle to the contact-line speed. Surface tension forces dominate the collapse dynamics for small holes with the collapse time appearing as a power law whose exponent compares favorably to experiments in the literature. Gravity accelerates the collapse process. Volume dependence is predicted and compared with experiment. Centrifugal forces slow the collapse process and lead to complex dynamics characterized by stalled spreading behavior that separates the large and small hole asymptotic regimes.

  20. Influence of surface charge on wetting kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puah, Lee San; Sedev, Rossen; Fornasiero, Daniel; Ralston, John; Blake, Terry

    2010-11-16

    The wettability of a titania surface, partially covered with octadecyltrihydrosilane, has been investigated as a function of solution pH. The results show that surface charge affects both static wettability and wetting kinetics. The static contact angle decreases above and below the point of zero charge of the titania surface in a Lippman-like manner as the pH is altered. The dependence of dynamic contact angle on velocity is also affected by pH. The molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) is used to interpret the dynamic contact angle data. The frequency of molecular displacement κ(0) strongly varies with surface charge, whereas the mean molecular displacement length λ is essentially unaffected. There is an exponential dependence of contact-line friction upon work of adhesion, which is varied simply by altering the pH.