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Sample records for aqueous effluent tritium

  1. Separation of tritium from aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the further development of the so-called ELEX process, carried out from 1 July 1980 until 31 December 1982. The ELEX process is the combination of electrolysis with the catalytic tritium exchange between hydrogen and water in order to accumulate the tritium in the liquid phase. The experimental study of the catalytic tritium exchange between hydrogen and liquid water was continued and the overall exchange rate could be substantially increased. An alternative process based on bithermal exchange of tritium has been evaluated. In the 10 mol h-1 mini-pilot bench scale detritiation unit the ELEX process was successfully demonstrated by detritiating up to now more than 1m3 of water containing up to 100 mCi tritium per dm3, which is the feed concentration to be expected for application of the process in a reprocessing plant. A 280 mol h-1 pilot detritiation installation now being constructed is described. This installation will realize a volume reduction factor of 100 and a process decontamination factor of 100. The maximum total tritium inventory will be about 1000 Ci. The plant consists mainly of a 80 kW electrolyser and a 10 cm diameter exchange column and can be considered as the ultimate step before industrial application of the ELEX process

  2. Methods of removal of tritium from aqueous effluent: a review of international research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium is formed in thermal nuclear reactors both by neutron activation of elements such as deuterium and lithium and by ternary fission in the fuel. It is a weak beta-emitter with a short half-life, 12.3 years, and its radiological significance in reactor discharges is very low. In heavy-water-cooled and -moderated reactors, such as the CANDU stations, the tritium concentration in the moderator is sufficiently high to cause a potential hazard to operators, and so a major research and development programme has been carried out on processes to remove the tritium. Detritiation of light water has also been the subject of major R and D effort world-wide, because reprocessing operations can generate significant quantities of tritium in liquid waste, and high concentrations of tritium may arise in some aqueous streams in fusion reactors. This Report presents a review of the methods that have been proposed, studied and developed for removal of tritium from light and heavy water: the principles of individual methods are discussed, and the current status of their development is reviewed. (author)

  3. Effluent Treatment Facility tritium emissions monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved sampling and analysis protocol was developed and executed to verify atmospheric emissions compliance for the new Savannah River Site (SRS) F/H area Effluent Treatment Facility. Sampling equipment was fabricated, installed, and tested at stack monitoring points for filtrable particulate radionuclides, radioactive iodine, and tritium. The only detectable anthropogenic radionuclides released from Effluent Treatment Facility stacks during monitoring were iodine-129 and tritium oxide. This paper only examines the collection and analysis of tritium oxide

  4. Tritium effluent control project at Mound Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium control technology and philosophies that have been developed at the various weapons complex sites can be drawn upon for the design and operation of fusion research facilities and Controlled Thermonuclear Reactor fuel cycle and tritium confinement systems. Historically, tritium control has been based on high volume air flows and dilution of effluent systems. As a consequence of the ''as low as practical'' criterion, control philosophies were reevaluated and control efforts intensified. It is the results of these recent efforts that are most applicable to the CTR program. At Mound Laboratory the tritium control development efforts are centered around an advanced technology project. The philosophy and goals of this project and a nearly completed pilot scale effluent control laboratory are described. (auth)

  5. Tritium liquid effluents from the Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, 12-months' fuel cycles in the Krsko NPP had not caused any problems regarding compliance with its Technical Specifications and license limits on liquid tritium releases (20 TBq/year, 8 TBq/three months). The first 18-months' fuel cycle, which was introduced in 2004, required fuel with higher enrichment, higher boron concentration in the primary coolant and more fuel rods with burnable poisons. In 2005, the NPP operated without refueling outage for the whole year and produced the highest amount of energy so far. Due to these facts and a few unplanned shutdowns and power reductions, production of tritium and releases increased strongly in 2005. As a result, the Krsko NPP hardly succeeded to stay within regulatory limits on tritium releases. However, the three-months' limit was exceeded in the first quarter of 2006. On the basis of conclusions acquired from the SNSA's study and practice of other European countries the SNSA considerably increased the annual limit of permitted liquid tritium releases (from 20 TBq to 45 TBq) and abolished the three-months' limit. At the same time, the SNSA reduced the limit of fission and activation products by halves. (author)

  6. Experimental study of the tritium distribution in the effluents resulting from the sodium hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the dismantling of fast breeder reactors in France several processes are under investigation regarding sodium disposal. One of them, called ELA (radioactive sodium waste treatment process), is based on the implementation of the sodium-water reaction, in a controlled and progressive way, to remove residual sodium. This sodium contains impurities such as sodium hydride, sodium oxide and tritiated sodium hydride. The hydrolysis of these various chemical species leads to the production of a liquid effluent, mainly composed of an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide, and a gaseous effluent, mainly composed of nitrogen (inert gas), hydrogen and steam. The tritium is distributed between these effluents, and, within the gaseous effluent, according to its forms HT and HTO (tritiated water). HTO being 10,000 times more radio-toxic than HT, a precise knowledge of the mechanisms governing the phase distribution of tritium is necessary. This paper presents the first experimental results from a parametric study on the tritium distribution between the various effluents generated during hydrolysis operations. A series of experiments have been performed in order to study the influence of water flow rate, argon flow rate, initial mass and specific activity of the hydrolyzed sodium sample. An important influence of the total tritium concentration in the hydrolyzed sample has been highlighted. As for the phenomena suspected to be responsible for the phase change of tritiated water, in the studied range of parameters, vaporization induced by the heat of reactions seems to be dominant over the evaporation induced by the inert gas flow rate

  7. Experimental study of the tritium distribution in the effluents resulting from the sodium hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassery, A. [CEA, DEN, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Universite de Toulouse, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Toulouse (France); Lorcet, H.; Godlewski, J; Liger, K.; Latge, C. [CEA, DEN, Centre de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Joulia, X. [Universite de Toulouse, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, Toulouse (France)

    2015-03-15

    Within the framework of the dismantling of fast breeder reactors in France several processes are under investigation regarding sodium disposal. One of them, called ELA (radioactive sodium waste treatment process), is based on the implementation of the sodium-water reaction, in a controlled and progressive way, to remove residual sodium. This sodium contains impurities such as sodium hydride, sodium oxide and tritiated sodium hydride. The hydrolysis of these various chemical species leads to the production of a liquid effluent, mainly composed of an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide, and a gaseous effluent, mainly composed of nitrogen (inert gas), hydrogen and steam. The tritium is distributed between these effluents, and, within the gaseous effluent, according to its forms HT and HTO (tritiated water). HTO being 10,000 times more radio-toxic than HT, a precise knowledge of the mechanisms governing the phase distribution of tritium is necessary. This paper presents the first experimental results from a parametric study on the tritium distribution between the various effluents generated during hydrolysis operations. A series of experiments have been performed in order to study the influence of water flow rate, argon flow rate, initial mass and specific activity of the hydrolyzed sodium sample. An important influence of the total tritium concentration in the hydrolyzed sample has been highlighted. As for the phenomena suspected to be responsible for the phase change of tritiated water, in the studied range of parameters, vaporization induced by the heat of reactions seems to be dominant over the evaporation induced by the inert gas flow rate.

  8. Handling of tritium contaminated effluents and wastes: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with the work on: (1) applicability of cotton, woodpulp, sawdust and certian cellulosic derivatives for the removal of tritium from aqueous medium, (2) containment and fixation of tritiated water in nonleachable matrices. The absorption studies on cotton, woodpulp, sawdust, and cellulose acetates were carried out with a view to assess their potentialities as concentration media and also to choose a matrix which can concentrate tritium to the maximum extent possible. The experiments on water hyacinth plants were designed to see the applicability of concentrating tritium and also for providing a via medium for slow release of tritium into the atmosphere. The immobilisation of tritiated water in cement matrices was studied with combinations of portland cement and five filler materials namely sand, silica, vermiculite, portland cement aggregate and accoproof. If cement blocks come in contact with aqueous media as it may happen when the tritium bearing blocks are disposed to the ground, a considerable portion of the contained activity is likely to diffuse and leach out. In order to prevent this, it was proposed to try several coating materials as diffusion barriers over cement blocks. Screening of locally available coating materials was done using a diffusion cell. Shalismatic HD, Anticor and epoxy paint were found to be promising among the screened materials. Tritiated cement blocks with 29% vermiculite loading were coated with the above coating materials, and were subjected to leaching, both in sea water and distilled water. The cumulative leaching data for tritiated cement blocks over a period of 400 days show that Shalimastic HD, when used as a coating material, retards the leaching to the maximum extent. Further leaching studies were started on Shalimastic HD blocks in one ground water formulation, which is continued to this date. (author)

  9. Partial alpha decontamination proceeding of an aqueous effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention concerns a partial alpha decontamination proceeding of an aqueous effluent having, at least one polluting element chosen among copper, zinc, tantalum, gold, actinides or lanthanides. This proceeding consists on putting in contact the aqueous effluent with a silica gel and to separate the contaminated effluent from the silica gel having fixed one of these polluting elements already mentioned; the effluent to treat has a ph value higher or equal to 3. This proceeding can be applied to the treatment of effluents coming from spent fuels reprocessing plants and technological effluents coming from nuclear power plants. (N.C.). 6 refs

  10. Handling of tritium-contaminated effluents and wastes. Part of a coordinated programme on handling tritium-contaminated effluents and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work was carried out on: (i) Applicability of cotton, woodpulp, sawdust, and certain cellulosic derivatives for the removal of tritium from aqueous medium. (ii) Containment and fixation of tritiated water in non-leachable matrices. The absorption studies on cotton, woodpulp, sawdust, and cellulose acetates were carried out with a view to assessing their potentialities as concentration media and also to choose a matrix which can concentrate tritium to the maximum extent possible. The experiments on water hyacinth plants were designed to see the applicability of concentrating tritium and also for providing a via medium for slow release of tritium into the atmosphere. The immobilisation studies on tritiated water in cement matrices were aimed at maximum retention of tritium

  11. Tritium exchange reactions in imidazole in aqueous and organic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium exchange reactions were studied in aqueous and organic solutions of imidazole and methylimidazole. For the exchange in an aqueous solution the mechanism through ylide intermediate formation postulated by VAUGHAN et al. was modified in this study. The rate constant obtained by MASLOVA et al. was found to be too small compared to ours. For the exchange reaction of methylimidazole in an aqueous solution the rate decreased due to the effect of a methyl group attached to the aromatic ring. The C-2 tritiation of imidazole was studied in chloroform, acetone and dioxane for the first time. It was dependent on polymer properties. An intramolecular exchange mechanism was applicable to the trimer while an intermolecular exchange mechanism was applicable to the dimer. The rate constants of the exchange reactions in organic solutions were obtained for both mechanisms. (orig.)

  12. Application of hydrophobic Pt catalysts for tritium removal from liquid and gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The platinum hydrophobic catalysts were first prepared and applied in deuterium and tritium separation and later their application was extended to other fields implying chemical reactions in the presence of liquid water or in saturated humidity conditions. The high activity and long stability of these catalysts was demonstrated and tested in processes like for instance: - detritiation of the heavy water used as moderator and coolant in CANDU type reactors; - tritium removal from light water reprocessed in nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities; - removal and recovery of tritium from atmosphere and gaseous effluents as well as from tritium processing. Applications were recently extended to catalytic hydrogen-oxygen recombination at ambient temperature or to removal of stable organic pollutants in waste waters. The hydrophobic catalysts are divided in two classes: metal is first dispersed onto a hydrophilic support (carbon) and then mixed and embedded with a polymer (teflon) to make it hydrophobic; - metal is laid down onto organic polymers (teflon, Sb, polyester)

  13. Continuously tritium monitoring of the pipe of liquid effluents at the Cea Cadarache; Controle en continu du tritium de la conduite des effluents liquides du CEA Cadarache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pira, Y

    2004-07-01

    This report is oriented toward the radiation protection of environment that is an essential component of radiation protection. It is necessary to detect any solid, liquid or gaseous abnormal release and to find its origin. The present study bears on a detection instrument in continuously to find tritium in liquid effluents of the Cea Cadarache. After having study the functioning principle of this device, an evaluation of its performances has been realised ( back noise, yield, detection limit) and to a checking in real conditions of utilization. (N.C.)

  14. Tritium Facility effluent measurements: statistical analysis for 52 periods in 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A statistical comparison has been made of Tritium Facility effluents for 52 periods in 1981, as measured by continuous sampling from two ventilation exhaust stacks. Pulse-counter data, recorded on 15-minute intervals, have been summed over approximately weekly periods and compared with adsorption apparatus data. A by-product of the analysis is a calibration of pulse counters in terms of adsorption data which are believed to be more reliable

  15. A New Hydrophobic Catalyst for Tritium Separation from Nuclear Effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrophobic catalysts were originally conceived in Canada for the deuterium enrichment and tritium separation by hydrogen-liquid water isotopic exchange in nuclear field. Unlike the conventional hydrophilic catalysts, which becomes inefficient to direct contact with liquid water, the hydrophobic catalysts kept a high catalytic activity and stability, even under the direct contact with liquid water or in presence of humid gas. Based on the long experience of the authors, in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts, and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D activities on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts, in tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: (1) to provide a database for selection of the most appropriate catalyst and catalytic packing for above mentioned processes, (2) to asses and to find a new procedure for preparation of a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. From reviewed references we consider that platinum remains the most active and efficient catalytic metal and the TEFLON is the best wetproofing agent. A new improved hydrophobic Pt-catalyst has been proposed and is now underway. The main steps and experimental conditions of preparation are largely discussed. A new wet-proofing agent and a new binding agents (titanium oxide, cerium oxide, zirconium oxide) with catalytic role are proposed and tested. The physico-structural parameters of new improved catalyst have been determined and are discussed in details. The new proposal is a promising idea to improve the performances of conventional hydrophobic Pt-catalysts

  16. A New hydrophobic catalyst for tritium separation from nuclear effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The hydrophobic catalysts were originally conceived in Canada for the deuterium enrichment and tritium separation by hydrogen-liquid water isotopic exchange in nuclear field. Unlike the conventional hydrophilic catalysts, which becomes inefficient to direct contact with liquid water, the hydrophobic catalysts kept a high catalytic activity and stability, even under the direct contact with liquid water or in presence of humid gas. Based on the long experience of the authors, in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts, and based on the reviewed references, this paper presents current R and D activities on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts, in tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: (1) to provide a database for selection of the most appropriate catalyst and catalytic packing for above mentioned processes; (2) to find and to asses a new procedure for preparation of a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. Based on reviewed references we concluded that platinum appears to be the most active and efficient catalytic metal while the Teflon is the best wet-proofing agent. A new improved hydrophobic Pt-catalyst has been proposed and its study is now underway. The main steps and experimental conditions of preparation are largely discussed. A new wet-proofing agent and new binding agents (titanium oxide, cerium oxide, zirconium oxide) with catalytic role were proposed and now are tested. The physico-structural parameters of newly improved catalyst have been determined and are discussed in details. The new proposal is a promising idea to improve the performances of conventional hydrophobic Pt-catalysts. (authors)

  17. Continuous environmental monitoring for aqueous effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitt, Jr., W. W.; Jones, G. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    An aquatic environmental monitor has been developed that will continuously monitor aqueous waste streams from coal processing plants. The monitor contains three different instruments: a continuous chemical oxygen demand monitor and two continuous-flow fluorometers with different excitation-emission characteristics. A prototype instrument was fabricated and evaluated for several different applications. The details of the instrument design and results of its evaluation are presented in this report.

  18. Solidification of aqueous tritium-containing wastes with calcium oxide and asphalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method is proposed for solidifying aqueous tritium-containing wastes with calcium oxide and asphalt. We incorporated tritiated calcium hydroxide into molten asphalt at 100-210/degree/C and studied the evolution of tritium (T) oxides there from as well as the extent to which calcium and tritium are leached out of the solidified product. Depending on temperature and heating time, the evolution of HTO from a Ca(OH)OT-asphalt mixture was low (between 5.6 x 10/sup /minus/4/ and 5.9 x 10/sup /minus/4/ wt.% of the original amount). Tritium evolution rates and leaching coefficients of tritium and calcium showed the solidified product to have high stability in water. Conclusions were drawn as to the usefulness of the proposed method

  19. Tritium monitoring in groundwater and evaluation of model predictions for the Hanford Site 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) disposal site, also known as the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS), receives treated effluent containing tritium, which is allowed to infiltrate through the soil column to the water table. Tritium was first detected in groundwater monitoring wells around the facility in July 1996. The SALDS groundwater monitoring plan requires revision of a predictive groundwater model and reevaluation of the monitoring well network one year from the first detection of tritium in groundwater. This document is written primarily to satisfy these requirements and to report on analytical results for tritium in the SALDS groundwater monitoring network through April 1997. The document also recommends an approach to continued groundwater monitoring for tritium at the SALDS. Comparison of numerical groundwater models applied over the last several years indicate that earlier predictions, which show tritium from the SALDS approaching the Columbia River, were too simplified or overly robust in source assumptions. The most recent modeling indicates that concentrations of tritium above 500 pCi/L will extend, at most, no further than ∼1.5 km from the facility, using the most reasonable projections of ETF operation. This extent encompasses only the wells in the current SALDS tritium-tracking network

  20. Radiological safety system based on real-time tritium-in-air monitoring indoors and in effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to tritium is an important health hazard in any tritium processing facility so that implementing a real-time tritium monitoring system is necessary for its operation in safety conditions. The tritium processing facility operators need to be informed at any time about the in-air tritium concentration indoors or in the stack effluents, in order to detect immediately any leaks in tritium containments, or any releases inside the buildings or to the environment. This information is very important for adopting if necessary protection measures and correcting actions as quickly as possible. In this paper we describe an improved real-time tritium monitoring system designed for the Heavy Water Detritiation Pilot Plant of National Institute for Cryogenics and Isotopes Separation, Rm. Valcea, Romania. The design of the Radiological Safety System implemented for the ICIT Water Detritiation Pilot Plant is intended to provide the maximum safety level based on the ALARA concept. The main functions of tritium monitoring system are: - monitoring the working areas and gaseous effluents by determination of the tritium-in-air activity concentration; - local and remote data display; - assessing of environment dose equivalent rates and dose equivalents in the working environment (for personnel exposure control and work planning); - assessing the total tritium activity released to the environment through ventilation exhaust stack; - safety functions, i.e., local and remote, locking/unlocking personnel access, process shut-down in emergency conditions and start of the air cleaning systems. With all these features our tritium monitoring system is really a safety system adequate for personnel and environmental protection. (authors)

  1. Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains information on chemical and physical properties, occurence, production, use, technology, release, radioecology, radiobiology, dose estimates, radioprotection and legal aspects of tritium. The objective of this report is to provide a reliable data base for the public discussion on tritium, especially with regard to its use in future nuclear fusion plants and its radiological assessment. (orig.)

  2. Radiological safety system based on real-time tritium-in-air monitoring in room and effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual design of the radiological safety system based on real time-in-air monitoring in room and effluents is intended to provide the maximum achievable safety level, basing no the ALARA concept. the capabilities of this system are not only to inform any time personnel about tritium in air concentration level, but it will be able to: initiate the shut down procedure and drain off the plant, as well to start the Air cleaning System when the tritium-in-air concentration exceed pre-established threshold; estimate tritium effective dose rate before starting an activity into the monitored area, or during this activity, or soon as the activity was finished; estimate tritium effective dose and instantly record and update individual effective doses, using a special computer application called 'dose record'; lock access into the radiological area for individuals when tritium dose rate in the monitoring area will exceed the pre-established thresholds, or when any individual dose data provided by 'dose records' application ask for, or for other protection consideration; calculate the total tritium activity released to the environment (per day, week, or month). (N.C.)

  3. Supplemental stack-effluent monitoring at the Safety Light Corporation, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplemental stack effluent monitoring was performed at the Safety Light Corporation (SLC) in Bloomsburg, PA, on August 16 through 20, 1982. Monitoring of the SLC stack effluents at the point of relese indicated concentrations of aqueous tritium above the guideline levels established for unrestricted areas. However, environmental air sampling off-site indicated that the levels of all forms of tritium, including aqueous tritium, were well within the guidelines. Analyses performed by both the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) and SLC of the stack effluents produced comparable results. It is concluded that the environmental tritium monitoring and control program established by SLC is adequate. Monitoring data are included

  4. Tritium and excess heat generation during electrolysis of aqueous solutions of alkali salts with nickel cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of open cell electrolysis experiments of the Mills and Kneizys type using Nickel as cathode, Pt wire as anode and aqueous solutions of carbonates of Potassium, Sodium and Lithium (natural and enriched) as electrolyte have been carried out in three different laboratories at Trombay. The cells were fabricated out of commercial dewar vacuum flasks. The difference in temperature at equilibrium between the operating cells and that of an identical dummy reference flask was measured to deduce excess heat. The cells were calibrated using resistance heaters. In all, studies have been carried out so far in 29 electrolytic cells with various electrolytes. In some cases a mixture of H2O and D2O was used. The cells were operated for a few weeks at a time and excess heat up to a maximum of 70% appears to be present in most cells when the input joule power is upto a watt or two. The current density was less than 40 mA/cm2. Electrolyte samples before and after electrolysis were analysed for tritium content after microdistillation to eliminate chemiluminescence effects. Samples from 18 out of 29 experiments analysed have indicated tritium levels varying in the region of 46 Bq/ml to 3390 Bq/ml. One cell with enriched Li2CO3 solution in H2O which was monitored continuously for over a month indicated that tritium generation is continuous. Although the highest amount of tritium produced so far was with a K2CO3 in 25% D2O cell, the generation of tritium in cells containing only H2O is a new finding. (author)

  5. A process to separate the sodium from radioactive aqueous effluents resulting from spent fuels reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns the separation of sodium from radioactive aqueous effluents resulting from spent fuels reprocessing. The sodium separation is carried out with the use of charged porous membranes methods and of nano-filtration. Membranes are formed by a polymer layer as poly-aramids, sulfonated poly-sulfone or ionomer containing fluorine. The tangential filtration technology limits the accumulation phenomenon of the retained species at the membrane surface and is then used preferentially. In order to obtain the wished retention rates, the pH value of the aqueous effluent, the temperature, the pressure and the flow rates have to be adjusted. The membrane retention rate for the radioactive elements can be improved by the complexation with the use of chelating agents of one or several elements present in the effluent. Radioactive effluents without sodium can be then stored in vitreous matrices. (O.M.). 4 refs., 26 figs., 4 tabs

  6. REMOVAL OF REMAZOL ROSSO RB DYE FROM AQUEOUS EFFLUENTS BY HOMOGENOUS FENTON OXIDATION PROCESSES

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Zaharia; Victoria Fedorcea; Adrian Beda; Victor Amarandei; Augustin Muresan

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents some data from our laboratory-setup experiments of homogenous oxidative processes with hydrogen peroxide (i.e. advanced Fenton oxidation processes) applied for Remazol Rosso RB dye-containing aqueous systems, especially textile effluents. Therefore, some different operating parameters (including pH, concentration of dye, H2O2 and ferrous ions, oxidation time, temperature, stirring regime, among its) were tested for determination of the best performance in effluent decolorat...

  7. Ni(II) removal from aqueous effluents by silylated clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Wagner A; Vignado, Carolina; Fontana, Juliane

    2008-05-30

    Industrial effluents discharged in water bodies without proper treatment contribute to water pollution by potentially toxic metal ions. Considering that the legislation for discarding of such effluents is getting more and more rigorous, the development of efficient processes for the treatment of industrial effluents is of great interest. A study on the capacity of metal retention by silylated-modified clays was carried out with the aim to evaluate the efficiency of this application. K10 clay was modified with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and tested in batch removal processes. We investigated the sorption process, obtaining isotherms and kinetics of adsorption and the influence of pH, the desorption process and the metal recovery. It was observed that the modified clay presents fast retention and good capacity of both adsorption and desorption. The use of K10/MPS as adsorbent shows to be more adequate in effluent final polishment, after a conventional treatment, or when Ni(II) initial concentration in the effluent is low enough to permit its adequate removal by conventional methods. PMID:17980481

  8. Experimental study and phenomenological modeling of the hydrolysis of tritiated sodium: influence of experimental conditions on the tritium distribution in the effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the decommissioning of fast reactors, several processes are under investigation regarding sodium disposal. One of them rests on the implementation of the sodium-water reaction (SWR), in a controlled and progressive way, to remove residual sodium containing impurities such as sodium hydrides, sodium oxides and tritiated sodium hydrides. Such a hydrolysis releases some amount of energy and produces a liquid effluent, composed of a solution of soda, and a gaseous effluent, composed of hydrogen, steam and an inert gas. The tritium, originally into the sodium as a soluble (T-) or precipitate form (NaT), will be distributed between the liquid and gaseous effluent, and according to two chemical forms, the tritium hydride HT and the tritiated water HTO. HTO being 10,000 times more radio-toxic than HT, a precise knowledge of the mechanisms governing the distribution of tritium is necessary in order to estimate the exhaust gas releases and design the process needed to treat the off-gas before its release into the environment. An experimental study has been carried out in order to determine precisely the phenomena involved in the hydrolysis. The influence of the experimental conditions on the tritium distribution has been tested. The results of this study leaded to a phenomenological description of the tritiated sodium hydrolysis that will help to predict the composition of the effluents, regarding tritium. (author)

  9. Screening of natural adsorbents for removal of radio-contaminants from aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper is a summary of studies carried out to examine the uptake potential of some of the bio/natural adsorbents for removal of radiocontaminants from aqueous effluents. Three different bio/natural materials namely coconut coir pith, sugarcane bagasse and saw dust were selected as adsorbents. Preliminary characterisations of the above adsorbents were carried out and percentage of removal of 239Pu and 241Am from aqueous solutions were checked using batch equilibration method. (author)

  10. Tritium distribution ratios between the 30 % tributyl phosphate(TBP)-normal dodecane(nDD) organic phase and uranyl nitrate-nitric acid aqueous phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium distribution ratios between the organic and aqueous phases were measured for the system of 30 % tributyl phosphate(TBP)-normal dodecane(nDD)/uranyl nitrate-nitric acid water. It was confirmed that tritium is extracted by TBP into the organic phase in both chemical forms of tritiated water (HTO) and tritiated nitric acid (TNO3). The value of tritium distribution ratio ranged from 0.002 to 0.005 for the conditions of 0-6 mol/L nitric acid, 0.5-800 mCi/L tritium in aqueous phase, and 0-125 g-U/L uranium in organic phase. Isotopic distribution coefficient of tritium between the organic and aqueous phases was observed to be about 0.95. (author)

  11. Aqueous stability of gadolinium in surface waters receiving sewage treatment plant effluent Boulder Creek, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verplanck, P.L.; Taylor, H.E.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Barber, L.B.

    2005-01-01

    In many surface waters, sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent is a substantial source of both regulated and unregulated contaminants, including a suite of complex organic compounds derived from household chemicals, pharmaceutical, and industrial and medical byproducts. In addition, STP effluents in some urban areas have also been shown to have a positive gadolinium (Gd) anomaly in the rare earth element (REE) pattern, with the Gd derived from its use in medical facilities. REE concentrations are relatively easy to measure compared to many organic wastewater compounds and may provide a more widely utilized tracer of STP effluents. To evaluate whether sewage treatment plant-associated Gd is a useful tracer of treatment plant effluent, an investigation of the occurrence, fate, and transport of rare earth elements was undertaken. The rare earth element patterns of four of five STP effluents sampled display positive Gd anomalies. The one site that did not have a Gd anomaly serves a small community, population 1200, with no medical facilities. Biosolids from a large metropolitan STP are not enriched in Gd even though the effluent is, suggesting that a substantial fraction of Gd remains in the aqueous phase through routine treatment plant operation. To evaluate whether STP-derived Gd persists in the fluvial environment, a 14-km study reach downstream of an STP was sampled. Gadolinium anomalies were present at all five downstream sites, but the magnitude of the anomaly decreased. Effluent from STPs is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic constituents, and to better understand the chemical interactions and their effect on REEs, the aqueous speciation was modeled using comprehensive chemical analyses of water samples collected downstream of STP input. These calculations suggest that the REEs will likely remain dissolved because phosphate and carbonate complexes dominate over free REE ions. This study supports the application of Gd anomalies as a useful tracer of urban

  12. REMOVAL OF REMAZOL ROSSO RB DYE FROM AQUEOUS EFFLUENTS BY HOMOGENOUS FENTON OXIDATION PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Zaharia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some data from our laboratory-setup experiments of homogenous oxidative processes with hydrogen peroxide (i.e. advanced Fenton oxidation processes applied for Remazol Rosso RB dye-containing aqueous systems, especially textile effluents. Therefore, some different operating parameters (including pH, concentration of dye, H2O2 and ferrous ions, oxidation time, temperature, stirring regime, among its were tested for determination of the best performance in effluent decoloration and dye removal, meaning the optimal values of each studied parameters for highest decoloration or dye removal.

  13. Aqueous salt blanket tritium systems for the TITAN-II reversed-field pinch fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TITAN is a high-power-density reversed-field pinch reactor design. The TITAN-II concept is based on an aqueous lithium salt blanket immersed in a loop-in-pool design to provide a high level of passive safety. The blanket uses 50 Ci/kg water in the primary heat transport circuit, and 0.4 Ci/kg in the cold water pool. The main coolant stream is treated by a 5-stage Vapor Phase Catalytic Exchange process, followed by Cryogenic Distillation. Water Distillation is used to process the cold pool. The design uses proven technologies (although on a ten times larger scale), and takes advantage of features of light water tritium recovery. Tritium losses are controlled to 50 Ci/d by leak-tight design, tritium release trapping by the cold pool, lower pressure in the primary system relative to the steam system, and air driers

  14. Tritium determination in aqueous samples by using LSC Quantulus in CDTN - Brazilian Development Center for Nuclear Technology, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temba, Eliane S.C.; Moreira, Rubens M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Meio Ambiente e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mails: esct@cdtn.br; rubens@cdtn.br; Mingote, Raquel M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Quimica e Radioquimica]. E-mail: mingote@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Tritium is the radioisotope of hydrogen which disintegrates by emission of beta particle to {sup 3}He. Its determination is important in several applications such as in oil recovery, where tritiated tracers are added to injection fluids, or in groundwater surveys, to estimate the recharging of aquifers, among others applications. Liquid scintillation spectrometry is an appropriate method for determining low-level contents of tritium in aqueous samples. We used a low background liquid scintillation system detector, Perkin Elmer - Wallac QuantulusTM 1220, recently acquired by Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN). The purpose of this work is the optimization of the counting performance for tritium determination in water samples by direct counting. For definition of optimum parameters we compare two cocktails, Instagel Plus{sup TM} and Optiphase Hisafe{sup TM} 3. The ratios of sample/cocktail studied were 8/10, 10/10 and 10/12. The stability of the sample/cocktail mixture was also analysed by the loss of mass and by the luminescence spectrum. The counting conditions were 60 minutes counts for each vial, in the selected counting windows 50-200 and 1-200 channels. The vial used was 20 mL polyethylene. For background estimation we used a very old water (dead water) from Thermas Antonio Carlos, Pocos de Caldas, Brazil. The good results obtained in national and international laboratory intercomparison programs indicate the excellence of the tritium analysis at CDTN. (author)

  15. The Luffa Cynlidrica fibre as discoloration medium of the aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text.The vegetal fibres of Luffa Cylindrica sponge are characterized in this work with electronic scanning microscopy. Having alveolar mico-porous structure, the material prepared under various treatments is then used for the removal of dissolved dyes from industrial effluents. The obtained results reveal that basic dyes of the triarylcarbonium structure type such as the Crystal violet present non negligible affinity toward the vegetal material on which substantial adsorption is observed within few hours contact time. The adsorption equilibria are fitted at 25 celsius degree according to the Van Vliet-Weber and the hybrid Langmuir-Freundlich correlations. Furthermore, quantitative elution of the sorbed dye is achieved with aqueous solutions of acetone or ethanol at 50%, v/v, which indicates to doubly advantageous use of the sorbent in the recovery and recycling of the dye as well as in the discoloration of the effluents

  16. Tritium Separation from High Volume Dilute Aqueous Streams- Milestone Report for M3FT-15OR0302092

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhave, Ramesh R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nair, S. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-02-29

    This report describes the synthesis and evaluation of molecular sieve zeolite membranes to separate and concentrate tritiated water (HTO) from dilute HTO-bearing aqueous streams. Several silico alumino phosphate (SAPO-34) molecular sieve zeolite membranes were synthesized and characterized with gas and vapor permeation measurements. The pervaporation process performance was evaluated for the separation and concentration of tritiated water. Experiments were performed over a range of tritiated water concentration covering the range of concentration anticipated in nuclear fuel processing where potentially both acid and water streams are recycled. The permeate was recovered under vacuum. The tritium concentration ranged from 0.5 to 1 mCi/mL which is about 0.1 mg/L or 0.1 ppm. The HTO concentration was three orders of magnitude lower than experiments performed with simulated feed containing HDO (>100 ppm) using deuterated water where high separation factors (>10) were obtained using SAPO membranes. Separation factor calculated from the measured tritium concentrations ranged from 0.83-0.98. Although the membrane performance characterization results were lower than expected, they can be explained on the basis of low feed volume and three orders of magnitude lower HTO concentration compared to HDO concentration in deuterated water. We have identified several new approaches, such as tuning the diffusion coefficient of HTO, that may help achieve preferential transport of tritium (HTO) resulting in a substantially more concentrated permeate.

  17. Introduction of a cation in aqueous solution by electrolytic dissolution of metal. Applications to the decontamination of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis aims at comparing results obtained in chemical decontamination of radioactive effluents with a metallic cation introduced by metal electro-dissolution or by dose addition. After an overview of methods used for the purification of radioactive effluents and a more precise presentation of chemical co-precipitation, the author reports preliminary tests of the application of chemical co-precipitation to the decontamination of radioactive effluents, reports the analysis of iron, zinc and copper behaviour in aqueous environment by means of thermodynamic diagrams and current-voltage curves. He reports the design and use of two electro-dissolution sets, and the application of copper electrolytic dissolution to the elimination of ruthenium in radioactive effluents. He finally addresses the purification treatment of effluents of nuclear reactors

  18. The potentialities of the complexation ultrafiltration technique for the decontamination of fission product contaminated aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many nuclear researchers and industrial operators lay emphasis on improving the back end of the fuel cycle. A major problem concerns the liquid wastes generated by the reprocessing plant at La Hague, discharged into the sea after treatment in the Effluent Treatment Station (STE) 3), and which have become crucial matter. The activity of these wastes is well below the current legal limits, and is constantly decreasing these last years. To bring it close to zero, and ambitious goal, entails innovative new reprocessing techniques. We accordingly investigated the possibilities of complexation-ultrafiltration, a technique that uses water-soluble macromolecules to complex the target elements to be separated. We first achieved the strontium (II) separation with poly-acrylic and poly-sulfonic acids. The effects of pH and NaNO3 concentration influence on Sr (II) complexation were studied. The Sr (II) complexation and concentration phases, followed by cation de-complexation to recover the polymer, were also taken into account. This research, combined with a potentiometric study of the polymers, offered a close understanding of the chemical systems involved, and of the operating conditions and limits of complexation-ultrafiltration. The laboratory results were also validated on a tangential ultrafiltration pilot plant. We then used complexation-ultrafiltration to treat a real effluent generated bu La Hague's STE 3 plant. This experiment demonstrated minimum 90 % decontamination of Sr (II) (with polyacrylate complexing agent), and also for 134-137Cs (with simple ultrafiltration). The use of two polyamides allowed partial decontamination of the effluent for 60Co and 106Ru. This work therefore offers a global approach to complexation-ultrafiltration, from laboratory to pilot scale, on real and simulated effluents. The future of this technique relies chiefly on the ability to solve the problem of polymer recovery. In other respect, complexation-ultrafiltration clearly offers a

  19. Advanced biological treatment of aqueous effluent from the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the processing steps in the nuclear fuel cycle generate aqueous effluent streams bearing contaminants that can, because of their chemical or radiological properties, pose an environmental hazard. Concentration of such contaminants must be reduced to acceptable levels before the streams can be discharged to the environment. Two classes of contaminants, nitrates and heavy metals, are addressed in this study. Specific techniques aimed at the removal of nitrates and radioactive heavy metals by biological processes are being developed, tested, and demonstrated. Although cost comparisons between biological processes and current treatment methods will be presented, these comparisons may be misleading because biological processes yield environmentally better end results which are difficult to price. The fluidized-bed biological denitrification process is an environmentally acceptable and economically sound method for the disposal of nonreusable sources of nitrate effluents. A very high denitrification rate can be obtained in a FBR as the result of a high concentration of denitrification bacteria in the bioreactor and the stagewise operation resulting from plug flow in the reactor. The overall denitrification rate in an FBR ranges from 20- to 100-fold greater than that observed for an STR bioreactor. It has been shown that the system can be operated using Ca2+, Na+, or NH4+ cations at nitrate concentrations up to 1 g/liter without inhibition. Biological sorption of uranium and other radionuclides (particularly the actinides) from dilute aqueous waste streams shows considerable promise as a means of recovering these valuable resources and reducing the environmental impact, however, further development efforts are required

  20. Considerations affecting deep-well disposal of tritium-bearing low-level aqueous waste from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevorrow, L. E.; Warner, D. L.; Steindler, M. J.

    1977-03-01

    Present concepts of disposal of low-level aqueous wastes (LLAW) that contain much of the fission-product tritium from light water reactors involve dispersal to the atmosphere or to surface streams at fuel reprocessing plants. These concepts have been challenged in recent years. Deep-well injection of low-level aqueous wastes, an alternative to biospheric dispersal, is the subject of this presentation. Many factors must be considered in assessing its feasibility, including technology, costs, environmental impact, legal and regulatory constraints, and siting. Examination of these factors indicates that the technology of deep-well injection, extensively developed for other industrial wastes, would require little innovation before application to low-level aqueous wastes. Costs would be low, of the order of magnitude of 10/sup -4/ mill/kWh. The environmental impact of normal deep-well disposal would be small, compared with dispersal to the atmosphere or to surface streams; abnormal operation would not be expected to produce catastrophic results. Geologically suitable sites are abundant in the U.S., but a well would best be co-located with the fuel-reprocessing plant where the LLAW is produced. Legal and regulatory constraints now being developed will be the most important determinants of the feasibility of applying the method.

  1. Considerations affecting deep-well disposal of tritium-bearing low-level aqueous waste from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present concepts of disposal of low-level aqueous wastes (LLAW) that contain much of the fission-product tritium from light water reactors involve dispersal to the atmosphere or to surface streams at fuel reprocessing plants. These concepts have been challenged in recent years. Deep-well injection of low-level aqueous wastes, an alternative to biospheric dispersal, is the subject of this presentation. Many factors must be considered in assessing its feasibility, including technology, costs, environmental impact, legal and regulatory constraints, and siting. Examination of these factors indicates that the technology of deep-well injection, extensively developed for other industrial wastes, would require little innovation before application to low-level aqueous wastes. Costs would be low, of the order of magnitude of 10-4 mill/kWh. The environmental impact of normal deep-well disposal would be small, compared with dispersal to the atmosphere or to surface streams; abnormal operation would not be expected to produce catastrophic results. Geologically suitable sites are abundant in the U.S., but a well would best be co-located with the fuel-reprocessing plant where the LLAW is produced. Legal and regulatory constraints now being developed will be the most important determinants of the feasibility of applying the method

  2. Tritium conference days

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Twenty presentations out of 21 are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - tritium in the environment (J. Garnier-Laplace); 2 - status of knowledge about tritium impact on health (L. Lebaron-Jacobs); 3 - tritium, discrete but present everywhere (M. Sene); 4 - management of tritium effluents from Areva NC La Hague site - related impact and monitoring (P. Devin); 5 - tritium effluents and impact in the vicinity of EDF's power plants (V. Chretien and B. Le Guen); 6 - contribution of CEA-Valduc centre monitoring to the knowledge of atmospheric tritiated water transfers to the different compartments of the environment (P. Guetat); 7 - tritium analysis in environment samples: constraints and means (N. Baglan); 8 - organically-linked tritium: the analyst view (E. Ansoborlo); 9 - study of tritium transfers to plants via OBT/HTOair and OBT/HTOfree (C. Boyer); 10 - tritium in the British Channel (M. Masson and P. Bailly-Du-Bois); 11 - tritium in British coastal waters (S. Jenkinson); 12 - recent results from epidemiology (R. Wakeford); 13 - effects of tritiated thymidine on hematopoietic stem cells (P.H. Romeo); 14 - tritium management issue in Canada: the point of view from authorities (P. Thompson); 15 - experience feedback of the detritiation process of Valduc centre (D. Leterq); 16 - difficulties linked with tritiated wastes confinement (F. Chastagner); 17 - optimisation of tritium management in the ITER project (P. Cortes); 18 - elements of thought about the management of tritium generated by nuclear facilities (M. Philippe); 19 - CIPR's position about the calculation of doses and risks linked with tritium exposure (F. Paquet); 20 - tritium think tanks (M. Fournier). (J.S.)

  3. Removal of toxic metals from aqueous effluents by electrodeposition in a spouted bed electrochemical reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Rosimeire; Britto-Costa, Pedro H; Ruotolo, Luís Augusto M

    2012-06-01

    This work investigates the removal of metal ions from synthetic aqueous effluents using a spouted bed electrochemical reactor whose cathode was composed of 1.0 mm copper particles. Using a Box-Behnken factorial design, the effects of current (I), electrode thickness (L), draught distance (d) and support electrolyte concentration (C(s)) on current efficiency (CE), space-time yield (Y) and energy consumption (EC) were analysed. The results were statistically analysed and the effect of each variable was evaluated using the surface response methodology. The results showed that C(s) is the most important variable to consider in the process optimization. A current of 8.0 A can be applied in order to obtain high Y and CE with an acceptable EC. Electrode thicknesses greater than 1.3 cm are not recommended because the irregular potential distribution leads to a Y drop owing to the low CE observed for this condition. The draught distance does not have statistical significance; therefore, the particle circulation rate is not important in this kind of electrochemical reactor. PMID:22856281

  4. Safe handling of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this publication is to provide practical guidance and recommendations on operational radiation protection aspects related to the safe handling of tritium in laboratories, industrial-scale nuclear facilities such as heavy-water reactors, tritium removal plants and fission fuel reprocessing plants, and facilities for manufacturing commercial tritium-containing devices and radiochemicals. The requirements of nuclear fusion reactors are not addressed specifically, since there is as yet no tritium handling experience with them. However, much of the material covered is expected to be relevant to them as well. Annex III briefly addresses problems in the comparatively small-scale use of tritium at universities, medical research centres and similar establishments. However, the main subject of this publication is the handling of larger quantities of tritium. Operational aspects include designing for tritium safety, safe handling practice, the selection of tritium-compatible materials and equipment, exposure assessment, monitoring, contamination control and the design and use of personal protective equipment. This publication does not address the technologies involved in tritium control and cleanup of effluents, tritium removal, or immobilization and disposal of tritium wastes, nor does it address the environmental behaviour of tritium. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Contribution to immersed arc plasma study: applications to organic aqueous effluent decontamination and gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is concerned with decontamination and gasification of aqueous organic liquid waste by immersed thermal plasma technology. In this concept, the organic compounds are decomposed into gas by high temperature plasma. A quench of about 107-108 K/s, is obtained by immersion into a given effluent. Two kinds of arc plasma are studied. The first one is an immersed electrical arc stricken between two graphite electrodes. The second one is a plasma jet generated by a non-transferred plasma torch. For dilute liquid waste (1 g/L) containing molecules incompatible with conventional biological processes, the hydroxyl radicals (OH0) are continuously produced by the plasma jet directly into the solution allowing complete molecule mineralization into carbon dioxide and water. The hetero-atoms, if present, are converted into solvated ions. The decomposition of the molecules, such as chloro-phenols and aniline, are studied. Considering the identified intermediate products, a reaction mechanism is proposed. For each tested molecules, their concentration decreased at least of 90 percent. Based on the 'gasosiphon' phenomenon, the experimental reactor insures the simultaneous recirculation of both gas and liquid phases. The hydrodynamic was studied using in situ high frequency imaging technology. A CFD code was applied for numerical simulation of the observed recirculation phenomena. The results were compared with obtained experimental data. In the case of concentrated liquid waste (≥ 100 g/L), syngas was produced by thermal cracking of organic molecules. The best measured composition of the gas is about 45% v/v of H2 and 45 % v/v of CO when an electrical arc is used. The usability of both studied plasma types were investigated in this field. The experimental study was carried on using fructose and glucose solution (several hundreds g/L) as surrogated effluent. With a specific injection method, gasification rate is about 30 % with one way. Optical Emission Spectroscopy and

  6. Desempenho de biomassas na adsorção de hidrocarbonetos leves em efluentes aquosos Performance of biomasses in the adsorption of simple hydrocarbons in aqueous effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elba Gomes dos Santos

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Removal of hydrocarbons from aqueous effluents using biosorbents was investigated. The effluent was simulated by a dispersion of gasoline (simple hydrocarbons in water. Corn-cob, wood powder, coconut mesocarp and sugar-cane bagasse were used as adsorbents and their performance verified by means of batch experiments performed in an agitated vessel. The influence of input variables such as hydrocarbon concentration, mass of biomass and agitation level on the adsorbents' capacity was studied by means of factorial design. The results indicated that, among the materials studied, coconut mesocarp and sugar-cane bagasse can be considered promising biomasses for treating aqueous effluents contaminated by hydrocarbons.

  7. Bioprospecting of gum kondagogu (Cochlospermum gossypium) for bioremediation of uranium (VI) from aqueous solution and synthetic nuclear power reactor effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ecofriendly green chemistry method using a natural biopolymer, Gum Kondagogu (GK) for the removal of U (VI) from aqueous, simulated nuclear effluents was studied. The adsorption characteristic of GK towards U (VI) from aqueous solution was studied at varied pH, contact time, adsorbent dose, initial U (VI) concentration and temperature using UV–Visible spectroscopy and ICP-MS. Maximum adsorption was seen at pH 4, 0.1% GK with 60 min contact time at room temperature. The GK- U (VI) composite was characterized by FT-IR, zeta potential, TEM and SEM-EDAX. The Langmuir isotherm was found to be 487 mg of U (VI) g−1 of GK. The adsorption capacity and (%) of U (VI) was found to be 490 ± 5.4 mg g−1 and 98.5%. Moreover adsorption of U (VI) by GK was not influenced by other cations present in the simulated effluents. The adsorbed U (VI) was efficiently stripped from composite using 1 M HCl. - Highlights: • An eco-friendly method for removal of U (VI) from simulated nuclear effluents by Gum Kondagogu. • The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm indicated favourable adsorption. • The adsorption (%) of U (VI) by GK was found to be 98.5%. • Desorption studies on biosorbed metal ions showed that HCl was a good eluent

  8. A study on triple-membrane-separator (TMS) process to treat aqueous effluents containing uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effective process incorporated with the novel membrane separation technology was developed to recover uranium from the filtrate effluent of uranium dioxide conversion processes. The prominent feature of the process is that it utilizes separation characteristics of three different types of membranes as follow: separation of uranium species from effluent of high fluoride content by ultrafiltration membrane, separation of uranium species from effluent of low fluoride content by reverse osmosis membrane, precipitation of uranium species with hydrogen peroxide, and filtration of uranium bearing precipitates by microfiltration membrane. The process is simple and feasible for treatment of liquid waste containing both soluble and suspended uranium species. The recovery of uranium can be as high as 95% and the treated effluents meet the current environmental standards. 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  9. Enrichment and isotope separation of tritium between hydrogen and liquid water in trikle bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium produced by ternary fission within pent fuel will be in most part as HTO form in aqueous effluents of the reprocessing plant. Its decharge to the environment will prove detrimental and studies have been undertaken to develop techniques to confine it and process it. For confining tritium in small volumes of aqueous effluents, a special study has been achieved using the ELEX process which should be adapted for use in the design of reprocessing plant. This process is a combination of water electrolysis and tritium exchange between hydrogen and liquid water in contre - courant trikle bed reactor in presence of platined hydrophobic catalyst. Experiments carried out have enabled : demonstration of the effectiveness of platined hydrophobic catalyst in isotope exchange and separation reaction of tritium between hydrogen and liquid water. Development of a pretreatment method of aqueous effluents that have to be detriliated to eliminate impurities which would be detrimental to the ELEX process system by accumulating in the electrolyser and being absorbed in the exchange column. To check hydrodynamical functionment for contre-courant flow system water-hydrogen in trikle bed reactor

  10. Desempenho de biomassas na adsorção de hidrocarbonetos leves em efluentes aquosos Performance of biomasses in the adsorption of simple hydrocarbons in aqueous effluents

    OpenAIRE

    Elba Gomes dos Santos; Odelsia Leonor Sanchez de Alsina; Flávio Luiz Honorato da Silva

    2007-01-01

    Removal of hydrocarbons from aqueous effluents using biosorbents was investigated. The effluent was simulated by a dispersion of gasoline (simple hydrocarbons) in water. Corn-cob, wood powder, coconut mesocarp and sugar-cane bagasse were used as adsorbents and their performance verified by means of batch experiments performed in an agitated vessel. The influence of input variables such as hydrocarbon concentration, mass of biomass and agitation level on the adsorbents' capacity was studied by...

