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Sample records for aqueous foam toxicology

  1. Aqueous foam toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Aqueous foams are aggregates of bubbles mechanically generated by passing air or other gases through a net, screen, or other porous medium that is wetted by an aqueous solution of surface-active foaming agents (surfactants). Aqueous foams are important in modem fire-fighting technology, as well as for military uses for area denial and riot or crowd control. An aqueous foam is currently being developed and evaluated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a Less-Than-Lethal Weapon for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the aqueous foam developed for the NIJ and to determine whether there are any significant adverse health effects associated with completely immersing individuals without protective equipment in the foam. The toxicity of the aqueous foam formulation developed for NIJ is determined by evaluating the toxicity of the individual components of the foam. The foam is made from a 2--5% solution of Steol CA-330 surfactant in water generated at expansion ratios ranging from 500:1 to 1000:1. SteoI CA-330 is a 35% ammonium laureth sulfate in water and is produced by Stepan Chemical Company and containing trace amounts (<0.1%) of 1,4-dioxane. The results of this study indicate that Steol CA-330 is a non-toxic, mildly irritating, surfactant that is used extensively in the cosmetics industry for hair care and bath products. Inhalation or dermal exposure to this material in aqueous foam is not expected to produce significant irritation or systemic toxicity to exposed individuals, even after prolonged exposure. The amount of 1,4-dioxane in the surfactant, and subsequently in the foam, is negligible and therefore, the toxicity associated with dioxane exposure is not significant. In general, immersion in similar aqueous foams has not resulted in acute, immediately life-threatening effects, or chronic, long-term, non-reversible effects following exposure.

  2. Materials Applications for Non-Lethal: Aqueous Foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GOOLSBY,TOMMY D.; SCOTT,STEVEN H.

    1999-09-15

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In the mid-1990s, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate (foaming agent) with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objectives were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might

  3. Materials Applications for Non-Lethal: Aqueous Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In the mid-1990s, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate (foaming agent) with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objectives were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might be

  4. Blast wave protection of aqueous foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary intention of the present study is to present new contribution of shock tube tests to the problem of particle related stabilization and enhanced mitigation action of the wet particulate foams. The experiments reported were designed to examine (i) the reflection of a shock wave from an air/foam face, (ii) the transmission of the shock wave through the air/foam face and (iii) propagation and dispersion of the transmitted shock wave inside the foam column. Because wet aqueous foam of desired specification is difficult to reproduce, handle and quantitatively characterize the fact that experiments on all the above aspects were conducted in a single facility is a potentially important consideration. Moreover vertical position of shock tube simplified the issues since the gradient of the liquid fraction in draining foam coincides with the shock wave propagation. Under these, much simplified test conditions resulted flows could be treated as one-dimensional and the shock wave mitigation depends on three parameters: the intensity of the incident shock wave, s M , the duration of the foam decay, ∆t and on the particle concentration, n

  5. Modeling of aqueous foam blast wave attenuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domergue L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of aqueous foams enables the mitigation of blast waves induced by the explosion of energetic materials. The two-phase confinement gives rise to interphase interactions between the gaseous and liquid phases, which role have been emphasized in shock-tube studies with solid foams [1, 2]. Multifluid formalism enables the thermo-mechanical disequilibria between phases to be taken into account. The flow model ensures the correct estimation of the acoustic impedance of the two-phase media. As for the numerical scheme, Riemann solvers are used to describe the microscopic fluid interactions, the summation of which provides the multiphase flux. The role of the different transfer mechanisms is evaluated in the case where the liquid ligaments of the foam matrix have been shattered into droplets by the shock impingement. Characteristics of blast waves in heterogeneous media leads to a decrease of overpressure. The numerical results have been compared favorably to experimental data [3, 4].

  6. Aqueous foam surfactants for geothermal drilling fluids: 1. Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    Aqueous foam is a promising drilling fluid for geothermal wells because it will minimize damage to the producing formation and would eliminate the erosion problems of air drilling. Successful use of aqueous foam will require a high foaming surfactant which will: (1) be chemically stable in the harsh thermal and chemical environment, and (2) form stable foams at high temperatures and pressures. The procedures developed to generate and test aqueous foams and the effects of a 260/sup 0/C temperature cycle on aqueous surfactant solutions are presented. More than fifty selected surfactants were evaluated with representatives from the amphoteric, anionic, cationic, and nonionic classes included. Most surfactants were severely degraded by this temperature cycle; however, some showed excellent retention of their properties. The most promising surfactant types were the alkyl and alkyl aryl sulfonates and the ethoxylated nonionics.

  7. Aspiration tests in aqueous foam using a breathing simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-12-01

    Non-toxic aqueous foams are being developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) for use in crowd control, cell extractions, and group disturbances in the criminal justice prison systems. The potential for aspiration of aqueous foam during its use and the resulting adverse effects associated with complete immersion in aqueous foam is of major concern to the NIJ when examining the effectiveness and safety of using this technology as a Less-Than-Lethal weapon. This preliminary study was designed to evaluate the maximum quantity of foam that might be aspirated by an individual following total immersion in an SNL-developed aqueous foam. A.T.W. Reed Breathing simulator equipped with a 622 Silverman cam was used to simulate the aspiration of an ammonium laureth sulfate aqueous foam developed by SNL and generated at expansion ratios in the range of 500:1 to 1000:1. Although the natural instinct of an individual immersed in foam is to cover their nose and mouth with a hand or cloth, thus breaking the bubbles and decreasing the potential for aspiration, this study was performed to examine a worst case scenario where mouth breathing only was examined, and no attempt was made to block foam entry into the breathing port. Two breathing rates were examined: one that simulated a sedentary individual with a mean breathing rate of 6.27 breaths/minute, and one that simulated an agitated or heavily breathing individual with a mean breathing rate of 23.7 breaths/minute. The results of this study indicate that, if breathing in aqueous foam without movement, an air pocket forms around the nose and mouth within one minute of immersion.

  8. Measurement of Aqueous Foam Rheology by Acoustic Levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn; Rogers, Rich (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An experimental technique is demonstrated for acoustically levitating aqueous foam drops and exciting their spheroidal modes. This allows fundamental studies of foam-drop dynamics that provide an alternative means of estimating the viscoelastic properties of the foam. One unique advantage of the technique is the lack of interactions between the foam and container surfaces, which must be accounted for in other techniques. Results are presented in which a foam drop with gas volume fraction phi = 0.77 is levitated at 30 kHz and excited into its first quadrupole resonance at 63 +/- 3 Hz. By modeling the drop as an elastic sphere, the shear modulus of the foam was estimated at 75 +/- 3 Pa.

  9. Aqueous Foam Stabilized by Tricationic Amphiphilic Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerschap, Seth; Marafino, John; McKenna, Kristin; Caran, Kevin; Feitosa, Klebert; Kevin Caran's Research Group Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The unique surface properties of amphiphilic molecules have made them widely used in applications where foaming, emulsifying or coating processes are needed. The development of novel architectures with multi-cephalic/tailed molecules have enhanced their anti-bacterial activity in connection with tail length and the nature of the head group. Here we report on the foamability of two triple head double, tail cationic surfactants (M-1,14,14, M-P, 14,14) and a triple head single tail cationic surfactant (M-1,1,14) and compare them with commercially available single headed, single tailed anionic and cationic surfactants (SDS,CTAB and DTAB). The results show that bubble rupture rate decrease with the length of the carbon chain irrespective of head structure. The growth rate of bubbles with short tailed surfactants (SDS) and longer, single tailed tricationic surfactants (M-1,1,14) was shown to be twice as high as those with longer tailed surfactants (CTAB, M-P,14,14, M-1,14,14). This fact was related to the size variation of bubbles, where the foams made with short tail surfactants exhibited higher polydispersivity than those with short tails. This suggests that foams with tricationic amphiphilics are closed linked to their tail length and generally insensitive to their head structure.

  10. Capillary rise of oil in an aqueous foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piroird, Keyvan; Lorenceau, Élise

    2012-11-01

    Oil is usually known as an anti-foaming agent. Yet, it has been shown that oil droplets present in the foaming solution can have the opposite effect and stabilize a foam when unable to cross the air/water interface. In these previous studies, oil is first emulsified and then mixed with air to generate a foam. In this work, we report experiments where an aqueous foam is put in direct contact with a large oil drop. With the appropriate choice of oil and surfactants, oil spontaneously invades the liquid network of the foam without damaging it. We study the dynamics of penetration at the scale of a single Plateau border, that acts as a ``liquid capillary tube'' in which oil flows in an unbroken stream. At the end of the experiment, a long and stable cylinder of oil is formed in the Plateau border. This cylinder breaks up into droplets when, following a rearrangement, oil is transferred from the Plateau border to a soap film.

  11. Point-source imbibition into dry aqueous foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensire, Rémy; Ault, Jesse T.; Lorenceau, Elise; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-02-01

    We use experiments, modeling and numerics to study the imbibition dynamics from a point source into a homogeneous dry aqueous foam. A distinctive feature of foams compared to solid porous material is that imbibition occurs in the liquid microchannels of the foam called Plateau borders, which have a volume varying in space and time. Dynamics is driven by the capillary pressure and resisted by the viscous and gravity forces in the liquid microchannels. Assuming a constant pressure in the imbibing liquid reservoir, we show that the imbibition front advances and flattens out in time due to gravity, the effect of which is quantified by introducing the Bond number B, which compares the gravitational effects to the capillary pressure using the mean bubble radius as the characteristic length. This evolution describes both miscible and immiscible imbibing liquids. For the latter, we introduce the idea of an effective interfacial tension γ\\textit{eff} to take the oil-water interfacial energy into account. The details of the imbibition process are confirmed by experiments and numerics using foams with tangentially immobile interfaces in the channel-dominated model.

  12. Toxicological studies of aqueous extract of Acacia nilotica root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alli Lukman Adewale

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acacia nilotica is a widely used plant in traditional medical practice in Northern Nigeria and many African countries. The aim of this study was to determine the toxicological effects of a single dose (acute and of repeated doses (sub-acute administration of aqueous extract of A. nilotica root in rodents, following our earlier study on antiplasmodial activity. In the acute toxicity test, three groups of Swiss albino mice were orally administered aqueous extract of A. nilotica (50, 300 and 2000 mg/kg body weight and signs of toxicity were observed daily for 14 days. In the sub-acute toxicity study, four groups of 12 rats (6 male and 6 female were used. Group 1 received 10 ml/kg b.w distilled water (control, while groups 2, 3 and 4 received 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w of the extract, respectively, for 28 consecutive days by oral gavage. Signs of toxicity/mortality, food and water intake and body weight changes were observed. Biochemical parameters were analysed in both plasma and liver homogenate. In the acute and sub-acute toxicity studies, the extract did not cause mortality. A significant reduction in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase was observed at 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w, while alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly higher than control values at 500 mg/kg b.w. The aqueous extract of A. nilotica was found to be safe in single dose administration in mice but repeated administration of doses higher than 250 mg/kg b.w of the extract for 28 days in rats may cause hepatotoxicity.

  13. Temporarily plugging a subterranean reservoir with a self-foaming aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkshire, D.C.; Lybarger, J.H.; Reisberg, J.; Richardson, E.A.; Scheuerman, R.F.

    1980-11-11

    Portions of a subterranean reservoir are temporarily plugged by injecting an aqueous liquid solution which contains nitrogen gasgenerating reactants, a foaming surfactant and a pH controlling system arranged so that the solution remains relatively unreactive within the well but forms a relatively immobile foam within the pores or other openings within the reservoir formation.

  14. Surface rheology and foaming properties of sodium oleate and C12(EO)6 aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneventi, Davide; Pugh, Robert J; Carré, Bruno; Gandini, Alessandro

    2003-12-01

    The dynamic surface tension (DST) and the surface viscoelastic modulus of sodium oleate aqueous solutions at different concentrations were measured using an image analysis tensiometer based on the oscillating bubble technique. The diffusion coefficient of oleate moieties was calculated from DST measurements and the surface viscoelastic modulus using the Langmuir-Szyszkowski and the diffusion-controlled adsorption models. The viscoelastic moduli obtained from model calculations were compared with the corresponding experimental values. The diffusion coefficient of C(12)(EO)(6) in water and the parameters of the Langmuir-Szyszkowski adsorption isotherm were taken from the literature and used to calculate the surface viscoelastic modulus of its aqueous solutions at different concentrations. The foaming properties of both C(12)(EO)(6) and sodium oleate solutions, viz., the foam conductance and the water volume fraction in the foam, were measured using a commercial Foamscan device. Foaming experiments with C(12)(EO)(6) and sodium oleate solutions were carried out either under static conditions; i.e., the foam conductance and the water volume fraction were measured as a function of time after the generation of a fixed volume of foam, or under dynamic conditions; i.e., the foam conductance and the water volume fraction were measured during foam formation. The variations in the foam permeability as a function of surfactant concentration were related to the viscoelastic properties of the air/water interface and to the presence of micelles in the foam films. With foams in which the water volume fraction was higher than 0.05, the foam electrical conduction could be described using a simple parallel resistor model and their conductance measurements were related to the foam water volume fraction. The results related to water drainage under static conditions were used to interpret water drainage under dynamic conditions. Preliminary conjectures on the influence of foam

  15. Graphene oxide/chitin nanofibril composite foams as column adsorbents for aqueous pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhongshi; Liu, Dagang; Zhu, Yi; Li, Zehui; Li, Zhenxuan; Tian, Huafeng; Liu, Haiqing

    2016-06-25

    A novel graphene oxide/chitin nanofibrils (GO-CNF) composite foam as a column adsorbent was prepared for aqueous contaminant disposal. The structures, morphologies and properties of composite foams supported by nanofibrils were characterized. As a special case, the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on GO-CNF was investigated regarding the static adsorption and column adsorption-desorption tests. Results from equilibrium adsorption isotherms indicated that the adsorption behavior was well-fitted to Langmuir model. The composite foams reinforced by CNF were dimensionally stable during the column adsorption process and could be reused after elution. The removal efficiency of MB was still nearly 90% after 3 cycles. Furthermore, other inorganic or organic pollutants adsorbed by composite foams were also explored. Therefore, this novel composite foam with remarkable properties such as dimensional stability, universal adsorbent for cationic pollutants, high adsorption capacity, and ease of regeneration was a desirable adsorbent in the future practical application of water pollutant treatment. PMID:27083813

  16. Effect of starch particles on foam stability and dilational viscoelasticity of aqueous-foam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongqiang Zhang; Zhidong Chang; Wenli Luo; Shaonan Gu; Wenjun Li; Jianbo An

    2015-01-01

    Surface dilational rheological behavior and foam stability of starch/surfactant mixed solutions were studied at differ-ent starch concentrations and constant surfactant concentration. The results show that dilational viscoelasticity modulus, dilational elasticity modulus and dilational viscosity modulus increase with the concentration of starch particles. Foam stability increases with dilational viscoelasticity. Foam strength also increases with starch concentra-tion. Starch particles play a positive effect on foam stability and dilational viscoelasticity and the effect becomes more significant as drainage proceeds. Film pictures indicate that the film with 20%(by mass) starch particles is thicker than that without starch. Starch particles gather in Plateau border and resist drainage, making the foam more stable. © 2014 The Chemical Industry and Engineering Society of China, and Chemical Industry Press. Al rights reserved.

  17. Ultradry Carbon Dioxide-in-Water Foams with Viscoelastic Aqueous Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng; Worthen, Andrew J; Da, Chang; Qajar, Ali; Ketchum, Isaiah Robert; Alzobaidi, Shehab; Huh, Chun; Prodanović, Maša; Johnston, Keith P

    2016-01-12

    For foams with ultra low water contents, the capillary pressure is very large and induces rapid drainage that destabilizes the aqueous lamellae between the gas bubbles. However, we show that high-pressure CO2-in-water foams can be stabilized with a viscoelastic aqueous phase composed of entangled wormlike micelles, even for extremely high CO2 volume fractions ϕ of 0.95 to 0.98; the viscosity of these ultradry foams increased by up to 3-4-fold, reaching more than 100 cP relative to foams formed with conventional low viscosity aqueous phases. The foam morphology consisted of fine ∼20 μm polyhedral-shaped CO2 bubbles that were stable for hours. The wormlike micelles were formed by mixing anionic sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) with salt and a protonated cationic surfactant, as shown by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and large values of the zero-shear viscosity and the dynamic storage and loss moduli. With the highly viscous continuous aqueous phases, the foam lamella drainage rates were low, as corroborated by confocal microscopy. The preservation of viscous thick lamellae resulted in lower rates of Ostwald ripening relative to conventional foams as shown by high-pressure optical microscopy. The ability to stabilize viscous ultra high internal phase foams is expected to find utility in various practical applications, including nearly "waterless" fracturing fluids for recovery of oil and gas in shale, offering the possibility of a massive reduction in the amount of wastewater. PMID:26666311

  18. Temporarily plugging a subterranean reservoir with a self-foaming aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, E.A.; Scheuerman, R.F.; Berkshire, D.C.; Reisberg, J.; Lybarger, J.H.

    1980-11-11

    Portions of a subterranean reservoir are temporarily plugged by injecting an aqueous liquid solution which contains nitrogen gas-generating reactants, a foaming surfactant and a pH controlling system arranged so that the solution remains relatively unreactive within the well but forms a relatively immobile foam within the pores or other openings within the reservoir formation. The invention provides a particularly preferred procedure for diverting a treating fluid into the normally less permeable portions of a reservoir. In that procedure, the pressure on the injected fluid is controlled to cause a preferential breaking of some or all of the foam within the most permeable openings. 10 claims.

  19. Silver nanoparticles of variable morphology synthesized in aqueous foams as novel templates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saikat Mandal; Sujatha K Arumugam; Renu Pasricha; Murali Sastry

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, we describe the synthesis of silver nanocrystals within aqueous foams as a template. More specifically, we show that aqueous Ag+ ions may be electrostatically complexed with the anionic surfactants aerosol OT (sodium bis-2-ethylhexyl-sulfosuccinate, (AOT) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)) in a highly stable liquid foam. After drainage of the foam, the silver ions are reduced in situ by introducing sodium borohydride into the foam by capillary flow. This leads to the formation of silver nanoparticles of spherical, tape- and sheet-like morphology in the foam. The structure of the foam is extremely complex and presents reaction sites of different spatial extent. The differences in foam reaction–site geometry are believed to be responsible for the morphology variation in the silver nanoparticles observed. The silver nanoparticles are observed to be extremely stable in solution suggesting that the AOT or SDS molecules stabilize them. This approach appears promising for application in large-scale synthesis of nanoparticles and may be readily extended to other chemical compositions.

  20. The foam separation of zirconium (IV) from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foam separation of zirconium(IV) from chloride solutions has been investigated over the 1.8-12 pH range using sodium lauryl sulphate or cetyl(trimethyl)ammonium bromide as collectors. The effects of gas flow rate, bubbling time, collector and zirconium(IV) concentrations, aging of the metal ion, and ionic strength have been studied and the results are discussed in relation to the hydrolytic behaviour of zirconium(IV). Under optimum conditions, ca. 99.5%-removal can be achieved. (orig.)

  1. Systematic investigations of foam separation of nickel (l l) from dilute aqueous solutions; by ion flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    this series of papers deal with a systematic investigation of application of different foam separation techniques for the removal of nickel (l l) from dilute aqueous solutions and to compare the effectiveness of the different techniques. in the present work, the feasibility of the use of sodium lauryl sulphate (Nals) and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as collectors to separate nickel (l l) at Ph values below the precipitation point of Ni (OH)2 was investigated using the ion flotation technique. the different factors that might affect the separation efficiency were investigated . both collectors were found to produce hydrated froths leading to rather low concentrations of the metal ion in the foam phase. however, nals was the most effective giving recoveries >95% and it was therefore extensively investigated . possible means to improve the foam separation efficiency of solubilized nickel are generally proposed . preliminary results using the surfactant : aerosol 18 as a collector are very promising

  2. Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery to Subsurface Using Shear Thinning Fluid and Aqueous Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Shen, Xin; Li, Xiqing

    2011-04-23

    A major issue with in situ subsurface remediation is the ability to achieve an even spatial distribution of remedial amendments to the contamination zones in an aquifer or vadose zone. Delivery of amendment to the aquifer using shear thinning fluid and to the vadose zone using aqueous foam has the potential to enhance the amendment distribution into desired locations and improve the remediation. 2-D saturated flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the enhanced sweeping, contaminant removal, and amendment persistence achieved by shear thinning fluid delivery. Bio-polymer xanthan gum solution was used as the shear thinning fluid. Unsaturated 1-D column and 2-D flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the mitigation of contaminant mobilization, amendment uniform distribution enhancement, and lateral delivery improvement by foam delivery. Surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate was used as the foaming agent. It was demonstrated that the shear thinning fluid injection enhanced the fluid sweeping over a heterogeneous system and increased the delivery of remedial amendment into low-permeability zones. The persistence of the amendment distributed into the low-perm zones by the shear thinning fluid was prolonged compared to that of amendment distributed by water injection. Foam delivery of amendment was shown to mitigate the mobilization of highly mobile contaminant from sediments under vadose zone conditions. Foam delivery also achieved more uniform amendment distribution in a heterogeneous unsaturated system, and demonstrated remarkable increasing in lateral distribution of the injected liquid compared to direct liquid injection.

  3. Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Marc

    Phenolic foam is a unique cellular material that can be utilized in either a fully open cell structure or a completely closed cell structure in a diversity of applications such as open cellular material for floral foam, soil propagation media and/or orthopedic use, and closed cell phenolic foam primarily for thermal insulation. Thus, phenolic foam is much more versatile than other competitive organic foams such as polystyrene and polyurethane with the latter materials being more heavily involved in thermal insulation. Foam processing can consider batch, semi-continuous, or continuous conditions, and the features and weaknesses of the appropriate processes are discussed along with continuous mix heads involving high and low pressure conditions.

  4. Responsive Aqueous Foams Stabilized by Silica Nanoparticles Hydrophobized in Situ with a Conventional Surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yue; Pei, Xiaomei; Jiang, Jianzhong; Cui, Zhenggang; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-12-01

    In the recent past, switchable surfactants and switchable/stimulus-responsive surface-active particles have been of great interest. Both can be transformed between surface-active and surface-inactive states via several triggers, making them recoverable and reusable afterward. However, the synthesis of these materials is complicated. In this paper we report a facile protocol to obtain responsive surface-active nanoparticles and their use in preparing responsive particle-stabilized foams. Hydrophilic silica nanoparticles are initially hydrophobized in situ with a trace amount of a conventional cationic surfactant in water, rendering them surface-active such that they stabilize aqueous foams. The latter can then be destabilized by adding equal moles of an anionic surfactant, and restabilized by adding another trace amount of the cationic surfactant followed by shaking. The stabilization-destabilization of the foams can be cycled many times at room temperature. The trigger is the stronger electrostatic interaction between the oppositely charged surfactants than that between the cationic surfactant and the negatively charged particles. The added anionic surfactant tends to form ion pairs with the cationic surfactant, leading to desorption of the latter from particle surfaces and dehydrophobization of the particles. Upon addition of another trace amount of cationic surfactant, the particles are rehydrophobized in situ and can then stabilize foams again. This principle makes it possible to obtain responsive surface-active particles using commercially available inorganic nanoparticles and conventional surfactants. PMID:26542227

  5. Lead and copper removal from aqueous solutions using carbon foam derived from phenol resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Jeon, Jun-Woo; Hwang, Min-Jin; Ahn, Kyu-Hong; Park, Chanhyuk; Choi, Jae-Woo; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2015-07-01

    Phenolic resin-based carbon foam was prepared as an adsorbent for removing heavy metals from aqueous solutions. The surface of the produced carbon foam had a well-developed open cell structure and the specific surface area according to the BET model was 458.59m(2)g(-1). Batch experiments showed that removal ratio increased in the order of copper (19.83%), zinc (34.35%), cadmium (59.82%), and lead (73.99%) in mixed solutions with the same initial concentration (50mgL(-1)). The results indicated that the Sips isotherm model was the most suitable for describing the experimental data of lead and copper. The maximum adsorption capacity of lead and copper determined to Sips model were 491mgg(-1) and 247mgg(-1). The obtained pore diffusion coefficients for lead and copper were found to be 1.02×10(-6) and 2.42×10(-7)m(2)s(-1), respectively. Post-sorption characteristics indicated that surface precipitation was the primary mechanism of lead and copper removal by the carbon foam, while the functional groups on the surface of the foam did not affect metal adsorption. PMID:25819762

  6. Aqueous Foams Stabilized by Hydrophilic Silica Nanoparticles via In-Situ Physisorption of Nonionic TX100 Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriatie Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper present the study of aqueous CO foam prepared 2 by a mixtures hydrophilic silica nanoparticles and non-ionic Triton X100, TX100, surfactant. The synergistic effects of the mixture on stabilizing the CO2 foam were inferred into few key parameters namely; particles and surfactant concentration, adsorption of surfactant onto the particles via surface tension and adsorption isotherm, foam lifetime and, the size of the bubbles produced. It was found that the adsorption behaviour of TX100 on silica surface exhibit a particular characteristics depend on the concentration of silica, high total surface area available leads to high adsorptionof surfactant molecules. The synergetic performance of silica/TX100 in stabilizing foam can be observed at low (0.01% and intermediate (0.1% concentration of TX100. Lower concentration required low silica concentration while the intermediate concentration required high silica fraction in the dispersion to stabilize the foam.

  7. The foam separation of thorium(IV) from dilute aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foam separation of thorium(IV) from the dilute aqueous solutions was investigated at pH values ranging from 1.2 to 12 using the cationic surfactant cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide and the anionic collector sodium lauryl sulphate. Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide could not remove soluble thorium but partially floated the hydrous oxide. The percentage removal was found to depend on the pH. With sodium lauryl sulphate, removals approaching 100% could be achieved at all the pH values tested. The various factors that can affect the separation process investigated and the results are discussed in terms of the hydrolysis of thorium. (orig.)

  8. Extraction of uranyl nitrate from aqueous nitrate solutions by open cell polyurethane foam sponge (OCPUFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of uranyl nitrate into open cell polyurethane foam sponge (OCPUFS) from aqueous solution, in the presence of salting agents, was examined. The extraction efficiency was observed to depend on the concentration of uranyl and nitrate ions. The charge of the cation was also found to influence the distribution ratio. The effect of the change in temperature and pH was also studied. The results are interpreted in terms of OCPUFS acting as a viscous organic ether of moderate dielectric constant. (author) 14 refs.; 6 figs

  9. Acute and subchronic toxicological assessment of Byrsocarpus coccineus Schum. and Thonn. (Connaraceae aqueous leaf extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O O Adeyemi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary: This study was conducted to determine the safety profile of Byrsocarpus coccineus (Connaraceae by carrying out the acute and subchronic toxicological assessment of its aqueous leaf extract. In the acute toxicity test, mice were administered orally with the extract up to 10 g/kg and intraperitoneally at doses of 50 – 800 mg/kg. Animals were then observed for behavioural changes, signs of toxicity, and mortality within 24 h. Surviving mice were monitored for 7 days for signs of delayed toxicity. In the subchronic toxicity test, rats were daily treated with the extract at doses of 40, 200, and 1000 mg/kg orally, for 30 days and 60 days. Control animals received distilled water and all animals were weighed at 7 days interval. At the end of the test periods, haematological, biochemical, and urinary parameters were determined in blood, serum, and urine samples respectively and vital organs macroscopically examined and weighed. In the acute toxicity test, the extract was practically non-toxic showing no mortality and visible signs of delayed toxicity. The LD50, given intraperitoneally, was estimated to be 158.4 mg/kg. Administered for 30 days, the extract did not produce any significant (P < 0.05 effect on haematological and biochemical parameters and vital organs. In the 60 day study, the extract elicited significant (P < 0.05 increases in platelet and WBC count and reductions in levels of liver enzymes (AST, ALT, and ALP, total cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, and total protein. The weight of the kidneys, spleen, epididymis, and testes were not significantly affected but significant changes were observed in the weight of the liver (↑, heart (↓, and lungs (↑. Generally, B. coccineus did not significantly affect body weight and urinary parameters. Results obtained in this study suggest that the aqueous leaf extract of B. coccineus is safe when administered orally with potential beneficial effects as immunostimulant, hepatoprotective

  10. Toxicology evaluation and hazard review for non-CFC containing rigid foams BKC 44317 and last-a-foam MSL-02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greulich, K.A.; Archuleta, M.M.

    1996-06-01

    New pour-in-place, low density, rigid polyurethane foam kits have been developed to mechanically stabilize damaged explosive ordnance. Although earlier foam systems used chlorofluorocarbons as blowing agents, the current versions rely on carbon dioxide generated by the reaction of isocynates with water. In addition, these kits were developed to manually generate small quantifies of rigid foam in the field with minimal or no protective equipment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and summarize available hazard information for the components of these rigid foam kits and to provide recommendations for personal protective equipment to be used while performing the manual combination of the components. As with most rigid foam systems, these kits consist of two parts, one a mixture of isocyanates; the other, a combination of polyols, surfactants, and amine catalysts. Once completely deployed, the rigid foam is non-toxic. The components, however, have some important health effects which must be considered when establishing handling procedures.

  11. Studies on the low Gas-Flow-Rate foam separation of uranium (V I) and thorium (IV) from aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing need to uranium and thorium for nuclear energy programmes has stimulated the development of many methods for their separation both in large amount and in trace. Of these methods, precipitation, ion exchange, adsorption and solvent extraction are the most important. These techniques, though have found much application for the separation of uranium , they their limitations and new methods are, therefore, required for the separation of these elements from aqueous solutions especially when they are present in low concentrations . For this reason, the relatively new techniques: foam separations have been investigated. In foam separation processes, separation occurs by virtue of differences in the surface activity of the substances to be removed. Until about two decades ago, only naturally surface - active substances could be separated by foaming. Metal ions are not naturally surface-active but, lately, it was discovered that foaming could also concentrate inorganic solutions

  12. Foam separation of Cu (II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions and simulated wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch experiments on the removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions were performed through two foam separation techniques: precipitate flotation (PTF) an adsorbing colloid flotation (ACF). In ACF, Fe(III), oxyhydroxide was used as co precipitant and/or adsorbing colloid and sodium lauryl sulfate was used as a collector. ACF required a lower collector concentration than PTF. foreign ions were found to decrease the percent removal, the extent of decrease being higher by divalent ions than that by monovalent ones. However, the percent removal could be improved, even in presence of foreign ions, by addition of Al(II) as an activator. High removals could be attained for Cu(II) and Ni(II) from simulated wastewaters containing different concentrations of both metal ions. The addition of concentrations below the limits recommended by the egyptian regulations for environmental discharge

  13. Foam clogging

    OpenAIRE

    ROUYER, Florence; Haffner, Benjamin; Louvet, Nicolas; Khidas, Yacine; Pitois, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    To what extent are aqueous foams prone to clogging? Foam permeability is measured as a function of particulate loading (trapped hydrophilic particles) under conditions where the particle to bubble size ratio is allowed to increase when the number of particles per bubble is fixed. In addition to experiments performed on the foam scale, we investigated experimentally and numerically the hydrodynamic resistance of a single foam node loaded with one particle. It is shown that, with respect to sol...

  14. Determination of aromatic amines in aqueous extracts of polyurethane foam using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for the determination of aromatic amines in aqueous extracts of polyurethane (PUR) foam. The method is based on the extraction of PUR foam using aqueous acetic acid (0.1%, w/v) followed by determination of extracted aromatic amines using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with positive electrospray ionisation. The injections of volumes up to 5 μL of aqueous solutions were made possible by on-column focusing with partially filled loop injections. The fragmentation patterns for 2,4- and 2,6-toluene diamine (TDA) and 4,4'-methylene dianiline (MDA) were clarified by performing a hydrogen-deuterium exchange study. TDA and MDA were determined using trideuterated 2,4- and 2,6-TDA and dideuterated 4,4'-MDA as internal standards. Linear calibration graphs were obtained over the range 0.025-0.5 μg mL-1 with correlation coefficients >0.996 and the instrumental detection limit for each compound was <50 fmol. The stability of the amines was influenced by the matrix, so their concentrations decreased over time. Agreement was observed between the results of analyses of PUR foam extracts by HILIC-MS/MS and results obtained by ethyl chloroformate derivatisation and reversed phase (RP) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). TDA was observed to be unstable in extracts of foam but not in pure solutions.

  15. Extraction of uranium from aqueous solution by phosphonic acid-imbedded polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phenylphosphonic acid was imbedded into the matrix of the polyurethane foam during the fabrication process of the polymer. The extraction of uranium by phosphonic acid-imbedded polyurethane foam and blank polyurethane (i.e., foam without phosphonic acid functional groups) was investigated. Phosphonic acid-imbedded foam showed superior extractability of uranium from solutions with pH = 7.0 ± 1.5 over a wide range of temperatures. (author)

  16. Acute and Sub-Acute Toxicological Assessment of the Aqueous Seed Extract of Persea Americana Mill (Lauraceae) in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ozolua, Raymond I.; Anaka, Ogochukwu N; Okpo, Stephen O; Idogun, Sylvester E

    2009-01-01

    The aqueous seed extract of Persea americana Mill (Lauraceae) is used by herbalists in Nigeria for the management of hypertension. As part of our on-going scientific evaluation of the extract, we designed the present study to assess its acute and sub-acute toxicity profiles in rats. Experiments were conducted to determine the oral median lethal dose (LD50) and other gross toxicological manifestations on acute basis. In the sub-acute experiments, the animals were administered 2.5 g/kg (p.o) pe...

  17. Polyurethane foam loaded with sodium dodecylsulfate for the extraction of 'quat' pesticides from aqueous medium: Optimization of loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinhal, Jonas O; Lima, Claudio F; Cassella, Ricardo J

    2016-09-01

    The cationic herbicides paraquat, diquat and difenzoquat are largely used in different cultures worldwide. With this, there is an intrinsic risk of environmental contamination when these herbicides achieve natural waters. The goal of this work was to propose a novel and low-cost sorbent for the removal of the cited herbicides from aqueous medium. The proposed sorbent was prepared by loading polyurethane foam with sodium dodecylsulfate. The influence of several parameters (SDS concentration, HCl concentration and shaking time) on the loading process was investigated. The results obtained in this work demonstrated that all studied variables influenced the loading process, having significant effect on the extraction efficiency of the resulted PUF-SDS. At optimized conditions, the PUF was loaded by shaking 200mg of crushed foam with 200mL of a solution containing 5.0×10(-3)molL(-1) SDS and 0.25molL(-1) HCl, for 30min. The obtained PUF-SDS was efficient for removing the three herbicides from aqueous medium, achieving extraction percentages higher than 90%. The sorption process followed a pseudo second-order kinetics, which presented excellent predictive capacity of the amount of herbicide retained with time. PMID:27213562

  18. Highly photoactive anatase foams prepared from lyophilized aqueous colloids of peroxo-polytitanic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pližingrová, Eva; Volfová, Lenka; Svora, Petr; Labhsetwar, N.; Klementová, Mariana; Szatmáry, Lórant; Šubrt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 240, FEB (2015), s. 107-113. ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20744S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Anatase * Lyophilization * Photocatalysis * Hydroxyl radical * Peroxo-polytitanic acid foams Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.893, year: 2014

  19. Partitioning of perfluorooctanesulfonate and perfluorohexanesulfonate in the aquatic environment after an accidental release of aqueous film forming foam at Schiphol Amsterdam Airport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwadijk, C.J.A.F.; Kotterman, M.J.J.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2008, an accidental release of Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) took place at Schiphol Amsterdam Airport (The Netherlands). After the release, water, fish and sediment samples were collected and analyzed for perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSA). In situ perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)

  20. Bioremediation of aqueous pollutants using biomass embedded in hydrophilic foam. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of this project was to examine the potential of a novel hydrophilic polyurethane foam as an immobilization medium for algal, bacteria, and other types of biomass, and to test the resulting foam/biomass aggregates for their use in cleaning up waters contaminated with heavy metals, radionuclides and toxic organic compounds. Initial investigations focused on the bioremoval of heavy metals from wastewaters at SRS using immobilized algal biomass. This effort met with limited success for reasons which included interference in the binding of biomass and target metals by various non-target constituents in the wastewater, lack of an appropriate wastewater at SRS for testing, and the unavailability of bioreactor systems capable of optimizing contact of target pollutants with sufficient biomass binding sites. Subsequent studies comparing algal, bacterial, fungal, and higher plant biomass demonstrated that other biomass sources were also ineffective for metal bioremoval under the test conditions. Radionuclide bioremoval using a Tc-99 source provided more promising results than the metal removal studies with the various types of biomass, and indicated that the alga Cyanidium was the best of the tested sources of biomass for this application. However, all of the biomass/foam aggregates tested were substantially inferior to a TEVA resin for removing Tc-99 in comparative testing. The authors also explored the use of hydrophilic polyurethane foam to embed Burkholderia cepacia, which is an efficient degrader of trichloroethylene (TCE), a contaminant of considerable concern at SRS and elsewhere. The embedded population proved to be incapable of growth on nutrient media, but retained respiratory activity. Lastly, the degradative capabilities of embedded G4 were examined. Phenol- or benzene-induced bacteria retained the ability to degrade TCE and benzene. The authors were successful in inducing enzyme activity after the organisms had already been embedded

  1. Bioremediation of aqueous pollutants using biomass embedded in hydrophilic foam. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.; Radway, J.C.; Santo Domingo, J.; Zingmark, R.G.; Whitaker, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The major objective of this project was to examine the potential of a novel hydrophilic polyurethane foam as an immobilization medium for algal, bacteria, and other types of biomass, and to test the resulting foam/biomass aggregates for their use in cleaning up waters contaminated with heavy metals, radionuclides and toxic organic compounds. Initial investigations focused on the bioremoval of heavy metals from wastewaters at SRS using immobilized algal biomass. This effort met with limited success for reasons which included interference in the binding of biomass and target metals by various non-target constituents in the wastewater, lack of an appropriate wastewater at SRS for testing, and the unavailability of bioreactor systems capable of optimizing contact of target pollutants with sufficient biomass binding sites. Subsequent studies comparing algal, bacterial, fungal, and higher plant biomass demonstrated that other biomass sources were also ineffective for metal bioremoval under the test conditions. Radionuclide bioremoval using a Tc-99 source provided more promising results than the metal removal studies with the various types of biomass, and indicated that the alga Cyanidium was the best of the tested sources of biomass for this application. However, all of the biomass/foam aggregates tested were substantially inferior to a TEVA resin for removing Tc-99 in comparative testing. The authors also explored the use of hydrophilic polyurethane foam to embed Burkholderia cepacia, which is an efficient degrader of trichloroethylene (TCE), a contaminant of considerable concern at SRS and elsewhere. The embedded population proved to be incapable of growth on nutrient media, but retained respiratory activity. Lastly, the degradative capabilities of embedded G4 were examined. Phenol- or benzene-induced bacteria retained the ability to degrade TCE and benzene. The authors were successful in inducing enzyme activity after the organisms had already been embedded.

  2. TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES OF THE AQUEOUS EXTRACT FROM BRILLANTAISIA VOGELIANA (NÉES BENTH. (ACANTHACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimé Valère SOH OUMBE

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Brillantaisia vogeliana (Acanthaceae is used in folk medicine in the West region of Cameroon to manage obesity. In this study, we investigated the toxic effect of the aqueous extract of B.v. in rats. Three doses of aqueous extract (250, 500, 1000 mg/kg were administrated orally once per 2 days during a period of 28 days and different hematology, biochemistry and histopatology parameters were determined. The results showed that there were no mortality, no significant differences in the body and relative organ weight between control and treated animals, except for the kidney. Hematological analysis showed no significant difference in any of the parameters examined (WBC count, platelet, RBC count, hematocrit, total leucocyte count and hemoglobin estimation between control and treated groups. There were also no significant change in blood chemistry parameters, including creatinine, urea nitrogen (UN, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate amino transferase (ASAT, calcium, alpha amylase, total protein and phosphorus, except alanine aminotransferase (ALAT between control and treated groups. Histopathological abnormalities changes were detected in organs of animals treated with various doses of product.

  3. Foam stability in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewalle, N.; Caps, H.; Delon, G.; Saint-Jalmes, A.; Rio, E.; Saulnier, L.; Adler, M.; Biance, A. L.; Pitois, O.; Cohen Addad, S.; Hohler, R.; Weaire, D.; Hutzler, S.; Langevin, D.

    2011-12-01

    Within the context of the ESA FOAM project, we have studied the stability of aqueous and non-aqueous foams both on Earth and in microgravity. Foams are dispersions of gas into liquid or solid. On Earth, the lifetime of a foam is limited by the free drainage. By drainage, we are referring to the irreversible flow of liquid through the foam (leading to the accumulation of liquid at the foam bottom, and to a global liquid content decreases within the foam). When the liquid films become thinner, they eventually break, and the foam collapses. In microgravity, this process is no more present and foams containing large amounts of liquid can be studied for longer time. While the difference between foaming and not-foaming solutions is clear, the case of slightly-foaming solutions is more complicated. On Earth, such mixtures are observed to produce unstable froth for a couple of seconds. However, these latter solutions may produce foam in microgravity. We have studied both configurations for different solutions composed of common surfactant, proteins, anti-foaming agents or silicon oil. Surprising results have been obtained, emphasizing the role played by gravity on the foam stabilization process.

  4. Foam stability in microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the context of the ESA FOAM project, we have studied the stability of aqueous and non-aqueous foams both on Earth and in microgravity. Foams are dispersions of gas into liquid or solid. On Earth, the lifetime of a foam is limited by the free drainage. By drainage, we are referring to the irreversible flow of liquid through the foam (leading to the accumulation of liquid at the foam bottom, and to a global liquid content decreases within the foam). When the liquid films become thinner, they eventually break, and the foam collapses. In microgravity, this process is no more present and foams containing large amounts of liquid can be studied for longer time. While the difference between foaming and not-foaming solutions is clear, the case of slightly-foaming solutions is more complicated. On Earth, such mixtures are observed to produce unstable froth for a couple of seconds. However, these latter solutions may produce foam in microgravity. We have studied both configurations for different solutions composed of common surfactant, proteins, anti-foaming agents or silicon oil. Surprising results have been obtained, emphasizing the role played by gravity on the foam stabilization process.

  5. investigations for the separation of radioisotopes and selected metal ions from dilute aqueous solutions and aqueous waste simulant by foaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    co precipitate flotation (CPF) investigations show that cesium can be efficiently separated from aqueous solutions by coprecipitation with zine hexacyanoferrate (II) (ZnHCF) and subsequent flotation of the precipitate . collectors of different types were tested but cetyl pyridinium chloride showed the best performance. before undertaking the flotation investigations , coprecipitation of Cs with ZnHCF was studied to determine the optimal coprecipitation conditions. the developed CPF process was applied successfully for 137Cs removal from process wastewater and low level liquid radioactive waste simulant. the obtained results compare favourably with data published for cesium removal by coprecipitation or adsorption processes. besides, CPF seems to be more advantageous

  6. The low gas flow rate foam separation of cerium(III) from dilute aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two low gas flow rate foam separation techniques, ion and precipitate flotation, have been investigated for the separation of trivalent cerium from solutions with initial cerium concentrations ranging from 1 x 10-8 to 1 x 10-4M in the pH range of 1.8 to 12 using the anionic collector sodium lauryl sulphate and the cationic surfactant cetyl trymethyl ammonium bromide. In addition to the type of collector, the pH and the cerium ion concentration, and other factors which can affect flotation results, viz. the time period of bubbling, the rate of gas flow, the ageing of both the cerium and the collector ions, the ionic strength, and the concentration of the collector ions have been investigated and optimum conditions have been established. Under optimum conditions removals as high a 98.5% can be achieved. (author)

  7. Employment of polyurethane foam for the adsorption of Methylene Blue in aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a detailed study about the adsorption of Methylene Blue (MB) onto polyether type polyurethane foam (PUF). The adsorption process is based on the formation of a hydrophobic ionic-pair between cationic dye MB and dodecylsulfate anion (SDS), which present high affinity by PUF. Set-up employed in the study was built up by adjusting a 200 mg cylinder of PUF to the arm of an overhead stirrer. The system was characterized in relation to equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic aspects and it was modeled by employing Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Obtained results showed that the ratio between SDS and MB concentrations plays an important role on the adsorption process. According to Langmuir isotherm, a maximum adsorption capacity of 7.20 x 10-5 mol MB g-1 was achieved when optimized operational conditions were employed. The adsorption rate seems to be regulated by an intraparticle diffusion mechanism. Adsorption process was spontaneous (negative ΔG) at ambient temperature and presented an endothermic characteristic (positive ΔH). Sequential extraction experiments were carried out by changing PUF plugs in 30 min time intervals and around 96% of the MB present in solution could be removed through consecutive extractions with six 200 mg PUF cylinders

  8. The removal of sodium and cadmium ions from dilute aqueous solutions using foam separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cationic metallic ions, Na+ and Cd2+, were flotated by using foam separation technique in a continuous flow system. Experiments were carried out mainly on the conditions such that the pH range was limited within 1.3 to 4.0 and collector (sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, M.W.=348.48) concentration was stoichiometrically greater than that of the colligend (Cadmium). Surface excess of colligend was greatly influenced by the co-existing H+ ion under constant concentration of collector and colligend ions within a pH range less than 4.0, and in turn, only slightly by the co-existing collector concentration under constant concentration of H+ ion and colligend (pH=4.0). It was also established that a considerable difference between mono- and divalent cationic metallic ions for the affinity to neutralize the negatively charged surface on gas-liquid interface was observed and verified by use of Gouy-Chapman diffuse double-layer theory, except for high concentration range of the co-existing collector forming micellaneous metal-collector complexes. (auth.)

  9. systematic investigations of foam separation of Nickel (l l) from dilute aqueous solutions; separation by adsorbing colloid flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    in the preceding parts we dealt with the application of the foam separation processes: ion and precipitate flotations for the separation of Ni (l l) from dilute aqueous solutions. Adsorbing colloid flotation (ACF), another type that has proved very useful, is the subject of this paper. ACF of Ni(l l) was investigated using Al (OH)3 as a colloidal carrier, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) or sodium lauryl sulphate (NaLs) either singly or in combination with gelatin as collectors. the precipitate flotation curve obtained for the carrier Al(OH)3, was compared with the corresponding theoretical one calculated from the data published for Al(I I I) hydrolysis. the effects of the different parameters that can influence the flotation process were determined . removals approaching 100% could be achieved under the optimum conditions. the results obtained were discussed with respect to the chemical state of Ni (l l), the ionization behaviour of the collectors, and properties of the carrier precipitate , and are compared with those results obtained by the ion and precipitate flotation techniques. the developed ACF process was successfully applied to the removal of Ni (l l) from radioactive wastewater

  10. Effects of Aqueous Film-Forming Foams (AFFFs) on Trichloroethene (TCE) Dechlorination by a Dehalococcoides mccartyi-Containing Microbial Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding-Marjanovic, Katie C; Yi, Shan; Weathers, Tess S; Sharp, Jonathan O; Sedlak, David L; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    The application of aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs) to extinguish chlorinated solvent-fueled fires has led to the co-contamination of poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and soil. Although reductive dechlorination of TCE by Dehalococcoides mccartyi is a frequently used remediation strategy, the effects of AFFF and PFASs on TCE dechlorination are not well-understood. Various AFFF formulations, PFASs, and ethylene glycols were amended to the growth medium of a D. mccartyi-containing enrichment culture to determine the impact on dechlorination, fermentation, and methanogenesis. The community was capable of fermenting organics (e.g., diethylene glycol butyl ether) in all AFFF formulations to hydrogen and acetate, but the product concentrations varied significantly according to formulation. TCE was dechlorinated in the presence of an AFFF formulation manufactured by 3M but was not dechlorinated in the presence of formulations from two other manufacturers. Experiments amended with AFFF-derived PFASs and perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) indicated that dechlorination could be inhibited by PFASs but that the inhibition depends on surfactant concentration and structure. This study revealed that the fermentable components of AFFF can stimulate TCE dechlorination, while some of the fluorinated compounds in certain AFFF formulations can inhibit dechlorination. PMID:26894610

  11. The removal of radioactive strontium from aqueous solutions by foam separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flotation of strontium ions from aqueous solutions has been investigated using cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, potassium laurate, sodium lauryl sulphate or Aeroslo 18 as collector. Aerosol 18 proved to be the most suitable. With this reagent strontium removals of about 97.5% - 99% could be achieved for metal ion concentrations ranging from 1 x 10-7 M (or probably less) to 1.3 x 10-4 M. The effects of pH, collector concentration, ionic strength, gas flow rate and period of bubbling were determined and the optimum flotation conditions have been established. (orig.)

  12. Preparation and evaluation of Pd/polymeric pyrrole-sodium lauryl sulfonate/foam-Ni electrode for 2,4-dichlorophenol dechlorination in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymeric pyrrole-sodium lauryl sulfonate (PPy-SLS) composite film was applied to the preparation of palladium/foam-nickel (Pd/foam-Ni) electrode. The prepared Pd/PPy-SLS/foam-Ni electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The addition of SLS improved the polymerization of pyrrole to form PPy-SLS film, which was conducive to prepare small Pd microparticles and led to the lower Pd loading, 0.85 mg cm−2. The composite electrode was used for electrochemically reductive dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) in aqueous solution. The influences of dechlorination current and initial pH value on the conversion efficiency and current the efficiency of 2,4-DCP dechlorination were studied. Complete dechlorination could be achieved on the Pd/PPy-SLS/foam-Ni electrode at ambient temperature under the condition of dechlorination current of 5 mA and initial pH value of 2.5 within 50 min. The electrode exhibits promising potential for dechlorination with high catalytic activity, good stability and low cost

  13. Removal of Zn(II) from dilute aqueous solutions and radioactive process wastewater by foam separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, precipitate and adsorbing colloid flotations of zinc(II) from dilute aqueous solutions have been investigated over a wide pH range using the anionic surfactant Aerosol OT or the cationic collector cetyl pyridinium chloride. In case of adsorbing colloid flotation (ACF) iron oxyhydroxide and aluminium hydroxide were used, either separately or together, as coprecipitants. The precipitate flotation curves were compared with the corresponding theoretical one calculated from the data published for Zn(II) hydrolysis. In addition to the effect of pH on the percent removal the effects of collector concentration, ionic strength, bubbling time and metal ion concentration were investigated and the optimum conditions were established. High removals could be achieved especially with ACF. The results obtained are discussed with respect to the chemical state of zinc, the ionization behaviour of the collectors and properties of the coprecipitants. The developed ACF process was applied to the removal of 65Zn from radioactive process wastewater. (author). 45 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  14. systematic investigation of foam separation of nickel (l l) from dilute aqueous solutions, precipitate flotation of nickel(l l) hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the foam separation of Ni (l l) from dilute aqueous solutions was investigated by precipitate flotation of nickel (l l) hydroxide from alkaline aqueous suspensions using the anionic surfactant sodium lauryl sulphate (Nals) and the cationic one , cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), as collectors. the main parameters affecting the process in batch experiments were examined. nals was found to be effective at Ph values below the isoelectric point of the hydroxide precipitate ∼ 11 removals >99% were obtained at the optimum operating conditions . CTAB could float Ni (OH)2 at Ph values >11. effects of foreign ions and of adsorption of the collectors by the hydroxide as well as their removal by the flotation process were also studied. the interpretation of the results is based on the analysis of possible chemical and electrostatic interactions between the ionized surfactant sites on the precipitate, active groups of the collector and type and concentration of electrolyte ions

  15. Development of advanced foams in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Moreno, Francisco; Babcsan, Norbert; Banhart, John; Andersson, Martin; Pugh, Robert J.; Kronberg, Bengt; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Marze, Sébastien; Langevin, Dominique; Brunke, Oliver; Odenbach, Stefan; Cox, Simon; Hutzler, Stefan; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Weaire, Denis; Baumgärtner, Frank; Seeliger, Wolfgang; Argillier, Jean-François; Lange, Dieter

    2005-10-01

    Metallic and aqueous foams are challenging materials for both fundamental and applied research. They distinguish themselves from other materials by their very low density and, especially in the case of metallic foams, by high specific stiffness, good damping and high-energy absorption capability. They are therefore becoming increasingly popular for industrial applications. Driven by industry demand, efforts have been made in recent years to improve foam quality. Microgravity conditions are essential for further analysis and improvement of aqueous and metallic foams. Experimental devices for in situ and ex situ analysis were developed within this MAP project. Foam properties such as drainage, rupture events and foam density were analysed quantitatively, as well as the influence of external conditions like gas pressure and foaming gas. Hardness and wetting angles for different stabilising particles were compared; mica is proposed as a suitable candidate for aluminium foams. In the case of aqueous foams, surfactants and proteins are found to have a different microscopic origin of stabilisation. A monodisperse aqueous foam generator will be adapted for metallic foams. Foam stabilisation mechanisms and foam evolution simulations were performed. 2-D X-ray foam images were successfully simulated.