  11. Public doses estimation based on effluents data and direct measurements of Tritium in environmental samples at Cernavoda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of any potential radioactive pollutant to the environment during routine operation of a Nuclear Power Plant should be the subject of appropriate controls and assessments. The layout of the Candu reactor and the design of its systems ensure that the radioactive waste quantities are minimized, but small amounts of radioisotopes are continuously discharged at very low concentrations through gaseous and liquid effluents. Radioprotection of the public is based on the principles recommended by ICRP, the protection being mainly achieved by control of the sources of exposure. Source monitoring provide a means of assessing the radiation exposure of population groups, critical groups and individual members of the public. The assessed doses are used to demonstrate the compliance with authorized dose limits - 1 mSv / year in our case - but can also be used for optimization purposes

  12. Improving the performances of hydrophobic catalysts used for tritium recovery and enrichment processes In liquid and gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Based on the long experience of the authors in the preparation, testing and evaluation of the performances of hydrophobic catalysts and based also on the reviewed references, this paper presents up-to-date R and D activities on the preparation methods and applications of the hydrophobic catalysts in tritium separation. The objectives of the paper are: (1) how to improve the characteristics and performance of platinum hydrophobic catalysts; (2) to assess and find a new procedure for the preparation of a new improved hydrophobic catalyst. From reviewed references it results that platinum appears to be the most active and efficient catalytic metal while polytetrafluoroethylene is the best wetproofing agent. A new improved hydrophobic Pt-catalyst has been obtained and tests are now underway. The main steps and experimental conditions of preparation are largely discussed. A new wetproofing agent and new binding agents (titanium dioxide, cerium dioxide, zirconium dioxide) with a catalytic role are proposed and tested. The physico-structural parameters of the improved catalyst have been determined and are discussed in detail. The new proposal is a promising for improving the performance of conventional hydrophobic Pt-catalysts. (authors)

  13. ITER task title - source term data, modelling, and analysis. ITER subtask no. S81TT05/5 (SEP 1-1). Global tritium source term analysis basis document. Subtask 1: operational tritium effluents and releases. Final report (1995 TASK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document represents the final report for the global tritium source term analysis task initiated in 1995. The report presents a room-by-room map/table at the subsystem level for the ITER tritium systems, identifying the major equipment, secondary containments, tritium release sources, duration/frequency of tritium releases and the release pathways. The chronic tritium releases during normal operation, as well as tritium releases due to routine maintenance of the Water Distillation Unit, Isotope Separation System and Primary and Secondary Heat Transport Systems, have been estimated for most of the subsystems, based on the IDR design, the Design Description Documents (April - Jun 1995 issues) and the design updates up to December 1995. The report also outlines the methodology and the key assumptions that are adopted in preparing the tritium release estimates. The design parameters for the ITER Basic Performance Phase (BPP) have been used in estimating the tritium releases shown in the room-by-room map/table. The tritium release calculations and the room-by-room map/table have been prepared in EXCEL, so that the estimates can be refined easily as the design evolves and more detailed information becomes available. (author). 23 refs., tabs

  14. Fully automated measuring equipment for aqueous boron and its application to online monitoring of industrial process effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Seiichi; Abe, Keiko; Ohsumi, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Miyazaki, Naotsugu; Miyadera, Koji; Akasaka, Kin-ichi

    2009-06-01

    Fully automated measuring equipment for aqueous boron (referred to as the online boron monitor) was developed on the basis of a rapid potentiometric determination method using a commercial BF4(-) ion-selective electrode (ISE). The equipment can measure boron compounds with concentration ranging from a few to several hundred mg/L, and the measurement is completed in less than 20 min without any pretreatment of the sample. In the monitor, a series of operations for the measurement, i.e., sampling and dispensing of the sample, addition of the chemicals, acquisition and processing of potentiometric data, rinsing of the measurement cell, and calibration of the BF4(-) ISE, is automated. To demonstrate the performance, we installed the monitor in full-scale coal-fired power plants and measured the effluent from a flue gas desulfurization unit. The boron concentration in the wastewater varied significantly depending on the type of coal and the load of power generation. An excellent correlation (R2 = 0.987) was obtained in the measurements between the online boron monitor and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, which proved that the developed monitor can serve as a useful tool for managing boron emission in industrial process effluent. PMID:19569339

  15. Development and use of thin film composite based positively charged nanofiltration membranes in separation of aqueous streams and nuclear effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new, positively charged, thin film composite (TFC) type nanofiltration membrane has been developed and studied for its use in various aqueous stream separations. The membrane, containing fixed quaternary ammonium moieties, was developed by insitu interfacial polymerization of a functionalized amine (polyethyleneimine) and terephthaloyl chloride on a suitable base membrane. The nature of the charge on the membrane was established by ATR FT IR spectroscopy and was estimated by determination of its ion exchange capacity. The membrane was tested for its performance in single solute feed systems containing salts of various combinations of univalent and bivalent ions (NaCl, Na2SO4, CaCl2 and MgSO4) in test cell as well as in 2512 spiral modules. The membrane gave differential separation profile for these solutes with high rejection for CaCl2 and low rejection for Na2SO4 due to positive charge on the membrane and the type of charge constituting the salts. The membrane was also used for separation of simulated effluent solution containing uranyl nitrate in combination with ammonium nitrate which is a common effluent generated in nuclear industry. Here also the membrane gave differential separation profile for uranyl nitrate and ammonium nitrate in their mixture by concentrating the former salt and passing the later. This helped separation of these two solutes in the mixture into two different streams. (author)

  16. Coir pith of the green coconut in the decontamination of radioactive aqueous effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrial segments as plant of mining, hospitals and university generate considerable volumes of radioactive wastewater containing uranium. The increasing development of the use of the nuclear energy to lead away to an expansion of the sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle, but it leads to security problems and it appears the necessity of control of the removing of uranium and radioactive effluent treatments. Researches evaluate if the technique of the biosorption would promote an alternative process with attractive characteristics of cost-benefit. The residual biomass from agricultural activities has been studied and used as adsorbent of metals and organic composts by low cost, abundance and for being biodegradable. In this work, it is presented the efficiency of the coir pith for the adsorption of ions UO22+. The coir pith is a by-product of the harvest of the coconut, a renewable natural source. The study was accomplished using the batch techniques. The influence from pH 2 to 5, the dose of the coir pith, equilibrium time and the models of kinetic reaction were investigated. It was verified that the adsorption increased with the increase of pH and of the dose. The equilibrium time was of 30 min and the best correspondence with the model of pseudo second-order was observed. The results obtained has been promising, so use as adsorbent of metallic ions represents an economic alternative in relation to the conventional treatment of effluent. (author)

  17. Microwave-assisted activated carbon from cocoa shell as adsorbent for removal of sodium diclofenac and nimesulide from aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Microwave-assisted cocoa shell activated carbon was prepared and characterized. • The anti-inflammatories, diclofenac and nimesulide, were adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0. • Adsorption maximum values are 63.47 (diclofenac) and 74.81 mg g−1 (nimesulide). • General order kinetic model suitably explained the adsorption process. • MWCS-1.0 was effectively used for treatment of simulated hospital effluents. - Abstract: Microwave-induced chemical activation process was used to prepare an activated carbon from cocoa shell for efficient removal of two anti-inflammatories, sodium diclofenac (DFC) and nimesulide (NM), from aqueous solutions. A paste was obtained from a mixture of cocoa shell and inorganic components; with a ratio of inorganic: organic of 1 (CSC-1.0). The mixture was pyrolyzed in a microwave oven in less than 10 min. The CSC-1.0 was acidified with a 6 mol L−1 HCl under reflux to produce MWCS-1.0. The CSC-1.0 and MWCS-1.0 were characterized using FTIR, SEM, N2 adsorption/desorption curves, X-ray diffraction, and point of zero charge (pHpzc). Experimental variables such as initial pH of the adsorbate solutions and contact time were optimized for adsorptive characteristics of MWCS-1.0. The optimum pH for removal of anti-inflammatories ranged between 7.0 and 8.0. The kinetic of adsorption was investigated using general order, pseudo first-order and pseu do-second order kinetic models. The maximum amounts of DCF and NM adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0 at 25 °C are 63.47 and 74.81 mg g−1, respectively. The adsorbent was tested on two simulated hospital effluents. MWCS-1.0 is capable of efficient removal of DCF and NM from a medium that contains high sugar and salt concentrations

  18. Rapid assessment of the latent hazard posed by dissolved mercaptans within aqueous effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of mercaptans (RSH) can usually be detected by their inherent noxious odour but there is a need to quantify the concentration within effluent and hence allow an assessment of the latent hazard to be made prior to disposal. The versatility of using naphthoquinone as a rapid derivatising agent through which to trap such species has been evaluated. The quinone moiety provides a label that can be quantified using colorimetric, electrochemical and chromatographic means and offers a significant advantage over conventional thiol labelling agents. The analytical characteristics of each approach have been investigated and the selectivity, sensitivity and applicability of the reaction system critically assessed for a range of model compounds. The naphthoquinone system has a detection limit in the low micromolar range with little interference from other components common to discharge water with 96% recovery of mercaptopropionate. The reaction to sulfide (HS-) has also been assessed and a disparity in response between the detection methods observed and a possible reaction pathway outlined

  19. Tritium monitor and collection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, J.D.; Wickham, K.L.; Ely, W.E.; Tuggle, D.G.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Grafwaller, E.G.; Maltrud, H.R.; Bourne, G.L.

    1991-03-26

    This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next online getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter.

  20. Tritium monitor and collection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Gary L.; Meikrantz, David H.; Ely, Walter E.; Tuggle, Dale G.; Grafwallner, Ervin G.; Wickham, Keith L.; Maltrud, Herman R.; Baker, John D.

    1992-01-01

    This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next on-line getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter.

  1. Recent studies on advanced methods for the decontamination of aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Harwell Laboratory has for many years been engaged in the design and development of processes to reduce the level of radioactivity present in low and intermediate level aqueous radioactive wastes to a very low level. A number of the radionuclides included in this work are those of toxic metals such as chromium, zinc, manganese, cobalt and nickel and therefore the processes that have been developed are also applicable to some of the wastes being generated in the non-nuclear industries. Work in Chemistry Division at Harwell has shown that precipitation processes and the use of inorganic ion-exchange materials in combination with ultrafiltration can achieve very effective decontamination. This paper presents some recent results from studies on decontamination processes and describes how the computer program is being amended to take account of sorption processes

  2. Investigations of photochemical transformations of aqueous mercury: implications for water effluent treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Heather E; Borello, Amy; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude; Mazyck, David W

    2009-09-01

    Photochemical transformations of mercury were studied to determine its potential as a treatment mechanism to reduce mercury laden waters to trace concentrations. In this study, aqueous solutions of mercury nitrate in deionized water were exposed to UV irradiation and a gas purge. The impacts of purge gas (including rate and bubble size), UV irradiation wavelength, initial mercury concentration and time on mercury removal have been studied. Nitrogen purge with 254 nm UV irradiation resulted in the greatest net production of elemental mercury for all initial concentrations. These conditions followed pseudo first order kinetics and achieved the highest rate constant of 0.18s(-1). As oxygen was introduced into the solution, the quantity of elemental mercury volatilized decreased but still resulted in significant mercury losses through volatilization up to 90% in 60 min. Overriding, the loss of elemental mercury from the solution is dependent upon the gas purge rate and bubble size. PMID:19595425

  3. Study of potentialities of micellar enhanced ultrafiltration for the decontamination of aqueous effluents containing heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the extraction of thorium, ruthenium and uranium by ultrafiltration using different micellar systems. These extractions are carried out in media which are strongly charged in salts (nitrates and carbonates). In the first part of this work has been studied the behaviour of micellar solutions. The type of used ultrafiltration (frontal or tangential), the pH, the initial concentration of surfactant, the salt type, the pressure, the recirculation rate, the surfactant type, the nature of the membrane (organic or mineral), the membrane support (aluminium oxide or carbon), the membrane cut threshold are factors able to affect the behaviour of micellar solutions, so their influences have been studied. This preliminary study has allowed to determine the ultrafiltration experimental conditions required to obtain the best possible flux for a minimal loss of surfactant in the permeate. The second part of this work deals with the metals extraction. The presence of strong salts concentrations is prejudicial to the process for the extractions carried out with SDC, CPC, or CTAB alone. The author has then studied micellar systems solubilizing an extractant agent (systems: Triton-X-100/Kelex-100, Triton-X-100/HS-21 and Brij 35/HS-21). The study of the different parameters affecting the extraction yields has allowed in this case to improve the results for reaching yields sometimes superior to 99.9% as well as for some metals taken separately than for the three metals treated simultaneously. The results of this work have shown the evident potentialities of the use of a surfactant/extractant system for the decontamination of effluents containing heavy metals and metals strongly charged in nitrates. (O.M.)

  4. Method to determine the release dilution factor for liquid radioactive effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current Brazilian regulation foresees that the operational management concerning to liquid effluents release considers the characteristics of the discharged liquid, the knowledge of the dispersion conditions after discharge into the system receptor (sewage and environment), the characteristics description of the effluent receiving system environment and the estimate of the dose. This paper describes a fast and cheap methodology to estimate the dilution factor in the liberation of liquid radioactive effluents at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN). The radioisotope tritium, generated in the routine operation of the Research Reactor IEA-R1, was used as radiotracer. The generated radioactive effluent was stored in a 300m3 capacity tank, has been determined initially the concentration of present radioisotope tritium. The tank flow rate exit was estimated as 10.9 ± 0.9 m3.h-1 for liquid controlled dispenser. A planned release for stored effluent tank was carried-out. Simultaneously it was made sampling upstream of the storage tank discharge point, monitoring the tritium concentration in the mix sewerage system point E1 at IPEN. The initial concentration of the 3H was determined as 56881±3255 Bq L-1. The estimated dilution factor for the aqueous effluent, in the discharge point E1 was of 4.3 and 7.4 respectively relative to two consecutive days of planned release and diluted effluents sampling. The developed methodology was rapid and without additional environmental and monetary costs, as it used the radiotracer tritium already existent routinely in the effluent, does not increment radioisotope concentrations into sewage and environment. Integrate the current goal in the world, which is the development and improvement of clean technologies. (author)

  5. Tritium. Today's and tomorrow's developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive hydrogen isotope, tritium is one of the radionuclides which is the most released in the environment during the normal operation of nuclear facilities. The increase of nuclear activities and the development of future generations of reactors, like the EPR and ITER, would lead to a significant increase of tritium effluents in the atmosphere and in the natural waters, thus raising many worries and questions. Aware about the importance of this question, the national association of local information commissions (ANCLI) wished to make a status of the existing knowledge concerning tritium and organized in 2008 a colloquium at Orsay (France) with an inquiring approach. The scientific committee of the ANCLI, renowned for its expertise skills, mobilized several nuclear specialists to carry out this thought. This book represents a comprehensive synthesis of today's knowledge about tritium, about its management and about its impact on the environment and on human health. Based on recent scientific data and on precise examples, it treats of the overall questions raised by this radionuclide: 1 - tritium properties and different sources (natural and anthropic), 2 - the problem of tritiated wastes management; 3 - the bio-availability and bio-kinetics of the different tritium species; 4 - the tritium labelling of environments; 5 - tritium measurement and modeling of its environmental circulation; 6 - tritium radio-toxicity and its biological and health impacts; 7 - the different French and/or international regulations concerning tritium. (J.S.)

  6. Management of tritium at nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents extending summaries of the works of the participants to an IAEA co-ordinated research programme, ''Handling Tritium - bearing effluents and wastes''. The subjects covered include production of tritium in nuclear power plants (mainly heavy water and light water reactors), as well as at reprocessing plants; removal and enrichment of tritium at nuclear facilities; conditioning methods and characteristics of immobilized tritium of low and high concentration; some potential methods of storage and disposal of tritium. In addition to the conclusions of this three-years work, possible activities in the field are recommended

  7. Microwave-assisted activated carbon from cocoa shell as adsorbent for removal of sodium diclofenac and nimesulide from aqueous effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saucier, Caroline [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Adebayo, Matthew A. [Department of Chemical Sciences, Ajayi Crowther University, Oyo, Oyo State (Nigeria); Lima, Eder C., E-mail: eder.lima@ufrgs.br [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Cataluña, Renato [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Thue, Pascal S. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Ngaoundere, P.O. Box 455, Ngaoundere (Cameroon); Prola, Lizie D.T.; Puchana-Rosero, M.J. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves 9500, P.O. Box 15003, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Machado, Fernando M. [Technology Development Center, Federal University of Pelotas (UFPEL), Pelotas (Brazil); Pavan, Flavio A. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Pampa (UNIPAMPA), Bagé, RS (Brazil); Dotto, G.L. [Chemical Engineering Department, Federal University of Santa Maria (UFSM), Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2015-05-30

    Highlights: • Microwave-assisted cocoa shell activated carbon was prepared and characterized. • The anti-inflammatories, diclofenac and nimesulide, were adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0. • Adsorption maximum values are 63.47 (diclofenac) and 74.81 mg g{sup −1} (nimesulide). • General order kinetic model suitably explained the adsorption process. • MWCS-1.0 was effectively used for treatment of simulated hospital effluents. - Abstract: Microwave-induced chemical activation process was used to prepare an activated carbon from cocoa shell for efficient removal of two anti-inflammatories, sodium diclofenac (DFC) and nimesulide (NM), from aqueous solutions. A paste was obtained from a mixture of cocoa shell and inorganic components; with a ratio of inorganic: organic of 1 (CSC-1.0). The mixture was pyrolyzed in a microwave oven in less than 10 min. The CSC-1.0 was acidified with a 6 mol L{sup −1} HCl under reflux to produce MWCS-1.0. The CSC-1.0 and MWCS-1.0 were characterized using FTIR, SEM, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption curves, X-ray diffraction, and point of zero charge (pH{sub pzc}). Experimental variables such as initial pH of the adsorbate solutions and contact time were optimized for adsorptive characteristics of MWCS-1.0. The optimum pH for removal of anti-inflammatories ranged between 7.0 and 8.0. The kinetic of adsorption was investigated using general order, pseudo first-order and pseu do-second order kinetic models. The maximum amounts of DCF and NM adsorbed onto MWCS-1.0 at 25 °C are 63.47 and 74.81 mg g{sup −1}, respectively. The adsorbent was tested on two simulated hospital effluents. MWCS-1.0 is capable of efficient removal of DCF and NM from a medium that contains high sugar and salt concentrations.

  8. Development of a surfactant liquid membrane extraction process for the cleansing of industrial aqueous effluents containing metallic cation traces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to develop a process of surfactant liquid membrane extraction to purify industrial waste solution containing Cu(II), Fe(III), and Zn(II) (about 0,1 g/L). The extractant is the ammonium salt of Cyanex 306 and Aliquat 336. The first part of this work deals with the study of the liquid-liquid extraction of the metals. The efficiency of the extractant has been shown for the extraction of each metal alone and for Cu(II) and Zn(II) in the case of a mixture of the three metals. During this study we have observed that Fe(III) is reduced to Fe(II) (which is not extracted by the salt of Cyanex 301) in presence of Cu(II) and the quaternary ammonium salt (Aliquat 336). The optimisation of the experimental conditions for the discontinuous surfactant liquid membrane process led us to choose the following composition of the emulsion: 1,5 % of Cyanex 301 salt, 2,5 % of ECA 4360, dodecan. The internal phase is an aqueous solution containing 3,5 mol/L of NaOH and 0,5 mol/L tri-ethanolamin The residual concentration of Cu(II) and Zn(II) in the external phase is very low. In the case of iron, only 60 % are extracted because of the reduction phenomenon (10 % in liquid-liquid extraction). The realisation of the continuous process in pulsed column, after optimisation of hydrodynamics conditions, leads to similar results. In stationary conditions, we obtain a raffinate containing less than 0,5 mg/L of Cu(II) and Zn(II) and 36 mg/L of iron. The internal phase contains about 2 g/L of Cu(II) an Zn(II). We tried and minimize the reduction of Fe(III) in surfactant liquid membrane process. Less than 16 % of iron cannot be reduced. This leads to a purification of only 84 % In the basis of these results, processes of purification have been proposed for effluents of various composition. They enable to purify the effluent and besides to concentrate the pollutants about twenty times. (author)

  9. Measurement of spread of tritium using the tritium labeled compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that a radioisotope disperses in the air from a radioisotope labeled compound in an aqueous solution via the isotopic exchange reaction. In this research, in order to examine the dispersion mechanism of tritium in the air from a tritium labeled compound, the model room which imitated a working room in the controlled area was made, and the radioactivity of the tritium contained in the air of the model room was measured by sampling the air in the model room. It was found that the dispersion rate of tritium in the air increased with the passage time from its purchase. The dispersion rate of tritium from 3H-ATP changed from 0.10% to 0.76% after 17.7 months. Furthermore, the two-dimensional distribution of tritium on the surface of the whole walls in the model room was obtained using an imaging plate technique. (author)

  10. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products

  11. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Frank, M.L.

    1986-02-01

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products.

  12. Environmental tritium contamination from a gaseous tritium light device maintenance facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of radiological characterization, decontamination works and validation assessments have been conducted for a Gaseous Tritium Light Device (GTLD) maintenance facility in Brisbane, Australia in 2003 and more recently in 2007. The initial survey utilised soil pore water tritium concentration as an indicator of the extent of contamination. Tritium, existing as tritiated water or HTO, is environmentally mobile and tends to behave as non-radioactive water would, i.e. will permeate through soil under normal hydraulic conditions. A more useful measure, and that exploited in this work, for the purposes of dealing with contaminated land is the 'non-aqueous tritium' concentration present in the soil. In addition to tritium existing as HTO, organically bound tritium (OBT), a result of fixation by biological and chemical processes, or tritium diffused into various matrices may be present and represent the non-aqueous component. Quantification of all these variants allows assessment of the reservoir of tritium that may become available in environmental processes. Screening soil contamination levels for non-aqueous tritium concentration of 8.5 Bq.g-1 and 16 Bq.g-1 for residential and industrial/commercial land uses respectively were applied. Comparison of non-aqueous tritium and soil pore water tritium and elemental zinc concentration in soil were made and tritium concentrations in groundwater wells surrounding the facility were determined (tk)

  13. Performance of two liquids scintillation and optimization of a Wallac 1411 counter in the tritium quantification in aqueous samples; Desempeno de dos centelleadores liquidos y optimizacion de un contador Wallac 1411 en la cuantificacion de tritio en muestras acuosas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras de la Cruz, E. de J.; Lopez del Rio, H.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F.; Pinedo V, J. L., E-mail: hlopezdelrio@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The optimization of a liquid scintillation counting Wallac 1411 is presented as well as the performance of the liquids scintillation miscible in water OptiPhase Hi Safe 3 and Last Gold Ab, in the tritium quantification in aqueous samples. The luminescence effect, the quenching, the solution ph and the level of pulse amplitude comparator (Pac) were evaluated in the response of both liquids scintillation in the tritium measurement. The quenching and the luminescence modify the scintillators response; in the first of them the counting efficiency decreases and the minimum detectable activity increases; the second interferes in the tritium quantification in the interest window, but the effect disappears after 4 hours of darkness of the samples. The maximum counting efficiency was of 24% for OptiPhase Hi Safe 3 and 31% for Last Gold Ab, diminishing with the quenching until values of 8 and 11%, respectively. For a counting time of 6 hours and lower quenching, the minimum detectable concentration for OptiPhase Hi Safe 3 was of 13.4 ± 0.2 Bq/L and 9.9 ± 0.1 Bq/L for Last Gold Ab. Both scintillators responded appropriately to sour and basic solutions, being only presented chemiluminescence in Last Gold Ab to ph highly basic. The Pac application that varies between 1 and 256 does not have effect in the tritium measurement until values above 90. (Author)

  14. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the tritium released from nuclear facilities into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered algae, aquatic plants, invertebrates, fish, and food chain studies, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near that of the external medium. Incorporation of tritium from triated water into the organic matter of cells is at a slower rate than incorporation into the tissue free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the 'carrier' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher tropic levels. Radiation doses to large populations of humans from tritium releases will most likely be from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products. (author)

  15. Handling of tritium-bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation of nuclear power and reprocessing of nuclear fuel results in the production of tritium and the possible need to control the release of tritium-contaminated effluents. In assessing the need for controls, it is necessary to know the production rates of tritium at different nuclear facilities, the technologies available for separating tritium from different gaseous and liquid streams, and the methods that are satisfactory for storage and disposal of tritiated wastes. The intention in applying such control technologies and methods is to avoid undesirable effects on the environment, and to reduce the radiation burden on operational personnel and the general population. This technical report is a result of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Handling of Tritium-bearing Effluents and Wastes, which was held in Vienna, 4 - 8 December 1978. It summarizes the main topics discussed at the meeting and appends the more detailed reports on particular aspects that were prepared for the meeting by individual participants

  16. Tritium discharge during nuclear power plant operation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarized tritium discharges from gaseous and liquid effluents of nuclear power plants in China prior to 2005. The differences of tritium discharges for various nuclear power plants were also evaluated. For all pressurized water reactors, tritium releases are lower than national authorized limits. For heavy water reactors, the average normalized tritium release is less than 10% of global average. The tritium releases are mainly from liquid pathways for pressurized water reactors, but gaseous and liquid tritium releases have are comparable for heavy water reactor. The gaseous release from the heavy water reactor is obviously higher than that from the pressurized water reactor. (authors)

  17. Application of biomass in oil and fat reduction content in aqueous effluent; Aplicacao de biomassa na reducao do teor de oleos e graxas presentes em efluentes aquosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boni, Hevelin Tabata; Souza, Antonio Augusto Ulson de; Souza, Selene Maria de Arruda Guelli Ulson de [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we have studied the bagasse from sugarcane as an alternative bioadsorbent in the treatment to oils and greases contaminated waters. The synthetic effluent was simulated by a distilled water and decahydronaphthalene dispersion, with initial concentration of 8900 mg . L {sup -1}. Gas chromatography was the analytical operation chosen to quantify the oil residual after the adsorption. The biomass was characterized by moisture analysis, CHNS and SEM. The experiments were carried out in batch process with agitation of 120 rpm, evaluating the equilibrium time of adsorptive process and the influence of pH of aqueous level. Results showed that the adsorption process achieved equilibrium quickly, in just 5 minutes of contact between the dispersion and biomass. No significant influence was noticed in the removal of hydrocarbon with the change in pH. The adsorption isotherm was developed changing by the mass of bioadsorbent, at 25 deg C, pH 6 and 120 rpm of agitation. The experimental results were fitted by Langmuir and Langmuir- Freundlich models. The best fit was obtained with Langmuir-Freundlich, providing a maximum adsorption capacity of 6,65 g hydrocarbon / g biomass. The experiments showed the great potential of the sugarcane bagasse to be used as bioadsorbent in reducing the oil and grease levels in industrial effluents. This alternative presents itself as a sustainable route due to the abundance of sugar cane bagasse in the sugar and alcohol industry, avoided the impact of aqueous sources contamination coming from oil and petrochemical industry. (author)

  18. Comparison of Spirulina platensis microalgae and commercial activated carbon as adsorbents for the removal of Reactive Red 120 dye from aqueous effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Natali F. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Lima, Eder C., E-mail: profederlima@gmail.com [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Royer, Betina; Bach, Marta V. [Institute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, UFRGS, AV. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Dotto, Guilherme L.; Pinto, Luiz A.A. [Unit Operation Laboratory, School of Chemistry and Food, Federal University of Rio Grande, FURG, R. Engenheiro Alfredo Huch 475, 96201-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Calvete, Tatiana [Universitary Center La Salle (UNILASALLE), Av. Victor Barreto 2288, 92010-000, Canoas, RS (Brazil)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spirulina platensis (SP) and activated carbon (AC) were used to remove RR-120 dye. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The maximum adsorption capacities were found at pH 2 and 298 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values were 482.2 and 267.2 mg g{sup -1} for SP and AC, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption was exothermic, spontaneous and favorable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SP and AC were effective to treat a simulated dye-house effluent. - Abstract: Spirulina platensis microalgae (SP) and commercial activated carbon (AC) were compared as adsorbents to remove Reactive Red 120 (RR-120) textile dye from aqueous effluents. The batch adsorption system was evaluated in relation to the initial pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and temperature. An alternative kinetic model (general order kinetic model) was compared with the traditional pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models. The equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Liu isotherm models, and the thermodynamic parameters were also estimated. Finally, the adsorbents were employed to treat a simulated dye-house effluent. The general order kinetic model was more appropriate to explain RR-120 adsorption by SP and AC. The equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacities of RR-120 dye were found at pH 2 and 298 K, and the values were 482.2 and 267.2 mg g{sup -1} for the SP and AC adsorbents, respectively. The thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption was exothermic, spontaneous and favourable. The SP and AC adsorbents presented good performance for the treatment of simulated industrial textile effluents, removing 94.4-99.0% and 93.6-97.7%, respectively, of the dye mixtures containing high saline concentrations.

  19. Comparison of Spirulina platensis microalgae and commercial activated carbon as adsorbents for the removal of Reactive Red 120 dye from aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Spirulina platensis (SP) and activated carbon (AC) were used to remove RR-120 dye. ► The maximum adsorption capacities were found at pH 2 and 298 K. ► The values were 482.2 and 267.2 mg g−1 for SP and AC, respectively. ► Adsorption was exothermic, spontaneous and favorable. ► SP and AC were effective to treat a simulated dye-house effluent. - Abstract: Spirulina platensis microalgae (SP) and commercial activated carbon (AC) were compared as adsorbents to remove Reactive Red 120 (RR-120) textile dye from aqueous effluents. The batch adsorption system was evaluated in relation to the initial pH, contact time, initial dye concentration and temperature. An alternative kinetic model (general order kinetic model) was compared with the traditional pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models. The equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich and Liu isotherm models, and the thermodynamic parameters were also estimated. Finally, the adsorbents were employed to treat a simulated dye-house effluent. The general order kinetic model was more appropriate to explain RR-120 adsorption by SP and AC. The equilibrium data were best fitted to the Liu isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacities of RR-120 dye were found at pH 2 and 298 K, and the values were 482.2 and 267.2 mg g−1 for the SP and AC adsorbents, respectively. The thermodynamic study showed that the adsorption was exothermic, spontaneous and favourable. The SP and AC adsorbents presented good performance for the treatment of simulated industrial textile effluents, removing 94.4–99.0% and 93.6–97.7%, respectively, of the dye mixtures containing high saline concentrations.

  20. Removal of uranium (VI) from aqueous solutions and nuclear industry effluents using humic acid-immobilized zirconium pillared clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Removal of uranium U(VI) from water and nuclear industrial effluent with humic acid immobilized zirconium-pillared clay (HA-Zr-PILC) was investigated using batch adsorption technique. The adsorbent was characterized using FTIR, XRD, SEM, surface area analyzer and potentiometric titration. The effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration, adsorbent dose, and adsorption isotherm on removal process were evaluated. The monolayer adsorption capacity for U(VI) removal was found to be 134.65 mg/g. Adsorption efficiency was tested using a simulated nuclear industry effluent sample. Repeated adsorption/desorption cycles show the feasibility of the adsorbent for the removal of U(VI) from water and nuclear industry effluents. (author)

  1. Degradation of polychlorinated biphenyls in aqueous solutions after UV-peroxide treatment: focus on toxicity of effluent to primary producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dennis N; Macawile, Maria Cristina A; Abella, Leonila C; Gallardo, Susan M

    2011-09-01

    The combination of UV irradiation and hydrogen peroxide (UV-H(2)O(2)) was shown to be effective in treating water spiked with 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobipheny (PCB 153), reducing its concentration by as much as 98%. To test the toxicity of the effluent, bioassays involving three species of primary producers were performed. Results showed the effluent exerting an adverse effect on the algae Scenedesmus bijugatus and the duckweed Lemna paucicostata. On the other hand, exposure of the mungbean Vigna radiata to the effluent revealed mostly no statistically significant adverse effect or growth stimulation. This suggested that on an exposure period of 96 h, higher forms of chlorophyll-bearing species such as plants are relatively unaffected by trace concentrations of PCBs and degradation products, while less differentiated species like algae and duckweeds are vulnerable. PMID:21531462

  2. Assessment of tritium using two-compartment environmental transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The models used to assess chronic atmospheric releases of radioactivity generate deterministic dose estimates by using standard assumptions about exposure conditions and environmental transport mechanisms. The most significant radionuclide released in gaseous effluences of Cernavoda NPP is tritium, mostly as tritiated water, which represents about 50% of the total radioactivity release in gaseous effluents. The chemical and physical properties of HTO include its complete miscibility in water. Other important properties of tritium like diffusion coefficient and vapor pressure are similar to water properties. No preferential uptake of tritiated water biota or other component of environment was observed. The tritiated water has an uniform distribution among the aqueous phases of all interacting compartments. These properties imply that the state and transport tendencies of HTO are best predicted by modeling it as having infinite affinity for the water phase and negligible affinity for other phases (organic phase of biota or mineral phase of soil). The purpose of the present paper is to present a two-component model to estimate the equilibrium distribution of tritiated water between air and soil media, that would result from gaseous tritium emissions from Cernavoda NPP. Using the principle of mass conservation the model provides an algorithm for predicting equilibrium specific activities of tritiated water in the soil and air components. (authors)

  3. Welsh tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of all radioactive isotopes, tritium and carbon-14 have a special status because of the possibility of their intimate involvement in the biosphere. Both are formed naturally in the upper atmosphere but both are also anthropogenic and discharged into the environment. Tritium has engendered considerably greater notoriety as it has been released into the environment in quite large amounts during nuclear weapons testing and subsequently from nuclear plants. The natural tritium inventory of about 1.3 EBq was dwarfed by contributions from weapons testing. In the 1960s this added about 186 EBq to the global inventory which even today remains at about 50 EBq. In contrast the nuclear industry has contributed about 0.43 EBq but the rate of discharge from some plants is far from insignificant - for instance, the Savannah River site in South Carolina (which is responsible for about 90% of the US tritium releases) discharged about 0.02 EBq in 1987. Currently the major sources of anthropogenic tritium in the UK are [4] the BNF plants at Sellafield (2756 TBq/year, 91% as liquid) and Chapelcross (1421 TBq/year, 0.05% as liquid). As described in the paper there have been unexpected levels of tritium in fish caught in the Bristol Channel in the vicinity of the outfall of the discharge from the Cardiff factory. This tritium is 'unexpected' because the levels in sea water in the area have been measured at around 10 Bq/l [4] and a greater part (90%) of the uptake into fish has been shown to be organically bound tritium (OBT) rather than as part of the body water

  4. Acidity control of the oxidation reactions induced by non-thermal plasma treatment of aqueous effluents in pollutant abatement processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The acid properties of a non-thermal plasma in humid air (e.g., a gliding arc device) induced in an aqueous solution may deeply affect the efficiency of the matching oxidising properties, especially when the aqueous targets involve organic solutes. Hence, their oxidation rate may be strongly modified. A series of buffers is proposed to control the pH of aqueous target for at least one-hour treatments. The selected acid-base systems were selected for their inertia towards oxidation reaction, to cover a very large range of acidity. The reported results are essential from both fundamental and applied points of view. They first allow the acute controlling of the degradation rate of organic compounds. They also enable estimating the efficiency of the gliding arc treatments in environmental applications. Besides, they allow getting reliable data on the bactericidal effect on the plasma treatments, which are a merging application of the electric discharges. (author)

  5. Tritium calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Future deuterium-tritium fusion experiments (like ITER) will use large amount of tritium. Therefore, it is very important to develop better tritium accountancy methods. Tritium calorimetry is used to measure the heat produced by the beta-decay of tritium. If we consider that all the decay energy is converted into thermal heat, we can calculate the tritium activity and mass from calorimetric measurements. The advantages of calorimetry are that it measures absolute activity, and the physical or chemical composition of the sample is not relevant. For example, tritiated structural components can only be measured in a non-destructive way with calorimeters. Disadvantages are: long measurement time for large sample volumes, and offline sampling. The accepted conversion factor is 0.324W/g ± 0.3%. I have started participation from ATOMKI in an EFDA-GOT program, called TRI-TOFFY (TRITium fOr Fusion Fuel cYcle), in 2010. I have spent 8 months at Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK), Germany in 2011, and 9 months in 2012. TLK is a semi-industrial scale facility for processing tritium, the radioactive hydrogen isotope. The main tasks of TLK are fusion research (ITER) and neutrino physics (KATRIN), but also EU projects. The present site inventory is ∼ 25 g T2 (8914 TBq). There are four calorimeters are used for tritium analytics at TLK. My main work was to carry out upgrade on these devices, to deploy new modern control and data acquisition (DAQ) software, and to partly change their hardware. I worked on three calorimeters at the laboratory. The ANTECH-351 is a commercial 20 years old calorimeter. It is a power compensation type isothermal calorimeter. Useful sample volume is 1.2 dm3. This is not a sensitive device (power range is 1 mW - 5 W), mainly used for tritium shipment (from Canadian CANDU reactors) validation, but can measure tritium samples very fast: less than 8 hours. The IGC-V0.5 is a custom made heat flow calorimeter, using a

  6. Tritium contamination and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishment of tritium safe handling technology is required with the development of fusion reactor research. Tritium is contained by multiple-barriers containment due to the difficulty in perfect containment of hydrogen isotopes. Tritium contamination of materials and subsequent desorption are one of the critical issues in tritium containment. And the development of tritium decontamination technology is also a critical issue in tritium safe handling. The status of tritium contamination study and tritium decontamination technology are reviewed. (author)

  7. Voltametric study of formic and dihydroxy malonic acids on platinum for the definition of a process for the electrolytic destruction of carboxylic acids in radioactive aqueous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To limit the amount of nuclear glasses generated by the treatment of the degraded solvent from the PUREX process for reprocessing of nuclear fuels, by solutions of sodium carbonate and caustic soda, it is planned to exploit the complexing power of certain carboxylic acids to return the metallic cations to the aqueous phase. The concept of this new treatment of the solvent by 'substitution' reagents demands a process for the decomposition of these reagents, especially to CO2. The investigation of the electrochemical behaviour, on platinum, of a substance selected as a model for understanding the interfacial mechanisms (HCOOH), and of dihydroxy malonic acid, revealed two distinct electro-poisoning processes: one is due to the adsorption of CO on the surface sites of platinum, and the second to the formation of a passivating layer of P†O. The application of 20 kHz ultrasonic flux in the neighbourhood of the platinum / aqueous formic acid solution interface also appears to cause a change in the superficial structure of the electrode used, in a direction that favours the decomposition of this compound. To overcome problems of poisoning of the platinum surface, aqueous solutions of formic, dihydroxy malonic and oxalic acids were electrolysed, in a cell without diaphragm, by applying voltage and current ranges, at levels adapted to each of the species. It is necessary to bring the working electrode to a higher potential than the oxidation potential for formic acid, and to a lower potential for dihydroxy malonic and oxalic acids. The frequent modifications of the electrode potentials helped to achieve quantitative destruction of these species, to CO2 (and to water) with an electrochemical efficiency approaching 100 %. This wet oxidation process also offers the advantage of not raising the energy potential of the effluents to be treated, because it takes place in mild conditions (ambient temperature and pressure). (author). 131 refs., 90 figs., 48 tabs

  8. Adsorption of lead and copper ions from aqueous effluents on rice husk ash in a dynamic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. A. Vieira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the kinetic adsorption of Pb and Cu ions using rice husk ash as adsorbent in a fixed bed. The maximum adsorption capacities obtained for lead and copper ions in the fixed bed were 0.0561 and 0.0682 mmol/g (at 20 ºC, respectively. The thermodynamic studies indicated that the lead adsorption process was exothermic and spontaneous, while the copper adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous. Characterization results indicated the presence of several functional groups, amorphous silica and a fibrous and longitudinal structure of rice husks. Rice husk ash (RHA from northern Brazil can be used as a bioadsorbent for the individual removal of Pb(II and Cu(II ions from metal-containing effluents.

  9. Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems. Annual progress report, January 1-December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, H.L.

    1980-01-04

    This is the third annual progress report for a continuing EPA-DOE jointly funded project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil-fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. The project is organized into four project tasks: (1) literature review; (2) process water screening; (3) methods development; and (4) recommendations. Our Bibliography of aquatic ecosystem effects, analytical methods and treatment technologies for organic compounds in advanced fossil-fuel processing effluents was submitted to the EPA for publication. The bibliography contains 1314 citations indexed by chemicals, keywords, taxa and authors. We estimate that the second bibliography volume will contain approximately 1500 citations and be completed in February. We compiled results from several laboratories of inorganic characterizations of 19 process waters: 55 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters; and Hanna-3, Hanna-4B 01W and Lawrence Livermore Hoe Creek underground coal gasification condenser waters. These process waters were then compared to a published summary of the analyses from 18 simulated in situ oil-shale retort waters. We completed this year 96-h flow-through toxicity bioassays with fathead minnows and rainbow trout and 48-h flow-through bioassays with Daphnia pulicaria exposed to 5 oil-shale process waters, 1 tar-sand process water, 2 underground coal gasification condenser waters, 1 post-gasification backflood condenser water, as well as 2 bioassays with fossil-fuel process water constituents. The LC/sub 50/ toxicity values for these respective species when exposed to these waters are given in detail. (LTN)

  10. A study of low-cost adsorbent materials for removing Cr(VI from aqueous waste effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Vargas-Niño

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available  The present paper shows very high potential for two types of solid (a commercial alumina and material obtained by composting, i.e. matured compost on Cr(VI adsorption/elimination in aqueous solution using a concentration range close to those previously detected in waste-water from Colombian industries. Both had important properties for eliminating Cr(VI, the compost being more important as it represents low-cost material. Optimal conditions for chromium adsorption on alumina and compost were established. Initial Cr(VI alumina concentration was 10 mgL-1, with 100 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.0, 1 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. For compost, initial Cr(VI concentration was = 3 mg L-1, 50 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.5, 3 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. The experiments showed that compost adsorption properties could be enhanced by adding small quantities of alumina. Compost could thus be chosen as a promising material for use in bioremediation chromium-containing waste water in a management programme for using solid waste in for minimising environmental impact.  

  11. Visible Light Induced Enhanced Photocatalytic Degradation of Industrial Effluents (Rhodamine B in Aqueous Media Using TiO2 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. O. Carneiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, new textile materials have been developed through the use of nanotechnology-based tools. The development of textile surfaces with self-cleaning properties has a large combined potential to reduce the environmental impact related to pollution. In this research work, three types of textiles substrates (cotton, Entretela, and polylactic acid (PLA were functionalized with titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 using chemical and mechanical processes (padding. During the functionalization process, two different methods were used, both of which allowed a good fixation of nanoparticles of TiO2 on textile substrates. The samples were examined for morphology and for photocatalytic properties under visible light irradiation. A study aimed at evaluating the effect of pH of the aqueous solution of TiO2 nanoparticles was performed in order to promote interaction between TiO2 and the dye solution rhodamine B (Rh-B. The TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The measurement of the zeta potential of the TiO2 nanoparticle solution proved to be always positive and have low colloidal stability. Chromatography (HPLC and GC-MS analyses confirm that oxalic acid is the intermediate compound formed during the photodegradation process.

  12. Occurrence of organically bound tritium in the Mohelno lake system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was focused on the 3Hactivitylevels in the unique 'tritium valley' around the Mohelno reservoir, which receives outlet cooling waters from the Dukovany nuclear power plant. Tritium activity levels above the background reference value were found in water from the reservoir and from the effluent part of the Jihlava water, in air moisture and in plant tissues tissue free water tritium(TFWT), and nonexchangeable organically bound tritium (NE-OBT). These zones were discernible that had noticeably different TFWT and NE-OBT values: (1) littoral zones, (2) slopes above the reservoir, (3) plateaus above the reservoir/river. (author)

  13. Continuous monitoring of tritium in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRYDYN is a detector studied for continuous monitoring of tritium in water. Its sensitivity of approximately 10-3μCi/milliliter (one third of the maximum permissible tritium concentration for the population at large) makes it ideal for radiological protection applications (effluents flowing in process drains, sewers, etc ...). The effluent is filtered and then passed through a transparent flowcell contaIning plastic scintillator beads held between two photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The cell's geometry and scintillator's geometry are designed to maximize measuring efficiency. Background is minimized by a 50 millimeter thick lead shielding and electronic circuitry of the same type as employed with liquid scintillators. This effluent purification unit can operate continuously for 8 days without manual intervention, the scintillator can operate for 6 months with a loss of sensitivity of less of 10%. The response time of the TRIDYN is less than 30 minutes for a concentration of 3.10-3μCi/milliliter

  14. Tritium handling in vacuum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, J.T. [Monsanto Research Corp., Miamisburg, OH (United States). Mound Facility; Coffin, D.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a course in Tritium handling in vacuum systems. Topics presented are: Properties of Tritium; Tritium compatibility of materials; Tritium-compatible vacuum equipment; and Tritium waste treatment.

  15. Magmatic tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed geochemical sampling of high-temperature fumaroles, background water, and fresh magmatic products from 14 active volcanoes reveal that they do not produce measurable amounts of tritium (3H) of deep origin (2O). On the other hand, all volcanoes produce mixtures of meteoric and magmatic fluids that contain measurable 3H from the meteoric end-member. The results show that cold fusion is probably not a significant deep earth process but the samples and data have wide application to a host of other volcanological topics

  16. ICF tritium production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual design of an ICF tritium production reactor is described. The chamber design uses a beryllium multiplier and a liquid lithium breeder to achieve a tritium breeding ratio of 2.08. The annual net tritium production of this 532 MW/sub t/ plant is 16.9 kg, and the estimated cost of tritium is $8100/g

  17. On the mechanism of biological activation by tritium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhko, T V; Badun, G A; Razzhivina, I A; Guseynov, O A; Guseynova, V E; Kudryasheva, N S

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism of biological activation by beta-emitting radionuclide tritium was studied. Luminous marine bacteria were used as a bioassay to monitor the biological effect of tritium with luminescence intensity as the physiological parameter tested. Two different types of tritium sources were used: HTO molecules distributed regularly in the surrounding aqueous medium, and a solid source with tritium atoms fixed on its surface (tritium-labeled films, 0.11, 0.28, 0.91, and 2.36 MBq/cm(2)). When using the tritium-labeled films, tritium penetration into the cells was prevented. The both types of tritium sources revealed similar changes in the bacterial luminescence kinetics: a delay period followed by bioluminescence activation. No monotonic dependences of bioluminescence activation efficiency on specific radioactivities of the films were found. A 15-day exposure to tritiated water (100 MBq/L) did not reveal mutations in bacterial DNA. The results obtained give preference to a "non-genomic" mechanism of bioluminescence activation by tritium. An activation of the intracellular bioluminescence process develops without penetration of tritium atoms into the cells and can be caused by intensification of trans-membrane cellular processes stimulated by ionization and radiolysis of aqueous media. PMID:27035890

  18. Release of tritium from fuel and collection for storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, L.L.; Trevorrow, L.E.

    1976-04-01

    Recent work is reviewed on the technology that has been suggested as applicable to collection and storage of tritium in anticipation of the necessity of that course of action. Collection technology and procedures must be adapted to the tritium-bearing effluent and to the facility from which it emerges. Therefore, this discussion of tritium collection technology includes some information on the processes from which release is expected to occur, the amounts, the nature of the effluent media, and the form in which tritium appears. Recent work on collection and storage concepts has explored, both by experimentation and by feasibility analyses, the operations generally aimed at producing recycle, collection, or storage of tritium from these streams. Storage concepts aimed specifically at tritium involve plans to store volumes ranging from that of the entire effluent stream to only that of a small volume of a concentrate. Decisions between storage of unconcentrated streams and storage of concentrates are expected to be made largely by weighing the cost of storage space against the cost of concentration. The storage of tritium concentrate requires the selection of a form of tritium possessing physical and chemical properties appropriate for the expected storage conditions. This selection of an appropriate storage form has occupied a major portion of recent work concerned with tritium storage concepts. In summary, within the context of present regulations and expected amounts of waste tritium; this waste can be disposed of by dilution and dispersal to the environment. In the future, however, more restrictive regulations might be introduced that could be satisfied only by some collection and storage operations. Technology for this practice is not now available, and the present discussion reviews recent activities devoted to its development.

  19. Disposal of tritiated effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After some introductory remarks on the origin of tritium, its properties and its behaviour in a reprocessing plant three alternative methods for the disposal of tritiated effluents produced during reprocessing are described (deep well injection, in-situ solidification, deep-sea dumping) and compared with each other under various aspects. The study is based on the concept of a 1400 t/a reprocessing plant for LWR fuel, which annually produces 3000 m3 of tritiated waste water with a tritium content of 6.5 x 1012 Bq/m3 as well as a residual fission product and actinide content. An assessment of the three methods under the aspects of simplicity, reliability, safety, costs, state of development and materials handling revealed advantages in favour of 'injection', followed by 'dumping' and 'in-situ solidification'. (orig./HP)

  20. Magmatic tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.; Aams, A.I. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); McMurtry, G.M. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Shevenell, L. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Pettit, D.R. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (United States); Stimac, J.A. [Union Geothermal Company (United States); Werner, C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Detailed geochemical sampling of high-temperature fumaroles, background water, and fresh magmatic products from 14 active volcanoes reveal that they do not produce measurable amounts of tritium ({sup 3}H) of deep origin (<0.1 T.U. or <0.32 pCi/kg H{sub 2}O). On the other hand, all volcanoes produce mixtures of meteoric and magmatic fluids that contain measurable {sup 3}H from the meteoric end-member. The results show that cold fusion is probably not a significant deep earth process but the samples and data have wide application to a host of other volcanological topics.

  1. Study of the synthesis of TiO2 layers on macroporous ceramic supports in supercritical (SC) CO2 for processing radioactive aqueous effluents in dynamic mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public and military nuclear industry generates a significant amount of radioactive liquid waste which must be treated before being released into the environment. Decontamination methods alternative to the industrial techniques (evaporation, chemical treatment) are being developed, such as column treatments or coupled filtration/sorption processes. Current researches mainly focus on the development and shaping of specific sorbents. In this context, the objectives of this thesis were first to study the synthesis of TiO2 layers on macroporous ceramic supports in supercritical (SC) CO2 and then to evaluate their potential for radionuclide extraction in these alternative processes. A robust synthesis method has been developed, based on the thermal decomposition of titanium isopropoxide in SC CO2 in the temperature range between 150 C and 350 C. Nano-structured TiO2 films were formed on the macroporous supports (ceramic foams, tubular α-alumina supports) with good adhesion, already at 150 C. The effect of the synthesis temperature on sorbents physico-chemical characteristics and sorption properties has been studied with TiO2 powders prepared under the same conditions as the supported films. The best sorption performance were observed for the powder prepared at 150 C, owing to its higher density of surface sites in comparison with powders prepared at either 250 C or 350 C. Consequently, this synthesis temperature (150 C) was selected for a detailed study of the composite sorbents (TiO2/support), in order to assess their sorption performance in continuous treatment processes. The sorption experiments have shown that a column of alumina macroporous foam (Φpore = 400μm) coated with TiO2 was suitable for processing effluents in dynamic mode with high throughputs. Both macro-pore sizes and column height were revealed as important parameters to be controlled. For the coupled filtration/sorption treatment, TiO2 membranes exhibit good mechanical strength and are able to

  2. Leaching of tritium from a cement composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching of tritium from cement composites into an aqueous phase has been studied to evaluate the safety of incorporation of the tritiated liquid waste into cement. Leaching tests were performed by the method recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The Leaching fraction was measured as functions of waste-cement ratio (Wa/C), temperature of leachant and curing time. The tritium leachability of cement in the long term test follows the order: alumina cement portland cement slag cement. The fraction of tritium leached increases with increasing Wa/C and temperature and decreasing curing period. A deionized water as a leachant gives a slightly higher leachability than synthetic sea water. The amount leached of tritium from a 200 l drum size specimen was estimated on the basis of the above results. (author)

  3. 2009 EVALUATION OF TRITIUM REMOVAL AND MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LUECK KJ; GENESSE DJ; STEGEN GE

    2009-02-26

    Since 1995, a state-approved land disposal site (SALDS) has received tritium contaminated effluents from the Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Tritium in this effluent is mitigated by storage in slow moving groundwater to allow extended time for decay before the water reaches the site boundary. By this method, tritium in the SALDS is isolated from the general environment and human contact until it has decayed to acceptable levels. This report contains the 2009 update evaluation of alternative tritium mitigation techniques to control tritium in liquid effluents and groundwater at the Hanford site. A thorough literature review was completed and updated information is provided on state-of-the-art technologies for control of tritium in wastewaters. This report was prepared to satisfy the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-026-07B (Ecology, EPA, and DOE 2007). Tritium separation and isolation technologies are evaluated periodically to determine their feasibility for implementation to control Hanford site liquid effluents and groundwaters to meet the Us. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40 CFR 141.16, drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL) for tritium of 20,000 pOll and/or DOE Order 5400.5 as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy. Since the 2004 evaluation, there have been a number of developments related to tritium separation and control with potential application in mitigating tritium contaminated wastewater. These are primarily focused in the areas of: (1) tritium recycling at a commercial facility in Cardiff, UK using integrated tritium separation technologies (water distillation, palladium membrane reactor, liquid phase catalytic exchange, thermal diffusion), (2) development and demonstration of Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) using hydrogen/water exchange to separate tritium from water, (3) evaporation of tritium contaminated water for dispersion in the

  4. Operating Experience Review of Tritium-in-Water Monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. A. Bruyere; L. C. Cadwallader

    2011-09-01

    Monitoring tritium facility and fusion experiment effluent streams is an environmental safety requirement. This paper presents data on the operating experience of a solid scintillant monitor for tritium in effluent water. Operating experiences were used to calculate an average monitor failure rate of 4E-05/hour for failure to function. Maintenance experiences were examined to find the active repair time for this type of monitor, which varied from 22 minutes for filter replacement to 11 days of downtime while waiting for spare parts to arrive on site. These data support planning for monitor use; the number of monitors needed, allocating technician time for maintenance, inventories of spare parts, and other issues.

  5. TRITIUM BARRIER MATERIALS AND SEPARATION SYSTEMS FOR THE NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, S; Thad Adams, T

    2008-07-17

    Contamination of downstream hydrogen production plants or other users of high-temperature heat is a concern of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Due to the high operating temperatures of the NGNP (850-900 C outlet temperature), tritium produced in the nuclear reactor can permeate through heat exchangers to reach the hydrogen production plant, where it can become incorporated into process chemicals or the hydrogen product. The concentration limit for tritium in the hydrogen product has not been established, but it is expected that any future limit on tritium concentration will be no higher than the air and water effluent limits established by the NRC and the EPA. A literature survey of tritium permeation barriers, capture systems, and mitigation measures is presented and technologies are identified that may reduce the movement of tritium to the downstream plant. Among tritium permeation barriers, oxide layers produced in-situ may provide the most suitable barriers, though it may be possible to use aluminized surfaces also. For tritium capture systems, the use of getters is recommended, and high-temperature hydride forming materials such as Ti, Zr, and Y are suggested. Tritium may also be converted to HTO in order to capture it on molecular sieves or getter materials. Counter-flow of hydrogen may reduce the flux of tritium through heat exchangers. Recommendations for research and development work are provided.

  6. On-line tritium monitoring in research reactor Dhruva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhruva is 100 MW (Th) research reactor. Heavy water is used as a coolant, moderator and reflector. Tritium is one of the gaseous effluents released from 100 meter stack. During reactor operation, tritium release is approximately 135 GBqd-1 with a concentration of ∼ 90-100 KBqm-3 (0.33 DAC) and in shutdown condition it is slightly higher and depends upon the heavy water related jobs. Continuous sampling of the exhaust air is carried out using bubbler method and samples are analyzed once in a day to estimate the tritium release during the period. Due to energy interference, it is not possible to monitor tritium in presence of 41Ar using continuous tritium monitor in normal sampling method. Detection of tritium in the presence of other radionuclides is a particular challenge since radiation from these species masks detector response for tritium. In Dhruva main interfering radionuclides is 41Ar which is produced due to activation of 40Ar present in air (∼ 1 %) while cooling shutoff rod assemblies and depends upon reactor power. Concentration of 41Ar in exhaust air is 34.1 MBqm3 at 100 MW. This paper describes the setup proposed for online tritium monitoring using multi-line continuous tritium monitor developed by RSSD

  7. The Tritium White Paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication proposes a synthesis of the activities of two work-groups between May 2008 and April 2010. It reports the ASN's (the French Agency for Nuclear Safety) point of view, describes its activities and actions, and gives some recommendations. It gives a large and detailed overview of the knowledge status on tritium: tritium source inventory, tritium origin, management processes, capture techniques, reduction, tritium metrology, impact on the environment, impacts on human beings

  8. TFTR tritium handling concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, to be located on the Princeton Forrestal Campus, is expected to operate with 1 to 2.5 MA tritium--deuterium plasmas, with the pulses involving injection of 50 to 150 Ci (5 to 16 mg) of tritium. Attainment of fusion conditions is based on generation of an approximately 1 keV tritium plasma by ohmic heating and conversion to a moderately hot tritium--deuterium ion plasma by injection of a ''preheating'' deuterium neutral beam (40 to 80 keV), followed by injection of a ''reacting'' beam of high energy neutral deuterium (120 to 150 keV). Additionally, compressions accompany the beam injections. Environmental, safety and cost considerations led to the decision to limit the amount of tritium gas on-site to that required for an experiment, maintaining all other tritium in ''solidified'' form. The form of the tritium supply is as uranium tritide, while the spent tritium and other hydrogen isotopes are getter-trapped by zirconium--aluminum alloy. The issues treated include: (1) design concepts for the tritium generator and its purification, dispensing, replenishment, containment, and containment--cleanup systems; (2) features of the spent plasma trapping system, particularly the regenerable absorption cartridges, their integration into the vacuum system, and the handling of non-getterables; (3) tritium permeation through the equipment and the anticipated releases to the environment; (4) overview of the tritium related ventilation systems; and (5) design bases for the facility's tritium clean-up systems

  9. The potentialities of the complexation ultrafiltration technique for the decontamination of fission product contaminated aqueous effluents; Potentialites de la complexation - ultrafiltration a la decontamination d`effluents radioactifs en produits de fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibert, V.

    1995-07-01

    Many nuclear researchers and industrial operators lay emphasis on improving the back end of the fuel cycle. A major problem concerns the liquid wastes generated by the reprocessing plant at La Hague, discharged into the sea after treatment in the Effluent Treatment Station (STE) (3), and which have become crucial matter. The activity of these wastes is well below the current legal limits, and is constantly decreasing these last years. To bring it close to zero, and ambitious goal, entails innovative new reprocessing techniques. We accordingly investigated the possibilities of complexation-ultrafiltration, a technique that uses water-soluble macromolecules to complex the target elements to be separated. We first achieved the strontium (II) separation with poly-acrylic and poly-sulfonic acids. The effects of pH and NaNO{sub 3} concentration influence on Sr (II) complexation were studied. The Sr (II) complexation and concentration phases, followed by cation de-complexation to recover the polymer, were also taken into account. This research, combined with a potentiometric study of the polymers, offered a close understanding of the chemical systems involved, and of the operating conditions and limits of complexation-ultrafiltration. The laboratory results were also validated on a tangential ultrafiltration pilot plant. We then used complexation-ultrafiltration to treat a real effluent generated bu La Hague`s STE 3 plant. This experiment demonstrated minimum 90 % decontamination of Sr (II) (with polyacrylate complexing agent), and also for {sup 134-137}Cs (with simple ultrafiltration). The use of two polyamides allowed partial decontamination of the effluent for {sup 60}Co and {sup 106}Ru. This work therefore offers a global approach to complexation-ultrafiltration, from laboratory to pilot scale, on real and simulated effluents. The future of this technique relies chiefly on the ability to solve the problem of polymer recovery. (Abstract Truncated)

  10. Removal of tritium and tritium-containing compounds from a gaseous stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritiated species, e.g., tritium, tritiated water, and/or tritiated hydrocarbons, are removed from gas streams containing these by reacting the same over a precious metal catalyst with sufficient air or oxygen to insure conversion of all tritiated species to tritiated water and, if hydrocarbons are present in the gaseous feedstock, carbon dioxide. The tritiated water and any other moisture that might be present in the reaction effluent are next adsorbed by a desiccant dryer, preferably to a level of less than one part per million. Most desirably, the desiccant dryer effluent is then diluted with non-radioactive water such that the tritiated water is diluted by a factor of at least about 1,000 to 1; the resulting water mixture can be adsorbed from the diluted effluent by a second desiccant dryer to provide a value in the ultimate effluent gas of less than about one-half parts per billion tritiated water

  11. Sources of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of tritium sources is presented. The tritium production and release rates are discussed for light water reactors (LWRs), heavy water reactors (HWRs), high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), and molten salt breeder reactors (MSBRs). In addition, release rates are discussed for tritium production facilities, fuel reprocessing plants, weapons detonations, and fusion reactors. A discussion of the chemical form of the release is included. The energy producing facilities are ranked in order of increasing tritium production and release. The ranking is: HTGRs, LWRs, LMFBRs, MSBRs, and HWRs. The majority of tritium has been released in the form of tritiated water

  12. Tritium contamination control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last years, there has been increased importance of tritium (3H or T), the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, in the nuclear power program and environmental studies. Cosmic ray interaction in the atmosphere, nuclear weapons testing, commercial products and nuclear facilities are the sources for environmental tritium. Several routes are available by which tritium as a gas or as tritiated water can reach the body tissues of man. It becomes necessary to constantly control the tritium concentration in the environment. Analytical methods to determine tritium in matrixes such as urine, water, air, fishes by scintillation counting and proportional counting are described. (Author)

  13. Monitoring for Tritium at Low Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium presents little external radiation hazard because the beta rays it emits have very low energy. However, the tritium produced by neutron capture in heavy water reactors is in the form of tritiated water which, if it escapes into the air, may be absorbed into the body through the lungs and skin. Direct measurement of tritiated water vapour (HTO) in air at levels below one (mpc)a is difficult with existing installed or portable monitors. However, an indirect measurement can be obtained by making frequent routine determinations of the amount of tritium absorbed by the workers who are chronically exposed. In addition, individual doses may be estimated directly. For this approach to area monitoring to be useful to a health physicist, rapid, direct measurement of HTO intake is needed. Analyses for tritium carried out in the laboratory usually involve delays, so an automatic urinalyser has been developed. It will detect body burdens of tritium resulting from chronic exposures to 0.05 (mpc)a. Urine is voided into a urinal attached to the analyser, a sample is automatically metred and mixed with liquid scintillator and the tritium activity is then measured. The assay takes less than two minutes. Performance of the instrument is automatically checked by processing standard and background samples. This method may also be used for monitoring planned acute exposures. The sensitivity is 5 (mpc)ah, although accurate measurements can oily be made when the HTO has dispersed throughout the body, one to two hours after the exposure. Tritium hazards at specific places may be monitored by collecting airborne HTO in water bubblers and then measuring the collected tritium with the urinalyser. Concentrations of HTO in air down to 0.01 (mpc)a may be detected. Since no manual processing of urine or other aqueous samples is needed the instrument is well suited to those nuclear installations, such as power stations, where minimal laboratory back-up facilities are available. (author)

  14. Tritium pellet injector results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Injection of solid tritium pellets is considered to be the most promising way of fueling fusion reactors. The Tritium Proof-of- Principle (TPOP) experiment has demonstrated the feasibility of forming and accelerating tritium pellets. This injector is based on the pneumatic pipe-gun concept, in which pellets are formed in situ in the barrel and accelerated with high-pressure gas. This injector is ideal for tritium service because there are no moving parts inside the gun and because no excess tritium is required in the pellet production process. Removal of 3He from tritium to prevent blocking of the cryopumping action by the noncondensible gas has been demonstrated with a cryogenic separator. Pellet velocities of 1280 m/s have been achieved for 4-mm-diam by 4-mm-long cylindrical tritium pellets with hydrogen propellant at 6.96 MPa (1000 psi). 10 refs., 10 figs

  15. Model parameters and validation for tritium transfer in plants from atmospheric release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model parameters and validation for tritium transfer in plants from atmospheric release are examined in different effluent modes. In most cases, tritium uptake by plants can be explained using simple models based on the flux of transpiration and/or vapor diffusion. But, concerning the organically bound tritium in plants, the production rate of it differed with different plant species and plant parts. So, the modeling of the production rate of OBT in target plants and parts still needs experimental results and theoretical consideration. For the release of atmospheric tritiated organic material, the mechanism of tritium incorporation into plant should be known. Tritium was detected in the plant leaves which were exposed to tritiated methane, not only in the water soluble form but also in the organically bound tritium form. The mechanism of this tritium accumulation in plant leaves is still uncertain. (author)

  16. Tritium removing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium-containing gases in a reactor container are discharged to a gas pressurizer and the gases pressurized there are sent to the primary side of a tritium separation device under a high or low pressure. Polyimide polymer separation membranes having selective permeability to elemental tritium and tritium vapor are coated in the tritium separation device. The separation device is divided into primary and secondary sides by the separation membranes and the pressure in the secondary side is lowered by a vacuum pump, etc. Tritium contained in the tritium-containing gases passes through the separation membranes selectively to be moved into the secondary side. Accordingly, tritium is treated in the elemental form and equipments for regeneration such as an adsorption column, etc. are no more necessary and the space can be saved due to minimization of the removing device. Further, since tritium can be removed continuously without storing a great amount of tritium, it is preferable in view of safety. (T.M.)

  17. Improved iodine and tritium control in reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During spent fuel processing, iodine and tritium are distributed in many aqueous, organic and gaseous process streams, which complicates their control. Small modifications of conventional purex flow sheets, compatible with processing in the headend and the first extraction cycle are necessary to confine the iodine and the tritium to smaller plant areas. The plant area connected to the dissolver off-gas (DOG) system is suited to confine the iodine and the plant area connected to the first aqueous cycle is suited to confine the tritium. A more clear and convenient iodine and tritium control will be achieved. Relevant process steps have been studied on a lab or a pilot plant scale using I-123 and H-3 tracer

  18. On electrochemical tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports tritium formed in LiOD-D2O solutions in which Pd cathodes are used to evolve D2. Electrolysis was carried out for up to 4 1/2 months. Excess heat has been observed from 5 electrodes out of 28, tritium in 15 out of 53 but 9 out of 13 if the electrodes are limited to 1 mm diameter. Steady state tritium concentrations were 104-107 disintegrations min-1 ml-1. A weak correlation may exist between heat observed and tritium produced. The rate of production of tritium was ca 1010 atoms cm-2 s-1. The branching ratio of tritium to neutrons was ∼108. A theoretical dendrite enhanced fusion model is suggested. Growing gas layer breakdown occurs at sufficiently high surface potential dendrite tips and correspondingly fusion reactions occur. The model gives quantitative consistence with experiment, especially the sporadic nature and the observed branching ratio. (author)

  19. Tritium monitoring techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of their operations, the U.S. Navy is required to store or maintain operational nuclear weapons on ships and at shore facilities. Since these weapons contain tritium, there are safety implications relevant to the exposure of personnel to tritium. This is particularly important for shipboard operations since these types of environments can make low-level tritium detection difficult. Some of these ships have closed systems, which can result in exposure to tritium at levels that are below normally acceptable levels but could still cause radiation doses that are higher than necessary or could hamper ship operations. This report describes the state of the art in commercial tritium detection and monitoring and recommends approaches for low-level tritium monitoring in these environments

  20. Application of proton-conducting ceramics and polymer permeable membranes for gaseous tritium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to carry out deuterium plasma experiments on the Large Helical Device (LHD), the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) is planning to install a system for the recovery of tritium from exhaust gas and effluent liquid. As well as adopting proven conventional tritium recovery systems, NIFS is planning to apply the latest technologies such as proton-conducting ceramics and membrane-type dehumidifiers in an overall strategy to ensure minimal risk in the tritium recovery process. Application of these new technologies to the tritium recovery system for the LHD deuterium plasma experiment is evaluated quantitatively using recent experimental data. (author)

  1. Inner Breeding Tritium Cycle Conceptual Design and Tritium Control Strategies for HCLL Blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design of the Inner Breeding Tritium Cycle (IBTC) for DEMO-like He-Cooled Lithium-Lead (HCLL) breeding blankets presents many open questions on solutions and choice of operational modes and parameters. Tritium transfer limits to the environment is the top design constraint for IBTC conceptual design. Among the options, Rankine cycle is the most conservative choice for Power Conversion Cycle in terms of technology maturity and tritium control requirements. Optimization of GC-HTR designs adaptation to DEMO primary coolant (PC) [300/500 oC, 80 bar] permit one to assess the two general diverse coolant chemistry options (HT oxidation or H2 isotopic swamping). Both options are discussed in terms of tritium control, and internal and external IBTC processing demands. Permeation from breeder into the He primary coolant and extraction of bred tritium out from the Pb15.7Li act as input givens of the IBTC conception. Dynamic tritium transfer under imposed MHD advection regimes coupling with convection fields in channel thermal steady-state distributions and radial breeding sources are inputs for actual assessments based on 2D moving-slab numerical techniques. IBTC relevant polarimetric runs showing the evolution of tritium poloidal-toroidal BB-in/BB-out concentration planes in LM channels are given. Ultimate tritium processing technologies performance (CPS: Coolant Purification System, TES: Tritium Extraction System from Pb15.7Li and TRS: Tritium Recovery System from TES purging columns) acts as boundary IBTC design constraints. Actual limits for transient modes are discussed. The IBTC design variables concern: i) system disposition in the IBTC lay-out, ii) use of tritium control solution at BB design level (ex. anti-permeation barrier), (iii) selection of system processing variables (ex. LM flowing velocities) and (iv) external effluents inputs for PC chemistry control. High processing efficiencies of CPS for relatively low flow rates means by-passing IHEx does not have a

  2. Confinement and Tritium Stripping Systems for APT Tritium Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report identifies functions and requirements for the tritium process confinement and clean-up system (PCCS) and provides supporting technical information for the selection and design of tritium confinement, clean-up (stripping) and recovery technologies for new tritium processing facilities in the Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT). The results of a survey of tritium confinement and clean-up systems for large-scale tritium handling facilities and recommendations for the APT are also presented

  3. Tritium in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Chapter a review is given of some of the important features of metal tritides as opposed to hydrides and deuterides. After an introduction to the topics of tritium and tritium in metals information will be presented on a variety of metal-tritium systems. Of main interest here are the differences from the classic hydrogen behavior; the so called isotope effect. A second important topic is that of aging effects produced by the accumulation of 3He in the samples. (orig.)

  4. Tritium and zirconium separation from PUREX-process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel of LWR-reactors contains among others tritium and zirkonium. Under PUREX-process conditions about 50 % of the total tritium enters the process with the aqueous solution after dissolution. While the major amount of the dissolved tritium and zirkonium follows the aqueous waste stream, a small part is extracted in or entrained by the organic phase which is loaded with uranium and plutonium. In order to prevent spreading of this tritium beyond the extended head end area, a special second scrub section has been added to the first high active scrub. According to the flowsheet for a reprocessing plant, a tritium decontamination factor of 40 should be obtained. A special tritium scrubber with a 0.8 molar nitric acid as the srub-solution is integrated therefore in the first extraction cycle of the German industrial reprocessing plant (WAK). In function of the low acidity this tritium scrubber works as a zirkoniumtrap as well, even when an external phase ratio of o:a = 20 - 40 was chosen. A five stage mixer settler with internal recycling of the scrub phase and a pulsed-nozzle plate column, both in a 1 :1 scale have been tested alternately

  5. Tritium Attenuation by Distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine how a 100 Area distillation system could be used to reduce to a satisfactory low value the tritium content of the dilute moderator produced in the 100 Area stills, and whether such a tritium attenuator would have sufficient capacity to process all this material before it is sent to the 400 Area for reprocessing

  6. The treatment of effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years the French Atomic Energy Commission has been studying with interest problems presented by radio-active effluents. Since high activities have not yet received a definite solution we will deal only, in this paper, with the achievements and research concerning low and medium activity effluents. In the field of the achievements, we may mention the various effluent treatment stations which have been built in France; a brief list will be given together with an outline of their main new features. Thus in particular the latest treatment stations put into operation (Grenoble, Fontenay-aux-Roses, Cadarache) will be presented. From all these recent achievements three subjects will be dealt with in more detail. 1 - The workshop for treating with bitumen the sludge obtained after concentration of radionuclides. 2 - The workshop for treating radioactive solid waste by incineration. 3 - A unit for concentrating radio-active liquid effluents by evaporation. In the field of research, several topics have been undertaken, a list will be given. In most cases the research concerns the concentration of radionuclides with a view to a practical and low cost storage, a concentration involving an efficient decontamination of the aqueous liquids in the best possible economic conditions. For improving the treatments leading to the concentration of nuclides, our research has naturally been concerned with perfecting the treatments used in France: coprecipitation and evaporation. In our work we have taken into account in particular two conditions laid down in the French Centres. 1 - A very strict sorting out of the effluents at their source in order to limit in each category the volume of liquid to be dealt with. 2 - The necessity for a very complete decontamination due to the high population density in our country. In the last past we present two original methods for treating liquid effluents. 1 - The use of ion-exchange resins for liquids containing relatively many salts. The

  7. The treatment and disposal of tritiated effluents. Technology and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study on the disposal of tritiated effluents has been conducted in coordination with investigations carried out at NUKEM GmbH under the heading ''Compilation of Safety-Related Data for an Industrial Disposal of Tritiated Effluents on the Basis of Large-Scale Invenstigations''. The findings of this study were adopted, in particular with a view to tritium exchange rates ascertained experimentally. After some introductory remarks on the origin of tritium, its properties and its behaviour in a reprocessing plant three alternative methods for the disposal of tritiated effluents produced during reprocessing are described in the present study and compared with each other under various aspects. The study is based on the concept of a 1400 t/a reprocessing plant for LWR fuel, which annually produces 3000 m3 of tritiated waste water with a tritium content of 6.5 x 1012 Bq/m3 as well as a residual fission product and actinide content. (orig./RW)

  8. Palisades Nuclear Plant. Radioactive effluents and environmental monitoring sections to second annual operating report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 0.435 Ci of radioactive liquid effluent less tritium was released with 19.63 Ci of tritium. Both liquid and gaseous releases were within permissible limits. There were 8 Ci of solid wastes stored on the site as of 12/31/76. Data clearly shows there was no detectable increase in radioactivity levels in the environmental media that can be attributed to plant effluents. Monitoring reports are presented concerning fish, meteorology, noise, and cooling tower drift

  9. Radiological effluents released and public doses from nuclear power plants in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As of the end of 2010, there were 20 commercially operating nuclear reactors in Korea. Releases of radioactive effluents from nuclear power plants (NPPs) have increased continuously; the total radioactivity of effluent amount released in 2010 was 547.12 TBq. From 2001 to 2010, the annual average radioactivity of gaseous and liquid effluents per reactor was 11.61 TBq for pressurised water reactors and 118.12 TBq for pressurised heavy water reactors. Most of the radioactivity from gaseous and liquid effluents came from tritium. Based on the results of release trends and analyses, the characteristics of effluents have been investigated to improve the management of radioactive effluents from NPPs. (authors)

  10. The Reconcentration of Tritium by Distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of tritium reconcentration by the total reflux distillation of water under reduced pressure using random-packed columns was investigated. For the maximum removal of tritium from a one liter reservoir, operating periods of several weeks were required. For this a fully automatic fractionating system incorporating an apparatus for taking samples automatically under reduced pressure was developed to enable the distillation to proceed with the minimum of manual adjustment. To reduce the possibility of flooding at the base of the column due to gravity settling of the packing over long periods of time, a novel design feature was incorporated at the junction of the column and the reflux meter. The performance of several commercially available column packings was investigated in an aqueous environment. Details of the packing pre-treatment to inhibit maldistribution in a liquid of high surface tension are given and enrichment factors calculated. A low H.E.T.P. (height equivalent to a theoretical plate) of about 0.8 in has been achieved with pre-treated phosphor-bronze gauze rings in an aqueous environment. With a reservoir-to-boiler volume ratio of the order of 7 : 1, a maximum of 98% of the tritium in the reservoir was removed in 28 d continuous distillation with a throughput of 100 ml/h. This indicated a tritium reconcentration factor of 6.3. By increasing the throughput to 140 ml/h, 92% of the tritium was extracted in 11 d. The reproducibility of the reconcentration factor with time was, however, shown to vary, and the reasons for this are discussed in the paper. (author)

  11. Voltametric study of formic and dihydroxy malonic acids on platinum for the definition of a process for the electrolytic destruction of carboxylic acids in radioactive aqueous effluents; Etude voltamperometrique des acides formiques et dihydroxymalonique sur platine en vue de la definition d`un procede de destruction electrolytique d`acides carboxyliques d`effluents aqueux radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Naour, C.

    1994-05-01

    To limit the amount of nuclear glasses generated by the treatment of the degraded solvent from the PUREX process for reprocessing of nuclear fuels, by solutions of sodium carbonate and caustic soda, it is planned to exploit the complexing power of certain carboxylic acids to return the metallic cations to the aqueous phase. The concept of this new treatment of the solvent by `substitution` reagents demands a process for the decomposition of these reagents, especially to CO{sub 2}. The investigation of the electrochemical behaviour, on platinum, of a substance selected as a model for understanding the interfacial mechanisms (HCOOH), and of dihydroxy malonic acid, revealed two distinct electro-poisoning processes: one is due to the adsorption of CO on the surface sites of platinum, and the second to the formation of a passivating layer of P{dagger}O. The application of 20 kHz ultrasonic flux in the neighbourhood of the platinum / aqueous formic acid solution interface also appears to cause a change in the superficial structure of the electrode used, in a direction that favours the decomposition of this compound. To overcome problems of poisoning of the platinum surface, aqueous solutions of formic, dihydroxy malonic and oxalic acids were electrolysed, in a cell without diaphragm, by applying voltage and current ranges, at levels adapted to each of the species. It is necessary to bring the working electrode to a higher potential than the oxidation potential for formic acid, and to a lower potential for dihydroxy malonic and oxalic acids. The frequent modifications of the electrode potentials helped to achieve quantitative destruction of these species, to CO{sub 2} (and to water) with an electrochemical efficiency approaching 100 %. This wet oxidation process also offers the advantage of not raising the energy potential of the effluents to be treated, because it takes place in mild conditions (ambient temperature and pressure). (author). 131 refs., 90 figs., 48 tabs.

  12. Interactions of tritium and materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamawaki, Michio; Yamaguchi, Kenji; Tanaka, Satoru; Ono, Futaba (Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.); Yamamoto, Takuya

    1993-11-01

    In D-T burning fusion reactors, problems related to tritium-material interactions are vitally important. From this point of view, plasma-material interactions, blanket breeder material-tritium interactions, safety aspects of tritium-material interactions and tritium storage materials are reviewed with emphasis on the works going on in the authors' laboratories. (author) 83 refs.

  13. Tritium breeding in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1982-10-01

    Key technological problems that influence tritium breeding in fusion blankets are reviewed. The breeding potential of candidate materials is evaluated and compared to the tritium breeding requirements. The sensitivity of tritium breeding to design and nuclear data parameters is reviewed. A framework for an integrated approach to improve tritium breeding prediction is discussed with emphasis on nuclear data requirements.

  14. TFTR tritium inventory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontau, A.E.; Brice, D.K.; Buchenauer, D.A.; Causey, R.A.; Doyle, B.L.; Hsu, W.L.; Lee, S.R.; McGrath, R.T.; Mills, B.; Wampler, W.R.; Wilson, K.L. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA); Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Langley, R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Dylla, H.F.; Heifetz, D.B.; Kilpatrick, S.; Lamarche, P.H.; Sissingh, R.A.P.; Ulrickson, M. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Brooks, J.N. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1989-06-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is scheduled to begin D-T operation in 1990 with the on-site tritium inventory limited to 5 grams. The physics and chemistry of the in-vessel tritium inventory will impact safety concerns, and also the entire operating schedule of the tokamak. We have investigated plasma-material interaction processes that will affect this first tritium-fueled tokamak. Tritium inventory estimates for TFTR are derived from: (1) Laboratory simulation, (2) in-situ plasma measurements, (3) post-run surface analysis, and (4) modeling. This paper presents the results of these investigations, the derivation of a tritium inventory estimate and its uncertainties, and a discussion of its impact. A particular discharge-by-discharge operating schedule has been developed and evaluated. The major source of in-vessel tritium inventory will be codeposition of tritium and eroded carbon onto surfaces. We find that the on-site limit may be approached unless specific inventory reduction techniques are invoked, e.g., discharge cleaning. (orig.).

  15. Tritium behaviors in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium intake of plants was briefly reviewed in this report. The major chemical forms of tritium released from nuclear facilities are HTO and HT and in the natural environment, tritium is also found in various OBT such as CH3T. The exposure dose to HTO by inhalation exposure in humans was evaluated by ICRP to be 104 fold higher than HT and 102 fold than CH3T. Whereas for the organic compound binding form, it was evaluated to be 2.3 times higher than that of HTO. To study the tritium transition into plants, especially edible parts such as vegetables and fruits and the transition process were thought important and many studies including theoretical analysis have been done mainly regarding HTO, HT and CH3T. The transition of HT tritium into plants was negligible. However, it was reported that the released HT was converted to HTO by microorganisms in surface soil and incorporated into plants. But, the HTO concentration of the leaves in potted plants always lower than that of water in the soil of the pot, suggesting that tritium was not concentrated by the plant. However, there are few studies on tritium transition via photosynthesis into plant tissues. (M.N.)

  16. Tritium technology. A Canadian overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the various tritium research and operational activities in Canada is presented. These activities encompass tritium processing and recovery, tritium interactions with materials, and tritium health and safety. Many of these on-going activities form a sound basis for the tritium use and handling aspects of the ITER project. Tritium management within the CANDU heavy water reactor, associated detritiation facilities, research and development facilities, and commercial industry and improving the understanding of tritium behaviour in humans and the environment remain the focus of a long-standing Canadian interest in tritium. While there have been changes in the application of this knowledge and experience over time, the operating experience and the supporting research and development continue to provide for improved plant and facility operations, an improved understanding of tritium safety issues, and improved products and tools that facilitate tritium management. (author)

  17. Tritium facility at TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sissingh, R.A.P. (Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project, Mississauga, ON (Canada)); Rossmassler, R.L. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-06-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton began operation in December 1982. While it has operated successfully with protium and deuterium achieving record energy confinement time and record ion temperatures. TFTR's ultimate goal is to achieve the scientific break even point of Q=1 for which deuterium/tritium injection is needed. This paper will discuss the design parameters resulting from using tritium as a fuel, the design and operating philosophies employed, the additional systems and equipment required, the effect on the heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems, the tritium monitoring system and the personnel training. (orig.).

  18. Tritium powered luminescent signs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tritium powered emergency exit sign is provided comprising an elongated tritium powered light tube mounted at the focus of a parabolic reflector coated with a phosphorescent coating. The tube and reflector are mounted in an elongate trough shaped housing, with a translucent cover. In an emergency, e.g. in the event of a power failure in a building or other structure, the phosphorescent coating will reinforce the light emitted by the tritium tube for a short period whilst the eyes adjust to the darkness. (author)

  19. Experience in handling concentrated tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The notes describe the experience in handling concentrated tritium in the hydrogen form accumulated in the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Tritium Laboratory. The techniques of box operation, pumping systems, hydriding and dehydriding operations, and analysis of tritium are discussed. Information on the Chalk River Tritium Extraction Plant is included as a collection of reprints of papers presented at the Dayton Meeting on Tritium Technology, 1985 April 30 - May 2

  20. Problems of anthropogenic tritium limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochetkov О.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article contains the current situation in respect to the environmental concentrations of anthropogenic and natural tritium. There are presented and analyzed domestic standards for НТО of all Radiation Safety Standards (NRB, as well as the regulations analyzed for tritium in drinking water taken in other countries today. This article deals with the experience of limitation of tritium and focuses on the main problem of rationing of tritium — rationing of organically bound tritium.

  1. Five years of tritium handling experience at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is a facility designed to develop and demonstrate, in full scale, technologies necessary for safe and efficient operation of tritium systems required for tokamak fusion reactors. TSTA currently consists of systems for evacuating reactor exhaust gas with compound cryopumps; for removing impurities from plasma exhaust gas and recovering the chemically-combined tritium; for separating the isotopes of hydrogen; for transfer pumping; or storage of hydrogen isotopes; for gas analysis; and for assuring safety by the necessary control, monitoring, and tritium removal from effluent streams. TSTA also has several small scale experiments to develop and test new equipment and processes necessary for fusion reactors. In this paper, data on component reliability, failure types and rates, and waste quantities are presented. TSTA has developed a Quality Assurance program for preparing and controlling the documentation of the procedures required for the design, purchase, and operation of the tritium systems. Operational experience under normal, abnormal, and emergency conditions is presented. One unique aspect of operations at TSTA is that the design personnel for the TSTA systems are also part of the operating personnel. This has allowed for the relatively smooth transition from design to operations. TSTA has been operated initially as a research facility. As the system is better defined, operations are proceeding toward production modes. The DOE requirements for the operation of a tritium facility like TSTA include personnel training, emergency preparedness, radiation protection, safety analysis, and preoperational appraisals. The integration of these requirements into TSTA operations is discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  2. RESULTS OF TRITIUM TRACKING AND GROUNDWATER MONITORING AT THE HANFORD SITE 200 AREA STATE APPROVED LAND DISPOSAL SITE FY2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ERB DB

    2008-11-19

    The Hanford Site's 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) processes contaminated aqueous wastes derived from Hanford Site facilities. The treated wastewater occasionally contains tritium, which cannot be removed by the ETF prior to the wastewater being discharged to the 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). During the first 11 months of fiscal year 2008 (FY08) (September 1, 2007, to July 31, 2008), approximately 75.15 million L (19.85 million gal) of water were discharged to the SALDS. Groundwater monitoring for tritium and other constituents, as well as water-level measurements, is required for the SALDS by State Waste Discharge Permit Number ST-4500 (Ecology 2000). The current monitoring network consists of three proximal (compliance) monitoring wells and nine tritium-tracking wells. Quarterly sampling of the proximal wells occurred in October 2007 and in January/February 2008, April 2008, and August 2008. The nine tritium-tracking wells, including groundwater monitoring wells located upgradient and downgradient of the SALDS, were sampled in January through April 2008. Water-level measurements taken in the three proximal SALDS wells indicate that a small groundwater mound is present beneath the facility, which is a result of operational discharges. The mound increased in FY08 due to increased ETF discharges from treating groundwater from extraction wells at the 200-UP-l Operable Unit and the 241-T Tank Farm. Maximum tritium activities increased by an order of magnitude at well 699-48-77A (to 820,000 pCi/L in April 2008) but remained unchanged in the other two proximal wells. The increase was due to higher quantities of tritium in wastewaters that were treated and discharged in FY07 beginning to appear at the proximal wells. The FY08 tritium activities for the other two proximal wells were 68,000 pCi/L at well 699-48-77C (October 2007) and 120,000 pCi/L at well 699-48-77D (October 2007). To date, no indications of a tritium incursion from

  3. Monitoring of effluent discharged from MINT's premise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active laboratories at the MINT's main complex are equipped with active sinks for discharging of radioactively contaminated aqueous liquid. Subsequently, the effluent is collected in tasks prior to transferring to the Collection Tanks at the Low Level Effluent Treatment Plant, Waste Management Centre. The need to treat or vice-versa of the effluent depends on the analysis carried out on the effluent. Generally, treated effluent is discharged to the environment once they meet the criteria / requirements as set by the laws. This paper discusses the criteria used in the analysis of the effluent and the readings obtained in a certain period of time. In addition, it has been observed in the drop of application of radioactive materials in recent years. (Author)

  4. Method of removing tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To remove trituim in airs simply and reliably in a large amount. Constitution: Tritium contained in air is oxidized in an oxidizing column into water and incorporated in the air. The water-air mixture is caused to flow into and cooled in a first freezing type air drier where almost of tritium water in the air are condensated and separated from the air and, after falling through the drier, recovered by way of a drain tube. The air passing through the freezing type air drier in humidified by a humidifier and then caused to flow into the second freezing drier. Then, a slight amount of tritium water remained in the air is mixed with steams by the humidifier for easier separation, dried in a drier and removed with tritium into cleaned air. After properly humidifying the air in the humidifier, it is flown out through the exit. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. TFTR tritium program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sissingh, R.A.P.; Rossmassler, R.L.

    1988-09-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton began operation in December 1982. Since then it has operated successfully with protium and deuterium achieving energy confinement time at peak electron density of 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/s, with ion temperatures of 20 keV. This paper describes the systems and preparations required for D-T operation, i.e. introducing and operating the tokamak with tritium in order to achieve the scientific break even point of Q=1. These systems include the tritium storage and delivery system, the tritium injection systems, the tritium clean-up systems, and the plasma exhaust and collection systems. It is expected that TFTR will have these systems fully operational, with trained personnel.

  6. Tritium waste package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmassler, Rich; Ciebiera, Lloyd; Tulipano, Francis J.; Vinson, Sylvester; Walters, R. Thomas

    1995-01-01

    A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium xide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen add oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

  7. Tritium catalyzed deuterium tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary assessment of the promise of the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium (TCD) tokamak power reactors relative to that of deuterium-tritium (D-T) and catalyzed deuterium (Cat-D) tokamaks is undertaken. The TCD mode of operation is arrived at by converting the 3He from the D(D,n)3He reaction into tritium, by neutron capture in the blanket; the tritium thus produced is fed into the plasma. There are three main parts to the assessment: blanket study, reactor design and economic analysis and an assessment of the prospects for improvements in the performance of TCD reactors (and in the promise of the TCD mode of operation, in general)

  8. Tritium protective clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational exposures to radiation from tritium received at present nuclear facilities and potential exposures at future fusion reactor facilities demonstrate the need for improved protective clothing. Important areas relating to increased protection factors of tritium protective ventilation suits are discussed. These areas include permeation processes of tritium through materials, various tests of film permeability, selection and availability of suit materials, suit designs, and administrative procedures. The phenomenological nature of film permeability calls for more standardized and universal test methods, which would increase the amount of directly useful information on impermeable materials. Improvements in suit designs could be expedited and better communicated to the health physics community by centralizing devlopmental equipment, manpower, and expertise in the field of tritium protection to one or two authoritative institutions

  9. Tritium systems concepts for the next European torus (NET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study deals with the design of the various tritium processing facilities that will be required for the Next European Torus (NET) design. The reference data for the design of the NET Tritium Systems was provided by the NET team. Significant achievements of this study were: (a) Identification of new ways of handling some problems for example: 1) Recovery of tritium from the helium purge of the lithium-ceramic blanket using a novel Adsoprtion and Catalytic Exchange Process, 2) A new way of combining fuel component separation and coolant water detritiation using cryogenic distillation, 3) The use of parasitic refrigeration for the cryogenic isotope separation, 4) Tritium extraction from effluent gas streams at their respective sources, 5) Attempt to eliminate the need for Air Cleanup Systems. (b) Identification of uncertainties, for example: composition of plasma exhaust, required helium purge rate of Li-Pb for tritium recovery, uncertainty in requirements for decontaminating blanket sectors, etc. (c) Review of ways to limit tritium permeation into steam by swamping with hydrogen and to provide quantitative estimates for this permeation

  10. Tritium source and behavior of tritiated water vapor in KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total tritium release rate from all of nuclear facilities, including thermonuclear experimental facilities, to environment as a gaseous form (HT) or a liquid form (HTO) reaches recently to the production rate of tritium in atmosphere by cosmic ray, although tritium effluent amounts from a single reactor facility is a few in comparison with nuclear explosion experiments in atmosphere. Tritium is produced by the nuclear reaction, D(n,γ)T. Tritium sources in KUR are divided into three pathways as follows: (1) heavy water contained in the primary light water cooling system, (2) heavy were as a moderator in preliminary tank which is installed in the reactor side, (3) liquid deuterium (∼4 L) in a cold neutron source facility (CNS). The tritiated water (HTO) in air-condensed water during stack exhaustion is sampled, and it's concentration is measured by a liquid scintillation method. The HTO concentration of reactor room during ventilation changes at every repair work of heavy water-transport pipe system. An ionization chamber (∼1.5 L) for continuous monitoring is installed near the reactor side. The ionization monitoring system, however, didn't work during reactor operation because of the radioactivity of Ar-41. The behavior of HTO concentration in the decay tank of heavy water exhaustion system is measured, and a tritium gas leakage from the system is detected. The behaviors of tritiated water vapor in KUR containment building are discussed in details. (Suetake, M.)