  16. A toxicological assessment of Athrixia phylicoides aqueous extract following sub-chronic ingestion in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellan, N; De Beer, D; Muller, C; Joubert, E; Louw, J

    2008-11-01

    Athrixia phylicoides is an aromatic, indigenous shrub used to brew "bush tea." Surveys have shown that the consumption of bush tea is widespread and commercialization of the extract holds economic and developmental potential. Aqueous extracts of A. phylicoides are non-toxic to brine shrimp and renal cell lines; however, verification in a mammalian model is needed. In this study, daily ingestion of high doses of aqueous A. phylicoides extract by mature Wistar rats was tested for potential toxicity over a 3-month period. Three-month-old Wistar rats were randomized into a control group (receiving no extract) and three experimental groups receiving 30, 90, or 180 mg dried aqueous A. phylicoides extract/kg body mass/day. After 90 days of daily extract ingestion, blood and tissue were harvested. There was no morbidity or mortality during the study. Food and water intake, as well as body mass and stool production, were unaffected by the consumption of the extract. Urine production was increased in the 90 and 180 mg/kg groups suggesting that A. phylicoides is mildly diuretic. Serum alkaline phosphatase, creatinine, and urea levels were normal for all groups. Histopathology showed no signs of any extract induced toxicity in the liver, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and other tissues studied. PMID:19244289

  17. Toxicology elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work studies the different aspects of the modern toxicology: toxico-kinetic, biological, medico legal, food, professional, pharmaceuticals, environmental, social and regulatory. It is divided in three parts that consider the principle problems of general toxicology and analytical toxicology. (N.C.)

  18. Foams for barriers and nonlethal weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Peter B.

    1997-01-01

    Our times demand better solutions to conflict resolution than simply shooting someone. Because of this, police and military interest in non-lethal concepts is high. Already in use are pepper sprays, bean-bag guns, flash-bang grenades, and rubber bullets. At Sandia we got a head start on non- lethal weapon concepts. Protection of nuclear materials required systems that went way beyond the traditional back vault. Dispensable deterrents were used to allow a graduated response to a threat. Sticky foams and stabilized aqueous foams were developed to provide access delay. Foams won out for security systems simply because you could get a large volume from a small container. For polymeric foams the expansion ratio is thirty to fifty to one. In aqueous foams expansion ratios of one thousand to ne are easily obtained. Recent development work on sticky foams has included a changeover to environmentally friendly solvents, foams with very low toxicity, and the development of non-flammable silicone resin based foams. High expansion aqueous foams are useful visual and aural obscurants. Our recent aqueous foam development has concentrated on using very low toxicity foaming agents combined with oleoresin capsicum irritant to provide a safe but highly irritating foam.

  19. Chemical enrichment and separation of uranyl ions in aqueous media using novel polyurethane foam chemically grafted with different basic dyestuff sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shahat, M F; Moawed, E A; Farag, A B

    2007-01-15

    The new type of the grafted polyurethane foam sorbents were prepared by coupling polyether polyol, toluene diisocyanate and basic dyestuff (Methylene blue, Rhodamine B and Brilliant green). The Me.B-PUF, Rh.B-PUF and Br.G-PUF were characterized using UV/vis, IR and TGA. The adsorption properties and chromatographic behaviour of these new adsorbents for preconcentration and separation of uranium(VI) ions at low concentrations from aqueous thiocyanate media were investigated by a batch process. The maximum sorption of U(VI) was in the pH ranges 1-4. The kinetics of sorption of the U(VI) by the Grafted-PUF were found to be fast with half life of sorption (t(1/2)) in 2.43min. The average sorption capacity of different sorbents 0.124meqg(-1) for uranyl ions, enrichment factors approximately 40 and the recovery 98-100% were achieved (R.S.D. approximately 0.73%). The basic dyestuff Grafted-PUF could be used many times without decreasing their capacities significantly. The value of the Gibbs free energy (DeltaG) for the sorbents is -7.3kJmol(-1), which reflects the spontaneous nature of sorption process. The sorption mechanism of the metal ion onto Grafted-PUF was also discussed. PMID:19071294

  20. Foam Behaviour of An Aqueous Solution of Piperazine- N-Methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) Blend as A Function of The Type of Impurities and Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Iwan Ratman; Ahmad Fauzi Ismail; Tutuk Djoko Kusworo

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the effect of impurities in the natural gas stream on the characteristic of foam behaviour in the blended piperazine and MDEA solution. Hydrocarbon liquids, Iron Sulphide, Sodium Chloride, Acetic Acid, Methanol and Polyethylene Glycol were used as the impurities. The results indicated that the type of impurities determined the foam formation of the amine solution. The concentration of piperazine-MDEA blends also enhanced to the increasing of the foam height of blended pi...

  1. Foam Behaviour of An Aqueous Solution of Piperazine- N-Methyldiethanolamine (MDEA Blend as A Function of The Type of Impurities and Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Ratman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the effect of impurities in the natural gas stream on the characteristic of foam behaviour in the blended piperazine and MDEA solution. Hydrocarbon liquids, Iron Sulphide, Sodium Chloride, Acetic Acid, Methanol and Polyethylene Glycol were used as the impurities. The results indicated that the type of impurities determined the foam formation of the amine solution. The concentration of piperazine-MDEA blends also enhanced to the increasing of the foam height of blended piperazine-MDEA. Iron sulfide, hydrocarbon and sodium chloride are the impurities which apparently contributed to the high foaming tendency of the solutions. At the same concentration of the impurities, iron sulfide appeared as the most influential contaminant to the foam formation, which promoted the highest foamability in any concentrations of the blend piperazine-MDEA

  2. Lupinus mutabilis: Composition, Uses, Toxicology, and Debittering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Larenas, F E; Linnemann, A R; Nout, M J R; Koziol, M; van Boekel, M A J S

    2016-07-01

    Lupinus mutabilis has protein (32.0-52.6 g/100 g dry weight) and lipid (13.0-24.6 g/100 g dry weight) contents similar to soya bean (Glycine max). The Ω3, Ω6, and Ω9 contents are 1.9-3.0, 26.5-39.6, and 41.2-56.2 g/100 g lipid, respectively. Lupins can be used to fortify the protein content of pasta, bread, biscuits, salads, hamburgers, sausages, and can substitute milk and soya bean. Specific lupin protein concentrates or isolates display protein solubility (>90%), water-absorption capacity (4.5 g/g dry weight), oil-absorption capacity (3.98 g/g), emulsifying capacity (2000 mL of oil/g), emulsifying stability (100%, 60 hours), foaming capacity (2083%), foaming stability (78.8%, 36 hours), and least gelation concentration (6%), which are of industrial interest. Lupins contain bitter alkaloids. Preliminary studies on their toxicity suggest as lethal acute dose for infants and children 10 mg/kg bw and for adults 25 mg/kg bw. However, alkaloids can also have medical use for their hypocholesterolemic, antiarrhythmic, and immunosuppressive activity. Bitter lupins can be detoxified by biological, chemical, or aqueous processes. The shortest debittering process requires one hour. This review presents the nutritional composition of lupins, their uses (as food, medicine, and functional protein isolates), toxicology, and debittering process scenarios. It critically evaluates the data, infers conclusions, and makes suggestions for future research. PMID:26054557

  3. Oleoresin Capsicum toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) is an extract of the pepper plant used for centuries as a culinary spice (hot peppers). This material has been identified as a safe and effective Less-Than- Lethal weapon for use by Law enforcement and security professionals against assault. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is currently also evaluating its use in conjunction with other Less-Than-Lethal agents such as aqueous foam for use in corrections applications. Therefore, a comprehensive toxicological review of the literature was performed for the National Institute of Justice Less-Than-Lethal Force program to review and update the information available on the toxicity and adverse health effects associated with OC exposure. The results of this evaluation indicate that exposure to OC can result in dermatitis, as well as adverse nasal, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal effects in humans. The primary effects of OC exposure include pain and irritation of the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and lining of the mouth. Blistering and rash have been shown to occur after chronic or prolonged dermal exposure. Ingestion of capsicum may cause acute stinging of the lips, tongue, and oral mucosa and may lead to vomiting and diarrhea with large doses. OC vapors may also cause significant pulmonary irritation and prolonged cough. There is no evidence of long term effects associated with an acute exposure to OC, and extensive use as a culinary additive and medicinal ointment has further provided no evidence of long term adverse effects following repeated or prolonged exposure.

  4. Development of Defoamers for Confinenment Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D M; Mitchell, A R

    2005-08-10

    Aqueous foam concentrate (AFC) 380 foam was developed by Sandia National Laboratory as a blast mitigation foam for unexploded ordnance (UXO) and its ''engineered foam structure'' is reported to be able to ''envelop chemical or biological aerosols'' [1]. It is similar to commercial fire-fighting foams, consisting mostly of water with small amounts of two alcohols, an ether and surfactant. It also contains xanthan gum, probably, to strengthen the foam film and delay drainage. The concentrate is normally diluted in a 6:94 ratio with water for foaming applications. The diluted solution is normally foamed with air to an expansion factor of about 100 (density 0.01 g/cc), which is called ''dry'' foam. Higher density foam (0.18 > {rho} > 0.03 g/cc) was discovered which had quite different characteristics from ''dry'' foam and was called ''wet'' foam. Some characterization of these foams has also been carried out, but the major effort described in this document is the evaluation, at the small and medium scale, of chemical, mechanical and thermal approaches to defoaming AFC 380 foam. Several chemical approaches to defoaming were evaluated including oxidation and precipitation of the xanthan, use of commercial oil-emulsion or suspension defoamers, pH modification, and cation exchange with the surfactant. Of these the commercial defoamers were most effective. Two mechanical approaches to defoaming were evaluated: pressure and foam rupture with very fine particles. Pressure and vacuum techniques were considered too difficult for field applications but high surface area silica particles worked very well on dry foam. Finally simple thermal techniques were evaluated. An order-disorder transition occurs in xanthan solutions at about 60 C, which may be responsible for the effectiveness of hot air as a defoamer. During defoaming of 55 gallons of foam with hot air, after about 70% of

  5. Behavioral toxicology.

    OpenAIRE

    Needleman, H L

    1995-01-01

    The new fields of behavioral toxicology and behavioral teratology investigate the outcome of specific toxic exposures in humans and animals on learning, memory, and behavioral characteristics. Three important classes of behavioral neurotoxicants are metals, solvents, and pesticides. The clearest data on the deleterious effects of prenatal exposure to toxicants comes from the study of two metals, lead and mercury, and from epidemiological investigations of the effects of alcohol taken during p...

  6. Characterization of Ti6Al7Nb alloy foams surface treated in aqueous NaOH and CaCl2 solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bütev, Ezgi; Esen, Ziya; Bor, Şakir

    2016-07-01

    Ti6Al7Nb alloy foams having 53-73% porosity were manufactured via evaporation of magnesium space holders. A bioactive 1µm thick sodium hydrogel titanate layer, NaxH2-xTiyO2y+1, formed after 5M NaOH treatment, was converted to crystalline sodium titanate, Na2TiyO2y+1, as a result of post-heat treatment. On the other hand, subsequent CaCl2 treatment of NaOH treated specimens induced calcium titanate formation. However, heat treatment of NaOH-CaCl2 treated specimens led to the loss of calcium and disappearance of the titanate phase. All of the aforementioned surface treatments reduced yield strengths due to the oxidation of the cell walls of the foams, while elastic moduli remained mostly unchanged. Accordingly, equiaxed dimples seen on the fracture surfaces of as-manufactured foams turned into relatively flat and featureless fracture surfaces after surface treatments. On the other hand, Ca- and Na-rich coating preserved their mechanical stabilities and did not spall during fracture. The relation between mechanical properties of foams and macro-porosity fraction were found to obey a power law. The foams with 63 and 73% porosity met the desired biocompatibility requirements with fully open pore structures and elastic moduli similar to that of bone. In vitro tests conducted in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that NaOH-heat treated surfaces exhibit the highest bioactivity and allow the formation of Ca-P rich phases having Ca/P ratio of 1.3 to form within 5 days. Although Ca-P rich phases formed only after 15 days on NaOH-CaCl2 treated specimens, the Ca/P ratio was closer to that of apatite found in bone. PMID:26807769

  7. Nanoporous Ag and Pd foam: Redox induced fabrication using electrochemically deposited nanoporous Cu foam with no need to any additive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple, rapid and green method for fabrication of nanoporous metal (Ag and Pd) foams using electrochemically deposited nanoporous copper foam is presented. Ideally direct electrochemical formation of Ag and Pd foam structures without any additive reagent does not lead to a desired result; however, indirect fabrication starting from electrochemically fabricated Cu foam seems promising. Highly porous copper foam is fabricated electrochemically at a copper sheet and in turn serves as a hard template and a redox inducer for the deposition of Ag or Pd. The redox induced replacement of copper foam with Ag or Pd is done via simple immersion of as-fabricated nanoporous copper foam in cation aqueous solutions of Ag or Pd. The surface morphology of the as-fabricated foam is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), EDX and X-ray diffraction. The hydrogen evolution reaction is investigated as an example to demonstrate the electrocatalytic ability of as-fabricated foams.

  8. Foam Microrheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microrheology of liquid foams is discussed for two different regimes: static equilibrium where the capillary number Ca is zero, and the viscous regime where viscosity and surface tension are important and Ca is finite. The Surface Evolver is used to calculate the equilibrium structure of wet Kelvin foams and dry soap froths with random structure, i.e., topological disorder. The distributions of polyhedra and faces are compared with the experimental data of Matzke. Simple shearing flow of a random foam under quasistatic conditions is also described. Viscous phenomena are explored in the context of uniform expansion of 2D and 3D foams at low Reynolds number. Boundary integral methods are used to calculate the influence of Ca on the evolution of foam microstructure, which includes bubble shape and the distribution of liquid between films, Plateau borders, and (in 3D) the nodes where Plateau borders meet. The micromechanical point of view guides the development of structure-property-processing relationships for foams

  9. Foam Microrheology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRAYNIK,ANDREW M.; LOEWENBERG,MICHAEL; REINELT,DOUGLAS A.

    1999-09-01

    The microrheology of liquid foams is discussed for two different regimes: static equilibrium where the capillary number Ca is zero, and the viscous regime where viscosity and surface tension are important and Ca is finite. The Surface Evolver is used to calculate the equilibrium structure of wet Kelvin foams and dry soap froths with random structure, i.e., topological disorder. The distributions of polyhedra and faces are compared with the experimental data of Matzke. Simple shearing flow of a random foam under quasistatic conditions is also described. Viscous phenomena are explored in the context of uniform expansion of 2D and 3D foams at low Reynolds number. Boundary integral methods are used to calculate the influence of Ca on the evolution of foam microstructure, which includes bubble shape and the distribution of liquid between films, Plateau borders, and (in 3D) the nodes where Plateau borders meet. The micromechanical point of view guides the development of structure-property-processing relationships for foams.

  10. Covering sources of toxic vapors with foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a case of chemical terrorism, first responders might well be confronted with a liquid source of toxic vapor which keeps spreading out its hazardous contents. With foam as an efficient and simple means, such a source could be covered up in seconds and the spread of vapors mitigated drastically. Once covered, the source could then wait for a longer time to be removed carefully and professionally by a decontamination team. In order to find foams useful for covering up toxic vapor sources, a large set of measurements has been performed in order to answer the following questions: - Which foams could be used for this purpose? - How thick should the foam cover be? - For how long would such a foam cover be effective? - Could the practical application of foam cause a spread of the toxic chemical? The toxic vapors sources included GB, GD and HD. Among the foams were 10 fire fighter foams (e.g. AFFF, protein) and the aqueous decontamination foam CASCAD. Small scale experiments showed that CASCAD is best suited for covering a toxic source; a 10 cm layer of it covers and decontaminates GB. The large scale experiments confirmed that any fire fighter foam is a suitable cover for a longer or shorter period.(author)

  11. Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

    2009-11-11

    transport of foam in porous media is complicated in that the number of lamellae present governs flow characteristics such as viscosity, relative permeability, fluid distribution, and interactions between fluids. Hence, foam is a non-Newtonian fluid. During transport, foam destruction and formation occur. The net result of the two processes determines the foam texture (i.e., bubble density). Some of the foam may be trapped during transport. According to the impacts of the aqueous and gas flow rates, foam flow generally has two regimes – weak and strong foam. There is also a minimum pressure gradient to initiate foam flow and a critical capillary for foam to be sustained. Similar to other fluids, the transport of foam is described by Darcy’s law with the exception that the foam viscosity is variable. Three major approaches to modeling foam transport in porous media are the empirical, semi-empirical, and mechanistic methods. Mechanistic approaches can be complete in principal but may be difficult to obtain reliable parameters, whereas empirical and semi-empirical approaches can be limited by the detail used to describe foam rheology and mobility. Mechanistic approaches include the bubble population-balance model, the network/percolation theory, the catastrophe theory, and the filtration theory. Among these methods, all were developed for modeling polyhedral foam with the exception that the method based on the filtration theory was for the ball foam (microfoam).

  12. Foam Micromechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraynik, A.M.; Neilsen, M.K.; Reinelt, D.A.; Warren, W.E.

    1998-11-03

    Foam evokes many different images: waves breaking at the seashore, the head on a pint of Guinness, an elegant dessert, shaving, the comfortable cushion on which you may be seated... From the mundane to the high tech, foams, emulsions, and cellular solids encompass a broad range of materials and applications. Soap suds, mayonnaise, and foamed polymers provide practical motivation and only hint at the variety of materials at issue. Typical of mukiphase materiaIs, the rheoIogy or mechanical behavior of foams is more complicated than that of the constituent phases alone, which may be gas, liquid, or solid. For example, a soap froth exhibits a static shear modulus-a hallmark of an elastic solid-even though it is composed primarily of two Newtonian fluids (water and air), which have no shear modulus. This apparent paradox is easily resolved. Soap froth contains a small amount of surfactant that stabilizes the delicate network of thin liq- uid films against rupture. The soap-film network deforms in response to a macroscopic strain; this increases interracial area and the corresponding sur- face energy, and provides the strain energy of classical elasticity theory [1]. This physical mechanism is easily imagined but very challenging to quantify for a realistic three-dimensional soap froth in view of its complex geome- try. Foam micromechanics addresses the connection between constituent properties, cell-level structure, and macroscopic mechanical behavior. This article is a survey of micromechanics applied to gas-liquid foams, liquid-liquid emulsions, and cellular solids. We will focus on static response where the foam deformation is very slow and rate-dependent phenomena such as viscous flow can be neglected. This includes nonlinear elasticity when deformations are large but reversible. We will also discuss elastic- plastic behavior, which involves yield phenomena. Foam structures based on polyhedra packed to fill space provide a unify- ing geometrical theme. Because a two

  13. Foam drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    Transient drainage from a column of persistent foam has been analyzed theoretically. Gravity-driven flow was assumed to occur through an interconnected network of Plateau borders that define the edges of foam cells taken to be regular pentagonal dodecahedrons. A small liquid volume fraction and monodisperse cell size distribution were assumed. In the basic model, it is assumed that all liquid is contained in Plateau borders that are bounded by rigid gas-liquid interfaces. The predicted half life, the time required for one half of the liquid to drain from the foam, is inversely proportional to the square of the cell diameter, illustrating the importance of foam structure in drainage. Liquid hold up in the films separating adjacent cells, nonuniform initial liquid volume fraction distribution and interfacial mobility are explored. Border suction due to reduced pressure in the Plateau borders provides a mechanism for film drainage. Simultaneous film drainage and flow through the Plateau borders are analyzed. Sufficient conditions for neglecting film drainage kinetics are obtained. The results indicate that improved foam stability is related to small cells, liquid hold up in the films and slow film drainage kinetics.

  14. Sticky foam technology for less-than-lethal force situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goolsby, T.D.

    1994-08-01

    Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to entangle and impair an individual. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the late 1970`s for usage in nuclear safeguards and security applications. In late 1992, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of sticky foam for law enforcement usage. The objectives of the project were to develop a dispenser capable of firing sticky foam, to conduct an extensive toxicology review of sticky foam (formulation SF-283), to test the developed dispenser and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and to have the dispenser and sticky foam further evaluated by correctional representatives. This paper discusses the results of the project.

  15. Foam drainage in the presence of solid particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Nguyen, A V

    2016-03-28

    We conducted forced drainage experiments to study the liquid flow within the foams stabilized by a cationic surfactant (CTAB) in the presence of partially hydrophobic silica particles. The results show that the presence of solid particles, even when present in small amounts (0.0932 g L(-1) foam), can significantly decrease the foam permeability. The scaling behaviour (power law) between the drainage velocity and the imposed flow rate indicates that the presence of solid particles in the foams triggers a transition of the foam drainage regime from a node-dominated regime to a Plateau border-dominated regime. We applied two foam drainage equations for aqueous foams to simulate the experimental data and interpret the transition. The simulation results show that the presence of solid particles in the foams increases the rigidity of the interfaces and the viscous losses in the channels (the Plateau borders) of the foams, and decreases the foam permeability. We also generalize the theory for the effects of unattached hydrophilic particles on foam drainage by considering the effects of hydrophobicity and concentration of solid particles on the confinement of foam networks. This study explores liquid drainage in three-phase foams and is relevant to the field of hydrophobic particle separation by froth flotation, in which the wash water is commonly applied to the froth layer to improve the product grade. PMID:26877265

  16. Forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummer, Olaf H

    2010-01-01

    Forensic toxicology has developed as a forensic science in recent years and is now widely used to assist in death investigations, in civil and criminal matters involving drug use, in drugs of abuse testing in correctional settings and custodial medicine, in road and workplace safety, in matters involving environmental pollution, as well as in sports doping. Drugs most commonly targeted include amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cannabis, cocaine and the opiates, but can be any other illicit substance or almost any over-the-counter or prescribed drug, as well as poisons available to the community. The discipline requires high level skills in analytical techniques with a solid knowledge of pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. Modern techniques rely heavily on immunoassay screening analyses and mass spectrometry (MS) for confirmatory analyses using either high-performance liquid chromatography or gas chromatography as the separation technique. Tandem MS has become more and more popular compared to single-stage MS. It is essential that analytical systems are fully validated and fit for the purpose and the assay batches are monitored with quality controls. External proficiency programs monitor both the assay and the personnel performing the work. For a laboratory to perform optimally, it is vital that the circumstances and context of the case are known and the laboratory understands the limitations of the analytical systems used, including drug stability. Drugs and poisons can change concentration postmortem due to poor or unequal quality of blood and other specimens, anaerobic metabolism and redistribution. The latter provides the largest handicap in the interpretation of postmortem results. PMID:20358697

  17. Biomarkers in Computational Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomarkers are a means to evaluate chemical exposure and/or the subsequent impacts on toxicity pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Computational toxicology can integrate biomarker data with knowledge of exposure, chemistry, biology, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and e...

  18. Toxicology Education Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bodies and our world. Welcome to the Toxicology Education Foundation! Our mission is to enhance public understanding ... TEF In the Classroom Our Goal The Toxicology Education Foundation seeks to help build the public's understanding ...

  19. CHARACTERIZATION AND PROPERTIES OF A LIGNOSULFONATE-BASED PHENOLIC FOAM

    OpenAIRE

    Lihong Hu; Yonghong Zhou; Meng Zhang; Ruijie Liu

    2011-01-01

    Phenolated lignosulfonate was introduced into the synthesis of phenolic resol with phenol and formaldehyde in an alkaline condition. The modified resol was successfully applied to prepare phenolic foam using appropriate combinations of flowing agents. N-pentane was found to be suitable as the foaming agent. Sulphuric acid (50% aqueous solution, w/w) and Tween-80 were used as catalyst and surfactant, respectively. The obtained foams were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scann...

  20. Occurrence of select perfluoroalkyl substances at U.S. Air Force aqueous film-forming foam release sites other than fire-training areas: Field-validation of critical fate and transport properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R Hunter; Long, G Cornell; Porter, Ronald C; Anderson, Janet K

    2016-05-01

    The use of aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) to extinguish hydrocarbon-based fires is recognized as a significant source of environmental poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs). Although the occurrence of select PFASs in soil and groundwater at former fire-training areas (FTAs) at military installations operable since 1970 has been consistently confirmed, studies reporting the occurrence of PFASs at other AFFF-impacted sites (e.g. emergency response locations, AFFF lagoons, hangar-related AFFF storage tanks and pipelines, and fire station testing and maintenance areas) are largely missing from the literature. Further, studies have mostly focused on a single site (i.e., FTAs at military installations) and, thus, lack a comparison of sites with diverse AFFF release history. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to evaluate select PFAS occurrence at non-FTA sites on active U.S. Air Force installations with historic AFFF use of varying magnitude. Concentrations of fifteen perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA), an important PFOS precursor, were measured from several hundred samples among multiple media (i.e., surface soil, subsurface soil, sediment, surface water, and groundwater) collected from forty AFFF-impacted sites across ten installations between March and September 2014, representing one of the most comprehensive datasets on environmental PFAS occurrence to date. Differences in detection frequencies and observed concentrations due to AFFF release volume are presented along with rigorous data analyses that quantitatively demonstrate phase-dependent (i.e., solid-phase vs aqueous-phase) differences in the chemical signature as a function of carbon chain-length and in situ PFOS (and to a slightly lesser extent PFHxS) formation, presumably due to precursor biotransformation. PMID:26786021

  1. Sticky foam as a less-than-lethal technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, S.H.

    1996-12-31

    Sandia National Labs (SNL) in 1994 completed a project funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to determine the applicability of sticky foam for correctional applications. Sticky foam is an extremely tacky, tenacious material used to block, entangle, and impair individuals. The NIJ project developed a gun capable of firing multiple shots of sticky foam, tested the gun and sticky foam effectiveness on SNL volunteers acting out prison and law enforcement scenarios, and had the gun and sticky foam evaluated by correctional representatives. Based on the NIJ project work, SNL supported the Marine Corps Mission, Operation United Shield, with sticky foam guns and supporting equipment to assist in the withdrawal of UN Peacekeepers from Somalia. Prior to the loan of the equipment, the Marines were given training in sticky foam characterization, toxicology, safety issues, cleanup and waste disposal, use limitations, use protocol and precautions, emergency facial clean-up, skin cleanup, gun filling, targeting and firing, and gun cleaning. The Marine Corps successfully used the sticky foam guns as part of that operation. This paper describes these recent developments of sticky foam for non-lethal uses and some of the lessons learned from scenario and application testing.

  2. Genetic toxicology: web resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert R

    2002-04-25

    Genetic toxicology is the scientific discipline dealing with the effects of chemical, physical and biological agents on the heredity of living organisms. The Internet offers a wide range of online digital resources for the field of Genetic Toxicology. The history of genetic toxicology and electronic data collections are reviewed. Web-based resources at US National Library of Medicine (NLM), including MEDLINE, PUBMED, Gateway, Entrez, and TOXNET, are discussed. Search strategies and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) are reviewed in the context of genetic toxicology. The TOXNET group of databases are discussed with emphasis on those databases with genetic toxicology content including GENE-TOX, TOXLINE, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, Integrated Risk Information System, and Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System. Location of chemical information including chemical structure and linkage to health and regulatory information using CHEMIDPLUS at NLM and other databases is reviewed. Various government agencies have active genetic toxicology research programs or use genetic toxicology data to assist fulfilling the agency's mission. Online resources at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) are outlined. Much of the genetic toxicology for pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals and pesticides that is performed in the world is regulatory-driven. Regulatory web resources are presented for the laws mandating testing, guidelines on study design, Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, and requirements for electronic data collection and reporting. The Internet provides a range of other supporting resources to the field of genetic toxicology. The web links for key professional societies and journals in genetic toxicology are listed. Distance education, educational media resources, and job placement services are also

  3. Foam-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2015-06-02

    Foam-based adsorbents and a related method of manufacture are provided. The foam-based adsorbents include polymer foam with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the foam-based adsorbents includes irradiating polymer foam, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Foam-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  4. Application of alkyl polyglucoside in the aqueous film forming foam extinguishing agent%烷基糖苷在水成膜泡沫灭火剂中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱江; 李屹; 姚晨婷; 田水承

    2012-01-01

    New aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) extinguishing agent formulations were developed by using alkyl polyglucosides ( APG1214 and APG0810) , together with C6 fluorocarbon surfactant (F1157) as main materials to replace C8 fluorocarbon surfactant (AF4018) that used in traditional AFFF extinguishing agent. Performances of the new formulations, including foaming, spreading, sealing of oil surface and fire -extinguishing were investigated. Practical fire - extinguishing efficacy of the various new formulated AFFF products were tested and examined as well. Results showed that; the AFFF product without fluorinated compounds could not meet the requirement of the China National Standard for "foam extinguishing agents" (GB 15308-2006) , which indicating that the fluorinated compounds are necessary for the AFFF. The AFFF product formulated with F1157 without APG could extinguish fire,but its heat resistant time was much lower than that of the AFFF formulated with Fl 157 together with APG and the concentration of F1157 has to be greatly increased; while the new AFFF products that formulated with both F1157 of lower concentration and APG1214 or APG0810,not only could be effective with reduced amount of Fl 157,but also improves the heat resistance time and fire - extinguishing performance. Test results also showed that the efficacy of APG0810 is higher than that of APG1214.%以烷基糖苷(APG1214和APG0810)与C6氟碳表面活性剂F1157为主要实验材料,逐步取代原水成膜泡沫灭火剂(AFFF)中的C8氟碳表面活性剂(AF4018)制成新的泡沫液配方,分别考察了其铺展性能、泡沫性能、密封性能和灭火性能,分析各新配方的灭火效果.结果表明:不含氟碳表面活性剂的AFFF达不到GB 15308-2006《泡沫灭火剂》规定的灭火要求;在未复配APG的情况下,以F1157替代C8氟碳表面活性剂可以满足灭火要求,但其抗烧时间下降且F1157用量加大;以APG1214或APG0810与较低浓度F1157

  5. Microstructural effects in foam fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Peter; Davis, Stephen; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-11-01

    We examine the fracture of a quasi two-dimensional aqueous foam under an applied driving pressure, using a network modelling approach developed for metallic foams by Stewart & Davis (J. Rheol., vol. 56, 2012, p. 543). In agreement with experiments, we observe two distinct mechanisms of failure analogous to those observed in a crystalline solid: a slow ductile mode when the driving pressure is applied slowly, where the void propagates as bubbles interchange neighbours through the T1 process, and a rapid brittle mode for faster application of pressures, where the void advances by successive rupture of liquid films driven by Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The simulations allow detailed insight into the mechanics of the fracturing medium and the role of its microstructure. In particular, we examine the stress distribution around the crack tip and investigate how brittle fracture localizes into a single line of breakages. We also confirm that pre-existing microstructural defects can alter the course of fracture.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION AND PROPERTIES OF A LIGNOSULFONATE-BASED PHENOLIC FOAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Hu,

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Phenolated lignosulfonate was introduced into the synthesis of phenolic resol with phenol and formaldehyde in an alkaline condition. The modified resol was successfully applied to prepare phenolic foam using appropriate combinations of flowing agents. N-pentane was found to be suitable as the foaming agent. Sulphuric acid (50% aqueous solution, w/w and Tween-80 were used as catalyst and surfactant, respectively. The obtained foams were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, friability, and mechanical property tests. The experimental results showed the foam to have lower density, better toughness, and excellent thermal insulation compared to those of foams obtained from conventional resol resin. The properties of phenolated lignosulfonate modified phenolic foam can comply with the required specifications for its practical utilization.

  7. Green Toxicology – Application of predictive toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Taxvig, Camilla;

    2014-01-01

    reduction. This objective is partly achieved through core principles of green chemistry. However, better utilization of existing predictive toxicological tools alongside new inventions is still required. For this, input from toxicologists early in the chemical enterprise is necessary to make informed...... safer chemicals and to identify problematic compounds already in use such as industrial compounds, drugs, pesticides and cosmetics, is required. Green toxicology is the application of predictive toxicology to the production of chemicals with the specific intent of improving their design for hazard...... be applied in chemical risk assessment to a greater extent than is currently the case. Greater focus on these tools, their strengths and weaknesses, should be part of chemistry training at the university level, thus ensuring constant focus on the issue and fostering new inventions into the future....

  8. Manufacture of cordierite foams by direct foaming

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Elisabete Ribeiro; N. Correia; Silva, J. M.; Oliveira, F. A. Costa; Ribeiro, F. R. M. C.; Bordalo, J. C.; Ribeiro, M.F.

    2007-01-01

    Open cell cordiereti fosms were prepared by a direct foaming two-component polyurethane (PUR)/ceramic system. Throught optimization of several experimental parameters such as contents of catalysts and ceramic cordiereti precursor, as well as plasticizer presence, foams with porosites 85-95&% and densities ranging from 130-410 kg/m3 were obtained. Thse foams characteristics make them attractive to be used as catalyst supports. The new two-component PUR/ceramics system developped allows the hig...

  9. Selective ion flotation (foam separation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batch and continuous experiments were carried out on the foam separation of the oxygen compounds of subgroup 4, 5, 6 and 7 transition metals with the cationic surfactant of (R) 4N+ type at various concentrations and pH of the aqueous solution. The experimental conditions were established basing on the ionic structure analysis for the aqueous solution of oxygen compounds of the metals studied, where as most of them occured as simple oxyanions. The metals studied can be divided into two main groups. The first group comprises V(5), Cr(6), Mo(6), W(6), Tc(7), and Re(7) occuring as simple oxyanions in the aqueous solution. The second group encompasses Ti(4), Zr(4), Hf(4), Nb(5), Ta(5), and Mn(7). Under experimantal conditions, metals classed among the second group were found to form colloidal systems or large polyoxyanions of somewhat sophisticated formulae and spatial structure built of MeO6 octahedra. It was experimentally shown that the intensity of anion flotation, equal to the batch flotation rate constant determined for individual ions under the same conditions, can be used as a measure of the affinity of anions for the cationic surfactant. The flotation selectivity orders, obtained in this way, are valid for adequate multicomponent solutions and similar to the flotation selectivity orders found during the continuous equilibrium foam separation. (author)

  10. Foam decontamination containing silica nanoparticles of various structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is needed to decrease the amounts of chemical reagents and secondary waste produced during the decontamination process. Decontamination foam is a non-stable, two-phase fluid with aqueous and gas phases representing not more than 10% and 90% of the total volume, respectively. The application of foam allows for remote decontamination processing using only an injection nozzle and the equipment to generate the decontamination foam, which reduces operator exposure to high radioactivity. Solid colloidal particles increase the foam stability in the foam formulation. These particles can be specifically hydrophobized for optimal adsorption at the liquid/gas interface, which creates armor for the bubbles and prevents coalescence by reducing the internal gas transfer. Conversely, hydrophilic particles remain confined in the liquid phase, and to enhance the foam stability. In addition, the silica nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized with various structures and used for the stabilizer of decontamination foam. In this study, we aimed to synthesize silica nanoparticles (NPs) with various structures such as porous, core-shell, and non-porous using methods proposed in previous literatures. We also investigated the effect of silica NPs with various structures for the foam stability and oxide dissolution rate with chemical reagents. This study showed the effect of the silica NPs with various structures on the decontamination foam. The result indicates that porous NPs have a significant effect on the foam stability and oxide dissolution rate because of lower density and smaller size owing to high specific surface area, large pore volume, and porosity

  11. Foam decontamination containing silica nanoparticles of various structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Inho; Kim, Chorong; Jung, Chonghun; Yang, Hanbeom; Park, Sang Yoon; Moon, Jeikwon; Choi, Wangkyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Suk Bon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    A process is needed to decrease the amounts of chemical reagents and secondary waste produced during the decontamination process. Decontamination foam is a non-stable, two-phase fluid with aqueous and gas phases representing not more than 10% and 90% of the total volume, respectively. The application of foam allows for remote decontamination processing using only an injection nozzle and the equipment to generate the decontamination foam, which reduces operator exposure to high radioactivity. Solid colloidal particles increase the foam stability in the foam formulation. These particles can be specifically hydrophobized for optimal adsorption at the liquid/gas interface, which creates armor for the bubbles and prevents coalescence by reducing the internal gas transfer. Conversely, hydrophilic particles remain confined in the liquid phase, and to enhance the foam stability. In addition, the silica nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized with various structures and used for the stabilizer of decontamination foam. In this study, we aimed to synthesize silica nanoparticles (NPs) with various structures such as porous, core-shell, and non-porous using methods proposed in previous literatures. We also investigated the effect of silica NPs with various structures for the foam stability and oxide dissolution rate with chemical reagents. This study showed the effect of the silica NPs with various structures on the decontamination foam. The result indicates that porous NPs have a significant effect on the foam stability and oxide dissolution rate because of lower density and smaller size owing to high specific surface area, large pore volume, and porosity.

  12. Foams theory, measurements, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Saad A

    1996-01-01

    This volume discusses the physics and physical processes of foam and foaming. It delineates various measurement techniques for characterizing foams and foam properties as well as the chemistry and application of foams. The use of foams in the textile industry, personal care products, enhanced oil recovery, firefighting and mineral floatation are highlighted, and the connection between the microstructure and physical properties of foam are detailed. Coverage includes nonaqueous foams and silicone antifoams, and more.

  13. Fire and ecotoxicological aspects of polyurethane rigid foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittbecker, F W; Giersig, M

    2001-01-01

    The main characteristics of fire effluents from polyurethane (PUR) foams are comparable to those from natural materials like wood, cork, or wool. This similarity has been demonstrated by comparative data from analytical and toxicological studies. It is therefore presumed that effluents of these materials present similar hazards to human beings and the environment. In almost all fires, dioxins can be found in the smoke and residues. In fires involving PURs, relevant quantities of halogenated dioxins or furans are not to be expected; this has been confirmed by investigations under controlled laboratory conditions. The insulation properties of rigid PUR foam contribute significantly to environmental protection and the conservation of resources. A number of methods for reusing and recycling PUR rigid foam waste have been developed and realized in practise. The possibilities range from reusing the material itself, generating liquid raw materials, and thermal recycling, even for (H)CFC-containing PUR rigid foams, by cocombustion in suitable plants. PMID:11370381

  14. Polyurethane-Foam Maskant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodemeijer, R.

    1985-01-01

    Brown wax previously used to mask hardware replaced with polyurethane foam in electroplating and electroforming operations. Foam easier to apply and remove than wax and does not contaminate electrolytes.

  15. Metallized polymeric foam material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, B. A.; Bilow, N.

    1974-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foams can be coated uniformly with thin film of metal by vapor deposition of aluminum or by sensitization of foam followed by electroless deposition of nickel or copper. Foam can be further processed to increase thickness of metal overcoat to impart rigidity or to provide inert surface with only modest increase in weight.

  16. Foam engineering fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Containing contributions from leading academic and industrial researchers, this book provides a much needed update of foam science research. The first section of the book presents an accessible summary of the theory and fundamentals of foams. This includes chapters on morphology, drainage, Ostwald ripening, coalescence, rheology, and pneumatic foams. The second section demonstrates how this theory is used in a wide range of industrial applications, including foam fractionation, froth flotation and foam mitigation. It includes chapters on suprafroths, flotation of oil sands, foams in enhancing petroleum recovery, Gas-liquid Mass Transfer in foam, foams in glass manufacturing, fire-fighting foam technology and consumer product foams.

  17. Covalent binding of a nerve agent hydrolyzing enzyme within polyurethane foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, K E; Russell, A J

    1996-08-20

    A phosphotriesterase preparation, extracted from Escherichia coli DH5alpha cells, was immobilized within a polyurethane foam matrix during polymer synthesis. The enzyme-foam interaction was shown to be covalent and analysis of the hydrolysis of paraoxon in aqueous solution demonstrated that more than 50% of the initial enzyme specific activity was retained after immobilization in the foam. Factors affecting the rate of paraoxon degradation include foam hydrophobicity, the degree of mixing applied to initiate polymerization, and foam pretreatment prior to use in substrate hydrolysis. The storage stability of the foam is significant, with phosphotriesterase-foam activity profiles exhibiting a three month half-life. Foams are currently being developed for biocatalytic air filtering, in which gaseous substrates will be simultaneously adsorbed and degraded by the immobilized enzyme system. (c) 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18629797

  18. Occupational medicine and toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Axel

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This editorial is to announce the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, a new Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal published by BioMed Central. Occupational medicine and toxicology belong to the most wide ranging disciplines of all medical specialties. The field is devoted to the diagnosis, prevention, management and scientific analysis of diseases from the fields of occupational and environmental medicine and toxicology. It also covers the promotion of occupational and environmental health. The complexity of modern industrial processes has dramatically changed over the past years and today's areas include effects of atmospheric pollution, carcinogenesis, biological monitoring, ergonomics, epidemiology, product safety and health promotion. We hope that the launch of the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology will aid in the advance of these important areas of research bringing together multi-disciplinary research findings.

  19. TOXNET: Toxicology Data Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for over 600 chemicals from authoritative groups worldwide Animal Testing Alternatives ALTBIB Resources on Alternatives to the Use of Live Vertebrates in Biomedical Research and Testing Archived, No Longer Updated ... cancer tests GENE-TOX Genetic Toxicology Data Bank. ...

  20. Coarsening of firefighting foams containing fluorinated hydrocarbon surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Matthew J.; Dougherty, John A.; Otto, Nicholas; Conroy, Michael W.; Williams, Bradley A.; Ananth, Ramagopal; Fleming, James W.

    2013-03-01

    Diffusion of gas between bubbles in foam causes growth of large bubbles at the expense of small bubbles and leads to increasing mean bubble size with time thereby affecting drainage. Experimental data shows that the effective diffusivity of nitrogen gas in aqueous film forming foam (AFFF), which is widely used in firefighting against burning liquids, is several times smaller than in 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) foam based on time-series photographs of bubble size and weighing scale recordings of liquid drainage. Differences in foam structure arising from foam production might contribute to the apparent difference in the rates of coarsening. AFFF solution produces wetter foam with initially smaller bubbles than SDS solution due in part to the lower gas-liquid surface tension provided by the fluorosurfactants present in AFFF. Present method of foam production generates microbubble foam by high-speed co-injection of surfactant solution and gas into a tube of 3-mm diameter. These results contribute to our growing understanding of the coupling between foam liquid fraction, bubble size, surfactant chemistry, and coarsening. NRC Resident Research Associate at NRL

  1. Starch-lignin foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Although starch foams are well known as biodegradable alternatives to foamed polystyrene, starch-lignin foams have not previously been reported. Lignin is an abundant byproduct of paper manufacture usually burned as fuel for lack of higher-value uses. We have prepared novel starch-kraft lignin foams with a known technique similar to compression molding. Replacing 20% of the starch with lignin has no deleterious effect on density or morphology as indicated by scanning electron microscopy: a thin outer layer of approximately 100 µm encloses a region of cellular structure containing 100–200 µm voids, with the major internal region of the foam consisting of large voids of up to 1 mm in size. Powder X-ray diffraction shows residual structure in both starch and starch-lignin foams. Differential scanning calorimetry displays endothermic transitions in the starch foam but not in the starch-lignin foam, indicating that lignin stabilizes the residual starch structure. Lignin decreases water absorption; diffusion constants for the starch and starch-lignin foams are 2.68•10–6 and 0.80•10–6 cm2/sec, respectively. The flexural strength of the starch-lignin foam is similar to that of foamed polystyrene, the strain at maximum stress is smaller, and the modulus of elasticity is larger.

  2. Foam process models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A. (Procter & Gamble Co., West Chester, OH); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2008-09-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

  3. Foam Glass for Construction Materials: Foaming Mechanism and Thermal Conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund

    2016-01-01

    in a solid foam glass. The foam glass industry employs a range of different melt precursors and foaming agents. Recycle glass is key melt precursors. Many parameters influence the foaming process and optimising the foaming conditions is very time consuming. The most challenging and attractive goal is...

  4. Material flow in metal foams studied by neutron radioscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two kinds of experiments are presented in this paper: In the first lead alloy foams were generated in a furnace by expanding a foamable precursor material containing metal and a blowing agent. Vertical columns of liquid metal foam were scanned with a beam of neutrons while recording the time-dependent local neutron transmission. The resulting transmission profiles reflect the kinetics of material redistribution in liquid metallic foams under the influence of gravity (drainage). In the second experiment pre-fabricated solid lead foams were re-melted in a furnace. Neutron transmission profiles were also obtained in these experiments. Results of each type of experiment are presented and compared with theoretical predictions for the density profile of aqueous foams. (orig.)

  5. Foam and gel methods for the decontamination of metallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Luis; Kaminski, Michael Donald

    2007-01-23

    Decontamination of nuclear facilities is necessary to reduce the radiation field during normal operations and decommissioning of complex equipment. In this invention, we discuss gel and foam based diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) chemical solutions that are unique in that these solutions can be applied at room temperature; provide protection to the base metal for continued applications of the equipment; and reduce the final waste form production to one step. The HEDPA gels and foams are formulated with benign chemicals, including various solvents, such as ionic liquids and reducing and complexing agents such as hydroxamic acids, and formaldehyde sulfoxylate. Gel and foam based HEDPA processes allow for decontamination of difficult to reach surfaces that are unmanageable with traditional aqueous process methods. Also, the gel and foam components are optimized to maximize the dissolution rate and assist in the chemical transformation of the gel and foam to a stable waste form.

  6. Observations on the Air-Serum Interface of Milk Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Brooker, B E

    1985-01-01

    A new rapid method for the preparation of milk foams for transmission electron microscopy is described . The air-serum interface of foams made from skimmed milk consists of a uniform electron dense layer (5 nm thick) to which casein micelles become secondarily attached . Changes in bubble volume lead to the formation of folds of excess interfacial material which project into the aqueous phase. Using collapsed bubble ghosts to study the attachment of micelles to the airserum interface it was c...

  7. Operator spin foam models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahr, Benjamin [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Hellmann, Frank; Kaminski, Wojciech; Kisielowski, Marcin; Lewandowski, Jerzy [Instytut Fizyki Teoretycznej, Uniwersytet Warszawski, ul. Hoza 69, 00-681 Warszawa (Warsaw), Polska. Poland (Poland)

    2011-05-21

    The goal of this paper is to introduce a systematic approach to spin foams. We define operator spin foams, that is foams labelled by group representations and operators, as our main tool. A set of moves we define in the set of the operator spin foams (among other operations) allows us to split the faces and the edges of the foams. We assign to each operator spin foam a contracted operator, by using the contractions at the vertices and suitably adjusted face amplitudes. The emergence of the face amplitudes is the consequence of assuming the invariance of the contracted operator with respect to the moves. Next, we define spin foam models and consider the class of models assumed to be symmetric with respect to the moves we have introduced, and assuming their partition functions (state sums) are defined by the contracted operators. Briefly speaking, those operator spin foam models are invariant with respect to the cellular decomposition, and are sensitive only to the topology and colouring of the foam. Imposing an extra symmetry leads to a family we call natural operator spin foam models. This symmetry, combined with assumed invariance with respect to the edge splitting move, determines a complete characterization of a general natural model. It can be obtained by applying arbitrary (quantum) constraints on an arbitrary BF spin foam model. In particular, imposing suitable constraints on a spin(4) BF spin foam model is exactly the way we tend to view 4D quantum gravity, starting with the BC model and continuing with the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine (EPRL) or Freidel-Krasnov (FK) models. That makes our framework directly applicable to those models. Specifically, our operator spin foam framework can be translated into the language of spin foams and partition functions. Among our natural spin foam models there are the BF spin foam model, the BC model, and a model corresponding to the EPRL intertwiners. Our operator spin foam framework can also be used for more general spin

  8. Foam Decontamination of Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foam decontamination is quite promising method for purifying radioactive contaminated surfaces. Foam decontamination solutions allow creating the necessary volume of deactivating medium and forming a relatively small amount of secondary liquid waste so that this method may be applicable to bulky objects. Also it should be noted that foam compositions can be effective for objects with a complex geometry. Despite the numerous advantages the well known foam decontamination methods are unpopular today due to their low efficiency and difficulties of recycling waste decontamination solutions. We have made some attempts to improve the attractiveness of foam decontamination process. Currently two compositions (acidic and alkaline) for foam decontamination have been tested. The main advantage of both tested compositions is that they are based on easily degradable surfactants. At the same time the acidic composition has a very low salt content. The preliminary results of tests carried out in real production conditions showed that such approach for metal decontamination was very promising. Metal decontamination factors over 2500 were achieved for consequent treating of metal surfaces with acidic and alkali foam solutions in industrial conditions. The total flow rate of foam generating solutions was 1 L/m2 and processing time was 1 hour. Presently we are trying to modify the foam physical properties to improve the process of decontamination of vertical, inclined and inverted surfaces. Also methods and scheme of spent foam generating solutions treatment are under development. (authors)

  9. Aerospace Toxicology and Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.; Parmet, A. J.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Toxicology dates to the very earliest history of humanity with various poisons and venom being recognized as a method of hunting or waging war with the earliest documentation in the Evers papyrus (circa 1500 BCE). The Greeks identified specific poisons such as hemlock, a method of state execution, and the Greek word toxos (arrow) became the root of our modern science. The first scientific approach to the understanding of poisons and toxicology was the work during the late middle ages of Paracelsus. He formulated what were then revolutionary views that a specific toxic agent or "toxicon" caused specific dose-related effects. His principles have established the basis of modern pharmacology and toxicology. In 1700, Bernardo Ramazzini published the book De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (The Diseases of Workers) describing specific illnesses associated with certain labor, particularly metal workers exposed to mercury, lead, arsenic, and rock dust. Modern toxicology dates from development of the modern industrial chemical processes, the earliest involving an analytical method for arsenic by Marsh in 1836. Industrial organic chemicals were synthesized in the late 1800 s along with anesthetics and disinfectants. In 1908, Hamilton began the long study of occupational toxicology issues, and by WW I the scientific use of toxicants saw Haber creating war gases and defining time-dosage relationships that are used even today.

  10. Superhydrophobic graphene foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Eklavya; Chen, Zongping; Houshmand, Farzad; Ren, Wencai; Peles, Yoav; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Koratkar, Nikhil

    2013-01-14

    The static and dynamic wetting properties of a 3D graphene foam network are reported. The foam is synthesized using template-directed chemical vapor deposition and contains pores several hundred micrometers in dimension while the walls of the foam comprise few-layer graphene sheets that are coated with Teflon. Water contact angle measurements reveal that the foam is superhydrophobic with an advancing contact angle of ∼163 degrees while the receding contact angle is ∼143 degrees. The extremely water repellent nature of the foam is also confirmed when impacting water droplets are able to completely rebound from the surface. Such superhydrophobic graphene foams show potential in a variety of applications ranging from anti-sticking and self-cleaning to anti-corrosion and low-friction coatings. PMID:22911509

  11. Foam fractionation in recovery of captopril

    OpenAIRE

    Avishek Mandal

    2013-01-01

    Toxic effect caused due to the presence of pharmaceuticals in waste water has been recognized as one of the emerging issue in the presentday environmental pollution. The aim of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of foam fractionation technique in batch mode for the recovery of captopril from dilute aqueous solution and to compare the performance of drug recovery from two feed solutions, one containing pure drug and the other containing formulated drug (tablet). Captopril is an...

  12. Fire-retardant foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliani, J.

    1978-01-01

    Family of polyimide resins are being developed as foams with exceptional fire-retardant properties. Foams are potentially useful for seat cushions in aircraft and ground vehicles and for applications such as home furnishings and building-construction materials. Basic formulations can be modified with reinforcing fibers or fillers to produce celular materials for variety of applications. By selecting reactants, polymer structure can be modified to give foams with properties ranging from high resiliency and flexibility to brittleness and rigidity.