  11. PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, G.H.; Shapiro, E.M.; Elliott, N.; Cannon, C.V.

    1963-02-26

    This invention relates to a process for the production of tritium by subjecting comminuted solid lithium fluoride containing the lithium isotope of atomic mass number 6 to neutron radiation in a self-sustaining neutronic reactor. The lithium fiuoride is heated to above 450 deg C. in an evacuated vacuum-tight container during radiation. Gaseous radiation products are withdrawn and passed through a palladium barrier to recover tritium. (AEC)

  12. Comparison of tritium production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed investigation and research on the source of tritium, tritium production facilities and their comparison are presented based on the basic information about tritium. The characteristics of three types of proposed tritium production facilities, i.e., fissile type, accelerator production tritium (APT) and fusion type, are presented. APT shows many advantages except its rather high cost; fusion reactors appear to offer improved safety and environmental impacts, in particular, tritium production based on the fusion-based neutron source costs much lower and directly helps the development of fusion energy source

  13. IN-SITU TRITIUM BETA DETECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this three-phase project were to design, develop, and demonstrate a monitoring system capable of detecting and quantifying tritium in situ in ground and surface waters, and in water from effluent lines prior to discharge into public waterways. The tritium detection system design is based on measurement of the low energy beta radiation from the radioactive decay of tritium using a special form of scintillating optical fiber directly in contact with the water to be measured. The system consists of the immersible sensor module containing the optical fiber, and an electronics package, connected by an umbilical cable. The system can be permanently installed for routine water monitoring in wells or process or effluent lines, or can be moved from one location to another for survey use. The electronics will read out tritium activity directly in units of pico Curies per liter, with straightforward calibration. In Phase 1 of the project, we characterized the sensitivity of fluor-doped plastic optical fiber to tritium beta radiation. In addition, we characterized the performance of photomultiplier tubes needed for the system. In parallel with this work, we defined the functional requirements, target specifications, and system configuration for an in situ tritium beta detector that would use the fluor-doped fibers as primary sensors of tritium concentration in water. The major conclusions from the characterization work are: A polystyrene optical fiber with fluor dopant concentration of 2% gave best performance. This fiber had the highest dopant concentration of any fibers tested. Stability may be a problem. The fibers exposed to a 22-day soak in 120 F water experienced a 10x reduction in sensitivity. It is not known whether this was due to the build up of a deposit (a potentially reversible effect) or an irreversible process such as leaching of the scintillating dye. Based on the results achieved, it is premature to initiate Phase 2 and commit to a prototype

  14. High accuracy tritium measurement for the verification of the tritium production rate calculations with MCNPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents high accuracy tritium production rate measurement results compared with calculations using the MCNPX Monte Carlo particle transport code. The experimental results are regarded as reference values for a new passive technique based on the secondary charged particle activation method developed for measuring the tritium production rate in the test blanket modules of the ITER Tokamak. The 16O(t,n)18F reaction, which is one of the possible tritium monitor reactions, was also extensively investigated, and the experimentally determined reaction rates were compared with simulations. Li2CO3 solution was filled and sealed into quartz ampoules which were irradiated in the Training Reactor of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics. The amount of 18F was determined using γ-spectroscopy. Then the precise tritium measurements were carried out in the Hertelendi Laboratory of Environmental Studies using the 3H–3He ingrowth method, where the 3He produced during the storage time is measured by a static noble gas mass spectrometer (VG-5400). The HT/HTO ratio in the irradiated aqueous solutions was found to be 0.1323±0.0034. Based on the comparison of the measurements and the simulations it was pointed out that the model calculations underestimate the reaction rate of both the 6Li(n,t)α and the 16O(t,n)18F reactions by 5–10% and 15%, respectively. -- Highlights: ► Tritium measurements for verifying the 6Li6(n, t)α reaction rate calculated by MCNPX. ► The HT/HTO ratio was determined in the neutron irradiated aqueous solution of Li2CO3. ► The reaction rate of 16O(t,n)18F was measured in thermal neutron spectrum

  15. Tritium analysis at TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium analytical system at TFRR is used to determine the purity of tritium bearing gas streams in order to provide inventory and accountability measurements. The system includes a quadrupole mass spectrometer and beta scintillator originally configured at Monsanto Mound Research Laboratory in the late 1970's and early 1980's. The system was commissioned and tested between 1991 and 1992 and is used daily for analysis of calibration standards, incoming tritium shipments, gases evolved from uranium storage beds and measurement of gases returned to gas holding tanks. The low resolution mass spectrometer is enhanced by the use of a metal getter pump to aid in resolving the mass 3 and 4 species. The beta scintillator complements the analysis as it detects tritium bearing species that often are not easily detected by mass spectrometry such as condensable species or hydrocarbons containing tritium. The instruments are controlled by a personal computer with customized software written with a graphical programming system designed for data acquisition and control. A discussion of the instrumentation, control systems, system parameters, procedural methods, algorithms, and operational issues will be presented. Measurements of gas holding tanks and tritiated water waste streams using ion chamber instrumentation are discussed elsewhere

  16. Tritium in the water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium activity concentrations in water environment in China have been summarized. The levels in different water categories can be listed as: precipitation, river, reservoir, tap water, well, sea and spring in the order of decrease of tritium. (5 tabs.)

  17. Tritium - is it underestimated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Practical experience in the use of the Whitlock Tritium Meter in various laboratories and industrial establishments throughout the world has shown that:-a) Measurements by smear/wipe tests can often be in error by three orders of magnitude or more; b) Sub-visual surface scratches (8μ deep) are radiologically important; c) Volatile forms of tritium exist in 20% to 30% of establishments visited. It is concluded that a) the widespread use of smear/wipe techniques for the assessment of 3H surface contamination based on the assumption that 10% of removable activity is collected by the smear/wipe should be re-examined and b) tritium surface contamination assessed as 'fixed' can contain volatile fractions with a hazard potential which may be considerably greater than the hazard from removable activity at present covered by maximum permissible level recommendations. (H.K.)

  18. Tritium in HTR systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from the basis of the radiological properties of tritium, the provisions of present-day radiation protection legislation are discussed in the context of the handling of this radionuclide in HTR plants. Tritium transportation is then followed through from the place of its creation up until the sink, i.e. disposal and/or environmental route, and empirical values obtained in experiments and in plant operation translated into guidelines for plant design and planning. The use of the example of modular HTR plants permits indication that environmental contamination via the 'classical' routes of air and water emissions, and contamination of products, and resulting consumer exposure, are extremely low even on the assumption of extreme conditions. This leads finally to a requirement that the expenditure for implementation of measures for further reduction of tritium activity rates be measured against low radiological effect. (orig.)

  19. Monitoring of tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, James A.; Meacham, Sterling A.

    1981-01-01

    The fluid from a breeder nuclear reactor, which may be the sodium cooling fluid or the helium reactor-cover-gas, or the helium coolant of a gas-cooled reactor passes over the portion of the enclosure of a gaseous discharge device which is permeable to hydrogen and its isotopes. The tritium diffused into the discharge device is radioactive producing beta rays which ionize the gas (argon) in the discharge device. The tritium is monitored by measuring the ionization current produced when the sodium phase and the gas phase of the hydrogen isotopes within the enclosure are in equilibrium.

  20. Tritium accounting during the first tritium experiment at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarises the measuring procedures and the results of the tritium accounting during the first tritium experiment at JET, carried out in November 1991. The measurement of the amount of tritium injected into the Torus and of the quantity recovered from the Torus and the Neutral Injector Boxes is described and the accuracy of the data assessed. The new Gas Collection System used during the experiment is briefly described. The tritium recovery data taken in the months following the experiment are reviewed, with special attention to the first three weeks after the experiment. The total amount of tritium collected in the Gas Collection System is compared with the data of tritium release from the Torus and the Neutral Injection Boxes. The analysis of the data allows us to estimate the residual tritium inventory in the Injection System and in the Torus. (orig.)

  1. An analysis of the tritium content in fish from Upper Three Runs Creek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November of 1988 the F/H-area effluent treatment facility (ETF) began releasing treated waste water to Upper Three Runs Creek. Previous to that time, there has been minimal discharge of plant waste water to this tributary of the Savannah River. The ETF is designed to remove the toxic and radioactive waste materials from the effluent stream and to meet the discharge limits of the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The only radioactive nuclide not removed by the process is tritium. Tritium, an isotope of hydrogen, is chemically associated with the water molecules in the waste stream and can not be economically removed at this time. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the concentration of tritium in the stream water and the concentration of tritium in the fish. Fish collections were made at two locations. The most upstream location was 50 meters downstream from the SRS Road C bridge. This is immediately downstream of the effluent discharge pipe from the ETF. The other location was at the bridge of SRS Road A (SC Highway 125). The water is removed from the fish by freeze drying under vacuum. This study suggests that, on the average, the tritium concentration of fish in Upper Three Runs Creek will be in equilibrium with the tritium in the water of the creek. The water in the fish comes into equilibrium with the water in the stream quite rapidly and it is quite likely that any single fish sampled will be higher or lower in tritium content of an integrated water sample, such as those collected by the Environmental Monitoring samplers. Both the time of sampling and the sampling of a sufficient number of fish is important in obtaining an accurate estimate of the average tritium concentration in the tissue water of the fish

  2. ARIES-I tritium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key safety concern in a D-T fusion reactor is the tritium inventory. There are three components in a fusion reactor with potentially large inventories, i.e., the blanket, the fuel processing system and the plasma facing components. The ARIES team selected the material combinations, decided the operating conditions and refined the processing systems, with the aiming of minimizing the tritium inventories and leakage. The total tritium inventory for the ARIES-I reactor is only 700 g. This paper discussed the calculations and assumptions we made for the low tritium inventory. We also addressed the uncertainties about the tritium inventory. 13 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  3. The toxicity of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among radionuclides of importance in atomic energy, 3H has relatively low toxicity. There is concern, however, because very large amounts are involved in nuclear fission and fusion, impressive quantities are released to the environment and tritium in its preferred state, water, has free access to living cells and organisms. The main health and environmental worry is the possibility that significant biological effects may follow from protracted exposure to low concentrations in water. To examine this possible hazard and measure toxicity at low tritium concentrations, chronic exposure studies were done on mice and monkeys. During vulnerable developmental periods animals were exposed to 3HOH and mice were exposed also to 60Co gamma irradiation and energy-related chemical agents. The biological endpoint measured was the irreversible loss of female germ cells. Effects from tritium were observed at surprisingly low concentrations where 3H was found more damaging than previously thought. Comparisons between tritium and gamma radiation showed the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to be greater than 1 and to reach approximately 3 at very low exposures. For perspective, other comparisons were made: between radiation and chemical agents, which revealed parallels in action on germ cells; and between pre- and postnatal exposure, which warn of possible special hazard to the foetus from both classes of energy-related byproducts. (author)

  4. Tritium breeding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium breeding materials are essential to the operation of D-T fusion facilities. Both of the present options - solid ceramic breeding materials and liquid metal materials are reviewed with emphasis not only on their attractive features but also on critical materials issues which must be resolved

  5. Tritium retention in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the materials physics related to D-T operation in TFTR. Research activities are described pertaining to basic studies of hydrogenic retention in graphite, hydrogen recycling phenomena, first-wall and limiter conditioning, surface analysis of TFTR first-wall components, and estimates of the tritium inventory

  6. Tritium transport calculations for the IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Delivery of material data for the tritium balance in the IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module. • Description of the topological models in TMAP and the adapted fusion-devoted Tritium Permeation Code (FUS-TPC). • Computation of release of tritium from the breeder solid material into the purge gas. • Computation of the loss of tritium over the capsule wall, rig hull, container wall and purge gas return line. - Abstract: The IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module (TRTM) is projected to measure online the tritium release from breeder ceramics and beryllium pebble beds under high energy neutron irradiation. Tritium produced in the pebble bed of TRTM is swept out continuously by a purge gas flow, but can also permeate into the module's metal structures, and can be lost by permeation to the environment. According analyses on the tritium inventory are performed to support IFMIF plant safety studies, and to support the experiment planning. This paper describes the necessary elements for calculation of the tritium transport in the Tritium Release Test Module as follows: (i) applied equations for the tritium balance, (ii) material data from literature and (iii) the topological models and the computation of the five different cases; namely release of tritium from the breeder solid material into the purge gas, loss of tritium over the capsule wall, rig hull, container wall and purge gas return line in detail. The problem of tritium transport in the TRTM has been studied and analyzed by the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) and the adapted fusion-devoted Tritium Permeation Code (FUS-TPC). TMAP has been developed at INEEL and now exists in Version 7. FUS-TPC Code was written in MATLAB with the original purpose to study the tritium transport in Helium Cooled Lead Lithium (HCLL) blanket and in a later version the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket by [6] (Franza, 2012). This code has been further modified to be applicable to the TRTM. Results from the

  7. Tritium transport calculations for the IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, Jana, E-mail: jana.freund@kit.edu; Arbeiter, Frederik; Abou-Sena, Ali; Franza, Fabrizio; Kondo, Keitaro

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Delivery of material data for the tritium balance in the IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module. • Description of the topological models in TMAP and the adapted fusion-devoted Tritium Permeation Code (FUS-TPC). • Computation of release of tritium from the breeder solid material into the purge gas. • Computation of the loss of tritium over the capsule wall, rig hull, container wall and purge gas return line. - Abstract: The IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module (TRTM) is projected to measure online the tritium release from breeder ceramics and beryllium pebble beds under high energy neutron irradiation. Tritium produced in the pebble bed of TRTM is swept out continuously by a purge gas flow, but can also permeate into the module's metal structures, and can be lost by permeation to the environment. According analyses on the tritium inventory are performed to support IFMIF plant safety studies, and to support the experiment planning. This paper describes the necessary elements for calculation of the tritium transport in the Tritium Release Test Module as follows: (i) applied equations for the tritium balance, (ii) material data from literature and (iii) the topological models and the computation of the five different cases; namely release of tritium from the breeder solid material into the purge gas, loss of tritium over the capsule wall, rig hull, container wall and purge gas return line in detail. The problem of tritium transport in the TRTM has been studied and analyzed by the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) and the adapted fusion-devoted Tritium Permeation Code (FUS-TPC). TMAP has been developed at INEEL and now exists in Version 7. FUS-TPC Code was written in MATLAB with the original purpose to study the tritium transport in Helium Cooled Lead Lithium (HCLL) blanket and in a later version the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket by [6] (Franza, 2012). This code has been further modified to be applicable to the TRTM. Results from the

  8. Tritium Exchange in Biological Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whenever tritium-labelled water is employed as a test solute or tracer in biological systems, an appreciable exchange between tritium and labile hydrogen atoms occurs that frequently affects the nature and interpretation of experimental results. The studies reported here are concerned with the magnitude of the effect that tritium exchange introduces into measurements of total body water and water metabolism in animals and humans. Direct measurements of exchange were made in rats, guinea pigs, pigeons, and rabbits. Tritium-labelled water was administered intravenously or by mouth, and tritium space and turnover determined from the concentration of tritium in blood. The animals were then desiccated to constant weight in vacuo. The specific activity of water collected periodically during desiccation increased by 50% as a result of isotope effects. Water from combustion of dried rabbit tissues contained about 2% of the tritium originally given to the animal. Adipose tissue alone contained little or no exchange tritium. The dried tissues of the other animals were rehydrated with inactive water and the appearance of tritium in the water observed. The specific activity of the water increased in exponential fashion, i.e., 1-exp. (kt), with about 90% of exchange occurring with a half-time of 1 h, and the remaining 10% with a half-time of 10 h. The total tritium extracted accounted for 1.5 to 3.5% of the dose given to the animal, which agrees with the difference between the tritium space and total body water determined by desiccation. An indirect estimate of exchange in humans was derived from concurrent measurements of tritium and antipyrene spaces. The average difference of about 2% in water volume agrees with the direct estimates of exchanges in animals. It is evident that tritium space should be reduced by about 2% to identify it with total body water. The magnitude and relatively slow rate of exchange may also influence the interpretation of metabolic studies with

  9. Tritium permeation and transport in the gasoline production system coupled with high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes scoping analyses on tritium behaviors in the HTGR-integrated gasoline production system, which is based on a methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) plant. In this system, the HTGR transfers heat and electricity to the MTG system. This system was analyzed using the TPAC code, which was recently developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The global sensitivity analyses were performed to understand and characterize tritium behaviors in the coupled HTGR/MTG system. This Monte Carlo based random sampling method was used to evaluate maximum 17,408 numbers of samples with different input values. According to the analyses, the average tritium concentration in the product gasoline is about 3.05*10-3 Bq/cm3, and 62 % cases are within the tritium effluent limit which is 3.7*10-3 Bq/cm3 [STP]). About 0.19% of released tritium is finally transported from the core to the gasoline product through permeations. This study also identified that the following four parameters are important concerning tritium behaviors in the HTGR/MTG system: (1) tritium source, (2) wall thickness of process heat exchanger, (3) operating temperature, and (4) tritium permeation coefficient of process heat exchanger. These four parameters contribute about 95 % of the total output uncertainties. This study strongly recommends focusing our future research on these four parameters to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate tritium permeation into the gasoline product. If the permeation barrier is included in the future study, the tritium concentration will be significantly reduced. (authors)

  10. Universal tritium transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Savannah River Site and throughout the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) tritium is measured using Ion or Kanne Chambers. Tritium flowing through an Ion Chamber emits beta particles generating current flow proportional to tritium radioactivity. Currents in the 1 x 10-15 A to 1 x 10-6 A are measured. The distance between the Ion Chamber and the electrometer in NNSA facilities can be over 100 feet. Currents greater than a few micro-amperes can be measured with a simple modification. Typical operating voltages of 500 to 1000 Volts and piping designs require that the Ion Chamber be connected to earth ground. This grounding combined with long cable lengths and low currents requires a very specialized preamplifier circuit. In addition, the electrometer must be able to supply 'fail safe' alarm signals which are used to alert personnel of a tritium leak, trigger divert systems preventing tritium releases to the environment and monitor stack emissions as required by the United States federal Government and state governments. Ideally the electrometer would be 'self monitoring'. Self monitoring would reduce the need for constant checks by maintenance personnel. For example at some DOE facilities monthly calibration and alarm checks must be performed to ensure operation. NNSA presently uses commercially available electrometers designed specifically for this critical application. The problems with these commercial units include: ground loops, high background currents, inflexibility and susceptibility to Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) which includes RF and Magnetic fields. Existing commercial electrometers lack the flexibility to accommodate different Ion Chamber designs required by the gas pressure, type of gas and range. Ideally the electrometer could be programmed for any expected gas, range and high voltage output. Commercially available units do not have 'fail safe' self monitoring capability. Electronics used to measure extremely low current must have

  11. Application of crown ethers to selective extraction and quantitative analysis of technetium 99, iodine 129 and cesium 135 in effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of crown ethers are first recalled. Then extraction of technetium 99 is studied in actual radioactive effluents. Quantitative analysis is carried out by liquid scintillation and interference of tritium is corrected. Iodine 129 is extracted from radioactive effluents and determined by gamma spectrometry. Finally cesium 135 is extracted and determined by thermo ionization mass spectroscopy

  12. Tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    A tritium transport vessel using depleted uranium was tested in the laboratory using deuterium and protium. The vessel contains 0.5 kg of depleted uranium and can hold up to 18 grams of tritium. The conditions for activation, tritium loading and tritium unloading were defined. The safety aspects that included air-ingress, tritium diffusion, temperature and pressure potentials were evaluated.

  13. Efficiency of the liquid scintillators applied by for a measurement of the tritium concentration in a water probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimum conditions for radiometry of low-active aqueous samples for three types of liquid scintillators, which are ZhS-8, ZhS-13n and ZhS-84, were determined. The traditional technique for scintillation tritium oxide radiometry in aqueous samples was used. The experimental was made at air temperature of 22-25 deg C. The curves providing for determination of optimum ratioes between aqueous samples and scintillators studied, were obtained. The ZhS-84 scintillator is recommended for tritium radiometry in aqueous samples with low activity

  14. Tritium neutrino mass experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status of the experimental search for neutrino mass is reviewed, with emphasis on direct kinematic methods, such as the beta decay of tritium. The situation concerning the electron neutrino mass as measured in tritium beta decay is essentially unchanged from a year ago, although a great deal of experimental work is in progress. The ITEP group continues to find evidence for a nonzero mass, now slightly revised to 26(5) eV. After correcting for recently discovered errors in the energy loss distribution and source thickness, however, the Z/umlt u/rich group still claims and upper limit of 18 eV. There may be evidence for neutrino mass and mixing in the SN1987a data, in the same range suggested by the ITEP experiment. 42 refs., 3 figs

  15. Environmental monitoring for tritium at tritium separation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cryogenic Pilot is an experimental project in the nuclear energy national research program, which has the aim of developing technologies for tritium and deuterium separation by cryogenic distillation. The experimental installation is located 15 km near the highest city of the area and 1 km near Olt River. An important chemical activity is developed in the area and the Experimental Cryogenic Pilot's, almost the entire neighborhood are chemical plants. It is necessary to emphasize this aspect because the sewerage system is connected with the other three chemical plants from the neighborhood. This is the reason that we progressively established elements of an environmental monitoring program well in advance of tritium operation in order to determine baseline levels. The first step was the tritium level monitoring in environmental water and waste water of industrial activity from neighborhood. In this work, a low background liquid scintillation is used to determine tritium activity concentration according to ISO 9698/1998. We measured drinking water, precipitation, river water, underground water and waste water. The tritium level was between 10 TU and 27 TU that indicates there is no source of tritium contamination in the neighborhood of Cryogenic Pilot. In order to determine baseline levels we decide to monitories monthly each location. In this paper a standard method is presented which it is used for tritium determination in water sample, the precautions needed in order to achieve reliable results, and the evolution of tritium level in different location near the Experimental Pilot Tritium and Deuterium Cryogenic Separation.(author)

  16. Tritium implantation in the accelerator production of tritium device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We briefly describe the methods we have developed to compute the magnitude and spatial distribution of born and implanted tritons and protons in the Accelerator Production of Tritium (AFT) device. The methods are verified against experimental measurements and then used to predict that 16% of the tritium is implanted in the walls of the APT distribution tubes. The methods are also used to estimate the spatial distribution of implanted tritium, which will be required for determining the possible diffusion of tritium out of the walls and back into the gas stream

  17. Evaluation of tritium release properties of advanced tritium breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demonstration power plant (DEMO) fusion reactors require advanced tritium breeders with high thermal stability. Lithium titanate (Li2TiO3) advanced tritium breeders with excess Li (Li2+xTiO3+y) are stable in a reducing atmosphere at high temperatures. Although the tritium release properties of tritium breeders are documented in databases for DEMO blanket design, no in situ examination under fusion neutron (DT neutron) irradiation has been performed. In this study, a preliminary examination of the tritium release properties of advanced tritium breeders was performed, and DT neutron irradiation experiments were performed at the fusion neutronics source (FNS) facility in JAEA. Considering the tritium release characteristics, the optimum grain size after sintering is <5 μm. From the results of the optimization of granulation conditions, prototype Li2+xTiO3+y pebbles with optimum grain size (<5 μm) were successfully fabricated. The Li2+xTiO3+y pebbles exhibited good tritium release properties similar to the Li2TiO3 pebbles. In particular, the released amount of HT gas for easier tritium handling was higher than that of HTO water. (authors)

  18. Tritium monitoring : present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report summarizes the present status of techniques employed for the monitoring of tritium in water, air and other samples. A brief mention of the work done by numerous workers in the field, critical comments about the work and a fairly exhaustive list of references about the work done during the last 4 decades has been presented. On-line monitoring on real time basis in nuclear reactors is also discussed. (author). 83 refs., 10 refs., 2 tabs

  19. Tritium in atmospheric hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, J. David; Hackett, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    The radioactivity of tritiated hydrogen (HT) in the atmosphere in Westwood, New Jersey was measured at approximately weekly intervals from August 1971 to August 1973. The background level remained constant at approximately 80 tritium atoms per milligram of air. Frequent increases in the activity level of up to an order of magnitude were observed until January 1973. The source(s) of HT which was responsible for the frequent increases apparently ceased as a tropospheric source in January 1973. ...

  20. Muon capture by tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The muon capture rate is computed with realistic wave function for the initial tritium nuclei (Faddeev equations on configuration space with realistic potentials), and plane wave approximation for the final three neutrons, with the effective Hamiltonian of Fujii and Primakoff for muon capture and via a non energy weighted sum rule. Such a forbidden transition is hoped to be a probe for exchange current contributions

  1. A personal tritium monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tritium monitor, similar in size to a normal gamma survey meter, is being developed to improve the measurement of tritiated water vapour (HTO) near workers in Candu nuclear power plants. Methods are available for sampling and monitoring on-line from work areas; the instrument described here is intended to complement such monitoring by allowing on-the-spot individual assessment of tritium hazards. Size, mass and cost are more important than sensitivity in an instrument of this kind than in a central monitor. Accordingly, only inexpensive, readily obtainable mechanical and electrical components have been used in a simple assembly needing little machining. The tritium detector is an ionization chamber. A signal proportional to the concentration of HTO in air is obtained as the difference between the currents from two 90 cm3 ionization chambers. Sample air flows directly through one chamber and through the other after being dried by passing through a replaceable desiccant cartridge. This technique reduces the unwanted signals from gamma radiation and radioactive noble gases. The electronics comprise a MOSFET, single chip amplifier and a liquid crystal digital display that indicates concentrations in the range 1-1999 (MPC)sub(a). The mass of the instrument is 2 kg. (H.K.)

  2. A prototype wearable tritium monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudden unexpected changes in tritium-in-air concentrations in workplace air can result in significant unplanned exposures. Although fixed area monitors are used to monitor areas where there is a potential for elevated tritium in air concentrations, they do not monitor personnel air space and may require some time for acute tritium releases to be detected. There is a need for a small instrument that will quickly alert staff of changing tritium hazards. A moderately sensitive tritium instrument that workers could wear would bring attention to any rise in tritium levels that were above predetermined limits and help in assessing the potential hazard therefore minimizing absorbed dose. Hand-held instruments currently available can be used but require the assistance of a fellow worker or restrict the user to using only one hand to perform some duties. (authors)

  3. Radioactive effluents in Savannah River. Summary report for 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winn, W.G.

    1993-09-21

    During 1992, the radioactive effluents in the Savannah River were less than those observed in 1991. Vogtle reported no significant releases in 1992, and in earlier years Vogtle improvements in pre-processing their releases had already effected a decreasing trend in release levels. Their effluents continue to be dominated by {sup 58}Co, which had a maximum concentration of only 0.068 pCi/L, which is just 1/3 of the maximum observed in 1991. Many of the other man-made radionuclides observed in earlier years have now decreased to where some are not even detected, and no new radionuclides were detected in the 1992 Vogtle effluents. In addition to {sup 58}Co, low levels of {sup 60}Co were frequently observed, but only traces of {sup 54}Mn and {sup 95}Nb were observed. Contrary to earlier years no {sup 51}Cr, {sup 57}Co, {sup 59}Fe, or {sup 95}Zr were seen in 1992. Tritium and {sup 137}Cs were also monitored, but their levels generally remain consistent with known SRS sources. The maximum tritium observed near Vogtle was 2 pCi,/mL. The maximum downstream tritium was higher (3.8 pCi/mL), primarily due to the tritium release from K-Reactor in December 1991; however, the levels had abated significantly prior to collection of the tritium samples of the present study. In addition to natural sources, the general levels in the Savannah River are due to routine releases from the effluent treatment facility and seepage basin migration into plant streams that flow into the river.

  4. Radioactive effluents in Savannah River. Summary report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1992, the radioactive effluents in the Savannah River were less than those observed in 1991. Vogtle reported no significant releases in 1992, and in earlier years Vogtle improvements in pre-processing their releases had already effected a decreasing trend in release levels. Their effluents continue to be dominated by 58Co, which had a maximum concentration of only 0.068 pCi/L, which is just 1/3 of the maximum observed in 1991. Many of the other man-made radionuclides observed in earlier years have now decreased to where some are not even detected, and no new radionuclides were detected in the 1992 Vogtle effluents. In addition to 58Co, low levels of 60Co were frequently observed, but only traces of 54Mn and 95Nb were observed. Contrary to earlier years no 51Cr, 57Co, 59Fe, or 95Zr were seen in 1992. Tritium and 137Cs were also monitored, but their levels generally remain consistent with known SRS sources. The maximum tritium observed near Vogtle was 2 pCi,/mL. The maximum downstream tritium was higher (3.8 pCi/mL), primarily due to the tritium release from K-Reactor in December 1991; however, the levels had abated significantly prior to collection of the tritium samples of the present study. In addition to natural sources, the general levels in the Savannah River are due to routine releases from the effluent treatment facility and seepage basin migration into plant streams that flow into the river

  5. An overview of tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of three types of proposed tritium production facilities, fissile type, accelerator production tritium (APT), and fusion type, are presented. The fissile reactors, especially commercial light water reactor, use comparatively mature technology and are designed to meet current safety and environmental guidelines. Conversely, APT shows many advantages except its rather high cost, while fusion reactors appear to offer improved safety and environmental impact, in particular, tritium production based on the fusion-based neutron source. However, its cost keeps unknown

  6. Tritium accounting for PHWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium, the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, is produced as a byproduct of the nuclear reactions in the nuclear power plants. In a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) tritium activity is produced in the Heat Transport and Moderator systems due to neutron activation of deuterium in heavy water used in these systems. Tritium activity build up occurs in some of the water systems in the PHWR plants through pick up from the plant atmosphere, inadvertent D2O ingress from other systems or transfer during processes. The tritium, produced by the neutron induced reactions in different systems in the reactor undergoes multiple processes such as escape through leaks, storage, transfer to external locations, decay, evaporation and diffusion and discharge though waste streams. Change of location of tritium inventory takes place during intentional transfer of heavy water, both reactor grade and downgraded, from one system to another. Tritium accounting is the application of accounting techniques to maintain knowledge of the tritium inventory present in different systems of a facility and to construct activity balances to detect any discrepancy in the physical inventories. It involves identification of all the tritium hold ups, transfers and storages as well as measurement of tritium inventories in various compartments, decay corrections, environmental release estimations and evaluation of activity generation during the accounting period. This paper describes a methodology for creating tritium inventory balance based on periodic physical inventory taking, tritium build up, decay and release estimations. Tritium accounting in the PHWR plants can prove to be an effective regulatory tool to monitor its loss as well as unaccounted release to the environment. (author)

  7. Tritium gas transfer pump development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-lubricated, hermetically sealed pumps for tritium service have been selected to replace Sprengel pumps in the existing Tritium Facility. These pumps will be the primary gas-transfer pumps in the planned Replacement Tritium Facility. The selected pumps are Metal Bellows Corporation's bellows pumps and Normetex scroll pumps. Pumping range for a Normetex/Metal Bellows system is from 0.01 torr suction to 2300 torr discharge. Performance characteristics of both pumps are presented. 10 figs

  8. Design of the OMEGA Laser Target Chamber Tritium Removal System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparations are currently underway at the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) to conduct direct drive laser implosion campaigns with inertial confinement fusion targets containing deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic ice layers. The OMEGA Cryogenic Target Handling System will fill plastic targets with high-pressure DT (150 MPa) at 300 to 500 K, cool them down to cryogenic temperature (<25 K), form the DT ice layer, and transport the targets to the OMEGA laser target chamber. Targets will then be shot with the 60-beam 30-kJ OMEGA laser. A tritium removal system has been designed to remove tritium from effluents associated with operation of the target chamber and its associated diagnostic antechambers, vacuum pumping systems, and target insertion systems. The design of the target chamber tritium removal system (TCTRS) is based on catalytic oxidation of DT and tritiated methane to tritiated water (DTO), followed by immobilization of DTO on molecular sieves. The design of the TCTRS presented a challenge due to the low tritium release limits dictated by the tritium license at UR/LLE. Aspen Plus, a commercial software package intended for the simulation and design of chemical processing systems operating at steady state, was used to simulate and design the TCTRS. A second commercial software package, Aspen ADSIM, was used to simulate and design the TCTRS molecular sieve beds, which operate at unsteady state. In this paper, we describe the design of the TCTRS and the benefits that were realized by use of the Aspen Plus and Aspen ADSIM software packages

  9. Tritium-assisted fusion breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report undertakes a preliminary assessment of the prospects of tritium-assisted D-D fuel cycle fusion breeders. Two well documented fusion power reactor designs - the STARFIRE (D-T fuel cycle) and the WILDCAT (Cat-D fuel cycle) tokamaks - are converted into fusion breeders by replacing the fusion electric blankets with 233U producing fission suppressed blankets; changing the Cat-D fuel cycle mode of operation by one of the several tritium-assisted D-D-based modes of operation considered; adjusting the reactor power level; and modifying the resulting plant cost to account for the design changes. Three sources of tritium are considered for assisting the D-D fuel cycle: tritium produced in the blankets from lithium or from 3He and tritium produced in the client fission reactors. The D-D-based fusion breeders using tritium assistance are found to be the most promising economically, especially the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium mode of operation in which the 3He exhausted from the plasma is converted, by neutron capture in the blanket, into tritium which is in turn fed back to the plasma. The number of fission reactors of equal thermal power supported by Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium fusion breeders is about 50% higher than that of D-T fusion breeders, and the profitability is found to be slightly lower than that of the D-T fusion breeders

  10. Tritium isotope separation from light and heavy water by bipolar electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for separating tritium from light and heavy water is described. Hydrogen is transferred at and through bipolar electrodes at rates H > D > T. In a cell containing several bipolar electrodes placed in series between two terminal electrodes, a flow of hydrogen is established from the terminal anode compartment toward the terminal cathode. An electrolyte feed containing tritium is continuously added to the system and is subsequently transported countercurrent to the hydrogen mass transfer. A cascaded system is established, in which effluent streams enriched and depleted in tritium can be withdrawn. The voltage drop is smaller at any bipolar electrode as compared to the voltage for normal electrolysis. Cell design is compact because isotope separation occurs at bipolar electrodes without evolution of gas. Isotope separation was demonstrated in laboratory cells where a steady-state tritium concentration gradient was attained. This gradient was in agreement with concentrations calculated from a derived mathematical model

  11. Technology developments for improved tritium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium technology developments have been an integral part of the advancement of CANDU reactor technology. An understanding of tritium behaviour within the heavy-water systems has led to improvements in tritium recovery processes, tritium measurement techniques and overall tritium control. Detritiation technology has been put in place as part of heavy water and tritium management practices. The advances made in these technologies are summarized. (author). 20 refs., 5 figs

  12. Tritium activity in milk by liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper estimates the total tritium content of both the organic and aqueous fractions simultaneously. To fulfill these conditions, the chosen scintillator should be able to accept large sample loadings and display the same counting efficiency for the organic as well as aqueous fractions of the whole milk. In an attempt to establish this method, samples from four different brands of milk were analysed using the pseudocumence based Picofluor 30 (Canberra Packard) and the di-isopropyl naphthalene based Aquasafe 500 (Zinser Analytic) scintillator solution. Glass vials were used thus enabling visual observation to be made. The tritium activities of four different brands of milks were estimated to be very low and at, or near, the detection level of the system

  13. Tritium separation from light and heavy water by bipolar electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of bipolar electrolysis with countercurrent electrolyte flow to separate hydrogen isotopes was investigated for the removal of tritium from light water effluents or from heavy water moderator. Deuterium-tritium and protium-tritium separation factors occurring on a Pd-25% Ag bipolar electrode were measured to be 2.05 to 2.16 and 11.6 to 12.4 respectively, at current densities between 0.21 and 0.50 A cm-2, and at 35 to 900C. Current densities up to 0.3 A cm-2 have been achieved in continuous operation, at 80 to 900C, without significant gas formation on the bipolar electrodes. From the measured overvoltage at the bipolar electrodes and the electrolyte conductivity the power consumption per stage was calculated to be 3.0 kwh/kg H2O at 0.2 A cm-2 and 5.0 kwh/kg H2O at 0.5 A cm-2 current density, compared to 6.4 and 8.0 kwh/kg H2O for normal electrolysis. A mathematical model derived for hydrogen isotope separation by bipolar electrolysis, i.e., for a square cascade, accurately describes the results for protium-tritium separation in two laboratory scale, multistage experiments with countercurrent electrolyte flow; the measured tiritum concentration gradient through the cascade agreed with the calculated values

  14. Groundwater Monitoring and Tritium-Tracking Plan for the 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DB Barnett

    2000-08-31

    The 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS) is a drainfield which receives treated wastewater, occasionally containing tritium from treatment of Hanford Site liquid wastes at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Since operation of the SALDS began in December 1995, discharges of tritium have totaled {approx}304 Ci, only half of what was originally predicted for tritium quantity through 1999. Total discharge volumes ({approx}2.7E+8 L) have been commensurate with predicted volumes to date. This document reports the results of all tritium analyses in groundwater as determined from the SALDS tritium-tracking network since the first SALDS wells were installed in 1992 through July 1999, and provides interpretation of these results as they relate to SALDS operation and its effect on groundwater. Hydrologic and geochemical information are synthesized to derive a conceptual model, which is in turn used to arrive at an appropriate approach to continued groundwater monitoring at the facility.

  15. Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility, Building 205, Technical Area 16: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) was planned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to retain at Los Alamos National Laboratory the capability of repackaging small quantities of tritium to exacting specifications. Small quantities of tritium are required for energy research and development activities and for research on nuclear weapons test devices carried out as part of the laboratory mission. The WETF is an improved design proposed to replace an aging Los Alamos facility where tritium has been repackaged for many years. This Environmental Assessment evaluates the environmental consequences to be expected from operating the new facility, for which construction was completed in 1984, compared with those from continuing to operate the old facility. The document was prepared for compliance with NEPA. In operation, the WETF will incorporate state-of-the-art systems for containing tritium in glove boxes and capturing any tritium released into the glove box exhaust system and the laboratory atmosphere. Liquid discharges from the WETF would contain less than 1% of the tritium found in effluents from the present facility. Effluent streams would be surface discharges and would not enter the aquifer from which municipal water supplies are drawn. The quantity of solid radioactive waste generated at the WETF would be approximately the same as that generated at the present facility. The risk to the public from normal tritium-packaging operations would be significantly less from the WETF than from the present facility. The proposed action will reduce the adverse environmental impacts caused by tritium repackaging by substantially reducing the amount of tritium that escapes to the environment. 35 refs., 3 figs., 21 tabs

  16. On the conversion of tritium units to mass fractions for hydrologic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonestrom, David A.; Andraski, Brain J.; Cooper, Clay A.; Mayers, Charles J.; Michel, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    We develop a general equation for converting laboratory-reported tritium levels, expressed either as concentrations (tritium isotope number fractions) or mass-based specific activities, to mass fractions in aqueous systems. Assuming that all tritium is in the form of monotritiated water simplifies the derivation and is shown to be reasonable for most environmental settings encountered in practice. The general equation is nonlinear. For tritium concentrations c less than 4.5×1012 tritium units (TU) - i.e. specific tritium activities11 Bq kg-1 - the mass fraction w of tritiated water is approximated to within 1 part per million by w ≈ c×2.22293×10-18, i.e. the conversion is linear for all practical purposes. Terrestrial abundances serve as a proxy for non-tritium isotopes in the absence of sample-specific data. Variation in the relative abundances of non-tritium isotopes in the terrestrial hydrosphere produces a minimum range for the mantissa of the conversion factor of [2.22287; 2.22300].

  17. Radiological assessment of multilateral radioactive effluents in the Pacific Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The liquid effluent has been discharged from each nuclear fuel cycle facility in mainly industrially advanced nations with authorization. Since the safety assessment confirms that environmental impact from each facility would be small enough, it was not necessary to assess the effect of the multilateral radioactive effluents. But it will be necessary to quantify the radiological impact between plural countries due to the increase of interest to the global environment and of demand on nuclear energy in the world. In this study, the long-term and multilateral environmental radiological assessment from tritium discharge by effluents from nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the world was carried out. Then, collective and effective doses were evaluated in case of intake of marine products. Additionally, an assessment from the nuclear testing in the atmosphere was carried out. It was confirmed that LAMER could perform the radiological assessment of multilateral radioactive effluents. The LAMER calculation will assist the sustainable nuclear future. (author)

  18. Tritium accountancy in fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has clearly defined requirements for nuclear material control and accountability (MCA) of tritium whereas the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) does not since tritium is not a fissile material. MCA requirements are expected for tritium fusion machines and will be dictated by the host country or regulatory body where the machine is operated. Material Balance Areas (MBA) are defined to aid in the tracking and reporting of nuclear material movements and inventories. Material sub-accounts (MSA) are established along with key measurement points (KMP) to further subdivide a MBA to localize and minimize uncertainties in the inventory difference (ID) calculations for tritium accountancy. Fusion systems try to minimize tritium inventory which may require continuous movement of material through the MSA. The ability of making meaningful measurements of these material transfers is described in terms of establishing the MSA structure to perform and reconcile ID calculations. For fusion machines, changes to the traditional ID equation will be discussed which includes breeding, burn-up, and retention of tritium in the fusion device. The concept of 'net' tritium quantities consumed or lost in fusion devices is described in terms of inventory taking strategies and how it is used to track the accumulation of tritium in components or fusion machines. (authors)

  19. Tritium practices past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    History of the production and use of tritium, as well as handling techniques, are reviewed. Handling techniques first used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory made use of glass vacuum systems and relatively crude ion chambers for monitoring airborne activity. The first use of inert atmosphere glove boxes demonstrated that uptake through the skin could be a serious personnel exposure problem. Growing environmental concerns in the early 1970's resulted in the implementation by the Atomic Energy Commission of a new criteria to limit atmospheric tritium releases to levels as low as practicable. An important result of the new criteria was the development of containment and recovery systems to capture tritium rather than vent it to the atmosphere. The Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, Tritium Research Laboratory containment and decontamination systems are presented as a typical example of this technology. The application of computers to control systems is expected to provide the greatest potential for change in future tritium handling practices

  20. Tritium permeation, contamination and decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the grant-in-aid for scientific research on priority areas entitled 'frontiers of tritium researches toward fusion reactors', coordinated three research programs on the tritium permeation, contamination and decontamination have been conducted by the CO2 team. The results are summarized as follows: (1) Study for the development of the tritium permeation barrier was carried out. A ZrO2 film with a magnesium phosphate layer sintered on a SUS 430 steel plate showed excellent reduction in the hydrogen permeation. (2) The non-destructive method using an imaging plate was proposed to monitor tritium release from contaminated materials. The method was applied to SUS 316 steel and revealed that the tritium release from SUS 316 steel was diffusion-limited. (3) As for contamination-protection and decontamination techniques, improvement in the decontamination rate from SUS 316 steel was obtained by providing CrO2 coating. (J.P.N.)

  1. The tritium operations experience on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tritium gas system is administratively limited to 5 grains of tritium and provides the feedstock gas for the neutral beam and torus injection systems. Tritium operations on TFTR began with leak checking of gas handling systems, qualification of the gas injection systems, and high power plasma operations using using trace amounts of tritium in deuterium feedstock gas. Full tritium operation commenced with four highly diagnosed neutral beam pulses into a beamline calorimeter to verify planned tritium beam operating routines and to demonstrate the deuterium to tritium beam isotope exchange. Since that time, TFTR has successfully operated each of the twelve neutral beam ion sources in tritium during hundreds of tritium beam pulses and torus gas injections. This paper describes- the TFTR tritium gas handling systems and TFTR tritium operations of the gas injection systems and the neutral beam ion sources. Tritium accounting and accountability is discussed, including tritium retention issues of the torus limiters and beam impinged surfaces of the beamline components. Also included is tritium beam velocity analysis that compares the neutral beam extracted ion species composition for deuterium and tritium and that determines the extent of beam isotope exchange on subsequent deuterium and tritium beam pulses. The required modifications to TFTR operating routines to meet the US Department of Energy regulations for a low hazard nuclear facility and the problems encountered during initial tritium operations are described

  2. The tritium operations experience on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Halle, A.; Gentile, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Anderson, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tritium gas system is administratively limited to 5 grains of tritium and provides the feedstock gas for the neutral beam and torus injection systems. Tritium operations on TFTR began with leak checking of gas handling systems, qualification of the gas injection systems, and high power plasma operations using using trace amounts of tritium in deuterium feedstock gas. Full tritium operation commenced with four highly diagnosed neutral beam pulses into a beamline calorimeter to verify planned tritium beam operating routines and to demonstrate the deuterium to tritium beam isotope exchange. Since that time, TFTR has successfully operated each of the twelve neutral beam ion sources in tritium during hundreds of tritium beam pulses and torus gas injections. This paper describes- the TFTR tritium gas handling systems and TFTR tritium operations of the gas injection systems and the neutral beam ion sources. Tritium accounting and accountability is discussed, including tritium retention issues of the torus limiters and beam impinged surfaces of the beamline components. Also included is tritium beam velocity analysis that compares the neutral beam extracted ion species composition for deuterium and tritium and that determines the extent of beam isotope exchange on subsequent deuterium and tritium beam pulses. The required modifications to TFTR operating routines to meet the US Department of Energy regulations for a low hazard nuclear facility and the problems encountered during initial tritium operations are described.

  3. Tritium-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals broadly with tritium-surface interactions as they relate to a fusion power reactor enterprise, viz., the vacuum chamber, first wall, peripherals, pumping, fuel recycling, isotope separation, repair and maintenance, decontamination and safety. The main emphasis is on plasma-surface interactions and the selection of materials for fusion chamber duty. A comprehensive review of the international (particularly U.S.) research and development is presented based upon a literature review (about 1 000 reports and papers) and upon visits to key laboratories, Sandia, Albuquerque, Sandia, Livermore and EGβG Idaho. An inventory of Canadian expertise and facilities for RβD on tritium-surface interactions is also presented. A number of proposals are made for the direction of an optimal Canadian RβD program, emphasizing the importance of building on strength in both the technological and fundamental areas. A compendium of specific projects and project areas is presented dealing primarily with plasma-wall interactions and permeation, anti-permeation materials and surfaces and health, safety and environmental considerations. Potential areas of industrial spinoff are identified

  4. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described

  5. Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

    1980-10-01

    Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described.

  6. Development and Verification of Tritium Analyses Code for a Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2009-09-01

    . The amount of tritium in the product hydrogen was estimated to be approximately an order less than the gaseous effluent limit for tritium.

  7. Utility considerations for tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Southern Nuclear Company has a long-standing commitment to nuclear power and is interested in pursuing the possible use of one of its existing commercial reactors as an alternative for reinitiating the production of tritium to support the nation's defense program requirements. We understand that Congress and the administration agree on the need to replenish the nation's supply of tritium and that a number of production options are under consideration. This paper discusses the financial considerations, legal and regulatory considerations for the production of tritium utilizing a commercial power reactor

  8. Tritium monitor for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the design, operation, and performance of a flow-through ion-chamber instrument designed to measure tritium concentrations in air containing 13N, 16N, and 41Ar produced by neutrons generated by D-T fusion devices. The instrument employs a chamber assembly consisting of two coaxial ionization chambers. The inner chamber is the flow-through measuring chamber and the outer chamber is used for current subtraction. A thin wall common to both chambers is opaque to the tritium betas. Currents produced in the two chambers by higher energy radiation are automatically subtracted, leaving only the current due to tritium

  9. Tritium Elimination System Using Tritium Gas Oxidizing Bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to eliminate atmospheric tritium gas (HT) released from tritium handling apparatus, we proposed to use the HT oxidizing ability (hydrogenase enzyme) of bacterial strains isolated from surface soils instead of a high temperature precious metal catalyst. Among the isolated strains with high HT oxidation activity, several strains were selected to develop a tritium elimination (detritiation) system. Bioreactors were made of bacterial cells grown on agar medium on a cartridge filter and stored in a refrigerator until use. The detritiation ability of these bioreactors at room temperature was investigated during the intentional HT release experiments carried out in the Cassion Assembly for Tritium Safety Study (CATS) in TPL/JAERI. When HT contaminated air from the CATS was introduced into the biological detritiation system, in which three bioreactors were connected in series, 86% of HT in air was removed as tritiated water in these bioreactors at a flow rate of 100 cm3/min for 2 hours

  10. Process for conditioning tritium for final storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process for conditioning tritium for final storage a) in which the tritium is introduced into a zeolite matrix, b) the zeolite matrix is dehydrated at temperatures above 4000C and c) the tritium in vapour form is brought into contact with the zeolite matrix is characterized by the fact that after saturation of the zeolite matrix with tritium, the tritium in the zeolite matrix is enclosed by means of microwave irradiation. (orig.)

  11. Tritium production, recovery and application in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Soon-Hwan; Lee, Sook-Kyung; Kim, Kwang-Sin

    2009-01-01

    Four CANDU reactors have been operating at the site of Wolsong Nuclear Power Generation in Korea. The Wolsong tritium removal facility was constructed to reduce the tritium levels in heavy water systems. This facility was designed to process 100kg/h of tritiated heavy water feed and to produce 99% pure T(2). This recovered tritium will be made available for commercial applications. The initial phases on the tritium applications are made to establish the infrastructure and the tritium controls. PMID:19307127

  12. Study of dilution of effluent discharged through a sea outfall near Mangalore using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fate of effluent discharged into water bodies is a matter of concern from the point of view of environmental pollution. Radiotracer techniques have been successfully used to study the change in concentration of effluents while being mixed with large water bodies. The technique used is to add a known concentration of radioactive tracer into the effluent stream and to measure the dilutions at different locations near the effluent discharge point with radiation detectors. M/s Mangalore Chemicals and Fertilizers Ltd (MCF) at Mangalore on the west coast of India disposes off the treated and initially diluted effluent at the rate of about 360 m3/h into the sea near by through an outfall extending about 100 meters into the sea. The effluent mainly contains ammonia in the range of 40-50 ppm as the pollutant. It was desired to measure the extent of dilution occurring to the effluent at a few locations of known distances along the sea shore from the discharge point of the effluent. Radiotracers 82Br as ammonium bromide solution and tritium as tritiated water were employed for the study. The concentration measurement was done at site for 82Br and by estimation of samples in the laboratory in the case of tritium. Dilution of the order of 1000 was obtained at about 100 meters distance for a continuous injection of about 4 hours. (author). 3 tables, 3 figures

  13. Tritium Plasma Experiment Upgrade for Fusion Tritium and Nuclear Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Taylor, Chase N.; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Buchenauer, Dean A.

    2015-11-01

    The Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) is a unique high-flux linear plasma device that can handle beryllium, tritium, and neutron-irradiated plasma facing materials, and is the only existing device dedicated to directly study tritium retention and permeation in neutron-irradiated materials [M. Shimada et.al., Rev. Sci. Instru. 82 (2011) 083503 and and M. Shimada, et.al., Nucl. Fusion 55 (2015) 013008]. Recently the TPE has undergone major upgrades in its electrical and control systems. New DC power supplies and a new control center enable remote plasma operations from outside of the contamination area for tritium, minimizing the possible exposure risk with tritium and beryllium. We discuss the electrical upgrade, enhanced operational safety, improved plasma performance, and development of tritium plasma-driven permeation and optical spectrometer system. This upgrade not only improves operational safety of the worker, but also enhances plasma performance to better simulate extreme plasma-material conditions expected in ITER, Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), and Demonstration reactor (DEMO). This work was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, under the DOE Idaho Field Office contract number DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  14. Facility effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleckler, B.P.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the facility effluent monitoring programs and provides an evaluation of effluent monitoring data. These evaluations are useful in assessing the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control systems, as well as management practices.

  15. Tritium transport around nuclear faciliteis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport and cycling of tritium around nuclear facilities is reviewed with special emphasis on studies at the Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina. These studies have shown that the rate of deposition from the atmosphere, the site of deposition, and the subsequent cycling are strongly influenced by the compound with which the tritium is associated. Tritiated hydrogen is largely deposited in the soil, while tritiated water is deposited in the greatest quantity in the vegetation. Tritiated hydrogen is converted in the soil to tritiated water that leaves the soil slowly, through drainage and transpiration. Tritiated water deposited directly to the vegetation leaves the vegetation more rapidly after exposure. Only a small part of the tritium entering the vegetation becomes bound in organic molecules. However, it appears that the existence of soil organic compounds with tritium concentrations greater than the equilibrium concentration in the associated water can be explained by direct metabolism of tritiated hydrogen in vegetation. (J.P.N.)

  16. High-concentration tritium sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paglieri, S. N. (Stephen N.); Richmond, S. (Scott); Snow, R. C. (Ronny C.); Morris, J. S. (John S.); Tuggle, D. G. (Dale Glenn)

    2004-01-01

    A bi-layer device was fabricated and tested for the direct collection of electrons emitted by tritium beta decay. The sensor functions at high pressures and concentrations where previously no simple and cost effective direct measurement technique existed for tritium. A polished KOVAR{trademark} (Fe-Ni-Co alloy) rod was coated with a 1-{mu}m thick insulating layer of alumina using electron-beam evaporation, physical vapor deposition (PVD) of aluminum with oxygen dosing. The alumina deposition process was optimized to minimize pinholes and obtain a stable coating with high resistivity. The detector exhibited a nanoampere electrical response over a few decades of tritium concentration, up to pure tritium at 200 kPa. The sensor has been in service for several months now without showing signs of degradation and no discernible physical damage or change in efficiency or linearity has been observed.

  17. Tritium in fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When tritium is used in a fusion energy experiment or reactor, several implications affect and usually restrict the design and operation of the system and involve questions of containment, inventory, and radiation damage. Containment is expected to be particularly important both for high-temperature components and for those components that are prone to require frequent maintenance. Inventory is currently of major significance in cases where safety and environmental considerations limit the experiments to very low levels of tritium. Fewer inventory restrictions are expected as fusion experiments are placed in more-remote locations and as the fusion community gains experience with the use of tritium. However, the advent of power-producing experiments with high-duty cycle will again lead to serious difficulties based principally on tritium availability; cyclic operations with significant regeneration times are the principal problems

  18. Tritium transport around nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport and cycling of tritium around nuclear facilities is reviewed with special emphasis on studies at the Savannah River Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina. These studies have shown that the rate of deposition from the atmosphere, the site of deposition, and the subsequent cycling are strongly influenced by the compound with which the tritium is associated. Tritiated hydrogen is largely deposited in the soil, while tritiated water is deposited in the greatest quantity in the vegetation. Tritiated hydrogen is converted in the soil to tritiated water that leaves the soil slowly, through drainage and transpiration. Tritiated water deposited directly to the vegetation leaves the vegetation more rapidly after exposure. Only a small part of the tritium entering the vegetation becomes bound in organic molecules. However, it appears tht the existence of soil organic compounds with tritium concentrations greater than the equilibrium concentration in the associated water can be explained by direct metabolism of tritiated hydrogen in vegetation

  19. High-concentration tritium sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bi-layer device was fabricated and tested for the direct collection of electrons emitted by tritium beta decay. The sensor functions at high pressures and concentrations where previously no simple and cost effective direct measurement technique existed for tritium. A polished KOVAR(trademark) (Fe-Ni-Co alloy) rod was coated with a 1-μm thick insulating layer of alumina using electron-beam evaporation, physical vapor deposition (PVD) of aluminum with oxygen dosing. The alumina deposition process was optimized to minimize pinholes and obtain a stable coating with high resistivity. The detector exhibited a nanoampere electrical response over a few decades of tritium concentration, up to pure tritium at 200 kPa. The sensor has been in service for several months now without showing signs of degradation and no discernible physical damage or change in efficiency or linearity has been observed.

  20. Overview of tritium: characteristics, sources, and problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, S; Momoshima, N

    1993-12-01

    Tritium has certain characteristics that present unique challenges for dosimetry and health-risk assessment. For example, in the gas form, tritium can diffuse through almost any container, including those made of steel, aluminum, and plastics. In the oxide form, tritium can generally not be detected by commonly used survey instruments. In the environment, tritium can be taken up by all hydrogen-containing molecules, distributing widely on a global scale. Tritium can be incorporated into humans through respiration, ingestion, and diffusion through skin. Its harmful effects are observed only when it is incorporated into the body. Several sources contribute to the inventory of tritium in our environment. These are 1) cosmic ray interaction with atmospheric molecules; 2) nuclear reactions in the earth's crust; 3) nuclear testing in the atmosphere during the 1950s and 1960s; 4) continuous release of tritium from nuclear power plants and tritium production facilities under normal operation; 5) incidental releases from these facilities; and 6) consumer products. An important future source will be nuclear fusion facilities expected to be developed for the purpose of electricity generation. The principal health physics problems associated with tritium are 1) the determination of the parameters for risk estimation with further reduction of their uncertainties (e.g., relative biological effectiveness and dose-rate dependency); 2) risk estimation from complex exposures to tritium in gas form, tritium in oxide form, tritium surface contamination, and other tritium-contaminated forms, with or without other ionizing radiations and/or nonionizing radiations; 3) the dose contributions of elemental tritium in the lung and from its oxidized tritium in the gastrointestinal tract; 4) prevention of tritium (in oxide form) intake and enhancement of tritium (oxide form) excretion from the human body; 5) precise health effects information for low-level tritium exposure; and 6) public

  1. Tritium pellet injector for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) phase. The existing TFTR deuterium pellet injector (DPI) has been modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed to provide pellets ranging from 3.3 to 4.5 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single-stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller. The new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed, and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellet. Results of the limited testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI is being installed on TFTR to support the D-D run period in 1992. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and secondary tritium containment systems and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability

  2. Tritium pellet injector for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium pellet injector (TPI) for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) will provide a tritium pellet fueling capability with pellet speeds in the 1- to 3-km/s range for the TFTR deuterium-tritium (D-T) phase. The existing TFTR deuterium pellet injector (DPI) has been modified at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide a four-shot, tritium-compatible, pipe-gun configuration with three upgraded single-stage pneumatic guns and a two-stage light gas gun driver. The TPI was designed to provide pellets ranging from 3.3 to 4.5 mm in diameter in arbitrarily programmable firing sequences at speeds up to approximately 1.5 km/s for the three single- stage drivers and 2.5 to 3 km/s for the two-stage driver. Injector operation is controlled by a programmable logic controller. A new pipe-gun injector assembly was installed in the modified DPI guard vacuum box, and modifications were made to the internals of the DPI vacuum injection line, including a new pellet diagnostics package. Assembly of these modified parts with existing DPI components was then completed, and the TPI was tested at ORNL with deuterium pellets. Results of the limited testing program at ORNL are described. The TPI is being installed on TFTR to support the D-D run period in 1992. In 1993, the tritium pellet injector will be retrofitted with a D-T fuel manifold and secondary tritium containment systems and integrated into TFTR tritium processing systems to provide full tritium pellet capability

  3. Obtaining polyacrylic acid labelled with tritium and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The polyacrylic hydrogels are a technological alternative for the storage of tritium liquid wastes with low and intermediate activity. β radiation emitted by tritium produces destructive radiolytic processes in the polymer networks. These processes can be studied by radiometric techniques using radioisotope labelled compounds or by spectrophotometrical methods by determining the spectral isotopic effects in the IR range. In this work, a method of preparation of polyacrylic acid labelled with tritium (T) and deuterium (D) in α) - positions is presented. The α - T polyacrylic acid has been obtained by radiopolymerization of 30% aqueous solution of acrylic acid which contains α-T sodium acrylate as tracer. The activity concentration was 1mCi/ml. The deuterium labelled polymer was obtained by radiopolymerization of 30% aqueous solution of α - D acrylic acid with an absorbed dose rate of 0.3 Mrad/h from a 60Co γ source. The integral absorbed dose was 0.4 Mrad at room temperature. The labelled monomers were synthesized by heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation (Pd/C catalyst) of αBr acrylic acid in the presence of Cu 2+ ions as homopolymerization inhibitors. The brominated compound was obtained by reaction of addition of Br2 to the acrylic acid in chloroform solution. (authors)

  4. Tritium concentrations in tree ring cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of tritium (tissue bound tritium; TBT) concentration in tree rings are presented and discussed. Such measurement is expected to provide a useful means of estimating the tritium level in the environment in the past. The concentration of tritium bound in the tissue (TBT) in a tree ring considered to reflect the environmental tritium level in the area at the time of the formation of the ring, while the concentration of tritium in the free water in the tissue represents the current environmental tritium level. First, tritium concentration in tree ring cellulose sampled from a cedar tree grown in a typical environment in Fukuoka Prefecture is compared with the tritium concentration in precipitation in Tokyo. Results show that the year-to-year variations in the tritium concentration in the tree rings agree well with those in precipitation. The maximum concentration, which occurred in 1963, is attibuted to atmospheric nuclear testing which was performed frequently during the 1961 - 1963 period. Measurement is also made of the tritium concentration in tree ring cellulose sampled from a pine tree grown near the Isotope Center of Kyushu University (Fukuoka). Results indicate that the background level is higher probably due to the release of tritium from the facilities around the pine tree. Thus, measurement of tritium in tree ring cellulose clearly shows the year-to-year variation in the tritium concentration in the atmosphere. (N.K.)

  5. Multiple-pass photoreactor for laser isotope separation of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As much as 10/sup 6/ Ci of tritium is expected to be released annually in the effluent water from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant that will be constructed in the next ten years in Japan. While many conventional hydrogen isotope separation processes are considered for the recovery of this tritium, laser isotope separation is believed in principle to have the advantage for this application, since the energy required for separation is directly related to the laser beam absorption by tritiated molecules present in the ppm level, while major untritiated molecules are unaffected. Tritium isotope separation by CO/sub 2/ laser-induced multiphoton dissociation was first demonstrated by the author's group, and the selectivity increased dramatically afterward. Among the several working substances we found, chlorotetrafluoroethane was found to yield very high T/H selectivity and low dissociation threshold. A new continuous-flow photoreactor with multiple-beam reflection was designed for this molecule. The design procedure of this photoreactor was experimentally validated

  6. Behavior of environmental carbon-14 and tritium in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 14C activity in plants began to rise appreciably above normal in 1957, and the level rose almost linearly with the rate of 7% per year to the level in 1959. Steep increase of the level to a peak in 1963, between 85% and 90% above normal, shows the effect of large scale nuclear explosions through the end of 1962. Liquid scintillation counting was used as a sensitive assay method of 14C and 3H. For 14C determination, the naturally incorporated 14C into alcohol and essential oils (thymol, menthol and lemongrass oil) and used, and water samples were used for 3H measurement. The total amount 65 x 1027 of 14C atoms has been produced in nuclear tests, and this amount is about 3% of the total amount of 14C in nature. The 3H concentration in rivers, streams and ponds decreased exponentially from 600 pCi/l in 1967 to 150 pCi/l in 1972, with the half life of 2.5yr. The difference of the 3H concentration in surface water according to the sampling locations implies geographical and meteorological variations in fallout 3H level. It is said conclusively that environmental waters in Japan have not been influenced by the discharge effluent of the facilities with regard to tritium contamination and that tritium content in precipitation still play an important role in reflecting annual variation of tritium concentration to surface waters. (J.P.N.)

  7. Tritium issues for realization of a DT fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A trend of studies of production and consumption of tritium is described. Realization of DT fusion reactor is discussed by tritium balance obtained from the above studies. It consists of introduction, tritium introduced into plasma vessel, tritium inventory in plasma vessel, tritium loss at fueling cycle system, tritium breeding and loss in blanket system, tritium balance in DT fusion reactor and summary. Investigation of development of external tritium resources has to be started. Tritium flow in DT fusion reactor, comparison of tritium inventory in fusion reactor, schematic diagram of tritium behavior in plasma vessel, change of overall burning efficiency and overall plasma generation rate, tritium inventory in re-deposition layer, effects of recovery efficiency of tritium from re-deposition layer, various breeding efficiencies in solid blanket, tritium flow in inertial confinement reactor with first wall, a tabular comparison of tritium balance calculation values, and comparison between tritium production methods are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  8. Metabolic models for tritium dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium (3H or T) is the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, which is produced by both natural, and man made sources. Tritium has a small relative natural abundance compared to hydrogen and deuterium (D). As was assessed by the United Nations scientific committee the contribution of cosmogenic tritium to annual effective dose in human is very small, only about 0.01 μSv (UNSCEAR, 2000). In case of heavy water reactors annual tritium doses for critical groups are also very small but theoretically could reach values of several μSv. In this case professionally exposed personnel could be exposed to tritium doses of some mSv. According to these considerations environmental and dosimetric aspects of this radionuclide are of special concern for health physicists. Tritium dose assessment methodologies have special particularities because hydrogen is a chemical element with an important metabolic role in the human body. Operating experience to date of CANDU reactors has indicated that the major contributor to the internal dose of professionally exposed people is the tritiated heavy water (DTO). DTO, like the tritiated water HTO, is assumed to be uniformly mixed with body water pool and reaching equilibrium immediately after the intake. All the statements in this paper related to HTO dosimetry are also considered valid in case of DTO. The results of the computations performed with different retention functions corresponding to different compartment models are presented. The differences between the models due to OBT (Organically Bound Tritium) contribution are 5.6% for two- compartment model and 13% for three-compartment Dunford - Johnson model, respectively. In practice the contribution of OBT is considered to be about 10%. (authors)

  9. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements

  10. A safety review of the NRU effluent heat recovery project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRU effluent heat recovery project diverts heated effluent water from the NRU process effluent weir and distributes the water for various heating applications in both the inner and active area at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL). The dominant hazard of the system operation is from leakage of tritiated heavy water from the reactor heavy water system into the light water system and the subsequent contamination of the steam system. Protective features include continuous leakage monitoring and automatic isolation of the recovery system. Modelling of the worst case accident, predicts a dose equivalent from tritium in steam humidification of about 26 mrem (260 μSv). The operation of the heat recovery project does not present an unacceptable risk to CRNL personnel

  11. TRITIUM PERMEATION AND TRANSPORT IN THE GASOLINE PRODUCTION SYSTEM COUPLED WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS (HTGRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Mike Patterson

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes scoping analyses on tritium behaviors in the HTGR-integrated gasoline production system, which is based on a methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) plant. In this system, the HTGR transfers heat and electricity to the MTG system. This system was analyzed using the TPAC code, which was recently developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The global sensitivity analyses were performed to understand and characterize tritium behaviors in the coupled HTGR/MTG system. This Monte Carlo based random sampling method was used to evaluate maximum 17,408 numbers of samples with different input values. According to the analyses, the average tritium concentration in the product gasoline is about 3.05×10-3 Bq/cm3, and 62 % cases are within the tritium effluent limit (= 3.7x10-3 Bq/cm3[STP]). About 0.19% of released tritium is finally transported from the core to the gasoline product through permeations. This study also identified that the following four parameters are important concerning tritium behaviors in the HTGR/MTG system: (1) tritium source, (2) wall thickness of process heat exchanger, (3) operating temperature, and (4) tritium permeation coefficient of process heat exchanger. These four parameters contribute about 95 % of the total output uncertainties. This study strongly recommends focusing our future research on these four parameters to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate tritium permeation into the gasol ine product. If the permeation barrier is included in the future study, the tritium concentration will be significantly reduced.

  12. Distillation and measurement of two forms of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two forms of tritium of HTO, free water tritium and bound tritium, exist in the environment. A method was introduced to acquire free water tritium by 8 hour's distilling at 130 degree C and collect bound tritium by oxidative 4 minute's burning at 850 degree C. Methods of measuring two forms of tritium by liquid scintillometer were also discussed

  13. Tritium in the environment. Knowledge synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report first presents the nuclear and physical-chemical properties of tritium and addresses the notions of bioaccumulation, bio-magnification and remanence. It describes and comments the natural and anthropic origins of tritium (natural production, quantities released in the environment in France by nuclear tests, nuclear plants, nuclear fuel processing plants, research centres). It describes how tritium is measured as a free element (sampling, liquid scintillation, proportional counting, enrichment method) or linked to organic matter (combustion, oxidation, helium-3-based measurement). It discusses tritium concentrations noticed in different parts of the environment (soils, continental waters, sea). It describes how tritium is transferred to ecosystems (transfer of atmospheric tritium to ground ecosystems, and to soft water ecosystems). It discusses existing models which describe the behaviour of tritium in ecosystems. It finally describes and comments toxic effects of tritium on living ground and aquatic organisms

  14. Recommended radiological controls for tritium operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This informal report presents recommendations for an adequate radiological protection program for tritium operations. Topics include hazards analysis, facility design, personnel protection equipment, training, operational procedures, radiation monitoring, to include surface and airborne tritium contamination, and program management

  15. Oxides as barriers to tritium permeation in steam generators and tritium content in CTR coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary release of tritium from a fusion reactor complex into the environment is via the steam generator system. Tritium in the coolant can permeate through the heat exchanger into the steam cycle, and is trapped in the steam as HTO. Subsequent recovery of tritium from the steam is impractical. The amount of tritium that permeates into the steam cycle will depend on the concentration of tritium in the coolant, or more significantly the amount of tritium that can be allowed in the coolant will depend on the rate of tritium permeation that can be tolerated

  16. TRICICLO/PB. A computational tool modelling dynamic tritium transfers at HCPB demo blankets systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    lay-out (by-passing or not PCS), (ii) use of tritium control solution at BB design level (eg. anti-permeation barrier), (iii) selection of system processing variables (ex. purge flowing velocities) and (iv) external effluents inputs for PC chemistry control. Global tuning of a complete set of process parameters is accomplished through an ad-hoc block diagram dynamic modelling tool (TRICICLO/PB). Visual realizations of the multiparametrical runs and optimizations for this coupled non-linear problem are given. (orig.)

  17. Linear accelerator for tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years now, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been working to develop a conceptual design of a facility for accelerator production of tritium (APT). The APT accelerator will produce high energy protons which will bombard a heavy metal target, resulting in the production of large numbers of spallation neutrons. These neutrons will be captured by a low-Z target to produce tritium. This paper describes the latest design of a room-temperature, 1.0 GeV, 100 mA, cw proton accelerator for tritium production. The potential advantages of using superconducting cavities in the high-energy section of the linac are also discussed and a comparison is made with the baseline room-temperature accelerator. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  18. Linear accelerator for tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years now, Los Alamos National Laboratory has been working to develop a conceptual design of a facility for accelerator production of tritium (API). The APT accelerator will produce high energy protons which will bombard a heavy metal target, resulting in the production of large numbers of spallation neutrons. These neutrons will be captured by a low-Z target to produce tritium. This paper describes the latest design of a room-temperature, 1.0 GeV, 100 mA, cw proton accelerator for tritium production. The potential advantages of using superconducting cavities in the high-energy section of the linac are also discussed and a comparison is made with the baseline room-temperature accelerator

  19. Tritium processing using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.I. duPont de Nemours and Company is commissioned by the US Department of Energy to operate the Savannah River Plant and Laboratory. The primary purpose of the plant is to produce radioactive materials for national defense. In keeping with current technology, new processes for the production of tritium are being developed. Three main objectives of this new technology are to ease the processing of, ease the storage of, and to reduce the operating costs of the tritium production facility. Research has indicated that the use of metal hydrides offers a viable solution towards satisfying these objectives. The Hydrogen and Fuels Technology Division has the responsibility to conduct research in support of the tritium production process. Metal hydride technology and its use in the storage and transportation of hydrogen will be reviewed

  20. Tritium calorimeter setup and operation

    CERN Document Server

    Rodgers, D E

    2002-01-01

    The LBNL tritium calorimeter is a stable instrument capable of measuring tritium with a sensitivity of 25 Ci. Measurement times range from 8-hr to 7-days depending on the thermal conductivity and mass of the material being measured. The instrument allows accurate tritium measurements without requiring that the sample be opened and subsampled, thus reducing personnel exposure and radioactive waste generation. The sensitivity limit is primarily due to response shifts caused by temperature fluctuation in the water bath. The fluctuations are most likely a combination of insufficient insulation from ambient air and precision limitations in the temperature controller. The sensitivity could probably be reduced to below 5 Ci if the following improvements were made: (1) Extend the external insulation to cover the entire bath and increase the top insulation. (2) Improve the seal between the air space above the bath and the outside air to reduce evaporation. This will limit the response drift as the water level drops. (...

  1. Modeling Tritium Life cycle in Nuclear Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mathematical development of a tritium model for nuclear power plants is presented. The model requires that the water and tritium material balance be satisfied throughout normal operations and shutdown. The model results obtained at the time of publishing include the system definitions and comparison of the model predictions of tritium generations compared to the observed plant data of the Braidwood station. A scenario that models using ion exchange resin to remove coolant boron demonstrates the tritium concentration levels are manageable. (authors)

  2. Conceptual Design of Tritium Extraction System

    OpenAIRE

    Miral Thakker, Prof.Amar vaghela

    2012-01-01

    The first generation of fusion reactors will use deuterium and tritium as fuel. Since tritium is not available in nature, it must be produced in the fusion reactor blanket which surrounds the plasma zone. Tritium extraction facility has been designed and fabricated. Calibration procedure has been performed to determine tritium losses, if any during the extraction. Lithium compounds were irradiated using Am-Be neutron source. Out of pile extraction from neutron irradiated lithium compounds was...

  3. Toxicity and dosimetry of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium doses to the general public are very low (currently about 0.2 μSv per year). Radiation doses from tritium to members of the public living in the vicinity of a CANDU power station are higher but rarely exceed 20 μSv per year or 1% of normal exposures to radiation from all natural sources, but doses to some radiation workers can approach ten mSv per year. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta rays varies appreciably depending upon the biological endpoint. Observed RBE values at low doses and low dose-rates are usually about 2 to 3 when tritium beta rays are compared to 60Co gamma rays but are closer to 1 than to 2 when compared to 200 kVp X-rays. This conclusion is supported by microdosimetric considerations of the quality of tritium beta rays, 60Co gamma rays and X-rays. Since X-rays have traditionally been accepted as reference radiation by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, it seems reasonable that the quality factor (Q) assigned to tritium beta rays should be close to one. Recommended procedures in Canada for estimation of effective dose equivalents from exposures to HTO and HT assume that Q = 1 and that body water represents 67% of the mass of soft tissue; they take into account conversions of HTO to appear to be reasonable for radiation protection purposes when the source of exposure is HTO or HT, but will not be adequate for exposures to other tritiated compounds. (modified author abstract) (137 refs., 11 figs., 12 tabs.)

  4. Study of the {sup 60}Co speciation in the aqueous radioactive waste of the la Hague nuclear reprocessing plant; environmental behaviour after discharges in the waters of the channel; Etude de la speciation du {sup 60}Co dans les effluents de l'usine de retraitement de combustibles irradies de la Hague; devenir apres rejet dans les eaux de la Manche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudaire, J.M

    1999-07-01

    {sup 60}Co is produced as an activation product and is present in the low-level aqueous radioactive waste released from the La Hague plant. At present, the concentration in the sea (non filtered at 0.45 {mu}m) at the Goury site are close to or even below, the detection limit: 0.2 mBq.l{sup -1}. The {sup 60}Co speciation depends on the type of effluent considered: in the effluent A ('active'), the cobalt is in the form of a stable trivalent complex; in the effluent V (to be checked), the cobalt is in majority (50% of the activity release) in the form of particles (>0.45 {mu}m), and then in the form of two soluble species: ionic divalent (Co{sup 2+}) and some stable complexes. The evolution of the reprocessing techniques used does not affect the speciation. So, since the nuclear reprocessing plant started at the La Hague plant in 1966, the chemical species discharged in the sea shows time variation related to the evolution of the type of effluent discharged. Thus, since 1994, the particles of cobalt are the main species discharged in the Channel (the V effluents represent more than 85% of the total {sup 60}Co activity released). The effect of instantaneous dilution into the marine conditions involving a variation of pH, oxido-reduction, ionic strength, a gradient of salinity, does not interfere with the evolution of the chemical species discharged. Nevertheless, during the discharge of the V effluent, the main constituents of the sea water (Mg{sup 2+} and Ca{sup 2+}) go through a precipitation. This comes with the coprecipitation of the ion Co{sup 2+} and with the particles of cobalt (complexes are not affected), and it can be responsible for an increase in the concentration in the particles. The chemical behaviour of the cobalt in the Channel is different from those of conservative element such as antimony. The ionic cobalt and the particles have a small dispersion in the water (cobalt has a very high particle/dissolved distribution factor, it is a non

  5. Tritium oxidation and exchange: preliminary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiological hazard resulting from an exposure to either tritium oxide or tritium gas is discussed and the factors contributing to the hazard are presented. From the discussion it appears that an exposure to tritium oxide vapor is 104 to 105 times more hazardous than exposure to tritium gas. Present and future sources of tritium are briefly considered and indicate that most of the tritium has been and is being released as tritium oxide. The likelihood of gaseous releases, however, is expected to increase in the future, calling to task the present general release assumption that 100% of all tritium released is as oxide. Accurate evaluation of the hazards from a gaseous release will require a knowledge of the conversion rate of tritium gas to tritium oxide. An experiment for determining the conversion rate of tritium gas to tritium oxide is presented along with some preliminary data. The conversion rates obtained for low initial concentrations (10-4 to 10-1 mCi/ml) indicate the conversion may proceed more rapidly than would be expected from an extrapolation of previous data taken at higher concentrations

  6. Tritium oxidation and exchange: preliminary studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J. E.; Easterly, C. E.

    1978-05-01

    The radiological hazard resulting from an exposure to either tritium oxide or tritium gas is discussed and the factors contributing to the hazard are presented. From the discussion it appears that an exposure to tritium oxide vapor is 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 5/ times more hazardous than exposure to tritium gas. Present and future sources of tritium are briefly considered and indicate that most of the tritium has been and is being released as tritium oxide. The likelihood of gaseous releases, however, is expected to increase in the future, calling to task the present general release assumption that 100% of all tritium released is as oxide. Accurate evaluation of the hazards from a gaseous release will require a knowledge of the conversion rate of tritium gas to tritium oxide. An experiment for determining the conversion rate of tritium gas to tritium oxide is presented along with some preliminary data. The conversion rates obtained for low initial concentrations (10/sup -4/ to 10/sup -1/ mCi/ml) indicate the conversion may proceed more rapidly than would be expected from an extrapolation of previous data taken at higher concentrations (10/sup -1/ to 10/sup 2/ mCi/ml).

  7. 10 CFR 30.55 - Tritium reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tritium reports. 30.55 Section 30.55 Energy NUCLEAR..., Inspections, Tests, and Reports § 30.55 Tritium reports. (a)-(b) (c) Except as specified in paragraph (d) of this section, each licensee who is authorized to possess tritium shall report promptly to...

  8. Tritium turnover in succulent plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of turnover rates for tissue free water tritium (TFWT) and tissue bound tritium (TBT) were carried out in three succulent plants, Opuntia sp., E. Trigona and E. Mili using tritiated water as tracer. The estimated half-times were 52, 57.5 and 80 days for TFWT and 212, 318 and 132 days for TBT in the stems of the above plants respectively. Opuntia sp. showed significant incorporation of TBT, 10% of TFWT on weight basis, while the other two plants showed lesser incorporation, 2-3% of TFWT. However, the leaves of E. Mili indicated the same level of fixation of TBT as the stem of Opuntia sp. (author)

  9. Reactions of atomic tritium with glucosamine and amino acids: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions of amino acids (glycine and serine) and amino sugar (glucosamine) with atomic tritium generated by thermal dissociation of molecular tritium on a tungsten filament was studied. A frozen aqueous solutions and a freeze-dried mixture of these compounds was bombarded with tritium atoms in a special vacuum unit. The relative yield of the labeled compounds was determined as influenced by the reaction conditions (residual pressure in the system and bombardment time) and target type (frozen solution and freeze-dried mixture). Formation of labeled products is almost independent of the tritium pressure. The ratio of the formation rates of labeled serine and glycine in the frozen solution and freeze-dried mixture bombarded with atomic tritium for 45-270 s was 1.66 ± 0.15 and 1.44 ± 0.13, respectively. At shorter reaction time (15 s), the ratio increases to 3.5 ± 0.2 and 2.0 ± 0.4, respectively. The formation rate of [3H]glucosamine in the mixture is higher at a shorter bombardment time. The radioactivity ratio of labeled glucosamine and glycine formed in frozen solutions and freeze-dried mixture in 15 s was 26.0 ± 2.3 and 6.8 ± 0.6, respectively. At longer reaction time, the relative yield of [3H]glucosamine sharply decreases owing to stronger radiolysis of labeled glucosamine on exposure to atomic tritium

  10. Tritium processing in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium retention analysis and tritium concentration measurement have been made during the large Tokamak JT-60U deuterium operations. This work has been carried out to evaluate the tritium retention for graphite tiles inside the vacuum vessel and tritium release characteristics in the tritium cleanup operations. JT-60U has carried out D-D experiments since July 1991. In the deuterium operations during the first two years, about 1.7 x 1019 D-D fusion neutrons were produced by D (d, p) T reactions in plasma, which are expected to produce ∼31 GBq of tritium. The tritium produced is evacuated by a pumping system. A part of tritium is, however, trapped in the graphite tiles. Several sample tiles were removed from the vessel and the retained tritium Distribution in the tiles was measured using a liquid scintillator. The results of poloidal distribution showed that the tritium concentration in the divertor tiles was higher than that in the first wall tiles and it peaked in the tiles between two strike points of divertor magnetic lines. Tritium concentration in the exhaust gas from the vessel have also been measured with an ion chamber during the tritium cleanup operations with hydrogen divertor discharges and He-GDC. Total of recovered tritium during the cleanup operations was ∼ 7% of that generated. The results of these measurements showed that the tritium of 16-23 GBq still remained in the graphite tiles, which corresponded to about 50-70% of the tritium generated in plasma. The vessel is ventilated during the in-vessel maintenance works, then the atmosphere is always kept lower than the legal concentration guide level of 0.7 Bq/cm3 for radiation work permit requirements. (author)

  11. Tritium monitoring in environment at ICIT Tritium Separation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Cryogenic Pilot is an experimental project developed within the national nuclear energy research program, which is designed to develop the required technologies for tritium and deuterium separation by cryogenic distillation of heavy water. The process used in this installation is based on a combination between liquid-phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) and cryogenic distillation. Basically, there are two ways that the Cryogenic Pilot could interact with the environment: by direct atmospheric release and through the sewage system. This experimental installation is located 15 km near the region biggest city and in the vicinity - about 1 km, of Olt River. It must be specified that in the investigated area there is an increased chemical activity; almost the entire Experimental Cryogenic Pilot's neighborhood is full of active chemical installations. This aspect is really essential for our study because the sewerage system is connected with the other three chemical plants from the neighborhood. For that reason we progressively established elements of an environmental monitoring program well in advance of tritium operation in order to determine baseline levels. The first step was the tritium level monitoring in environmental water and wastewater of industrial activity from neighborhood. In order to establish the base level of tritium concentration in the environment around the nuclear facilities, we investigated the sample preparation treatment for different types of samples: onion, green beams, grass, apple, garden lettuce, tomato, cabbage, strawberry and grapes. We used azeotropic distillation of all types of samples, the carrier solvent being toluene from different Romanian providers. All measurements for the determination of environmental tritium concentration were performed using liquid scintillation counting (LSC), with the Quantulus 1220 spectrometer. (authors)

  12. Tritium Movement and Accumulation in the NGNP System Interface and Hydrogen Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirofumi Ohashi; Steven R. Sherman

    2007-06-01

    Tritium movement and accumulation in a Next Generation Nuclear Plant with a hydrogen plant using a high temperature electrolysis process and a thermochemical water splitting sulfur iodine process are estimated by the numerical code THYTAN as a function of design, operational, and material parameters. Estimated tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product and in process chemicals in the hydrogen plant of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant using the high temperature electrolysis process are slightly higher than the drinking water limit defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the limit in the effluent at the boundary of an unrestricted area of a nuclear plant as defined by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However, these concentrations can be reduced to within the limits through use of some designs and modified operations. Tritium concentrations in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant using the Sulfur-Iodine Process are significantly higher as calculated and are affected by parameters with large uncertainties (i.e., tritium permeability of the process heat exchanger, the hydrogen concentration in the heat transfer and process fluids, the equilibrium constant of the isotope exchange reaction between HT and H2SO4). These parameters, including tritium generation and the release rate in the reactor core, should be more accurately estimated in the near future to improve the calculations for the NGNP using the Sulfur-Iodine Process. Decreasing the tritium permeation through the heat exchanger between the primary and secondary circuits may be an an effective measure for decreasing tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product, the hydrogen plant, and the tertiary coolant.

  13. Enhancement of tritium concentrations on uptake by marine biota: experience from UK coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of tritium in sea water and marine biota as reported over the last ∼ 10 years from monitoring programmes carried out by this laboratory under contract to the UK Food Standards Agency are reviewed from three areas: near Cardiff; Sellafield; and Hartlepool. Near Cardiff, enhancement of concentration factors (CFs) above an a priori value of ∼ 1 have already been studied, and attributed to compounds containing organically bound tritium in local radioactive waste discharges. Further data for Cardiff up to 2006 are reported in this note. Up to 2001, CFs increased to values of more than ∼ 7000 in flounders and ∼ 4000 in mussels, but have subsequently reduced; this variability could be due to changes in the organic constitution of compounds discharged. Near Sellafield and Hartlepool, enhancements to the tritium concentration factor are observed but they are relatively small compared with those near Cardiff. Near Sellafield, plaice and mussels appear to have a CF for tritium of ∼ 10; in some cases concentrations of tritium in winkles are below detection limits and positively measured values indicate a CF of ∼ 3. The variation could be due to mechanisms of uptake by the different organisms. Near Hartlepool there were only a few cases where tritium was positively measured. These data give a value of ∼ 5 for the CF in plaice (on the basis of two samples); ∼ 15 in winkles (eight samples); and > 45 in mussels (two samples). Any differences between the behaviours at Sellafield and Hartlepool would need to be confirmed by improved measurements. Possible causes are the organic composition of the effluent and differences in environmental behaviour and uptake by organisms near the two sites. These potential causes need further investigation. It is emphasised that results from tritium analyses are heavily method dependent; thus comparison with results from other programmes needs to take this into account. Further, the results for enhancement of CF will

  14. The accelerator production of tritium - An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reliable supply of tritium is necessary to maintain the U.S. nuclear defense capability. Because tritium decays to 3He at the rate of 5.5% per year, it must be continually replenished. Since the shutdown of the last production reactor in 1988, tritium requirements have been met through reuse of tritium recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons. This is insufficient for future needs, requiring the U.S. Department of Energy to bring a new tritium production capability on-line by 2007

  15. Computer simulation of tritium removal facility design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a computer simulation of tritium diffusion out of molten salt is performed using COMSOL Multiphysics. The purpose of the simulation is to investigate the efficiency of the permeation window type tritium removal facility, which is proposed for tritium control in FHRs. The result of the simulation suggests a large surface area is one of the key issues in the design of the tritium removal facility, and the simple tube bundle concept is insufficient to provide the surface area needed for an efficient tritium removal process. (author)

  16. Tritium hazard via the ingestion pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classic methodology for estimating dose to man from environmental tritium ignores the fact that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs may be directly assimilated in the bound compartment of tissues without previous oxidation. We propose a four-compartment model that allows for the ability to input organically bound tritium in foodstuffs directly into the organic compartments of the model. We found that organically bound tritium in foodstuffs can increase the total body dose by a factor of 1.7 to 4.5 times the free body water dose alone, depending on the bound to loose ratio of tritium in the diet. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Sorption of tritium by modified natural aluminosilicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium sorption was studied using natural clays, as well as organic compounds intercalated into alumosilicate matrices, i.e. kaolinite and montmorillonite, to consider interaction of tritium-containing underground water with argillaceous geological barriers and potentiality of the water decontamination in terms of tritium. It was ascertained that montmorillonite samples modified by dodecylpyridinium bromide, dimethylsulfoxide and hydrazine-sulfate, as well as kaolinite samples modified by hydrazine-sulfate, feature the highest sorption capacity towards tritium. A mechanism of tritium sorption is suggested, which consists in its isotopic exchange for hydrogen atoms in organic and inorganic compounds containing unshared electron pairs

  18. EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON POLYMERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, E.; Fox, E.; Kane, M.; Staack, G.

    2011-01-07

    Effects of tritium gas exposure on various polymers have been studied over the last several years. Despite the deleterious effects of beta exposure on many material properties, structural polymers continued to be used in tritium systems. Improved understanding of the tritium effects will allow more resistant materials to be selected. Currently polymers find use mainly in tritium gas sealing applications (eg. valve stem tips, O-rings). Future uses being evaluated including polymeric based cracking of tritiated water, and polymer-based sensors of tritium.

  19. Total tritium measurement in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of tritium in the atmosphere is of strong interest wherever this radionuclide is used. Therefore, a method is proposed for the joint measurement of burnable tritium, independently from its physico-chemical form, and of tritiated water. The method consists of transforming the tritiated molecules of the gases present in the air volume into tritiated water by burning them together with a known quantity of hydrogen. The water vapor is condensed and added to a liquid scintillator. The scintillator is also able to dissolve conventional filters so that the tritium attached to particulate and concentrated on these filters can be jointly measured, as will be discussed in a future report. The overall detection limit of the method is approximately 64 Bq m-3 for a combustion period of 10 min (which corresponds to sampling an air volume of 15 L) and a counting period of 10 min. This limit, much lower than the derived air concentrations in the most unfavorable cases, allows the application of the method for safety purposes. Moreover, the method can be integrated into a general procedure for the measurement of tritium in different chemical forms, to be applied in case of necessity

  20. Weapons engineering tritium facility overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najera, Larry [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-20

    Materials provide an overview of the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) as introductory material for January 2011 visit to SRS. Purpose of the visit is to discuss Safety Basis, Conduct of Engineering, and Conduct of Operations. WETF general description and general GTS program capabilities are presented in an unclassified format.

  1. Extraction of tritium from ceramic breeder material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first generation of fusion reactors will use deuterium and tritium as fuel since this reaction takes place at relatively low temperature. Since tritium is not available in nature, it must be produced in the fusion reactor blanket which surrounds the plasma zone. The lithium bearing compound is available in plenty in earths crust and by absorbing neutron, lithium produces tritium by the reactions 6Li (n, α) T and 7Li (n, n'α) T. Natural lithium consists of 93% 7Li and the remaining 7% as 6Li. Since the inelastic scattering of 7Li with fast neutrons produces one tritium and one neutron, more than one tritium atom can be produced per neutron. Hence by suitably designing the lithium blanket, more than one tritium atom per fusion reaction can be produced. In the absence of thermonuclear reactions, the (D,T) neutrons which are energetic 14-MeV neutrons, are produced in the accelerator based neutron generators. In order to ensure that sufficient amount of tritium would be produced in the future fusion reactor blankets, experiments are carried out to irradiate the lithium assembly using the available neutron source and measurements are done to estimate the tritium breeding. Also, it is required to extract the tritium produced in the lithium blanket. This work consists of tritium breeding measurement technique and a design of tritium extraction system. (author)

  2. Tritium systems test assembly stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) was a facility dedicated to tritium technology Research and Development (R and D) primarily for future fusion power reactors. The facility was conceived in mid 1970's, operations commenced in early 1980's, stabilization and deactivation began in 2000 and were completed in 2003. The facility will remain in a Surveillance and Maintenance (S and M) mode until the Department of Energy (DOE) funds demolition of the facility, tentatively in 2009. A safe and stable end state was achieved by the TSTA Facility Stabilization Project (TFSP) in anticipation of long term S and M. At the start of the stabilization project, with an inventory of approximately 140 grams of tritium, the facility was designated a Hazard Category (HC) 2 Non-Reactor Nuclear facility as defined by US Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-1027-92 (1997). The TSTA facility comprises a laboratory area, supporting rooms, offices and associated laboratory space that included more than 20 major tritium handling systems. The project's focus was to reduce the tritium inventory by removing bulk tritium, tritiated water wastes, and tritium-contaminated high-inventory components. Any equipment that remained in the facility was stabilized in place. All of the gloveboxes and piping were rendered inoperative and vented to atmosphere. All equipment, and inventoried tritium contamination, remaining in the facility was left in a safe-and-stable state. The project used the End Points process as defined by the DOE Office of Environmental Management (web page http://www.em.doe.- gov/deact/epman.htmtlo) document and define the end state required for the stabilization of TSTA Facility. The End Points process added structure that was beneficial through virtually all phases of the project. At completion of the facility stabilization project the residual tritium inventory was approximately 3,000 curies, considerably less than the 1.6-gram threshold for a HC 3 facility. TSTA is now

  3. Tritium pellet injection sequences for TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium pellet injection into neutral deuterium, beam heated deuterium plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is shown to be an attractive means of (1) minimizing tritium use per tritium discharge and over a sequence of tritium discharges; (2) greatly reducing the tritium load in the walls, limiters, getters, and cryopanels; (3) maintaining or improving instantaneous neutron production (Q); (4) reducing or eliminating deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron production in nonoptimized discharges; and (5) generally adding flexibility to the experimental sequences leading to optimal Q operation. Transport analyses of both compression and full-bore TFTR plasmas are used to support the above observations and to provide the basis for a proposed eight-pellet gas gun injector for the 1986 tritium experiments

  4. Fusion tritium program in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fusion technology development program for tritium in the US is centered around the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Labortory. Objectives of this project are to develop and demonstrate the fuel cycle for processing the reactor exhaust gas (unburned deuterium and tritium plus impurities), and the necessary personnel and environemntal protection systems for the next generation of fusion devices. The TSTA is a full-scale system for an INTOR/ITER sized machine. That is, TSTA has the capacity to process tritium in a closed loop mode at the rate of 1 kg per day, requiring a tritium inventory of about 100 g. The TSTA program also interacts with all other tritium-related fusion technology programs in the US and all major programs abroad. This report is a summary of the results and interactions of the TSTA program since a previous summary was published and an overview of related tritium programs

  5. NDT and inspection of tritium removal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU heavy water reactors produce tritium in the moderator and coolant circuits through neutron absorption by the deuterium atoms in heavy water. The concentration of tritium, in the form of DTO molecules builds up slowly with time of reactor operation. A typical yearly production rate of tritium is 2400 curie for each megawatt of electricity produced and as a consequence, a 600 megawatt Candu reactor produces 1.4 million curie of tritium per year. Tritium decays to 3He, a non radioactive species, and has a half life of approximately 12 years. Both Ontario Hydro and AECL are constructing plants to remove tritium from heavy water to maintain the tritium concentration below the equilibrium value. This will result in lower radiation doses to operating personnel and reduce the level of radiation in any releases of heavy water to the environment

  6. Radiobiological characteristic of tritium-labelled lysine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on mice and rats injected with tritium-labeled lysine have revealed that one day after injection about 80% of the label was retained in organs and tissues as tissue-bound tritium. Retention curves for tritium in the body were decomposed into two exponentials. The biological half-lives of tritium-labeled lysine in various tissues exceed half-lives of other tritiated amino acids and of triated water. The average dose in different tissues following injection of tritiated lysine exceeds that from equal of tritium oxide (THO) by 1.5-8 times. Contribution of the tissue-bound tritium in dose is about 90%. radiobiological experiments showed strong genetic and citotoxic effects in male mice after injection of tritium-labeled lysine

  7. Development of online measurement system of tritium in out-of-pile tritium release experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is very important to accurately measure tritium concentration and morphology for mastering tritium release behavior of tritium production breeder and improving the performance of tritium production breeder in out-of-pile tritium release experiment. According to the characteristics of small flow of carrier gas, small quantity of gas and argon as carrier gas, based on the ionization chamber, the digital online tritium measurement system was developed. The sensitive volume of ionization chamber is 50 mL, the digital instrument can automatically obtain the tritium concentration, at the same time, process and display it. The results show that the saturated zone of ionization chamber is about 35 V in argon, and the detection limit is 3.7 × 107 Bq/m3, which is satisfactory for online tritium measurement in out-of-pile tritium release experiment. (authors)

  8. Tritium Burn-up Depth and Tritium Break-Even Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cheng-Yue; DENG Bai-Quan; HUANG Jin-Hua; YAN Jian-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    @@ Similarly to but quite different from the xenon poisoning effects resulting from fission-produced iodine during the restart-up process of a fission reactor, we introduce a completely new concept of the tritium burn-up depth and tritium break-even time in the fusion energy research area. To show what the least required amount of tritium storage is used to start up a fusion reactor and how long a time the fusion reactor needs to be operated for achieving the tritium break-even during the initial start-up phase due to the finite tritium breeding time that is dependent on the tritium breeder, specific structure of breeding zone, layout of coolant flow pipe, tritium recovery scheme, extraction process, the tritium retention of reactor components, unrecoverable tritium fraction in breeder, leakage to the inertial gas container, and the natural decay etc., we describe this new phenomenon and answer this problem by setting up and by solving a set of equations, which express a dynamic subsystem model of the tritium inventory evolution in a fusion experimental breeder (FEB). It is found that the tritium burn-up depth is 317g and the tritium break-even time is approximately 240 full power days for FEB designed detail configuration and it is also found that after one-year operation, the tritium storage reaches 1.18kg that is more than theleast required amount of tritium storage to start up three of FEB-like fusion reactors.