  13. Shape memory polymer foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo, Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymer (SMP) foam research are reviewed. The SMPs belong to a new class of smart polymers which can have interesting applications in microelectromechanical systems, actuators and biomedical devices. They can respond to specific external stimulus changing their configuration and then remember the original shape. In the form of foams, the shape memory behaviour can be enhanced because they generally have higher compressibility. Considering also the low weight, and recovery force, the SMP foams are expected to have great potential applications primarily in aerospace. This review highlights the recent progress in characterization, evaluation, and proposed applications of SMP foams mainly for aerospace applications.

  14. Ultralight metal foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-09-01

    Ultralight (silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain ɛD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory.

  15. Animal-free toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2013-01-01

    assessment, in accordance with the legislation on chemical, medicine and food safety. Toxicology studies based on human mechanistic and exposure information can replace animal studies. These animal-free approaches can be further supplemented by new in silico methods and chemical structure......-activity relationships. The inclusion of replacement expertise in the international Three Rs centres, the ongoing exploration of alternatives to animal research, and the improvement of conditions for research animals, all imply the beginning of a paradigm shift in toxicology research toward the use of human data....

  16. A NOVEL ENVIRONMENT FRIENDLY METHOD FOR EXPANSION AND MOLDING OF POLYMERIC FOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the project is to develop an environment friendly, novel and efficient alternative process for expansion and molding of polymeric foam. Spherical, expandable polymer beads are prepared from liquid monomer suspended in an aqueous medium, containing an expansion...

  17. Glucose dehydration to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in a biphasic system over solid acid foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordomsky, Vitaly V; van der Schaaf, John; Schouten, Jaap C; Nijhuis, T Alexander

    2013-09-01

    A solid acid foam-structured catalyst based on a binderless zirconium phosphate (ZrPO) coating on aluminum foam was prepared. The catalyst layer was obtained by performing a multiple washcoating procedure of ZrPO slurry on the anodized aluminum foam. The effect of the pretreatment of ZrPO, the concentration of the slurry, and the amount of coating on the properties of the foam was studied. The catalytic properties of the prepared foams have been evaluated in the dehydration of glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) in a biphasic reactor. The catalytic behavior of ZrPO foam-based catalysts was studied in a rotating foam reactor and compared with that of bulk ZrPO. The effect of a silylation procedure on the selectivity of the process was shown over bulk and foam catalysts. This treatment resulted in a higher selectivity due to the deactivation of unselective Lewis acid sites. Addition of methylisobutylketone leads to extraction of HMF from the aqueous phase and stabilization of the selectivity to HMF over bulk ZrPO. A more intensive contact of the foam with the aqueous and organic phases leads to an increase in the selectivity and resistance to deactivation of the foam in comparison with a bulk catalyst. PMID:23616489

  18. Toxicological aspects of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different toxicological aspects of water have been studied, remarking the activity of various chemical substances in the organism. These substances are divided in: trace metals (Sb, As, Cd, Zn, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se), other contaminants (CN-, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, pesticides, detergents) and radioactivity. Finally, some considerations on this subject are made

  19. Micromodel foam flow study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, K.T.; Radke, C.J.

    1990-10-01

    Foams are often utilized as part of enhanced oil recovery techniques. This report presents the results of a micromodel foam flow study. Micromodels are valuable tools in uncovering capillary phenomena responsible for lamellae generation and coalescence during foam flow in porous media. Among the mechanisms observed are snap-off, weeping-flow breakup, and lamella division and leave behind. Coalescence mechanisms include dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage and gas diffusion. These phenomena are sensitive to the mode of injection, the local capillary environment, and the geometry of the pore structure. An important consideration in presenting a tractable model of foam flow behavior is the ability to identify the pore-level mechanisms having the greatest impact on foam texture. The predominant mechanisms will vary depending upon the application for foam as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) fluid. Both simultaneous gas and surfactant injection and surfactant alternating with gas injection (SAG) have been used to create foam for mobility control in EOR projects. The model developed is based on simultaneous gas and surfactant injection during steady-state conditions into a Berea sandstone core. The lamellae generation and coalescence mechanisms included in this model are snap-off, lamella division, and dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage. This simplified steady-state model serves as a foundation for developing more complete rate expressions and for extending the population balance to handle transient foam flow behavior. 70 refs., 30 figs.

  20. Chronicles of foam films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochev, G; Platikanov, D; Miller, R

    2016-07-01

    The history of the scientific research on foam films, traditionally known as soap films, dates back to as early as the late 17th century when Boyle and Hooke paid special attention to the colours of soap bubbles. Their inspiration was transferred to Newton, who began systematic study of the science of foam films. Over the next centuries, a number of scientists dealt with the open questions of the drainage, stability and thickness of foam films. The significant contributions of Plateau and Gibbs in the middle/late 19th century are particularly recognized. After the "colours" method of Newton, Reinold and Rücker as well as Johhonnot developed optical methods for measuring the thickness of the thinner "non-colour" films (first order black) that are still in use today. At the beginning of the 20th century, various aspects of the foam film science were elucidated by the works of Dewar and Perrin and later by Mysels. Undoubtedly, the introduction of the disjoining pressure by Derjaguin and the manifestation of the DLVO theory in describing the film stability are considered as milestones in the theoretical development of foam films. The study of foam films gained momentum with the introduction of the microscopic foam film methodology by Scheludko and Exerowa, which is widely used today. This historical perspective serves as a guide through the chronological development of knowledge on foam films achieved over several centuries. PMID:26361708

  1. Metal foams: A survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; F.; Ashby; LU; Tianjian(卢天健)

    2003-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art in the development of cellular metal foams is reviewed, with focus on their fabrication, mechanical/thermal/acoustic properties, and potential applications as lightweight panels, energy absorbers, heat exchangers, and acoustic liners. Foam property charts with scaling relations are presented, allowing scoping and selection through the use of material indices.

  2. Foam Experiment Hardware are Flown on Microgravity Rocket MAXUS 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockowandt, C.; Löth, K.; Jansson, O.; Holm, P.; Lundin, M.; Schneider, H.; Larsson, B.

    2002-01-01

    The Foam module was developed by Swedish Space Corporation and was used for performing foam experiments on the sounding rocket MAXUS 4 launched from Esrange 29 April 2001. The development and launch of the module has been financed by ESA. Four different foam experiments were performed, two aqueous foams by Doctor Michele Adler from LPMDI, University of Marne la Vallée, Paris and two non aqueous foams by Doctor Bengt Kronberg from YKI, Institute for Surface Chemistry, Stockholm. The foam was generated in four separate foam systems and monitored in microgravity with CCD cameras. The purpose of the experiment was to generate and study the foam in microgravity. Due to loss of gravity there is no drainage in the foam and the reactions in the foam can be studied without drainage. Four solutions with various stabilities were investigated. The aqueous solutions contained water, SDS (Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate) and dodecanol. The organic solutions contained ethylene glycol a cationic surfactant, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and decanol. Carbon dioxide was used to generate the aqueous foam and nitrogen was used to generate the organic foam. The experiment system comprised four complete independent systems with injection unit, experiment chamber and gas system. The main part in the experiment system is the experiment chamber where the foam is generated and monitored. The chamber inner dimensions are 50x50x50 mm and it has front and back wall made of glass. The front window is used for monitoring the foam and the back window is used for back illumination. The front glass has etched crosses on the inside as reference points. In the bottom of the cell is a glass frit and at the top is a gas in/outlet. The foam was generated by injecting the experiment liquid in a glass frit in the bottom of the experiment chamber. Simultaneously gas was blown through the glass frit and a small amount of foam was generated. This procedure was performed at 10 bar. Then the pressure was

  3. Stray-field NMR diffusion q-space diffraction imaging of monodisperse coarsening foams.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Kieron; Burbidge, Adam; Apperley, David C.; Hodgkinson, Paul; Markwell, Fraser A.; Topgaard, Daniel; Hughes, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The technique of stray field diffusion NMR is adapted to study the diffusion properties of water in monodisperse wet foams. We show for the first time, that the technique is capable of observing q-space diffusion diffraction peaks in monodisperse aqueous foams with initial bubble sizes in the range of 50–85 μm. The position of the peak maximum can be correlated simply to the bubble size in the foam leading to a technique that can investigate the stability of the foam over time. The diffus...

  4. Extraction behavior of uranium(VI) with polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution with polyether-based polyurethane (PU) foam was studied. The effects of the kinds and concentrations of nitrate salts, uranium(VI) concentration, temperature, nitric acid concentration, pH, the content of poly(ethylene oxide) in the polyurethane foam, and the ratio of PU foam weight and solution volume on the extraction of uranium(VI) were investigated. The interferences of fluoride and carbonate ions on the extraction of uranium(VI) were also examined, and methods to overcome both interferences were suggested. It was found that no uranium was extracted in the absence of a nitrate salting-out agent, and the extraction behaviors of uranium(IV) with polyurethane foam could be explained in terms of an etherlike solvent extraction mechanism. In addition, the percentage extraction of a multiple stage was also estimated theoretically

  5. Interfacial Stabilization of Fiber-Laden Foams with Carboxymethylated Lignin toward Strong Nonwoven Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Xiang, Wenchao; Järvinen, Marjo; Lappalainen, Timo; Salminen, Kristian; Rojas, Orlando J

    2016-08-01

    Wet foams were produced via agitation and compressed air bubbling of aqueous solutions of carboxymethylated lignin (CML). Bubble size and distribution were assessed in situ via optical microscopy. Foamability, bubble collapse rate, and foam stability (half-life time) were analyzed as a function of CML concentration, temperature, pH, and air content. Dynamic changes of the CML liquid foam were monitored by light transmission and backscattering. Cellulosic fibers of different aspect ratios (long pine fibers and short birch fibers) were suspended under agitation by the liquid foams (0.6% CML in the aqueous phase) with an air (bubble) content as high as 75% in volume. Remarkably, the half-life time of fiber-laden CML foams was 10-fold higher than that of the corresponding fiber-free liquid foam. Such lignin-based foams were demonstrated, after dewatering, as a precursor for the synthesis of nonwoven, layered structures. The resulting fiber networks (paper), obtained here for the first time with lignin-based foams, were characterized for pore size distribution, lignin retention, morphology, and physical-mechanical properties (network formation quality, density, air permeability, surface roughness, and tensile and internal bond strengths). The results were compared against structures obtained from foams stabilized with an anionic surfactant (SDS) as well as those from foam-free, water-based web-laying. Remarkably, compared to SDS, the foam-formed materials produced with CML displayed better bonding and tensile strengths. Overall, CML-based foams were found to be suitable carriers of cellulosic fibers and have opened the possibility for integrating fully biobased systems in foam-forming. This is an emerging option to increase the effective solids content in the system without compromising the quality of formed nonwoven materials while achieving reductions in water and energy consumption. PMID:27398988

  6. Domain growth kinetics in stratifying foam films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiran; Sharma, Vivek

    2015-11-01

    Baking bread, brewing cappuccino, pouring beer, washing dishes, shaving, shampooing, whipping eggs and blowing bubbles all involve creation of aqueous foam films. Typical foam films consist of two surfactant-laden surfaces that are ~ 5 nm - 10 micron apart. Sandwiched between these interfacial layers is a fluid that drains primarily under the influence of viscous and interfacial forces, including disjoining pressure. Interestingly, a layered ordering of micelles inside the foam films (thickness <100 nm) leads to a stepwise thinning phenomena called stratification, which results in a thickness-dependent variation in reflected light intensity, visualized as progressively darker shades of gray. Thinner, darker domains spontaneously grow within foam films. We show that the domain expansion dynamics exhibit two distinct growth regimes with characteristic scaling laws. Though several studies have focused on the expansion dynamics of isolated domains that exhibit a diffusion-like scaling, the change in expansion kinetics observed after domains contact with the Plateau border has not been reported and analyzed before.

  7. Foam coating of filtration media

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Mirva

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to find out if foam coating could be applied to non-woven filtration media. The goal was to increase collection efficiency without significantly decreasing air permeability. In the theoretical part, foams and their characteristics were the centre of attention. Coating in general and, of course, foam coating were also studied. The empirical part consisted of series of foaming experiments and pilot scale coating experiments. In the foaming experiments differ...

  8. Rheology of liquid foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid foams can behave like solids or liquids, depending on the applied stress and on the experimental timescale. Understanding the origin of this complex rheology which gives rise to many applications and which resembles that of many other forms of soft condensed matter made of closely packed soft units requires challenging theoretical questions to be solved. We briefly recall the basic physics and physicochemistry of foams and review the experiments, numerical simulations and theoretical models concerning foam rheology published in recent years. (topical review)

  9. The foaming of lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeefe, J. A.; Walton, W.

    1976-01-01

    Foaming is of great practical and theoretical significance for volcanic processes on the earth, the moon, and perhaps the meteorite parent bodies. The theory of foams agrees with steelmaking experience to indicate that their presence depends on the existence of solutes in the lavas which reduce the surface tension, and are not saturated. These solutes concentrate at the surface, and are called surfactants. The surfactant responsible for the formation of volcanic ash was not identified; it appears to be related to the oxygen partial pressure above the lava. This fact may explain why lunar and meteoritic melts are not observed to foam. Experimental studies are needed to clarify the process.

  10. Toxicology of inorganic tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin(II) or stannous ion as a reducing agent is important in nuclear medicine because it is an essential component and common denominator for many in vivo radiodiagnostic agents, commonly called kits for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. This report is intended to alert nuclear medicine community regarding the wide range of biological effects that the stannous ion is capable of producing, and is a review of a large number of selected publications on the toxicological potential of tin(II)

  11. Sensitive detection and semiquantitative determination of molybdenum (VI) using unloaded and specially treated polyurethane foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyurethane foams loaded with phenylhydrazine solution in carbon tetrachloride in the absence or presence of tricaprylyl tertiary amine (plasticizer) have been examined for the determination of molybdenum in aqueous acidic solution (pH ca.2). In static experiments as low as 0.05 and 0.1 ppm molybdenum were readily detected with phenylhydrazine plasticized and unplasticized foams, respectively. However, in the dynamic column extraction mode concentrations of 0.002 and 0.025 ppm molybdenum were easily detected with the plasticized and unplasticized foams, respectively. The analytical utility of untreated polyurethane foam and foam loaded with tricaprylyl tertiary amine solution for the selective detection of molybdenum (VI) in aqueous thiocyanate media have also been evaluated. The detection of 0.01 and 0.05 ppm of molybdenum is easily carried out using the loaded and unloaded foam, respectively, in batch extraction mode. In dynamic column experiments as low as 0.003 and 0.005 ppm of molybdenum were easily detected. The semi-quantitative determinations of molybdenum by the proposed foam detection methods have also been achieved. The effect of diverse ions present in aqueous solution together with molybdenum on the proposed foam tests have also been investigated

  12. Foaming Behaviour, Structure, and Properties of Polypropylene Nanocomposites Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Antunes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the preparation and characterization of compression-moulded montmorillonite and carbon nanofibre-polypropylene foams. The influence of these nanofillers on the foaming behaviour was analyzed in terms of the foaming parameters and final cellular structure and morphology of the foams. Both nanofillers induced the formation of a more isometric-like cellular structure in the foams, mainly observed for the MMT-filled nanocomposite foams. Alongside their crystalline characteristics, the nanocomposite foams were also characterized and compared with the unfilled ones regarding their dynamic-mechanical thermal behaviour. The nanocomposite foams showed higher specific storage moduli due to the reinforcement effect of the nanofillers and higher cell density isometric cellular structure. Particularly, the carbon nanofibre foams showed an increasingly higher electrical conductivity with increasing the amount of nanofibres, thus showing promising results as to produce electrically improved lightweight materials for applications such as electrostatic painting.

  13. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red

  14. Dynamics of poroelastic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forterre, Yoel; Sobac, Benjamin

    2010-11-01

    Soft poroelastic structures are widespread in biological tissues such as cartilaginous joints in bones, blood-filled placentae or plant organs. Here we investigate the dynamics of open elastic foams immersed in viscous fluids, as model soft poroelastic materials. The experiment consists in slowly compacting blocs of polyurethane solid foam embedded in silicon oil-tanks and studying their relaxation to equilibrium when the confining stress is suddenly released. Measurements of the local fluid pressure and foam velocity field are compared with a simple two-phase flow approach. For small initial compactions, the results show quantitative agreement with the classical diffusion theory of soil consolidation (Terzaghi, Biot). On the other hand, for large initial compactions, the dynamics exhibits long relaxation times and decompaction fronts, which are mainly controlled by the highly non-linear mechanical response of the foam. The analogy between this process and the evaporation of a polymer melt close to the glass transition will be briefly discussed.

  15. Foaming in stout beers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, W T; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    We review the differences between bubble formation in champagne and other carbonated drinks, and stout beers which contain a mixture of dissolved nitrogen and carbon dioxide. The presence of dissolved nitrogen in stout beers gives them a number of properties of interest to connoisseurs and physicists. These remarkable properties come at a price: stout beers do not foam spontaneously and special technology, such as the widgets used in cans, is needed to promote foaming. Nevertheless the same m...

  16. Responsive foams for nanoparticle delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Christina; Xiao, Edward; Sinko, Patrick J; Szekely, Zoltan; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-09-01

    We have developed responsive foam systems for nanoparticle delivery. The foams are easy to make, stable at room temperature, and can be engineered to break in response to temperature or moisture. Temperature-responsive foams are based on the phase transition of long chain alcohols and could be produced using medical grade nitrous oxide as a propellant. These temperature-sensitive foams could be used for polyacrylic acid (PAA)-based nanoparticle delivery. We also discuss moisture-responsive foams made with soap pump dispensers. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoparticles or PMMA latex nanoparticles were loaded into Tween 20 foams and the particle size was not affected by the foam formulation or foam break. Using biocompatible detergents, we anticipate this will be a versatile and simple approach to producing foams for nanoparticle delivery with many potential pharmaceutical and personal care applications. PMID:26091943

  17. Synthetic toxicology: where engineering meets biology and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Markus; Pei, Lei

    2011-03-01

    This article examines the implications of synthetic biology (SB) for toxicological sciences. Starting with a working definition of SB, we describe its current subfields, namely, DNA synthesis, the engineering of DNA-based biological circuits, minimal genome research, attempts to construct protocells and synthetic cells, and efforts to diversify the biochemistry of life through xenobiology. Based on the most important techniques, tools, and expected applications in SB, we describe the ramifications of SB for toxicology under the label of synthetic toxicology. We differentiate between cases where SB offers opportunities for toxicology and where SB poses challenges for toxicology. Among the opportunities, we identified the assistance of SB to construct novel toxicity testing platforms, define new toxicity-pathway assays, explore the potential of SB to improve in vivo biotransformation of toxins, present novel biosensors developed by SB for environmental toxicology, discuss cell-free protein synthesis of toxins, reflect on the contribution to toxic use reduction, and the democratization of toxicology through do-it-yourself biology. Among the identified challenges for toxicology, we identify synthetic toxins and novel xenobiotics, biosecurity and dual-use considerations, the potential bridging of toxic substances and infectious agents, and do-it-yourself toxin production. PMID:21068213

  18. Hyperbranched exopolysaccharide-enhanced foam properties of sodium fatty alcohol polyoxyethylene ether sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Quanhua; Li, Haiping; Sun, Haoyang; Sun, Yange; Li, Ying

    2016-05-01

    The foam properties, such as the foamability, foam stability, drainage, coalescence and bulk rheology, of aqueous solutions containing an eco-friendly exopolysaccharide (EPS) secreted by a deep-sea mesophilic bacterium, Wangia profunda SM-A87, and an anionic surfactant, sodium fatty alcohol polyoxyethylene ether sulfate (AES), were studied. Both the foamability and foam stability of the EPS/AES solutions are considerably higher than those of single AES solutions, even at very low AES concentrations, although pure EPS solutions cannot foam. The improved foamability and foam stability arise from the formation of the EPS/AES complex via hydrogen bonds at the interfaces. The synergism between the EPS and AES decreases the surface tension, increases the interfacial elasticity and water-carrying capacity, and suppresses the coalescence and collapse of the foams. The EPS/AES foams are more salt-resistant than the AES foams. This work provides not only a new eco-friendly foam with great potential for use in enhanced oil recovery and health-care products but also useful guidance for designing other environmentally friendly foam systems that exhibit high performance. PMID:26852104

  19. Transport of particles in liquid foams: a multi-scale approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foam is used for the decontamination of radioactive tanks since foam is a system that has a large surface for a low amount of liquid and as a consequence requires less water to be decontaminated. We study experimentally different particle transport configurations in fluid micro-channels network (Plateau borders) of aqueous foam. At first, foam permeability is measured at the scale of a single channel and of the whole foam network for 2 soap solutions known for their significant different interface mobility. Experimental data are well described by a model that takes into account the real geometry of the foam and by considering a constant value of the Boussinesq number of each soap solutions. Secondly, the velocity of one particle convected in a single foam channel is measured for different particle/channel aspect ratio. For small aspect ratio, a counterflow that is taking place at the channel's corners slows down the particle. A recirculation model in the channel foam films is developed to describe this effect. To do this, the Gibbs elasticity is introduced. Then, the threshold between trapped and released of one particle in liquid foam are carried out. This threshold is deduced from hydrodynamic and capillary forces equilibrium. Finally, the case of a clog foam node is addressed. (author)

  20. History of wildlife toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A

    2009-10-01

    The field of wildlife toxicology can be traced to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Initial reports included unintentional poisoning of birds from ingestion of spent lead shot and predator control agents, alkali poisoning of waterbirds, and die-offs from maritime oil spills. With the advent of synthetic pesticides in the 1930s and 1940s, effects of DDT and other pesticides were investigated in free-ranging and captive wildlife. In response to research findings in the US and UK, and the publication of Silent Spring in 1962, public debate on the hazards of pollutants arose and national contaminant monitoring programs were initiated. Shortly thereafter, population-level effects of DDT on raptorial and fish-eating birds were documented, and effects on other species (e.g., bats) were suspected. Realization of the global nature of organochlorine pesticide contamination, and the discovery of PCBs in environmental samples, launched long-range studies in birds and mammals. With the birth of ecotoxicology in 1969 and the establishment of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry in 1979, an international infrastructure began to emerge. In the 1980s, heavy metal pollution related to mining and smelting, agrichemical practices and non-target effects, selenium toxicosis, and disasters such as Chernobyl and the Exxon Valdez dominated the field. Biomarker development, endocrine disruption, population modeling, and studies with amphibians and reptiles were major issues of the 1990s. With the turn of the century, there was interest in new and emerging compounds (pharmaceuticals, flame retardants, surfactants), and potential population-level effects of some compounds. Based upon its history, wildlife toxicology is driven by chemical use and misuse, ecological disasters, and pollution-related events affecting humans. Current challenges include the need to more thoroughly estimate and predict exposure and effects of chemical-related anthropogenic

  1. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used as...... only closed pores and its overall thermal conductivity will be much lower than that of the foam glass with open pores. In this work we have prepared foam glass using different types of recycled glasses and different kinds of foaming agents. This enabled the formation of foam glasses having gas cells...... glass types could have a significant advantage for getting low thermal conductivity when recycled for thermal insulation applications. The impact of crystallisation on the thermal conductivity of foam glasses is also discussed....

  2. Method of making metal-doped organic foam products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for producing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (Nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers

  3. Low density metal hydride foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam. 6 figures

  4. Foaming in stout beers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. T.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-10-01

    We review the differences between bubble formation in champagne and other carbonated drinks, and stout beers which contain a mixture of dissolved nitrogen and carbon dioxide. The presence of dissolved nitrogen in stout beers gives them several properties of interest to connoisseurs and physicists. These remarkable properties come at a price: stout beers do not foam spontaneously and special technology, such as the widgets used in cans, is needed to promote foaming. Nevertheless, the same mechanism, nucleation by gas pockets trapped in cellulose fibers, responsible for foaming in carbonated drinks is active in stout beers, but at an impractically slow rate. This gentle rate of bubble nucleation makes stout beers an excellent model system for investigating the nucleation of gas bubbles. The equipment needed is modest, putting such experiments within reach of undergraduate laboratories. We also consider the suggestion that a widget could be constructed by coating the inside of a beer can with cellulose fibers.

  5. Foaming in stout beers

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, W T

    2011-01-01

    We review the differences between bubble formation in champagne and other carbonated drinks, and stout beers which contain a mixture of dissolved nitrogen and carbon dioxide. The presence of dissolved nitrogen in stout beers gives them a number of properties of interest to connoisseurs and physicists. These remarkable properties come at a price: stout beers do not foam spontaneously and special technology, such as the widgets used in cans, is needed to promote foaming. Nevertheless the same mechanism, nucleation by gas pockets trapped in cellulose fibres, responsible for foaming in carbonated drinks is active in stout beers, but at an impractically slow rate. This gentle rate of bubble nucleation makes stout beers an excellent model system for the scientific investigation of the nucleation of gas bubbles. The equipment needed is very modest, putting such experiments within reach of undergraduate laboratories. Finally we consider the suggestion that a widget could be constructed by coating the inside of a beer...

  6. Foams in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsden, S.S.

    1986-07-01

    In 1978 a literature search on selective blocking of fluid flow in porous media was done by Professor S.S. Marsden and two of his graduate students, Tom Elson and Kern Huppy. This was presented as SUPRI Report No. TR-3 entitled ''Literature Preview of the Selected Blockage of Fluids in Thermal Recovery Projects.'' Since then a lot of research on foam in porous media has been done on the SUPRI project and a great deal of new information has appeared in the literature. Therefore we believed that a new, up-to-date search should be done on foam alone, one which would be helpful to our students and perhaps of interest to others. This is a chronological survey showing the development of foam flow, blockage and use in porous media, starting with laboratory studies and eventually getting into field tests and demonstrations. It is arbitrarily divided into five-year time periods. 81 refs.

  7. Evaluation of Toxicological Effects of an Aqueous Extract of Shells from the Pecan Nut Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch and the Possible Association with Its Inorganic Constituents and Major Phenolic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Luiz Carlos S.; Sousa, Karen; Ambrozio, Mariana L.; de Almeida, Aline; dos Santos, Carla Eliete I.; Dias, Johnny F.; Allgayer, Mariangela C.; dos Santos, Marcela S.; Pereira, Patrícia; Picada, Jaqueline N.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Industrial processing of the pecan nut Carya illinoinensis K. Koch generated a large amount of shells, which have been used to prepare nutritional supplements and medicinal products; however, the safe use of shells requires assessment. This study evaluated the toxic, genotoxic, and mutagenic effects of pecan shell aqueous extract (PSAE) and the possible contribution of phenolic compounds, ellagic and gallic acids, and inorganic elements present in PSAE to induce toxicity. Results. Levels of inorganic elements like K, P, Cl, and Rb quantified using the Particle-Induced X-Ray Emission method were higher in PSAE than in pecan shells, while Mg and Mn levels were higher in shells. Mice showed neurobehavioral toxicity when given high PSAE doses (200–2,000 mg kg−1). The LD50 was 1,166.3 mg kg−1. However, PSAE (50–200 mg·kg−1) and the phenolic compounds (10–100 mg·kg−1) did not induce DNA damage or mutagenicity evaluated using the comet assay and micronucleus test. Treatment with ellagic acid (10–100 mg·kg−1) decreased triglyceride and glucose levels, while treatments with PSAE and gallic acid had no effect. Conclusion. Pecan shell toxicity might be associated with high concentrations of inorganic elements such as Mn, Al, Cu, and Fe acting on the central nervous system, besides phytochemical components, suggesting that the definition of the safe dose should take into account the consumption of micronutrients. PMID:27525021

  8. Space Time Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garattini, Remo

    In the context of a model of space-time foam, made by N wormholes we discuss the possibility of having a foam formed by different configurations. An equivalence between Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-Anti-de Sitter wormholes in terms of Casimir energy is shown. An argument to discriminate which configuration could represent a foamy vacuum coming from Schwarzschild black hole transition frequencies is used. The case of a positive cosmological constant is also discussed. Finally, a discussion involving charged wormholes leads to the conclusion that they cannot be used to represent a ground state of the foamy type.

  9. Long lasting decontamination foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  10. Overview: developmental toxicology: new directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuey, Dana; Kim, James H

    2011-10-01

    Since regulatory agencies began implementing the use of standardized developmental toxicology protocols in the mid-1960s, our knowledge base of embryo-fetal development and technologies for experimentation has grown exponentially. These developmental toxicology protocols were a direct result of the thalidomide tragedy from earlier that decade, when large numbers of women were exposed to the drug and over 10,000 cases of phocomelia resulted. In preventing a recurrence of such tragedies, the testing protocols are immensely successful and the field of toxicology has been dedicated to using them to advance safety and risk assessment of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Recently, our perspectives on toxicity testing have been challenged by a growing awareness that while we have excelled in hazard identification, we are in dire need of improved methodologies for human health risk assessment, particularly with respect to the large numbers of environmental chemicals for which we have little toxicology data and to the growing sentiment that better alternatives to whole animals tests are needed. To provide a forum for scientists, researchers, and regulators, the Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee of the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute organized a 2-day workshop titled "Developmental Toxicology-New Directions" to evaluate lessons learned over the past 30 years and discuss the future of toxicology testing. The following four articles describe different presentations and discussions that were held over the course of those 2 days. PMID:21770024

  11. Fatigue of closed cell foams

    OpenAIRE

    Zenkert, Dan; Shipsha, Andrey; Burman, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    The static properties of foams scale with relative density and scaling can be obtained through various static tests. The same scaling appears to be valid for both crack propagation rates and fatigue properties of the foams. This implies that, once the fatigue behavior of one relative density foam is established, one can predict the fatigue behavior of all other density foams within the same class of materials. This study deals with fatigue of closed cell foams. The main idea is to use a few s...

  12. Fatigue of closed cell foams

    OpenAIRE

    Zenkert, Dan; Shipsha, Andrey; Burman, Magnus

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with fatigue of closed cell foams. The main idea is to use a few simple tests to predict the tension-tension fatigue properties of foams. The required testing consists of crack propagation rate measurements and one tension-tension fatigue test performed at yield stress for the foam. This data can then be combined to construct a synthetic S-N Curve for the foam. Tests on three densities of Divinycell H-grade foam are performed and the results Support this approach. Some prelim...

  13. Sensory and Foaming Properties of Sparkling Cider

    OpenAIRE

    Picinelli, A.M. (Anna); Fernández, Norman; Rodríguez, Roberto; Suárez, Belén

    2012-01-01

    The effect of yeast strain and aging time on the chemical composition, analytical, and sensory foam properties of sparkling ciders has been studied. The analytical foam parameters (foamability, HM; Bikerman coefficient, ∑; and foam stability time, Ts) were significantly influenced by aging and yeast strain. The sensory attributes (initial foam, foam area persistence, bubble size, foam collar, and overall foam quality) improved with aging time. Likewise, the yeast strain positively influenced ...

  14. pH stability and comparative evaluation of ranaspumin-2 foam for application in biochemical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous channels of foam represent a simplified, natural bioreactor on the micro-/nano-scale. Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility and potential application of foams in replicating cellular process in vitro, but no research has been performed to establish a basis for designing stable and biocompatible foam formulations. Our research has been directed specifically to the evaluation of ranaspumin-2 (RSN-2), a frog foam nest protein. The strong surfactant activity of RSN-2 enabled us to produce foams using low protein concentration (1 mg ml−1) over a wide pH range (pH ≥ 3). Importantly, the RSN-2 formulation exhibited the best foam stability at a near neutral pH condition, which shows a potential for application to various biosynthesis applications. Model cellular systems such as liposomes and inactivated A/PR/8/34 influenza virus maintained their physicochemical stability and full hemagglutination activity, indicating biocompatibility of RSN-2 with both cellular membranes and proteins both in bulk solution and in foam. Moreover, the addition of RSN-2 did not exert any deteriorative effects on bacterial cell growth kinetics. In contrast, Tween 20, Triton X-100, and BSA did not show satisfactory performance in terms of foamability, foam stability, physicochemcial stability, and biochemical stability. Although our study has been limited to representative formulations composed of only surfactant molecules, a number of unique advantages make RSN-2 a promising candidate for in vitro foam biosynthesis. (paper)

  15. Foaming in manure based digesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Boe, Kanokwan; Angelidaki, Irini

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion foaming is one of the major problems that occasionally occurred in the Danish full-scale biogas plants, affecting negatively the overall digestion process. The foam is typically formatted in the main biogas reactor or in the pre-storage tank and the entrapped solids in the foam....... Moreover, foaming presents adverse environmental impacts owing to the overflowing of the pre-storage or digester tanks. So far, there has never been thoroughly investigation of foaming problem in manure-based digester, which is the main anaerobic digestion applied in Denmark. The purpose of the present...... study was to identify potential causes of foaming in manure based digesters. Moreover, it was also an aim to investigate possible solutions to counteract foam formation with the use of antifoam agents. Thus, the impact of organic loading rate and content of feeding substrate on anaerobic digestion...

  16. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  17. Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (ACTOR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (ACTOR) is a database on environmental chemicals that is searchable by chemical name and other identifiers, and by...

  18. Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource (AcTOR) is EPA's online aggregator of all the public sources of chemical toxicity data. ACToR aggregates data...

  19. American College of Medical Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Club ACMT Grand Rounds Medical Toxicology LLSA JMT Peer Reviewer Webinar Resident-Medical Student Webinars 2015 Fellows-in-Training Research Webinar Other Enduring Education PEHSU National Classroom Chemical Agents of Opportunity Webinars Podcasts Public Health ...

  20. A construction of novel iron-foam-based calcium phosphate/chitosan coating biodegradable scaffold material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhaohui; Zhang, Liming; Chen, Chao; Liu, Yibo; Wu, Changjun; Dai, Changsong

    2013-04-01

    Slow corrosion rate and poor bioactivity restrict iron-based implants in biomedical application. In this study, we design a new iron-foam-based calcium phosphate/chitosan coating biodegradable composites offering a priority mechanical and bioactive property for bone tissue engineering through electrophoretic deposition (EPD) followed by a conversion process into a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). Tensile test results showed that the mechanical property of iron foam could be regulated through altering the construction of polyurethane foam. The priority coatings were deposited from 40% nano hydroxyapatite (nHA)/ethanol suspension mixed with 60% nHA/chitosan-acetic acid aqueous solution. In vitro immersion test showed that oxidation-iron foam as the matrix decreased the amount of iron implanted and had not influence on the bioactivity of this implant, obviously. So, this method could also be a promising method for the preparation of a new calcium phosphate/chitosan coating on foam construction. PMID:23827538

  1. Behavioral assays in environmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B.

    1979-01-01

    Environmental toxicology is too permeated by questions about how the whole organism functions to abandon intact animals as test systems. Behavior does not participate as a single entity or discipline. It ranges across the total spectrum of functional toxicity, from tenuous subjective complaints to subtle sensory and motor disturbances demanding advanced instrumentation for their evaluation. Three facets of behavioral toxicology that illustrate its breadth of interests and potential contributions are discussed.

  2. Foam-Delivery of Remedial Amendments for Enhanced Vadose Zone Metals and Radionuclides Remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The remediation of metals and radionuclides contamination, such as Cr(VI), Tc-99, and Sr-90 in the U.S. DOE Hanford Site vadose zone is a critical need. Water-based remedial amendments delivery to the deep vadose zone is facing significant technical challenges. Water-based delivery will easily leach out the highly mobile pollutants therefore contaminate the underlying aquifer. Preferential flow of the amendment-laden solution in the vadose zone due to the formation heterogeneity is difficult to overcome, resulting in bypassing of the less permeable zones. Foam has unique transport properties in the vadose zone that enable mitigation on the mobilization of mobile contaminants and enhance the sweeping over heterogeneous systems. Calcium polysulfide (CPS) is a remedial amendment that can be used to reduce and immobilize hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] and other redox-sensitive radionuclides/metals in the vadose zone. The delivery of CPS to the vadose zone using foam and the immobilization of Cr(VI) via reduction by the foam-delivered CPS was investigated in this study. Batch tests were conducted to select the foam-generating CPS-surfactant solutions, to determine the solution foamability and the reducing potential of CPS-containing foams, and to study the influence of foam quality, surfactant concentration, and CPS concentration on foam stability. Column experiments were performed to test the foam delivery of CPS to sediments under conditions similar to field vadose zone, to study the foam transport and interaction with sediments, and to determine the extent of Cr(VI) immobilization using this novel delivery approach. CPS-containing foams with high reducing potential were prepared based on the batch tests. Sediment reduction by foam-delivered CPS was observed in the column studies. Significant mobilization of Cr(VI) from sediments occurred when CPS was delivered in aqueous solution. The Cr(VI) mobilization was minimized when CPS was delivered by foams, resulting in

  3. Intertwined nanocarbon and manganese oxide hybrid foam for high-energy supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Guo, Shirui; Bozhilov, Krassimir N; Yan, Dong; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S

    2013-11-11

    Rapid charging and discharging supercapacitors are promising alternative energy storage systems for applications such as portable electronics and electric vehicles. Integration of pseudocapacitive metal oxides with single-structured materials has received a lot of attention recently due to their superior electrochemical performance. In order to realize high energy-density supercapacitors, a simple and scalable method is developed to fabricate a graphene/MWNT/MnO2 nanowire (GMM) hybrid nanostructured foam, via a two-step process. The 3D few-layer graphene/MWNT (GM) architecture is grown on foamed metal foils (nickel foam) via ambient pressure chemical vapor deposition. Hydrothermally synthesized α-MnO2 nanowires are conformally coated onto the GM foam by a simple bath deposition. The as-prepared hierarchical GMM foam yields a monographical graphene foam conformally covered with an intertwined, densely packed CNT/MnO2 nanowire nanocomposite network. Symmetrical electrochemical capacitors (ECs) based on GMM foam electrodes show an extended operational voltage window of 1.6 V in aqueous electrolyte. A superior energy density of 391.7 Wh kg(-1) is obtained for the supercapacitor based on the GMM foam, which is much higher than ECs based on GM foam only (39.72 Wh kg(-1) ). A high specific capacitance (1108.79 F g(-1) ) and power density (799.84 kW kg(-1) ) are also achieved. Moreover, the great capacitance retention (97.94%) after 13 000 charge-discharge cycles and high current handability demonstrate the high stability of the electrodes of the supercapacitor. These excellent performances enable the innovative 3D hierarchical GMM foam to serve as EC electrodes, resulting in energy-storage devices with high stability and power density in neutral aqueous electrolyte. PMID:23650047

  4. Emulsion stability and rigid foams from styrene or divinylbenzene water-in-oil emulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) provide an attractive route to open cell foams. In this paper, we extend our earlier work to include oil phases comprised of 100% styrene or 100% divinylbenzene. In addition, we have evaluated the effects oil-soluble versus water-soluble polymerization initiators, aqueous-phase salt concentrations, and the degree of cross-linking on the microstructure and compressive properties. Foam cell sizes were found to be inversely related surfactant level, relatively insensitive to increases in the monomer levels, but greatly affected by salt concentration. The best textured foams generally had the best formed cells and the most open microstructure

  5. [Toxicologic blood emergency screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sabine; Manat, Aurélie; Dumont, Benoit; Bévalot, Fabien; Manchon, Monique; Berny, Claudette

    2010-01-01

    In order to overcome the stop marketing by Biorad company of automated high performance liquid chromatograph with UV detection (Remedi), we developed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and to give an approximation of the overdose of molecules frequently encountered in drug intoxications. Therefore two hundred eighty seventeen blood samples were collected over a period of one year and allowed us to evaluate and compare the performance of these two techniques. As identification, GC-MS does not identify all molecules detected by Remedi in 24.2% of cases; there is a lack of sensitivity for opiates and the systematic absence of certain molecules such as betablockers. However, in 75.8% of cases the GC-MS detects all molecules found by Remedi and other molecules such as meprobamate, paracetamol, benzodiazepines and phenobarbital. The concentrations obtained are interpreted in terms of overdose showed 15.7% of discrepancy and 84.3% of concordance between the two techniques. The GC-MS technique described here is robust, fast and relatively simple to implement; the identification is facilitated by macro commands and the semi quantification remains manual. Despite a sequence of cleaning the column after each sample, carryover of a sample to the next remains possible. This technique can be used for toxicologic screening in acute intoxications. Nevertheless it must be supplemented by a HPLC with UV detection if molecules such as betablockers are suspected. PMID:20348049

  6. The extraction of trichlorostannato-rhodium complexes by polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyurethane foam (polyether based) has been found to efficiently extract rhodium from hydrochloric acid solutions containing stannous chloride. The amount of rhodium extracted is significantly influenced by inter alia temperature, acid concentration, the Sn(II):Rh mol ratio and the presence of alkali metal cations. The extraction efficiency is promoted by increased acid concentration and high Sn(II):Rh ratios. The presence of K+ inhibits the extraction or rhodium, while the effect of Li+ and Na+ is small. A series of model urethane compounds (diurethane podands and linear polyurethanes) have been synthesized and characterized. These model compounds allowed the direct determination of the extracted trichlorostannato-rhodium complex anions by 119Sn nmr spectroscopy. The 119Sn nmr study showed the formation of a new rhodium-hydrido complex formulated to be [RhH(SnCl3)4Cl]3-. In the presence of low tin(II) concentrations (Sn(II):Rh = 4:1), [Rh(SnCl3)3Cl3]3- is predominantly extracted by the foam phase. Analysis of the acid-decomposed polyurethane foam phase by atomic absorption spectroscopy and of the model urethane compound phase by 7Li nmr spectroscopy, confirmed the extraction of alkali metal cations from aqueous solutions containing alkali metal salts. It is indicated that the polyether chains of polyurethane foam play a major role in the extraction process, and that the flexibility of the chains influences the efficiency of polyurethane foam as an extractant. The creation of cationic sites within the foam matrix, which facilitate the extraction of the rhodium-tin complex anions, is postulated to occur by protonation of the donor oxygen atoms as well as by chelation of cations such as H3O+, Li+, Na+ and K+ by the polyether chains. A working model for the extraction of the trichlorostannato-rhodium complexes by polyurethane foam is proposed. 79 figs., 51 tabs., 272 refs

  7. A non-foaming proteosurfactant engineered from Ranaspumin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Shelli L; Todd, Jacob; Wurtzler, Elizabeth; Strelez, Carly R; Wendell, David

    2015-09-01

    Advances in biological surfactant proteins have already yielded a diverse range of benefits from dramatically improved survival rates for premature births to artificial photosynthesis. Presented here is the design, development, and analysis of a novel biosurfactant protein we call Surfactant Resisting Foam formatioN (SRFN). Starting with the Tungara frog's foam forming protein Ranaspumin-2, we have engineered a new surfactant protein with a destabilized hinge region to alter the kinetics and equilibrium of the protein structural transition from aqueous globular form to an extended surfactant structure at the air/water interface. SRFN is capable of approximately the same total surface tension reduction, but with the unique property of forming quickly collapsible foams. The difference in foam formation is attributed to the destabilizing glycine substitutions engineered into the hinge region. Surfactants used specifically to increase wettability, such as those used in agricultural applications would benefit from this new proteosurfactant since foamed liquid has greater wind resistance and decreased dispersal. Indeed, given growing concern of organsilicone surfactant effects on declining bee populations, biological surfactant proteins have several unique advantages over more common amphiphiles in that they can be renewably sourced, are environmentally friendly, degrade readily into non-toxic byproducts, and reduce surface tension without deleterious effects on cell membranes. PMID:26117804

  8. Metal Foam Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the ballistic performance of metallic foam sandwich structures with honeycomb structures. Honeycomb sandwich structures, consisting of metallic or composite facesheets and honeycomb cores, are often used in spacecraft construction due to their light-weight and structural stiffness. Honeycomb panels, however, are considered rather poor candidates for protection from micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) particles because the honeycomb channels the debris cloud from MMOD impacts on outer facesheet causing a concentrated load on the second facesheet. Sandwich structures with light-weight, open-cell metallic cores and metal or composite facesheets provide improved MMOD protection because channeling does not occur and because the core is more effective at disrupting hypervelocity impacts then honeycomb. This paper describes hypervelocity impact tests on metallic foam sandwich structures (aluminum and titanium) with metallic facesheets, compare them to equivalent mass and thickness honeycomb panels, based on the results of hypervelocity impact tests.

  9. Shape memory polyurethane foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molded flexible polyurethane (PU foams have been synthesized from polypropylene glycol (PPG with different molecular weights (Mw and functionalities (f, and 2,4/2,6-toluene diisocyanate (TDI-80 with water as blowing agent. It was found that the glassy state properties of the foam mainly depended on the urethane group content while the rubbery state properties on the crosslink density. That is, PPG of low MW and low f (more urethane groups provided superior glass state modulus, strength, density, shape fixity and glass transition temperature (Tg, while that of high Mw and high f (higher crosslink density showed high rubbery modulus and shape recovery. Consequently shape fixity of low Mw PPG decreased from 85 to 72% while shape recovery increased from 52 to 63% as the content of high Mw PPG increased from 0 to 40%.

  10. Shock Hugoniot Measurements in Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petel, Oren; Ouellet, Simon; Frost, David; Higgins, Andrew

    2013-06-01

    Foams are found in a variety of protective equipment, including those used in applications involving high-speed impact and blast waves. Despite their exposure to shock wave loadings, there is a considerable lack of shock Hugoniot data for these materials. Typical characterizations of foams have involved the use of split-Hopkinson pressure bars or quasi-static compression machines to determine the stress-strain relationship in the foams. As such, the elastic-plastic response of foam at intermediate pressure ranges continues to be a source of confusion. In the present study, Photonic Doppler Velocimetry is used to measure the shock Hugoniot of a foam for a comparison to its quasi-static compression curves. The deviation of these two curves will be discussed and compared to common plasticity models used to describe dynamic foam behaviour in the literature.

  11. Studies on the use of surface active agents for the removal of some pollutants from dilute aqueous solutions: foam separation techniques and sorption by sorbents synthesized from Silicious materials and surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing concern towards protection of the environment and optimization of a wide range of industrial processes and activities in both nuclear and non-nuclear fields imposes the need for the development of advanced separation processes in particular for treatment of liquid wastes and effluents.The work presented in this thesis will address the above objective with respect to the removal, from aqueous solutions, of two types of hazardous pollutants: chemical (dyes) and radiological (radionuclides) using two relatively modern separation techniques: ion flotation and adsorption onto a synthesized organo-clay. It will also include the results of treatment of dye-contaminated wastewater and mixed radioactive process wastewater, containing a toxic dye in addition to the radionuclides.The thesis comprises four chapters. Literature on dye separation by (i) ion flotation and (II) adsorption onto organo-clays are reviewed in the introductory section of chapter III and of chapter IV, respectively.

  12. Photon Channelling in Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Schmiedeberg, Michael; Miri, MirFaez; Stark, Holger

    2005-01-01

    Experiments by Gittings, Bandyopadhyay, and Durian [Europhys. Lett.\\ \\textbf{65}, 414 (2004)] demonstrate that light possesses a higher probability to propagate in the liquid phase of a foam due to total reflection. The authors term this observation photon channelling which we investigate in this article theoretically. We first derive a central relation in the work of Gitting {\\em et al.} without any free parameters. It links the photon's path-length fraction $f$ in the liquid phase to the li...

  13. Complications of foam sclerotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavezzi, A; Parsi, K

    2012-03-01

    Foam sclerotherapy may result in drug and/or gas-related complications of a generalized or localized nature. Significant complications include anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions (very rare), deep vein thrombosis (1-3%), stroke (0.01%), superficial venous thrombosis (4.4%), tissue necrosis (variable frequency), oedema (0.5%) and nerve damage (0.2%). Cosmetic complications include telangiectatic matting (15-24%) and pigmentation (10-30%). Patent foramen ovale and other cardio-pulmonary right-to-left shunts seem to play a role in the systemic gas-related complications. In conclusion, foam sclerotherapy is characterized by an overall high degree of safety, though special attention should be given to the embolic and thrombotic complications. Good technique, adequate imaging, general precautions and compliance with post-treatment instructions may help avoid some of the adverse events and an appropriate early intervention may minimize possible sequelae. Higher volumes of sclerosant foam have been attributed to local and distant thrombotic complications and should be avoided. PMID:22312067

  14. Polyimide Foams Offer Superior Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, Erik Weiser and his colleagues in the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch were working with a new substance for fabricating composites for use in supersonic aircraft. The team, however, was experiencing some frustration. Every time they tried to create a solid composite from the polyimide (an advanced polymer) material, it bubbled and foamed. It seemed like the team had reached a dead end in their research - until they had another idea. "We said, This isn t going to work for composites, but maybe we could make a foam out of it," Weiser says. "That was kind of our eureka moment, to see if we could go in a whole other direction. And it worked." Weiser and his colleagues invented a new kind of polyimide foam insulation they named TEEK. The innovation displayed a host of advantages over existing insulation options. Compared to other commercial foams, Weiser explains, polyimide foams perform well across a broad range of temperatures, noting that the NASA TEEK foams provide effective structural insulation up to 600 F and down to cryogenic temperatures. The foam does not burn or off-gas toxic fumes, and even at -423 F - the temperature of liquid hydrogen - the material stays flexible. The inventors could produce the TEEK foam at a range of densities, from 0.5 pounds per cubic foot up to 20 pounds per cubic foot, making the foam ideal for a range of applications, including as insulation for reusable launch vehicles and for cryogenic tanks and lines. They also developed a unique, friable balloon format for manufacturing the foam, producing it as hollow microspheres that allowed the foam to be molded and then cured into any desired shape - perfect for insulating pipes of different sizes and configurations. The team s originally unplanned invention won an "R&D 100" award, and a later form of the foam, called LaRC FPF-44 (Spinoff 2009), was named "NASA Invention of the Year" in 2007.

  15. Cancer and Toxicology Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cancer and Toxicology Section is concerned with the investigation of the mechanisms by which chemicals, radiation, and viruses cause the changes broadly identified as cancer. In addition, the study of mechanisms has been extended to include the nontumorigenic effects of various agents associated with fossil energy and fuels. Research in molecular genetics of carcinogenesis focuses largely on the transposon properties of the genomes of retroviruses. The transposon structure of the DNA genomes of endogenous murine N-tropic and B-tropic type C retroviruses is being elucidated, and their chromosomal location mapped in hamster-mouse cell hybrids. A model of the mechanism of retrovirus induction by radiation and chemicals is being developed, and experiments have established that compounds such as hydroxyurea act as inducer. There is the possibility that transposition of sequences of this endogenous virus may be linked to leukemogenesis. Research in regulation of gene expression aims at defining in molecular terms the mechanisms determining expression of specific genes, how these are regulated by hormones, and the events responsible for dysfunction of gene expression in cancer. In corollary work, a library of cloned cDNAs specific for products of genes of special interest to regulation is being developed. Improvement of reversed-phase chromatography as a means of isolating bacterial plasmids and restriction fragments of DNA is underway. Newly developed techniques permit the isolation of supercoiled plasmid DNA directly from bacterial extracts. The technology has been developed recently for the photosynthetic growth of the chemo-autotrophic organism Rhodospirillum rubrum and the enzyme ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase has been produced in quantity

  16. Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increased focus on energy savings and waste recycling foam glass materials have gained increased attention. The production process of foam glass is a potential low-cost recycle option for challenging waste, e.g. CRT glass and industrial waste (fly ash and slags). Foam glass is used as thermal insulating material in building and chemical industry. The large volume of gas (porosity 90 – 95%) is the main reason of the low thermal conductivity of the foam glass. If gases with lower the...

  17. Polyurethane Foams with Pyrimidine Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kania Ewelina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligoetherols based on pyrimidine ring were obtained upon reaction of barbituric acid with glycidol and alkylene carbonates. These oligoetherols were then used to obtain polyurethane foams in the reaction of oligoetherols with isocyanates and water. The protocol of foam synthesis was optimized by the choice of proper kind of oligoetherol and synthetic composition. The thermal resistance was studied by dynamic and static methods with concomitant monitoring of compressive strength. The polyurethane foams have similar physical properties as the classic ones except their enhanced thermal resistance. They stand long-time heating even at 200°C. Moreover thermal exposition of foams results generally in increase of their compressive strength.

  18. Fiber reinforced hybrid phenolic foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Amit

    Hybrid composites in recent times have been developed by using more than one type of fiber reinforcement to bestow synergistic properties of the chosen filler and matrix and also facilitating the design of materials with specific properties matched to end use. However, the studies for hybrid foams have been very limited because of problems related to fiber dispersion in matrix, non uniform mixing due to presence of more than one filler and partially cured foams. An effective approach to synthesize hybrid phenolic foam has been proposed and investigated here. Hybrid composite phenolic foams were reinforced with chopped glass and aramid fibers in varied proportions. On assessing mechanical properties in compression and shear several interesting facts surfaced but overall hybrid phenolic foams exhibited a more graceful failure, greater resistance to cracking and were significantly stiffer and stronger than foams with only glass and aramid fibers. The optimum fiber ratio for the reinforced hybrid phenolic foam system was found to be 1:1 ratio of glass to aramid fibers. Also, the properties of hybrid foam were found to deviate from rule of mixture (ROM) and thus the existing theories of fiber reinforcement fell short in explaining their complex behavior. In an attempt to describe and predict mechanical behavior of hybrid foams a statistical design tool using analysis of variance technique was employed. The utilization of a statistical model for predicting foam properties was found to be an appropriate tool that affords a global perspective of the influence of process variables such as fiber weight fraction, fiber length etc. on foam properties (elastic modulus and strength). Similar approach could be extended to study other fiber composite foam systems such as polyurethane, epoxy etc. and doing so will reduce the number of experimental iterations needed to optimize foam properties and identify critical process variables. Diffusivity, accelerated aging and flammability

  19. Nickel foam-supported polyaniline cathode prepared with electrophoresis for improvement of rechargeable Zn battery performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yang; Zhu, Derong; Si, Shihui; Li, Degeng; Wu, Sen

    2015-06-01

    Porous nickel foam is used as a substrate for the development of rechargeable zinc//polyaniline battery, and the cathode electrophoresis of PANI microparticles in non-aqueous solution is applied to the fabrication of Ni foam supported PANI electrode, in which the corrosion of the nickel foam substrate is prohibited. The Ni foam supported PANI cathode with high loading is prepared by PANI electrophoretic deposition, and followed by PANI slurry casting under vacuum filtration. The electrochemical charge storage performance for PANI material is significantly improved by using nickel foam substrate via the electrophoretic interlayer. The specific capacity of the nickel foam-PANI electrode with the electrophoretic layer is higher than the composite electrode without the electrophoretic layer, and the specific capacity of PANI supported by Ni foam reaches up to 183.28 mAh g-1 at the working current of 2.5 mA cm-2. The present electrophoresis deposition method plays the facile procedure for the immobilization of PANI microparticles onto the surface of non-platinum metals, and it becomes feasible to the use of the Ni foam supported PANI composite cathode for the Zn/PANI battery in weak acidic electrolyte.

  20. Strong, Water-Durable, and Wet-Resilient Cellulose Nanofibril-Stabilized Foams from Oven Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervin, Nicholas Tchang; Johansson, Erik; Larsson, Per A; Wågberg, Lars

    2016-05-11

    Porous materials from cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) have been prepared using Pickering foams from aqueous dispersions. Stable wet foams were first produced using surface-modified CNFs as stabilizing particles. To better maintain the homogeneous pore structure of the foam after drying, the foams were dried in an oven on a liquid-filled porous ceramic frit. The cell structure was studied by scanning electron microscopy and liquid porosimetry, the mechanical properties were studied by compression testing, and the liquid absorption capacity was determined both with liquid porosimetry and by soaking in water. By controlling the charge density of the CNFs, it was possible to prepare dry foams with different densities, the lowest density being 6 kg m(-3), that is, a porosity of 99.6%. For a foam with a density of 200 kg m(-3), the compressive Young's modulus was 50 MPa and the energy absorption to 70% strain was 2.3 MJ m(-3). The use of chemically modified CNFs made it possible to prepare cross-linked foams with water-durable and wet-resilient properties. These foams absorbed liquid up to 34 times their own weight and were able to release this liquid under compression and to reabsorb the same amount when the pressure was released. PMID:27070532

  1. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database (DART)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A bibliographic database on the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) with references to developmental and reproductive toxicology...

  2. Effect of osteoblastic culture conditions on the structure of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foam scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, A. S.; Zhu, G.; Morris, G. E.; Meszlenyi, R. K.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) foams are an osteoconductive support that holds promise for the development of bone tissue in vitro and implantation into orthopedic defects. Because it is desirable that foams maintain their shape and size, we examined a variety of foams cultured in vitro with osteoblastic cells. Foams were prepared with different porosities and pore sizes by the method of solvent casting/porogen leaching using 80, 85, and 90 wt% NaCl sieved with particle sizes of 150-300 and 300-500 microm and characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry. Foams seeded with cells were found to have volumes after 7 days in static culture that decreased with increasing porosity: the least porous exhibited no change in volume while the most porous foams decreased by 39 +/- 10%. In addition, a correlation was observed between decreasing foam volume after 7 days in culture and decreasing internal surface area of the foams prior to seeding. Furthermore, foams prepared with the 300-500 microm porogen had lower porosities, greater mean wall thicknesses between adjacent pores, and larger volumes after 7 days in culture than those prepared with the smaller porogen. Two culture conditions for maintaining cells, static and agitated (in a rotary vessel), were found to have similar influences on foam size, cell density, and osteoblastic function for 7 and 14 days in culture. Finally, we examined unseeded foams in aqueous solutions of pH 3.0, 5.0, and 7.4 and found no significant decrease in foam size with degradation. This study demonstrates that adherent osteoblastic cells may collapse very porous PLGA foams prepared by solvent casting/particulate leaching: a potentially undesirable property for repair of orthopedic defects.

  3. Foam fractionation in recovery of captopril

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avishek Mandal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxic effect caused due to the presence of pharmaceuticals in waste water has been recognized as one of the emerging issue in the presentday environmental pollution. The aim of the present work is to investigate the feasibility of foam fractionation technique in batch mode for the recovery of captopril from dilute aqueous solution and to compare the performance of drug recovery from two feed solutions, one containing pure drug and the other containing formulated drug (tablet. Captopril is an anionic compound used as antihypertensive drug. Presence of this drug can cause aquatic toxicity. The performance of recovery was investigated as a function of gas velocity, pH of feed solution, collector-colligend ratio (j, colligend (drug concentration, feed volume, column height and aliphatic chain length of the collector (surface active agent and finally, optimum condition had been determined. Percentage recovery was enhanced to 90% (approx for pure drug at the optimum pH value of 3.75, j = 4 at an optimum gas velocity. The optimum gas velocity depends on feed volume. Percentage recovery (Rp decreases with increase of chain length. Enrichment ratio (Er was enhanced with the increase of foam height in the column. Rp and Er were found lower in formulated type of captopril in comparison to the pure drug due to the presence of other soluble ingredients in tablet.

  4. Foaming behaviour of polymer-surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the effect of a non-ionic amphiphilic polymer (PEG-100 stearate also called Myrj 59) on the foaming behaviour of aqueous solutions of an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate or SDS). The SDS concentration was kept fixed while the Myrj 59 concentration was varied. Measurements of foamability, surface tension and electrical conductivity were carried out. The results show two opposite effects depending on the polymer concentration: foamability is higher when the Myrj 59 concentration is low; however, it decreases considerably when the polymer concentration is increased. This behaviour is due to the polymer adsorption at the air/liquid interface at lower polymer concentrations, and to the formation of a polymer-surfactant complex in the bulk at higher concentrations. The results are confirmed by surface tension and electrical conductivity measurements, which are interpreted in terms of the microstructure of the polymer-surfactant solutions. The observed behaviour is due to the amphiphilic nature of the studied polymer. The increased hydrophobicity of Myrj 59, compared to that of water-soluble polymers like PEG or PEO, increases its 'reactivity' towards SDS, i.e. the strength of its interaction with this anionic surfactant. Our results show that hydrophobically modified polymers have potential applications as additives in order to control the foaming properties of surfactant solutions

  5. Preparation and Stability of Inorganic Solidified Foam for Preventing Coal Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botao Qin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic solidified foam (ISF is a novel material for preventing coal fires. This paper presents the preparation process and working principle of main installations. Besides, aqueous foam with expansion ratio of 28 and 30 min drainage rate of 13% was prepared. Stability of foam fluid was studied in terms of stability coefficient, by varying water-slurry ratio, fly ash replacement ratio of cement, and aqueous foam volume alternatively. Light microscope was utilized to analyze the dynamic change of bubble wall of foam fluid and stability principle was proposed. In order to further enhance the stability of ISF, different dosage of calcium fluoroaluminate was added to ISF specimens whose stability coefficient was tested and change of hydration products was detected by scanning electron microscope (SEM. The outcomes indicated that calcium fluoroaluminate could enhance the stability coefficient of ISF and compact hydration products formed in cell wall of ISF; naturally, the stability principle of ISF was proved right. Based on above-mentioned experimental contents, ISF with stability coefficient of 95% and foam expansion ratio of 5 was prepared, which could sufficiently satisfy field process requirements on plugging air leakage and thermal insulation.

  6. Pulmonary toxicology of respirable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 44 papers presented in these proceedings that deal will radioactive particles. The last paper (Stannard) in the proceedings is an historical review of the field of inhalation toxicology and is not included in the analytics

  7. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, V.J.; Groten, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures

  8. Toxicology Selective Toxicity dan Test

    OpenAIRE

    Mansyur

    2002-01-01

    Toxicology adalah pemahaman-pemahaman mengenai effek-effek bahan kimia yang merugikan bagi organisme. Dari definisi tersebut, jelas terdapat unsur-unsur bahan kimia dan organisme, dimana didalam kedua unsur-unsur ini terdapat istilah-istilah toksisitas dan animal test-test. Tulisan ini bermaskud membicarakan mengenai selective toxicity dan animal toxicity tetst. kedokteran-mansyur5

  9. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, V J; Groten, J P

    2002-06-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures have gradually substituted trial-and-error approaches, improving the insight into the testability of joint action and interaction of constituents of mixtures. The acquired knowledge has successfully been used to evaluate the safety of combined exposures and complex mixtures such as, for example, the atmosphere at hazardous waste sites, drinking water disinfection by-products, natural flavouring complexes, and the combined intake of food additives. To consolidate the scientific foundation of mixture toxicology, studies are in progress to revisit the biological concepts and mathematics underlying formulas for low-dose extrapolation and risk assessment of chemical mixtures. Conspicuous developments include the production of new computer programs applicable to mixture research (CombiTool, BioMol, Reaction Network Modelling), the application of functional genomics and proteomics to mixture studies, the use of nano-optochemical sensors for in vivo imaging of physiological processes in cells, and the application of optical sensor micro- and nano-arrays for complex sample analysis. Clearly, the input of theoretical biologists, biomathematicians and bioengineers in mixture toxicology is essential for the development of this challenging branch of toxicology into a scientific subdiscipline of full value. PMID:11983277

  10. Surprises and omissions in toxicology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rašková, H.; Zídek, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2004), S94-S96. ISSN 1210-7778. [Inderdisciplinary Czech-Slovak Toxicological Conference /8./. Praha, 03.09.2004-05.09.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5008914 Keywords : bacterial toxins Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry

  11. Dielectric and Radiative Properties of Sea Foam at Microwave Frequencies: Conceptual Understanding of Foam Emissivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter W. Gaiser

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Foam fraction can be retrieved from space-based microwave radiometric data at frequencies from 1 to 37 GHz. The retrievals require modeling of ocean surface emissivity fully covered with sea foam. To model foam emissivity well, knowledge of foam properties, both mechanical and dielectric, is necessary because these control the radiative processes in foam. We present a physical description of foam dielectric properties obtained from the foam dielectric constant including foam skin depth; foam impedance; wavelength variations in foam thickness, roughness of foam layer interfaces with air and seawater; and foam scattering parameters such as size parameter, and refraction index. Using these, we analyze the scattering, absorption, reflection and transmission in foam and gain insights into why volume scattering in foam is weak; why the main absorption losses are confined to the wet portion of the foam; how the foam impedance matching provides the transmission of electromagnetic radiation in foam and maximizes the absorption; and what is the potential for surface scattering at the foam layers boundaries. We put all these elements together and offer a conceptual understanding for the high, black-body-like emissivity of foam floating on the sea surface. We also consider possible scattering regimes in foam.

  12. Toxicological evaluation of organic residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de la Peña de Torres

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available It is pointed out the importance of short term assays for the characterization of organic residues, specially some methods for toxicological, mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic evaluation (Vibrio fischeri, Salmonella typhimurium and Allium cepa, used in the characterization of environmental complex mixtures lixiviates. These methods take part together with other bioassays in the evaluation by toxicological identification (VIT, which allows the evaluation of other ecotoxicological effects: a bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri; b germination and root length of Lepidum sativum; c root length of Allium cepa and Tradescantia sp.; d inhibition of the mobility of Daphnia magna; and e abnormalities in the development of Oryzias latipes, or medaka fish. All these assays take part in the EU battery of bioassays, applied to discriminate and select between those environmental matrixes which must be subject to more complex and specific chemical characterizations.We make a review of the methods for toxicological evaluation, used for the characterization of chemical compounds or complex mixtures, as well as the use of its results for the human and environmental risk assessment. This evaluation consists, in short, of the identification of dangers, evaluation of dose-response ratio, evaluation of exposure and risk characterization, resulting in the analysis, use and communication of this risk. It is emphasized the high predictive value for carcinogenicity of some of these bioassays.It is shown the utility of short term assays for the evaluation of substances, products and complex mixtures, which would contribute to improve the toxicological knowledge of a greater number substances. This is a vital need in the EU, due to the lack of complete toxicological information of about the 70% of the 106.000 existing and used substances.It is emphasized the great value that mutagenicity assays represent inside the toxicological tests in the basic level, which

  13. Cylinder overpack phenolic foam shock testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical shock absorbability of phenolic foam made from reagent grade chemicals, specified in US Atomic Energy Commission (Department of Energy) Material and Equipment Specification SP-9 is compared to that of foam made from substituted commercial grade chemicals. The testing reported herein compares mechanical properties of the foams. The test results demonstrate the equivalence in the shock absorbability of the two foam types

  14. Production of lightweight foam glass (invited talk)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass production allows low cost recycling of postconsumer glass and industrial waste materials as foaming agent or as melt resource. Foam glass is commonly produced by utilising milled glass mixed with a foaming agent. The powder mixture is heat-treated to around 10^3.7 – 10^6 Pa s, whi...

  15. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  16. Drainage in a rising foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazhgur, Pavel; Rio, Emmanuelle; Rouyer, Florence; Pigeonneau, Franck; Salonen, Anniina

    2016-01-21

    Rising foams created by continuously blowing gas into a surfactant solution are widely used in many technical processes, such as flotation. The prediction of the liquid fraction profile in such flowing foams is of particular importance since this parameter controls the stability and the rheology of the final product. Using drift flux analysis and recently developed semi-empirical expressions for foam permeability and osmotic pressure, we build a model predicting the liquid fraction profile as a function of height. The theoretical profiles are very different if the interfaces are considered as mobile or rigid, but all of our experimental profiles are described by the model with mobile interfaces. Even the systems with dodecanol are well known to behave as rigid in forced drainage experiments. This is because in rising foams the liquid fraction profile is fixed by the flux at the bottom of the foam. Here the foam is wet with higher permeability and the interfaces are not in equilibrium. These results demonstrate once again that it is not only the surfactant system that controls the mobility of the interface, but also the hydrodynamic problem under consideration. For example liquid flow through the foam during generation or in forced drainage is intrinsically different. PMID:26554500

  17. The Emergence of Systematic Review in Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Martin L; Betts, Kellyn; Beck, Nancy B; Cogliano, Vincent; Dickersin, Kay; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Freeman, James; Gray, George; Hartung, Thomas; McPartland, Jennifer; Rooney, Andrew A; Scherer, Roberta W; Verloo, Didier; Hoffmann, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    The Evidence-based Toxicology Collaboration hosted a workshop on "The Emergence of Systematic Review and Related Evidence-based Approaches in Toxicology," on November 21, 2014 in Baltimore, Maryland. The workshop featured speakers from agencies and organizations applying systematic review approaches to questions in toxicology, speakers with experience in conducting systematic reviews in medicine and healthcare, and stakeholders in industry, government, academia, and non-governmental organizations. Based on the workshop presentations and discussion, here we address the state of systematic review methods in toxicology, historical antecedents in both medicine and toxicology, challenges to the translation of systematic review from medicine to toxicology, and thoughts on the way forward. We conclude with a recommendation that as various agencies and organizations adapt systematic review methods, they continue to work together to ensure that there is a harmonized process for how the basic elements of systematic review methods are applied in toxicology. PMID:27208075

  18. Effect of Associative Polymers on the Foaming Properties of Surfactant Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Alfredo; Robles, Emmanuel; Acuña, Heriberto; Gamez, Rogelio; Maldonado, Amir

    2006-03-01

    Aqueous foams are materials which have many industrial applications. Their stability is affected by three mechanisms: bubble coalescence (film rupture), coarsening (gas diffusion) and drainage (gravity-driven liquid flow). The aim of this work is to obtain some insight into the effect of associative polymers on the foamability, foam stability and drainage of surfactant solutions. The foams were produced by air bubbling and by the turbulent mixing method. The surfactant is SDS and the associative polymers studied are HEUR and POE-Stearate. We studied the effect of polymer concentration for each macromolecule. The results show that two opposite effects are present when the polymer concentration is increased: for low polymer concentrations, foamability and foam stability is higher than for high concentrations. Results are discussed in terms of the properties of the solution: surface tension, electrical conductivity, bulk viscosity, etc.

  19. Foam decontamination of the pneumatic transfer network at La Hague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turchat, J.P.; Fournel, B. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    The foam cleaning process is based on the filling of an equipment with an aqueous foam containing suitable chemical reagents and, if necessary, its recirculation through a recycling loop. The major advantage of the technique is the reduction of the amount of liquid thus reducing the secondary waste production. Moreover, due to its high viscosity, the foam bed is able to carry solid contamination out of the equipment without needing a further dissolution of the solid deposit. The process has been recently experimented in La Hague on a 22 metres pipe. The pipe is part of the Pneumatic Transfer Network, which basic function is to transfer the small jugs containing liquid samples, from production points to laboratories in order to analyse them. As some contamination may incidentally exit from the jugs, it is necessary to dismantle sections of the pipe or to decontaminate the internal surfaces of the pipe essentially consisting of aluminium. The total length of the pipe network has been estimated in the range of 80 km. The CEA is working on the decontamination of the network since 1994 in association with COGEMA. A new process enabling the circulation of the foam under depression has been implemented. Furthermore, a mobile installation has been worked out by the CEA for this demonstration operation. (author)

  20. Foam decontamination of the pneumatic transfer network at La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foam cleaning process is based on the filling of an equipment with an aqueous foam containing suitable chemical reagents and, if necessary, its recirculation through a recycling loop. The major advantage of the technique is the reduction of the amount of liquid thus reducing the secondary waste production. Moreover, due to its high viscosity, the foam bed is able to carry solid contamination out of the equipment without needing a further dissolution of the solid deposit. The process has been recently experimented in La Hague on a 22 metres pipe. The pipe is part of the Pneumatic Transfer Network, which basic function is to transfer the small jugs containing liquid samples, from production points to laboratories in order to analyse them. As some contamination may incidentally exit from the jugs, it is necessary to dismantle sections of the pipe or to decontaminate the internal surfaces of the pipe essentially consisting of aluminium. The total length of the pipe network has been estimated in the range of 80 km. The CEA is working on the decontamination of the network since 1994 in association with COGEMA. A new process enabling the circulation of the foam under depression has been implemented. Furthermore, a mobile installation has been worked out by the CEA for this demonstration operation. (author)

  1. Synthesis of nanoparticles with frog foam nest proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microemulsions provide an efficient means of synthesizing monodispersed nanoparticles. Recent studies have demonstrated potential problems of surfactant due to the interaction with nanoparticles/precursors. To solve the problems, various types of chemical surfactants have been tested, but natural biosurfactants have not received a great deal of attention in engineering application. Here, we report the formation of microemulsions using frog foam nest protein, ranaspumin-2 (RSN-2), based on the hypothesis that RSN-2 assembles at the water–oil interface as a result of conformational change into an extended form. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies showed that RSN-2 undergoes a reversible transition between extended and globular conformation in foams/microemulsions and aqueous solution, respectively. Microemulsions were formulated with RSN-2 to synthesize 8–10 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by mixing precursor-containing microemulsions with base-containing microemulsions. RSN-2 proteins were recovered from microemulsions and found to be recycled to make foams and microemulsions. Fluorescence spectroscopic analyses showed that RSN-2 maintained its mechanical agitation-induced amphiphilicity throughout multiple foaming/defoaming processes. These results suggest that conformational flexibility and structural stability of RSN-2 in aggressive environments enable the recycled use of RSN-2, elucidating the cost-effective advantage.

  2. Synthesis of nanoparticles with frog foam nest proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyo-Jick, E-mail: choihc@ucmail.uc.edu; Ebersbacher, Charles F. [University of Cincinnati, School of Energy, Environmental, Biological and Medical Engineering (United States); Myung, Nosang V. [University of California, Riverside, Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering (United States); Montemagno, Carlo D., E-mail: montemcd@ucmail.uc.edu [University of Cincinnati, School of Energy, Environmental, Biological and Medical Engineering (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Microemulsions provide an efficient means of synthesizing monodispersed nanoparticles. Recent studies have demonstrated potential problems of surfactant due to the interaction with nanoparticles/precursors. To solve the problems, various types of chemical surfactants have been tested, but natural biosurfactants have not received a great deal of attention in engineering application. Here, we report the formation of microemulsions using frog foam nest protein, ranaspumin-2 (RSN-2), based on the hypothesis that RSN-2 assembles at the water-oil interface as a result of conformational change into an extended form. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies showed that RSN-2 undergoes a reversible transition between extended and globular conformation in foams/microemulsions and aqueous solution, respectively. Microemulsions were formulated with RSN-2 to synthesize 8-10 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by mixing precursor-containing microemulsions with base-containing microemulsions. RSN-2 proteins were recovered from microemulsions and found to be recycled to make foams and microemulsions. Fluorescence spectroscopic analyses showed that RSN-2 maintained its mechanical agitation-induced amphiphilicity throughout multiple foaming/defoaming processes. These results suggest that conformational flexibility and structural stability of RSN-2 in aggressive environments enable the recycled use of RSN-2, elucidating the cost-effective advantage.

  3. Solvent stimulated actuation of polyurethane-based shape memory polymer foams using dimethyl sulfoxide and ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, A. J.; Weems, A. C.; Hasan, S. M.; Nash, L. D.; Monroe, M. B. B.; Maitland, D. J.

    2016-07-01

    Solvent exposure has been investigated to trigger actuation of shape memory polymers (SMPs) as an alternative to direct heating. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol (EtOH) to stimulate polyurethane-based SMP foam actuation and the required solvent concentrations in water for rapid actuation of hydrophobic SMP foams. SMP foams exhibited decreased T g when submerged in DMSO and EtOH when compared to water submersion. Kinetic DMA experiments showed minimal or no relaxation for all SMP foams in water within 30 min, while SMP foams submerged in EtOH exhibited rapid relaxation within 1 min of submersion. SMP foams expanded rapidly in high concentrations of DMSO and EtOH solutions, where complete recovery over 30 min was observed in DMSO concentrations greater than 90% and in EtOH concentrations greater than 20%. This study demonstrates that both DMSO and EtOH are effective at triggering volume recovery of polyurethane-based SMP foams, including in aqueous environments, and provides promise for use of this actuation technique in various applications.

  4. Novel biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite foams for removing heavy-metals from polluted water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila, M.; Sanchez-Salcedo, S.; Cicuendez, M.; Izquierdo-Barba, I. [Inorganic and BioInorganic Chemistry Department, Pharmacy Faculty, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Plaza de Ramon y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, CIBER-BBN (Spain); Vallet-Regi, Maria, E-mail: vallet@farm.ucm.es [Inorganic and BioInorganic Chemistry Department, Pharmacy Faculty, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Plaza de Ramon y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, CIBER-BBN (Spain)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} 3D-macroporous biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) foams as potential devices for the treatment of heavy metal ions. {yields} HA stable foams coated with biopolymers. {yields} Feasible advance in development of new, easy to handle and low cost water purifying methods. - Abstract: 3D-macroporous biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) foams have been developed as potential devices for the treatment of lead, cadmium and copper contamination of consumable waters. These foams have exhibited a fast and effective ion metal immobilization into the HA structure after an in vitro treatment mimicking a serious water contamination case. To improve HA foam stability at contaminated aqueous solutions pH, as well as its handling and shape integrity the 3D-macroporous foams have been coated with biopolymers polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatine cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (G/Glu). Metal ion immobilization tests have shown higher and fast heavy metals captured as function of hydrophilicity rate of biopolymer used. After an in vitro treatment, foam morphology integrity is guaranteed and the uptake of heavy metal ions rises up to 405 {mu}mol/g in the case of Pb{sup 2+}, 378 {mu}mol/g of Cu{sup 2+} and 316 {mu}mol/g of Cd{sup 2+}. These novel materials promise a feasible advance in development of new, easy to handle and low cost water purifying methods.

  5. Novel biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite foams for removing heavy-metals from polluted water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → 3D-macroporous biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) foams as potential devices for the treatment of heavy metal ions. → HA stable foams coated with biopolymers. → Feasible advance in development of new, easy to handle and low cost water purifying methods. - Abstract: 3D-macroporous biopolymer-coated hydroxyapatite (HA) foams have been developed as potential devices for the treatment of lead, cadmium and copper contamination of consumable waters. These foams have exhibited a fast and effective ion metal immobilization into the HA structure after an in vitro treatment mimicking a serious water contamination case. To improve HA foam stability at contaminated aqueous solutions pH, as well as its handling and shape integrity the 3D-macroporous foams have been coated with biopolymers polycaprolactone (PCL) and gelatine cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (G/Glu). Metal ion immobilization tests have shown higher and fast heavy metals captured as function of hydrophilicity rate of biopolymer used. After an in vitro treatment, foam morphology integrity is guaranteed and the uptake of heavy metal ions rises up to 405 μmol/g in the case of Pb2+, 378 μmol/g of Cu2+ and 316 μmol/g of Cd2+. These novel materials promise a feasible advance in development of new, easy to handle and low cost water purifying methods.

  6. EFFICIENT NANO-SCALE ADMIXTURE FOR FOAM STABILITY IMPROVEMENT OF CELLULAR CONCRETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishina Аnna Nikolaevna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors present their methodology of synthesis of a nano-scale additive designated for the stabilization of synthetic foaming agents. The nano-scale admixture is composed of iron hydroxide (III sol and aqueous sodium hydro silicates (water glass. Besides the above method, the topological structural model of the nano-scale additive is proposed. The additive stability was assessed upon its one-day storage (with the foaming agent added, and the assessment data are provided in the article. The authors have discovered that it is advisable to use an iron chloride solution in the concentration of 1 % to manufacture the iron hydroxide (III sol. The authors have also discovered that the rate of jellification goes up in the process of injecting the foaming agent into the foam that contains the nano-scale admixture developed by the authors. Dependence between the amount of sodium hydro silicate and the viscosity of the system composed of the water glass and the sol of iron hydroxide (III is examined in detail. The authors have identified that the average water glass viscosity curve demonstrates an extreme nature. The additive is used for the stabilization of the foam generated by synthetic foaming agents. The injection of the proposed additive improves foam stability. It is noteworthy that this positive result is free from any negative side effects.

  7. Viscous Control of the Foam Glass Process

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    The production of foam glass as heat insulating material is an important industrial process because it enables low-cost recycling of glass waste from a variety of chemical compositions. Optimization of the foaming process of new glass waste compositions is time consuming, since many factors affect the foaming process such as temperature, particle size, type and concentration of foaming agent. The foaming temperature is one of the key factors, because even small temperature changes can affect ...

  8. Composite carbon foam electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  9. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Judith W.; Montoya, Orelio J.; Rand, Peter B.; Willan, Vernon O.

    1984-01-01

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO.sub.2 in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  10. Raman investigation of tannin foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Tannin-based organic foams are new foam materials which are environmentally friendly, resistant to re and inexpensive, and intended to be used for building insulation, and also as water absorber or shock absorber. These foams can be produced via an acid catalyzed polycondensation reaction between condensed flavonoids and furfuryl alcohol. Several studies deal with the mechanism involved in this process, but some ambiguities still persist. Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique suitable for the non-destructive chemical investigation of polymers, allowing to determine the presence of functional groups within a polymer through the interaction of laser light with the vibrational modes of the molecules setting up the sample under investigation. By this spectroscopic technique we have characterized the tannin-based foams and compared their spectral signature with that of tannins, and of polymerized furfuryl alcohol. Similarities and differences to the spectral features of carbonaceous material are discussed. (author)

  11. Microcellular foams via phase separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of wide variety of processes for making plastic foams shows that phase separation processes for polymers from solutions offers the most viable methods for obtaining rigid plastic foams which met the physical requirements for fusion target designs. Four general phase separation methods have been shown to give polymer foams with densities less than 0.1 g/cm3 and cell sizes of 30μm or less. These methods involve the utilization of non-solvent, chemical or thermal cooling processes to achieve a controlled phase separation wherein either two distinct phases are obtained where the polymer phase is a continuous phase or two bicontinuous phases are obtained where both the polymer and solvent are interpenetrating, continuous, labyrinthine phases. Subsequent removal of the solvent gives the final foam structure

  12. Continuous production of microcellular foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiangmin

    Continuous production of microcellular foams, characterized by cell size smaller than 10 mum and cell density larger than 109 cells/cm 3, was studied using supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) as the foaming agent. Microcellular foams of polystyrene and polystyrene nanocomposites were successfully produced on a two-stage single screw extruder. The contraction flow in the extrusion die was simulated with the FLUENT fluid dynamics computational code to predict profiles of pressure, temperature, viscosity, and velocity. The nucleation onset was determined based on the pressure profile and equilibrium solubility. It was shown that a high CO 2 concentration or a high foaming temperature induces an earlier nucleation near the die entrance. The pressure profile and the position of nucleation onset were correlated to cell nucleation and growth, which helps understand the effects of operating conditions on cell structure. To perform the simulation, viscosity and solubility of the CO2/polystyrene system were characterized. Sanchez-Lacombe equation of state was applied to represent the phase equilibrium. Effects of temperature, pressure, and CO 2 content on the shear viscosity were explained using the free volume theory. Systematic experiments were performed to verify effects of three key operating conditions: CO2 content, pressure drop or pressure drop rate, and foaming temperature, on the foam cell structure. Experimental results were compared with simulations to gain insight into the foaming process. Studies exhibit that a higher pressure drop or pressure drop rate results in smaller cells and greater cell density. Below the CO2 solubility, cell size decreases and cell density increases with an increase of CO2 concentration. A high CO2 concentration favors producing open cell foams. Die temperature affects both cell size and cell structure (open or closed). Combining nano-clay compounding with supercritical CO2 foaming provides a new technique for the design and control of

  13. Toxicologic methods: controlled human exposures.

    OpenAIRE

    Utell, M J; Frampton, M W

    2000-01-01

    The assessment of risk from exposure to environmental air pollutants is complex, and involves the disciplines of epidemiology, animal toxicology, and human inhalation studies. Controlled, quantitative studies of exposed humans help determine health-related effects that result from breathing the atmosphere. The major unique feature of the clinical study is the ability to select, control, and quantify pollutant exposures of subjects of known clinical status, and determine their effects under id...

  14. Toxicological Assessment of Noxious Inhalants

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinsasser, N. H.; Sassen, A. W.; Wallner, B. W.; Staudenmaier, R.; Harréus, U. A.; Richter, E

    2004-01-01

    In the past centuries mankind has been exposed to various forms of air pollution not only at his occupational but also in his social environment. He mainly gets exposed with these pollutants through the respiratory organs and partially absorbs them into the body. Many of these airborne substances can be harmful for humans and some of them may account for tumorigenic effects. The following essay describes the main features of toxicological assessment of inhalative environmental and workplace x...

  15. Supercapacitors based on carbon foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1993-11-09

    A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc-1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m[sup 2]/g-1000 m[sup 2]/g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved. 9 figures.

  16. Composite and Nanocomposite Metal Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Duarte; José M. F. Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Open-cell and closed-cell metal foams have been reinforced with different kinds of micro- and nano-sized reinforcements to enhance their mechanical properties of the metallic matrix. The idea behind this is that the reinforcement will strengthen the matrix of the cell edges and cell walls and provide high strength and stiffness. This manuscript provides an updated overview of the different manufacturing processes of composite and nanocomposite metal foams.

  17. Surface Forces in Foam Films

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liguang

    2006-01-01

    Fundamental studies of surface forces in foam films are carried out to explain the stability of foams and froths in froth flotation. The thin film pressure balance (TFPB) technique was used to study the surface forces between air bubbles in water from equilibrium film thickness and dynamic film thinning measurements. The results were compared with the disjoining pressure predicted from the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The contribution from the non-DLVO force was estimated b...

  18. Equipment compatibility and logistics assessment for containment foam deployment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McRoberts, Vincent M.; Martell, Mary-Alena; Jones, Joseph A.

    2005-09-01

    The deployment of the Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) is evolving toward a lean and mobile response team. As a result, opportunities to support more rapid mobilization are being investigated. This study investigates three specific opportunities including: (1) the potential of using standard firefighting equipment to support deployment of the aqueous foam concentrate (AFC-380); (2) determining the feasibility and needs for regional staging of equipment to reduce the inventory currently mobilized during a JTOT response; and (3) determining the feasibility and needs for development of the next generation AFC-380 to reduce the volume of foam concentrate required for a response. This study supports the need to ensure that requirements for alternative deployment schemes are understood and in place to support improved response activities.

  19. Equipment compatibility and logistics assessment for containment foam deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deployment of the Joint Technical Operations Team (JTOT) is evolving toward a lean and mobile response team. As a result, opportunities to support more rapid mobilization are being investigated. This study investigates three specific opportunities including: (1) the potential of using standard firefighting equipment to support deployment of the aqueous foam concentrate (AFC-380); (2) determining the feasibility and needs for regional staging of equipment to reduce the inventory currently mobilized during a JTOT response; and (3) determining the feasibility and needs for development of the next generation AFC-380 to reduce the volume of foam concentrate required for a response. This study supports the need to ensure that requirements for alternative deployment schemes are understood and in place to support improved response activities

  20. Stability of metallic foams studied under microgravity

    CERN Document Server

    Wuebben, T; Banhart, J; Odenbach, S

    2003-01-01

    Metal foams are prepared by mixing a metal powder and a gas-releasing blowing agent, by densifying the mix to a dense precursor and finally foaming by melting the powder compact. The foaming process of aluminium foams is monitored in situ by x-ray radioscopy. One observes that foam evolution is accompanied by film rupture processes which lead to foam coalescence. In order to elucidate the importance of oxides for foam stability, lead foams were manufactured from lead powders having two different oxide contents. The two foam types were generated on Earth and under weightlessness during parabolic flights. The measurements show that the main function of oxide particles is to prevent coalescence, while their influence on bulk viscosity of the melt is of secondary importance.

  1. Stability of metallic foams studied under microgravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal foams are prepared by mixing a metal powder and a gas-releasing blowing agent, by densifying the mix to a dense precursor and finally foaming by melting the powder compact. The foaming process of aluminium foams is monitored in situ by x-ray radioscopy. One observes that foam evolution is accompanied by film rupture processes which lead to foam coalescence. In order to elucidate the importance of oxides for foam stability, lead foams were manufactured from lead powders having two different oxide contents. The two foam types were generated on Earth and under weightlessness during parabolic flights. The measurements show that the main function of oxide particles is to prevent coalescence, while their influence on bulk viscosity of the melt is of secondary importance

  2. The flow of a foam in a two-dimensional porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géraud, Baudouin; Jones, Siân. A.; Cantat, Isabelle; Dollet, Benjamin; Méheust, Yves

    2016-02-01

    Foams have been used for decades as displacing fluids for enhanced oil recovery and aquifer remediation, and more recently, for remediation of the vadose zone, in which case foams carry chemical amendments. Foams are better injection fluids than aqueous solutions due to their low sensitivity to gravity and because they are less sensitive to permeability heterogeneities, thus allowing a more uniform sweep. The latter aspect results from their peculiar rheology, whose understanding motivates the present study. We investigate foam flow through a two-dimensional porous medium consisting of circular obstacles positioned randomly in a horizontal transparent Hele-Shaw cell. The local foam structure is recorded in situ, which provides a measure of the spatial distribution of bubble velocities and sizes at regular time intervals. The flow exhibits a rich phenomenology including preferential flow paths and local flow nonstationarity (intermittency) despite the imposed permanent global flow rate. Moreover, the medium selects the bubble size distribution through lamella division-triggered bubble fragmentation. Varying the mean bubble size of the injected foam, its water content, and mean velocity, we characterize those processes systematically. In particular, we measure the spatial evolution of the distribution of bubble areas, and infer the efficiency of bubble fragmentation depending on the various control parameters. We furthermore show that the distributions of bubble sizes and velocities are correlated. This study sheds new light on the local rheology of foams in porous media and opens the way toward quantitative characterization of the relationship between medium geometry and foam flow properties. It also suggests that large-scale models of foam flows in the subsurface should account for the correlation between bubble sizes and velocities.

  3. Determination of foam stability for decontamination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forming and foam stability have done that their auxiliary devices of foam level control . Foam forming simulation its mixing from 1 L water and detergent 5, 10, 20, 40, 50 grams. Each of the foam added the de contaminant of EDTA or oxalic acids about 5 grams. The result from experiment that on the composition of 40 gram detergent and water is 1000 ml is finding setting time and foam stability is 317 seconds and 1458 seconds. Addition of 5 gram EDTA or 5 gram Oxalic Acids to that compositions are found setting time 285 seconds and 263 seconds and foam stability are 1314 seconds and 1312 seconds. (author)

  4. Development of drilling foams for geothermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, W.J.; Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; Chenevert, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of foam drilling fluids in geothermal applications is addressed. A description of foams - what they are, how they are used, their properties, equipment required to use them, the advantages and disadvantages of foams, etc. - is presented. Geothermal applications are discussed. Results of industry interviews presented indicate significant potential for foams, but also indicate significant technical problems to be solved to achieve this potential. Testing procedures and results of tests on representative foams provide a basis for work to develop high-temperature foams.

  5. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Rossen

    2005-03-16

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research is to lay the groundwork for more-applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media.

  6. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO2 balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

  7. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, F.; Schneider, A.; Elsner, P.

    2014-05-01

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO2 balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength).

  8. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, F., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Schneider, A., E-mail: florian.rapp@ict.fraunhofer.de, E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT (Germany); Elsner, P., E-mail: peter.elsner@ict.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT, Germany and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO{sub 2} balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

  9. Transport of particles in liquid foams: a multi-scale approach; Etude multi-echelles du transport de particules dans les mousses liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louvet, N.

    2009-11-15

    Foam is used for the decontamination of radioactive tanks since foam is a system that has a large surface for a low amount of liquid and as a consequence requires less water to be decontaminated. We study experimentally different particle transport configurations in fluid micro-channels network (Plateau borders) of aqueous foam. At first, foam permeability is measured at the scale of a single channel and of the whole foam network for 2 soap solutions known for their significant different interface mobility. Experimental data are well described by a model that takes into account the real geometry of the foam and by considering a constant value of the Boussinesq number of each soap solutions. Secondly, the velocity of one particle convected in a single foam channel is measured for different particle/channel aspect ratio. For small aspect ratio, a counterflow that is taking place at the channel's corners slows down the particle. A recirculation model in the channel foam films is developed to describe this effect. To do this, the Gibbs elasticity is introduced. Then, the threshold between trapped and released of one particle in liquid foam are carried out. This threshold is deduced from hydrodynamic and capillary forces equilibrium. Finally, the case of a clog foam node is addressed. (author)

  10. Discussion on Improvement of Toxicological Pathology Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RenJin

    2003-01-01

    Toxicological pathology plays a key role in drug safety assessment. To enhance the research level of toxicological pathology, the following stud-ies should be carried out urgently: setting up a standard operation procedure (SOP) for toxico-logical pathology assessment; emphasizing on immunotoxicology evaluation; adopting a new ex-periment model of replacement, featuring high speed and reliability; introducing new techniques and new models in toxicological mechanism re-search; and establishing a new appraisal system to screen innovative drug and rapid and high pre-cision methods for early security assessment, de-tection and measurement.

  11. Foaming of mixtures of pure hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. V.; Woods, W. W.

    1950-01-01

    Mixtures of pure liquid hydrocarbons are capable of foaming. Nine hydrocarbons were mixed in pairs, in all possible combinations, and four proportions of each combination. These mixtures were sealed in glass tubes, and the foaming was tested by shaking. Mixtures of aliphatic with other aliphatic hydrocarbons, or of alkyl benzenes with other alkyl benzenes, did not foam. Mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl benzenes did foam. The proportions of the mixtures greatly affected the foaming, the maximum foaming of 12 of 20 pairs being at the composition 20 percent aliphatic hydrocarbon, 80 percent alkyl benzene. Six seconds was the maximum foam lifetime of any of these mixtures. Aeroshell 120 lubricating oil was fractionated into 52 fractions and a residue by extraction with acetone in a fractionating extractor. The index of refraction, foam lifetime, color, and viscosity of these fractions were measured. Low viscosity and high index fractions were extracted first. The viscosity of the fractions extracted rose and the index decreased as fractionation proceeded. Foam lifetimes and color were lowest in the middle fractions. Significance is attached to the observation that none of the foam lifetimes of the fractions or residue is as high as the foam lifetime of the original Aeroshell, indicating that the foaming is not due to a particular foaming constituent, but rather to the entire mixture.

  12. Changes in porosity of foamed aluminum during solidification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to control the porosity of foamed aluminum, the changes in the porosity of foamed aluminum melt in the processes of foaming and solidification, the distribution of the porosity of foamed aluminum, and the relationship between them were studied. The results indicated that the porosity of foamed aluminum coincides well with the foaming time.

  13. Engineering the Quantum Foam

    CERN Document Server

    Cahill, R T

    2005-01-01

    In 1990 Alcubierre, within the General Relativity model for space-time, proposed a scenario for `warp drive' faster than light travel, in which objects would achieve such speeds by actually being stationary within a bubble of space which itself was moving through space, the idea being that the speed of the bubble was not itself limited by the speed of light. However that scenario required exotic matter to stabilise the boundary of the bubble. Here that proposal is re-examined within the context of the new modelling of space in which space is a quantum system, viz a quantum foam, with on-going classicalisation. This model has lead to the resolution of a number of longstanding problems, including a dynamical explanation for the so-called `dark matter' effect. It has also given the first evidence of quantum gravity effects, as experimental data has shown that a new dimensionless constant characterising the self-interaction of space is the fine structure constant. The studies here begin the task of examining to w...

  14. Graduate Training in Toxicology in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robens, J. F.; Buck, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are an American Board of Veterinary Toxicology survey and evaluation of the training resources available in graduate programs in toxicology located in colleges of veterinary medicine. Regulatory toxicology, number of toxicologists needed, and curriculum are also discussed. (JMD)

  15. Numerical modeling of foam flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid foam flows are involved in numerous applications, e.g. food and cosmetics industries, oil extraction, nuclear decontamination. Moreover, their study leads to fundamental knowledge: as it is easier to manipulate and analyse, foam is used as a model material to understand the flow of emulsions, polymers, pastes, or cell aggregates, all of which display both solid and liquid behaviour. Systematic experiments performed by Francois Graner et al. provide precise data that emphasize the non Newtonian properties of the foam. Meanwhile, Pierre Saramito proposed a visco-elasto-plastic continuous tensorial model, akin to predict the behaviour of the foam. The goal of this thesis is to understand this complex behaviour, using these two elements. We have built and validated a resolution algorithm based on a bidimensional finite elements methods. The numerical solutions are in excellent agreement with the spatial distribution of all measured quantities, and confirm the predictive capabilities of the model. The dominant parameters have been identified and we evidenced the fact that the viscous, elastic, and plastic contributions to the flow have to be treated simultaneously in a tensorial formalism. We provide a substantial contribution to the understanding of foams and open the path to realistic simulations of complex VEP flows for industrial applications. (author)

  16. Stray-field NMR diffusion q-space diffraction imaging of monodisperse coarsening foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kieron; Burbidge, Adam; Apperley, David; Hodgkinson, Paul; Markwell, Fraser A; Topgaard, Daniel; Hughes, Eric

    2016-08-15

    The technique of stray field diffusion NMR is adapted to study the diffusion properties of water in monodisperse wet foams. We show for the first time, that the technique is capable of observing q-space diffusion diffraction peaks in monodisperse aqueous foams with initial bubble sizes in the range of 50-85μm. The position of the peak maximum can be correlated simply to the bubble size in the foam leading to a technique that can investigate the stability of the foam over time. The diffusion technique, together with supplementary spin-spin relaxation analysis of the diffusion data is used to follow the stability and coarsening behaviour of monodisperse foams with a water fraction range between 0.24 and 0.33. The monodisperse foams remain stable for a period of hours in terms of the initial bubble size. The duration of this stable period correlates to the initial size of the bubbles. Eventually the bubbles begin to coarsen and this is observed in changes in the position of the diffusion diffraction maxima. PMID:27179175

  17. Metal-doped organic foam and method of making same. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinde, J.A.

    Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for producing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

  18. THE STRUCTURE CONTROL OF ALUMINUM FOAMS PRODUCED BY POWDER COMPACTED FOAMING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.H. You; F. Wang; L.C. Wang

    2004-01-01

    A new technique, powder compact foaming process for the production of aluminum foams has been studied in this article. According to this method, the aluminum powder is mixed with a powder foaming agent (TiH2). Subsequent to mixing, the powder blend is hot compacted to obtain a dense semi-finished product. Upon heating to temperatures within the range of the melting point, the foaming agent decomposes to evolve gas and the semi-finished product expands into a porous cellular aluminum. Foaming process is the key in this method. Based on experiments, the foaming characteristics were mainly analyzed and discussed. Experiments show that the aluminum-foam with closed pores and a uniform cell structure of high porosity can be obtained using this method by adjusting the foaming parameters: the content of foaming agent and foaming temperature.

  19. Does water foam exist in microgravity?

    OpenAIRE

    Caps, H.; Delon, G.; Vandewalle, N.; Guillermic, R. M.; Pitois, Olivier; Biance, A. L.; Saulnier, L.; Yazhgur, P.; RIO, E.; Salonen, A.; Langevin, D.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid foams are omnipresent in everyday life, but little is understood about their properties. On Earth, the liquid rapidly drains out of the foam because of gravity, leading to rupture of the thin liquid films between bubbles. Several questions arise: are liquid foams more stable in microgravity environments? Can pure liquids, such as water, form stable foams in microgravity whereas they do not on Earth? In order to answer these questions, we performed experiments both in parabolic flights ...

  20. Low-density, salt-loaded foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment was conducted at LLL that required low-density, fine-celled foams uniformly loaded with rubidium. Foams meeting these requirements were produced by impregnating foams made from polyacrylonitrile with rubidium fluoride. Foams with densities from 0.025 to 0.4 g/cm3 were prepared and loaded with 0.002 to 0.20 g/cm3 of rubidium fluoride

  1. Structure design of and experimental research on a two-stage laval foam breaker for foam fluid recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-song; Cao, Pin-lu; Yin, Kun

    2015-07-01

    Environmental, economical and efficient antifoaming technology is the basis for achievement of foam drilling fluid recycling. The present study designed a novel two-stage laval mechanical foam breaker that primarily uses vacuum generated by Coanda effect and Laval principle to break foam. Numerical simulation results showed that the value and distribution of negative pressure of two-stage laval foam breaker were larger than that of the normal foam breaker. Experimental results showed that foam-breaking efficiency of two-stage laval foam breaker was higher than that of normal foam breaker, when gas-to-liquid ratio and liquid flow rate changed. The foam-breaking efficiency of normal foam breaker decreased rapidly with increasing foam stability, whereas the two-stage laval foam breaker remained unchanged. Foam base fluid would be recycled using two-stage laval foam breaker, which would reduce the foam drilling cost sharply and waste disposals that adverse by affect the environment. PMID:26387358

  2. Sulfur-35 foam flotation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A kinetic is studied of the foam flotation of the trace amounts of 35S with the use of quartenary ammonium salts (QAS), namely alkylbenzyldimethylammoniumchloride and alkyltrimethylammoniumchloride with respect to the pH value of the solution. The rate of the carrying-out QAS and 35S to the foam layer depends on the solution ionic strength, the rate of the isotope extraction being highest and that of the collector - the lowest in the neutral region of pH. The kinetics of the 35S and QAS foam flotation can be described by the first-order reaction equations. The process rate constants have been calculated at various pH values

  3. Various Facets of Spacetime Foam

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Y Jack

    2011-01-01

    Spacetime foam manifests itself in a variety of ways. It has some attributes of a turbulent fluid. It is the source of the holographic principle. Cosmologically it may play a role in explaining why the energy density has the critical value, why dark energy/matter exists, and why the effective dynamical cosmological constant has the value as observed. Astrophysically the physics of spacetime foam helps to elucidate why the critical acceleration in modified Newtonian dynamics has the observed value; and it provides a possible connection between global physics and local galactic dynamics involving the phenomenon of flat rotation curves of galaxies and the observed Tully-Fisher relation. Spacetime foam physics also sheds light on nonlocal gravitational dynamics.

  4. Foam formation in low gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Mcmanus, Samuel P.; Matthews, John; Patel, Darayas

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus that produced the first polyurethane foam in low gravity has been described. The chemicals were mixed together in an apparatus designed for operation in low gravity. Mixing was by means of stirring the chemicals with an electric motor and propeller in a mixing chamber. The apparatus was flown on Consort 1, the first low-gravity materials payload launched by a commercial rocket launch team. The sounding rocket flight produced over 7 min of low gravity during which a polyurethane spheroidal foam of approximately 2300 cu cm was formed. Photographs of the formation of the foam during the flight show the development of the spheroidal form. This begins as a small sphere and grows to approximately a 17-cm-diam spheroid. The apparatus will be flown again on subsequent low-gravity flights.

  5. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass.

  6. Foam: The "Right Stuff" for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Imi-Tech Corporation, in cooperation with Johnson Space Center, introduced the Solimide AC-500 series of polyimide foam products designed to meet the needs of the aircraft/aerospace industry. These foams accomodate the requirements of state-of-the-art insulation systems. Solimide polyimide foams are currently used in defense, industrial and commercial applications.

  7. Recycle Glass in Foam Glass Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The foam glass industry turn recycle glass into heat insulating building materials. The foaming process is relative insensitive to impurities in the recycle glass. It is therefore considered to play an important role in future glass recycling. We show and discuss trends of use of recycled glasses...... in foam glass industry and the supply sources and capacity of recycle glass....

  8. Toxicological Assessment of Noxious Inhalants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinsasser, N. H.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past centuries mankind has been exposed to various forms of air pollution not only at his occupational but also in his social environment. He mainly gets exposed with these pollutants through the respiratory organs and partially absorbs them into the body. Many of these airborne substances can be harmful for humans and some of them may account for tumorigenic effects.The following essay describes the main features of toxicological assessment of inhalative environmental and workplace xenobiotics. The essay also explains relevant characteristics and limit values of noxious compounds and gases and depicts modern testing methods. To this end, emphasis is given on methods characterizing the different stages of tumorigenic processes. Various test systems have been developed which can be used in vivo, ex vivo or in vitro. They are to a great part based on the evidence of changes in DNA or particular genes of cells. Among others they have highlighted the impact of interindividual variability on enzymatic activation of xenobiotics and on susceptibility of the host to tumor diseases.Unfortunately, for many inhalative environmental noxious agents no sufficient risk profiles have been developed. The completion of these profiles should be the goal of toxicological assessment in order to allow reasonable socioeconomic or individual-based risk reduction.