  9. Tritium safety of fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium systems of a nuclear fusion plant, using the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle, has to ensure tritium safety during plant operation, and activated/tritiated materials management, during plant decommissioning. Accidents resulting in tritium releases to the environment may occur. It is important, therefore, to minimize the mobile tritium inventory by means of an adequate design and optimization of the plant tritium-bearing systems. Furthermore, the behaviour of tritium in the environment must be accurately studied, in order to take into account its oxidation and absorption by different materials. An experimental tritium-breeding module of DEMO fusion reactor is now under development in Russia. We plan to test it in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The ceramic lithium orthosilicate will be used in it as tritium breeder. The Tritium Cycle System (TCS) will ensure tritium extracting and processing of gaseous mixtures containing tritium. The report contains the flow chart of the TCS using alloys producing hydrides. TCS assures highest possible autonomy and independence on ITER tritium plant at technological operations. The classification of the TCS modes of operation, adopted at the present stage of the module development, is described. The main initial events that may result in accidents are analysed. The maximum design accident and its consequences are considered. In particular, the maximum effective dose equivalent to the most exposed individual is calculated by means of the GEN II/FRAMES code. The flow sheet of technological operations at the maintenance and repair works and the System of Radiological Safety ensuring safety during these works is analyzed. Finally, some aspects of tritium decontamination from standpoint of waste handling are developed. In particular, material detritiation should be sufficient to allow clearance and recycling of less activated fusion materials. (orig.)

  10. 2001 Evaluation of Tritium Removal & Mitigation Technologies for Waste Water Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PENWELL, D.L.

    2001-06-01

    This report contains the 2001 biennial update evaluation of separation technologies and other mitigation techniques to control tritium in liquid effluents and groundwater at the Hanford site. A thorough literature review was completed, and national and international experts in the field of tritium separation and mitigation techniques were consulted. Current state-of-the-art technologies to address the control of tritium in wastewaters were identified and are described. This report was prepared to satisfy the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Tri-Party Agreement, Milestone M-29-O5H (Ecology, EPA, and DOE 1996). Tritium separation and isolation technologies are evaluated on a biennial basis to determine their feasibility for implementation for the control of Hanford site liquid effluents and groundwater to meet the US. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40 CFR 141.16, drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL) for tritium of 0.02 {mu} Ci/l ({approx}2 parts per quadrillion [10{sup -15}]) and/or DOE Order 5400.5 as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy The objectives of this evaluation were to (1) status the development of potentially viable tritium separations technologies with regard to reducing tritium concentrations in current Hanford site process waters and existing groundwater to MCL levels and (2) status control methods to prevent the flow of tritiated water at concentrations greater than the MCL to the environment. Current tritium releases are in compliance with applicable US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, and U.S. Department of Energy requirements under the Tri-Party Agreement. Advances in technologies for the separation of tritium from wastewater since the 1999 Hanford Site evaluation report include: (1) construction and testing of the Combined Industrial Reforming and Catalytic Exchange (CIRCE) Prototype Plant by Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL). The plant has a stage that uses

  11. Detritiation of Tritiated Effluent Gas and Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a demonstration scale equipment for treatment of tritium in off-gas, Pt/SDBC as oxidation catalyst and Zeolite 13X as adsorbent was charged in the beds, respectively. It was confirmed from the performance test that decontamination factor of the equipment showed more than 100 under the flow rate of off-gas of 90 l/hr and at the temperature of 65 ∼ 80 .deg. C. A small scale CECE process has been developed combining LPCE catalytic column with SPE (solid polymer electrolyte) electrolysis. The catalytic column was a trickle-bed type packed with the mixture of 1 wt% Pt/SDBC catalyst and 4 mm Dixon wire-mesh ring. The experimental results of the CECE process proved that the decontamination factor of 13 ∼ 20 under the operating conditions of the water of the 4 l/day and the effluent hydrogen gas of 16.2 mol/h. A design code of CECE process also developed which will be applied the tritium industry. An experimental method for the reduction of tritiated organic waste by using catalytic oxidation was tested in a heated catalytic reactor of 0.5 wt% Pd/Al2O3. The simulated organic liquid was converted to water over 99%. A gas chromatographic column material was developed for the separation of mixed hydrogen isotopes. 17 wt% Pd-Pt on alumina showed 90% separation efficiency at 77 % yield for the separation of 29.2 % D2-H2 gas mixture

  12. Procurement of tritium for fusion reactor. 2. Transportation of large amounts of tritium for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITER will require kilograms of tritium to be transferred before and after the tritium experiment starts from tritium supplying facilities abroad and/or domestic. Currently, a Zr-Co type transfer container developed in JAERI with a capacity of 25 g tritium is available for international shipping; however, it does not seem enough large for tritium transfer for ITER. This article discusses the technical issues involving in developing a transfer container with a large tritium capacity and regulations governing radio isotope transport containers. (author)

  13. Analysis on tritium permeation in tritium storage bed with gas flowing calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium permeation amount in a tritium storage bed with gas flowing calorimetric was evaluated under a condition of new operation mode for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). As a result, tritium permeation under the new operation mode was estimated to be about twice of that under the practical operation mode. This result show that it would be regardless in a view point of material control of tritium, however, it was suggested to be required additional tritium removal or evacuate system in a view points of safety control or performance of accountability or thermal insulating of the tritium storage bed. (author)

  14. Organically bound tritium level in vegetation at ICIT tritium removal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the impact of tritium on wild vegetation around ICIT we have monitored the tritium concentrations in precipitation, air, soil, grass and green wheat from a specific area near the tritium removal facility during vegetation periods in 2012-2013. The tissue free water tritium concentration showed the influence of tritium level in precipitation, with higher values during the summer (around 2 Bq l-1) and lower values during the autumn (around 1.3 Bq l-1). The same behavior was observed for the total organically bound tritium level. (author)

  15. INEEL Liquid Effluent Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, C.A.

    1997-06-01

    The INEEL contractors and their associated facilities are required to identify all liquid effluent discharges that may impact the environment at the INEEL. This liquid effluent information is then placed in the Liquid Effluent Inventory (LEI) database, which is maintained by the INEEL prime contractor. The purpose of the LEI is to identify and maintain a current listing of all liquid effluent discharge points and to identify which discharges are subject to federal, state, or local permitting or reporting requirements and DOE order requirements. Initial characterization, which represents most of the INEEL liquid effluents, has been performed, and additional characterization may be required in the future to meet regulations. LEI information is made available to persons responsible for or concerned with INEEL compliance with liquid effluent permitting or reporting requirements, such as the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Wastewater Land Application, Storm Water Pollution Prevention, Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures, and Industrial Wastewater Pretreatment. The State of Idaho Environmental Oversight and Monitoring Program also needs the information for tracking liquid effluent discharges at the INEEL. The information provides a baseline from which future liquid discharges can be identified, characterized, and regulated, if appropriate. The review covered new and removed buildings/structures, buildings/structures which most likely had new, relocated, or removed LEI discharge points, and at least 10% of the remaining discharge points.

  16. In-situ tritium borehole probe for measurement of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apparatus for measuring the in situ levels of tritium in ground water at depth in the earth. A tritium analyzer is made to fit in a sonde or probe which is placed in a borehole. This analyzer can perform a programmed cycle and has a sample intake to allow ambient water to enter; a reaction chamber; a drying chamber; an ion chamber; a cryogenic gas pump, and a spent capsule collection chamber. After the water sample is brought into the unit, it rises into the reaction chamber where it reacts with a preweighed quantity of calcium carbide in a capsule to yield acetylene. Next the acetylene vapor passes through the drying chamber to remove excess water and then flows into the evacuated ion chamber. Following this, the ion chamber is sealed off and a count of tritium beta decay events is started. Following the completion of the count, a valve is opened to remove the acetylene from the ion chamber with the cryogenic gas pump. The spent capsule containing the residue from the reaction is ejected into a collection chamber. Last, the holder for the preweighed calcium carbide capsule is refilled from a stock of such capsules in preparation for a new measurement cycle

  17. The Chalk River Tritium Extraction Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chalk River Tritium Extraction Plant for removal of tritium from heavy water is described. Tritium is present in the heavy water from research reactors in the form of DTO at a concentration in the range of 1-35 Ci/kg. It is removed by a combination of catalytic exchange to transfer the tritium from DTO to DT, followed by cryogenic distillation to separate and concentrate the tritium to T2. The tritium product is reacted with titanium and packaged for transportation and storage as titanium tritide. The plant processes heavy water at a rate of 25 kg/h and removes 80% of the tritium and 90% of the protium per pass. Catalytic exchange is carried out in the liquid phase using a proprietary wetproofed catalyst. The plant serves two roles in the Canadian fusion program: it produces pure tritium for use in fusion research and development, and it demonstrates on an industrial scale many of the tritium technologies that are common to the tritium systems in fusion reactors (author)

  18. Titanium for long-term tritium storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heung, L.K.

    1994-12-01

    Due to the reduction of nuclear weapon stockpile, there will be an excess of tritium returned from the field. The excess tritium needs to be stored for future use, which might be several years away. A safe and cost effective means for long term storage of tritium is needed. Storing tritium in a solid metal tritide is preferred to storing tritium as a gas, because a metal tritide can store tritium in a compact form and the stored tritium will not be released until heat is applied to increase its temperature to several hundred degrees centigrade. Storing tritium as a tritide is safer and more cost effective than as a gas. Several candidate metal hydride materials have been evaluated for long term tritium storage. They include uranium, La-Ni-Al alloys, zirconium and titanium. The criteria used include material cost, radioactivity, stability to air, storage capacity, storage pressure, loading and unloading conditions, and helium retention. Titanium has the best combination of properties and is recommended for long term tritium storage.

  19. Nuclear reactor effluent monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minns, J.L.; Essig, T.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Radiological environmental monitoring and effluent monitoring at nuclear power plants is important both for normal operations, as well as in the event of an accident. During normal operations, environmental monitoring verifies the effectiveness of in-plant measures for controlling the release of radioactive materials in the plant. Following an accident, it would be an additional mechanism for estimating doses to members of the general public. This paper identifies the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulatory basis for requiring radiological environmental and effluent monitoring, licensee conditions for effluent and environmental monitoring, NRC independent oversight activities, and NRC`s program results.

  20. Behaviour of tritium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: There is considerable interest in the behaviour of radionuclides of global character that may be released to the environment through the development of nuclear power. Tritium is of particular interest due to its direct incorporation into water and organic tissue. Although there has been a large decrease (more than ten times) in tritium concentration since the stopping of nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere, the construction in the near future of many water reactors and in the far future of fusion reactors could increase the present levels. Progress has been made during recent years in the assessment of tritium distribution, in detection methods and in biological studies While several meetings have given scientists an opportunity to present papers on tritium, no specific symposium on this topic has been organized by the IAEA since 1961. Thus the purpose of the meeting was to review recent advances and to report on the practical aspects of tritium utilization and monitoring. The symposium was jointly organized with OECD/NEA, in co-operation with the US Department of Energy and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Papers were presented on distribution of tritium, evaluation of future discharges, measurement of tritium, tritium in the aquatic environment, tritium in the terrestrial environment, tritium in man and monitoring of tritium Very interesting papers were given on distribution of tritium and participants got a good idea of the circulation of this radionuclide Some new data were provided on tritium pollution from luminous compounds and we learnt that the tritium release of the Swiss luminous compounds industry is of the same order of magnitude as the tritium release of Windscale. Projections indicate that, in the USA, the total quantity of tritium contained in discarded digital watches will be equal, approximately ten years in the future, to the release of nuclear power reactors Whereas nuclear reactor discharges are controlled there is no control

  1. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch: August 1994. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In August 1994, well point water and near-surface water samples were collected to further characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds in the Wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E at the Savannah River Plant. Well point samples were collected from seven locations and near-surface water samples were collected at four locations. Results of the August 1994 sampling event further support findings that tritium and volatile organic compounds are outcropping in the Wetlands near the old F-area effluent ditch. Four analytes (1,2-dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene, tritium, and vinyl chloride) were detected at least once at concentrations above the primary Drinking Water Standards or the Maximum Contaminant Levels. Five analytes (the above chemicals plus tetrachloroethylene) were detected at least once in the near-surface water samples at concentrations greater than the method detection limit

  2. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

  3. Radiological training for tritium facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835

  4. Development of a tritium monitor combined with an electrochemical tritium pump using a proton conducting oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection of low level tritium is one of the key issues for tritium management in tritium handling facilities. Such a detection can be performed by tritium monitors based on proton conducting oxide technique. We tested a tritium monitoring system composed of a commercial proportional counter combined with an electrochemical hydrogen pump equipped with CaZr0.9In0.1O3-α as proton conducting oxide. The hydrogen pump operated at 973 K under electrolysis conditions using tritiated water vapor (HTO). The proton conducting oxide extracts tritium molecules (HT) from HTO and tritium concentration is measured by the proportional counter. The advantage of the proposed tritium monitoring system is that it is able to convert HTO into molecular hydrogen

  5. Liquid Effluent Retention Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) is located in the central part of the Hanford Site. LERF is permitted by the State of Washington and has three liquid...

  6. GEOTHERMAL EFFLUENT SAMPLING WORKSHOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report outlines the major recommendations resulting from a workshop to identify gaps in existing geothermal effluent sampling methodologies, define needed research to fill those gaps, and recommend strategies to lead to a standardized sampling methodology.

  7. Automation of the Tritium Extraction Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy has determined its future requirements for tritium will be met using the existing reactors of the Tennessee Valley Authority. Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) will replace the existing burnable absorber rods in the reactor core to beneficially use excess neutrons to create the tritium. The irradiated TPBARs will be shipped from the reactor to a new facility at the Savannah River Site. This new facility, the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF), will receive the shipments from the reactor, store the TPBARs, prepare the TPBARs for tritium extraction, extract the tritium, and package the waste for disposal. The high level of gamma radiation emitted from the TPBARs will preclude human contact. Automation and remote handling will be used to accomplish the required operations, while minimizing radiation exposure to workers

  8. DEPLOYMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, P.

    2013-10-10

    A new Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) was designed by the Savannah River National Laboratory to be a replacement for a package that has been used to ship tritium in a variety of content configurations and forms since the early 1970s. The BTSP was certified by the National Nuclear Safety Administration in 2011 for shipments of up to 150 grams of Tritium. Thirty packages were procured and are being delivered to various DOE sites for operational use. This paper summarizes the design features of the BTSP, as well as associated engineered material improvements. Fabrication challenges encountered during production are discussed as well as fielding requirements. Current approved tritium content forms (gas and tritium hydrides), are reviewed, as well as, a new content, tritium contaminated water on molecular sieves. Issues associated with gas generation will also be discussed.

  9. History of 232-F, tritium extraction processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1950 the Atomic Energy Commission authorized the Savannah River Project principally for the production of tritium and plutonium-239 for use in thermonuclear weapons. 232-F was built as an interim facility in 1953--1954, at a cost of $3.9M. Tritium extraction operations began in October, 1955, after the reactor and separations startups. In July, 1957 a larger tritium facility began operation in 232-H. In 1958 the capacity of 232-H was doubled. Also, in 1957 a new task was assigned to Savannah River, the loading of tritium into reservoirs that would be actual components of thermonuclear weapons. This report describes the history of 232-F, the process for tritium extraction, and the lessons learned over the years that were eventually incorporated into the new Replacement Tritium Facility

  10. Tritium proof-of-principle injector experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tritium Proof-of-Principle (TPOP) pellet injector was designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the production and acceleration of tritium pellets for fueling future fusion reactors. The injector uses the pipe-gun concept to form pellets directly in a short liquid-helium-cooled section of the barrel. Pellets are accelerated by using high-pressure hydrogen supplied from a fast solenoid valve. A versatile, tritium-compatible gas-handling system provides all of the functions needed to operate the gun, including feed gas pressure control and flow control, plus helium separation and preparation of mixtures. These systems are contained in a glovebox for secondary containment of tritium. Tritium experiments will be carried out at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  11. Dosimetric impact evaluation of primary coolant chemistry of the internal tritium breeding cycle of a fusion reactor DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velarde, M. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (DENIM), ETSII, Universidad Politecnica Madrid UPM, J. Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Sedano, L. A. [Asociacion Euratom-Ciematpara Fusion, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Perlado, J. M. [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (DENIM), ETSII, Universidad Politecnica Madrid UPM, J. Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    Tritium will be responsible for a large fraction of the environmental impact of the first generation of DT fusion reactors. Today, the efforts of conceptual development of the tritium cycle for DEMO are mainly centred in the so called Inner Breeding Tritium Cycle, conceived as guarantee of reactor fuel self-sufficiency. The EU Fusion Programme develops for the short term of fusion power technology two breeding blanket conceptual designs both helium cooled. One uses Li-ceramic material (HCPB, Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed) and the other a liquid metal eutectic alloy (Pb15.7Li) (HCLL, Helium-Cooled Lithium Lead). Both are Li-6 enriched materials. At a proper scale designs will be tested as Test Blanket Modules in ITER. The tritium cycles linked to both blanket concepts are similar, with some different characteristics. The tritium is recovered from the He purge gas in the case of HCPB, and directly from the breeding alloy through a carrier gas in HCLL. For a 3 GWth self-sufficient fusion reactor the tritium breeding need is few hundred grams of tritium per day. Safety and environmental impact are today the top priority design criteria. Dose impact limits should determine the key margins and parameters in its conception. Today, transfer from the cycle to the environment is conservatively assumed to be operating in a 1-enclosure scheme through the tritium plant power conversion system (intermediate heat exchangers and helium blowers). Tritium loss is caused by HT and T{sub 2} permeation and simultaneous primary coolant leakage through steam generators. Primary coolant chemistry appears to be the most natural way to control tritium permeation from the breeder into primary coolant and from primary coolant through SG by H{sub 2} tritium flux isotopic swamping or steel (EUROFER/INCOLOY) oxidation. A primary coolant chemistry optimization is proposed. Dynamic flow process diagrams of tritium fluxes are developed ad-hoc and coupled with tritiated effluents dose impact evaluations

  12. Dosimetric impact evaluation of primary coolant chemistry of the internal tritium breeding cycle of a fusion reactor DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium will be responsible for a large fraction of the environmental impact of the first generation of DT fusion reactors. Today, the efforts of conceptual development of the tritium cycle for DEMO are mainly centred in the so called Inner Breeding Tritium Cycle, conceived as guarantee of reactor fuel self-sufficiency. The EU Fusion Programme develops for the short term of fusion power technology two breeding blanket conceptual designs both helium cooled. One uses Li-ceramic material (HCPB, Helium-Cooled Pebble Bed) and the other a liquid metal eutectic alloy (Pb15.7Li) (HCLL, Helium-Cooled Lithium Lead). Both are Li-6 enriched materials. At a proper scale designs will be tested as Test Blanket Modules in ITER. The tritium cycles linked to both blanket concepts are similar, with some different characteristics. The tritium is recovered from the He purge gas in the case of HCPB, and directly from the breeding alloy through a carrier gas in HCLL. For a 3 GWth self-sufficient fusion reactor the tritium breeding need is few hundred grams of tritium per day. Safety and environmental impact are today the top priority design criteria. Dose impact limits should determine the key margins and parameters in its conception. Today, transfer from the cycle to the environment is conservatively assumed to be operating in a 1-enclosure scheme through the tritium plant power conversion system (intermediate heat exchangers and helium blowers). Tritium loss is caused by HT and T2 permeation and simultaneous primary coolant leakage through steam generators. Primary coolant chemistry appears to be the most natural way to control tritium permeation from the breeder into primary coolant and from primary coolant through SG by H2 tritium flux isotopic swamping or steel (EUROFER/INCOLOY) oxidation. A primary coolant chemistry optimization is proposed. Dynamic flow process diagrams of tritium fluxes are developed ad-hoc and coupled with tritiated effluents dose impact evaluations. Dose

  13. The influence of tritium build-up in Cernavoda NPP systems on gaseous and liquid emission after four years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintillation Spectrometry methods currently determines tritium activities in effluent samples. All information about the radioactivity of liquid and gaseous effluent is stored into a dedicated data base and used to make periodical reports. Based on four years data the present paper made an analysis of tritium emissions in gaseous effluents in order to highlight the trends and to provide a method to identify abnormal tritium emission. (authors)

  14. Preliminary study on lithium-salt aqueous solution blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous solution blanket using lithium salts such as LiNO3 and LiOH have been studied in the US-TIBER program and ITER conceptual design activity. In the JAERI/LANL collaboration program for the joint operation of TSTA (Tritium Systems Test Assembly), preliminary design work of blanket tritium system for lithium ceramic blanket, aqueous solution blanket and liquid metal blanket, have been performed to investigate technical feasibility of tritium demonstration tests using the TSTA. Detail study of the aqueous solution blanket concept have not been performed in the Japanese fusion program, so that this study was carried out to investigate features of its concept and to evaluated its technical problems. The following are the major items studied in the present work: (i) Neutronics of tritium breeding ratio and shielding performance Lithium concentration, Li-60 enrichment, beryllium or lead, composition of structural material/beryllium/solution, heavy water, different lithium-salts (ii) Physicochemical properties of salts Solubility, corrosion characteristics and compatibility with structural materials, radiolysis (iii) Estimation of radiolysis in ITER aqueous solution blanket. (author)

  15. Tritium radioluminescent devices, Health and Safety Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, R.J.; Jensen, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    This document consolidates available information on the properties of tritium, including its environmental chemistry, its health physics, and safe practices in using tritium-activated RL lighting. It also summarizes relevant government regulations on RL lighting. Chapters are divided into a single-column part, which provides an overview of the topic for readers simply requiring guidance on the safety of tritium RL lighting, and a dual-column part for readers requiring more technical and detailed information.

  16. Compatibility problems in tritium breeding blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compatibility between tritium breeding materials (liquid or solid), neutron multiplier and structural steels is a concern for the choice of a tritium breeding blanket for NET. For solid tritium breeding blanket, it seems that the more severe compatibility problem is due to the interaction of beryllium with steel. As for the water-cooled Pb17Li blanket, the first results obtained in experimental conditions closed to the concept have evidenced lower corrosion rates than those measured in thermal convection loops

  17. Overview of light sources powered by tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their long lifespan and stable intensity, light sources initiated by tritium instead of electricity or batteries are suitable for low level lighting applications. Therefore, tritium-based radioluminescent (RL) light sources are widely used in both military and civil applications. However, traditional tritium lights with the gas tube structure have several shortcomings: (1) the phosphors are opaque; (2) the glass tube is fragile and easily broken; and (3) the beta kinetic energy is attenuated due to the sorption by the gas; etc. As a result, further application of the tritium lights is limited. In this paper, the lighting mechanism and radiation safety of tritium-based RL light sources are briefly reviewed. Besides, the history and prospects of the development of tritium-based RL light source are discussed. Due to their long lifespan and stable intensity, light sources initiated by tritium instead of electricity or batteries are suitable for low level lighting applications. Therefore, tritium- based radioluminescent (RL) light sources are widely used in both military and civil applications. However, traditional tritium lights with the gas tube structure have several short- comings: (1) the phosphors are opaque; (2) the glass tube is fragile and easily broken; and (3) the beta kinetic energy is attenuated due to the sorption by the gas; etc. As a result, further application of the tritium lights is limited. In this paper, the lighting mechanism and radiation safety of tritium-based RL, light sources are briefly reviewed. Besides, the history and prospects of the development of tritium-based RL light source are discussed. (authors)

  18. The movement of tritium in ecological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This literature survey summarizes the interaction of tritium gas and tritiated water with various components of the ecological system. The intake of tritium gas and tritiated water in plants and soil is described as well as the location of the highest measurable concentration. This information may serve as a basis for risk assessment from tritium to man through the food chain and enables effective tracing of its concentration in the environment. (author)

  19. Tritium radioluminescent devices, Health and Safety Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document consolidates available information on the properties of tritium, including its environmental chemistry, its health physics, and safe practices in using tritium-activated RL lighting. It also summarizes relevant government regulations on RL lighting. Chapters are divided into a single-column part, which provides an overview of the topic for readers simply requiring guidance on the safety of tritium RL lighting, and a dual-column part for readers requiring more technical and detailed information

  20. Evaluation of permeable and non-permeable tritium in normal condition in a fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marta, V; Manuel, P J [Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (DENIM)/ETSII, Universidad Politecnica Madrid (UPM) (Spain); Sedano Luis, A [Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia, Ciemat (Spain)], E-mail: marta@denim.upm.es

    2008-05-15

    The tritium cycle, technologies of process and control of the tritium in the plant will constitute a fraction of the environmental impact of the first generation of DT fusion reactors. The efforts of conceptual development of the tritium cycle are centered in the Internal Regenerator Cycle. The tritium could be recovered from a flow of He gas, or directly from solid breeder. The limits of transfers to the atmosphere are assumed {approx} 1 gr-T/a ({approx}20 Ci/a) (without species distinction). In the case of ITER, for example, we have global demands of control of 5 orders of magnitude have been demonstrated at experimental level. The transfer limits determine the key parameters in tritium Cycle (HT, HTO, as dominant, and T2, T2O as marginal). Presently, the transfer from the cycle to the environment is assumed through the exchange system of the power plant (primary to secondary). That transport is due to the permeation through HT, T2, or leakage to the coolant in the primary system. It is key the chemical optimization in the primary system, that needs to be reanalyzed in terms of radiological impact both for permeable, HT, T2, and non-permeable HTO, T2O. It is necessary considered the pathway of tritium from the reactor to the atmosphere, these processes are modelled adequately. Results of the assessments were early and chronic doses which have been evaluated for the Most Exposed Individual at particular distance bands from the release point. The impact evaluations will be performed with the computational tools (NORMTRI), besides national regulatory models, internationally accepted computer these code for dosimetric evaluations of tritiated effluents in operational conditions.

  1. The introduction of tritium in lactose and saccharose by isotope exchange with gaseous tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for conducting reactions of catalytic protium-tritium isotopic exchange with gaseous tritium were developed in order to synthesize tritium labelled lactose and saccharose. These methods enabled to prepare these labelled disaccharides with high molar activity. The yield was equal to 50-60%, radiochemical purity ∼ 95%

  2. Portable tritium-in-air monitor (TIAM) for monitoring tritium activity during shutdown in PHWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses an overview of Portable Tritium in Air Monitor and usefulness of the system for health safety in Pressured Heavy Water Reactor based Nuclear Power Plants during Shutdown activity. Tritium in Air Monitor is meant for detection of Tritium activity in air in different accessible area and shutdown area inside the Reactor Building and also in atmospheric release. (author)

  3. Estimation of tritium and helium inventory in the tritium handling system in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Korea, the Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility (WTRF) is under construction to reduce the amount of tritium present in the moderator and coolant of the CANDU type Wolsong nuclear power plants. Recently, a study on the tritium handling system for recovery of the tritium collected from the WTRF was started. Some tritium would enter the steel of the container walls and subsequently decay to helium. This helium can deteriorate the mechanical properties of the material of the tritium handling system. To evaluate the tritium and helium inventory in the stainless steel wall of this system, the time-dependent diffusion equation was developed, solved and the results are presented in this paper. These results were compared to previous work that evaluated the tritium inventory in the stainless steel wall of 50-L tritium containers. Tritium and helium concentration profiles and the corresponding inventories were evaluated with respect to the various parameters such as exposure time, temperature, and partial pressure. After 24 years, the helium inventory in the wall of the tritium handling system exceeds the tritium inventory. (authors)

  4. The trends of global tritium precipitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trends of global tritium precipitation from 1953 to 1979 were estimated based on the tritium data published in seven volumes of Environmental Isotope Data by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Tritium precipitation samples were collected from 342 stations in the world and tritium concentrations were measured by IAEA and 27 laboratories. Due to repeated atomospheric nuclear explosions, tritium precipitations showed maximum peak in 1963. After the agreement of the Partial Test Ban Treaty in 1964, they have gradually decreased until now showing seasonal variations. To obtain clear trends of tritium precipitations, seasonal and irregular factors were eliminated from the original time-series data using a code developed by the Japanese Economic Planning Agency. Results of analyses were as follows; a) Peak concentrations and precipitations of tritium were observed every year around the period of late spring to summer. b) The maximum annual tritium concentration and precipitation were observed in 1963 for northern hemisphere stations. c) A latitude effect was observed in the northern hemisphere. The maximum concentrations and precipitations were seen at the latitude of approximately 50 deg N. d) Continental stations always showed higher tritium concentrations and precipitations than comparable maritime stations. (author)

  5. The Production Rate of Natural Tritium

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Harmon; Lal, Devendra

    2011-01-01

    A detailed evaluation is made of the production rate of natural tritium in the pre-thermonuclear epoch. Deuterium and tritium analyses on the same precipitation samples are used to establish the uncontaminated tritium levels in precipitation sampled before the Castle tests, and the tritium balance is calculated for the North American troposphere. The global mean production rate Q?, calculated from the geochemical inventory, is found to be 0.5 ± 0.3 atoms T/cm2 sec. This value is three ...

  6. Tritium stripping by a catalytic exchange stripper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A catalytic exchange process for stripping elemental tritium from gas streams has been demonstrated. The process uses a catalyzed isotopic exchange reaction between tritium in the gas phase and protium or deuterium in the solid phase on alumina. The reaction is catalyzed by platinum deposited on the alumina. The process has been tested with both tritium and deuterium. Decontamination factors (ration of inlet and outlet tritium concentrations) as high as 1000 have been achieved, depending on inlet concentration. The test results and some demonstrated applications are presented

  7. Development of tritium handing technology(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Kim, K. R. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yook, D. S.; Song, K. M.; Son, S. H. [KEPRI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K. J.; Jung, H. Y.; Song, M. C. [KAIST, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    The buildup rate of tritium in heavy water moderator and coolant of pressurized heavy water reactors in Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant is about 4MCi/a. The control of tritium is of increasing concern to the power reactor industry and general public in Korea. Metal tritides have the advantage of significantly decreasing the volume required to store tritium without increasing the pressure of storage vessel. Titanium hydride was safely used for the long-term storage of tritium. The experimental thermodynamic P-C-T data show that titanium soaks up hydrogen isotope gas at ambient temperature and modest pressures.

  8. Tritium immobilization and packaging using metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium recovered from CANDU heavy water reactors will have to be packaged and stored in a safe manner. Tritium will be recovered in the elemental form, T2. Metal tritides are effective compounds in which to immobilize the tritium as a stable non-reactive solid with a high tritium capacity. The technology necessary to prepare hydrides of suitable metals, such as titanium and zirconium, have been developed and the properties of the prepared materials evaluated. Conceptual designs of packages for containing metal tritides suitable for transportation and long-term storage have been made and initial testing started. (author)

  9. Mutagenic effect of incorporated tritium amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic effect of tritium labelled amino acids was studied. The experiments were carried out on white mongreal rats, genetic effects were evaluated by dominant lethal mutation frequency in male germ cells. It was shown that administration of tritium amino acids results in genetic violations in male germ cells manifested in progeny death. Assessment of integral temporal indices of induced post implantation embryos death showed that 3H-lysine effect exceeds tritium oxide effect by 1.5-2 fold in case of equal absorbed doses. The obtained results are used in alculation of radiation hygienic standards for biogenic tritium compounds. 4 refs.; 1 tab

  10. Tritium proof-of-principle pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium proof-of-principle (TPOP) experiment was designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the formation and acceleration of the world's first tritium pellets for fueling of future fusion reactors. The experiment was first used to produce hydrogen and deuterium pellets at ORNL. It was then moved to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the production of tritium pellets. The injector used in situ condensation to produce cylindrical pellets in a 1-m-long, 4-mm-ID barrel. A cryogenic 3He separator, which was an integral part of the gun assembly, was capable of lowering 3He levels in the feed gas to <0.005%. The experiment was housed to a glovebox for tritium containment. Nearly 1500 pellets were produced during the course of the experiment, and about a third of these were pure tritium or mixtures of deuterium and tritium. Over 100 kCi of tritium was processed through the experiment without incident. Tritium pellet velocities of 1400 m/s were achieved with high-pressure hydrogen propellant. The design, operation, and results of this experiment are summarized. 34 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Evaluation of specific tritium transfer parameters in equilibrium conditions for Cernavoda area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Romania, a CANDU nuclear power plant with five reactors of 600 MWe is under construction. The first unit reached its criticality on April 1996 and became operational at full power on December 1996. The nuclear power plant is placed in Cernavoda area, in the S-E of Romania, between the Danube River and the Danube-Black Sea Canal. The prevalent local climate is continental and agricultural activity in the neighbourhood of the nuclear power plant is of intensive type. The routine atmospheric tritium release from the 3 GWe nuclear power plant is expected to be about 460 TBq/year and the aqueous release is expected to be 350 TBq/year. The aim of this study was to evaluate the environmental tritium reference level before commissioning the nuclear power plant. Representative samples for Cernavoda area were analysed: air humidity; water from Danube River, Danube-Black Sea Canal, lakes; drinking and ground water, rain (snow) water; soil at different depths; tissue free water tritium in vegetal and animal foodstuff relevant for human diet: cereals (wheat, maize, barley), vegetables (potato, tomato, cabbage, onion, bean), fruits, grapes, wine and milk; organically bound tritium in wheat and maize grains. The equipment and methods used were: Liquid scintillation analyzer of type TRICARB 1900 TR; scintillation cocktails of Instagel and Pico Fluor LLT type; sampling system for trapping the atmospheric tritium on molecular sieves; furnace; vacuum line and freeze trap (-60 deg. C); equipment for simple, fractionating and azeotropic distillation. The background level of tritium concentration was determined in environmental samples in Cernavoda area, in preoperational stage of nuclear power plant. The mean values determined during 1994-early 1996 are : (7.4±5.5) Bq/L in air humidity, (3.1±1.0) Bq/L in water, (3.53±0.4) Bq/L in tissue water from vegetable and (4.9±1.7) Bq/L in tissue water from cereals (grains). The values of tritium concentration in air, water, soil and

  12. Tritium levels in the environment of KAPS - an indicator of quality performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium is produced in the Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor by the activation of Heavy water used as moderator and coolant. Due to its large abundance in the reactor and its presence in both liquid and gaseous effluents, Tritium concentration in environmental matrices is an indicator of radioactivity releases from PHWR type reactors. Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS) is a PHWR type power station located at Kakrapar Village in the Surat district. The station is operating since 1993 and a comprehensive environmental survey program was carried out at this site by Health Physics Division, BARC for radioactivity levels in the environment. The survey carried out at KAPS environment for the past ten years (1994-2003) reveals that there is no increase in radiation levels and tritium is the only radionuclide detected in environmental matrices. The yearly average committed effective dose due to Tritium in the environment works out to be about 2.2 μSv, which is a conservative figure and is of very low significance. The life time stochastic risk to the total population (all age group) attributable to 2 μSv effective dose works out to be 1x10-7 which is also a conservative estimate and can be considered to be very safe. The very low committed dose observed in KAPS environment, indicate the quality performance of the station. (author)

  13. Tritium transport and release from lithium ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an operating fusion reactor,, the tritium breeding blanket will reach a condition in which the tritium release rate equals the production rate. The tritium release rate must be fast enough that the tritium inventory in the blanket does not become excessive. Slow tritium release will result in a large tritium inventory, which is unacceptable from both economic and safety viewpoints As a consequence, considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the tritium release mechanism from ceramic breeders and beryllium neutron multipliers through theoretical, laboratory, and in-reactor studies. This information is being applied to the development of models for predicting tritium release for various blanket operating conditions

  14. Transfer and incorporation of tritium in mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolism of tritium in mammals has been studied in a number of laboratories which have participated in the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on the Behaviour of Tritium in the Environment. The results of these studies are discussed and related to data obtained elsewhere. The animals studied are small laboratory and domestic animals. Tritium has been administered as THO, both in single and long-term dosing experiments, and also as organically bound tritium. The biological half-life of tritium in the body water pool has been determined in different species. The following values have been found: 1.1 days in mice; 13.2 days in kangaroo rats; 3.8 days in pigs; 4.1 days in lactating versus 8.3 in non-lactating goats and 3.1-4.0 days in lactating cows and steers. Much attention has been paid to the incorporation of tritium into organic constituents, both in the animal organism (organs, tissues) and in the secretions of the animal after continuous administration of tritium, mostly as THO. When compared with tritium levels in body water, and expressed as the ratio of specific activities, values of 0.25 and 0.40 have been found in mice liver and testis respectively. In cow's milk, these ratios vary from 0.30 for casein to 0.60 for lactose. The transfer of tritium into milk after continuous ingestion of THO by a lactating cow is about 1.50% of the daily ingested tritium per litre of milk. Some results of experiments, utilizing organically bound tritium, are also presented. (author)

  15. Impact of blanket tritium against the tritium plant of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The breeder blanket and the blanket tritium recovery system are tested using test blanket modules during ITER campaign. And then, these are integrated with the tritium plant for the first time at a prototype reactor after ITER. In this work, impact to the tritium plant by integration of the solid breeder blanket was discussed. The method of tritium extraction from the blanket and the choice of the process for breeder blanket interface should be discussed not only from the viewpoint of tritium release but also from the viewpoint of the load of processing. (author)

  16. Development of a tritium recovery system from CANDU tritium removal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of the Tritium Recovery System (TRS) is to reduce to a maximum possible extent the release of tritium from the facility following a tritium release in confinement boundaries and also to have provisions to recover both elemental and vapors tritium from the purging gases during maintenance and components replacement from various systems processing tritium. This work/paper proposes a configuration of Tritium Recovery System wherein elemental tritium and water vapors are recovered in a separated, parallel manner. The proposed TRS configuration is a combination of permeators, a platinum microreactor (MR) and a trickle bed reactor (TBR) and consists of two branches: one branch for elemental tritium recovery from tritiated deuterium gas and the second one for tritium recovery from streams containing a significant amount of water vapours but a low amount, below 5%, of tritiated gas. The two branches shall work in a complementary manner in such a way that the bleed stream from the permeators shall be further processed in the MR and TBR in view of achieving the required decontamination level. A preliminary evaluation of the proposed TRS in comparison with state of the art tritium recovery system from tritium processing facilities is also discussed. (authors)

  17. Development of a tritium recovery system from CANDU tritium removal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draghia, M.; Pasca, G.; Porcariu, F. [SC.IS.TECH SRL, Timisoara (Romania)

    2015-03-15

    The main purpose of the Tritium Recovery System (TRS) is to reduce to a maximum possible extent the release of tritium from the facility following a tritium release in confinement boundaries and also to have provisions to recover both elemental and vapors tritium from the purging gases during maintenance and components replacement from various systems processing tritium. This work/paper proposes a configuration of Tritium Recovery System wherein elemental tritium and water vapors are recovered in a separated, parallel manner. The proposed TRS configuration is a combination of permeators, a platinum microreactor (MR) and a trickle bed reactor (TBR) and consists of two branches: one branch for elemental tritium recovery from tritiated deuterium gas and the second one for tritium recovery from streams containing a significant amount of water vapours but a low amount, below 5%, of tritiated gas. The two branches shall work in a complementary manner in such a way that the bleed stream from the permeators shall be further processed in the MR and TBR in view of achieving the required decontamination level. A preliminary evaluation of the proposed TRS in comparison with state of the art tritium recovery system from tritium processing facilities is also discussed. (authors)

  18. Application of tritium behavior simulation code (TBEHAVIOR) to an actual-scale tritium handling room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is essential from the viewpoint of fusion safety to confine and remove tritium in a room since tritium handling room is placed as 'final barrier' of fusion plant to prevent the environmental discharge of tritium. At the Tritium Process Laboratory (TPL) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), the application of our original three-dimensional TBEHAVIOR code to the tritium behavior in a room of 3000 m3 was verified. The Renormalization Group Theory (RNG) model was selected as Low-Reynolds model for practical calculation time as well as to reasonable precision in evaluation of velocity from the engineering viewpoint. A series of evaluated results indicated that a flow adjacent to a wall surface plays an important role for tritium transport in a ventilated room. Evaluation of attenuating behavior is further important since the ventilation is normally stopped for the tritium confinement in the case of tritium leakage. We demonstrated that an attenuating behavior can also be evaluated well by the TBEHAVIOR code. Even an attenuating or stagnant flow of less than 10mm/s in a room mixed tritium concentration uniform promptly. The presence of apparatuses in a room did not generally affect tritium behavior. Although the effect of buoyancy was limited to the initial period after the leak, the spread of tritium was promoted by buoyancy. It led to the shortening of elapsed time until the concentration became uniform. (author)

  19. Proposal for platinum hydrophobic catalyst for hydrogen isotopes separation from nuclear effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The hydrophobic catalysts were originally conceived in Canada for deuterium enrichment and tritium separation by hydrogen-liquid water isotopic exchange in nuclear field. Unlike the conventional hydrophilic catalysts, which become inefficient at direct contact with liquid water, the hydrophobic catalysts keep a high catalytic activity and stability, even under direct contact with liquid water or in presence of saturated humidity. A new method for preparation of new improved hydrophobic Pt-catalysts has been proposed and is now underway. The main steps and experimental conditions of preparation are largely discussed. A new wet-proofing agent and some new binding agents (titanium oxide, cerium oxide, zirconium oxide) with catalytic role are proposed and tested. The applications of the new hydrophobic catalyst in nuclear field for tritium separations from tritiated liquid effluents and for the clean-up of the airborne tritium at nuclear facilities are discussed. (authors)

  20. Tritium removal using vanadium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an initial examination of the feasibility of separation of tritium from gaseous protium-tritium mixtures using vanadium hydride in cyclic processes is reported. Interest was drawn to the vanadium-hydrogen system because of the so-called inverse isotope effect exhibited by this system. Thus the tritide is more stable than the protide, a fact which makes the system attractive for removal of tritium from a mixture in which the light isotope predominates. The initial results of three phases of the research program are reported, dealing with studies of the equilibrium and kinetics properties of isotope exchange, development of an equilibrium theory of isotope separation via heatless adsorption, and experiments on the performance of a single heatless adsorption stage. In the equilibrium and kinetics studies, measurements were made of pressure-composition isotherms, the HT--H2 separation factors and rates of HT--H2 exchange. This information was used to evaluate constants in the theory and to understand the performance of the heatless adsorption experiments. A recently developed equilibrium theory of heatless adsorption was applied to the HT--H2 separation using vanadium hydride. Using the theory it was predicted that no separation would occur by pressure cycling wholly within the β phase but that separation would occur by cycling between the β and γ phases and using high purge-to-feed ratios. Heatless adsorption experiments conducted within the β phase led to inverse separations rather than no separation. A kinetic isotope effect may be responsible. Cycling between the β and γ phases led to separation but not to the predicted complete removal of HT from the product stream, possibly because of finite rates of exchange. Further experimental and theoretical work is suggested which may ultimately make possible assessment of the feasibility and practicability of hydrogen isotope separation by this approach

  1. Doses due to tritium releases by NET - data base and relevant parameters on biological tritium behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study gives an overview on the current knowledge about the behaviour of tritium in plants and in food chains in order to evaluate the ingestion pathway modelling of existing computer codes for dose estimations. The tritium uptake and retention by plants standing at the beginning of the food chains is described. The different chemical forms of tritium, which may be released into the atmosphere (HT, HTO and tritiated organics), and incorporation of tritium into organic material of plants are considered. Uptake and metabolism of tritiated compounds in animals and man are reviewed with particular respect to organically bound tritium and its significance for dose estimations. Some basic remarks on tritium toxicity are also included. Furthermore, a choice of computer codes for dose estimations due to chronic or accidental tritium releases has been compared with respect to the ingestion pathway. (orig.)

  2. Integrated management of liquid effluents at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This poster session illustrates the integrated approach that the Hanford Site has taken in managing high-priority liquid effluent streams. These waste waters are produced from a variety of process- and utility-related sources. The Hanford Site approach to management of liquid effluents focusses on eliminating the source, reusing where possible, and treating and disposing of the water that cannot be eliminated or recycled prior to disposal. Thirteen of the high-priority waste water streams have been or will be eliminated by the end of 1995. Some of these streams have been eliminated as the result of shutting down the associated operation. However, the elimination of other streams has been the result of process modifications, equipment substitutions, or recycling. Several of the waste water streams will receive treatment at the individual generating facility before being discharged into a new industrial sewer (the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility). The industrial sewer will collect treated streams from various plants in the 200 Areas and dispose of the clean effluent at two uncontaminated new 20,235-square meter (5-acre) ponds permitted by Washington State. Finally, condensate from the 200 Areas tank waste evaporator and waste water from operations in the 300 Area will be treated at two end-of-the-pipe treatment facilities. The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility will treat condensate (a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (1)-listed waste) from the tank waste evaporator, thereby allowing the waste to be delisted prior to disposal. The treated effluent will be pumped to a state-approved land disposal site selected to maximize the migration time to the river. This disposal site allows for the decay of tritium, which will be present in the condensate but cannot be removed using current technologies

  3. Tritium recovery from ceramic breeder blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that chemical forms of tritium released from ceramic breeders are T2O and T2. Among issues relevant to the tritium chemical form, tritium inventory is one of the major criteria in the selection of breeder material. The primary purpose of this report is to study the dependence of tritium inventory in a blanket with ceramic solid breeder on the tritium chemical form. In this light, tritium inventory in a Li2O blanket has been evaluated as a function of tritium chemical form under the conditions of the Japanese Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER). It was shown that in a blanket with Li2O as a breeder, which has a strong affinity to water vapor, the inventory due to T2O adsorption becomes quite large. In order to reduce the T2O adsorption inventory, conversion of the tritium chemical form through an isotope exchange reaction with hydrogen added to the sweep gas (T2O + 2 H2 → H2O + 2 HT) has been proposed, and its advantages and problems have been examined. Lithium hydroxide formation and mass transfer, which are considered to be inherent in the Li2O-T2O system and to be critical issues for the feasibility of a Li2O blanket, have been also discussed. (author)

  4. Tritium Systems Test Facility. Volume II. Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document includes the following appendices: (1) vacuum pumping, (2) tritium migration into the power cycle, (3) separation of hydrogen isotopes, (4) tritium research laboratory, (5) TSTF containment and cleanup, (6) instrumentation and control, (7) gas heating in torus, and (8) TSTF fuel loop operating procedures

  5. The Sandhausen shallow-groundwater tritium experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of environmental tritium were carried out over several years in a shallow unconfined aquifer composed of fine to coarse sand, in the alluvial plain of the Upper Rhine river, Federal Republic of Germany. The observations reached to a maximum of 75 m depth but were concentrated in the top 15 m of the ground (the top 12 m of groundwater). For the period 1967 to 1971, the vertically integrated tritium content was near 500 TU · m H2O, and the depth of bomb tritium influence increased from about 10 to 25 m below the groundwater table. A groundwater recharge rate of 164 mm yearly (standard error ±25%) is deduced (for an assumed porosity of 0.30; precipitation averages 686 mm yearly), from a balance with the tritium supplied by precipitation. The largest contribution to the error arises from estimating the tritium concentration in the recharge water from that of precipitation, whereas the amount of tritium deposited in the ground can be determined to probably ± 10%. The recharge rate is consistent with the results of other investigations. In a forest clearing in the area that is elsewhere covered by high pine trees, the tritium deposition was higher by nearly 50%. Excessive tritium concentrations were found at localities downstream from small depressions in the ground that expose the water-table. (author)

  6. Synthesis of tritium-labeled fosfomycin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertel, H.E.; Meriwether, H.T. (Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Labs., Rahway, NJ (USA))

    1982-03-01

    Tritium gas was used as a labeling agent for the preparation of (1,2-/sup 3/H)fosfomycin. Introduction of tritium into a precursor, the synthesis including resolution of the intermediate racemic 1,2-epoxypropylphosphonic acid, and preparation of both amine and calcium salts of the labeled antibiotic are described.