  9. Toxicological assessment of noxious inhalants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, N H; Sassen, A W; Wallner, B W; Staudenmaier, R; Harréus, U A; Richter, E

    2004-01-01

    In the past centuries mankind has been exposed to various forms of air pollution not only at his occupational but also in his social environment. He mainly gets exposed with these pollutants through the respiratory organs and partially absorbs them into the body. Many of these airborne substances can be harmful for humans and some of them may account for tumorigenic effects.The following essay describes the main features of toxicological assessment of inhalative environmental and workplace xenobiotics. The essay also explains relevant characteristics and limit values of noxious compounds and gases and depicts modern testing methods. To this end, emphasis is given on methods characterizing the different stages of tumorigenic processes. Various test systems have been developed which can be used in vivo, ex vivo or in vitro. They are to a great part based on the evidence of changes in DNA or particular genes of cells. Among others they have highlighted the impact of interindividual variability on enzymatic activation of xenobiotics and on susceptibility of the host to tumor diseases.Unfortunately, for many inhalative environmental noxious agents no sufficient risk profiles have been developed. The completion of these profiles should be the goal of toxicological assessment in order to allow reasonable socioeconomic or individual-based risk reduction. PMID:22073045

  10. Evolution of toxicology information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassom, J.S.; Lu, P.Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Society today is faced with new health risk situations that have been brought about by recent scientific and technical advances. Federal and state governments are required to assess the many potential health risks to exposed populations from the products (chemicals) and by-products (pollutants) of these advances. Because a sound analysis of any potential health risk should be based on the use of relevant information, it behooves those individuals responsible for making the risk assessments to know where to obtain needed information. This paper reviews the origins of toxicology information systems and explores the specialized information center concept that was proposed in 1963 as a means of providing ready access to scientific and technical information. As a means of illustrating this concept, the operation of one specialized information center (the Environmental Mutagen Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) will be discussed. Insights into how toxicological information resources came into being, their design and makeup, will be of value to those seeking to acquire information for risk assessment purposes. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  11. Foam formation and mitigation in a three-phase gas-liquid-particulate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Krishna; Nikolov, Alex; Wasan, Darsh

    2006-11-16

    Foaming is of great concern in a number of industrial processes involving three-phase gas-liquid-finely divided solid systems such as those encountered in the vitrification of highly radioactive nuclear waste slurries and sludges. Recent work has clearly shown that the surface properties of the particles such as hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity or biphilicity (i.e. partially wetted by water) are the cause of foamability and foam stability. The literature data on particles causing foaminess and foam stability in the absence of any surfactant are rather scarce. This paper presents experimental observations on aqueous foams with polyhedral structures containing over 90% air generated due to the presence of irregularly-shaped fine crystalline particles of sodium chloride which were modified into amphiphilic particles by physical adsorption of a cationic surfactant. Cross-polarized light microscopy was used to visualize the physical adsorption of the surfactant on the crystal surface. It is shown that these biphilic or amphiphilic particles attach to the air bubble surface and prevent the coalescence of bubbles, thereby extending the life of the foam. The foaming power of solid particles increases with an increase in the concentration of amphiphilic particles, and a maximum in foaminess is observed which is due to two competing effects. Amphiphilic particles promote foamability by attachment to the bubble surfaces as individual particles and foam inhibition due to the clustering or flocculation of particles in the bulk at high particle concentrations. We studied the adsorption of amphiphilic particles at a planar air-water surface and found that the degree of foamability correlates well with the particle coverage (i.e. adsorption density) at the air-liquid surface. An exploratory study was also conducted using an antifoam recently developed by IIT researchers to mitigate foaming in particle-laden gas-liquid systems. PMID:16997269

  12. Vacuum applications of metal foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1980-01-01

    Several vacuum applications of copper foams in the density range 2-5% and pore sizes of 0.5-0.7 mm are discussed, such as a foreline hydrocarbon trap in a mechanical vacuum pump, a molecular-flow resistor, a diffuser, and a water injector. Other suggested applications include the use of foam copper in the form of an externally heated plug to remove traces of oxygen from inert gases bled into a vacuum system through a stainless steel line and the use of the porous surface for minimizing release of secondary electrons from electrodes in the path of charged particle beams.

  13. Thermal Expansion of Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    Closed cell foams are often used for thermal insulation. In the case of the Space Shuttle, the External Tank uses several thermal protection systems to maintain the temperature of the cryogenic fuels. A few of these systems are polyurethane, closed cell foams. In an attempt to better understand the foam behavior on the tank, we are in the process of developing and improving thermal-mechanical models for the foams. These models will start at the microstructural level and progress to the overall structural behavior of the foams on the tank. One of the key properties for model characterization and verification is thermal expansion. Since the foam is not a material, but a structure, the modeling of the expansion is complex. It is also exacerbated by the anisoptropy of the material. During the spraying and foaming process, the cells become elongated in the rise direction and this imparts different properties in the rise direction than in the transverse directions. Our approach is to treat the foam as a two part structure consisting of the polymeric cell structure and the gas inside the cells. The polymeric skeleton has a thermal expansion of its own which is derived from the basic polymer chemistry. However, a major contributor to the thermal expansion is the volume change associated with the gas inside of the closed cells. As this gas expands it exerts pressure on the cell walls and changes the shape and size of the cells. The amount that this occurs depends on the elastic and viscoplastic properties of the polymer skeleton. The more compliant the polymeric skeleton, the more influence the gas pressure has on the expansion. An additional influence on the expansion process is that the polymeric skeleton begins to breakdown at elevated temperatures and releases additional gas species into the cell interiors, adding to the gas pressure. The fact that this is such a complex process makes thermal expansion ideal for testing the models. This report focuses on the thermal

  14. Quantum foam and topological strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We find an interpretation of the recent connection found between topological strings on Calabi-Yau threefolds and crystal melting: Summing over statistical mechanical configuration of melting crystal is equivalent to a quantum gravitational path integral involving fluctuations of Kaehler geometry and topology. We show how the limit shape of the melting crystal emerges as the average geometry and topology of the quantum foam at the string scale. The geometry is classical at large length scales, modified to a smooth limit shape dictated by mirror geometry at string scale and is a quantum foam at area scales ∼ gsα'

  15. Process for epoxy foam production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celina, Mathias C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-08-23

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 60 wt % and 90 wt %, a maleic anhydride of between approximately 1 wt % and approximately 30 wt %, and an imidazole catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt % where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-30 wt % maleic anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the maleic anhydride compound molten, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  16. OpenFOAM for beginners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedyalkov, Ivaylo; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    OpenFOAM has gained significant popularity in academia and industry, but is still not widely introduced to CFD novices - e.g., undergraduate students. This is likely due to the steep learning curve of the software. A relatively short tutorial was developed to introduce students to the basic features of OpenFOAM, allowing them to modify and create simulations, and to better understand other online resources. The tutorial has been successfully introduced to students working on undergraduate capstone projects at the University of New Hampshire and parts of it were presented at a tech-camp for K-12 students.

  17. Shielding effects of concrete and foam external pipeline coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research project began in July, 1986 and was completed in December, 1990. The objectives of the research were: To determine whether concrete and urethane foam-barrier coatings shield the pipe from cathodic-protection current, To determine whether the barrier coatings also effectively shield the pipe from the environment, thus reducing the need for cathodic protection, To determine what levels of cathodic protection will be required to overcome shielding, and To establish what types of barrier coatings are most compatible with obtaining adequate levels of cathodic protection. To achieve these objectives, laboratory experiments were conducted with five barrier coating materials. These materials were (1) 2-lb/ft3, closed-cell urethane foam, (2) 3-lb/ft3, closed-cell urethane foam, (3) concrete barrier material, (4) glass fiber-reinforced concrete barrier material, and (5) sand. The barrier materials, whole and intentionally cracked, were applied to the bare, FBE-coated, and tape-coated steel specimens. The specimens were tested in aqueous electrolytes at room temperature and 140 degree F with no protection, protection to -0.95 V, and overprotection to -1.2 V (Cu/CuSO4)

  18. Foam Assisted WAG, Snorre Revisit with New Foam Screening Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spirov, Pavel; Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Khan, Arif

    2012-01-01

    This study deals with simulation model of Foam Assisted Water Alternating Gas (FAWAG) method that had been implemented to two Norwegian Reservoirs. Being studied on number of pilot projects, the method proved successful, but Field Scale simulation was never understood properly. New phenomenologic...

  19. Processing and properties of advanced metallic foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Alan Harold

    Since the development of the first aluminum foams in the middle of the 20th century [178], great advances have been made in the processing and fundamental understanding of metallic foams. As a result of these advances, metallic foams are now penetrating a number of applications where their unique suite of properties makes them superior to solid materials, such as lightweight structures, packaging and impact protection, and filtration and catalysis [3]. The purpose of this work is to extend the use of metallic foams in such applications by expanding their processing to include more sophisticated base alloys and architectures. The first four chapters discuss replacement of conventional crystalline metal foams with ones made from high-strength, low-melting amorphous metals, a substitution that offers potential for achieving mechanical properties superior to those of the best crystalline metal foams, without sacrificing the simplicity of processing methods made for low-melting crystalline alloys. Three different amorphous metal foams are developed in these chapters, and their structures and properties characterized. It is shown for the first time that amorphous metal foams, due to stabilization of shear bands during bending of their small strut-like features, are capable of compressive ductility comparable to that of ductile crystalline metal foams. A two-fold improvement in mechanical energy absorption relative to crystalline aluminum foams is shown experimentally to result from this stabilization. The last two chapters discuss modifications in foam processing that are designed to introduce controllable and continuous gradients in local foam density, which should improve mass efficiency by mimicking the optimized structures found in natural cellular materials [64], as well as facilitate the bonding and joining of foams with solid materials in higher-order structures. Two new processing methods are developed, one based on replication of nonuniformly-compressed polymer

  20. Fluid Physics of Foam Evolution and Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref, H.; Thoroddsen, S. T.; Sullivan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    The grant supported theoretical, numerical and experimental work focused on the elucidation of the fluid physics of foam structure, evolution and flow. The experimental work concentrated on these subject areas: (a) Measurements of the speed of reconnections within a foam; (b) statistics of bubble rearrangements; and (c) three-dimensional reconstruction of the foam structure. On the numerical simulation and theory side our efforts concentrated on the subjects: (a) simulation techniques for 2D and 3D foams; (b) phase transition in a compressible foam; and (c) TCP structures.

  1. Amorphous Fe-based metal foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A foam synthesis method that takes advantage of the viscous high-temperature liquid state of Fe-based bulk glass-forming alloys to produce amorphous steel foam is introduced. Zirconium hydride is utilized as a foaming agent taking advantage of the low hydrogen solubility of these glass-forming alloys. Amorphous foams with porosities up to 65% were produced having homogenous cellular morphologies that exhibit cell-size uniformity. Even though intracellular solid regions as thin as a few micrometers are detected, on a global scale the cellular structure is determined to be incapable of alleviating the foam from the brittle nature of the monolithic glass

  2. Viscosity and stability of ultra-high internal phase CO2-in-water foams stabilized with surfactants and nanoparticles with or without polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zheng; Worthen, Andrew; Qajar, Ali; Robert, Isaiah; Bryant, Steven L; Huh, Chun; Prodanović, Maša; Johnston, Keith P

    2016-01-01

    To date, relatively few examples of ultra-high internal phase supercritical CO2-in-water foams (also referred to as macroemulsions) have been observed, despite interest in applications including "waterless" hydraulic fracturing in energy production. The viscosities and stabilities of foams up to 0.98 CO2 volume fraction were investigated in terms of foam bubble size, interfacial tension, and bulk and surface viscosity. The foams were stabilized with laurylamidopropyl betaine (LAPB) surfactant and silica nanoparticles (NPs), with and without partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM). For foams stabilized with mixture of LAPB and NPs, fine ∼70 μm bubbles and high viscosities on the order of 100 cP at>0.90 internal phase fraction were stabilized for hours to days. The surfactant reduces interfacial tension, and thus facilitates bubble generation and decreases the capillary pressure to reduce the drainage rate of the lamella. The LAPB, which is in the cationic protonated form, also attracts anionic NPs (and anionic HPAM in systems containing polymer) to the interface. The adsorbed NPs at the interface are shown to slow down Ostwald ripening (with or without polymer added) and increase foam stability. In systems with added HPAM, the increase in the bulk and surface viscosity of the aqueous phase further decreases the lamella drainage rate and inhibits coalescence of foams. Thus, the added polymer increases the foam viscosity by threefold. Scaling law analysis shows the viscosity of 0.90 volume fraction foams is inversely proportional to the bubble size. PMID:26414421

  3. Effect of Chemical Reagents in Foam Decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decontamination foam comprises at least one surfactant to generate the foam and one or more chemical reactants to achieve the dissolution of the contaminants at the solid surface. In order to improve the efficiency of decontamination foam, the present study attempts to find the optimum condition of chemical reagents to the foaming solution. This paper deals with understanding the effects of chemical reagents involved in foam decontamination efficiency, evaluation of side effect on foam stability and finally the improvement brought by formulation science. Basic experiments using the nanoparticle-based complex fluid decontamination foam have been performed in order to development of decontamination foam technology. Results show that in the case of coexistence of chemical reagents, for the purpose of the good foam ability and foam stability, it is necessary to increase the concentration of surfactant. In corrosion test, metal materials including carbon steel, stainless steel 304, aluminum, inconel 600 and cupper, generally corrosion solubility percent in nitric acid solution were higher than in phosphoric acid solution. Bench-scale testing was used to evaluate the efficacy of three decontamination formulations on contaminant carbon steel component of dry oven. The results shows decontamination factor was in the range of 6.1∼13.4. Results suggest that our foam formulations have a feasibility potential to removal of about 83∼93% total radioactivity in contaminant

  4. Effect of Chemical Reagents in Foam Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Han Beom; Yoonm Inho; Jung, Chonghun; Choi, Wangkyu [Korea Atomic Energy research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The decontamination foam comprises at least one surfactant to generate the foam and one or more chemical reactants to achieve the dissolution of the contaminants at the solid surface. In order to improve the efficiency of decontamination foam, the present study attempts to find the optimum condition of chemical reagents to the foaming solution. This paper deals with understanding the effects of chemical reagents involved in foam decontamination efficiency, evaluation of side effect on foam stability and finally the improvement brought by formulation science. Basic experiments using the nanoparticle-based complex fluid decontamination foam have been performed in order to development of decontamination foam technology. Results show that in the case of coexistence of chemical reagents, for the purpose of the good foam ability and foam stability, it is necessary to increase the concentration of surfactant. In corrosion test, metal materials including carbon steel, stainless steel 304, aluminum, inconel 600 and cupper, generally corrosion solubility percent in nitric acid solution were higher than in phosphoric acid solution. Bench-scale testing was used to evaluate the efficacy of three decontamination formulations on contaminant carbon steel component of dry oven. The results shows decontamination factor was in the range of 6.1∼13.4. Results suggest that our foam formulations have a feasibility potential to removal of about 83∼93% total radioactivity in contaminant.

  5. Pressure-Induced Foaming of Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Moreno, Francisco; Mukherjee, Manas; Jiménez, Catalina; Banhart, John

    2015-05-01

    Pressure-induced foaming (PIF) of metals is a foaming technique in which blowing agent free compacted metal powders are foamed. The method consists of heating hot-compacted metallic precursors to above their melting temperature under gas overpressure and foaming them by pressure release. This study focuses on PIF of Al99.7 and AlSi7 alloys under both air or Ar and overpressures up to 9 bar. In situ x-ray radioscopy allows us to follow the foaming process and to perform quantitative analyses of expansion, foam morphology, and coalescence rate. Mass spectrometry helps to identify hydrogen as the foaming gas. Adsorbates on the former powder particles are found to be the primary gas source. Various advantages of this new method are identified and discussed.

  6. Aluminium foams. manufacture, properties and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminium foams are porous to have many interesting combinations of physical and mechanical properties, such as high stiffness in conjunction with very low specific weight. The aluminium foam structure, manufacture processes, physical, chemical and mechanical properties and applications are reviewed in this paper. The various manufacturing processes are classified according to the state of matter in which the metal is processed. Liquid aluminium can be foamed directly by injecting gas or gas-releasing blowing agents. Indirect methods include melting of powder compacts which contain a blowing agent. An inert gas entrapped in powder compacts can produce aluminium foams in solid state after heat treatment. Electron-deposition or metal vapour deposition also allow for the production of aluminium foams. Physical, chemical and mechanical properties and the various ways for characterising the aluminium foams are reviewed in second section of this paper. finally, the various application fields for aluminium foams are discussed. They are divided into different industrial sectors. (Author) 75 refs

  7. Viscous Control of the Foam Glass Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup;

    The production of foam glass as heat insulating material is an important industrial process because it enables low-cost recycling of glass waste from a variety of chemical compositions. Optimization of the foaming process of new glass waste compositions is time consuming, since many factors affect...... the foaming process such as temperature, particle size, type and concentration of foaming agent. The foaming temperature is one of the key factors, because even small temperature changes can affect the melt viscosity by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, it is important to establish the viscosity...... range in which the foaming process should take place, particularly when the type of recycled cullet is changed or several types of cullet are mixed in one batch. According to recent glass literature, the foaming process should occur at viscosity 103 to 105 Pa s. However, no systematic studies have...

  8. Fabrication of Gold Nanoparticles Doped DVB Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication of gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams was researched, which can be used as ICF target materials. By high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) method, gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams were prepared, with gold nanoparticles dissolved in inner phase. The results show that the content of Au in the gold nanoparticles doped DVB foam is 3. 19%, the axial direction density of the foam is uniform which indicates none evident settlement of gold nanoparticles. SEM tests show that the gold doped DVB polymer foams have open-celled structure and very uniform aperture, and the average pore size is about 1 μm, which is much smaller than that of pure DVB foams. EDX test shows that Au disperses uniformly in the foams. (authors)

  9. Positivity of spin foam amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amplitude for a spin foam in the Barrett-Crane model of Riemannian quantum gravity is given as a product over its vertices, edges and faces, with one factor of the Riemannian 10j symbols appearing for each vertex, and simpler factors for the edges and faces. We prove that these amplitudes are always nonnegative for closed spin foams. As a corollary, all open spin foams going between a fixed pair of spin networks have real amplitudes of the same sign. This means one can use the Metropolis algorithm to compute expectation values of observables in the Riemannian Barrett-Crane model, as in statistical mechanics, even though this theory is based on a real-time (eiS) rather than imaginary-time e-S path integral. Our proof uses the fact that when the Riemannian 10j symbols are nonzero, their sign is positive or negative depending on whether the sum of the ten spins is an integer or half-integer. For the product of 10j symbols appearing in the amplitude for a closed spin foam, these signs cancel. We conclude with some numerical evidence suggesting that the Lorentzian 10j symbols are always nonnegative, which would imply similar results for the Lorentzian Barrett-Crane model

  10. Multiscale modelling of evolving foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, R. I.; Sethian, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a set of multi-scale interlinked algorithms to model the dynamics of evolving foams. These algorithms couple the key effects of macroscopic bubble rearrangement, thin film drainage, and membrane rupture. For each of the mechanisms, we construct consistent and accurate algorithms, and couple them together to work across the wide range of space and time scales that occur in foam dynamics. These algorithms include second order finite difference projection methods for computing incompressible fluid flow on the macroscale, second order finite element methods to solve thin film drainage equations in the lamellae and Plateau borders, multiphase Voronoi Implicit Interface Methods to track interconnected membrane boundaries and capture topological changes, and Lagrangian particle methods for conservative liquid redistribution during rearrangement and rupture. We derive a full set of numerical approximations that are coupled via interface jump conditions and flux boundary conditions, and show convergence for the individual mechanisms. We demonstrate our approach by computing a variety of foam dynamics, including coupled evolution of three-dimensional bubble clusters attached to an anchored membrane and collapse of a foam cluster.

  11. Toxicologic Study of Monochloroacetic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Bo; Zhan Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ Monochloroacetic Acid (MCA) is a chlorinated analog of acetic acids. MCA and its sodium salt (SMCA) are widely used as a chemical intermediate (primarily in the manufacture of chlorophenoxy herbicides,carboxymethylcelluose, glycine and indigoid dyes).Moreover, MCA has been found as a common by-product of the chlorination of drinking water. Chloroacetates are ubiquitous in the environment, and MCA is the most abundant among chloroacetates. A background level of 0.1 - 1μg/L is expected to occur in precipitation[1]. Total world wide annual production of MCA reported was about 400 000 tons[2]. Many studies have showed that MCA not only caused acute or chronic damage to the skin , liver, kidney, heart, brain and other organs, but also caused acute death systemically under high concentration[2,3]. So this article will discuss the toxic effect of Monochloroacetic Acid in Toxicology.

  12. Common questions in veterinary toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N; Rawson-Harris, P; Edwards, N

    2015-05-01

    Toxicology is a vast subject. Animals are exposed to numerous drugs, household products, plants, chemicals, pesticides and venomous animals. In addition to the individual toxicity of the various potential poisons, there is also the question of individual response and, more importantly, of species differences in toxicity. This review serves to address some of the common questions asked when dealing with animals with possible poisoning, providing evidence where available. The role of emetics, activated charcoal and lipid infusion in the management of poisoning in animals, the toxic dose of chocolate, grapes and dried fruit in dogs, the use of antidotes in paracetamol poisoning, timing of antidotal therapy in ethylene glycol toxicosis and whether lilies are toxic to dogs are discussed. PMID:25728477

  13. human and environmental nuclear toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the civil nuclear is in expansion, this book takes stock of the situation on the geochemical processes implied the accumulation of radioactive or stable chemical elements and on the toxicity and all that is ensuing. It is important to answer at the best to increasing demands of toxicology, ecotoxicology for evaluation and management of environmental and sanitary risks. This work is divided in five parts: the behaviour of chemical species in biosphere, particularly for the living, the cell molecular mechanisms of interactions among the living, their consequences on human health and the ecosystems, the state of knowledge, element by element and the new development of technology opened with the knowledge progress. The fields of application, goes from the detection to the treatments of contaminations, from environment to man. (N.C.)

  14. Predictive toxicology: the paths of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevention of possible noxious effects in relation with the exposure to one or several chemical, physical or biological agents present in our domestic or professional environment is one of today's big public health stakes. Another stake is the better assessment of the risks linked with the use of health-care products. The efficacy and predictiveness of toxicology studies are directly related to the combination of alternate complementary methods and animal experiments (obtaining data from different species and with different models: in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo). Despite important efforts, the toxicological evaluation remains perfectible. The proceedings of this 2010 congress of the French Society of cell pharmaco-toxicology deal with recent advances, both scientific and technological, in 'predictive toxicology'. Four main topics are approached: cell and organ models, 'omics', in silico modeling, and new technologies (imaging, cell ships, high-speed processing). Among the different presentations, 3 abstracts present some recent advances in imaging techniques applied to toxicology studies. These are: 1 - first uses in toxicology of TOF-SIMS mass spectroscopy imaging (O. Laprevote, Paris-Descartes Univ. (FR)); 2 - Small animal imaging, a tool for predictive toxicology (A. Le Pape, CNRS Orleans (FR)); 3 - uranium localization at cell level using SIMS imaging technique (C. Rouas et al., IRSN Fontenay-aux-Roses (FR)). (J.S.)

  15. Historical perspectives on cadmium toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first health effects of cadmium (Cd) were reported already in 1858. Respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred among persons using Cd-containing polishing agent. The first experimental toxicological studies are from 1919. Bone effects and proteinuria in humans were reported in the 1940's. After World War II, a bone disease with fractures and severe pain, the itai-itai disease, a form of Cd-induced renal osteomalacia, was identified in Japan. Subsequently, the toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of Cd were described including its binding to the protein metallothionein. International warnings of health risks from Cd-pollution were issued in the 1970's. Reproductive and carcinogenic effects were studied at an early stage, but a quantitative assessment of these effects in humans is still subject to considerable uncertainty. The World Health Organization in its International Program on Chemical Safety, WHO/IPCS (1992) (Cadmium. Environmental Health Criteria Document 134, IPCS. WHO, Geneva, 1-280.) identified renal dysfunction as the critical effect and a crude quantitative evaluation was presented. In the 1990's and 2000 several epidemiological studies have reported adverse health effects, sometimes at low environmental exposures to Cd, in population groups in Japan, China, Europe and USA (reviewed in other contributions to the present volume). The early identification of an important role of metallothionein in cadmium toxicology formed the basis for recent studies using biomarkers of susceptibility to development of Cd-related renal dysfunction such as gene expression of metallothionein in peripheral lymphocytes and autoantibodies against metallothionein in blood plasma. Findings in these studies indicate that very low exposure levels to cadmium may give rise to renal dysfunction among sensitive subgroups of human populations such as persons with diabetes.

  16. Chromium leaching from a silicone foam-encapsulated mixed waste surrogate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study assessed chromium leaching from silicone foam-encapsulated salt waste, using a surrogate formulated after Department of Energy complex mixed waste. Two commercial formulations of silicone foam (Wacker ELEKTROGUARD 2100 and General Electric RTV-664) were evaluated as a function of waste load (28--48 wt%). Chromium leaching was formulation specific and increased with increasing waste load as measured by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). Chromium release followed transport controlled dissolution at all waste loads under TCLP (cut samples) and Accelerated Leach Test (ALT) (molded samples) conditions. Aqueous and surface complexation modeling was also used to describe reduced chromium effective diffusivity due to iron oxide addition. Comparison of modeling and measured diffusivities as a function of waste load demonstrated that the total available iron surface site concentration increased with increasing waste load, consistent with pore differences measured by image analysis. These results provide a basis for further work on modeling and engineering waste encapsulation using silicone foam

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Directionally Freeze-cast Copper Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelia I. Cuba Ramos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Because of their excellent thermal and electric conductivities, copper foams are ideally suited for applications such as heat exchangers, catalyst supports and EMI-shields. Here, we demonstrate the preparation of copper with ~80% aligned, elongated, interconnected pores via directional freeze casting, a well established processing technique for porous ceramics. First, an aqueous slurry of 40−80 nm cupric oxide powders was directionally solidified, resulting in a preform consisting of elongated, aligned dendrites of pure ice separated by interdendritic ice walls with high oxide powder content. Oxide rather than metallic nanometric particles are used, as the latter would oxidize rapidly and uncontrollably when suspended in the aqueous solution used during directional casting. The preforms were then freeze-dried to sublimate the ice and sintered in a hydrogen-bearing atmosphere to reduce the copper oxide to metallic copper particles and densify these copper particles. Microstructural analysis of the copper foams shows that three types of porosities are present: (i aligned, elongated pores replicating the ice dendrites created during the freeze-casting process; (ii micro-porosity in the partially sintered copper walls separating the elongated pores; and (iii cracks in these copper walls, probably created because of shrinkage associated with the reduction of the oxide powders.

  18. Ethnobotanical, phytochemical and toxicological studies of Xanthium strumarium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Rashedul; Uddin, Mohammad Zashim; Rahman, Mohammad Sharifur; Tutul, Ershad; Rahman, Mohammed Zakiur; Hassan, Md Abul; Faiz, M A; Hossain, Moazzem; Hussain, Maleeha; Rashid, Mohammad Abdur

    2009-12-01

    The present study describes the ethnobotanical, phytochemical, and toxicological evaluations of Xanthium strumarium L. growing in Bangladesh. In toxicity evaluation on rats, the methanol extract of seedlings showed mortality, while both seedling and mature plant extracts raised the serum alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase values and produced significant abnormalities in the histopathology of liver and kidney of rats. On the other hand, the aqueous soluble fraction of methanol extract of mature plant (LC50 = 0.352 microg/mL) and methanol crude extract of seedlings (LC50 = 0.656 microg/mL) demonstrated significant toxicity in the brine shrimp lethality bioassay. A total of four compounds were purified and characterized as stigmasterol (1), 11-hydroxy-11-carboxy-4-oxo-1(5),2(Z)-xanthadien-12,8-olide (2), daucosterol (3) and lasidiol-10-anisate (4). The present study suggests that X. strumarium is toxic to animal. PMID:20922910

  19. Scale-Up Testing-Foam as a Remedial Amendment Carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes results from intermediate-scale, two-dimensional testing of foam injection into sedimentary materials collected from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The testing was performed to evaluate the effects of delivery pressure, injection rate, foam stability, foam quality, and formation heterogeneities on the migration of foam, water, remediation amendment, and contaminants within a sedimentary volume. Testing was accomplished in a test bed that is configured in the form of two thin rectangular boxes. Each of the boxes holds approximately 135 liters (255 kilograms) of sediment. Foam was injected into each box through a segment of polyvinyl chloride slotted well casing, and air was extracted from the boxes through a similar system. Four sets of tests were conducted. During Test 1, both of the boxes were loaded in a homogeneous manner, while in Tests 2, 3, and 4, both of the boxes were loaded so as to contain two rectangular zones of heterogeneity. In addition, a zone of the sediment contained in the test bed used for Test 4 was augmented with uranium-rich calcite to produce a known concentration of uranium. The injection rate varied between the boxes during the Test 1 but was the same for each box during the final three tests. The foam generation formula for Tests 1 and 2 consisted of an aqueous solution of anionic surfactant. The foam generation formula used in Test 3 consisted of an aqueous solution of anionic surfactant and contained 25,000 milligrams per liter (mg/L) of phosphate in the form of a 9:1 mixture of sodium phosphate and sodium tripolyphosphate. The foam generating formula used in Test 4 consisted of an aqueous solution of an anionic surfactant and a nonionic surfactant and also contained 5,000 mg/L of phosphate as the aforementioned mixture. Subsequent to each of the four tests, the test beds were disassembled, and samples of the sediments were taken and analyzed for a number of parameters, depending on the specific

  20. Multiscale Toxicology- Building the Next Generation Tools for Toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retterer, S. T. [ORNL; Holsapple, M. P. [Battelle Memorial Institute

    2013-10-31

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was established between Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the goal of combining the analytical and synthetic strengths of the National Laboratories with BMI's expertise in basic and translational medical research to develop a collaborative pipeline and suite of high throughput and imaging technologies that could be used to provide a more comprehensive understanding of material and drug toxicology in humans. The Multi-Scale Toxicity Initiative (MSTI), consisting of the team members above, was established to coordinate cellular scale, high-throughput in vitro testing, computational modeling and whole animal in vivo toxicology studies between MSTI team members. Development of a common, well-characterized set of materials for testing was identified as a crucial need for the initiative. Two research tracks were established by BMI during the course of the CRADA. The first research track focused on the development of tools and techniques for understanding the toxicity of nanomaterials, specifically inorganic nanoparticles (NPs). ORNL"s work focused primarily on the synthesis, functionalization and characterization of a common set of NPs for dissemination to the participating laboratories. These particles were synthesized to retain the same surface characteristics and size, but to allow visualization using the variety of imaging technologies present across the team. Characterization included the quantitative analysis of physical and chemical properties of the materials as well as the preliminary assessment of NP toxicity using commercially available toxicity screens and emerging optical imaging strategies. Additional efforts examined the development of high-throughput microfluidic and imaging assays for measuring NP uptake, localization, and

  1. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be...

  2. Making continuous bubble type polyethylene foam incombustible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since continuous bubble type plastic foam has excellent compression characteristics and sound absorption characteristics, it has been widely used as cushion material, sealing material, sound insulating material and so on. However, the most part of plastic foam is taken by air, therefore at the time of fires, it becomes a very dangerous material. At present, the material used mostly as the seat cushions for airliners, railroad coaches, automobiles and others is polyurethane foam, but since it contains C-N couples in its molecules, it is feared to generate cyanic gas according to the condition of combustion. As the plastic foam that does not generate harmful gas at the time of fires, there is continuous bubble type polyethylene which is excellent in its weathering property and chemical resistance. A reactive, phosphorus-containing oligomer has large molecular weight and two or more double couplings in a molecule, therefore, it does not enter the inside of polyethylene, and polymerizes and crosslinks on the surfaces of bubble walls in the foam, accordingly it is expected that the apparent graft polymerization is carried out, and it is very effective for making polyethylene foam incombustible. The method of making graft foam, the properties of graft foam and so on are reported. When the graft polymerization of this oligomer to continuous bubble type polyethylene foam was tried, highly incombustible polyethylene foam was obtained. (K.I.)

  3. Advanced Metal Foam Structures for Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanan, Jay; Johnson, William; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use advanced materials especially bulk metallic glass (BMG) foams in structural components of spacecraft, lunar habitats, and the like. BMG foams, which are already used on Earth in some consumer products, are superior to conventional metal foams: BMG foams have exceptionally low mass densities and high strength-to-weight ratios and are more readily processable into strong, lightweight objects of various sizes and shapes. These and other attractive properties of BMG foams would be exploited, according to the proposal, to enable in situ processing of BMG foams for erecting and repairing panels, shells, containers, and other objects. The in situ processing could include (1) generation of BMG foams inside prefabricated deployable skins that would define the sizes and shapes of the objects thus formed and (2) thermoplastic deformation of BMG foams. Typically, the generation of BMG foams would involve mixtures of precursor chemicals that would be subjected to suitable pressure and temperature schedules. In addition to serving as structural components, objects containing or consisting of BMG foams could perform such functions as thermal management, shielding against radiation, and shielding against hypervelocity impacts of micrometeors and small debris particles.

  4. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF ACROLEIN (2003 Final)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is announcing the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Acrolein: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Acrolein and accompanying Quickview have also been added to the IRIS Database.

  5. MINING ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY INFORMATION WEB RESOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental toxicology is the study of the ecological effects of anthropogenic substances released into the environment. It is a relatively diverse field addressing impacts to aquatic and terrestrial organisms and communities. The determination of potential risk associated with...

  6. Pulmonary toxicology of respirable particles. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, C.L.; Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.; Mahaffey, J.A. (eds.)

    1980-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 44 papers presented in these proceedings. The last paper (Stannard) in the proceedings is an historical review of the field of inhalation toxicology and is not included in the analytics. (DS)

  7. Techniques for Investigating Molecular Toxicology of Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Chenchen; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Lei, Zhendong; Wu, Minghong

    2016-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been a rapidly developing field in the past few decades, resulting in the more and more exposure of nanomaterials to human. The increased applications of nanomaterials for industrial, commercial and life purposes, such as fillers, catalysts, semiconductors, paints, cosmetic additives and drug carriers, have caused both obvious and potential impacts on human health and environment. Nanotoxicology is used to study the safety of nanomaterials and has grown at the historic moment. Molecular toxicology is a new subdiscipline to study the interactions and impacts of materials at the molecular level. To better understand the relationship between the molecular toxicology and nanomaterials, this review summarizes the typical techniques and methods in molecular toxicology which are applied when investigating the toxicology of nanomaterials and include six categories: namely; genetic mutation detection, gene expression analysis, DNA damage detection, chromosomal aberration analysis, proteomics, and metabolomics. Each category involves several experimental techniques and methods. PMID:27319209

  8. Multiscale Toxicology - Building the Next Generation Tools for Toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, Brian D.; Minard, Kevin R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2012-09-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was sponsored by Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle, Columbus), to initiate a collaborative research program across multiple Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories aimed at developing a suite of new capabilities for predictive toxicology. Predicting the potential toxicity of emerging classes of engineered nanomaterials was chosen as one of two focusing problems for this program. PNNL’s focus toward this broader goal was to refine and apply experimental and computational tools needed to provide quantitative understanding of nanoparticle dosimetry for in vitro cell culture systems, which is necessary for comparative risk estimates for different nanomaterials or biological systems. Research conducted using lung epithelial and macrophage cell models successfully adapted magnetic particle detection and fluorescent microscopy technologies to quantify uptake of various forms of engineered nanoparticles, and provided experimental constraints and test datasets for benchmark comparison against results obtained using an in vitro computational dosimetry model, termed the ISSD model. The experimental and computational approaches developed were used to demonstrate how cell dosimetry is applied to aid in interpretation of genomic studies of nanoparticle-mediated biological responses in model cell culture systems. The combined experimental and theoretical approach provides a highly quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their physical form in a controlled manner.

  9. Current developments in toxicological research on arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Bolt, Hermann M.

    2013-01-01

    There is a plethora of recent publications on all aspects relevant to the toxicology of arsenic (As). Over centuries exposures to arsenic continue to be a major public health problem in many countries. In particular, the occurrence of high As concentrations in groundwater of Southeast Asia receives now much attention. Therefore, arsenic is a high-priority matter for toxicological research. Key exposure to As are (traditional) medicines, combustion of As-rich coal, presence of As in groundwate...

  10. lazar: a modular predictive toxicology framework

    OpenAIRE

    ChristophHelma; AndreasMaunz

    2013-01-01

    lazar (lazy structure–activity relationships) is a modular framework for predictive toxicology. Similar to the read across procedure in toxicological risk assessment, lazar creates local QSAR (quantitative structure–activity relationship) models for each compound to be predicted. Model developers can choose between a large variety of algorithms for descriptor calculation and selection, chemical similarity indices, and model building. This paper presents a high level description of the lazar f...

  11. Electrochemical reduction of CO2 to formate catalyzed by electroplated tin coating on copper foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Jing; Lv, Weixin; Fang, Hailin; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Sn/f-Cu electrode has been prepared by electrodeposition Sn on a Cu foam substrate in aqueous plating solution, which has been used as the cathode for electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) in aqueous KHCO3 solution. Here, we have explored the effects of the deposition time and the electrolysis potential on the Faradaic efficiency for producing formate. The results demonstrate that maximum Faradaic efficiency of 83.5% is obtained at -1.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl when the Sn/f-Cu electrode is prepared by electrodeposition for 35 min. The Sn/f-Cu electrode exhibits excellent catalytic activity for CO2 reduction compared with the Cu foam electrode and the Sn plate electrode. The average current density and the production rate of formate for the Sn/f-Cu electrode are more than twice those for the Sn plate electrode during electrochemical reduction of CO2.

  12. Characterization of Functionalized Polyurethane Foam for Lead Ion Removal from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashini Gunashekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane foams functionalized with sulfonic acid groups are used in this study to exchange lead (Pb2+ ions from aqueous solutions. Toluene-2, 4-diisocyanate, 2,6-diisocyanate (TDI was reacted with Polypropylene glycol 1200 (PPG in 2 : 1 molar ratio to form a linear prepolymer. The linear prepolymer was further polymerized using N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (BES, which acts both as a chain extender and an ion-exchanger for Pb2+ ions. The functionalized polyurethane foam was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. The Pb2+ ion exchange capacity was determined using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS. The maximum Pb2+ ion exchange capacity of the foam was found to be 51 ppb/g from a 100 ppb Pb2+ solution over a period of two hours. In addition, pH analysis was carried out on the foam composition with the best Pb2+ ion removal capacity. The pH results based on two-hour exposures showed that the functionalized polyurethane foam performed better at lower pH levels.

  13. Mechanical behavior of open cell aluminum foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jikou

    Open cell metallic foams are relatively new materials with increasingly applications due to their attractive combinations of physical, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. Since plastic deformation in the struts involves dislocation motion, dislocation slip bands are used to track the initiation/propagation and locations of plastic deformation in individual struts. We find that the onset of plastic deformation in struts is far beyond the observable strut/cell shape changes, and both plastic bending and buckling are strut deformation modes. To measure the strut mechanical properties, an existing micro-scale tensile tester was updated to test the individual struts extracted from foams using electro-discharged machining. The micro-tensile testing results show that the foam struts are typically more ductile and one time stronger than the corresponding fully dense alloy. To integrate the measured strut and foam properties, a four-strut structure unit is identified as a structural representative of the open cell foam structure. Based on the observed strut deformation modes, mechanics analysis is performed on the structure unit to predict the foam stiffness and strength. The predictions are in good agreement with the measured data, suggesting the significance of the studies on the foam strut properties and deformation. This model also predicts the bounds of the foam strengths. Under cyclic compression, foams fail due to damage accumulation in individual struts, in which surface cracks initiate and grow. At low stress levels, surface cracks are formed in multiple struts that are distributed across the foam block. This results in an abrupt strain jump due to the crush of foam block, upon foam failure. To meet applications requirements, open cell aluminum foams are usually annealed or strengthened. The studies are carried out in the foams in the as-fabricated (F), annealed (O) and T6-strengthed (T6) conditions. We find that annealing and T6 strengthening

  14. Optical Tomography of Polydisperse Dry Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieco, Anthony; Feitosa, Klebert; Korda, P. T.; Roth, A. E.; Durian, D. J.

    2011-11-01

    Dry foam is a disordered packing of bubbles that distort into familiar polyhedral shapes. We have implemented a method that uses optical axial tomography to reconstruct the internal structure of a dry foam in three dimensions. The technique consists of taking a series of photographs of the dry foam against a uniformly illuminated background at successive angles. By summing the projections we create images of the cross section of the foam and analyze them to locate the Plateau borders and vertices. The vertices are then connected according to Plateau's rules to reconstruct the internal structure of the foam. Using this technique we are able to visualize a large number of bubbles of real 3D foams and obtain statistics of faces and edges. We gratefully acknowledge support from DOD-ASSURE/NSF-REU grant # DMR-0851367.

  15. Crosslinked polyethylene foams, via eb radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyethylene foams, produced by radio-induced crosslinking, show a smooth and homogeneous surface, when compared to chemical crosslinking method using peroxide as crosslinking agent. This process fosters excellent adhesive and printability properties. Besides that, closed cells, intrinsic to these foams, imparts optimum mechanical, shocks and insulation resistance, indicating these foams to some markets segments as: automotive and transport; buoyancy, flotation and marine; building and insulation; packaging; domestic sports and leisure goods. We were in search of an ideal foam, by adding 5 to 15% of blowing agent in LDPE. A series of preliminary trials defined 203 degree sign C as the right blowing agent decomposition temperature. At a 22.7 kGys/dose ratio, the lowest dose for providing an efficient foam was 30 kGy, for a formulation comprising 10% of azodicarbonamide in LDPE, within a 10 minutes foaming time

  16. Protein separation by differential drainage from foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, S B; Lyddiatt, A

    1994-11-20

    Commercially available beer, which is a dilute solution containing components of yeast, malt, and hop used in the manufacture of the beer, was used as a model system to demonstrate the potential of foam fractionation beyond the primary foaming stage. Most of the components present in the beer concentrated in the initial foam, but they drained differentially in the subsequent collapsed foam collected over a period of 30 min. This resulted in further enrichment, in particular, of components which were present in low concentration in the original beer, Preferential drainage from foam, hence, might provide a novel way of fractionating further the proteins concentrated initially in the liquid films of foam. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:18618553

  17. Crosslinked polyethylene foams, via EB radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, E. C. L.; Lugão, A. B.; Andrade E. Silva, L. G.

    1998-06-01

    Polyethylene foams, produced by radio-induced crosslinking, show a smooth and homogeneous surface, when compared to chemical crosslinking method using peroxide as crosslinking agent. This process fosters excellent adhesive and printability properties. Besides that, closed cells, intrinsic to theses foams, imparts opitmum mechanical, shocks and insulation resistance, indicating these foams to some markets segments as: automotive and transport; buoyancy, flotation and marine: building and insulation: packaging: domestic sports and leisure goods. We were in search of an ideal foam, by adding 5 to 15% of blowing agent in LDPE. A series of preliminary trials defined 203° C as the right blowing agent decomposition temperature. At a 22.7 kGy/dose ratio, the lowest dose for providing an efficient foam was 30 kGy, for a formulation comprising 10% of azodicarbonamide in LDPE, within a 10 minutes foaming time.

  18. Fibrillization of whey proteins improves foaming capacity and foam stability at low protein concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Oboroceanu, Daniela; Wang, Lizhe; Magner, Edmond; Auty, Mark A. E.

    2014-01-01

    peer-reviewed The foaming properties of fibrillar whey proteins were compared with those of native or denatured whey proteins and also with egg white protein. Whey protein foaming capacity and stability were related to protein concentration, pH, time of whipping, pressure and heating treatments. Foams produced from fibrils showed significant improvement in foaming capacity and stability when compared with non-fibrillar whey proteins. Dynamic high shear (microfluidization) or moderate shear...

  19. Dynamic Behavior of Hybrid APM (Advanced Pore Morphology Foam) and Aluminum Foam Filled Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Joerg Weise; Valerio Mussi; Michele Monno; Massimo Goletti; Joachim Baumeister

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of different densities of hybrid aluminum polymer foam on the frequency behavior of a foam filled steel structure with different ratios between steel and foam masses. The foam filled structure is composed of three steel tubes with a welded flange at both ends bolted together to form a portal grounded by its free ends. Structure, internal and ground constraints have been designed and manufactured in order to minimize nonlinear effects and to guara...

  20. Entropy from the foam, 2

    CERN Document Server

    Garattini, R

    2002-01-01

    A simple model of spacetime foam, made by two different types of wormholes in a semiclassical approximation, is taken under examination: one type is a collection of $N_{w}$ Schwarzschild wormholes, while the other one is made by Schwarzschild-Anti-de Sitter wormholes. The area quantization related to the entropy via the Bekenstein-Hawking formula hints a possible selection between the two configurations. Application to the charged black hole are discussed.

  1. Entropy from the Foam II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garattini, Remo

    A simple model of space-time foam, made by two different types of wormholes in a semiclassical approximation, is taken under examination: one type is a collection of Nw Schwarzschild wormholes, while the other one is made by Schwarzschild-Anti-de Sitter wormholes. The area quantization related to the entropy via the Bekenstein-Hawking formula hints a possible selection between the two configurations. Application to the charged black hole are discussed.

  2. Linear Shear Rheology of Incompressible Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Buzza, D.; D. Lu, C.-Y.; Cates, M.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss various mechanisms for viscous dissipation in the linear response to oscillatory shear of incompressible foams (such as biliquid foams or dense emulsions). These include viscous flow of liquid in films and plateau borders; intrinsic viscosity of the surfactant layers; and diffusion resistance. Marangoni-type and marginal regeneration mechanisms are considered for the transport of surfactant. We predict (on the basis of typical parameters for biliquid foams) that the zero shear visc...

  3. Sorption of heteropoly acids by polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption of oxidized and reduced forms of molybdosilicic, molybdophosphoric and molybdovanadophosphoric acids by polyurethane foam based on ethers and esters is studied. On the basis of sorption dependence on solution pH, polyurethane foam type and spectral characteristics of sorbates the suggestion has been made that in the polyurethane foam phase there are two main types of sorbent-sorbate interaction: electrostatic (ion-ion) and with hydrogen bond formation: and it is impossible to determine the contribution of every interaction

  4. Soft Matter Drainage in a rising foam

    OpenAIRE

    YAZHGUR, Pavel; Rio, Emmanuelle; ROUYER, Florence; Pigeonneau, Franck; Salonen, Anniina

    2015-01-01

    Rising foams created by continuously blowing gas into a surfactant solution are widely used in many technical processes, such as flotation. The prediction of the liquid fraction profile in such flowing foams is of particular importance since this parameter controls the stability and the rheol-ogy of the final product. Using drift flux analysis and recently developed semi-empirical expressions for foam permeability and osmotic pressure, we build a model predicting the liquid fraction profile a...

  5. Carbon microsphere-filled Pyrrone foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    Syntactic foam formulations were prepared from mixtures of Pyrrone prepolymers and hollow carbon microspheres. Very low curing shrinkages were obtained for high volume loadings of microspheres. The resulting syntactic foams were found to be remarkably stable over a wide range in temperature. A technique was developed for the emplacement of these foam formulations in polyimide-fiberglass, titanium alloy and stainless steel honeycomb without sacrificing low curing shrinkage or thermal stability.

  6. Foam Fractionation of surfactant-protein mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Kamalanathan, Ishara Dedunu

    2015-01-01

    Foam fractionation is an adsorptive bubble separation technology that has shown potential as a replacement to the more costly and non-sustainable traditional downstream processing methods such as solvent extraction and chromatography for biological systems. However biological systems mostly tend to be a mixture of surface active species that complicates the foam fractionation separation. In this thesis a detailed experimental study on the application of foam fractionation to separate a well-d...

  7. [Cosmetic colorants. Toxicology and regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzek, T; Krätke, R; Klein, G; Schulz, C

    2005-01-01

    Some recent publications raised concern over a possible link between hair dye use and the incidence of bladder tumours in a Californian population. The Scientific Committee for Cosmetic Products and Non-Food Products intended for Consumers (SCCNFP) demanded the toxicological testing of all hair dyes used in Europe to exclude any risk. The EU commission initiated corresponding measures. Only safe hair dyes will be included on a positive list while all other hair dyes will be banned. The hair dye lawsone--the dyeing ingredient of henna--was evaluated by the SCCNFP as genotoxic but the BfR came to another conclusion. The regulation of both lawsone and henna remains an open question. Furthermore, some cosmetic colorants were critically discussed. The azo dyes CI 12150, CI 26100, CI 27290 and CI 20170 are allowed for use in cosmetics. On cleavage they form the carcinogenic aromatic amines o-anisidine, 4-aminoazobenzene and 2,4-xylidine, respectively. For three of these dyes the cleavage by human skin bacteria in vitro to the respective arylamine was shown experimentally. Further problems may arise from colorants used for tattoos and permanent makeup. These products up to now are not subject to legislation and there are no regulatory stipulations with respect to health safety and purity for colorants used for these purposes. PMID:15650909

  8. Role of quinones in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, J L; Trush, M A; Penning, T M; Dryhurst, G; Monks, T J

    2000-03-01

    Quinones represent a class of toxicological intermediates which can create a variety of hazardous effects in vivo, including acute cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenesis. The mechanisms by which quinones cause these effects can be quite complex. Quinones are Michael acceptors, and cellular damage can occur through alkylation of crucial cellular proteins and/or DNA. Alternatively, quinones are highly redox active molecules which can redox cycle with their semiquinone radicals, leading to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and ultimately the hydroxyl radical. Production of ROS can cause severe oxidative stress within cells through the formation of oxidized cellular macromolecules, including lipids, proteins, and DNA. Formation of oxidatively damaged bases such as 8-oxodeoxyguanosine has been associated with aging and carcinogenesis. Furthermore, ROS can activate a number of signaling pathways, including protein kinase C and RAS. This review explores the varied cytotoxic effects of quinones using specific examples, including quinones produced from benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, estrogens, and catecholamines. The evidence strongly suggests that the numerous mechanisms of quinone toxicity (i.e., alkylation vs oxidative stress) can be correlated with the known pathology of the parent compound(s). PMID:10725110

  9. Introduction: biomarkers in neurodevelopment toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Needleman, H.L.

    1987-10-01

    The search for markers of toxicant exposure and effect upon the development of organisms presents a set of challenges that differ in many ways from those encountered in the study of markers in reproduction or pregnancy. These latter two fields specify a relatively narrow set of organs or biological systems. The term development, on the other hand, can apply to any organ system, or to any set of phenomena that changes in an ordered way over time. For this reason the papers presented in the session on development were chosen to narrow the focus to neurodevelopmental markers, as such markers may be altered by neurotoxic exposure. In attempting to meet this task, the authors have been able to select a group of investigators who work at the leading edges of their respective fields of developmental neuroanatomy, neurotoxicology, neuroendocrinology, neuropsychology, and infant development. The notion that toxicants could affect behavior certainly is not new. Recent knowledge that behavioral aberrations can occur at exposures below those which produce organic changes, and that behavioral aberrations can occur at exposures below those which produce organic changes, and that behavioral observation might provide early markers of effect has given rise to two new fields: behavioral toxicology and behavioral teratology.

  10. [Toxicological evaluation in the childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Amparo; Rodrigo, Carlos; Marrón, M Teresa

    2014-03-01

    Intoxications in infancy require urgent medical treatment within national health systems. In our country they represent 0.3% of paediatric urgencies. Most of them are accidental intoxications but is not infrequent to find some related to child abuse or to suicidal intentions, especially in adolescence. The objectives of the study are to evaluate both clinical health care and medical legal aspects in intoxications in infancy. Medical assistance is described and it includes clinical diagnosis, typology of the more common toxics, percentages and referral to social work and emergency care equipment units of the Ministry of Social Welfare and the Department of Health or, where appropriate, directly to prosecutors and courts for their intervention. In cases of detection of alcohol, drugs or medication in infants, the importance of the correct interpretation of the results of toxicological findings is discussed. Several studies for the interpretation of results concerning the detection of these toxics are reported. Both legal aspects and the forensic medical opinion are assessed. The findings will be analysed by the judicial authority in order to circumscribe responsibilities or to take appropriate decisions concerning the protection of infants' interests. In conclusion intoxication in infancy can lead to legal proceedings requiring specific actions for their protection. Both physicians and hospitals must comply with the legal requirement of the submission to the court of judicial parties. On the other hand, this information is an interesting step toward reinforcing public health surveillance. PMID:24913753

  11. Bubbles in sheared two-dimensional foams

    OpenAIRE

    Quilliet, C.; Idiart, M. A. P.; Dollet, B.; Berthier, L.; Yekini, A.

    2005-01-01

    Oscillatory shear on two-dimensional monodisperse liquid foams was performed. We show that the effect of the oscillatory shear is to cause the migration of bubbles which size is greater than that of a typical bubble of the foam. These so-called flaws move towards the periphery of the foam in a non random motion, thus realizing size segregation in a system which is by construction gravity insensitive. We also show that elongated cavities in the foam could be relaxed towards a more isotropic fo...

  12. Integration of FreeFOAM in Salome

    OpenAIRE

    Farré Vicente, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to extend and adapt the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) software used in advanced studies on hemodynamics at the RMEE team at UPC/EPSEM. The FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) CFD software FreeFOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation) is used for this purpose. FreeFOAM is a fork of the widely used OpenFOAM CFD software. It is geared towards freeing OpenFOAM from its system dependency (using Cmake), enabling it to run natively on as many operating systems as...

  13. Plasma-Spray Metal Coating On Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, J.

    1994-01-01

    Molds, forms, and other substrates made of foams coated with metals by plasma spraying. Foam might be ceramic, carbon, metallic, organic, or inorganic. After coat applied by plasma spraying, foam left intact or removed by acid leaching, conventional machining, water-jet cutting, or another suitable technique. Cores or vessels made of various foam materials plasma-coated with metals according to method useful as thermally insulating containers for foods, liquids, or gases, or as mandrels for making composite-material (matrix/fiber) parts, or making thermally insulating firewalls in automobiles.

  14. Defect generation during solidification of aluminium foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reason for the frequent occurrence of cell wall defects in metal foams was investigated. Aluminium foams often expand during solidification, a process which is referred as solidification expansion (SE). The effect of SE on the structure of aluminium foams was studied in situ by X-ray radioscopy and ex situ by X-ray tomography. A direct correlation between the magnitude of SE and the number of cell wall ruptures during SE and finally the number of defects in the solidified foams was found.

  15. Toxicological and toxicogenetic effects of plants used in popular medicine and in cattle food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia R. Ribeiro

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxicological and toxicogenetic effects of aqueous (tea and hexanica fruit extract of Indigofera suffruticosa Mill, and hydroalcoholic root extract od Solanum agrarium Stendt. Were evaluated in Balb C male mice intraperitoneally exposed. A hepatotoxic effect was observed just for animals treated with aqueous fruit extract of I. suffruticosa. In relation to the toxicogenetic effect, just the group trreated with 12.5% of toxic dose of aqueous fruit extract of I. suffruticosa showed a statistically significant increase in the frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations (cytogenetic effect, although a slight increase was also observed for the highest dose (25% of LF50_ of hydroalcoholic root extract of S. agrarium. The results obtanied show that before S. agrarium is used as medicine and before the wide use of I. suffruticosa in cattle food, careful evaluation must be done.

  16. Non-precautionary aspects of toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Empirical studies in toxicology aim at deciphering complex causal relationships, especially in regard to human disease etiologies. Several scientific traditions limit the usefulness of documentation from current toxicological research, in regard to decision-making based on the precautionary principle. Among non-precautionary aspects of toxicology are the focus on simplified model systems and the effects of single hazards, one by one. Thus, less attention is paid to sources of variability and uncertainty, including individual susceptibility, impacts of mixed and variable exposures, susceptible life-stages, and vulnerable communities. In emphasizing the need for confirmatory evidence, toxicology tends to penalize false positives more than false negatives. An important source of uncertainty is measurement error that results in misclassification, especially in regard to exposure assessment. Standard statistical analysis assumes that the exposure is measured without error, and imprecisions will usually result in an underestimation of the dose-effect relationship. In testing whether an effect could be considered a possible result of natural variability, a 5% limit for 'statistical significance' is usually applied, even though it may rule out many findings of causal associations, simply because the study was too small (and thus lacked statistical power) or because some imprecision or limited sensitivity of the parameters precluded a more definitive observation. These limitations may be aggravated when toxicology is influenced by vested interests. Because current toxicology overlooks the important goal of achieving a better characterization of uncertainties and their implications, research approaches should be revised and strengthened to counteract the innate ideological biases, thereby supporting our confidence in using toxicology as a main source of documentation and in using the precautionary principle as a decision procedure in the public policy arena

  17. Investigation for the selection of foaming agents to produce steel foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.J.; Eifert, H.H. [Fraunhofer Resource Center Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Knuewer, M.; Weber, M.; Baumeister, J. [Fraunhofer Inst. for Applied Materials Research, Bremen (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    During earlier investigators conducted at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Materials Research (IFAM), concentrating on the metal foaming technology using the powder metallurgy process, it was shown that some steel alloys are foamable with Fraunhofer`s patented powder technology approach. To further investigate the foamability of steel alloys, suitable foaming agents need to be identified and characterized. This article reports the finding of two metallic compounds used for steel foaming. The foaming behaviors of the selected foaming agents in the steel powder compacts are also evaluated in terms of different alloying elements.

  18. New decontamination process using foams containing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One key point in the dismantling of nuclear facilities is the thorough cleaning of radiation- exposed surfaces on which radioactive deposits have formed. This cleaning step is often achieved by successive liquid rinses with specific solutions containing alkaline, acidic, or even oxidizing species depending on whether the aim is to dissolve greasy deposits (like ter-butylphosphate) or to corrode surfaces on micrometric thicknesses. An alternative process to reduce the amount of chemicals and the volume of the resulting nuclear wastes consists in using the same but foamed solutions (1). Carrying less liquid, the resulting foams still display similar kinetics of dissolution rates and their efficiency is determined by their ability to hold sufficient wetnesses during the time required for the decontamination. Classical foam decontamination process illustrated by foam pulverization or circulation in the 90 turned five years ago into a specific static process using high-lifetime viscosified foam at a steady state. One way to slow down the liquid drainage is to raise liquid viscosity by adding organic viscosifiers like xanthan gum (2). In 2005, new studies started on an innovative process proposed by S. Faure and based on triphasic foams containing particles [3]. The aim is to generate new decontamination foams containing less quantities of organics materials (surfactants and viscosifiers). Silica particles are obviously known to stabilize or destabilize foams (4). In the frame of S. Guignot Ph.D., new fundamental studies are initiated in order to clarify the role of silica solid microparticles in these foams. Our final goal is to determine whether this kind of new foam can be stable for several hours for a decontamination process. The results we will report focus on wet foams used for nuclear decontamination and incorporating fumed silica. The study is conducted on a vertical foam column in a pseudo-free drainage configuration, and aims at investigating the influence of

  19. New decontamination process using foams containing particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guignot, S.; Faure, S. [CEA Marcoule, Lab. des Procedes Avances de Decontamination, 30 (France)

    2008-07-01

    One key point in the dismantling of nuclear facilities is the thorough cleaning of radiation- exposed surfaces on which radioactive deposits have formed. This cleaning step is often achieved by successive liquid rinses with specific solutions containing alkaline, acidic, or even oxidizing species depending on whether the aim is to dissolve greasy deposits (like ter-butylphosphate) or to corrode surfaces on micrometric thicknesses. An alternative process to reduce the amount of chemicals and the volume of the resulting nuclear wastes consists in using the same but foamed solutions (1). Carrying less liquid, the resulting foams still display similar kinetics of dissolution rates and their efficiency is determined by their ability to hold sufficient wetnesses during the time required for the decontamination. Classical foam decontamination process illustrated by foam pulverization or circulation in the 90 turned five years ago into a specific static process using high-lifetime viscosified foam at a steady state. One way to slow down the liquid drainage is to raise liquid viscosity by adding organic viscosifiers like xanthan gum (2). In 2005, new studies started on an innovative process proposed by S. Faure and based on triphasic foams containing particles [3]. The aim is to generate new decontamination foams containing less quantities of organics materials (surfactants and viscosifiers). Silica particles are obviously known to stabilize or destabilize foams (4). In the frame of S. Guignot Ph.D., new fundamental studies are initiated in order to clarify the role of silica solid microparticles in these foams. Our final goal is to determine whether this kind of new foam can be stable for several hours for a decontamination process. The results we will report focus on wet foams used for nuclear decontamination and incorporating fumed silica. The study is conducted on a vertical foam column in a pseudo-free drainage configuration, and aims at investigating the influence of

  20. Detailed investigation of the microbial community in foaming activated sludge reveals novel foam formers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Yu, Ke; Zhang, T.

    2015-01-01

    Foaming of activated sludge (AS) causes adverse impacts on wastewater treatment operation and hygiene. In this study, we investigated the microbial communities of foam, foaming AS and non-foaming AS in a sewage treatment plant via deep-sequencing of the taxonomic marker genes 16S rRNA and mycobacterial rpoB and a metagenomic approach. In addition to Actinobacteria, many genera (e.g., Clostridium XI, Arcobacter, Flavobacterium) were more abundant in the foam than in the AS. On the other hand, deep-sequencing of rpoB did not detect any obligate pathogenic mycobacteria in the foam. We found that unknown factors other than the abundance of Gordonia sp. could determine the foaming process, because abundance of the same species was stable before and after a foaming event over six months. More interestingly, although the dominant Gordonia foam former was the closest with G. amarae, it was identified as an undescribed Gordonia species by referring to the 16S rRNA gene, gyrB and, most convincingly, the reconstructed draft genome from metagenomic reads. Our results, based on metagenomics and deep sequencing, reveal that foams are derived from diverse taxa, which expands previous understanding and provides new insight into the underlying complications of the foaming phenomenon in AS.

  1. Anti-foam System design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Anti-foam System is a sub-system of the 242-A Evaporator facility. The Anti-foam is used within the C-A-1 Vapor-Liquid Separator, to reduce the effect of foaming and reduce fluid bumping while the vapor and liquid are separated within the C-A-1 Vapor-Liquid Separator. Excessive foaming within the vessel may possibly cause the liquid slurry mixture in the evaporator vessel to foul the de-entrainment pads and cause plant shutdown. The Anti-foam System consists of the following primary elements: the Anti-foam Tank and the Metering Pump. The upgrades to Anti-foam System include the following: installation of a new pump, instruments, and valves; and connection of the instruments, pump and agitator associated with the Anti-foam System to the Monitoring and Control System (MCS). The 242-A Evaporator is a waste treatment facility designed to reduce liquid waste volumes currently stored in the Hanford Area double shell Waste Storage Tanks. The evaporator uses evaporative concentration to achieve this volume reduction, returning the concentrated slurry to the double-shell tanks for storage and, at the same time, releasing the process effluent to a retention facilities for eventual treatment and release to the environment

  2. A coherent approach to spacetime foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coherent superposition of N Schwarzschild wormholes is proposed as a model for space-time foam. Following the subtraction procedure for manifolds with boundaries, we calculate by variational methods the Casimir energy. A proposal for an alternative foamy model formed by N Schwarzschild-Anti-de Sitter wormholes is here considered. Finally, a conjecture about the foam evolution is proposed. (orig.)

  3. A coherent approach to Spacetime Foam

    CERN Document Server

    Garattini, R

    2001-01-01

    A coherent superposition of N Schwarzschild wormholes is proposed as a model for spacetime foam. Following the subtraction procedure for manifolds with boundaries, we calculate by variational methods the Casimir energy. A proposal for an alternative foamy model formed by N Schwarzschild-Anti-de Sitter wormholes is here considered. Finally, a conjecture about the foam evolution is proposed.

  4. Expanded polylactide bead foaming - A new technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofar, M.; Ameli, A.; Park, C. B.

    2015-05-01

    Bead foaming technology with double crystal melting peak structure has been recognized as a promising method to produce low-density foams with complex geometries. During the molding stage of the bead foams, the double peak structure generates a strong bead-to-bead sintering and maintains the overall foam structure. During recent years, polylactide (PLA) bead foaming has been of the great interest of researchers due to its origin from renewable resources and biodegradability. However, due to the PLA's low melt strength and slow crystallization kinetics, the attempts have been limited to the manufacturing methods used for expanded polystyrene. In this study, for the first time, we developed microcellular PLA bead foams with double crystal melting peak structure. Microcellular PLA bead foams were produced with expansion ratios and average cell sizes ranging from 3 to 30-times and 350 nm to 15 µm, respectively. The generated high melting temperature crystals during the saturation significantly affected the expansion ratio and cell density of the PLA bead foams by enhancing the PLA's poor melt strength and promoting heterogeneous cell nucleation around the crystals.

  5. Development of Steel Foam Materials and Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth Kremer; Anthony Liszkiewicz; James Adkins

    2004-10-20

    In the past few years there has been a growing interest in lightweight metal foams. Demands for weight reduction, improved fuel efficiency, and increased passenger safety in automobiles now has manufacturers seriously considering the use of metal foams, in contrast to a few years ago, when the same materials would have been ruled out for technical or economical reasons. The objective of this program was to advance the development and use of steel foam materials, by demonstrating the advantages of these novel lightweight materials in selected generic applications. Progress was made in defining materials and process parameters; characterization of physical and mechanical properties; and fabrication and testing of generic steel foam-filled shapes with compositions from 2.5 wt.% to 0.7 wt.% carbon. A means of producing steel foam shapes with uniform long range porosity levels of 50 to 60 percent was demonstrated and verified with NDE methods. Steel foam integrated beams, cylinders and plates were mechanically tested and demonstrated advantages in bend stiffness, bend resistance, and crush energy absorption. Methods of joining by welding, adhesive bonding, and mechanical fastening were investigated. It is important to keep in mind that steel foam is a conventional material in an unconventional form. A substantial amount of physical and mechanical properties are presented throughout the report and in a properties database at the end of the report to support designer's in applying steel foam in unconventional ways.

  6. Foam-Mixing-And-Dispensing Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Keith Y.; Toombs, Gordon R.; Jackson, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Time-and-money-saving machine produces consistent, homogeneously mixed foam, enhancing production efficiency. Automatically mixes and dispenses polyurethane foam in quantities specified by weight. Consists of cart-mounted, air-driven proportioning unit; air-activated mechanical mixing gun; programmable timer/counter, and controller.

  7. Recovery of uranium with polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recovery of uranium from nitrate media by sorption on polyurethane foam (polyether type) has been found to be dependent on the following variables: total nitrate molarity, cation valency, uranium concentration, percentage of water-miscible organic solvent added, and impregnation of the polyurethane foam with organic extractants such as ethyl acetate

  8. Damping of liquid sloshing by foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauret, A.; Boulogne, F.; Cappello, J.; Dressaire, E.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-02-01

    When a container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to oscillate or slosh. Such effects can be observed when a glass of water is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rims of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily as water, which suggests that foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of a liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath. We generate a monodisperse two-dimensional liquid foam in a rectangular container and track the motion of the foam. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is experimentally characterized: only a few layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscillations. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient through viscous dissipation on the walls of the container. Then we extend our study to confined three-dimensional liquid foam and observe that the behavior of 2D and confined 3D systems are very similar. Thus, we conclude that only the bubbles close to the walls have a significant impact on the dissipation of energy. The possibility to damp liquid sloshing using foam is promising in numerous industrial applications such as the transport of liquefied gas in tankers or for propellants in rocket engines.

  9. Low-density carbonized resorcinol-formaldehyde foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents research and development on resorcinol- formaldehyde-based foam materials conducted between 1986 and June 1990, when the effort was discontinued. The foams discussed are resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) foam, carbonized RF (CRF) foam, and two composite foams, a polystyrene/RF (PS/RF) foam and its carbonized derivative (CPR). The RF foams are synthesized by the polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde in a slightly basic solution. Their structure and density depend strongly on the concentration of the sodium carbonate catalyst. The have an interconnected bead structure similar to that of silica aerogels; bead sizes range from 30 to 130 Angstrom, and cell sizes are less than 0.1 μm. We have achieved densities of 16 to 200 mg/cm3. The RF foams can be pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere to form a vitreous carbon foam (CRF), which has a similar microstructure but much higher mechanical strength. The PS/RF foams are obtained by filling the 2- to 3-μm cells of PS foam (a low-density hydrocarbon foam we have developed) with RF. The resultant foams have the outstanding handling and machinability of the PS foam matrix and the small cell size of RF. Pyrolyzing PS/RF foams causes depolymerization and loss of the PS; the resulting CPR foams have a structure similar to the PS foams in which CRF both replicates and fills the PS cells

  10. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    electronic search for literature published in English between 2003 and 2014. The included papers were assessed for their risk of bias and the results were narratively synthesized due to study heterogeneity. The quality of evidence was expressed according to GRADE. RESULTS: A total of 19 papers were included......, previously established in systematic reviews. The lack of clinical trials free from bias is, however, still a concern, especially for fluoride mouth rinses and fluoride foam. There is also a scientific knowledge gap on the benefit and optimal use of these fluoride supplements in combination with daily tooth...... brushing with fluoride toothpaste....

  11. Reviews of environmental contamination and toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, G. (ed.)

    2007-07-01

    Review of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology attempts to provide concise, critical reviews of timely advances, philosophy and significant areas of accomplished or needed endeavour in the total field of xenobiotics, in any segment of the environment, as well as toxicological implications. This edition contains a paper 'Health effects of arsenic, fluorine and selenium from indoor burning of Chinese coal, by Liu Guijian, Zheng Liugen, Nurdan S. Duzgoren-Aydin, Gao Lianfen, Liu Junhua, and Peng Zicheng. Other papers are: Chemistry and fate of simazine; Ethanol production: energy, economic, and environmental losses; Arsenic behaviour from groundwater and soil to crops: impacts on agriculture and food safety; Mercury content of hair in different populations relative to fish consumption; and Toxicology of 1,3-butadiene, chloroprene, and isoprene. 15 ills.

  12. Modeling Decomposition of Unconfined Rigid Polyurethane Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHU,TZE YAO; ERICKSON,KENNETH L.; HOBBS,MICHAEL L.

    1999-11-01

    The decomposition of unconfined rigid polyurethane foam has been modeled by a kinetic bond-breaking scheme describing degradation of a primary polymer and formation of a thermally stable secondary polymer. The bond-breaking scheme is resolved using percolation theory to describe evolving polymer fragments. The polymer fragments vaporize according to individual vapor pressures. Kinetic parameters for the model were obtained from Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The chemical structure of the foam was determined from the preparation techniques and ingredients used to synthesize the foam. Scale-up effects were investigated by simulating the response of an incident heat flux of 25 W/cm{sup 2} on a partially confined 8.8-cm diameter by 15-cm long right circular cylinder of foam which contained an encapsulated component. Predictions of center, midradial, and component temperatures, as well as regression of the foam surface, were in agreement with measurements using thermocouples and X-ray imaging.

  13. Characterization of Steel Foams for Structural Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay R. Arwade

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Experimentally measured mechanical properties of hollow sphere steel foam are the subject of this paper. The characterization of the hollow sphere foam encompasses compressive yield stress and densification strain, compressive plastic Poisson’s ratio, and compressive unloading modulus, as well as tensile elastic modulus, tensile unloading modulus, tensile yield stress, and tensile fracture strain. Shear properties are also included. These tests provide sufficient information to allow calibration of a macroscopic, continuum constitutive model. Calibrated foam plasticity parameters are tabulated, and unique feature of foam plasticity are explained. Also, initial development of mesoscale simulations, which explicitly model voids and sintered hollow spheres, is reported. This work is part of a larger effort to help the development of steel foam as a material with relevance to civil engineering applications.

  14. Autoclave foam concrete: Structure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestnikov, Alexei; Semenov, Semen; Strokova, Valeria; Nelubova, Viktoria

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the technology and properties of autoclaved foam concrete taking into account practical experience and laboratory studies. The results of study of raw materials and analysis of structure and properties of foam-concrete before and after autoclave treatment are basic in this work. Experimental studies of structure and properties of foam concrete are carried out according to up-to-date methods and equipment on the base of the shared knowledge centers. Results of experimental studies give a deep understanding of properties of raw materials, possible changes and new formations in inner layers of porous material providing the improvement of constructional and operational properties of autoclaved foam concrete. Principal directions of technology enhancement as well as developing of production of autoclave foam concretes under cold-weather conditions in Russia climate are justified.

  15. Method to evaluate foaming in petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, A.K.; Rezende, D.A.; Santos, R.F.; Mansur, C.R.E. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas], e-mail: celias@ima.ufrj.br

    2011-01-15

    In oil fields, gravitational separation tanks are generally used to separate the oil, gas and water phases, remove emulsifying agents present at the interfaces and permit the coalescence of water droplets associated with the crude oil being pumped. The main problem that influences the performance of these separators is the formation of foam. In this work, a method was developed to evaluate foaming in crude oil in laboratory scale, reproducing the operation conditions in gas-oil separators in real fields. This method was employed with seven crude oil samples, and the performance of silicone anti foams with different molar masses could be tested. The results indicated that the method of evaluating the breakdown of foam in oil by using the Aging Cell apparatus in a roller oven proved to be suitable. It was observed that the oil viscosity is a determining factor in predicting whether or not foam will form. (author)

  16. Macroporous polymer foams by hydrocarbon templating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, V P; Martin, I; Langer, R

    2000-02-29

    Porous polymeric media (polymer foams) are utilized in a wide range of applications, such as thermal and mechanical insulators, solid supports for catalysis, and medical devices. A process for the production of polymer foams has been developed. This process, which is applicable to a wide range of polymers, uses a hydrocarbon particulate phase as a template for the precipitation of the polymer phase and subsequent pore formation. The use of a hydrocarbon template allows for enhanced control over pore structure, porosity, and other structural and bulk characteristics of the polymer foam. Polymer foams with densities as low as 120 mg/cc, porosity as high as 87%, and high surface areas (20 m(2)/g) have been produced. Foams of poly(l-lactic acid), a biodegradable polymer, produced by this process have been used to engineer a variety of different structures, including tissues with complex geometries such as in the likeness of a human nose. PMID:10696111

  17. Toxicological issues after depleted uranium weapons attacked

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the uranium enrichment for producing nuclear reactor or nuclear weapon. DU is used in the military as an armor-piercing projectile due to its hardness, strength, and density. A lot of DU weapons were fired in the Gulf War, and bring about critical environmental and internal contamination. Therefore, DU becomes suddenly a hot issue. Some toxicological problems after DU weapons attacked have been reviewed, which include features of internal DU contamination. Hazard of wound contamination and inhalation with insoluble uranium, and other urgent toxicological issues. The healthy effects of implanted with depleted uranium pellets were illustrated in particular

  18. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1996 Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to present toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of certain chemicals on mammalian and avian wildlife species. Publication of this document meets a milestone for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Risk Assessment Program. This document provides the ER Program with toxicological benchmarks that may be used as comparative tools in screening assessments as well as lines of evidence to support or refute the presence of ecological effects in ecological risk assessments. The chemicals considered in this report are some that occur at US DOE waste sites, and the wildlife species evaluated herein were chosen because they represent a range of body sizes and diets

  19. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1996 Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E.; Opresko, D.M.; Suter, G.W., II

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of certain chemicals on mammalian and avian wildlife species. Publication of this document meets a milestone for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Risk Assessment Program. This document provides the ER Program with toxicological benchmarks that may be used as comparative tools in screening assessments as well as lines of evidence to support or refute the presence of ecological effects in ecological risk assessments. The chemicals considered in this report are some that occur at US DOE waste sites, and the wildlife species evaluated herein were chosen because they represent a range of body sizes and diets.

  20. Adsorption of foam-forming surfactants in Berea sandstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannhardt, K.; Novasad, J.J. (Petroleum Recovery Inst., Calgary, AB (Canada)); Jha, K.N. (Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    1994-02-01

    Adsorption measurements carried out with representativs of four classes of surfactant suitable for foam flooding (alpha olefin sulphonate, internal olefin sulphonate, linear xylene sulphonate, and betaine) on Berea sandstone at different conditions of temperature and salinity are described. Adsorption of the anionic surfactants from a low salinity brine is low, but increases substantially at moderate salinities. Limited solubility of the anionic surfactants in aqueous media tends to drive these surfactants to the solid/liquid interface and can also lead to increased surfactant loss through precipitation. The betaine is highly soluble, but adsorbs very strongly on sandstone. Adsorption of this surfactant can be reduced by mixing it with an anionic surfactant. 30 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Hybrid Deployable Foam Antennas and Reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivellini, Tommaso; Willis, Paul; Hodges, Richard; Spitz, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid deployable radio antennas and reflectors of a proposed type would feature rigid narrower apertures plus wider adjoining apertures comprising reflective surfaces supported by open-cell polymeric foam structures (see figure). The open-cell foam structure of such an antenna would be compressed for compact stowage during transport. To initiate deployment of the antenna, the foam structure would simply be released from its stowage mechanical restraint. The elasticity of the foam would drive the expansion of the foam structure to its full size and shape. There are several alternatives for fabricating a reflective surface supported by a polymeric foam structure. One approach would be to coat the foam with a metal. Another approach would be to attach a metal film or a metal-coated polymeric membrane to the foam. Yet another approach would be to attach a metal mesh to the foam. The hybrid antenna design and deployment concept as proposed offers significant advantages over other concepts for deployable antennas: 1) In the unlikely event of failure to deploy, the rigid narrow portion of the antenna would still function, providing a minimum level of assured performance. In contrast, most other concepts for deploying a large antenna from compact stowage are of an "all or nothing" nature: the antenna is not useful at all until and unless it is fully deployed. 2) Stowage and deployment would not depend on complex mechanisms or actuators, nor would it involve the use of inflatable structures. Therefore, relative to antennas deployed by use of mechanisms, actuators, or inflation systems, this antenna could be lighter, cheaper, amenable to stowage in a smaller volume, and more reliable. An open-cell polymeric (e.g., polyurethane) foam offers several advantages for use as a compressible/expandable structural material to support a large antenna or reflector aperture. A few of these advantages are the following: 3) The open cellular structure is amenable to compression to a very

  2. Carbon particle induced foaming of molten sucrose for the preparation of carbon foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narasimman, R.; Vijayan, Sujith; Prabhakaran, K., E-mail: kp2952002@gmail.com

    2014-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • An easy method for the preparation of carbon foam from sucrose is presented. • Wood derived activated carbon particles are used to stabilize the molten sucrose foam. • The carbon foams show relatively good mechanical strength. • The carbon foams show excellent CO{sub 2} adsorption and oil absorption properties. • The process could be scaled up for the preparation of large foam bodies. - Abstract: Activated carbon powder was used as a foaming and foam setting agent for the preparation of carbon foams with a hierarchical pore structure from molten sucrose. The rheological measurements revealed the interruption of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in molten sucrose by the carbon particles. The carbon particles stabilized the bubbles in molten sucrose by adsorbing on the molten sucrose–gas interface. The carbon foams obtained at the activated carbon powder to sucrose weight ratios in the range of 0–0.25 had a compressive strength in the range of 1.35–0.31 MPa. The produced carbon foams adsorb 2.59–3.04 mmol/g of CO{sub 2} at 760 mmHg at 273 K and absorb oil from oil–water mixtures and surfactant stabilized oil-in-water emulsions with very good selectivity and recyclability.

  3. Experimental study of foam flow through Berea Sandstone with applications to foam diversion in matrix acidizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parlar, M.; Parris, M.D.; Jasinski, R.J.; Robert, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    The results of a series of dual (diversion) and single core foam experiments followed by liquid injection in unfired Berea sandstone cores are reported at high rates relevant to matrix acidizing. The sensitivity of the results to surfactant type and concentration, foam and post-foam liquid injection rates, permeability, temperature and presence of oil are discussed. Surfactant type, preflush and foam slug sites are identified as critical parameters for subsequent liquid diversion into low-permeability regions. In contrast to EOR processes, surfactant adsorption is shown to be beneficial for diversion. At low liquid rates and high foam qualities relevant to EOR, foam at steady-state is found to behave as a Newtonian fluid with respect to liquid rate provided that the gas rate is above a critical rate. At high liquid rates and low qualities a shear-thinning behavior is observed. Pressure gradient during post-foam liquid injection is found to be independent of both foam and subsequent liquid rates, and to depend only on permeability for fixed surfactant chemistry. The entrance effects noted in foam literature are found to be more pronounced at high permeabilities and intermediate injection rates. Potential mechanisms as to why foam diversion in matrix acidizing works in the field are also discussed.

  4. On the transparency of foam in low-density foam Z-pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Z-pinch experiments have been performed on the SATURN and Z machines at Sandia National Laboratories to study physics issues related to x-ray radiation generation and inertial confinement fusion. Some of these experiments utilize a CH foam located on-axis to convert energy to radiation and act as a radiative transfer volume. A significant issue for foam Z-pinch experiments is the transparency of the heated foam as a function of time and wavelength. Foam transparency will be important in future foam Z-pinch experiments both because it influences the time-dependent radiation field seen by an inertial confinement fusion capsule embedded in the foam, and because it is an important factor in making high-resolution spectral measurements of a capsule or tracers embedded in the foam. In this article, we describe results from simulations and experiments which address the issue of foam transparency. We discuss imaging data from one Z experiment in which x-ray emission from a half-Au/half-CH disk located at the bottom of a 1-cm-tall, 14 mg/cc TPX foam is observed. Simulation results predicting CH foam optical depths as a function of plasma conditions are presented. In addition, we present results from spectral calculations which utilize 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation predictions for the time-dependent foam conditions. Our results indicate that the observed x-ray framing camera images are consistent with early-time (several ns prior to stagnation) foam electron temperatures of approx-gt 30 eV, which is somewhat hotter than the foam electron temperatures predicted from the 2D MHD simulations at early times. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  5. On the transparency of foam in low-density foam Z-pinch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foam Z-pinch experiments have been performed on the SATURN and Z machines at Sandia National Laboratories to study physics issues related to x-ray radiation generation and inertial confinement fusion. A significant issue for foam Z-pinch experiments is the transparency of the heated foam as a function of time and wavelength. Foam transparency will be important in future foam Z-pinch experiments both because it influences the time-dependent radiation field seen by an ICF capsule embedded in the foam, and because it is an important factor in making high-resolution spectral measurements of a capsule or tracers embedded in the foam. In this paper, the authors describe results from simulations and experiments which address the issue of foam transparency. They discuss imaging data from one Z experiment in which x-ray emission from a half-Au/half-CH disk located at the bottom of a 1 cm-tall, 14 mg/cc TPX foam is observed. Simulation results predicting CH foam optical depths as a function of plasma conditions are presented. In addition, the authors present results from spectral calculations which utilize 2-D MHD simulation predictions for the time-dependent foam conditions. The results indicate that the observed x-ray framing camera images are consistent with early-time (several ns prior to stagnation) foam electron temperatures of approx-gt 30 eV, which is somewhat hotter than the foam electron temperatures predicted from the 2-D MHD simulations at early times

  6. 大豆分离蛋白发泡剂的泡沫染色%Foam dyeing with soy protein isolate foaming agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺志鹏; 吴赞敏; 王健

    2012-01-01

    采用搅打发泡的方法研究了大豆分离蛋白浓度、pH值、表面活性剂对大豆分离蛋白泡沫性能的影响;选取多个有利于泡沫性能的因素,以大豆蛋白泡沫作为染料载体,选用活性黄染料对纯棉织物进行了泡沫染色的探究,测试了染色织物的匀染性、拉伸性和色牢度.结果表明,在pH值为7,大豆分离蛋白质量分数2%,十二烷基硫酸钠(SDS)质量浓度1g/L,Tween-80质量浓度2g/L的条件下,泡沫性能最优.泡沫染色织物的匀染性、色牢度均优于常规水浴染色,织物强力提高.%Foam of soy protein isolate, SPI) is produced by whipping method. The effects of soy protein isolate concentration, pH value and surfactant on foaming property of SPI are discussed. Using SPI foam as a dye carrier, cotton dyeing with reactive yellow is carried out. Levelness, strength and color fastness of the dyeings are tested. The results show that the optimum foaming conditions are pH value of 7, SPI mass fraction of 2%, sodium dodecyl sulfate(SDS) of 1 g/L and Tween-80 of 2 g/L. Compared with conventional aqueous dyeing, the cotton dyeings with SPI foam feature better levelness, higher color fastness and strength retention.

  7. Flow of Aqueous Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Google Plus Email Print this page Flow of Aqueous Humor Most, but not all, forms ... aqueous humor) produced by the eye's ciliary body flows out freely (follow blue arrow). Aqueous humor flows ...

  8. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam. [For access denial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, J.W.; Montoya, O.J.; Rand, P.B.; Willan, V.O.

    1983-12-21

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO/sub 2/ in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  9. Metal Foaming Investigated by X-ray Radioscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Jiménez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of X-ray radioscopy for in-situ studies of metal foam formation and evolution is reviewed. Selected results demonstrate the power of X-ray radioscopy as diagnostic tool for metal foaming. Qualitative analyses of foam nucleation and evolution, drainage development, issues of thermal contact, mold filling, cell wall rupture and more are given. Additionally, quantitative analyses based on series of images of foam expansion yielding coalescence rates, density distributions, etc., are performed by dedicated software. These techniques help us to understand the foaming behavior of metals and to improve both foaming methods and foam quality.

  10. Crude-oil foaming problems at the Sullom Voe terminal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early in the program of commissioning the Ninian stabilization trains at Sullom Voe terminal, problems of severe foaming in the first- and second- stage separators occurred. This resulted in massive carry-over of crude into the gas lines. Injection of the conventional anti-foam compound into the crude alleviated the problem somewhat. At higher gas/oil ratios (GOR's), however, conventional anti-foam agents did not control the foaming adequately. The authors discuss how they investigated the foaming characteristics of the crude and developed, with others, a novel foam inhibitor that effectively prevented foam generation in the separators

  11. DRY MIX FOR OBTAINING FOAM CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Leonovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Composition of a dry mix has been developed for production of non-autoclaved foam concrete with natural curing. The mix has been created on the basis of Portland cement, UFAPORE foaming agent, mineral additives (RSAM sulfoaluminate additive, MK-85 micro-silica and basalt fiber, plasticizing and accelerating “Citrate-T” additive and   redispersible Vinnapas-8034 H powder. It has been established that foam concrete with  density of 400–800 kg/m3, durability of 1,1–3,4 MPa, low water absorption (40–50 %, without shrinkable cracks has been formed while adding water of Water/Solid = 0.4–0.6 in the dry mix,  subsequent mechanical swelling and curing of foam mass.Introduction of the accelerating and plasticizing “Citrate-T” additive into composition of the dry mix leads to an increase of rheological properties in expanded foam mass and  time reduction of its drying and curing. An investigation on microstructure of foam-concrete chipping surface carried out with the help of a scanning electron microscope has shown that the introduction of  basalt fiber and redispersible Vinnapas-8034 H powder into the composition of the dry mix promotes formation of more finely-divided crystalline hydrates. Such approach makes it possible to change purposefully morphology of crystalline hydrates and gives the possibility to operate foam concrete structurization process.

  12. R2-Dispersion Simulation of Foam Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baete, S.; De Deene, Y.

    2008-12-01

    The spin-spin relaxation rate R2 ( = 1/T2) in hydrogel foams measured by use of a multi spin echo sequence is found to be dependent on the echo time spacing. This property, referred to as R2-dispersion, originates from both surface relaxation and molecular self-diffusion of water within internal field gradients that result from magnetic susceptibility differences between the gel and air phase. In hydrogel foams, correlations between the average air bubble size and R2-values are found (S. Baete and Y. De Deene, Proc. Intl. Soc. Mag. Reson. Med. (15) 37, 2007.). Random walk diffusion is simulated to correlate the R2-dispersion with the foam microstructure (i.e. the mean air bubble radius and standard deviation of the air bubble radius) and foam composition properties (i.e. magnetic susceptibilities, diffusion coefficient and surface relaxivity). Simulations of R2-dispersion are in agreement with NMR measurements of a hydrogel foam. By correlating the R2-dispersion parameters and microstructure properties a semi-empirical relationship is obtained that enables the mean air bubble size to be derived from measured R2-dispersion curves. The R2-derived mean air bubble size of a hydrogel foam is in agreement with the bubble size measured with X-ray micro-CT. This illustrates the applicability of 1H R2-dispersion measurements for the macroscopic determination of the size of air bubbles in hydrogel foams and alveoli in lung tissue.

  13. Damping of liquid sloshing by foams

    CERN Document Server

    Sauret, Alban; Cappello, Jean; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard A

    2014-01-01

    When a container is set in motion, the free surface of the liquid starts to oscillate or slosh. Such effects can be observed when a glass of wa ter is handled carelessly and the fluid sloshes or even spills over the rims of the container. However, beer does not slosh as readily as water, wh ich suggests that foam could be used to damp sloshing. In this work, we study experimentally the effect on sloshing of a liquid foam placed on top of a liquid bath. We generate a monodisperse two-dimensional liquid foam in a rectangular container and track the motion of the foam. The influence of the foam on the sloshing dynamics is experimentally characterized: only a few layers of bubbles are sufficient to significantly damp the oscill ations. We rationalize our experimental findings with a model that describes the foam contribution to the damping coefficient through viscous dissi pation on the walls of the container. Then we extend our study to confined three-dimensional liquid foam and observe that the behavior of 2D a...

  14. A prospective toxicology analysis in alcoholics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørgen Lange; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Felby, Søren;

    1997-01-01

    A prospective and comprehensive investigation was done on 73 medico–legal autopsies in alcoholics. The results of the toxicology analyses are described. Alcohol intoxication was the cause of death in 8%, combined alcohol/drug intoxication in 15% and drugs alone in 19%. Alcoholic ketoacidosis was...... than the exception in deaths in alcoholics....

  15. FISH PHYSIOLOGY, TOXICOLOGY, AND WATER QUALITY:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-one participants from Europe, North America and China convened in Chongqing, China, October 12-14, 2005, for the Eighth International Symposium in Fish Physiology, Toxicology and Water Quality. The subject of the meeting was "Hypoxia in vertebrates: Comparisons of terrestr...

  16. Low Overpotential and High Current CO2 Reduction with Surface Reconstructed Cu Foam Electrodess

    KAUST Repository

    Min, Shixiong

    2016-06-23

    While recent reports have demonstrated that oxide-derived Cu-based electrodes exhibit high selectivity for CO2 reduction at low overpotential, the low catalytic current density (<2 mA/cm2 at -0.45 V vs. RHE) still largely limits its applications for large-scale fuel synthesis. Here we report an extremely high current density for CO2 reduction at low overpotential using a Cu foam electrode prepared by air-oxidation and subsequent electroreduction. Apart from possessing three-dimensional (3D) open frameworks, the resulting Cu foam electrodes prepared at higher temperatures exhibit enhanced electrochemically active surface area and distinct surface structures. In particular, the Cu foam electrode prepared at 500 °C exhibits an extremely high geometric current density of ~9.4 mA/cm2 in CO2-satrurated 0.1 M KHCO3 aqueous solution and achieving ~39% CO and ~23% HCOOH Faradaic efficiencies at -0.45 V vs. RHE. The high activity and significant selectivity enhancement are attributable to the formation of abundant grain-boundary supported active sites and preferable (100) and (111) facets as a result of reconstruction of Cu surface facets. This work demonstrates that the structural integration of Cu foam with open 3D frameworks and the favorable surface structures is a promising strategy to develop an advanced Cu electrocatalyst that can operate at high current density and low overpotential for CO2 reduction.

  17. Analysis of Water Mist Suppression with Foam Additive in Wind Generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Wei Chiu[1; Yin-Tsz Lin[1; Yi-Liang Shu[2

    2015-01-01

    The study adopted a 20-foot long container to simulate the situation inside a turbine cabin. Water mist sprays were installed internally and used to perform fire extinguishing tests. Under these different scenarios, several operating factors were adjusted with the results of each adjustment subsequently measured. The operating factors studied included: operating pressures, foam concentrations, cabin opening issues, and obstacles. Each of the factors was compared with the others so as to find out which combinations would be most suitable for a water mist spray system installed inside a wind turbine cabin. The presence of obstructions hinders the direct impact of the mist spray on the fire source and in average an additional 2 to 3 minutes is required to put out the fire. This study found that the effect of the foam-water ratio is linear. Regardless of the scenario, the optimum mixture ratio is 3%. The line graph shows that the most unsuitable aqueous film-forming mixture ratio is 6%. This experiment found that the main fire extinguishing mechanism of water mist spray is the cooling of a large area via water droplets. This system is very effective in bringing down the temperature. The addition of foam in water mist spray, however, impaired the effectiveness of the cooling effect although the fire control mechanism via emulsification markedly reduced the time required to put out the fire. The increase in foam magnification will considerably enhance the fire extinguishing efficiency.

  18. Foaming in manure based digesters: Effect of overloading and foam suppression using antifoam agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Tsapekos, Panagiotis; Boe, Kanokwan; Angelidaki, Irini

    Anaerobic digestion foaming is one of the major problems that occasionally occur in full-scale biogas plants, affecting negatively the overall digestion process. The foam is typically created either in the main biogas reactor or/and in the pre-storage tank and the entrapped solids in the foam cause...... severe operational problems, such as blockage of mixing devices and collapse of pumps. Furthermore, the foaming problem is linked with economic consequences for biogas plants, due to income losses derived from the reduced biogas production, extra labour work and additional maintenance costs. Moreover......, foaming presents adverse environmental impacts owing to the overflowing of the pre-storage or digester tanks. So far, there has never been thoroughly investigation of foaming problem in manure-based digesters, which is the main anaerobic digestion system applied in Denmark. The purpose of the present...

  19. New Approaches to Aluminum Integral Foam Production with Casting Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Güner; Mustafa Merih Arıkan; Mehmet Nebioglu

    2015-01-01

    Integral foam has been used in the production of polymer materials for a long time. Metal integral foam casting systems are obtained by transferring and adapting polymer injection technology. Metal integral foam produced by casting has a solid skin at the surface and a foam core. Producing near-net shape reduces production expenses. Insurance companies nowadays want the automotive industry to use metallic foam parts because of their higher impact energy absorption properties. In this paper, m...

  20. Effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, D. S.; Dutton, Bryan C.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Pilon, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    The effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming has been studied with the specific goal of understanding the impact of increased water content on foaming in oxy-fired furnaces. E-glass foams were generated in a fused-quartz crucible located in a quartz window furnace equipped with video recording. The present study showed that humidity in the furnace atmosphere destabilizes foam, while other gases have little effect on foam stability. These findings do not contradict the generally accepte...

  1. Behaviour of aluminum foam under fire conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grabian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account fire-protection requirements it is advantageous for aluminum foam, after melting at a temperature considerably exceeding the melting point, to have a structure of discontinuous suspension of solid inclusions to liquid metal instead of liquid consistency. Continuity of the suspension depends on the solid phase content. The boundary value of the phase determined by J. Śleziona, above which the suspension becomes discontinuous, is provided by the formula (1. Figure 1 presents the relationship graphically. Boundary values of the vs content resulting from the above relationship is too low, taking into account the data obtained from the technology of suspension composites [4]. Therefore, based on the structure assumed for the suspension shown in Figure 2 these authors proposed another way of determining the contents, the value of which is determined by the relationship (3 [5].For purposes of the experimental study presented in the paper two foams have been molten: a commercially available one, made by aluminum foaming with titanium hydride, and a foam manufactured in the Marine Materials Plant of the Maritime University of Szczecin by blowing the AlSi7 +20% SiC composite with argon. Macrophotographs of foam cross-sections are shown in Figure 3. The foams have been molten in the atmosphere of air at a temperature of 750ºC. The products of melting are presented in Figure 4. It appears that molten aluminum foam may have no liquid consistency, being unable to flow, which is a desired property from the point of view of fire-protection. The above feature of the molten foam results from the fact that it may be a discontinuous suspension of solid particles in a liquid metal. The suspended particles may be solid particles of the composite that served for making the foam or oxide membranes formed on extended metal surface of the bubbles included in the foam. The desired foam ability to form a discontinuous suspension after melting may be

  2. Dynamic compressive behavior of foamed polyethylene film

    OpenAIRE

    Tateyama Kohei; Yamada Hiroyuki; Ogasawara Nagahisa; Okui Ryo; Ogawa Kinya

    2015-01-01

    The foamed film as the shock absorption material has attracted much attention because it is thin (100 μm ∼ 400 μm) and has a closed cell structure. However, the dynamic mechanical properties have not been reported in the foamed film. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the compressive behavior of the foamed polyethylene film at the wide strain rate range. First, the new compressive test apparatus for the dynamic strain rate, the drop-weight testing machine with opposed load cell, was de...

  3. Distance learning in toxicology: Australia's RMIT program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RMIT University was the first to offer a comprehensive Masters of Toxicology in Australasia 19 years ago. In 2001 the program was transformed into two stages, leading to a Graduate Diploma and Master of Applied Science in Toxicology. Now, these programs are fully online and suitable for graduates living and working anywhere in the world. The modular distance-learning courses are specifically designed to equip students with essential skills for entering fields such as chemical and drug evaluation; risk assessment of chemicals in the workplace; environmental and food toxicology. RMIT's online course delivery system has made it possible to deliver the toxicology programs, both nationally and internationally. The learning material and interactive activities (tests and quizzes, discussion boards, chat sessions) use Blackboard and WebBoard, each with a different educational function. Students log in to a Learning Hub to access their courses. The Learning Hub enables students to extend their learning beyond the classroom to the home, workplace, library and any other location with Internet access. The teaching staff log in to the Learning Hub to maintain and administer the online programs and courses which they have developed and/or which they teach. The Learning Hub is also a communication tool for students and staff, providing access to email, a diary and announcements. The early experience of delivering a full toxicology program online is very positive. However this mode of teaching continues to present many interesting technical, educational and cultural challenges, including: the design and presentation of the material; copyright issues; internationalisation of content; interactive participation; and the assessment procedures

  4. Extractable organic compounds in polyurethane foam with special reference to aromatic amines and derivatives thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for determination of aromatic amines and related compounds in flexible toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-based polyurethane (PUR) foam were investigated. The foam was extracted using 0.1% (w/v) aqueous acetic acid (HAc). Extraction solutions were analysed and aromatic amines were determined as ethyl chloroformate (Et) and pentafluoropropionic acid anhydride (PFPA) derivatives. The determinations were performed using liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) detection with electrospray ionisation (ESI) or gas chromatography (GC)-MS with chemical ionisation monitoring negative ions (NCI). The Et derivatives were determined using LC-ESI+-MS with detection limit of 2 pg of toluenediamine (TDA). The PFPA derivatives were determined using LC-ESI--MS or GC-NCI-MS with detection limits of 0.1 and 0.02 pg of TDA, respectively. Using trideuterium labelled TDA as internal standard, linear calibration curves were obtained in the range of 0.01-0.50 μg ml-1 (n=7), with correlation coefficients >0.999. When plotting calibration curves for TDA-PFPA derivatives determined using LC-MS against TDA-PFPA using GC-MS and TDA-Et using LC-MS, linear curves were obtained. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for determination of TDA in foam extraction solutions were 13%. LC-MS determination of PFPA derivatives was more selective, as compared to LC-MS of Et derivatives. In foam extraction solutions, 2,4- and 2,6-TDA, several isomers of methylenedianiline (MDA) and dimers of TDA/TDI were observed. 2,4-TDA and 4,4'-MDA are possible human carcinogens. Hydrolysis of the extraction solution revealed a large pool of TDA/TDI compounds and oligomers. The concentration of TDA in foam was affected by the extraction media, temperature and duration. The choice of derivatisation procedure also affected the determination of TDA. In extraction solutions from six different commercially available flexible foam qualities 2,4- and 2,6-TDA were found in the range of 0-7 and 0-6 μg g-1 foam

  5. Foam used during EPB tunnelling in saturated sand, parameters determining foam consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Bezuijen, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The amount of foam injected during drilling with an EPB-shield in saturated sand is quite often based on experience and/or empiric relations. A method is presented in to calculate the amount of foam needed to create a muck with limited or no grain stress. The results show that, as expected, the volume of the foam to be injected is much larger in dry soil compared to saturated soil. In saturated soil the amount of foam to be injected depends on various parameters. The permeability of the soil ...

  6. Influence of the glass particle size on the foaming process and physical characteristics of foam glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    We have prepared low-density foam glasses from cathode-ray-tube panel glass using carbon and MnO2 as the foaming agents. The effect of the glass particle size on the foaming process, the apparent density and the pore morphology is revealed. The results show that the foaming is mainly caused by the...... reduction of manganese. Foam glasses with a density of <150 kg m−3 are obtained when the particle size is ≤33 μm (D50). The foams have a homogeneous pore distribution and a major fraction of the pores are smaller than 0.5 mm. Only when using the smallest particles (13 μm) does the pore size increase to 1......–3 mm due to a faster coalescence process. However, by quenching the sample from the foaming to the annealing temperature the pore size is reduced by a factor of 5–10. The foams with an apparent density of <200 kg m−3 are predominantly open-porous. The foams exhibit a thermal conductivity as lowas 38.1m...

  7. Low density polycarbonate-graphene nanocomposite foams produced by supercritical carbon dioxide two-step foaming. Thermal stability

    OpenAIRE

    Gedler, Gabriel; Antunes, Marcelo de Sousa Pais; Velasco Perero, José Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The thermal stability of low density polycarbonate-graphene nanocomposite foams prepared by supercritical carbon dioxide two-step foaming was investigated. Unfilled polycarbonate foams showed improved thermal stabilities when compared to the unfoamed polycarbonate, as the cellular structure of foams effectively slowed down the heat transfer process. Comparatively, polycarbonate foams with larger cells exhibited the highest delays in the early stage of thermal decomposition. Low density polyca...

  8. Substance-tailored testing strategies in toxicology : an in silico methodology based on QSAR modeling of toxicological thresholds and Monte Carlo simulations of toxicological testing

    OpenAIRE

    Pery, Alexandre; Desmots, Sophie; Mombelli, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    International audience The design of toxicological testing strategies aimed at identifying the toxic effects of chemicals without (or with a minimal) recourse to animal experimentation is an important issue for toxicological regulations and for industrial decision-making. This article describes an original approach which enables the design of substance-tailored testing strategies with a specified performance in terms of false-positive and false-negative rates. The outcome of toxicological ...

  9. Open Cell Metal Foams for Beam Liners?

    OpenAIRE

    Croce, R. P.; Petracca, S.; Stabile, A.

    2013-01-01

    The possible use of open-cell metal foams for particle accelerator beam liners is considered. Available materials and modeling tools are reviewed, potential pros and cons are pointed out, and a study program is outlined.

  10. Piezoresistive Foam Sensor Arrays for Marine Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dusek, Jeff E; Lang, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    Spatially-dense pressure measurements are needed on curved surfaces in marine environments to provide marine vehicles with the detailed, real-time measurements of the near-field flow necessary to improve performance through flow control. To address this challenge, a waterproof and conformal pressure sensor array comprising carbon black-doped-silicone closed-cell foam (CBPDMS foam) was developed for use in marine applications. The response of the CBPDMS foam sensor arrays was characterized using periodic hydrodynamic pressure stimuli from vertical plunging, from which a piecewise polynomial calibration was developed to describe the sensor response. Inspired by the distributed pressure and velocity sensing capabilities of the fish lateral line, the CBPDMS foam sensor arrays have significant advantages over existing commercial sensors for distributed flow reconstruction and control. Experimental results have shown the sensor arrays to have sensitivity on the order of 5 Pascal, dynamic range of 50-500 Pascal; are...

  11. Phenolic cutter for machining foam insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, T. A.; Miller, A. C.; Price, B. W.; Stiles, W. S.

    1970-01-01

    Pre-pregged fiber glass is an efficient abrasive for machining polystyrene and polyurethane foams. It bonds easily to any cutter base made of aluminum, steel, or phenolic, is inexpensive, and is readily available.

  12. Measurement of radiant properties of ceramic foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental facility is described for the measurement of the normal spectral and total emissivity and transmissivity of semi-transparent materials in the temperature range of 600 C to 1200 C. The set-up was used for the measurement of radiation properties of highly porous ceramic foam which is used in low NOx radiant burners. Emissivity and transmissivity data were measured and are presented for coated and uncoated ceramic foam of different thicknesses. (orig.)

  13. Carbon foams for energy storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1996-06-25

    A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc--1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m{sup 2}/g-1000 m{sup 2}/g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved. 9 figs.