  7. Tritium waste disposal technology in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium waste disposal methods in the US range from disposal of low specific activity waste along with other low-level waste in shallow land burial facilities, to disposal of kilocurie amounts in specially designed triple containers in 65' deep augered holes located in an aird region of the US. Total estimated curies disposed of are 500,000 in commercial burial sites and 10 million curies in defense related sites. At three disposal sites in humid areas, tritium has migrated into the ground water, and at one arid site tritium vapor has been detected emerging from the soil above the disposal area. Leaching tests on tritium containing waste show that tritium in the form of HTO leaches readily from most waste forms, but that leaching rates of tritiated water into polymer impregnated concrete are reduced by as much as a factor of ten. Tests on improved tritium containment are ongoing. Disposal costs for tritium waste are 7 to 10 dollars per cubic foot for shallow land burial of low specific activity tritium waste, and 10 to 20 dollars per cubic foot for disposal of high specific activity waste. The cost of packaging the high specific activity waste is 150 to 300 dollars per cubic foot. 18 references

  8. Environmental tritium monitoring around Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental tritium monitoring in the sea near Tokai Reprocessing Plant has been performed since 1977, the year of having started the hot test operation of the plant. On the other hand, atmospheric tritium monitoring was started almost at the same time as a research program instead of a routine program. This paper is a review for tritium monitoring in the sea and in the air around the Tokai Reprocessing Plant. The plant is located in Tokai Village, Ibaraki Prefecture, on the Pacific coast. It is based on the Purex process, and the nominal capacity is 210 tons per year. Around the TRP, there are four uranium fabrication facilities, five research reactors, two power reactors and other research facilities. About 173,000 inhabitants are within 10 km range from the plant. The authorized discharge limit of tritium is 200 Ci per day and 51,100 Ci per year in the sea. That in the atmosphere is 50 Ci per day and about 15,000 Ci per year. The tritium from the TRP was discharged mainly into the sea. The sea water samples were distilled, and the tritium concentration was measured by liquid scintillation counting. During three years of the hot operation of TRP, discharged tritium was about 7,000 Ci into the sea and about 140 Ci into the atmosphere. The tritium level has been maintained, and its significant increase was not observed. (Kako, I.)

  9. Quarterly sampling of the wetlands along the old F Area effluent ditch: August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In August 1994, well point water and near-surface water samples were collected to characterize tritium and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the wetlands along the old F-Area effluent ditch south of 643-E (old burial ground). The August sampling event was the third in a series of eight events. Groundwater flow paths suggest that compounds detected in water table wells around 643-E migrate towards the old F-Area effluent ditch and Fourmile Branch. Recent analytical results from well point and near-surface water sampling in the wetlands that comprise the old F-Area effluent ditch have shown that tritium and small quantities of VOCs are outcropping in the area. For this study, seven locations along the old F-Area effluent ditch were selected to be sampled. Well point samples were collected from all seven locations and near-surface water samples were collected at four locations. A secondary objective of this project was to compare VOC concentrations between the well points installed to depths of 6 to 8 ft and the near-surface water sampling buckets installed to depths of 1 to 2 ft. Based on differences in tritium concentrations at each location, it was determined that the sampling devices intercepted different groundwater flow paths. This negated direct comparison of analytical results between devices. However, when VOC concentrations measured at each well point and bucket location were normalized, based on the percent differences observed in tritium concentrations at that location, the resulting well point and bucket VOC concentrations were comparable in most cases. These results are consistent with the results from the three previous sampling events, and suggest that volatilization losses of VOCs from the buckets may be negligible. Since the results from the two sampling methodologies are not directly comparable, further sampling of the buckets is not planned

  10. Experiences with decontaminating tritium-handling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium-handling apparatus has been decontaminated as part of the downsizing of the LLNL Tritium Facility. Two stainless-steel glove boxes that had been used to process lithium deuteride-tritide (LiDT) slat were decontaminated using the Portable Cleanup System so that they could be flushed with room air through the facility ventilation system. In this paper the details on the decontamination operation are provided. A series of metal (palladium and vanadium) hydride storage beds have been drained of tritium and flushed with deuterium, in order to remove as much tritium as possible. The bed draining and flushing procedure is described, and a calculational method is presented which allows estimation of the tritium remaining in a bed after it has been drained and flushed. Data on specific bed draining and flushing are given

  11. DOE handbook: Tritium handling and safe storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The DOE Handbook was developed as an educational supplement and reference for operations and maintenance personnel. Most of the tritium publications are written from a radiological protection perspective. This handbook provides more extensive guidance and advice on the null range of tritium operations. This handbook can be used by personnel involved in the full range of tritium handling from receipt to ultimate disposal. Compliance issues are addressed at each stage of handling. This handbook can also be used as a reference for those individuals involved in real time determination of bounding doses resulting from inadvertent tritium releases. This handbook provides useful information for establishing processes and procedures for the receipt, storage, assay, handling, packaging, and shipping of tritium and tritiated wastes. It includes discussions and advice on compliance-based issues and adds insight to those areas that currently possess unclear DOE guidance.

  12. Management of Tritium in European Spallation Source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ene, Daniela; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Jensen, Mikael; Nielsen, Sven Poul; Severin, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) will produce tritium via spallation and activation processes during operational activities. Within the location of ESS facility in Lund, Sweden site it is mandatory to demonstrate that the management strategy of the produced tritium ensures the compliance with...... the country regulation criteria. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the different aspects of the tritium management in ESS facility. Besides the design parameter study of the helium coolant purification system of the target the consequences of the tritium releasing into the environment...... were also analyzed. Calculations shown that the annual release of tritium during the normal operations represents a small fraction from the estimated total dose. However, more refined calculations of migration of activated-groundwater should be performed for higher hydraulic conductivities, with the...

  13. Solidification of enriched tritium from reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During reprocessing of spent fuel elements from LWR tritium containing waste water is produced. Studies have proved that it is possible to enrich the tritium from the waste water to about 10 m3/a hydrogen gas by e.g. electrolysis and catalytic exchange. Possibilities are studied for the fixation of tritium containing hydrogen gas as a hydride/tritide in zirconium or titanium sponge and final disposal of the product in a repository. On the basis of small scale laboratory experiments a concept for a technical TRItium FIXation plant ''TRIFIX'' is developed. It is shown that the mechanical and thermal properties of the reaction product zirconium hydride are sufficient for final disposal. Experiments with small amounts of tritium prove that the loaded metal sponge is resistant against leaching and degassing. Semi-empirical equations are developed for describing the loading reaction as well as the degassing and leaching behaviour of the metal hydride/tritide. (orig./HP)

  14. DOE handbook: Tritium handling and safe storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE Handbook was developed as an educational supplement and reference for operations and maintenance personnel. Most of the tritium publications are written from a radiological protection perspective. This handbook provides more extensive guidance and advice on the null range of tritium operations. This handbook can be used by personnel involved in the full range of tritium handling from receipt to ultimate disposal. Compliance issues are addressed at each stage of handling. This handbook can also be used as a reference for those individuals involved in real time determination of bounding doses resulting from inadvertent tritium releases. This handbook provides useful information for establishing processes and procedures for the receipt, storage, assay, handling, packaging, and shipping of tritium and tritiated wastes. It includes discussions and advice on compliance-based issues and adds insight to those areas that currently possess unclear DOE guidance

  15. Applying tracer techniques to NPP Cernavoda liquid effluents dispersed in Danube - Black Sea Canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this study we propose to use tritiated liquid effluents from CANDU type Cernavoda NPP as a tracer, to study dispersion efficiency on Danube-Black Sea Canal. Tritiated water can be used to simulate the transport and dispersion of solutes in Danube-Black Sea Canal because they have the same physical characteristics as water. A study of experimental published formulas was used to determine proper mixing length. Simultaneous measurements in different locations of the Canal confirm the inlet location of the experiment. Another result used in the further experiment concerns the tritium level along the Danube-Black Sea Canal. We measured tritium activity concentration in water sampled along the Canal between July 2002-April 2003. We established tritium level and tritium concentrations significant for the edge and the tail of tritiated wastewater releases. We obtained unit-peak-attenuation (UPA) curve as related to different mixing times using three locations in which we measured tracer-response curves. During the releases of tritiated liquid effluents we determined the slope of the UPA curve, that helped us to model the water movement in observed area of Danube-Black Sea Canal. In this way with a specific software we can predict maximum concentration of soluble pollutant accidental spills in studied area. (authors)

  16. A study on the safety evaluation of concentrated tritium storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. J.; Kim, K. K.; Lee, S. Y.; Lee, Y. E.; Hong, D. S.; Jung, H. Y.; Song, M. C.; Hwang, K. H.; Kim, S. I.; Yook, D. S.; Sheen, J. J. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-03-01

    In this study, hazards of hydrogen and the risk due to storage of tritium are reviewed. The safety related factors are suggested in terms of classification of hydrogen hazards and problems related to the tritium storage. The major design parameters of the vessel of foreign countries for the storage and transport of tritium are reviewed. By review of major safety parameters related to the tritium storage, the results of this study can be applied and helpful to the development and design of tritium storage vessel in Korea. Also, the results can be useful at design of the tritium treatment facility. The integrity of tritium storage vessel material was evaluated with considering the embrittlement of metal material in hydrogen environment. The tritium storage is one of the most important problems for the safety of tritium removal facility. The research for tritium storage could be divided into two parts, one is for the metal getter of tritium and the other is for the integrity of tritium storage vessel. Especially, the integrity of tritium storage vessel is up to the tritium embrittlement of vessel materials, for tritium vessel is mostly made of metal material. In this work, the evaluation of the tritium embrittlement for the tritium storage vessel material is performed with the equipment that is made for high temperature and high vacuum. 33 refs., 56 figs., 23 tabs. (Author)

  17. Percutaneous absorption of tritium-gas-contaminated pump oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, A. [Radiation Biology and Health Physics Branch, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-08-01

    One of the radiological problems encountered in tritium handling facilities is the hazards associated with tritium`s ability to label and degrade organic materials. Experiments in which male hairless rats have been contaminated with tritium-gas-contaminated pump oil have demonstrated that tritium deposited on the skin provides an input of organically bound tritium and tritiated water in the body. The accumulation of organically bound tritium at the point of contact in the skin and in various tissues influenced tritium excretion in urine and feces. The retention of tritium in the body showed that tritium was mainly metabolized and assimilated as organically bound tritium. The distribution of tritiated water was rapid and uniform in the whole-body. Analyses of tritium excreted in animal urine and feces showed that a significant level of organically bound tritium was excreted shortly after exposure. The highest concentration of tritium activity was measured in the exposed area of the skin. An increased level of tritium accumulation in the liver and kidneys was seen. Dose calculations showed that the exposed skin had the highest dose, and the skin dose was primarily due to the retention of organically bound tritium at the point of contact. The interpretation of these data has indicated that the retention of short-term organically bound tritium in the skin may be a dominant factor for dosimetry purposes. 19 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Interaction of energetic tritium with silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the physical and chemical interactions of energetic hydrogen isotope species with silicon carbide, recoil tritium from the 3He(n,p)T reaction has been allowed to react with K-T silicon carbide and silicon carbide powder. The results show that if the silicon carbide has been degassed and annealed at 14000C prior to tritium bombardment, a considerable fraction of the tritium (ca. 40%) is released as HTO from the SiC upon heating to 13500C under vacuum conditions. Most of the remaining tritium is retained in SiC, e.g., the retention of the tritium in the K-T SiC was found to be 62 and 22% upon heating to 600 and 13500C, respectively. This is in direct contrast to graphite samples in which the tritium is not released to any significant extent even when heated to 13500C. Samples which were exposed to H2O and H2 prior to tritium bombardment were heated to 6000C after the irradiation. The results obtained indicate that a total of 38.7 and 2.49% of the tritium is released in the form of HT and CH3T in the case of H2 or H2O exposure, respectively. Treatment of degassed samples after tritium bombardment with H2O and H2 at temperatures up to 10000C leads to the release of up to 44.9% of the tritium as HT and CH3T. 42 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  19. Tritium behavior in an aquatic ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium behavior in aquatic organisms through a model food chain was investigated. In this model food chain, tritium in water reaches bacteria or Japanese killifish via diatoms and brine shrimps. Tritium accumulation in these organisms as organic bound form was expressed as the R value which is defined as the ratio of tritium specific activity in lyophilized organisms (μCi/gH) to that in water (μCi/gH). The maximum R values were 0.5 in diatoms: Chaetoceros gracilis, 0.2 in bacteria: Escherichia coli, 0.5 in brine shrimps: Artemia salina, and 0.32 in Japanese killifish: Oryzias latipes under the growing condition in which tritium accumulation was due to tritium in tritiated water and not tritiated foods. Brine shrimps and Japanese killifish were grown from larve to adult in tritiated sea water and were fed on tritiated foods (model food chain). Their R values were 0.70 and 0.67, respectively. Bacteria, which grew in tritiated water by adding the hydrolysate of tritiated brine shrimps, showed a maximum R value at 0.32. The R values of each organ of Japanese killifish and of DNA and the nucleotides purified from brine shrimps growing in tritiated water with or without tritiated food were measured to estimate the tritium distribution in the body or various molecules of the organisms. These results did not indicate concentration of tritium in specific organs or compounds. The changes of specific activity of tritium in these organisms were measured when they were transferred to non-tritiated water. These retention of tritium was not only different among the tissues but also depended on whether or not the organisms were reared with tritiated foods. (author)

  20. Investigation of aqueous slurries as fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical and experimental studies were carried out to assess the feasibility of using an aqueous slurry, with lithium in its solid component, to meet the tritium breeding, cooling, and shielding requirements of a controlled thermonuclear reactor (CTR). The numerical studies were designed to demonstrate the theoretical ability of a conceptual slurry blanket to breed adequate tritium to sustain the CTR. The experimental studies were designed to show that the tritium retention characteristics of likely solid components for the slurry were conducive to adequate tritium recovery without the need for isotopic separation. The numerical portion of this work consisted in part of using ANISN, a one-dimensional finite difference neutron transport code, to model the neutronic performance of the slurry blanket concept. The parameters governing tritium production and retention in a slurry were computed and used to modify the results of the ANISN computer runs. The numerical work demonstrated that the slurry blanket was only marginally capable of breeding sufficient tritium without the aid of a neutron multiplying region. The experimental portion of this work consisted of several neutron irradiation experiments, which were designed to determine the retention abilities of LiF particles

  1. TRITIUM RESERVOIR STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE PREDICTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P.S.; Morgan, M.J

    2005-11-10

    The burst test is used to assess the material performance of tritium reservoirs in the surveillance program in which reservoirs have been in service for extended periods of time. A materials system model and finite element procedure were developed under a Savannah River Site Plant-Directed Research and Development (PDRD) program to predict the structural response under a full range of loading and aged material conditions of the reservoir. The results show that the predicted burst pressure and volume ductility are in good agreement with the actual burst test results for the unexposed units. The material tensile properties used in the calculations were obtained from a curved tensile specimen harvested from a companion reservoir by Electric Discharge Machining (EDM). In the absence of exposed and aged material tensile data, literature data were used for demonstrating the methodology in terms of the helium-3 concentration in the metal and the depth of penetration in the reservoir sidewall. It can be shown that the volume ductility decreases significantly with the presence of tritium and its decay product, helium-3, in the metal, as was observed in the laboratory-controlled burst tests. The model and analytical procedure provides a predictive tool for reservoir structural integrity under aging conditions. It is recommended that benchmark tests and analysis for aged materials be performed. The methodology can be augmented to predict performance for reservoir with flaws.

  2. Results of Tritium Tracking and Groundwater Monitoring at the Hanford Site 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site-FY 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) processes contaminated liquids derived from Hanford Site facilities. The clean water generated by these processes is occasionally enriched in tritium and is discharged to the 200 Area State Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). Groundwater monitoring for tritium and other constituents is required by the state-issued permit at 21 wells surrounding the facility. During FY 1999, average tritium activities in most wells declined from average activities in 1998. The exception was deep well 69948-77C, where tritium results were at an all-time high (77,000 pCi/L) as a result of the delayed penetration of effluent deeper into the aquifer. Of the 12 constituents with permit enforcement limits, which are monitored in SALDS proximal wells, all were within limits during FY 1999. Water level measurements in nearby wells indicate that a small hydraulic mound exists around the SALDS facility as a result of discharges. This feature is directing groundwater flow radially outward a short distance before the regional northeasterly flow predominates. Evaluation of this condition indicates that the network is currently adequate for tracking potential effects of the SALDS on the groundwater. Recommendations include the discontinuation of ammonia, benzene, tetrahydrofuran, and acetone from the regular groundwater constituent list; designating background well 299-W8-1 as a tritium-tracking well only, and the use of quadruplicate averages of field pH, instead of a single laboratory measurement, as a permit compliance parameter

  3. PDRD (SR13046) TRITIUM PRODUCTION FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.; Sheetz, S.

    2013-09-30

    Utilizing the results of Texas A&M University (TAMU) senior design projects on tritium production in four different small modular reactors (SMR), the Savannah River National Laboratory’s (SRNL) developed an optimization model evaluating tritium production versus uranium utilization under a FY2013 plant directed research development (PDRD) project. The model is a tool that can evaluate varying scenarios and various reactor designs to maximize the production of tritium per unit of unobligated United States (US) origin uranium that is in limited supply. The primary module in the model compares the consumption of uranium for various production reactors against the base case of Watts Bar I running a nominal load of 1,696 tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) with an average refueling of 41,000 kg low enriched uranium (LEU) on an 18 month cycle. After inputting an initial year, starting inventory of unobligated uranium and tritium production forecast, the model will compare and contrast the depletion rate of the LEU between the entered alternatives. This is an annual tritium production rate of approximately 0.059 grams of tritium per kilogram of LEU (g-T/kg-LEU). To date, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license has not been amended to accept a full load of TPBARs so the nominal tritium production has not yet been achieved. The alternatives currently loaded into the model include the three light water SMRs evaluated in TAMU senior projects including, mPower, Holtec and NuScale designs. Initial evaluations of tritium production in light water reactor (LWR) based SMRs using optimized loads TPBARs is on the order 0.02-0.06 grams of tritium per kilogram of LEU used. The TAMU students also chose to model tritium production in the GE-Hitachi SPRISM, a pooltype sodium fast reactor (SFR) utilizing a modified TPBAR type target. The team was unable to complete their project so no data is available. In order to include results from a fast reactor, the SRNL

  4. Tritium emission reduction at Darlington tritium removal facility using a Bubbler System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ontario Power Generation Nuclear (OPGN) has a 4 x 880 MWe CANDU nuclear station at its Darlington Nuclear Div. located in Bowmanville. The station operates a Tritium Removal Facility (TRF) to reduce and maintain low tritium levels in the Moderator and Heat Transport heavy water systems of Ontario's CANDU fleet by extracting, concentrating, immobilizing and storing as a metal tritide. Minimizing tritium releases to the environment is of paramount importance to ensure that dose to the public is as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) and to maintain credibility with the Public. Tritium is removed from the Cryogenic Distillation System to the Tritium Immobilization System (TIS) glove box via a transfer line that is protected by a rupture disc and relief valve. An overpressure event in 2003 had caused the rupture disc to blow, resulting in the release of a significant quantity of elemental tritium into the relief valve discharge line, which ties into the contaminated exhaust system. As a result of a few similar events occurring over a number of years of TRF operation, the released elemental tritium would have been converted to tritium oxide in the presence of a stagnant moist air environment in the stainless steel discharge line. A significant amount of tritium oxide hold-up in the discharge line was anticipated. To minimize any further releases to the environment, a Bubbler System was designed to remove and recover the tritium from the discharge line. This paper summarizes the results of several Bubbler recovery runs that were made over a period of a month. Approximately 3500 Ci of tritium oxide and 230 Ci of elemental tritium were removed and collected. The tritium contained in the water produced from the Bubbler system was later safely recovered in the station's downgraded D2O clean-up and recovery system. (authors)

  5. Effluent polishing by means of advanced oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different Advanced Oxidation Processes (ozonation at pH 7.5, electron beam irradiation and a combination ozonation/electron beam irradiation) have been applied to study decomposition of aqueous naphthalene-1,5-disulfonic acid (1,5-NDSA) with regard to mineralization and formation of biodegradable intermediates. Formation of biodegradable intermediates could not be indicated for any of the processes used, single electron beam irradiation treatment was the most efficient process for mineralization of organic carbon contained in aqueous 1,5-NDSA. Applied to a real wastewater effluent from a mixed municipal/industrial wastewater electron beam irradiation with a radiation dose of 2 kGy was sufficient to reduce the concentrations of all naphthalene sulfonic acids and some of the alkylphenol ethoxylates by about 2 orders of magnitude. Moreover, high energy electrons effectively inactivate indicator bacteria in effluents from municipal wastewater treatment plants and eliminate simultaneously any estrogenic activity originating from natural and synthetic hormones also contained in the wastewater effluents. Inactivation of bacteria and bacterial spores by electron beam irradiation was found to be practically unaffected by the water matrix and suspended solids. There is a strong indication from literature data that these findings are also relevant to viruses of concern in water hygiene like poliovirus. Cost analysis of the irradiation process based on actual numbers from the first full scale wastewater treatment plant in the Republic of Korea indicated a total cost of about 0.2 US$/m3 treated water for 2 kGy irradiation dose. (author)

  6. Tritium in the Savannah River environment addendum to WSRC-RP--90-424-1, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Carlton, W.H.

    1992-05-28

    This document is an addendum to Tritium in the Savannah River Site Environment,'' WSRC-RP90-424- 1, released in May of 1991. The purpose of this report is to update the information found in WSRC-RP-90-424-1 for the four year period 1987--1990. Some data has also been included from 1991. The report includes summaries of atmospheric and aqueous monitoring of tritium and estimates of the dose to the population surrounding the Savannah River Site.

  7. Tritium in the Savannah River environment addendum to WSRC-RP--90-424-1, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Carlton, W.H.

    1992-05-28

    This document is an addendum to ``Tritium in the Savannah River Site Environment,`` WSRC-RP90-424- 1, released in May of 1991. The purpose of this report is to update the information found in WSRC-RP-90-424-1 for the four year period 1987--1990. Some data has also been included from 1991. The report includes summaries of atmospheric and aqueous monitoring of tritium and estimates of the dose to the population surrounding the Savannah River Site.

  8. Detritiation of Tritiated Effluent Gas and Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Do Hee; Kim, Kwang Rag; Paek, Seung Woo; Lee, Min Soo; Yim, Sung Paal; Chung Hong Suk

    2007-06-15

    In a demonstration scale equipment for treatment of tritium in off-gas, Pt/SDBC as oxidation catalyst and Zeolite 13X as adsorbent was charged in the beds, respectively. It was confirmed from the performance test that decontamination factor of the equipment showed more than 100 under the flow rate of off-gas of 90 l/hr and at the temperature of 65 {approx} 80 .deg. C. A small scale CECE process has been developed combining LPCE catalytic column with SPE (solid polymer electrolyte) electrolysis. The catalytic column was a trickle-bed type packed with the mixture of 1 wt% Pt/SDBC catalyst and 4 mm Dixon wire-mesh ring. The experimental results of the CECE process proved that the decontamination factor of 13 {approx} 20 under the operating conditions of the water of the 4 l/day and the effluent hydrogen gas of 16.2 mol/h. A design code of CECE process also developed which will be applied the tritium industry. An experimental method for the reduction of tritiated organic waste by using catalytic oxidation was tested in a heated catalytic reactor of 0.5 wt% Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The simulated organic liquid was converted to water over 99%. A gas chromatographic column material was developed for the separation of mixed hydrogen isotopes. 17 wt% Pd-Pt on alumina showed 90% separation efficiency at 77 % yield for the separation of 29.2 % D{sub 2}-H{sub 2} gas mixture.

  9. Integrating effluent management

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The paper discusses a closed recycle shrimp farm in Thailand which integrates effluent management. The closed recycle system can reduce risk of heavy metals, pesticides, ammonia, and other toxic particles coming in with water from natural sources by reducing the quantity of water brought to the farm.

  10. Tritium module for ITER/Tiber system code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tritium module was developed for the ITER/Tiber system code to provide information on capital costs, tritium inventory, power requirements and building volumes for these systems. In the tritium module, the main tritium subsystems/emdash/plasma processing, atmospheric cleanup, water cleanup, blanket processing/emdash/are each represented by simple scaleable algorithms. 6 refs., 2 tabs

  11. Percutaneous absorption of tritium-gas-contaminated pump oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, A

    1995-07-01

    One of the radiological problems encountered in tritium handling facilities is the hazards associated with tritium's ability to label and degrade organic materials. Experiments in which male hairless rats have been contaminated with tritium-gas-contaminated pump oil have demonstrated that tritium deposited on the skin provides an input of organically bound tritium and tritiated water in the body. The accumulation of organically bound tritium at the point of contact in the skin and in various tissues influenced tritium excretion in urine and feces. The retention of tritium in the body showed that tritium was mainly metabolized and assimilated as organically bound tritium. The distribution of tritiated water was rapid and uniform in the whole-body. Analyses of tritium excreted in animal urine and feces showed that a significant level of organically bound tritium was excreted shortly after exposure. The highest concentration of tritium activity was measured in the exposed area of the skin. An increased level of tritium accumulation in the liver and kidneys was seen. Dose calculations showed that the exposed skin had the highest dose, and the skin dose was primarily due to the retention of organically bound tritium at the point of contact. The interpretation of these data has indicated that the retention of short-term organically bound tritium in the skin may be a dominant factor for dosimetry purposes. (author)

  12. Estimated Release of Tritium from 232-F Concrete Rubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an estimate of the release of tritium from contaminated concrete from the demolition of the old 232-F Tritium Facility at the Savannah River Site. The estimate uses data from the scientific literature and information about tritium migration in concrete developed during studies of tritium in concrete at SRS

  13. 10 CFR 39.55 - Tritium neutron generator target sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tritium neutron generator target sources. 39.55 Section 39... Equipment § 39.55 Tritium neutron generator target sources. (a) Use of a tritium neutron generator target...) Use of a tritium neutron generator target source, containing quantities exceeding 1,110 GBg or in...

  14. Percutaneous absorption of tritium-gas-contaminated pump oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the radiological problems encountered in tritium handling facilities is the hazards associated with tritium's ability to label and degrade organic materials. Experiments in which male hairless rats have been contaminated with tritium-gas-contaminated pump oil have demonstrated that tritium deposited on the skin provides an input of organically bound tritium and tritiated water in the body. The accumulation of organically bound tritium at the point of contact in the skin and in various tissues influenced tritium excretion in urine and feces. The retention of tritium in the body showed that tritium was mainly metabolized and assimilated as organically bound tritium. The distribution of tritiated water was rapid and uniform in the whole-body. Analyses of tritium excreted in animal urine and feces showed that a significant level of organically bound tritium was excreted shortly after exposure. The highest concentration of tritium activity was measured in the exposed area of the skin. An increased level of tritium accumulation in the liver and kidneys was seen. Dose calculations showed that the exposed skin had the highest dose, and the skin dose was primarily due to the retention of organically bound tritium at the point of contact. The interpretation of these data has indicated that the retention of short-term organically bound tritium in the skin may be a dominant factor for dosimetry purposes. (author)

  15. A study of low-cost adsorbent materials for removing Cr(VI from aqueous waste effluent Estudio de materiales adsorbentes de bajo costo para remover Cr(VI de efluentes acuosos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo Serna Elianna

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available  

    The present paper shows very high potential for two types of solid (a commercial alumina and material obtained by composting, i.e. matured compost on Cr(VI adsorption/elimination in aqueous solution using a concentration range close to those previously detected in waste-water from Colombian industries. Both had important properties for eliminating Cr(VI, the compost being more important as it represents low-cost material. Optimal conditions for chromium adsorption on alumina and compost were established. Initial Cr(VI alumina concentration was 10 mgL-1, with 100 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.0, 1 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. For compost, initial Cr(VI concentration was = 3 mg L-1, 50 mL/g volume of solution per adsorbent mass, pH=2.5, 3 hour equilibrium time and 150 rpm stirring. The experiments showed that compost adsorption properties could be enhanced by adding small quantities of alumina. Compost could thus be chosen as a promising material for use in bioremediation chromium-containing waste water in a management programme for using solid waste in for minimising environmental impact.

     

     

    Status of advanced tritium breeder development for DEMO in the broader approach activities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DEMO reactors require '6Li-enriched ceramic tritium breeders' which have high tritium breeding ratios (TBRs) in the blanket designs of both EU and JA. Both parties have been promoting the development of fabrication technologies of Li2TiO3 pebbles and of Li4SiO4 pebbles including the reprocessing. However, the fabrication techniques of tritium breeders pebbles have not been established for large quantities. Therefore, these parties launch a collaborative project on scaleable and reliable production routes of advanced tritium breeders. In addition, this project aims to develop fabrication techniques allowing effective reprocessing of 6Li. The development of the production and 6Li reprocessing techniques includes preliminary fabrication tests of breeder pebbles, reprocessing of lithium, and suitable out-of-pile characterizations. The R and D on the fabrication technologies of the advanced tritium breeders and the characterization of developed materials has been started between the EU and Japan in the DEMO R and D of the International Fusion Energy Research Centre (IFERC) project as a part of the Broader Approach activities from 2007 to 2016. The equipment for production of advanced breeder pebbles is planned will be installed in the DEMO R and D building at Rokkasho, Japan. The design work in this facility was carried out. The specifications of the pebble production apparatuses and related equipment in this facility were fixed, and the basic data of these apparatuses was obtained. In this design work, the preliminary investigations of the dissolution and purification process of tritium breeders were carried out. From the results of the preliminary investigations, lithium resources of 90% above were recovered by the aqueous dissolving methods using HNO3 and H2O2. The removal efficiency of 60Co by the addition in the dissolved solutions of lithium ceramics were 97-99.9% above using activated carbon impregnated with 8-hydroxyquinolinol. In this report, preparation status

  16. Risks of tritium and their mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the effects of an antibacterial drug, norfloxacin, and an antibiotic, clindamycin, on in vivo oxidation of tritium gas in rats were investigated. Wistar strain male rats were used. They were provided with a standard diet, water ad libitum, and maintained in glass metabolic cages of approximately 20 liters capacity. The air flow and temperature were controlled. To investigate the availability of norfloxacin and clindamycin on the inhibition effects of the oxidation of tritium gas, two types of the experiments were conducted one was that, before the exposure to tritium gas for 2 hours, norfloxacin or clindamycin was administrated to rats three times a day for 4 days, and the other was administration of a drug after tritium gas exposure. After the exposure to tritium gas, blood, the liver, urine and feces samples were collected from rats and the radioactivity of them was determined after combustion using a sample oxidizer. In the case of norfloxacin, tritium concentration in rat body decreased one fifth of that in non-treated rats. On the other hand, administration of clindamycin shortened the biological half-life of tritium in urine to three fifth of that of non-treated rats. (author)

  17. Thermal release of tritium from SS316

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to improve current understanding of the mechanisms controlling the long-term release of tritium incorporated thermally into stainless steel SS316 and to develop reliable as well as economically feasible techniques for the conditioning of tritium-containing metallic wastes, a systematic investigation is underway in Toyama under carefully controlled conditions. The release rate of tritium from SS316 at ambient pressure was determined experimentally in a flow system at several constant temperatures within the range 287-573 K for rather extended periods of time. Under these conditions HTO was found to constitute by far the most important tritium-containing species being released, i.e. approx. 99 %. Much data has accumulated in recent years with a variety of specimens, i.e. type of stainless steel and specimen dimension, loaded with tritium under different pressure and temperature conditions. Dynamic behavior of long-term tritium release has been successfully modeled using a onedimensional diffusion equation and assuming that the release rate is governed by the tritium flux at the metal surface boundary. The implications of the results for interim storage and thermal conditioning of stainless steel waste will be discussed. (orig.)

  18. Development of tritium technologies at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea has been operating a CANDU nuclear power plant since 1983. Tritium generated in the heavy water of the plant is removed by the Wolsong TRF (Tritium Removal Facility) and measurement campaigns of tritium near the power plant have shown the efficiency of the TRF system. The HANARO reactor uses heavy water as both reflector and moderator. In HANARO the tritiated water removal system consists of compressors, condensers, and adsorption beds. A tritium behavior analysis code (TRIBAC) for a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) is under development at KAERI. The TRIBAC computer software has been equipped with models for tritium production, purification, and leakage, as well as chemisorption and tritium behavior, in the hydrogen production system. Korea takes part into the ITER program and is responsible for the supply of an SDS (Tritium Storage and Delivery System). Within this program Korea has launched an experimental program to study the physico-chemical properties of metal and their hydrides in which hydrogen isotope gases can be stored and removed safely

  19. Development of tritium technologies at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.; Koo, D.; Lee, J.; Park, J.; Yim, S.P.; Yoon, C.; Lim, J.; Choi, W.; Ahn, H.; Kang, H.; Kim, I.; Paek, S. [KAERI-UST, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yunn, S.H.; Jung, K.J. [NFRI, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Korea has been operating a CANDU nuclear power plant since 1983. Tritium generated in the heavy water of the plant is removed by the Wolsong TRF (Tritium Removal Facility) and measurement campaigns of tritium near the power plant have shown the efficiency of the TRF system. The HANARO reactor uses heavy water as both reflector and moderator. In HANARO the tritiated water removal system consists of compressors, condensers, and adsorption beds. A tritium behavior analysis code (TRIBAC) for a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) is under development at KAERI. The TRIBAC computer software has been equipped with models for tritium production, purification, and leakage, as well as chemisorption and tritium behavior, in the hydrogen production system. Korea takes part into the ITER program and is responsible for the supply of an SDS (Tritium Storage and Delivery System). Within this program Korea has launched an experimental program to study the physico-chemical properties of metal and their hydrides in which hydrogen isotope gases can be stored and removed safely.

  1. Behavior of tritium in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the ATR Fugen power station, the radiation control regarding the tritium in heavy water has been carried out since the heavy water was filled in the system of the reactor in November, 1977. At first, the concentration of tritium in heavy water was about 60 μCi/cc, but in November, 1981, it increased to about 1.3 mCi/cc, and the saturation concentration after 30 years is estimated to become about 17 mCi/cc. In this report, on the transfer of tritium to the work environment and general environment, its barrier, recovery, measurement and the protection against it, the experience in the Fugen power station is described. The heavy water system was constructed as the perfectly closed circuit by welding stainless steel, and a canned heavy water circulating pump has been used. The leak of heavy water in the steady operation is negligible, but attention must be paid to the transfer of tritium to the environment when the system is disassembled for the regular inspection. The measurement of tritium for individual exposure control, environment and released radioactivity, the tritium-removing equipment and protective suits, and the release of tritium to general environment are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Preliminary test for reprocessing technology development of tritium breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop the reprocessing technology of lithium ceramics (Li2TiO3, CaO-doped Li2TiO3, Li4SiO4 and Li2O) as tritium breeder materials for fusion reactors, the dissolution methods of lithium ceramics to recover 6Li resource and the purification method of their lithium solutions to remove irradiated impurities (60Co) were investigated. In the present work, the dissolving rates of lithium from each lithium ceramic powder using chemical aqueous reagents such as HNO3, H2O2 and citric acid (C6H8O7 . H2O) were higher than 90%. Further the decontamination rate of 60Co added into the solutions dissolving lithium ceramics was higher than 97% using the activated carbon impregnated with 8-hydroxyquinolinol as chelate agent.

  3. Transfer of fallout tritium from environment to human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large quntity of tritium will be used as a fuel of nuclear fusion in the future. It is, therefore, considered important to elucidate tritium behavior present in the environment and the process of tritium transfer from the environment to the human body. Fallout tritium is an applicable material in searching for the long term behavior of tritium in the environment. This paper focuses on the American, Italian, Japanese literature concerning fallout tritium in food and in the human body. The specific activity ratio of bound to free tritium poses an important problem. The mechanism of biological concentration must await further studies. (N.K.) 63 refs

  4. Tritium production and processing in a Tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Important aspects of the tritium system in Tokamak reactors that have to be controlled are overviewed in this paper. The doubling time is one of them, that is to say the time required to produce, in addition to the tritium burned enough tritium to be able to supply the initial tritium inventory. Another one is the tritium permeation through walls. In addition to the permeation phenomena, large tritium inventories are trapped in the reactor structural material. Finally, the different atmospheres of halls, etc.., that can be contaminated with tritium, have to be reprocessed

  5. Measurement of the tritium contamination of the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sources of natural and artificial tritium activities are discussed. Environmental tritium concentrations were determined either by a low background proportional counter after converting tritium to hydrogen, methane or ethane gas or by a liquid scintillation coincidence counter when tritium was found in the form of water. Tritium can be enriched electrolytically. The radioactivity of tritium in the Danube, in ground and rain water was determined before commissioning the Paks Nuclear Power Plant. Based on the analysis of tritium concentrations in wines and in annual rings of trees it is possible to detect local contaminations. (V.N.) 6 refs.; 16 figs

  6. Tritium monitor with improved gamma-ray discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Samson A.; Bennett, Edgar F.; Yule, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Apparatus and method for selective measurement of tritium oxide in an environment which may include other radioactive components and gamma radiation, the measurement including the selective separation of tritium oxide from a sample gas through a membrane into a counting gas, the generation of electrical pulses individually representative by rise times of tritium oxide and other radioactivity in the counting gas, separation of the pulses by rise times, and counting of those pulses representative of tritium oxide. The invention further includes the separate measurement of any tritium in the sample gas by oxidizing the tritium to tritium oxide and carrying out a second separation and analysis procedure as described above.

  7. Tritium system design studies of fusion experimental breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the tritium system design studies for the engineering outline design of a fusion experimental breeder (FEB-E) is presented. This paper is divided into three sections. In first section, the geometry, loading features and tritium concentrations in liquid lithium of tritium breeding zones of blanket are described. The tritium flow chart corresponding to the tritium fuel cycle system has been constructed, and the inventories in ten subsystems are calculated using SWITRIM code in section 2. Results show that the necessary initial tritium storage to start up FEB-E with fusion power of 143 MW is about 319 g. In final section, the tritium leakage issues under different operation circumstances have been analyzed. It was found that the potential danger of tritium leakage could be resulted from the exhausted gas of the diverter system. It is important to elevate the tritium burnup fraction and reduce the tritium throughput. (authors)

  8. Tritium labeling of amino acids and peptides with liquid and solid tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amino acids and peptides were labeled with liquid and solid tritium at 21/degree/K and 9/degree/K. At these low temperatures radiation degradation is minimal, and tritium incorporation increases with tritium concentration and exposure time. Ring saturation in L-phenylalanine does not occur. Peptide linkage in oligopeptides is stable toward tritium. Deiodination in 3-iodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine occurs readily and proceeds in steps by losing one iodine atom at a time. Nickel and noble metal supported catalysts when used as supports for dispersion of the substrate promote tritium labeling at 21 K. Our study shows that both liquid and solid tritiums are potentially useful agents for labeling peptides and proteins

  9. Tritium labeling of amino acids and peptides with liquid and solid tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amino acids and peptides were labeled with liquid and solid tritium at 21 K and 9 K. At these low temperatures radiation degradation is minimal, and tritium incorporation increases with tritium concentration and exposure time. Ring saturation in L-phenyl-alanine does not occur. Peptide linkage in oligopeptides is stable toward tritium. Deiodination in 3-iodotyrosine and 3,5-diiodotyrosine occurs readily and proceeds in steps by losing one iodine atom at a time. Nickel and noble metal supported catalysts when used as supports for dispersion of the substrate promote tritium labeling at 21 K. Our study shows that both liquid and solid tritium are potentially useful agents for labeling peptides and proteins. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  10. Chemical equilibrium studies of tritium--lithium and tritium--lithium alloy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In deuterium-tritium fusion reactors currently under design, the production of tritium is accomplished by utilizing a lithium-bearing blanket. Lithium metal is presently the leading candidate for the blanket material, although molten Li2BeF4, solid Li--Al (50-50 at. percent) alloy and other lithium-containing materials are distinct possibilities. This paper summarizes progress of ongoing studies of the thermodynamics of some of these lithium containing systems. The individual solubilities of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium in lithium as a function of temperature (700 to 10000C) and pressure are presented. Recent work with the solid alloy Li--Al (50-50 at. percent) has shown that the tritium solubility between 400 and 6000C is low. When the tritium pressure was between 0.14 and 0.52 torr, the Li--Al samples contained only 1 to 4 ppm tritium

  11. Processing of radioactive effluents in Cadarache research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French Atomic Energy Commission (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique - CEA) is studying the design of a new plant for processing liquid aqueous radioactive effluents produced on Cadarache Research Centre. Effluents to be processed are low and medium activity effluents, with, for some of them, important concentrations of actinides, and which lead to the production of A and B category solid wastes, according to the French legislation, and suitable for final disposal. The objectives in terms of minimization of discharge's activity level and solid waste production have guided a selection of processes and their arrangement, in order to optimise decontamination and volume concentration factors. Seeded-ultrafiltration and vitrification with cold crucible melter are part of the selected processes for which developments are in progress in CEA for application to the characteristics of the project. (authors)

  12. Tritium release during RB reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium content in daily precipitation, ground condensation and atmospheric water vapor samples was monitoring during normal RB reactor operating conditions in November and December 1994. Generated fission energy from the reactor was ranging between 1.7 MWh and 14.62 Wh per day. Tritium concentrations in precipitation and ground condensation were 1.4-132.6 Bq/l and 47.2-1204 Bq/l, respectively. Tritium content in atmospheric water vapor in HTO from varied from 2.8 to 6.2 Bq/m3. (author)

  13. Electrolytic gettering of tritium from air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have removed 90% of 1 part-per-million tritium gas in air of 25% to 35% humidity by the dc electrical action of the solid proton electrolyte hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP). Gettering takes 5 to 24 hours for a 1 cm2 HUP disc at 2 to 4 V in a static, 1200 cc gas volume. Hydrogen gas may be used to flush captured tritium through the HUP. Liquid water leaches out the tritium but water vapor is ineffective. This technique promises an alternative to the conventional catalyst/zeolite method

  14. Preparation of honey sample for tritium monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of preparation of honey sample for tritium monitoring was described. The equipments consist of an air and honey supply system, a quartz combustor with CM-type monolithic combustion catalyst and a condensation system. In the equipments, honey sample was converted into cooling water by the distilling, cracking and carbonizing procedures for tritium counting. The recovery ratio is 99.0 ± 4.5 percent for tritiated water and 96.0 ± 2.0 for tritiated organic compounds. It is a feasible preparing method for the total tritium monitoring in honey sample

  15. Tritium inventory measurements using calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past calorimetry has been developed as a powerful tool in radiometrology. Calorimetric methods have been applied for the determination of activities, half lives and mean energies released during the disintegration of radioactive isotopes. The fundamental factors and relations which determine the power output of radioactive samples are presented and some basic calorimeter principles are discussed in this paper. At the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) a family of 3 calorimeters has been developed to measure the energy release from radiative waste products arising from reprocessing operations. With these calorimeters, radiative samples with sizes from a few cm3 to 2 ·105 cm3 and heat ratings ranging from a few nW to kW can be measured. After modifications of tits inner part the most sensitive calorimeter among the three calorimeters mentioned above would be best suited for measuring the tritium inventory in T-getters of the Amersham-type

  16. Tritium-in-air monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system for continuously monitoring air for the presence of tritiated water vapor is described comprising contacting a predetermined mass flow of an air sample with a predetermined flow of a liquid miscible with tritiated water to transfer any tritiated water vapor in the air sample to the liquid; stripping radioactive noble gases from the liquid with a stream of gas; and analyzing the liquid for beta radiation to determine the presence of tritium. In the preferred embodiment of the apparatus an air-liquid contactor, a gas-liquid separator and a stripper are combined into a single unit with a common outlet for the contacted air and stripping gas. 6 claims, 2 figures

  17. Environmental monitoring of molecular tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation of atmospheric molecular tritium (HT) in vegetation was determined by in vitro experiments for various kinds of woody and herbaceous plant leaves, mosses and lichens taken from a forest and a garden in Ibaraki prefecture and a forest in Gifu prefecture, and comparison of the HT oxidation activity in vegetation was made with those in its neighboring surface soil (0-5cm in depth). The oxidation of HT in woody plant leaves was extremely low, only about 1/10000-1/1000 that in the surface soil as well as herbaceous plant leaves with some exception, whereas HT oxidation in mosses and lichens was 50-500 times that in pine needles. These results suggest the usefulness of mosses and lichens as monitor vegetation for accidental release of HT into the environment. (author)

  18. Methods of tritium condensate production during spent fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of simulator verification of such methods for tritium condensate production as evaporation, distillation by live steam, rectification of juice vapors, recycling of water condensate and regenerated acid, rectification of isotropic nitrogen acid containing tritium are discussed. The testing results considered together with the data on phase equilibrium in systems simulating composition of tritium-containing liquid process fluxes form the basis for development and design of equipment and process schemes for production of tritium condensate for tritium localization

  19. Transport of tritium in SS316 at moderate temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From tritium release experiments with stainless steel 316 carried out at several temperatures and tritium depth profiles of tritium-depleted specimen information on the transport of tritium by two diverse techniques was obtained. The results could be interpreted by a one dimensional diffusion model. The activation energy for the diffusion of tritium through stainless steel was found to be 61.3 kJ/mol. (authors)

  20. Tritium containing polymers having a polymer backbone substantially void of tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, George A.; Nelson, David A.; Molton, Peter M.

    1992-01-01

    A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium.