  14. Interfacial Viscoelasticity in Emulsions and Foams

    OpenAIRE

    Lucassen-Reynders, E. H.

    1993-01-01

    Both the generation and the stability of emulsions and foams depend on interfacial properties induced by adsorbed surfactants. The essential function of surfactants during emulsification and foaming is not that they reduce the equilibrium interfacial tension, but they impart specific dynamic properties to the interface. A surfactant- covered interface behaves as a two-dimensional body with its own elasticity and viscosity, which a re related to the non-equilibrium values of the interfacial te...

  15. Joining ceramics to metals using metallic foam

    OpenAIRE

    Shirzadi, A. A.; Zhu, Y.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2008-01-01

    A general method for brazing ceramics to metals using a compliant metallic foam as a buffer layer has been developed. Using stainless steel foams, bonds between alumina and 316 stainless steel with shear strengths up to 33 MPa have been achieved. The resultant ductility enhances the resistance of the joint to thermal cycling; AlN-Inconel 600 bonds exhibited good thermal shock resistance. Alumina - stainless steel bonds withstood more that 60 thermal cycles between 200 and 800°C in air.

  16. Ultra-low density microcellular foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra-low density (<6.0 mg/cc) microcellular foams (cell size less than 20 μmeters) have been developed to support the NARYA pulsed-power-driven X-ray laser program. Other pulsed power targets using these foams are anticipated. Because of the extreme fragility of these foams emphasis was placed on molding to shape to avoid machining. The foams are made by a thermally induced phase separation process from solutions of water soluble polymers. In practice the solutions are rapidly frozen to induce the phase separation, and they are then freeze dried to remove the solvent without destroying the foam's structure. A number of water soluble polymers have proven capable of meeting the density and cell size requirements. However, polyacrylic acid was used in most of our work because of its low shrinkage during molding and its purity. These foams have been molded into rods (1, 2, and 3 mm dia.), half rods, half annuli, and most recently full annuli with 3.0 mm outside diameter and 2.0 mm inside diameter. The molding techniques have varied with the various shapes. The rods were molded by freezing the solution in thin walled silicone rubber molds, extracting the frozen preform from the mold, and then freeze drying. Metal molds were used to make all other shapes. Rapid surface melting, followed by rapid refreezing, was used to remove the more complex shapes from their molds. In the case of the foam annuli, a pin with a very small taper was used to form the inner diameter. The foam rods have been successfully used in gas-puff implosion experiments on the PROTO-II accelerator. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Holographic Foam, Dark Energy and Infinite Statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Y. Jack

    2007-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations of spacetime give rise to quantum foam, and black hole physics dictates that the foam is of holographic type. Applied to cosmology, the holographic model requires the existence of dark energy which, we argue, is composed of an enormous number of inert ``particles'' of extremely long wavelength. These "particles" necessarily obey infinite statistics in which all representations of the particle permutation group can occur. For every boson or fermion in the present observabl...

  18. Foams Stabilized by Tricationic Amphiphilic Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    Heerschap, Seth; Marafino, John N.; McKenna, Kristin; Caran, Kevin L.; Feitosa, Klebert

    2015-01-01

    The unique surface properties of amphiphilic molecules have made them widely used in applications where foaming, emulsifying or coating processes are needed. Novel surfactant architectures with multi-cephalic and multi-tailed molecules have reportedly enhanced their anti-bacterial activity in connection with tail length and the nature of the head group, but their ability to produce and stabilize foam is mostly unknown. Here we report on experiments with tris-cationic, triple-headed, double- a...

  19. Wall slip of bubbles in foams

    OpenAIRE

    WEAIRE, DENIS LAWRENCE

    2006-01-01

    PUBLISHED We present a computational analysis of the flow of liquid foam along a smooth wall, as encountered in the transport of foams in vessels and pipes. We concentrate on the slip of the bubbles at the wall and present some novel finite element calculations of this motion for the case of fully mobile gas/liquid interfaces. Our two-dimensional simulations provide for the first time the bubble shapes and entire flow field, giving detailed insight into the distribution of stre...

  20. Ultra-low density microcellular foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, P.B.

    1986-01-01

    Ultra-low density (<6.0 mg/cc) microcellular foams (cell size less than 20 ..mu..meters) have been developed to support the NARYA pulsed-power-driven X-ray laser program. Other pulsed power targets using these foams are anticipated. Because of the extreme fragility of these foams emphasis was placed on molding to shape to avoid machining. The foams are made by a thermally induced phase separation process from solutions of water soluble polymers. In practice the solutions are rapidly frozen to induce the phase separation, and they are then freeze dried to remove the solvent without destroying the foam's structure. A number of water soluble polymers have proven capable of meeting the density and cell size requirements. However, polyacrylic acid was used in most of our work because of its low shrinkage during molding and its purity. These foams have been molded into rods (1, 2, and 3 mm dia.), half rods, half annuli, and most recently full annuli with 3.0 mm outside diameter and 2.0 mm inside diameter. The molding techniques have varied with the various shapes. The rods were molded by freezing the solution in thin walled silicone rubber molds, extracting the frozen preform from the mold, and then freeze drying. Metal molds were used to make all other shapes. Rapid surface melting, followed by rapid refreezing, was used to remove the more complex shapes from their molds. In the case of the foam annuli, a pin with a very small taper was used to form the inner diameter. The foam rods have been successfully used in gas-puff implosion experiments on the PROTO-II accelerator. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The OpenFOAM technology primer

    CERN Document Server

    Maric, Tomislav; Mooney, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    This book covers two main aspects of working with OpenFOAM: using the applications and developing and extending the library code. In the first part of the book, we chose a few utilities and applications to describe the OpenFOAM work flow. This information should provide a sufficient starting point for the reader, who can investigate his/her interests further by following the provided instructions in a similar way for another solver or application.

  2. Ultrathin mesoporous Co3O4 nanosheets on Ni foam for high-performance supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrathin Co3O4 nanosheets with a mesoporous structure and a large surface area are hydrothermally grown on a three dimensional nickel foam. The ultrathin mesoporous Co3O4 nanosheets are grown on Ni foam with robust adhesion, which endows fast ion and electron transport, large electroactive surface area, and excellent structural stability. Such unique nanoarchitecture exhibits remarkable electrochemical performance with high capacitance and desirable cycle life. When evaluate as an electrode material for supercapacitors, the Co3O4 nanosheets electrode is able to deliver high specific capacitance of 2194 F g−1 at a current density of 1 A g−1 in 1 M KOH aqueous solution. The electrode also exhibits excellent cycling stability by retaining 93.1% of the maximum capacitance after 5000 charge-discharge cycles. The fabrication strategy presented here is facile, cost-effective, and can offer a way for energy storage device applications

  3. Spin foam models as energetic causal sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortês, Marina; Smolin, Lee

    2016-04-01

    Energetic causal sets are causal sets endowed by a flow of energy-momentum between causally related events. These incorporate a novel mechanism for the emergence of space-time from causal relations [M. Cortês and L. Smolin, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084007 (2014); Phys. Rev. D 90, 044035 (2014)]. Here we construct a spin foam model which is also an energetic causal set model. This model is closely related to the model introduced in parallel by Wolfgang Wieland in [Classical Quantum Gravity 32, 015016 (2015)]. What makes a spin foam model also an energetic causal set is Wieland's identification of new degrees of freedom analogous to momenta, conserved at events (or four-simplices), whose norms are not mass, but the volume of tetrahedra. This realizes the torsion constraints, which are missing in previous spin foam models, and are needed to relate the connection dynamics to those of the metric, as in general relativity. This identification makes it possible to apply the new mechanism for the emergence of space-time to a spin foam model. Our formulation also makes use of Markopoulou's causal formulation of spin foams [arXiv:gr-qc/9704013]. These are generated by evolving spin networks with dual Pachner moves. This endows the spin foam history with causal structure given by a partial ordering of the events which are dual to four-simplices.

  4. Dynamic compressive behavior of foamed polyethylene film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tateyama Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The foamed film as the shock absorption material has attracted much attention because it is thin (100 μm ∼ 400 μm and has a closed cell structure. However, the dynamic mechanical properties have not been reported in the foamed film. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the compressive behavior of the foamed polyethylene film at the wide strain rate range. First, the new compressive test apparatus for the dynamic strain rate, the drop-weight testing machine with opposed load cell, was developed, which can be also evaluated the dynamic stress equilibrium of the specimen. It is confirmed that the compressive flow stress increased with increasing the strain rate, regardless of the film thickness. The foamed polyethylene film has the high strain rate sensitivity in the quasi-static deformation. On the other hand, there is almost no change of the strain rate sensitivity in the dynamic and the impact deformation. In order to investigate the mechanism of strain rate dependence, the foamed polyethylene film was observed by X-ray computed tomography scanner before and after compressive test. The fracture of the closed cell only occurred in the quasi-static deformation. It was clarified that the strain rate sensitivity of the foamed film depends strongly on that of the construction material, polyethylene.

  5. Shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudyakov, A. I.; Steshenko, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of research of dispersion-reinforced cement foam concrete with chrysotile asbestos fibers. The goal was to study the patterns of influence of chrysotile asbestos fibers on drying shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete of natural hardening. The chrysotile asbestos fiber contains cylindrical fiber shaped particles with a diameter of 0.55 micron to 8 microns, which are composed of nanostructures of the same form with diameters up to 55 nm and length up to 22 microns. Taking into account the wall thickness, effective reinforcement can be achieved only by microtube foam materials, the so- called carbon nanotubes, the dimensions of which are of power less that the wall pore diameter. The presence of not reinforced foam concrete pores with perforated walls causes a decrease in its strength, decreases the mechanical properties of the investigated material and increases its shrinkage. The microstructure investigation results have shown that introduction of chrysotile asbestos fibers in an amount of 2 % by weight of cement provides the finely porous foam concrete structure with more uniform size closed pores, which are uniformly distributed over the volume. This reduces the shrinkage deformation of foam concrete by 50%.

  6. Auxetic Polyurethane Foam (Fabrication, Properties and Applications)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern technology requires new materials of special properties. For the last two decades there has been a great interest in a class of materials known as auxetic materials. An auxetic material is a material that has a negative Poisson's ratio which means that this material expands laterally when they subjected to a tensile force unlike most of the other traditional materials. This material has superior properties over the traditional material such as high shear modulus and high impact resistance, which makes this material a good candidate for many engineering applications. In the present research work, auxetic flexible polyurethane polymeric foams having different densities were fabricated from conventional flexible polyurethane polymeric foam at different compression ratios. The microstructure of conventional and processed foams was examined by optical microscope to compare between the two structures. The microstructure of processed foam was compared with the one presented in the literature and it has shown the auxetic structure configuration. This is the first time to produce auxetic foam in Egypt. Conventional and auxetic foam samples having cylindrical and square cross-sections were produced from foams having different densities (25 kg/m3 and 30 kg/m3). The compression ratios used to produce the auxetic samples are (5.56, 6.94 and 9.26). Four mechanical tests were carried out to get the mechanical properties for both conventional and auxetic foams. Two quasi-static mechanical tests tension and compressionand two dynamic mechanical tests Hysteresis and resiliencewere carried out to compare between the conventional and auxetic foams. The quasi-static tensile test was carried out at speed was adjusted to be position control rate of 0.2 mm/s. The compression and hysteresis tests were carried out at strain control rate of 0.3 S-1. The data recorded from the machine were stress and strain. The modulus of elasticity and Poisson's ratio of the test samples

  7. Current developments in toxicological research on arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Hermann M

    2013-01-01

    There is a plethora of recent publications on all aspects relevant to the toxicology of arsenic (As). Over centuries exposures to arsenic continue to be a major public health problem in many countries. In particular, the occurrence of high As concentrations in groundwater of Southeast Asia receives now much attention. Therefore, arsenic is a high-priority matter for toxicological research. Key exposure to As are (traditional) medicines, combustion of As-rich coal, presence of As in groundwater, and pollution due to mining activities. As-induced cardiovascular disorders and carcinogenesis present themselves as a major research focus. The high priority of this issue is now recognized politically in a number of countries, research funds have been made available. Also experimental research on toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics and on modes of toxic action is moving very rapidly. The matter is of high regulatory concern, and effective preventive measures are required in a number of countries. PMID:27092031

  8. Regulatory assessment of reproductive toxicology data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This chapter outlines a regulator's personal approach to the assessment of reproductive toxicology data in the context of the assessment of the overall nonclinical data package for pharmaceutical agents. Using as a framework the International Conference on Harmonisation Common Technical Document headings, guidance is provided on the expectations of regulators for the presentation and discussion of the data by the applicant to facilitate the risk assessment process. Consideration is given to the use of reproductive toxicology data in the assessment process for both clinical trial applications (CTAs) and marketing authorization applications (MAAs). Suggestions for some guiding principles in drafting of the various product information documents (for example the Investigator's Brochure (IB) for CTAs and the Nonclinical Overview and Summary of Product Characteristics for MAAs) are included. PMID:23138923

  9. Toxicology of iodine: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilin Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is necessary for all living organisms. Deficiency of iodine in the organism leads to various diseases (including mental and increased rates of cancer. It is well known that one third of the world’s population lived in iodine-deficient areas. At present time, the primary intervention for preventing iodine deficiency disorders worldwide is through the iodization of salt. The two most common types of fortificant used to iodize salt are potassium iodide and potassium iodate. Iodine-containing compounds are also widely used in clinical medicine as a highly effective topical antimicrobial agent that has been used clinically in the treatment of wounds. Hence, the genetic toxicology of iodine and iodine-containing compounds is very essential topic. In this literature review are analyzed the data concerning genetic toxicology and the influence of these compounds on tumor rates in epidemiological and experimental studies.

  10. Toxicology of Nanomaterials: Permanent interactive learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castranova Vince

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Particle and Fibre Toxicology wants to play a decisive role in a time where particle research is challenged and driven by the developments and applications of nanomaterials. This aim is not merely quantitative in publishing a given number of papers on nanomaterials, but also qualitatively since the field of nanotoxicology is rapidly emerging and benchmarks for good science are needed. Since then a number of things have happened that merit further analysis. The interactive learning issue is best shown by report and communications on the toxicology of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT. A special workshop on the CNT has now been organized twice in Nagano (Japan and this editorial contains a summary of the most important outcomes. Finally, we take the opportunity discuss some recent reports from the nanotech literature, and more specifically a Chinese study that claims severe consequences of nanoparticle exposure.

  11. Nano-technology and nano-toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Maynard

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapid developments in nano-technology are likely to confer significant benefits on mankind. But, as with perhaps all new technologies, these benefits are likely to be accompanied by risks, perhaps by new risks. Nano-toxicology is developing in parallel with nano-technology and seeks to define the hazards and risks associated with nano-materials: only when risks have been identified they can be controlled. This article discusses the reasons for concern about the potential effects on health of exposure to nano-materials and relates these to the evidence of the effects on health of the ambient aerosol. A number of hypotheses are proposed and the dangers of adopting unsubstantiated hypotheses are stressed. Nano-toxicology presents many challenges and will need substantial financial support if it is to develop at a rate sufficient to cope with developments in nano-technology.

  12. Toxicology in Asia--Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, T

    2015-12-01

    The Asian Society of Toxicology (ASIATOX), which consists of the seven national toxicology member societies of Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan, Thailand, Singapore, and Iran, now boasts of more than 3,000 members from a variety of industries, academia, and regulatory organizations. ASIATOX congresses are spaced three years apart and rotated among the member societies. In 1995, ASIATOX joined the International Union of Toxicology (IUTOX) as a regional society, and now serves as the scientific voice of toxicology in Asia under the IUTOX umbrella. Since its inauguration, the society has worked diligently to handle matters deemed essential to promoting the vision set fourth by its founders. Future perspectives of ASIATOX include the establishment of education and training programs, and the certification and accreditation of toxicologists. As the leading voice of toxicology in Asia, the society seeks to extend knowledge of toxicological issues to developing nations in Asia based on the following missions and goals: (1) to provide leadership as a worldwide scientific organization that objectively addresses global issues involving the toxicological sciences, (2) to broaden the geographical base of toxicology as a discipline and profession to all countries of the world, and (3) to pursue capacity building in toxicology, particularly in developing countries, while utilizing its global perspective and network to contribute to the enhancement of toxicology education and the career development of young toxicologists. PMID:26614818

  13. Society of Toxicologic Pathology position paper: organ weight recommendations for toxicology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Rani S; Morton, Daniel; Michael, Bindhu; Roome, Nigel; Johnson, Julie K; Yano, Barry L; Perry, Rick; Schafer, Ken

    2007-08-01

    The evaluation of organ weights in toxicology studies is an integral component in the assessment of pharmaceuticals, chemicals, and medical devices. The Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) has created recommendations for weighing organs in GLP general toxicology studies lasting from 7 days to 1 year. The STP recommends that liver, heart, kidneys, brain, testes, and adrenal glands be weighed in all multidose general toxicology studies. Thyroid gland and pituitary gland weights are recommended for all species except mice. Spleen and thymus should be weighed in rodent studies and may be weighed in non-rodent studies. Weighing of reproductive organs is most valuable in sexually mature animals. Variability in age, sexual maturity, and stage of cycle in non-rodents and reproductive senescence in female rodents may complicate or limit interpretation of reproductive organ weights. The STP recommends that testes of all species be weighed in multidose general toxicology studies. Epididymides and prostate should be weighed in rat studies and may be weighed on a case-by-case basis in non-rodent and mouse studies. Weighing of other organs including female reproductive organs should be considered on a case-by-case basis. Organ weights are not recommended for any carcinogenicity studies including the alternative mouse bioassays. Regardless of the study type or organs evaluated, organ weight changes must be evaluated within the context of the compound class, mechanism of action, and the entire data set for that study. PMID:17849358

  14. Toxicological awakenings: the rebirth of hormesis as a central pillar of toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses historical reasons that may account for the marginalization of hormesis as a dose-response model in the biomedical sciences in general and toxicology in particular. The most significant and enduring explanatory factors are the early and close association of the concept of hormesis with the highly controversial medical practice of homeopathy and the difficulty in assessing hormesis with high-dose testing protocols which have dominated the discipline of toxicology, especially regulatory toxicology. The long-standing and intensely acrimonious conflict between homeopathy and 'traditional' medicine (allopathy) lead to the exclusion of the hormesis concept from a vast array of medical- and public health-related activities including research, teaching, grant funding, publishing, professional societal meetings, and regulatory initiatives of governmental agencies and their advisory bodies. Recent publications indicate that the hormetic dose-response is far more common and fundamental than the dose-response models [threshold/linear no threshold (LNT)] used in toxicology and risk assessment, and by governmental regulatory agencies in the establishment of exposure standards for workers and the general public. Acceptance of the possibility of hormesis has the potential to profoundly affect the practice of toxicology and risk assessment, especially with respect to carcinogen assessment

  15. TPX foams for inertial fusion laser experiments: foam preparation, machining, characterization, and discussion of density issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low density foams (in this work, foam density refers to apparent density) are materials of interest for fusion experiments. Low density poly(4-methyl-1-pentene)(commercial name TPX) foams have been produced for 30 years. TPX foams have been shown to have densities as low as 3 mg.cm-3, which is very close to air density (1.2 mg.cm-3). Around this density foams are very light and highly fragile. Their fabrication is thus a real technological challenge. However, shrinking always appears in ranges ranking from 25% to almost 200%. As a result, the apparent density of the final foam never matches the expected value given by the precursor solution concentration. Besides, even if the mold dimensions are precisely known, shrinkage is never linear, and foams have to be machined for precise density measurement. In our work we present a fabrication process for TPX foams and discuss machining and density measuring issues. Particularly, we have found that there are volume and weight limits for a determination of density within the range of 3% uncertainty. This raises the question whether density should rather be determined directly on millimeter-sized targets or should be performed on a bigger scale sample prepared from the same batch. (authors)

  16. Dynamic Behavior of Hybrid APM (Advanced Pore Morphology Foam and Aluminum Foam Filled Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg Weise

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of different densities of hybrid aluminum polymer foam on the frequency behavior of a foam filled steel structure with different ratios between steel and foam masses. The foam filled structure is composed of three steel tubes with a welded flange at both ends bolted together to form a portal grounded by its free ends. Structure, internal and ground constraints have been designed and manufactured in order to minimize nonlinear effects and to guarantee optimal constraint conditions. Mode shapes and frequencies were verified with finite elements models (FEM to be in the range of experimental modal analysis, considering the frequency measurement range limits for instrumented hammer and accelerometer. Selected modes have been identified with suitable modal parameters extraction techniques. Each structure has been tested before and after filling, in order to compute the percentage variation of modal parameters. Two different densities of hybrid aluminum polymer foam have been tested and compared with structures filled with aluminum foams produced using the powder compact melting technique. All the foam fillings were able to suppress high frequency membrane modes which results in a reduction of environmental noise and an increase in performance of the components. Low frequency modes show an increase in damping ratio only when small thickness steel frames are filled with either Hybrid APM or Alulight foam.

  17. Arsenic Exposure and Toxicology: A Historical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Michael F.; Beck, Barbara D.; Chen, Yu; Lewis, Ari S.; Thomas, David J

    2011-01-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed in food, water, air, and soil. Arsenic has a long history of use as a homicidal agent, but in the past 100 years arsenic, has been used as a pesticide, a chemotherapeutic agent and a constituent of consumer products. In some areas of the world, high levels of arsenic are naturally present in drinking water and are a toxicological concern. There are several structural forms and oxidation states o...

  18. Nano-technology and nano-toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Maynard, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid developments in nano-technology are likely to confer significant benefits on mankind. But, as with perhaps all new technologies, these benefits are likely to be accompanied by risks, perhaps by new risks. Nano-toxicology is developing in parallel with nano-technology and seeks to define the hazards and risks associated with nano-materials: only when risks have been identified they can be controlled. This article discusses the reasons for concern about the potential effects on health of ...

  19. Modern Instrumental Methods in Forensic Toxicology*

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Michael L.; Vorce, Shawn P.; Holler, Justin M.; Shimomura, Eric; Magluilo, Joe; Jacobs, Aaron J.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews modern analytical instrumentation in forensic toxicology for identification and quantification of drugs and toxins in biological fluids and tissues. A brief description of the theory and inherent strengths and limitations of each methodology is included. The focus is on new technologies that address current analytical limitations. A goal of this review is to encourage innovations to improve our technological capabilities and to encourage use of these analytical techniques...

  20. Methods in radioimmunoassay, toxicology, and related areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were discussed at the conference: past, present, and potential of radioimmunoassay; measurement of biogenic amines at the picogram level; parathyroid hormone; in vitro radioisotope methods for clinical evaluation of vitamin B12 and folic acid metabolism; forensic toxicology; role of biotransformation reactions in prenatal and postnatal chemical toxicity; the use of electrochemical techniques in FDA analytical procedures; and atomic absorption in food analysis

  1. Toxicology of Nanomaterials: Permanent interactive learning

    OpenAIRE

    Castranova Vince; Borm Paul

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Particle and Fibre Toxicology wants to play a decisive role in a time where particle research is challenged and driven by the developments and applications of nanomaterials. This aim is not merely quantitative in publishing a given number of papers on nanomaterials, but also qualitatively since the field of nanotoxicology is rapidly emerging and benchmarks for good science are needed. Since then a number of things have happened that merit further analysis. The interactive learning is...

  2. Wind of Change Challenges Toxicological Regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Tralau, Tewes; Riebeling, Christian; Pirow, Ralph; Oelgeschläger, Michael; Seiler, Andrea; Liebsch, Manfred; Luch, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background: In biomedical research, the past two decades have seen the advent of in vitro model systems based on stem cells, humanized cell lines, and engineered organotypic tissues, as well as numerous cellular assays based on primarily established tumor-derived cell lines and their genetically modified derivatives. Objective: There are high hopes that these systems might replace the need for animal testing in regulatory toxicology. However, despite increasing pressure in recent years to red...

  3. Compressive properties of open-cell ceramic foams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-yan; FU Yi-ming; ZENG Xiao-ming

    2006-01-01

    The compressive experiments of two kinds of ceramic foams were completed. The results show that the behavior of ceramic foams made by organic filling method is anisotropic. The stress-strain responses of ceramic foams made by sponge-replication show isotropy and strain rate dependence. The struts brittle breaking of net structure of this ceramic foam arises at the weakest defects of framework or at the part of framework,which causes the initiation and expanding of cracks. The compressive strength of ceramic foam is dependent on the strut size and relative density of foams.

  4. New Approaches to Aluminum Integral Foam Production with Casting Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Güner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Integral foam has been used in the production of polymer materials for a long time. Metal integral foam casting systems are obtained by transferring and adapting polymer injection technology. Metal integral foam produced by casting has a solid skin at the surface and a foam core. Producing near-net shape reduces production expenses. Insurance companies nowadays want the automotive industry to use metallic foam parts because of their higher impact energy absorption properties. In this paper, manufacturing processes of aluminum integral foam with casting methods will be discussed.

  5. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report

  6. ICPP radiological and toxicological sabotage analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June of 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued Notice 5630.3A, open-quotes Protection of Departmental Facilities Against Radiological and Toxicological Sabotage,close quotes which states that all significant radiological and toxicological hazards at Department facilities must be examined for potential sabotage. This analysis has been completed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The ICPP radiological and toxicological hazards include spent government and commercial fuels, Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), high-level liquid wastes, high-level solid wastes, and process and decontamination chemicals. The analysis effort included identification and assessment of quantities of hazardous materials present at the facility; identification and ranking of hazardous material targets; development of worst case scenarios detailing possible sabotage actions and hazard releases; performance of vulnerability assessments using table top and computer methodologies on credible threat targets; evaluation of potential risks to the public, workers, and the environment; evaluation of sabotage risk reduction options; and selection of cost effective prevention and mitigation options

  7. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report.

  8. Foam stabilisation using surfactant exfoliated graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, Alison Y W; Notley, Shannon M

    2016-05-01

    Liquid-air foams have been stabilised using a suspension of graphene particles at very low particle loadings. The suspension was prepared through the liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in the presence of the non-ionic tri-block surfactant, Pluronic® F108. The graphene particles possess an extremely high aspect ratio, with lateral dimensions of between 0.1 and 1.3 μm as evidenced by TEM imaging. The particles were shown to exhibit a number of other properties known to favour stabilisation of foam structures. Particle surface activity was confirmed through surface tension measurements, suggesting the particles favour adsorption at the air-water interface. The evolution of bubble size distributions over time indicated the presence of particles yielded improvements to foam stability due to a reduction in disproportionation. Foam stability measurements showed a non-linear relationship between foam half-life and graphene concentration, indicative of the rate at which particles adsorb at bubble surfaces. The wettability of the graphene particles was altered upon addition of alkali metal chlorides, with the stability of the foams being enhanced according to the series Na(+)>Li(+)>K(+)>Cs(+). This effect is indicative of the relative hydration capacity of each salt with respect to the surfactant, which is adsorbed along the graphene plane as a result of the exfoliation process. Thus, surfactant exfoliated graphene particles exhibit a number of different features that demonstrate efficient application of high-aspect ratio particles in the customisation and enhancement of foams. PMID:26890385

  9. Estudo da sorção do corante catiônico violeta cristal por espuma de poliuretano em meio aquoso contendo dodecilsulfato de sódio Sorption of crystal violet by polyurethane foam from aqueous medium containing sodium dodecylsulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Mori

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a detailed study about the sorption of crystal violet (CV cationic dye onto polyether type polyurethane foam (PUF. The sorption process was based on the formation of an ionic-pair between cationic dye and dodecylsulfate anion (SDS, which presented high affinity by PUF. Set-up employed in the study was built up by adjusting a 200 mg cylinder of PUF to the arm of an overhead stirrer. The system was characterized in relation to equilibrium and kinetic aspects and it was modeled by employing Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Obtained results showed that the ratio between SDS and MB concentrations played an important role on the sorption process. According to results found it was possible to retain up to 3.4 mg of dye from 200 mL of a 5.0 x 10-5 mol L-1 CV solution containing 1.25 x 10-4 mol L-1 SDS, which represented a removal efficiency of around 92%.

  10. In silico toxicology for the pharmaceutical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applied use of in silico technologies (a.k.a. computational toxicology, in silico toxicology, computer-assisted tox, e-tox, i-drug discovery, predictive ADME, etc.) for predicting preclinical toxicological endpoints, clinical adverse effects, and metabolism of pharmaceutical substances has become of high interest to the scientific community and the public. The increased accessibility of these technologies for scientists and recent regulations permitting their use for chemical risk assessment supports this notion. The scientific community is interested in the appropriate use of such technologies as a tool to enhance product development and safety of pharmaceuticals and other xenobiotics, while ensuring the reliability and accuracy of in silico approaches for the toxicological and pharmacological sciences. For pharmaceutical substances, this means active and impurity chemicals in the drug product may be screened using specialized software and databases designed to cover these substances through a chemical structure-based screening process and algorithm specific to a given software program. A major goal for use of these software programs is to enable industry scientists not only to enhance the discovery process but also to ensure the judicious use of in silico tools to support risk assessments of drug-induced toxicities and in safety evaluations. However, a great amount of applied research is still needed, and there are many limitations with these approaches which are described in this review. Currently, there is a wide range of endpoints available from predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models driven by many different computational software programs and data sources, and this is only expected to grow. For example, there are models based on non-proprietary and/or proprietary information specific to assessing potential rodent carcinogenicity, in silico screens for ICH genetic toxicity assays, reproductive and developmental toxicity, theoretical

  11. Characterization of Functionalized Polyurethane Foam for Lead Ion Removal from Water

    OpenAIRE

    Subhashini Gunashekar; Nidal Abu-Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Polyurethane foams functionalized with sulfonic acid groups are used in this study to exchange lead (Pb2+) ions from aqueous solutions. Toluene-2, 4-diisocyanate, 2,6-diisocyanate (TDI) was reacted with Polypropylene glycol 1200 (PPG) in 2 : 1 molar ratio to form a linear prepolymer. The linear prepolymer was further polymerized using N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid (BES), which acts both as a chain extender and an ion-exchanger for Pb2+ ions. The functionalized polyurethan...

  12. METHODS OF REDUCTION OF FREE PHENOL CONTENT IN PHENOLIC FOAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruyako Mikhail Gerasimovich

    2012-12-01

    method aimed at reduction of toxicity of phenolic foams consists in the introduction of a composite mixture of chelate compounds. Raw materials applied in the production of phenolic foams include polymers FRB-1A and VAG-3. The aforementioned materials are used to produce foams FRP-1. Introduction of 1% aluminum fluoride leads to the 40% reduction of the free phenol content in the foam. Introduction of crystalline zinc chloride accelerates the foaming and curing of phenolic foams. The technology that contemplates the introduction of zeolites into the mixture includes pre-mixing with FRB -1A and subsequent mixing with VAG-3; thereafter, the composition is poured into the form, in which the process of foaming is initiated. The content of free phenol was identified using the method of UV spectroscopy. The objective of the research was to develop methods of reduction of the free phenol content in the phenolic foam.

  13. On the stability of foams made with surfactant bilayer phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño-Ahumada, Zenaida; Maldonado, Amir; Impéror-Clerc, Marianne; Langevin, Dominique

    2016-02-01

    The stability of foams made with sponge phases (L3 phases) and lamellar phases (L(α) phases), both containing surfactant bilayers, has been investigated. The extreme stability of foams made with lamellar phases seems essentially due to the high viscosity of the foaming solution, which slows down gravity drainage. Moreover, the foams start draining only when the buoyancy stress overcomes the yield stress of the L(α) phase. The bubble growth associated with gas transfer is unusual: it follows a power law with an exponent smaller than those corresponding to Ostwald ripening (wet foams) and to coarsening (dry foams). The foams made with sponge phases are in turn very unstable, even less stable than pure surfactant foams made with glycerol solutions having the same viscosity. The fact that the surfactant bilayers in the sponge phase have a negative Gaussian curvature could facilitate bubble coalescence. PMID:26647140

  14. New Flexible FR Polyurethane Foams for Energy Absorption Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Project involves development of new flexible FR polyurethane (PU)insulation foams through a non-toxic environmentally friendly composite approach. Foams have...

  15. Compact assembly generates plastic foam, inflates flotation bag

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Device for generating plastic foam consists of an elastomeric bag and two containers with liquid resin and a liquid catalyst. When the walls of the containers are ruptured the liquids come into contact producing foam which inflates the elastomeric bag.

  16. Rheology of Foam Near the Order-Disorder Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, R. Glynn; McDaniel, J. Gregory

    1999-01-01

    Foams are extremely important in a variety of industrial applications. Foams are widely used in fire-fighting applications, and are especially effective in fighting flammable liquid fires. In fact the Fire Suppression System aboard the Space Shuttle utilizes cylinders of Halon foam, which, when fired, force a rapidly expanding foam into the convoluted spaces behind instrument panels. Foams are critical in the process of enhanced oil recovery, due to their surface-active and highly viscous nature. They are also used as drilling fluids in underpressurized geologic formations. They are used as transport agents, and as trapping agents. They are also used as separation agents, where ore refinement is accomplished by froth flotation of the typically lighter and hydrophobic contaminants. The goal of the proposed investigation is the determination of the mechanical and rheological properties of foams, utilizing the microgravity environment to explore foam rheology for foams which cannot exist, or only exist for a short time, in 1g.

  17. Optimized Synthesis of Foam Glass from Recycled CRT Panel Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Most of the panel glass from cathode ray tubes (CRTs) is landfilled today. Instead of landfilling, the panel glass can be turned into new environment-friendly foam glass. Low density foam glass is an effective heat insulating material and can be produced just by using recycle glass and foaming...... additives. In this work we recycle the CRT panel glass to synthesize the foam glass as a crucial component of building and insulating materials. The synthesis conditions such as foaming temperature, duration, glass particle size, type and concentrations of foaming agents, and so on are optimized by...... performing systematic experiments. In particular, the concentration of foaming agents is an important parameter that influences the size of bubbles and the distribution of bubbles throughout the sample. The foam glasses are characterised regarding density and open/closed porosity. Differential scanning...

  18. New Flexible FR Polyurethane Foams for Energy Absorption Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of new polyurethane (PU) insulation foams through a non-toxic environmentally friendly composite approach. Target FR foams will exhibit high heat flow...

  19. Stability of minoxidil in Espumil foam base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Christine M; Sorenson, Bridget; Whaley, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Minoxidil is a drug used to stimulate hair growth and to slow balding. It is marketed under a number of trade names, including Rogaine, and is available in varying strength dose forms from a number of generic manufacturers. Minoxidil is available in oral and topical forms. In topical form, it can be applied by a metered-spray or rub-on applicator. A hydroalcoholic compounding vehicle can minimize greasiness, itching, burning, and contact dermatitis where low concentrations of ethanol and propylene glycol are present. Espumil Foam Base contains low concentrations of these ingredients and also can form a foam on topical application. Espumil's unique delivery by foam-activating packaging assures simple application to difficult-to-treat areas, and it vanishes quickly after application, keeping it in place and avoiding health skin areas. The objective of this study was to determine the stability of minoxidil in Espumil Foam Base. The studied sample was compounded into a 50-mg/mL solution and stored in a plastic foam-activating bottle at room temperature conditions. Three samples were assayed at each time point out to 90 days by a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method. The method was validated for its specificity through forced-degradation studies. The beyond-use-date is at least 90 days, based on data collected when this formulation was stored at room temperature, protected from light. PMID:23696178

  20. Effects of ultrasound on polymeric foam porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Sanchez, C; Corney, J R

    2008-04-01

    A variety of materials require functionally graded cellular microstructures whose porosity is engineered to meet specific applications (e.g. mimic bone structure for orthopaedic applications; fulfil mechanical, thermal or acoustic constraints in structural foamed components, etc.). Although a huge variety of foams can be manufactured with homogenous porosity, there are no generic processes for controlling the distribution of porosity within the resulting matrix. Motivated by the desire to create a flexible process for engineering heterogeneous foams, the authors have investigated how ultrasound, applied during the formation of a polyurethane foam, affects its cellular structure. The experimental results demonstrated how the parameters of ultrasound exposure (i.e. frequency and applied power) influenced the volume and distribution of pores within the final polyurethane matrix: the data demonstrates that porosity (i.e. volume fraction) varies in direct proportion to both the acoustic pressure and frequency of the ultrasound signal. The effects of ultrasound on porosity demonstrated by this work offer the prospect of a manufacturing process that can adjust the cellular geometry of foam and hence ensure that the resulting characteristics match the functional requirements. PMID:17602849

  1. Field verification of CO sub 2 -foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.D.; Heller, J.P.; Weiss, W.W.

    1992-05-01

    In September 1989, the Petroleum Recovery Research Center (PRRC), a division of New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, received a grant from the US Department of Energy (DOE) for a project entitled Field Verification of CO{sub 2} Foam.'' The grant provided for an extension of the PRRC laboratory work to a field testing stage to be performed in collaboration with an oil producer actively conducting a CO{sub 2} flood. The objectives of this project are to: (1) conduct reservoir studies, laboratory tests, simulation runs, and field tests to evaluate the use of foam for mobility control or fluid diversion in a New Mexico CO{sub 2} flood, and (2) evaluate the concept of CO{sub 2}-foam in the field by using a reservoir where CO{sub 2} flooding is ongoing, characterizing the reservoir, modeling the process, and monitoring performance of the field test. Seven tasks were identified for the successful completion of the project: (1) evaluate and select a field site, (2) develop an initial site- specific plan, (3) conduct laboratory CO{sub 2}-foam mobility tests, (4) perform reservoir simulations, (5) design the foam slug, (6) implement a field test, and (7) evaluate results.

  2. Fire-Induced Response in Foam Encapsulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek, T.T.; Chu, T.Y.; Erickson, K.L.; Gill, W.; Hobbs, M.L.; Humphries, L.L.; Renlund, A.M.; Ulibarri, T.A.

    1999-04-02

    The paper provides a concise overview of a coordinated experimental/theoretical/numerical program at Sandia National Laboratories to develop an experimentally validated model of fire-induced response of foam-filled engineered systems for nuclear and transportation safety applications. Integral experiments are performed to investigate the thermal response of polyurethane foam-filled systems exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. A suite of laboratory experiments is performed to characterize the decomposition chemistry of polyurethane. Mass loss and energy associated with foam decomposition and chemical structures of the virgin and decomposed foam are determined. Decomposition chemistry is modeled as the degradation of macromolecular structures by bond breaking followed by vaporization of small fragments of the macromolecule with high vapor pressures. The chemical decomposition model is validated against the laboratory data. Data from integral experiments is used to assess and validate a FEM foam thermal response model with the chemistry model developed from the decomposition experiments. Good agreement was achieved both in the progression of the decomposition front and the in-depth thermal response.

  3. Advancing Risk Assessment through the Application of Systems Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, John Michael; Kleensang, André; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Hayes, A. Wallace

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessment is the process of quantifying the probability of a harmful effect to individuals or populations from human activities. Mechanistic approaches to risk assessment have been generally referred to as systems toxicology. Systems toxicology makes use of advanced analytical and computational tools to integrate classical toxicology and quantitative analysis of large networks of molecular and functional changes occurring across multiple levels of biological organization. Three presentations including two case studies involving both in vitro and in vivo approaches described the current state of systems toxicology and the potential for its future application in chemical risk assessment. PMID:26977253

  4. CARBONIZED STARCH MICROCELLULAR FOAM-CELLULOSE FIBER COMPOSITE STRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew R. Rutledge; Richard A. Venditti; Joel J. Pawlak; Sameer Patel; Janderson L. Cibils

    2008-01-01

    The production of microporous carbon foams from renewable starch microcellular foam-fiber (SMCF-Fiber) composites is described. Carbon foams are used in applications such as thermal insulation, battery electrodes, filters, fuel cells, and medical devices. SMCF-Fiber compos-ites were created from an aquagel. The water in the aquagel was exchanged with ethanol and then dried and carbonized. Higher amylose content starches and fiber contents of up to 4% improved the processability of the foam. ...

  5. Foam for Flow Assurance in Gas-Condensate Pipelines

    OpenAIRE

    Karam, Thereza

    2013-01-01

    Use of foam in the oil industry is employed for lifting cuttings in drilling operations, for removal of liquid loading in vertical wells and for increasing oil recovery. Limited researches discussed the foam applicability as a flow assurance practice. This study is an initial attempt to investigate the possibility of using foam to remove or reduce liquid accumulations in horizontal gas-condensate pipelines. The different rheological models of foam had been examined along with the correspondin...

  6. Low-density, salt-loaded foams. [RbF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinde, J.A.

    1979-01-10

    An experiment was conducted at LLL that required low-density, fine-celled foams uniformly loaded with rubidium. Foams meeting these requirements were produced by impregnating foams made from polyacrylonitrile with rubidium fluoride. Foams with densities from 0.025 to 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ were prepared and loaded with 0.002 to 0.20 g/cm/sup 3/ of rubidium fluoride.

  7. Study on the high performance coal gangue foam concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin gang Yu; Hong fei Wang; Yue xiang Li; Yi Gong; De jun Li; Jian xiong Ye; Dong Shu; Ming Wei [Chongqing University, Chongqing (China)

    2009-07-01

    The high performance coal gangue foam concrete with the dry density less than 440kg/m{sup 3}, the thermal conductivity less than 0.085W/(m.K) and the compressive strength over 2.0 MPa was prepared. The microstructure of the coal gangue foam concrete was analyzed by SEM. The hydrates of the coal gangue foam concrete were detected by XRD, and the temperature stability of the coal gangue foam concrete was analyzed by DTA and DSC.

  8. The Role of Foaming Agent and Processing Route in the Mechanical Performance of Fabricated Aluminum Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nakamura

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of the present study highlight the role of foaming agent and processing route in influencing the contamination of cell wall material by side products, which, in turn, affect the macroscopic mechanical response of closed-cell Al-foams. Several kinds of Al-foams have been produced with pure Al by the Alporas melt process and powder metallurgical technique, all performed either with conventional TiH2 foaming agent or CaCO3 as an alternative. Mechanical characteristics of contaminating products induced by processing additives, all of which were presented in one or another kind of Al-foam, have been determined in indentation experiments. Damage behavior of these contaminations affects the micro-mechanism of deformation and favors either plastic buckling or brittle failure of the cell walls. It is justified that there is no discrepancy between experimental values of compressive strengths for Al-foams comprising ductile Al + Al4Ca eutectic domains and those prescribed by theoretical models for closed-cell structure. However, the presence of low ductile Al + Al3Ti + Al4Ca eutectic domains and brittle particles/layers of Al3Ti, fine CaCO3/CaO particles, Al2O3 oxide network, and, especially, residues of partially reacted TiH2, results in reducing the compressive strength to values close to or even below those of open-cell foams of the same relative density.

  9. Studies on separation of heavy metals from acidic solutions by foam fractionation with respect to an application on acidic soil extracs

    OpenAIRE

    Wömmel, Simone; Calmano, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation is presented on the batch foam fractionation of the heavy metal cations Pb2+, Cd2+, Cu2+, Sb3+ and As5+ from diluted aqueous solutions with hexamethylenedithiocarbamate (HMDC) as complexing agent and sodiumdodecylsulfate (SDS) as surfactant. Among the considered pH-values of 2, 4 and 7 the pH 2 experiments allow a direct application of foam fractionation on acidic extracts from heavy metal contaminated soil. The experiments at pH 2 and pH 4 show better results th...

  10. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Rekha R.; Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry; Long, Kevin Nicholas; Russick, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    We are developing computational models to help understand manufacturing processes, final properties and aging of structural foam, polyurethane PMDI. Th e resulting model predictions of density and cure gradients from the manufacturing process will be used as input to foam heat transfer and mechanical models. BKC 44306 PMDI-10 and BKC 44307 PMDI-18 are the most prevalent foams used in structural parts. Experiments needed to parameterize models of the reaction kinetics and the equations of motion during the foam blowing stages were described for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 in the first of this report series (Mondy et al. 2014). BKC 44307 PMDI-18 is a new foam that will be used to make relatively dense structural supports via over packing. It uses a different catalyst than those in the BKC 44306 family of foams; hence, we expect that the reaction kineti cs models must be modified. Here we detail the experiments needed to characteriz e the reaction kinetics of BKC 44307 PMDI-18 and suggest parameters for the model based on these experiments. In additi on, the second part of this report describes data taken to provide input to the preliminary nonlinear visco elastic structural response model developed for BKC 44306 PMDI-10 foam. We show that the standard cu re schedule used by KCP does not fully cure the material, and, upon temperature elevation above 150 o C, oxidation or decomposition reactions occur that alter the composition of the foam. These findings suggest that achieving a fully cured foam part with this formulation may be not be possible through therma l curing. As such, visco elastic characterization procedures developed for curing thermosets can provide only approximate material properties, since the state of the material continuously evolves during tests.

  11. Neutrons attenuation on composite metal foams and hybrid open-cell Al foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive investigation of monochromatic neutron attenuation effectiveness for close-cell composite metal foams (CMFs) and open-cell Al foam infiltrated with variety of second phase materials is presented using both experimental and theoretical methods. The experimental results indicated higher neutron flux reduction in open-cell Al foam with fillers compared to the close-cell CMFs due to their large percentage of low Z elements such as hydrogen, boron and carbon, with superior neutron attenuation performance, in their filler materials. The main factor controlling the shielding effectiveness of steel–steel CMFs is found to be the ratio of the thickness of the sphere wall to the sphere radius while the intermetallic phases in the matrix of Al–steel CMFs seem to have a major role on their shielding properties. Successful models that link the observed material properties and microstructure have been developed using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) to verify the accuracy of the experimental results. Close-cell CMFs were proposed through three different sphere arrangements: simple cubic, body center cubic and face center cubic, whereas open-cell Al foam with fillers was represented by creating a three-dimensional structure using periodic unit cell through two approaches. The simulation results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental values. This research indicates the potential of utilizing light-weight close-cell CMFs and open-cell Al foam with fillers as nuclear shields replacing conventional materials to achieve a specified shielding level with additional benefits of excellent energy absorption and thermal isolation. - Highlights: • Close-cell metal foams were processed with various sphere sizes. • Open-cell foams were infiltrated with hydrogen-rich fillers. • Open-cell foams with fillers exhibit excellent neutron shielding efficiency. • Close-cell CMFs were modeled through simple, body center, and face center cubic

  12. Insulating Foams Save Money, Increase Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Scientists at Langley Research Center created polyimide foam insulation for reusable cryogenic propellant tanks on the space shuttle. Meanwhile, a small Hialeah, Florida-based business, PolyuMAC Inc., was looking for advanced foams to use in the customized manufacturing of acoustical and thermal insulation. The company contacted NASA, licensed the material, and then the original inventors worked with the company's engineers to make a new material that was better for both parties. The new version, a high performance, flame retardant, flexible polyimide foam, is used for insulating NASA cryogenic propellant tanks and shows promise for use on watercraft, aircraft, spacecraft, electronics and electrical products, automobiles and automotive products, recreation equipment, and building and construction materials.

  13. Foam insulated transfer line test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles of underground insulated piping will be installed at the Hanford site to transfer liquid waste. Significant cost savings may be realized by using pre-fabricated polyurethane foam insulated piping. Measurements were made on sections of insulated pipe to determine the insulation's resistance to axial expansion of the pipe, the force required to compress the foam in the leg of an expansion loop and the time required for heat up and cool down of a buried piping loop. These measurements demonstrated that the peak axial force increases with the amount of adhesion between the encasement pipe and the insulation. The compressive strength of the foam is too great to accommodate the thermal growth of long straight pipe sections into the expansion loops. Mathematical models of the piping system's thermal behavior can be refined by data from the heated piping loop

  14. Plastic Foam Withstands Greater Temperatures And Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, John A.; Macarthur, Doug

    1993-01-01

    Improved plastic foam suitable for use in foam-core laminated composite parts and in tooling for making fiber/matrix-composite parts. Stronger at high temperatures, more thermally and dimensionally stable, machinable, resistant to chemical degradation, and less expensive. Compatible with variety of matrix resins. Made of polyisocyanurate blown with carbon dioxide and has density of 12 to 15 pounds per cubic feet. Does not contibute to depletion of ozone from atmosphere. Improved foam used in cores of composite panels in such diverse products as aircraft, automobiles, railroad cars, boats, and sporting equipment like surfboards, skis, and skateboards. Also used in thermally stable flotation devices in submersible vehicles. Machined into mandrels upon which filaments wound to make shells.

  15. Quasi-one-dimensional foam drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassia, P.; Cilliers, J. J.; Neethling, S. J.; Ventura-Medina, E.

    Foam drainage is considered in a froth flotation cell. Air flow through the foam is described by a simple two-dimensional deceleration flow, modelling the foam spilling over a weir. Foam microstructure is given in terms of the number of channels (Plateau borders) per unit area, which scales as the inverse square of bubble size. The Plateau border number density decreases with height in the foam, and also decreases horizontally as the weir is approached. Foam drainage equations, applicable in the dry foam limit, are described. These can be used to determine the average cross-sectional area of a Plateau border, denoted A, as a function of position in the foam. Quasi-one-dimensional solutions are available in which A only varies vertically, in spite of the two-dimensional nature of the air flow and Plateau border number density fields. For such situations the liquid drainage relative to the air flow is purely vertical. The parametric behaviour of the system is investigated with respect to a number of dimensionless parameters: K (the strength of capillary suction relative to gravity), α (the deceleration of the air flow), and n and h (respectively, the horizontal and vertical variations of the Plateau border number density). The parameter K is small, implying the existence of boundary layer solutions: capillary suction is negligible except in thin layers near the bottom boundary. The boundary layer thickness (when converted back to dimensional variables) is independent of the height of the foam. The deceleration parameter α affects the Plateau border area on the top boundary: weaker decelerations give larger Plateau border areas at the surface. For weak decelerations, there is rapid convergence of the boundary layer solutions at the bottom onto ones with negligible capillary suction higher up. For strong decelerations, two branches of solutions for A are possible in the K=0 limit: one is smooth, and the other has a distinct kink. The full system, with small but non

  16. Foam insulated transfer line test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squier, D.M.

    1994-06-01

    Miles of underground insulated piping will be installed at the Hanford site to transfer liquid waste. Significant cost savings may be realized by using pre-fabricated polyurethane foam insulated piping. Measurements were made on sections of insulated pipe to determine the insulation`s resistance to axial expansion of the pipe, the force required to compress the foam in the leg of an expansion loop and the time required for heat up and cool down of a buried piping loop. These measurements demonstrated that the peak axial force increases with the amount of adhesion between the encasement pipe and the insulation. The compressive strength of the foam is too great to accommodate the thermal growth of long straight pipe sections into the expansion loops. Mathematical models of the piping system`s thermal behavior can be refined by data from the heated piping loop.

  17. Microstructural characteristics of graphene/polycarbonate nanocomposite foams

    OpenAIRE

    Gedler, Gabriel; Sousa Pais Antunes, Marcelo de; Rende, Deniz; Schadler, Linda; Velasco Perero, José Ignacio; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2014-01-01

    The microstructural characteristics of polycarbonate-graphene nanocomposite foams prepared using supercritical CO2 foaming are investigated using small and wide angle X-ray diffraction to understand the effect of graphene, cellular microstructure and polymer morphology on electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness. The observed microstructural changes suggest a preferential orientation of polycarbonate chains and graphene nanoplatelets induced by foaming, which could explain the e...

  18. Thermomechanical analyses of phenolic foam reinforced with glass fiber mat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Over 10% glass fiber was used to reinforce phenolic foam in the shape of glass fiber mat. • Nucleating agents were used together with glass fiber mat and improved tensile strength of phenolic foam by 215.6%. • Nucleating agents lead to a smaller bubble size of phenolic foam. • The glass transition temperature of phenolic foam remained unchanged during the reinforcement. - Abstract: In this paper, thermomechanical analysis (TMA) and dynamic mechanical analysis were employed to study the properties of phenolic foam reinforced with glass fiber mat. Unreinforced phenolic foam was taken as the control sample. Mechanical tests and scanning electron microscopy were performed to confirm the results of TMA. The results show that glass fiber mat reinforcement improves the mechanical performance of phenolic foam, and nucleating agents improve it further. Phenolic foam reinforced with glass fiber mat has a smaller thermal expansion coefficient compared with unreinforced foam. The storage modulus of the reinforced phenolic foam is also higher than that in unreinforced foam, whereas the loss modulus of the former is lower than that of the latter. The glass transition temperature of the phenolic foam matrix remains unchanged during the reinforcement

  19. 46 CFR 179.240 - Foam flotation material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., see 46 CFR 175.600). The fire resistance test is not required. (2) Foam may be installed only in void spaces that are free of ignition sources, unless the foam complies with the requirements of 33 CFR 183... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foam flotation material. 179.240 Section...

  20. Foam Fractionation of Lycopene: An Undergraduate Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zhang, Mingjie; Hu, Yongliang

    2010-01-01

    A novel experiment for the extraction of lycopene from tomato paste by foam fractionation is described. Foam fractionation is a process for separating and concentrating chemicals by utilizing differences in their surface activities. Extraction of lycopene by foam fractionation is a new method that has not been previously reported in the…

  1. Co-doped titanium oxide foam and water disinfection device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shang, Jian-Ku; Wu, Pinggui; Xie, Rong-Cai

    2016-01-26

    A quaternary oxide foam, comprises an open-cell foam containing (a) a dopant metal, (b) a dopant nonmetal, (c) titanium, and (d) oxygen. The foam has the advantages of a high surface area and a low back pressure during dynamic flow applications. The inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) was demonstrated in a simple photoreactor.

  2. Molded ultra-low density microcellular foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra-low density (< 0.01 g/cc) microcellular foams were required for the NARYA pulsed-power-driven x-ray laser development program. Because of their extreme fragility, molded pieces would be necessary to successfully field these foams in the pulsed power accelerator. All of the foams evaluated were made by the thermally induced phase separation technique from solutions of water soluble polymers. The process involved rapidly freezing the solution to induce the phase separation, and then freeze drying to remove the water without destroying the foam's structure. More than sixty water soluble polymers were evaluated by attempting to make their solutions into foams. The foams were evaluated for shrinkage, density, and microstructure to determine their suitability for molding and meeting the required density and cell size requirements of 5.0 mg/cc and less than twenty μmeters. Several promising water soluble polymers were identified including the polyactylic acids, guar gums, polyactylamide, and polyethylene oxide. Because of thier purity, structure, and low shrinkage, the polyacrylic acids were chosen to develop molding processes. The initial requirements were for 2.0 cm. long molded rods with diameters of 1.0, 2.0. and 3.0 mm. These rods were made by freezing the solution in thin walled silicon rubber molds, extracting the frozen preform from the mold, and then freeze drying. Requirements for half rods and half annuli necessitated using aluminum molds. Again we successfully molded these shapes. Our best efforts to date involve molding annuli with 3.0 mm outside diameters and 2.0 mm inside diameters

  3. Molded ultra-low density microcellular foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rand, P.B.; Montoya, O.J.

    1986-07-01

    Ultra-low density (< 0.01 g/cc) microcellular foams were required for the NARYA pulsed-power-driven x-ray laser development program. Because of their extreme fragility, molded pieces would be necessary to successfully field these foams in the pulsed power accelerator. All of the foams evaluated were made by the thermally induced phase separation technique from solutions of water soluble polymers. The process involved rapidly freezing the solution to induce the phase separation, and then freeze drying to remove the water without destroying the foam's structure. More than sixty water soluble polymers were evaluated by attempting to make their solutions into foams. The foams were evaluated for shrinkage, density, and microstructure to determine their suitability for molding and meeting the required density and cell size requirements of 5.0 mg/cc and less than twenty ..mu..meters. Several promising water soluble polymers were identified including the polyactylic acids, guar gums, polyactylamide, and polyethylene oxide. Because of thier purity, structure, and low shrinkage, the polyacrylic acids were chosen to develop molding processes. The initial requirements were for 2.0 cm. long molded rods with diameters of 1.0, 2.0. and 3.0 mm. These rods were made by freezing the solution in thin walled silicon rubber molds, extracting the frozen preform from the mold, and then freeze drying. Requirements for half rods and half annuli necessitated using aluminum molds. Again we successfully molded these shapes. Our best efforts to date involve molding annuli with 3.0 mm outside diameters and 2.0 mm inside diameters.

  4. Toxicology of sulfur in ruminants: review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandylis, K.

    1984-10-01

    This review deals with the toxicology of sulfur in ruminants including toxicity, neurotoxic effects, and mechanism of toxic action of hydrogen sulfide, clinical signs, and treatment. It will report effects of excessive intake of sulfur by ruminants on feed intake, animal performance, ruminal digestion and motility, rumination, and other physiological functions. Poisoning of animals with sulfur from industrial emissions (sulfur dioxide) also is discussed. Excessive quantities of dietary sulfur (above .3 to .4%) as sulfate or elemental sulfur may cause toxic effects and in extreme cases can be fatal. The means is discussed whereby consumption of excessive amounts of sulfur leads to toxic effects. 53 references, 1 table.

  5. Collaborative development of predictive toxicology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Barry; Douglas, Nicki; Helma, Christoph; Rautenberg, Micha; Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin; Nikolova, Ivelina; Benigni, Romualdo; Tcheremenskaia, Olga; Kramer, Stefan; Girschick, Tobias; Buchwald, Fabian; Wicker, Joerg; Karwath, Andreas; Gütlein, Martin; Maunz, Andreas; Sarimveis, Haralambos; Melagraki, Georgia; Afantitis, Antreas; Sopasakis, Pantelis; Gallagher, David; Poroikov, Vladimir; Filimonov, Dmitry; Zakharov, Alexey; Lagunin, Alexey; Gloriozova, Tatyana; Novikov, Sergey; Skvortsova, Natalia; Druzhilovsky, Dmitry; Chawla, Sunil; Ghosh, Indira; Ray, Surajit; Patel, Hitesh; Escher, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    OpenTox provides an interoperable, standards-based Framework for the support of predictive toxicology data management, algorithms, modelling, validation and reporting. It is relevant to satisfying the chemical safety assessment requirements of the REACH legislation as it supports access to experimental data, (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship models, and toxicological information through an integrating platform that adheres to regulatory requirements and OECD validation principles. Initial research defined the essential components of the Framework including the approach to data access, schema and management, use of controlled vocabularies and ontologies, architecture, web service and communications protocols, and selection and integration of algorithms for predictive modelling. OpenTox provides end-user oriented tools to non-computational specialists, risk assessors, and toxicological experts in addition to Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for developers of new applications. OpenTox actively supports public standards for data representation, interfaces, vocabularies and ontologies, Open Source approaches to core platform components, and community-based collaboration approaches, so as to progress system interoperability goals.The OpenTox Framework includes APIs and services for compounds, datasets, features, algorithms, models, ontologies, tasks, validation, and reporting which may be combined into multiple applications satisfying a variety of different user needs. OpenTox applications are based on a set of distributed, interoperable OpenTox API-compliant REST web services. The OpenTox approach to ontology allows for efficient mapping of complementary data coming from different datasets into a unifying structure having a shared terminology and representation.Two initial OpenTox applications are presented as an illustration of the potential impact of OpenTox for high-quality and consistent structure-activity relationship modelling of REACH

  6. Collaborative development of predictive toxicology applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Barry

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OpenTox provides an interoperable, standards-based Framework for the support of predictive toxicology data management, algorithms, modelling, validation and reporting. It is relevant to satisfying the chemical safety assessment requirements of the REACH legislation as it supports access to experimental data, (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship models, and toxicological information through an integrating platform that adheres to regulatory requirements and OECD validation principles. Initial research defined the essential components of the Framework including the approach to data access, schema and management, use of controlled vocabularies and ontologies, architecture, web service and communications protocols, and selection and integration of algorithms for predictive modelling. OpenTox provides end-user oriented tools to non-computational specialists, risk assessors, and toxicological experts in addition to Application Programming Interfaces (APIs for developers of new applications. OpenTox actively supports public standards for data representation, interfaces, vocabularies and ontologies, Open Source approaches to core platform components, and community-based collaboration approaches, so as to progress system interoperability goals. The OpenTox Framework includes APIs and services for compounds, datasets, features, algorithms, models, ontologies, tasks, validation, and reporting which may be combined into multiple applications satisfying a variety of different user needs. OpenTox applications are based on a set of distributed, interoperable OpenTox API-compliant REST web services. The OpenTox approach to ontology allows for efficient mapping of complementary data coming from different datasets into a unifying structure having a shared terminology and representation. Two initial OpenTox applications are presented as an illustration of the potential impact of OpenTox for high-quality and consistent structure

  7. Toxicological applications of neutron-activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal neutron-activation analysis is recognised as a useful tool for trace element studies in toxicology. This paper describes some recent applications of the technique to three elements when ingested by people in excess of normal intake Two of the elements (copper and chromium) are essential to life and one (bromine) is as yet unclassified. Three deaths were investiagted and trace element levels compared with normal levels from healthy subjects in the same geographical area who had died as a result of violence. (author)

  8. [Meta-analysis in neurobehavioral toxicological studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y X; Liang, Y X

    1994-09-01

    Meta-analysis was used to deal with the data collected in neurobehavioral toxicological studies to synthesize their findings quantitatively. Results revealed neurotoxic chemicals could cause changes in cognitive abilities, psychomotor function and emotion of persons exposed. However, each toxicant had its distinct effects on neurobehavior, for example, lead mainly impairs touch sense, memory, emotion and cognitive abilities, mercury does intelligence, concentration and motor stability, and carbon disulfide does eye-hand coordination. It suggested meta-analysis could be directive to selecting the best combination of neurobehavioral tests. PMID:7842892

  9. Failure of classical elasticity in auxetic foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Roh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Poisson's ratio, ν, was measured for four materials, a rubbery polymer, a conventional soft foam, and two auxetic foams. We find that for the first two materials, having ν ≥ 0.2, the experimental determinations of Poisson's ratio are in good agreement with values calculated from the shear and tensile moduli using the equations of classical elasticity. However, for the two auxetic materials (ν < 0, the equations of classical elasticity give values significantly different from the measured ν. We offer an interpretation of these results based on a recently published analysis of the bounds on Poisson's ratio for classical elasticity to be applicable.

  10. Froth flotation via microparticle stabilized foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a still growing interest in the recovery of rare earth elements due to their manifold industrial and technological applications. We present here a simple and effective method for the enrichment of micrometer sized La2O3 particles via microparticle stabilized foams. By using the short chain amphiphile (1-hexyl)trimethylammonium bromide (C6TAB) foam that is generated by surface modified particles only can be generated. This technique allows a more selective and specific particle transport mechanism. The results are discussed in terms of surface charges and transport mechanisms. Furthermore, the effects of particle concentration, pH and amphiphile concentration are studied and evaluated. (authors)

  11. Estimation of octanol/water partition coefficient and aqueous solubility of environmental chemicals using molecular fingerprints and machine learning methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Octanol/water partition coefficient (logP) and aqueous solubility (logS) are two important parameters in pharmacology and toxicology studies, and experimental measurements are usually time-consuming and expensive. In the present research, novel methods are presented for the estim...

  12. Liquids, gels, foams and supercritical fluids: four states of matter for radioactive decontamination of solids - 59158

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: To face the future challenges in the nuclear industry as dismantling and decommissioning, the Advanced Decontamination Processes Laboratory (Laboratoire des Procedes Avances de Decontamination - LPAD) from the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) is developing new radioactive decontamination of solids processes to protect workers and to reduce strongly the quantity of secondary wastes produced. We have focused in the last past years on the use of four states of matter to develop new patented nuclear decontamination processes: micellar aqueous solutions, gels, foams and supercritical fluids. The conference gives an overview of these four ways to decontaminate a solid surface. The major applications and results obtained on real decontamination operations will be presented for each process. First, micellar solutions based on copolymers blocks surfactants are presented for radioactive degreasing. The advantage to formulate self-drying and cracking gels films sprayed on metallic surfaces is then detailed. For decontamination foams, an approach using new additives polymers or particles- is defended to obtain high life time foams that are able to treat huge and complex shape materials such as fission products tanks or steam generator. At the end, original works to treat textiles or gloves boxes using surfactants in CO2 supercritical fluid are given. Finally, the major challenges to develop more secure processes and to reach a better decontamination efficiency are given. (authors)

  13. Modification of aqueous enzymatic oil extraction to increase the yield of corn oil from dry fractionated corn germ

    Science.gov (United States)

    In previous aqueous enzymatic extraction experiments we reported an oil yield of 67 grams from 800 grams of dry fractionated corn germ. In the current experiments, a dispersion of 10% cooked, dry-fractionated germ in water and was treated with amylases and a cellulase complex. A foam fraction was s...

  14. The Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP): an Analysis of the First Year of a Novel Toxicology Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anselm; Vohra, Rais; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Koutsogiannis, Zeff; Graeme, Kimberlie; Dargan, Paul I; Wood, David M; Greene, Shaun L

    2015-09-01

    The international boundaries to medical education are becoming less marked as new technologies such as multiuser videoconferencing are developed and become more accessible to help bridge the communication gaps. The Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP) is aimed at connecting clinicians in countries with established clinical toxicology services to clinicians in countries without clinical toxicologists around the globe. Centers that manage or consult on toxicology cases were registered through the American College of Medical Toxicology website via Survey Monkey®. Data was analyzed retrospectively from February 2014 to January 2015. Google hangouts® was used as the main conferencing software, but some sites preferred the use of Skype®. Registration data included contact details and toxicology background and qualifications. Thirty sites in 19 different countries in Australasia, Europe, Africa, and America were registered. Twenty-eight (93 %) sites were located in a major urban center, one (3.5 %) site in a major rural center and one (3.5 %) a private practice. Expectations of GETUP included sharing toxicology cases and education (30, 100 % of sites), assistance with toxicology management guidelines (2, 7 %), assistance with providing a toxicology teaching curriculum in languages other than English (2, 7 %), and managing toxicology presentations in resource-poor settings, international collaboration, and toxicovigilance (2 sites, 7 %). Twenty-two conferences were performed during the first 12 months with a mean of 3 cases per conference. GETUP has connected countries and clinical units with and without toxicology services and will provide a platform to improve international collaboration in clinical toxicology. PMID:25952764

  15. Toxicological evaluation and risk assessment of chemical mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassee, F.R.; Groten, J.P.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Feron, V.J.

    1998-01-01

    A major objective of combination toxicology is to establish whether a mixture of chemicals will result in an effect similar to that expected on the basis of additivity. This requires understanding of the basic concepts of the combined toxicological action of the compounds of the mixture: simple simi

  16. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methanol (Noncancer) (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On May 3, 2013, the Toxicological Review of Methanol (noncancer) (Revised External Review Draft) was posted for public review and comment. Subsequently, the draft Toxicological Review, Appendices, and draft IRIS Summary were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agenci...

  17. Toxicología de metales y minerales

    OpenAIRE

    García Fernández, Antonio Juan

    2011-01-01

    Presentaciones de los temas de Toxicología de metales y minerales: mercurio, cadmio, plomo, cobre, arsénico, flúor, selenio, zinc, talio, etc impartidas en la asignatura de Toxicología en el curso 2011/12. Se aborda desde las perspectivas ambiental, alimentaria y clínica, tanto sobre los animales como sobre las personas.

  18. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE CONSULTATION DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Septemeber 30, 2010, the draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agenc...

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF REFERENCE ARTEMIA III FOR MARINE TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASTM Practice for Using Brine Shrimp Nauplii as Food for Test Animals in Aquatic Toxicology Tests (E 1203) suggests use of Reference Artemis as a reference standard for evaluating other batches of brine shrimp as food for organisms used in toxicology. in 1988, the U.S. EPA was ab...

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Urea (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On September 28, 2010, the Toxicological Review of Urea and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Of...

  1. Male Reproductive Toxicology: Environmental Exposures vs Reproductive Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like the lecture this chapter begins with an overview of male reproductive biology and transitions into male reproductive toxicology. It ends with a brief discussion of the strengths and weaknesses in male reproductive toxicology and epidemiology today. This chapter is highly il...

  2. Microbial analysis in biogas reactors suffering by foaming incidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kougias, Panagiotis; De Francisci, Davide; Treu, Laura;

    2014-01-01

    Foam formation can lead to total failure of digestion process in biogas plants. In the present study, possible correlation between foaming and the presence of specific microorganisms in biogas reactors was elucidated. The microbial ecology of continuous fed digesters overloaded with proteins......, or decrease the surface tension of the media, increased their relative abundance after foam formation. Finally, a microorganism similar to widely known foaming bacteria (Nocardia and Desulfotomaculum) was found to increase its relative abundance in all reactors once foam was observed, regardless of the used...

  3. Computation of Blast Pressures foam Propellant for Compaction of Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Agarwal

    1974-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of blast pressure characteristics is a pre-requisite for a suitable application of foam propellant to emergency military construction such as compacting of the soil from an aircraft using the foam propellant. The foam propellant considered here is a combination of hydrazine and ammonium perchlorate. The blast pressure is found to be a function of the quantity of foam propellant used and the distance of the observation point. This paper attempts to compute the blast pressure versus time characteristics of a foam propellant strip.

  4. Chemical characterization of a paper mill wastewater foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foams from mill wastewater aeration ponds were collapsed and separated by a freeze, thaw, and filter method. The dried solids were of a brittle, resinous, nonfibrous type. They could release up to 30% of their mass into fresh water and confer foaming ability on the water extracts. Thus, solids accumulating in the treatment pond may serve as a reservoir for foaming agents and give rise to episodes of foaming in the final effluent even after further treatment. Measurements of foam stabilities, surface tensions, and estimation of alkali lignins and lignosulfonates by unltraviolet absorption spectrophotometry and the Pearl-Benson colorimetric method are reported

  5. Aqueous solubility, dispersibility and toxicity of biodiesels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollebone, B.P.; Fieldhouse, B.; Lumley, T.C.; Landriault, M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). ; Doe, K.; Jackman, P. [Environment Canada, Moncton, NB (Canada). Toxicology Laboratory, Environmental Science Centre

    2007-07-01

    The renewed interest in the use of biological fuels can be attributed to that fact that feedstocks for fatty-acid ester biodiesels are renewable and can be reclaimed from waste. Although there are significant benefits to using biodiesels, their increased use leaves potential for accidental release to the environment. Therefore, their environmental behaviours and impacts must be evaluated along with the risk associated with their use. Biodiesel fuels may be made from soy oil, canola oil, reclaimed restaurant grease, fish oil and animal fat. The toxicological fate of biofuel depends on the variability of its chemical composition. This study provided an initial assessment of the aqueous fate and effects of biodiesel from a broad range of commonly available feedstocks and their blends with petroleum diesels. The study focused primarily on the fate and impact of these fuels in fresh-water. The use of chemical dispersion as a countermeasure for saltwater was also investigated. The exposure of aquatic ecosystems to biodiesels and petroleum diesel occurs via the transfer of material from the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) into the aqueous phase, as both soluble and dispersed components. The aqueous solubilities of the fuels were determined from the equilibrium water-accommodated fraction concentrations. The acute toxicities of many biodiesels were reported for 3 test species used by Environment Canada for toxicological evaluation, namely rainbow trout, the water flea and a luminescent bacterium. This study also evaluated the natural potential for dispersion of the fuels in the water column in both low and high-energy wave conditions. Chemical dispersion as a potential countermeasure for biodiesel spills was also evaluated using solubility testing, acute toxicity testing, and dispersibility testing. It was shown that biodiesels have much different fates and impacts from petroleum diesels. The compounds partitioning into the water column are also very different for each

  6. Aqueous solubility, dispersibility and toxicity of biodiesels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The renewed interest in the use of biological fuels can be attributed to that fact that feedstocks for fatty-acid ester biodiesels are renewable and can be reclaimed from waste. Although there are significant benefits to using biodiesels, their increased use leaves potential for accidental release to the environment. Therefore, their environmental behaviours and impacts must be evaluated along with the risk associated with their use. Biodiesel fuels may be made from soy oil, canola oil, reclaimed restaurant grease, fish oil and animal fat. The toxicological fate of biofuel depends on the variability of its chemical composition. This study provided an initial assessment of the aqueous fate and effects of biodiesel from a broad range of commonly available feedstocks and their blends with petroleum diesels. The study focused primarily on the fate and impact of these fuels in fresh-water. The use of chemical dispersion as a countermeasure for saltwater was also investigated. The exposure of aquatic ecosystems to biodiesels and petroleum diesel occurs via the transfer of material from the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) into the aqueous phase, as both soluble and dispersed components. The aqueous solubilities of the fuels were determined from the equilibrium water-accommodated fraction concentrations. The acute toxicities of many biodiesels were reported for 3 test species used by Environment Canada for toxicological evaluation, namely rainbow trout, the water flea and a luminescent bacterium. This study also evaluated the natural potential for dispersion of the fuels in the water column in both low and high-energy wave conditions. Chemical dispersion as a potential countermeasure for biodiesel spills was also evaluated using solubility testing, acute toxicity testing, and dispersibility testing. It was shown that biodiesels have much different fates and impacts from petroleum diesels. The compounds partitioning into the water column are also very different for each

  7. Space Toxicology Challenges and Ethical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Before delineating specific ways that nanotechnology enterprises might contribute to better management of toxicological risks during spaceflight, I will show how ethical considerations and several theories of justice can be applied to nanotechnology strategic plans. The principles that guide an ethical technical enterprise include autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, veracity and justice. Veracity (truth) is the underpinning principle; however, beyond this, proponents of nanotechnology must think carefully about balancing conflicting principles. For example, autonomy must yield to beneficence when fearful individuals simply lack knowledge to appreciate nanotechnology's beneficial advances. Justice is a complex topic upon which I will place six models: utilitarian, distributive, free-exchange/choice, individual dignity (social participation), equity vs. greed, and liberation of the poor. After briefly summarizing each model, I will present what I call an iterative-hybrid model of justice to show specifically how our thinking can be applied to nanotechnology enterprises. Within that broad landscape, I will discuss a single feature: how our early effort to understand health risks of carbon nanotubes fits into the iterative model. Finally, I will suggest ways that nanotechnology might advance our management of toxicological risks during spaceflight, but always with an eye toward how such advances might result in a more just world.

  8. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney A. Katz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U, and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles. Such weapons were used by the military in the Persian Gulf, the Balkans and elsewhere. The testing of depleted uranium weapons and their use in combat has resulted in environmental contamination and human exposure. Although the chemical and the toxicological behaviors of depleted uranium are essentially the same as those of natural uranium, the respective chemical forms and isotopic compositions in which they usually occur are different. The chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium can injure biological systems. Normal functioning of the kidney, liver, lung, and heart can be adversely affected by depleted uranium intoxication. The focus of this review is on the chemical and toxicological properties of depleted and natural uranium and some of the possible consequences from long term, low dose exposure to depleted uranium in the environment.

  9. TRANSGENIC FISH MODEL IN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Sharma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A number of experiments and the use of drugs have been performed in fish. The fish may be used as model organism in various biological experiments, including environmental toxicology. Aquatic animals are being engineered to increase aquaculture production, for medical and industrial research, and for ornamental reasons. Fish have been found to play an important role in assessing potential risks associated with exposure to toxic substances in aquatic environment. Hence, it has been thought that the development of transgenic fish can enhance the use of fish in environmental toxicology. India has developed experimental transgenics of rohu fish, zebra fish, cat fish and singhi fish. Genes, promoters and vectors of indigenous origin are now available for only two species namely rohu and singhi for engineering growth. Development of fish model carrying identical transgenes to those found in rodents is beneficial and has shown that several aspects of in vivo mutagenesis are similar between the two classes of vertebrates. Fish shows the frequencies of spontaneous mutations similar to rodents and respond to mutagen exposure consistent with known mutagenic mechanisms. The feasibility of in vivo mutation analysis using transgenic fish has been demonstrated and the potential value of transgenic fish as a comparative animal model has been illustrated. Therefore, the transgenic fish can give the significant contribution to study the environmental toxicity in animals as a whole.

  10. Trangenic fish as models in environmental toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, R N

    2001-01-01

    Historically, fish have played significant roles in assessing potential risks associated with exposure to chemical contamination in aquatic environments. Considering the contributions of transgenic rodent models to biomedicine, it is reasoned that the development of transgenic fish could enhance the role of fish in environmental toxicology. Application of transgenic fish in environmental studies remains at an early stage, but recent introduction of new models and methods demonstrates progress. Rapid advances are most evident in the area of in vivo mutagenesis using fish carrying transgenes that serve as recoverable mutational targets. These models highlight many advantages afforded by fish as models and illustrate important issues that apply broadly to transgenic fish in environmental toxicology. Development of fish models carrying identical transgenes to those found in rodents is beneficial and has revealed that numerous aspects of in vivo mutagenesis are similar between the two classes of vertebrates. Researchers have revealed that fish exhibit frequencies of spontaneous mutations similar to rodents and respond to mutagen exposure consistent with known mutagenic mechanisms. Results have demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo mutation analyses using transgenic fish and have illustrated their potential value as a comparative animal model. Challenges to development and application of transgenic fish relate to the needs for improved efficiencies in transgenic technology and in aspects of fish husbandry and use. By taking advantage of the valuable and unique attributes of fish as test organisms, it is anticipated that transgenic fish will make significant contributions to studies of environmentally induced diseases. PMID:11581523

  11. PIXE applications to the toxicological field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Several studies have been carried out in order to investigate the toxicological properties of some chemical elements in different type of biological samples. lon beam techniques, in particular PIXE, have been successfully used to analyze the elemental composition of food, beverage, plants and animal tissues. In this context, the PIXE line of the lon Implantation Laboratory (Porto Alegre, Brazil) have been used in the last few years to study food and beverage processing and biological specimens exposed to contaminated environment. The aim of this study is to present some of our results using PIXE analysis applied to toxicological research field. For instance, a recent published research [1] investigated the genotoxic and mutagenic effects in tobacco farmers exposed to metal-based formulated pesticides. Levels of Mg, AI, CI, Zn, Cr and Br, elements associated with DNA damage, were higher in the blood samples of tobacco farmers exposed to pesticide than in the non-exposed group. The occupational genotoxicity among copper smelters was also investigated [2]. The elemental content of blood samples were analyzed by PIXE. DNA damage in the peripheral blood Iymphocytes of workers exposed to copper smelter was observed. However, no clear correlation was found between the metal content and DNA damage. [1] F. R. da Silva, J. da Silva, M. C. AlIgayer, C. F. Simon, J. F. Dias, C. E. I. dos Santos, M. Salvador, C. Branco, N. B. Schneider, V. Kahl, P. Rohr, K. Kvitko, J. Hazard. Mat., 225-226 (2012) 81-90. (author)

  12. PIXE applications to the toxicological field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, C.E.I. dos; Dias, J.F.; Jobim, P.F.C.; Yoneama, M.L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Laboratorio de Implantacao Ionica; Andrade, V.M. [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Criciuma, SC (Brazil). Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular; Amaral, L.; Silva, J. da [Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Canoas, RS (Brazil). Laboratorio de Toxicologia Generica

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Several studies have been carried out in order to investigate the toxicological properties of some chemical elements in different type of biological samples. lon beam techniques, in particular PIXE, have been successfully used to analyze the elemental composition of food, beverage, plants and animal tissues. In this context, the PIXE line of the lon Implantation Laboratory (Porto Alegre, Brazil) have been used in the last few years to study food and beverage processing and biological specimens exposed to contaminated environment. The aim of this study is to present some of our results using PIXE analysis applied to toxicological research field. For instance, a recent published research [1] investigated the genotoxic and mutagenic effects in tobacco farmers exposed to metal-based formulated pesticides. Levels of Mg, AI, CI, Zn, Cr and Br, elements associated with DNA damage, were higher in the blood samples of tobacco farmers exposed to pesticide than in the non-exposed group. The occupational genotoxicity among copper smelters was also investigated [2]. The elemental content of blood samples were analyzed by PIXE. DNA damage in the peripheral blood Iymphocytes of workers exposed to copper smelter was observed. However, no clear correlation was found between the metal content and DNA damage. [1] F. R. da Silva, J. da Silva, M. C. AlIgayer, C. F. Simon, J. F. Dias, C. E. I. dos Santos, M. Salvador, C. Branco, N. B. Schneider, V. Kahl, P. Rohr, K. Kvitko, J. Hazard. Mat., 225-226 (2012) 81-90. (author)

  13. Foam height effects on heat transfer performance of 20 ppi aluminum foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the heat transfer performance of two 20 PPI (pores per linear inch) aluminum foams with constant porosity (around 0.93) and different foam core height (20 mm and 40 mm). The aluminum foams are cellular structure materials that present a stochastic interconnected pores distribution mostly uniform in size and shape. Most commercially available metal foams are based on aluminum, copper, nickel and metal alloys. Metal foams have considerable applications in multifunctional heat exchangers, cryogenics, combustion chambers, cladding on buildings, strain isolation, petroleum reservoirs, compact heat exchangers for airborne equipment, air cooled condensers and compact heat sinks for power electronics. The experimental measurements of the heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop have been carried out in a test apparatus built at Dipartimento di Fisica Tecnica of the Università di Padova. The foam core height effects on the heat transfer performance have been studied imposing three constant specific heat fluxes at the bottom of the samples: 25.0, 32.5 and 40.0 kW m−2 and varying the frontal air velocity between 2.0 and 5.0 m s−1. The experimental heat transfer coefficients and pressure gradients have been compared against the predictions obtained from two models recently suggested by present authors. - Highlights: ► Foam height effects on the heat transfer performance of 20 PPI foams are investigated. ► Heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops during air flow are presented. ► Two models suggested by the authors are compared with present experimental data.

  14. Method of Preventing Shrinkage of Aluminum Foam Using Carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nakamura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metallic foams are commonly produced using titanium hydride as a foaming agent. Carbonates produce aluminum foam with a fine and homogenous cell structure. However, foams produced using carbonates show marked shrinkage, which is clearly different from those produced using titanium hydride. It is essential for practical applications to clarify foam shrinkage and establish a method of preventing it. In this research, cell structures were observed to study the shrinkage of aluminum foam produced using carbonates. The cells of foam produced using dolomite as a foaming agent connected to each other with maximum expansion. It was estimated that foaming gas was released through connected cells to the outside. It was assumed that cell formation at different sites is effective in preventing shrinkage induced by cell connection. The multiple additions of dolomite and magnesium carbonate, which have different decomposition temperatures, were applied. The foam in the case with multiple additions maintained a density of 0.66 up to 973 K, at which the foam produced using dolomite shrank. It was verified that the multiple additions of carbonates are effective in preventing shrinkage.

  15. Tailoring properties of reticulated vitreous carbon foams with tunable density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorygo, Oleg; Marukovich, Alexander; Mikutski, Vitali; Stathopoulos, Vassilis; Hryhoryeu, Siarhei; Sadykov, Vladislav

    2016-06-01

    Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) foams were manufactured by multiple replications of a polyurethane foam template structure using ethanolic solutions of phenolic resin. The aims were to create an algorithm of fine tuning the precursor foam density and ensure an open-cell reticulated porous structure in a wide density range. The precursor foams were pyrolyzed in inert atmospheres at 700°C, 1100°C and 2000°C, and RVC foams with fully open cells and tunable bulk densities within 0.09-0.42 g/cm3 were synthesized. The foams were characterized in terms of porous structure, carbon lattice parameters, mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, electric conductivity, and corrosive resistance. The reported manufacturing approach is suitable for designing the foam microstructure, including the strut design with a graded microstructure.

  16. Ultrasonic Measurement of Elastic Modulus of Kelvin Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Sukwon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastic modulus of 3D-printed Kelvin foam plate is investigated by measuring the acoustic wave velocity of 1 MHz ultrasound. An isotropic tetrakaidecahedron foam of 3 mm unit cell is designed and printed layer upon layer to fablicate a Kelvin foam plate of 14mm thickness by 3D CAD/printer using ABS plastic. The Kelvin foam plate is filled completely with paraffin wax for impedance matching, so that acoustic wave may propagate through the porous foam plate. The acoustic wave velocity of the foam plate is measured using the time-of-flight (TOF method to calculate the elastic modulus of the Kelvin foam plate based on acousto-elasticity.

  17. NMR of laser-polarized 129Xe in blood foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C. H.; Peled, S.; Nascimben, L.; Oteiza, E.; Walsworth, R. L.; Jolesz, F. A.

    1997-01-01

    Laser-polarized 129Xe dissolved in a foam preparation of fresh human blood was investigated. The NMR signal of 129Xe dissolved in blood was enhanced by creating a foam in which the dissolved 129Xe exchanged with a large reservoir of gaseous laser-polarized 129Xe. The dissolved 129Xe T1 in this system was found to be significantly shorter in oxygenated blood than in deoxygenated blood. The T1 of 129Xe dissolved in oxygenated blood foam was found to be approximately 21 (+/-5) s, and in deoxygenated blood foam to be greater than 40 s. To understand the oxygenation trend, T1 measurements were also made on plasma and hemoglobin foam preparations. The measurement technique using a foam gas-liquid exchange interface may also be useful for studying foam coarsening and other liquid physical properties.

  18. Microcellular foam injection molding with cellulose nanofibers (CNFs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Masahiro; Kubota, Masaya; Ishihara, Shota; Hikima, Yuta; Sato, Akihiro; Sekiguchi, Takafumi

    2016-03-01

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) nanocomposites polypropylene foams are prepared by microcellular foam injection molding with core-back operation. The modified CNFs were blended with isotactic-polypropylene (i-PP) at different CNFs weight percentages and foamed to investigate the effect of CNFs on cell morphology. CNFs in i-PP increased the elastic modulus and induced a strain hardening behavior. CNFs also shifted the crystallization temperature of i-PP to higher temperature and enhanced crystallization. With these changes in rheological and thermal properties, CNFs could reduce the cell size and increase the cell density of the foams. By adjusting the core-back timing i.e., foaming temperature, the closed cell and the nano-fibrillated open cellular structure could be produced. The flexural modulus and bending strength of foams were measured by three point flexural tester. The flexural modulus and bending strength were increased as the CNFs content in i-PP was increased at any foam expansion ratio.

  19. Effect of environmental humidity on static foam stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xueliang; Karakashev, Stoyan I; Evans, Geoffrey M; Stevenson, Paul

    2012-03-01

    The quality of foaming products (such as beer and shampoo) and the performance of industrial processes that harness foam (such as the froth flotation of minerals or the foam fractionation of proteins) depend upon foam stability. In this study, experiments are performed to study the effect of environmental humidity on the collapse of static foams. The dependency of the rate at which a foam collapses upon humidity is demonstrated, and we propose a hypothesis for bubble bursting due to Marangoni instability induced by nonuniform evaporation to help explain the dependency. This hypothesis is supported by direct experimental observations of the bursting process of isolated bubbles by high speed video recording and the thinning of isolated foam films under different values of humidity and temperature by microinterferometric methods. PMID:22303917

  20. Capillary foams: stabilization and functionalization of porous liquids and solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Allen, Michael C; Zhao, Ruiyang; Deheyn, Dimitri D; Behrens, Sven H; Meredith, J Carson

    2015-03-10

    Liquid foams are two-phase systems in which a large volume of gas is dispersed as bubbles in a continuous liquid phase. These foams are ubiquitous in nature. In addition, they are found in industrial applications, such as pharmaceutical formulation, food processing, wastewater treatment, construction, and cosmetics. Recently, we reported a new type of foam material, capillary foam, which is stabilized by the synergistic action of particles and a small amount of an immiscible secondary liquid. In this study, we explore in more detail the foam preparation routes. To illustrate some of the potential applications, we create vividly colored wet and dried foams, which are difficult to prepare using traditional methods, and load-bearing porous solids. The combined action of particles and immiscible secondary fluid confers exceptional stability to capillary foams and many options for functionalization, suggesting a wide range of possible applications. PMID:25689577

  1. Tailoring properties of reticulated vitreous carbon foams with tunable density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorygo, Oleg; Marukovich, Alexander; Mikutski, Vitali; Stathopoulos, Vassilis; Hryhoryeu, Siarhei; Sadykov, Vladislav

    2016-04-01

    Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) foams were manufactured by multiple replications of a polyurethane foam template structure using ethanolic solutions of phenolic resin. The aims were to create an algorithm of fine tuning the precursor foam density and ensure an open-cell reticulated porous structure in a wide density range. The precursor foams were pyrolyzed in inert atmospheres at 700°C, 1100°C and 2000°C, and RVC foams with fully open cells and tunable bulk densities within 0.09-0.42 g/cm3 were synthesized. The foams were characterized in terms of porous structure, carbon lattice parameters, mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, electric conductivity, and corrosive resistance. The reported manufacturing approach is suitable for designing the foam microstructure, including the strut design with a graded microstructure.

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Laval Annular Mechanical Foam Breaker for Foam Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Lu Cao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code, Fluent, is employed to simulate the flow phenomena inside the annular foam breaker in order to improve its performance. The numerical simulation results show that the value and the distribution of the negative pressure are very important for the annular foam breaker. The design of the Laval nozzle not only can increase the fluid velocity, but also can reduce the pressure value from -30.2 to -50.3 kPa compared with the common annular nozzle foam breaker. In order to improve the range of the internal negative pressure, the two-stage Laval annular foam breaker is designed in this study. The analysis results show the distance between the two annular slit have greatly influence on its performance. There is a small overlap area between the two negative pressure zones generated by the two annular slits. The smaller the value distance is, the larger the overlap zone is. When the value of the distance decreases to 50 mm, the minimum negative pressure can be reduced to approximately -65.5 kPa. Meanwhile, the range of the internal negative pressure is larger than the single Laval annular foam breaker, which is benefit to break foam.

  3. mFOAM-1.02: A Compact Version of the Cellular Event Generator FOAM

    CERN Document Server

    Jadach, S

    2007-01-01

    The general-purpose self-adapting Monte Carlo (MC) event generator/simulator mFOAM (standing for mini-FOAM) is a new compact version of the FOAM program, with a slightly limited functionality with respect to its parent version. On the other hand, mFOAM is easier to use for the average user. This new version is fully integrated with the ROOT package, the C++ utility library used widely in the particle physics community. The internal structure of the code is simplified and the very valuable feature of the persistency of the objects of the mFOAM class is improved. With the persistency at hand, it is possible to record very easily the complete state of a MC simulator object based on mFOAM and ROOT into a disk-file at any stage of its use: just after object allocation, after full initialization (exploration of the distribution), or at any time during the generation of the long series of MC events. Later on the MC simulator object can be easily restored from the disk-file in the ``ready to go'' state. Objects of TF...

  4. Dynamic response of rigid polyurethane foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, R.A.

    1976-09-01

    The dynamic characteristics of six rigid polyurethane foams were studied at impact velocities from 15.24 to 60.96 m/s (50 to 200 ft/s). A test technique developed for crushing confined samples is described. The dynamic properties of materials tested are reported by both graphical and tabular methods.

  5. Behaviour of Metal Foam Sandwich Panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkhudery, Hayder; Virdi, Kuldeep

    Sandwich panels as used in structures comprise of a foam core enclosed by thin high strength steel faces. This paper discusses currently design formulae of local buckling behaviour of such panels using the finite element method. Multiple wave finite element models were adopted to investigate and...

  6. Nano-Aramid Fiber Reinforced Polyurethane Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmes, Edmund B.; Frances, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Closed cell polyurethane and, particularly, polyisocyanurate foams are a large family of flexible and rigid products the result of a reactive two part process wherein a urethane based polyol is combined with a foaming or "blowing" agent to create a cellular solid at room temperature. The ratio of reactive components, the constituency of the base materials, temperature, humidity, molding, pouring, spraying and many other processing techniques vary greatly. However, there is no known process for incorporating reinforcing fibers small enough to be integrally dispersed within the cell walls resulting in superior final products. The key differentiating aspect from the current state of art resides in the many processing technologies to be fully developed from the novel concept of milled nano pulp aramid fibers and their enabling entanglement capability fully enclosed within the cell walls of these closed cell urethane foams. The authors present the results of research and development of reinforced foam processing, equipment development, strength characteristics and the evolution of its many applications.

  7. Formulation, Preparation, and Characterization of Polyurethane Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Moises L.

    2010-01-01

    Preparation of laboratory-scale polyurethane foams is described with formulations that are easy to implement in experiments for undergraduate students. Particular attention is given to formulation aspects that are based on the main chemical reactions occurring in polyurethane production. This allows students to develop alternative formulations to…

  8. Rigid polyurethane and kenaf core composite foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigid polyurethane foams are valuable in many construction applications. Kenaf is a bast fiber plant where the surface stem skin provides bast fibers whose strength-to-weight ratio competes with glass fiber. The higher volume product of the kenaf core is an under-investigated area in composite appli...

  9. Modeling of Sandwich Sheets with Metallic Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, H.; Jorge, R. Natal; Santos, A.; Fernandes, A. A.; Valente, R. A. F.; Parente, M. P. L.

    2011-08-01

    World-wide vehicles safety experts agree that significant further reductions in fatalities and injuries can be achieved as a result of the use of new lightweight and energy absorbing materials. On this work, the authors present the development and evaluation of an innovative system able to perform reliable panels of sandwich sheets with metallic foam cores for industrial applications. The mathematical model used to describe the behavior of sandwich shells with metal cores foam is presented and some numerical examples are presented. In order to validate those results mechanical experiments are carried out. Using the crushable foam constitutive model, available on ABAQUS, a set of different mechanical tests were simulated. There are two variants of this model available on ABAQUS: the volumetric hardening model and the isotropic hardening model. As a first approximation we chose the isotropic hardening variant. The isotropic hardening model available uses a yield surface that is an ellipse centered at the origin in the p-q stress plane. Based on this constitutive model for the foam, numerical simulations of the tensile and bulge test will be conducted. The numerical results will be validated using the data obtained from the experimental results.

  10. Microcellular Polystyrene Foams: Improved Heat Insulators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nistor, A.; Rygl, A.; Sajfrtová, Marie; Bobák, M.; Kosek, J.

    Marseille: International Society for Advancement of Supercritical Fluids, 2014, s. 120. ISBN 978-2-37111-002-1. [European Meeting on Supercritical Fluids /14./. Marseille (FR), 18.05.2014-21.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-23274S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : polystyrene * foams * supercritical carbon dioxide Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  11. Organic reactants rapidly produce plastic foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, G. F.

    1965-01-01

    Adding trichlorofluoromethane to polyether resin accelerates the reaction between the resin and toluene diisocyanate. This accelerated reaction instantaneously produces a plastic foam of low density and uniform porosity needed to provide buoyancy for flotation recovery of instrument packages dropped into the sea from spacecraft.

  12. Elasticity and plasticity : foams near jamming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemens, Alexander Oltmann Nicolaas

    2013-01-01

    Many materials, like foams, emulsions, suspensions and granular media obtain finite rigidity once their constituent particles are brought in contact. Nevertheless, all these materials can be made to flow by the application of relatively small stresses. By varying thermodynamic (temperature or densit

  13. Thermo-mechanical characterization of silicone foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaswamy, Partha [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Nickolaus A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cady, Carl M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewis, Matthew W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Cellular solids such as elastomeric foams are used in many structural applications to absorb and dissipate energy, due to their light weight (low density) and high energy absorption capability. In this paper we will discuss foams derived from S5370, a silicone foam formulation developed by Dow Corning. In the application presented, the foam is consolidated into a cushion component of constant thickness but variable density. A mechanical material model developed by Lewis (2013), predicts material response, in part, as a function of relative density. To determine the required parameters for this model we have obtained the mechanical response in compression for ambient, cold and hot temperatures. The variable density cushion provided samples sufficient samples so that the effect of sample initial density on the mechanical response could be studied. The mechanical response data showed extreme sensitivity to relative density. We also observed at strains corresponding to 1 MPa a linear relationship between strain and initial density for all temperatures. Samples taken from parts with a history of thermal cycling demonstrated a stiffening response that was a function of temperature, with the trend of more stiffness as temperature increased above ambient. This observation is in agreement with the entropic effects on the thermo-mechanical behavior of silicone polymers. In this study, we present the experimental methods necessary for the development of a material model, the testing protocol, analysis of test data, and a discussion of load (stress) and gap (strain) as a function of sample initial densities and temperatures

  14. Indentation of aluminium foam at low velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The indentation behaviour of aluminium foams at low velocity (10 m/s ∼ 30 m/s was investigated both in experiments and numerical simulation in this paper. A flat-ended indenter was used and the force-displacement history was recorded. The Split Hopkinson Pressure bar was used to obtain the indentation velocity and forces in the dynamic experiments. Because of the low strength of the aluminium foam, PMMA bar was used, and the experimental data were corrected using Bacon's method. The energy absorption characteristics varying with impact velocity were then obtained. It was found that the energy absorption ability of aluminium foam gradually increases in the quasi-static regime and shows a significant increase at ∼10 m/s velocity. Numerical simulation was also conducted to investigate this process. A 3D Voronoi model was used and models with different relative densities were investigated as well as those with different failure strain. The indentation energy increases with both the relative density and failure strain. The analysis of the FE model implies that the significant change in energy absorption ability of aluminium foam in indentation at ∼10 m/s velocity may be caused by plastic wave effect.

  15. Preparation of precursor for stainless steel foam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiang-yang; LI Shan-ni; LI Jie; LIU Ye-xiang

    2008-01-01

    The effects of polyurethane sponge pretreatment and slurry compositions on the slurry loading in precursor were discussed, and the,performances of stainless steel foams prepared from precursors with different slurry loadings and different particle sizes of the stainless steel powder were also investigated. The experimental results show that the pretreatment of sponge with alkaline solution is effective to reduce the jam of cells in precursor and ensure the slurry to uniformly distribute in sponge, and it is also an effective method for increasing the slurry loading in precursor; the mass fraction of additive A and solid content in slurry greatly affect the slurry loading in precursor, when they are kept in 9%-13% and 52%-75%, respectively, the stainless steel foam may hold excellent 3D open-cell network structure and uniform muscles; the particle size of the stainless steel powder and the slurry loading in precursor have great effects on the bending strength, apparent density and open porosity of stainless steel foam; when the stainless steel powder with particle size of 44 tan and slurry loading of 0.5 g/cm3 in precursor are used, a stainless steel foam can be obtained, which has open porosity of 81.2%, bending strength of about 51.76 MPa and apparent density of about 1.0 g/cm3.

  16. Foam drainage on a sloping weir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassia, P; Neethling, S J; Cilliers, J J

    2002-08-01

    Foam drainage is considered in a froth flotation tank with a sloping weir. The drainage is shown to be gravity dominated in most of the foam, except for thin boundary layers at the base of the froth, and along the sloping weir. The mathematical reason for the boundary layers is that capillary suction is a much weaker effect than gravity, but cannot be ignored altogether, because it represents a singular perturbation. The relative weakness of capillary suction with respect to gravity is represented by a key dimensionless parameter, denoted K, which satisfies Kbulk of the flotation tank. The liquid volume fraction in the jet is likewise O(K(-2/3)) larger than that in the bulk. Across the jet, the foam exhibits a known profile of liquid fraction vs. distance from the weir: this is known as the equilibrium profile. The foam requires a distance equivalent to O(K(4/3)) weir lengths to dry out significantly from the wetness value on the weir, but a larger O(K) distance to fall back to a wetness comparable with that in the bulk of the froth. PMID:15015124

  17. Foam - novel delivery technology for remediation of vadose zone environments - 59019

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep vadose zone environments can be a primary source and pathway for contaminant migration to groundwater. These environments present unique characterization and remediation challenges that necessitate scrutiny and research. The thickness, depth, and intricacies of the deep vadose zone, combined with a lack of understanding of the key subsurface processes (e.g., biogeochemical and hydrologic) affecting contaminant migration, make it difficult to create validated conceptual and predictive models of subsurface flow dynamics and contaminant behavior across multiple scales. These factors also make it difficult to design and deploy sustainable remedial approaches and monitor long-term contaminant behavior after remedial actions. Functionally, methods for addressing contamination must remove and/or reduce transport of contaminants. This problem is particularly challenging in the arid western United States where the vadose zone is hundreds of feet thick, rendering transitional excavation methods exceedingly costly and ineffective. Delivery of remedial amendments is one of the most challenging and critical aspects for all remedy-based approaches. The conventional approach for delivery is through injection of aqueous remedial solutions. However, heterogeneous deep vadose zone environments present hydrologic and geochemical challenges that limit the effectiveness. Because the flow of solution infiltration is dominantly controlled by gravity and suction, injected liquid preferentially percolates through highly permeable pathways, by-passing low-permeability zones that frequently contain the majority of contamination. Moreover, the wetting front can readily mobilize and enhance contaminant transport to the underlying aquifer prior to stabilization. Development of innovative in-situ technologies may be the only means to meet remedial action objectives and long-term stewardship goals. Surfactants can be used to lower the liquid surface tension and create stabile foams, which

  18. Foam-forming properties of Ilex paraguariensis (mate saponin: foamability and foam lifetime analysis by Weibull equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Treter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Saponins are natural soaplike foam-forming compounds widely used in foods, cosmetic and pharmaceutical preparations. In this work foamability and foam lifetime of foams obtained from Ilex paraguariensis unripe fruits were analyzed. Polysorbate 80 and sodium dodecyl sulfate were used as reference surfactants. Aiming a better data understanding a linearized 4-parameters Weibull function was proposed. The mate hydroethanolic extract (ME and a mate saponin enriched fraction (MSF afforded foamability and foam lifetime comparable to the synthetic surfactants. The linearization of the Weibull equation allowed the statistical comparison of foam decay curves, improving former mathematical approaches.

  19. Experiments and Models for Polymeric Microsphere Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipes, R. Byrona; Kyu, Thein

    2005-01-01

    The current project was performed under the direction of Dr. Byron Pipes as its lead investigator from January 2001 to August 2004. With the permission of the NASA, the project was transferred to Dr. Thein Kyu as the principle investigator for the period of September 2004 - June 2005. There were two major thrust areas in the original proposal; (1) experimental characterization and kinematics of foam structure formation and (2) determination of the mechanical, physical, and thermal properties, although these thrust areas were further sub- divided into 7 tasks. The present project has been directed primarily to elucidate kinematics of micro-foam formation (tasks 1 and 3) and to characterize micro-foam structures, since the control of the micro-structure of these foams is of paramount importance in determining their physical, mechanical and thermal properties. The first thrust area was accomplished in a timely manner; however, the second thrust area of foam properties (tasks 2,4-7) has yet to be completed because the area of kinematics of foam structure formation turned out to be extremely complex and thus consumed more time than what have been anticipated. As will be reported in what follows, the present studies have greatly enhances the in-depth understanding of mechanisms and kinematics of the micro-foam formation from solid powders. However, in order to implement all objectives of the second thrust areas regarding investigations of mechanical, physical, and thermal properties and establishment of the correlation of structure - properties of the foams, the project needs additional time and resources. The technical highlights of the accomplishment are summarized as follows. The present study represents a first approach to understanding the complexities that act together in the powder foaming process to achieve the successful inflation of polyimide microstructures. This type of study is novel as no prior work had dissected the fundamentals that govern the inflation

  20. Transient foam flow in porous media with CAT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Dianbin; Brigham, W.E.

    1992-03-01

    Transient behavior is likely to dominate over most of the duration of a foam injection field project. Due to the lack of date, little is presently known about transient foam flow behavior. Foam flow does not follow established models such as the Buckley-Leverett theory, and no general predictive model has been derived. Therefore, both experimental data and a foam flow theory are needed. In this work, foam was injected at a constant mass rate into one-dimensional sandpacks of 1-in diameter and 24-in or 48-in length that had initially been saturate with distilled water. The system was placed in a cat Scanner. Data, obtained at room temperature and low pressure at various times, include both the pressure and saturation distributions. Pressure profiles showed that the pressure gradient is much greater behind the foam front than ahead of it. Moreover, the pressure gradients keep changing as the foam advances in the sandpack. This behavior differs from Buckley-Leverett theory. The CT scan results demonstrated gas channeling near the front, but eventually the foam block all these channels and sweeps the entire cross section after many pore volumes of injection. Three series of experiments were run: (1) surfactant adsorption measurements; (2) gas displacements of surfactant-laden solutions and (3) foam displacements. The first two series of experiments were made to provide the necessary parameters required to match the foam displacements. To this end, it was necessary to smooth the saturation history data, using a Langmuir-type formula. A theory was proposed based on the principles of the fractional flow curve construction method. This foam theory treats the foam as composed of infinitesimal slugs of gas of varying viscosities. The foam front has the lowest viscosity and foam at the injection end has the highest.