  1. Design and test of the instrument measuring the tritium leaking of the reserved tritium waste bin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It describes the design and test of the instrument measuring the tritium leaking of the reserved tritium waste bin. The instrument can measure the tritium leaking from low concentration to high concentration. Testing results showed that the measuring precision of ionization chamber, the absorbing efficiency of blow bubble container, the oxidation efficiency of oxidation efficiency container are consistent with the designing standards and the entire unit works well. (authors)

  2. The Separation of Hydrogen Tritium and Tritium Hydride by Gas Chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Now that successful separation of hydrogen, deuterium and hydrogen deuteride has been achieved by gas chromatography, similar studies are being made dealing with mixtures of hydrogen, tritium and tritium hydride. Since tritium is used in tracer quantities the usual katharometer cannot be employed for its detection. This difficulty has been overcome by providing immediately following the katharometer a vibrating reed electrometer equipped with a high resistance leak which allows continuous monitoring of the activity of any tritium or tritium hydride emerging from the column by means of synchronized recorders. Separation of such mixtures has been tested with columns packed with palladium on silica, silica, alumina, and alumina coated with chromium oxide or ferric oxide. No effective separation was obtained with the palladium on silica column. Good separation was achieved with the plain silica column where hydrogen was employed as the carrier gas, but helium failed to elute the isotopes. Satisfactory results were obtained with the coated, partially deactivated alumina packing when helium or neon was the carrier gas, but the best separation was found with a column packing of uncoated activated alumina. Calibration with helium-tritium mixtures of known activity plus equilibrated hydrogen-tritium mixtures also of known activity allows quantitative estimation of tritium and tritium hydride. (author)

  3. Overview of tritium processing development at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been operating with tritium since June 1984. Presently there are some 50 g of tritium in the main processing loop. This 50 g has been sufficient to do a number of experiments involving the cryogenic distillation isotope separation system and to integrate the fuel cleanup system into the main fuel processing loop. In January 1986 two major experiments were conducted. During these experiments the fuel cleanup system was integrated, through the transfer pumping system, with the isotope separation system, thus permitting testing on the integrated fuel processing loop. This integration of these systems leaves only the main vacuum system to be integrated into the TSTA fuel processing loop. In September 1986 another major tritium experiment was performed in which the integrated loop was operated, the tritium inventory increased to 50 g and additional measurements on the performance of the distillation system were taken. In the period June 1984 through September 1986 the TSTA system has processed well over 108 Ci of tritium. Total tritium emissions to the environment over this period have been less than 15 Ci. Personnel exposures during this period have totaled less than 100 person-mRem. To date, the development of tritium technology at TSTA has proceeded in progressive and orderly steps. In two years of operation with tritium, no major design flows have been uncovered

  4. Tritium metabolism in cow's milk after administration of tritiated water and of organically bound tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium was administered as THO and as organically bound tritium (OBT) to lactating cows. Urine and milk samples were collected and analyzed for tritium content. Plateau levels in milk water and in milk fat, lactose and casein were reached in about 20 days after feeding either THO or OBT. Comparison of the specific activity (pCi3H/g H) of the various milk constituents with the specific activity of the body water showed that, after administration of THO, the highest tritium incorporation occurred in lactose (0.58), followed by milk fat (0.36) and casein (0.27). Tritium incorporation in milk dry matter (0.45) is considerably higher than in most tissue components of several mammalian species after continuous ingestion of THO as reported in the literature. After feeding OBT, the highest tritium incorporation occurred in milk fat and to a lesser extent in casein. Tritium levels in lactose were surprisingly low and the reason for this is not clear. They were similar to those in milk water. Tritium levels in milk and urine water showed systematic differences during administration of OBT and after this was stopped. There was more tritium in milk water until the last day of OBT feeding and this situation was reversed after this. (author)

  5. A study on the safety of tritium storage and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For reduction of tritium release to the environment and utilization of tritium at industrial application and fusion technology, it is necessary to separate and store tritium. As a tritium separation and storage system, Tritium Removal Facility (TRF) and tritium storage vessel is under development in Korea. For the construction and operation of the system, it is necessary to estimate the safety of tritium storage system. As an isotope of hydrogen, tritium has similar hazards to hydrogen. In addition to the hydrogen hazards, due to radioactive decay of tritium, it is necessary to consider the risk of hydrogen and radioactive decay for the safe storage. In this study, hazards of hydrogen and the risk due to storage of tritium are reviewed. The safety related factors are suggested in terms of classification of hydrogen hazards and problems related to the tritium storage. The major design parameters of the vessel of foreign countries for the storage and transport of tritium are reviewed. By review of major safety parameters related to the tritium storage, the results of this study can be applied and helpful to the development and design of tritium storage vessel in Korea. Also, the results can be useful at design of the tritium treatment facility

  6. The diaplacental transfer and teratogenicity of tritium in organic compounds. Diaplazentare Verteilung und teratogene Wirkung von organisch gebundenem Tritium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistner, G.; Wiggenhauser, A.; Krestel, R.

    1987-10-01

    In the introductory section of this report the relevant literature on the environmental prevalence of tritium, its uptake and distribution in the organisms as well as on the calculation of tritium-related exposure risks is reviewed in brief. The literature study as well as recent workshops on tritium (as e.g. in Karlsruhe, 1986) emphasize the role of organically bound tritium in the assessment of tritium-related radiation exposure. (orig./MG).

  7. Tritium means of detection and of protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is an attempt to correlate present data concerning tritium, especially from the health physics points of view. The various detection and measurement methods are reviewed in turn: measurement of tritium in the atmosphere, in liquids and on surfaces. The operation of various types of apparatus is analyzed and the sensitivity limits deduced from laboratory tests are given. Otter sections are devoted to the means of protection which can be used against inhalation of tritium (ventilation, protective clothing) and to calculations of the changes in atmospheric pollution in a given place and of the time spent in a contaminated zone. The last part deals with the decontamination of equipment contaminated with tritium. (author)

  8. FDMH - The tritium model in RODOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of its RTD (Research and Technological Development) Framework Programmes, the European Commission has supported the development of the RODOS (Real-time On-line DecisiOn Support) system for off-site emergency management. The project started in 1989 focusing on PWR/LWR type accidents and using experience from the Chernobyl accident. In 1996 it was realised that tritium should be included in the list of radionuclides, as large tritium sources exist in Europe and to allow a potential expansion of the RODOS system for application on future fusion reactor accidents. The National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) in Romania - in close co-operation with the Research Centre Karlsruhe (FZK) - was charged to develop the tritium module, based on previous experience in environmental tritium modelling and the operation of CANDU reactor-based NPP in Romania (with potential tritium accidents). Tritium, being an isotope of hydrogen, is incorporated immediately in the life cycle and its transport into the biosphere differs considerably from other radionuclides treated by the RODOS system. Concentrations in the individual compartments may change very rapidly (hours) under varying environmental conditions and conversion to organic forms by biochemical and metabolic processes takes place in plants and animals. Consequently, the tritium code in RODOS was developed as a separate module and harmonisation in data sets and interfaces with other food chain modules integrated in RODOS was ensured. Presently, the tritium module - FDMH- is integrated and documented in the RODOS system, delivering time dependent tritium concentration (as tritiated water or organically bound tritium) in plant and animal products, inhalation dose and ingestion dose for various groups of population, after an accident emitting tritiated water and for up to 2520 locations around the source. FDMH incorporates many improved techniques in radiological assessment and makes

  9. Technologies for immobilization and disposal of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was done within a program one of whose objectives was to know the state of the technology development for tritium separation in the moderator circuit at HWR and to define the possible technologies to be applied to the Argentine nuclear power plants. Within this framework the strategies adopted by each country and the available technologies for a safe disposal of tritium, not only in its gaseous state tritium but also as tritiated water were analyzed. It is considered that if the selected separation method is such that the tritium is in its gaseous state, the hydride formation for long periods of immobilization should be studied. whereas if it were triated water immobilization should be studied to choose the technology between cementation and drying agents, in both cases the final disposal site will have to be selected. (author). 8 refs

  10. Synthesis of tritium-labelled natural prostaglandins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most suitable method for the preparation of tritium-labelled prostaglandins is the biosynthetic procedure. Polyunsaturated labelled fatty acids are converted into prostaglandins by a prostaglandin synthetase enzyme system produced from sheep seminal vesicule, and the crude product is purified using thin layer chromatography. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are prepared in a reaction series. Tritium is introduced at the very last step. A very little amount (10-20 mg) of tritium-labelled prostaglandin E2 can be converted into A2, B2 and F2 respectively, conversion and separation being carried out simultaneously on the same silica plate. After the separation on thin layer silica gel the obtained tritium-labelled prostaglandin (PC) was chemically and radiochemically pure, its activity was 3700 GBq/mmol (100 Ci/mmol) and it was suitable for RIA kits. (author)

  11. Release of gaseous tritium during reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 50% of the tritium put through an LWR reprocessing plant is obtained as tritium-bearing water, HTO. Gaseous tritium, HT has a radiotoxicity which is by 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of HTO. A possibility for the removal of HTO could therefore be its conversion into the gas phase with subsequent emission of the HT into the atmosphere. However, model computations which are, in part, supported by experimental data reveal that the radiation exposure caused by HT release is only by about one order of magnitude below that caused by HTO. This is being attributed to the relatively quick reoxidation of HT by soil bacteria. Two alternatives for producing HT from HTO (electrolysis; voloxidation with subsequent electrolysis) are presented and compared with the reference process of deep-well injection of HTO. The authors come to the conclusion that tritium removal by HT release into the atmosphere cannot be recommended at present under either radiological or economic aspects. (orig.)

  12. Tritium proof-of-principle injector experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tritium Proof-of-Principle (TPOP) pellet injector was designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the production and acceleration of tritium pellets for fueling future fision reactors. The injector uses the pipe-gun concept to form pellets directly in a short liquid-helium-cooled section of the barrel. Pellets are accelerated by using high-pressure hydrogen supplied from a fast solenoid valve. A versatile, tritium-compatible gas-handling system provides all of the functions needed to operate the gun, including feed gas pressure control and flow control, plus helium separation and preparation of mixtures. These systems are contained in a glovebox for secondary containment of tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). 18 refs., 3 figs

  13. Organically bound tritium, OBT: Its true constitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium which is analytically determined to be non exchangeable bound in tissue solids is assumed to be bound to carbon. Furthermore, it is followed, the biochemical Powys's by photosynthesis or enzymatic transfer reactions are retarded by the kinetic isotope effect leading to discrimination of tritium in biomolecules. Contradictory, the logistic growth analysis of plants discloses a larger intrinsic growth rate of OBT than of OBH resulting in tritium accumulation in biomolecules. Exchange experiments providing fractionation factors of 1.4 and 2 confirm this accumulation. In summary, a larger part of the so called OBT is not carbon bound but consists of tritium positioned in hydrogen bridges of biopolymers which have been occupied during formation of the molecules and which became later inacessible for exchange (so called buried hydrogens). Furthermore, there are experimental results indicating even rapid exchange during the 'in vivo'-state but inhibited in the 'in vitro'-state which is commonly given in biosamples prepared for analysis. (author)

  14. Development of Tritium Permeation Analysis Code (TPAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh; Mike Patterson

    2010-10-01

    Idaho National Laboratory developed the Tritium Permeation Analysis Code (TPAC) for tritium permeation in the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR). All the component models in the VHTR were developed and were embedded into the MATHLAB SIMULINK package with a Graphic User Interface. The governing equations of the nuclear ternary reaction and thermal neutron capture reactions from impurities in helium and graphite core, reflector, and control rods were implemented. The TPAC code was verified using analytical solutions for the tritium birth rate from the ternary fission, the birth rate from 3He, and the birth rate from 10B. This paper also provides comparisons of the TPAC with the existing other codes. A VHTR reference design was selected for tritium permeation study from the reference design to the nuclear-assisted hydrogen production plant and some sensitivity study results are presented based on the HTGR outlet temperature of 750 degrees C.

  15. Survey of pumps for tritium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report considers many different types of pumps for their possible use in pumping tritium gas in the low, intermediate and high vacuum ranges. No one type of pump is suitable for use over the wide range of pumping pressure required in a typical pumping system. The favoured components for such a system are: bellows pump (low vacuum); orbiting scroll pump (intermediate vacuum); magnetically suspended turbomolecular pump (high vacuum); cryopump (high vacuum). Other pumps which should be considered for possible future development are: mound modified vane pump; SRTI wobble pump; roots pump with canned motor. It is proposed that a study be made of a future tritium pumping system in a Canadian tritium facility, e.g. a tritium laboratory

  16. Tritium glovebox stripper system seismic design evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinnell, J. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Klein, J. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-01

    The use of glovebox confinement at US Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities has been discussed in numerous publications. Glovebox confinement protects the workers from radioactive material (especially tritium oxide), provides an inert atmosphere for prevention of flammable gas mixtures and deflagrations, and allows recovery of tritium released from the process into the glovebox when a glovebox stripper system (GBSS) is part of the design. Tritium recovery from the glovebox atmosphere reduces emissions from the facility and the radiological dose to the public. Location of US DOE defense programs facilities away from public boundaries also aids in reducing radiological doses to the public. This is a study based upon design concepts to identify issues and considerations for design of a Seismic GBSS. Safety requirements and analysis should be considered preliminary. Safety requirements for design of GBSS should be developed and finalized as a part of the final design process.

  17. Tritium measurements with a tandem accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, R.; Klein, J.; Fink, D.

    1990-06-01

    Tritium concentrations ( 3H: 2H) of less than 10 -15 are readily measurable with almost any tandem accelerator and with an overall detection efficiency as high as 4.5%. The isobar, 3He, and other potential sources of interference (mainly 6Li, 2H and 1H) can all be removed by an absorber in front of the triton detector, so there is little need for analyzing elements other than the negative-and positive-ion magnets found on most tandems. The technique is particularly well suited for detecting tritium in deuterium absorbed in a metal and testing for cold fusion. We caution that tritium can occur in commercial deuterium and heavy water from sources other than cold fusion; one sample was observed to have a tritium-to-deuterium ratio of 10 -10.

  18. Permeability of protective coatings to tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The permeability of four protective coatings to tritium gas and tritiated water was investigated. The coatings, including two epoxies, one vinyl and one urethane, were selected for their suitability in CANDU plant service in Ontario Hydro. Sorption rates of tritium gas into the coatings were considerably larger than for tritiated water, by as much as three to four orders of magnitude. However, as a result of the very large solubility of tritiated water in the coatings, the overall permeability to tritium gas and tritiated water is comparable. Marked differences were also evident among the four coatings, the vinyl exhibiting an abnormally high retention of free water because of a highly porous surface structure. It appears that epoxy coatings having a high pigment-to-binder ratio are most suited for coating concrete in tritium handling facilities

  19. Tritium-management survey of Wolsong 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commissioned in 1983, Wolsong 1 has had one of the best lifetime capacity factors in the world. It has also maintained tritium emissions and heavy-water losses at or below those of similar CANDU 6 reactors. To further ensure that emissions remain as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), Wolsong 1, AECL and the KEPC0 (Korean Electric Power Company)Research Center collaborated on a survey of tritium management at Wolsong 1 during the spring of 1995. This survey identified similarities and differences between Wolsong 1 and the Canadian CANDU 6 stations. It also corroborated several of Wolsong 1's plans to further refine and upgrade tritium management. This report summarizes those aspects of the Wolsong 1 tritium survey. (author)

  20. Tritium Depth Profiles in 316 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torikai, Yuji; Murata, Daiju; Penzhorn, Ralf-Dieter; Akaishi, Kenya; Watanabe, Kuniaki; Matsuyama, Masao

    To investigate the behavior of hydrogen uptake and release by 316 stainless steel (SS316), as-received and finely polished stainless steel specimens were exposed at 573 K to tritium gas diluted with hydrogen. Then tritium concentration in the exposed specimens was measured as a function of depth using a chemical etching method. All the tritium concentration profiles showed a sharp drop in the range of 10 μm from the top surface up to the bulk. The amount of tritium absorbed into the polished specimens was three times larger than that into the as-received specimen. However, the polishing effects disappeared by exposing to the air for a long time.

  1. Methods of tritium recovery from molten lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to keep the tritium inventory in a blanket of a thermonuclear reactor at a low level both to eliminate possible hydriding of structural components and to reduce inventory cost. Removing the tritium from a lithium blanket by fractional distillation, flash vaporization, and fractional crystallization was investigated. No definitive data are available either on the vapor-liquid equilibrium between lithium and tritium at low T2 concentrations, or on the rate of formation and decomposition of lithium tritide. The final distinction between the recovery systems discussed in this report will depend on such data, but presently distillation appears to be the best alternate to the diffusion scheme proposed by A.P. Fraas. The capital cost of equipment necessary to remove tritium by distillation appears to be greater than 10 million dollars for a 5000 MW system, whereas the capital cost associated with the diffusion process has been estimated to be 4 million dollars

  2. Origin, handling and storage of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origin, handling and intermediate and/or final storage of tritium in the Federal Republic of Germany are described and evaluated. For this the following subjects - use, amounts of waste and emission, waste handling, transport, legal situation and points relevant to safety in respect to tritium handling, general valuation and future development - are completely presented. Presently and in future the waste volume will be determined by the fact that nearly the whole amount of tritium waste activity is contained in a small part of the overall waste volume. The rest is distributed to a relatively big waste volume accordingly showing low activity concentration levels. Future efforts are mainly necessary in respect to the handling of tritium waste. (orig.)

  3. Biomedical tritium applications with AMS detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are numerous applications for tritium (3 H) as a tracer isotope in biomedicine commonly combined with liquid scintillation counting method. The use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a rather new detection method will, enlarge and open new possibilities for tritium applications in biomedicine, especially when sample volumes are small. The tritium in the samples has to be transformed to solid form, which yields a high output of negative hydrogen ion current. The sample preparation is done in two steps: firstly extracting water from the biological sample and secondly, extracting hydrogen/tritium from the water and forming a chemically suitable compound for the AMS ion source. In this paper a chemical for the sample preparation is described. The results of the first measurements of tritiated water with known activity using the AMS detection technique will also be presented.(authors)

  4. Public impact of released radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents during active test at Rokkasho reprocessing plant (RRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RRP started its active test with spent fuel on the 31st March 2006. When the spent fuel is reprocessed, radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent such as krypton-85, tritium, etc are released. In order to keep the dose to the public as low as reasonably achievable, RRP removes radioactive materials from radioactive gaseous liquid effluent as much as reasonably achievable by the help of evaporation, scrubbing, filtering, etc, according to their physical and chemical form, and then releases effluent through the main stack and the sea discharge pipeline that allow to make dispersion and dilution very efficient. Also, concerning the radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents to be released into the environment, we control annual release amount not to exceed the target values in our Safety Rule by monitoring the radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents. RRP reprocessed 320 tUpr of spent fuel during April 2006 to February 2008. In this report, we report about; The amount of radioactive gaseous and liquid effluent during April 2006 to March 2008. The performance of removal of radioactive materials in gaseous and liquid effluents at RRP. The impact on the public from radioactive effluents during the active test at RRP. (author)

  5. Tritium Issues in Next Step Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium issues will play a central role in the performance and operation of next-step deuterium-tritium (DT) burning plasma tokamaks and the safety aspects associated with tritium will attract intense public scrutiny. The orders-of-magnitude increase in duty cycle and stored energy will be a much larger change than the increase in plasma performance necessary to achieve high fusion gain and ignition. Erosion of plasma-facing components will scale up with the pulse length from being barely measurable on existing machines to centimeter scale. Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) devices with carbon plasma-facing components will accumulate tritium by co-deposition with the eroded carbon and this will strongly constrain plasma operations. We report on a novel laser-based method to remove co-deposited tritium from carbon plasma-facing components in tokamaks. A major fraction of the tritium trapped in a co-deposited layer during the deuterium-tritium (DT) campaign on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was released by heating with a scanning laser beam. This technique offers the potential for tritium removal in a next-step DT device without the use of oxidation and the associated deconditioning of the plasma-facing surfaces and expense of processing large quantities of tritium oxide. The operational lifetime of alternative materials such as tungsten has significant uncertainties due to melt layer loss during disruptions. Production of dust and flakes will need careful monitoring and minimization, and control and accountancy of the tritium inventory will be critical issues. Many of the tritium issues in Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) are similar to MFE, but some, for example those associated with the target factory, are unique to IFE. The plasma-edge region in a tokamak has greater complexity than the core due to lack of poloidal symmetry and nonlinear feedback between the plasma and wall. Sparse diagnostic coverage and low dedicated experimental run time has hampered the

  6. Tritium dynamics in vegetables: experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium levels were monitored in tomato and cucumber grown in a prototype waste heat greenhouse adjacent to the Pickering Generating Station. Similar horticultural species of tomato were also grown in a controlled environmental chamber to measure the dynamics of tritium uptake and desorption. The tissue-free-water tritium (TFWT) concentration in the ripe greenhouse produce ranged from 0.4 to 0.8 of the tritium concentration in air moisture, with a mean of 0.5. TFWT concentration in foliage was higher and more variable, with the tritium ratio of leaf to air moisture averaging 0.8. Growth chamber experiments with soil isolated from air and irrigated with uncontaminated water provided somewhat lower TFWT ratios for ripe-fruit/air (0.20) and foliage/air (0.45). In the growth chamber experiments more than 200 hours were required to reach 50% of the steady state concentration in green fruit, and the steady state concentration was significantly lower in green than in ripe fruit. HTO desorption was not significant in small or medium ripe fruit up to 16 days following harvest, nor was it substantial during a ten day period in large mature fruit on the vine. Growth chamber experiments involving irrigation with tritiated water are underway for comparison purposes. For greenhouse produce, the relative specific activity ratio of tritium in the tissue-bound component of the produce to the TFWT component was 3.2. However, the bound component accounts for only 9% of the total tritium content. Total annual doses from tritium in produce are typically 0.1 mrem/a

  7. Tritium balance modeling in a macroscale catchment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute of Hydrology at the Freiburg University (IHF) is working in cooperation with the German Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) on a project implementing tritium data into modeling concepts of large river systems. Tritium concentrations that are measured in precipitation (Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation - GNIP) and discharge (BfG - HYDABA data base) are combined with information on water balance components on monthly basis over a period of 50 years. Precipitation and potential evapotranspiration were calculated from the German Weather Authority (DWD). The TRIBIL software was developed to process a large amount of data sets. It allows considering tritium input from precipitation, nuclear power plants and channel systems. Evapotranspiration from land and water surface as well as snow cover are considered for calculations of infiltrating water. Beneath a direct runoff component the amount of infiltrating water is distinguished into fast and slow groundwater reservoirs were each consists of a mobile and immobile fraction. The amount of tritium stored in these groundwater fractions is calculated using discharge recession curve analyses. An outline of the model structure as well as results for the river systems Fulda, Werra and Weser-1 is presented. A comparison of measured and modeled tritium concentrations in discharge showed considerable fits. Modeling efficiencies are around 0.8. The results allow an interpretation of storage volumes and residence times of the supposed groundwater reservoirs. Because there is no influence through nuclear power plants, tritium processing industries and channels the Fulda and Werra catchments serve as a reference for continuing studies in the Weser catchment (48.300 km2). An implementation of tritium emission by nuclear power plants will be considered with extending catchment site. Including the conservative tracer tritium into large scale modeling is a rather new approach. Feasibilities and possibilities are

  8. Energy Metabolism and Human Dosimetry of Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of current revision of human dosimetry of 14C and tritium, undertaken by the International Commission of Radiological Protection, we propose a novel approach based on energy metabolism and a simple biokinetic model for the dynamics of dietary intake (organic 14C, tritiated water and Organically Bound Tritium-OBT). The model predicts increased doses for HTO and OBT comparing to ICRP recommendations, supporting recent findings

  9. Tritium in austenitic stainless steel vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austenitic stainless steels are normally recommended for components of hydrogen-handling equipment in applications where high in-service reliability is required. The literature leading to this recommendation is reviewed, and it is shown that AISI Type 316L stainless is particularly suitable for use in tritium-handling and storage systems. When made of this steel, the storage vessels will be extremely resistant to any degradation from tritium in both routine and accident conditions. (author)

  10. Zero effluent; Efluente zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Silvio Rogerio; Santos, Angelo Francisco dos [Liquigas Distribuidora S.A., Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    A scenery of water shortage and the search for profitability improvement obligate the companies to exercise their creativity and to adopt alternative methods to the conventional ones to preserve the environmental resources. The 'Effluent Zero' project comes from a paradigms changing that the environmental preservation is a necessary cost. It brings a new analysis approach of this problem with the purpose to adapt the investments and operational costs with the effluents treatment to the demands of the productive processes. In Liquigas, the project brought significant results; made a potential reduction of nearly 90% in the investments of the effluents treatment systems. That means nearly 13% in reduction in the total investments in modernization and upgrade of the existents companies installations and of 1,6% in the total operational costs of the Company. Further more, it has contributed for a reduction of until 43% of the water consumption in the bottling process of the Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). This way, the project resulted in effective actions of environmental protection with relevant economic benefits. (author)

  11. Characterisation of redundant tritium light devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaseous tritium light devices (GTLDs) are currently used widely as long lasting totally independent sources of illumination. Although tritium is of low radiological significance particularly when in gaseous form, because of their widespread use they could give rise to hazardous situations if action is not taken to provide a sensible recycling and disposal route for redundant devices. As a first step to developing this treatment process a number of GTLDs have been destructively examined to determine the amount and speciation of the remaining tritium. This report covers a further investigation sponsored by HMIP which reviewed the production process for GTLDs to identify a typical GTLD type from which a set of specimens with known ages could be selected. These were then subjected to destructive analysis to measure the total tritium, its speciation and the conditions necessary to effect the release of absorbed tritium. The data provided by the analysis programme has been used in a review of treatment process options for handling redundant GTLDs which ranged from long term storage, tritium recovery and recycle to disposal. In addition the results have been used to assess the possible hazards which could arise from the accidental disposal of typical GTLD packages to an open refuse site. (author)

  12. Management of tritium European Spallation Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) will produce tritium via spallation and activation processes during operational activities. Within the location of ESS facility in Lund, Sweden site it is mandatory to demonstrate that the management strategy of the produced tritium ensures the compliance with the country regulation criteria. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the different aspects of the tritium management in ESS facility. Besides the design parameter study of the helium coolant purification system of the target the consequences of the tritium releasing into the environment were also analyzed. Calculations show that the annual release of tritium during the normal operations represents a small fraction from the estimated total dose. However, more refined calculations of migration of activated-groundwater should be performed for higher hydraulic conductivities, with the availability of the results on soil examinations. With the assumption of 100% release of tritium to the atmosphere during the occurring of the extreme accidents, it was found as well that the total dose complies with the constraint. (authors)

  13. Solid breeder blanket design and tritium breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermonuclear D-T power plants will have to be tritium self-sufficient. In addition to recovering the energy carried by the fusion neutrons (about 80% of the fusion energy), the blanket of the reactor will thus have to breed tritium to replace that burnt in the fusion process. This paper is an attempt to cover in a concise way the questions of tritium breeding, and the influence of this issue on the design of, and the material selection for, power reactor blanket relying on the use of solid breeder materials. Tritium breeding requirements - to breed one tritium per fusion neutron - are shown to be quite demanding. To meet them, the blanket must incorporate, in addition to a tritium breeding lithium compound, a neutron multiplier so as to compensate for neutron losses. Presently prefered lithium compounds are Li2O, LiAlO2, Li2ZrO3, Li4SiO4. The neutron multiplier considered in most design concepts is beryllium. Furthermore, the blanket must be designed with a view to minimizing these neutron losses (search for compactness and high coverage ratio of the plasma while minimizing the amount of structures and coolant). The design guidelines are justified and the technological problems which limit their implementation are discussed and illustrated with typical designs of solid breeder blanket. (orig.)

  14. A New Solid State Tritium Surface Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditionally the amount of tritium on a surface is determined by swiping the surface with a material such as filter paper and counting the removed tritium by scintillation. While effective, this method can be time consuming, can alter the surface, only measures removable tritium and produces radioactive waste. For a given application each of these considerations may or may not be a disadvantage. A solid state monitor, on the other hand, has the potential to provide rapid analysis, not alter the surface, measure all tritium on a surface and produce little or not radioactive waste. This allure has promoted open wall ion chamber and PIN diode-based tritium surface monitor development, and these techniques have enjoyed certain success. Recently the first tests were performed with an avalanche photodiode (APD) for surface tritium measurement. While quite similar in concept to PIN diode based measurements, side-by-side testing showed that the APD provided substantially better counting efficiency. Considerations included count rate, background, sensitivity, stability and effect of ambient light. Of particular importance in the US, the APD was able to measure concentrations down to the 'free release' limit, i.e., the concentration below which items can be removed from radiological control areas

  15. Tritium release from neutron irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reactortechnik

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important open issues related to beryllium for fusion applications refers to the kinetics of the tritium release as a function of neutron fluence and temperature. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating the beryllium response under neutron irradiation. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from the above mentioned irradiation experiments, trying to elucidate the tritium release controlling processes. In agreement with previous studies it has been found that release starts at about 500-550degC and achieves a maximum at about 700-750degC. The observed release at about 500-550degC is probably due to tritium escaping from chemical traps, while the maximum release at about 700-750degC is due to tritium escaping from physical traps. The consequences of a direct contact between beryllium and ceramics during irradiation, causing tritium implanting in a surface layer of beryllium up to a depth of about 40 mm and leading to an additional inventory which is usually several times larger than the neutron-produced one, are also presented and the effects on the tritium release are discussed. (author)

  16. Tritium level along Romanian Black Sea Coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishing the tritium level along the Romanian Black Sea Coast, after 10 years of exploitation of the nuclear power plant from Cernavoda, is a first step in evaluating its impact on the Black Sea ecosystem. The monitoring program consists of tritium activity concentration measurement in sea water and precipitation from Black Sea Coast between April 2005 and April 2006. The sampling points were spread over the Danube-Black Sea Canal - before the locks Agigea and Navodari, and Black Sea along the coast to the Bulgarian border. The average tritium concentration in sea water collected from the sampling locations had the value of 11.1 ± 2.1 TU, close to tritium concentration in precipitation. Although an operating nuclear power plant exists in the monitored area, the values of tritium concentration in two locations are slightly higher than those recorded elsewhere. To conclude, it could be emphasized that until now, Cernavoda NPP did not had any influence on the tritium concentration of the Black Sea Shore. (authors)

  17. Tritium evolution from various morphologies of palladium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have been able to extend the tritium production techniques to various novel morphologies of palladium. These include small solid wires of various diameters and a type of pressed powder wire and a plasma cell. In most successful experiments, the amount of palladium required, for an equivalent tritium output, has been reduced by a factor of 100 over the older powder methods. In addition, they have observed rates of tritium production (>5 nCi/h) that far exceed most of the previous results. Unfortunately, the methods that they currently use to obtain the tritium are poorly understood and consequently there are numerous variables that need to be investigated before the new methods are as reliable and repeatable as the previous techniques. For instance, it seems that surface and/or bulk impurities play a major role in the successful generation of any tritium. In those samples with total impurity concentrations of >400 ppM essentially no tritium has been generated by the gas loading and electrical simulation methods

  18. Environmental and Effluent Monitoring at ANSTO Sites, 2002-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of environmental and effluent monitoring at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre (LHSTC) and the National Medical Cyclotron (NMC) from January 2002 to June 2003. Potential effective dose rates to the general public from airborne discharges from the LHSTC site were less than 0.01 mSv/year, well below the 1 mSv/year dose rate limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the Australian National Occupational Health and Safety Commission. The effective dose rates to hypothetical individuals potentially exposed to radiation in routine liquid effluent discharges from the LHSTC were recently calculated to be less than 0.001 mSv/year. This is much less than dose rates estimated for members of public potentially exposed to airborne emissions. The levels of tritium detected in roundwater and stormwater at the LHSTC were less than the Australian drinking water guidelines. The airborne and liquid effluent emissions from the NMC were below the ARPANSA-approved notification levels and NSW EPA limits, respectively. ANSTO's routine operations at the LHSTC and the NMC make only a very small addition to the natural background radiation dose experienced by members of the Australian public. (authors)

  19. Application of solid-phase heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation for preparation of ethanolamine labelled by tritium and ethanolamides of aroachidonic, eicosanepentaenic, docosahexaenic acids labelled by tritium partially

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethanolamine labelled with tritium with 35-40 Ci/mmol molar radioactivity is produced from glycolic acid nitrile by means of solid-phase heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation on 5% Rh/C. Preparational quantities of labelled ethanolamine are produced with 10-20% yield with the use of 5% of pd?C and 70% of glycolic acid aqueous nitrile, the molar activity of the preparation required is 4-6 Ci/mmol. Ethanolamides of arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic acids are synthesized from the labelled ethanolamine. The compound produced are tested by chromatographic and fermentative methods

  20. Appendix for blanket - University of Wisconsin: tritium issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selection of the liquid metal alloys, Li17Pb83, as the tritium breeder with helium serving as the heat transfer fluid suggests two alternative techniques for the removal of tritium from the breeder. The low solubility of tritium in this liquid breeder requires only a simple vacuum degassing technique for tritium removal. Because of this high tritium partial pressure, tritium removal in the present design could potentially be achieved by either (a) slow circulation of the liquid LiPb alloy to an external degassing system, or (b) noncirculation of the liquid breeder so that the tritium permeates through the walls of the coolant tubes into the circulating helium for subsequent recovery. Both of these techniques were investigated with special attention given to the resultant tritium inventories in the liquid breeder and the helium system, and the potential for tritium permeation at the steam generator (SG)

  1. Studies on steps affecting tritium residence time in solid blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the self sustaining of CTR fuel cycle, the effective tritium recovery from blankets is essential. This means that not only tritium breeding ratio must be larger than 1.0, but also high recovering speed is required for the short residence time of tritium in blankets. Short residence time means that the tritium inventory in blankets is small. In this paper, the tritium residence time and tritium inventory in a solid blanket are modeled by considering the steps constituting tritium release. Some of these tritium migration processes were experimentally evaluated. The tritium migration steps in a solid blanket using sintered breeding materials consist of diffusion in grains, desorption at grain edges, diffusion and permeation through grain boundaries, desorption at particle edges, diffusion and percolation through interconnected pores to purging stream, and convective mass transfer to stream. Corresponding to these steps, diffusive, soluble, adsorbed and trapped tritium inventories and the tritium in gas phase are conceivable. The code named TTT was made for calculating these tritium inventories and the residence time of tritium. An example of the results of calculation is shown. The blanket is REPUTER-1, which is the conceptual design of a commercial reversed field pinch fusion reactor studied at the University of Tokyo. The experimental studies on the migration steps of tritium are reported. (Kako, I.)

  2. Tritium balance modeling in a macroscale catchment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Institute of Hydrology at the Freiburg University (IHF) is working in cooperation with the German Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) on a project implementing tritium data into modeling concepts of large river systems. Tritium concentrations that are measured in precipitation (Global Network of Isotopes in Precipitation - GNIP) and discharge (BfG - HYDABA data base) are combined with information on water balance components on monthly basis over a period of 50 years. In a first step the Fulda and Werra catchments (6.890 km2 and 5.410 km2) in Germany were used to test the model approach, to study residence times, groundwater storage behaviour and water balance components. Environmental tritium in precipitation that was mainly introduced into the water cycle by nuclear weapon tests in the 60s is the source of tritium input in this catchments. Precipitation and potential evapotranspiration were calculated from the German Weather Authority (DWD). The TRIBIL software was developed to process a large amount of data sets. It allows to consider tritium input from precipitation, nuclear power plants and channel systems. Evapotranspiration from land and water surface as well as snow cover are considered for calculations of infiltrating water. Beneath a direct runoff component the amount of infiltrating water is distinguished into fast and slow groundwater reservoirs were each consists of a mobile and immobile fraction. The amount of tritium stored in these groundwater fractions is calculated using discharge recession curve analyses. An outline of the model structure as well as results for the river systems Fulda and Werra will be presented. A comparison of measured and modeled tritium concentrations in discharge showed considerable fits. Modeling efficiencies are around 0.8. The results allow an interpretation of storage volumes and residence times of the supposed groundwater reservoirs. Because there is no influence through nuclear power plants, tritium

  3. Tritium hydrology of the Mississippi River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, R.L.

    2004-01-01

    In the early 1960s, the US Geological Survey began routinely analysing river water samples for tritium concentrations at locations within the Mississippi River basin. The sites included the main stem of the Mississippi River (at Luling Ferry, Louisiana), and three of its major tributaries, the Ohio River (at Markland Dam, Kentucky), the upper Missouri River (at Nebraska City, Nebraska) and the Arkansas River (near Van Buren, Arkansas). The measurements cover the period during the peak of the bomb-produced tritium transient when tritium concentrations in precipitation rose above natural levels by two to three orders of magnitude. Using measurements of tritium concentrations in precipitation, a tritium input function was established for the river basins above the Ohio River, Missouri River and Arkansas River sampling locations. Owing to the extent of the basin above the Luling Ferry site, no input function was developed for that location. The input functions for the Ohio and Missouri Rivers were then used in a two-component mixing model to estimate residence times of water within these two basins. (The Arkansas River was not modelled because of extremely large yearly variations in flow during the peak of the tritium transient.) The two components used were: (i) recent precipitation (prompt outflow) and (ii) waters derived from the long-term groundwater reservoir of the basin. The tritium concentration of the second component is a function of the atmospheric input and the residence times of the groundwaters within the basin. Using yearly time periods, the parameters of the model were varied until a best fit was obtained between modelled and measured tritium data. The results from the model indicate that about 40% of the flow in the Ohio River was from prompt outflow, as compared with 10% for the Missouri River. Mean residence times of 10 years were calculated for the groundwater component of the Ohio River versus 4 years for the Missouri River. The mass flux of

  4. Application of Tritium Remote Control and Monitoring System (TRECAMS) to TFTR's tritium inventory management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TFTR has a stringent program to manage and account for its tritium inventory. In support of this a tritium inventory accounting capability has been implemented on TRECAMS. This was an ideal approach because TRECAMS is a high reliability system that monitors the necessary parameters, i.e., temperatures, pressures, valve positions, etc., to track the movement of tritium. It also has a powerful set of utilities which support such an application. This paper describes the application of TRECAMS to monitor the transfer of tritium between the Uranium Beds (UBEDs), the Tritium Gas Delivery Manifold (TGDM), 14 Tritium Use Point holding volumes, and the TFTR torus. Real time data is presented to the TFTR operators using graphical displays and trends. An event driven program automatically collects the data before and after tritium transfers, calculates differences and sums, tabulates the data and provides printed reports. The reports include summaries of tritium deliveries, bleedback operations, injections, a daily summary of delivery/bleedback activities, and a daily summary of injection activities. All reference data is archived and can be reproduced in a plotted or tabular format. This data can be displayed or printed by the TFTR Shift Supervisor's VAX workstation or by anyone with an account on the laboratory's VAX cluster

  5. Helium irradiation effects on tritium retention and long-term tritium release properties in polycrystalline tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DT+ ion irradiation with energy of 0.5 and 1.0 keV was performed on helium pre-irradiated tungsten and the amount of retained tritium and the long-term release of retained tritium in vacuum was investigated using an IP technique and BIXS. Tritium retention and long-term tritium release were significantly influenced by helium pre-irradiation. The amount of retained tritium increased until it reached 1 × 1017 He/cm2, and at 1 × 1018 He/cm2 it became smaller compared to 1 × 1017 He/cm2. The amount of retained tritium in tungsten without helium pre-irradiation largely decreased after several weeks preservation in vacuum, and the long-term release rate during vacuum preservation was retarded by helium pre-irradiation. The results indicate that the long-term tritium release and the helium irradiation effect on it should be taken into account for more precise estimation of tritium retention in the long-term use of tungsten in fusion devices

  6. Tritium levels in milk in the vicinity of chronic tritium releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, P; Guétat, Ph; Vichot, L; Leconte, N; Badot, P M; Gaucheron, F; Fromm, M

    2016-01-01

    Tritium is the radioactive isotope of hydrogen. It can be integrated into most biological molecules. Even though its radiotoxicity is weak, the effects of tritium can be increased following concentration in critical compartments of living organisms. For a better understanding of tritium circulation in the environment and to highlight transfer constants between compartments, we studied the tritiation of different agricultural matrices chronically exposed to tritium. Milk is one of the most frequently monitored foodstuffs in the vicinity of points known for chronic release of radionuclides firstly because dairy products find their way into most homes but also because it integrates deposition over large areas at a local scale. It is a food which contains all the main nutrients, especially proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. We thus studied the tritium levels of milk in chronic exposure conditions by comparing the tritiation of the main hydrogenated components of milk, first, component by component, then, sample by sample. Significant correlations were found between the specific activities of drinking water and free water of milk as well as between the tritium levels of cattle feed dry matter and of the main organic components of milk. Our findings stress the importance of the metabolism on the distribution of tritium in the different compartments. Overall, dilution of hydrogen in the environmental compartments was found to play an important role dimming possible isotopic effects even in a food chain chronically exposed to tritium. PMID:26551587

  7. Removal of Pyrethrin from Aqueous Effluents by Adsorptive Micellar Flocculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardon K. Kuipa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium adsorption of pyrethrin onto aggregates formed by the flocculation of micelles of the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS with aluminium sulphate is reported. The experimental results were analysed using different adsorption isotherms (Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Sips, Radke-Prausnitz, Temkin, linear equilibrium, and the Dubin-Radushkevich isotherms. The Freundlich and linear equilibrium isotherms best describe the adsorption of pyrethrin onto SDS micellar flocs, with the Freundlich adsorption constant, KF, and the mass distribution coefficient, KD, of 64.266 ((mg/g(L/mg1/n and 119.65 L/g, respectively. Applicability of the Freundlich adsorption model suggests that heterogeneous surface adsorption affects the adsorption. The mean free energy value estimated using the Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm was 0.136 kJ/mol indicating that physisorption may be predominant in the adsorption process.

  8. FDNH - the tritium module in RODOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of its RTD (Research and Technological Development) Framework Programmes, the European Commission has supported the development of the RODOS (Real-time On-line Decision Support) system for off-site emergency management. The project started in 1989 focusing on PWR/LWR type accidents and using experience from the Chernobyl accident. In 1997 it was realised that tritium should be included in the list of radionuclides, as large tritium sources exists in Europe and to allow a potential expansion of the RODOS system for application on future fusion reactor accidents. The National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) in Romania - in close co-operation with the Research Centre Karlsruhe (FZK) - was charged to develop the tritium module, based on previous experience in environmental tritium modelling and the operation of CANDU reactors in Romania (with potential tritium accidents). At present, the Food and Dose Module Hydrogen -(FDMH) - for tritium applications - is integrated and documented in the RODOS system. It calculates the time dependent tritium concentration (as tritiated water or organically bound tritium) in crops (as much as 22 different species) and up to 12 animal products, inhalation doses and ingestion dose from up to 34 diet items for various groups of the population and for up to 2520 locations around the source, following an accidental emission of tritiated water. FDMH incorporates many improved techniques in radiological assessment and makes intensively use of interdisciplinary research. It is developed in a modular structure with a variable time grid according to the physical processes. Differing from other models, using generic transfer parameters or parameters fitted on individual experiments, FDMH derives tritium transfer rates based on physical and physiological process analysis, using scientifically accepted results from interdisciplinary research on, among others, land-atmosphere interaction, water cycle in the

  9. Tritium-enrichment via CECE-process with high temperature steam electrolysis (HOT ELLY)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous waste which is a by-product of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, is contaminated with tritium in the form of HTO. This waste must be disposed of in a suitable compact manner. In order to minimize waste volume, tritiated water is enriched by several orders of magnitude of its original concentration. This task is accomplished by using the existing combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE)-Process, which is presently in pilot operation with tritium in a German nuclear research facility (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, KfK, FRG). Substantial energy reduction can be achieved by substituting the conventional water electrolysis by high-temperature steam electrolysis (HOT ELLY) for separating tritiated water into its components

  10. Recovery of tritium from a liquid lithium blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talbot, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    The sorption of tritium on yttrium from liquid lithium and the subsequent release of tritium from yttrium by thermal regeneration of the metal sorbent were investigated to study such a tritium-recovery process for a fusion reactor blanket of liquid lithium. Recent static sorption experiments have shown the effects of lithium temperature and possible impurities on the sorption of tritium. Diffusivity data, obtained from previous tritium recovery experiments, were evaluated to show the importance of the yttrium surface condition in controlling the release of tritium.

  11. Information for establishing bioassay measurements and evaluations of tritium exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes information and references used in developing regulatory guidance on programs for the bioassay of tritium as well as information useful in planning and conducting tritium bioassay programs and evaluating bioassay data. A review of literature on tritium radiobiology is included to provide a ready source of information useful for estimating internal doses of tritium and risks for the various tritium compounds and forms, including elemental (gaseous) tritium. Simplified and conservative dose conversion factors are derived and tabulated for easy reference in program planning, safety evaluations, and compliance determinations

  12. Information for establishing bioassay measurements and evaluations of tritium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, A.

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes information and references used in developing regulatory guidance on programs for the bioassay of tritium as well as information useful in planning and conducting tritium bioassay programs and evaluating bioassay data. A review of literature on tritium radiobiology is included to provide a ready source of information useful for estimating internal doses of tritium and risks for the various tritium compounds and forms, including elemental (gaseous) tritium. Simplified and conservative dose conversion factors are derived and tabulated for easy reference in program planning, safety evaluations, and compliance determinations.

  13. Radiation treatment of sewage effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The water demand of the past several years increased rapidly. Recycling of municipal wastewater is the effective means of coping with water shortage in Tokyo. We studied the radiation treatment method of further purification of the effluent from sewage treatment plant. By gamma irradiation the refractory organic substances in effluent were decomposed. The COD values decreased and the light brown color faded with increasing dose. The high molecular weight components in effluent were degraded to lower molecular weight substances and were decomposed finally to carbon dioxide. Recent attention has been given to the disadvantages of using chlorine as a disinfectant of municipal wastewater effluents. It has been shown that the chlorination of organic substances in water may produce chlorinated hydrocarbons with carcinogenic properties. So a development of the effective sterilization method for the effluent has been needed instead of chlorine. The radiation sterilization of coliforms and total bacteria in primary effluent, secondary effluent and rapid sand filtered effluent were studied. Coliforms were very sensitive to radiation treatment in comparison with total bacteria. Especially, coliforms in secondary and rapid sand filtered effluents were disinfected to 10 % of initial at 0.1 kGy. (author)

  14. Tritium in liquid phase in a BWR-5 like Laguna Verde; Tritio en fase liquida en un BWR-5 como Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tijerina S, F.; Vargas A, A.; Cardenas J, J., E-mail: francisco.tijerina@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Subgerencia de Ingenieria, Carretera Veracruz-Medellin Km 7.5, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    In boiling water reactors (BWR), the tritium (H{sub 3}) takes place mainly as a result of ternary fissions in the nuclear reactors, of those which 75% are in gaseous form and 25% in liquid form. In the liquid phase, the tritium is transported to the pipes of the primary coolant toward condensed tanks or tanks of drainage excesses of radioactive equipment, located in external areas of a BWR, as well as to the processes of radioactive wastes to be able to be directed to the liquid effluents. For that reason, is necessary to know the possible routes of the transport and processes of the tritium in a BWR to control this radioisotope in the site of the event of leaks in equipment s and buried pipes, avoiding that emigrates toward underground flowing and an impact to the environment and to the people in general. (Author)

  15. Tritium isotopic exchange in air detritiation dryers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic exchange between tritiated and non-tritiated water species in a molecular sieve bed has been demonstrated. At high humidities (+6 degrees Celsius dew point) the rate of tritium isotopic exchange in a 2.4 L molecular sieve bed has been demonstrated to be at least 50% of published exchange rates. In an industrial-sized air detritiation dryer, utilizing the pretreatment technique of H2O steam washing to elute the residual tritium, a DF of 12 600 has been demonstrated when operating at an inlet vapor tritium concentration of 14 Ci/kg and at inlet and outlet dew points of 4.8 and -54 degrees Celsius, respectively. In the NPD dryer bed studied, which was not optimally designed for full benefit from isotopic exchange, at least one order of magnitude in additional detritiation is attributed to isotopic exchange in the unsaturated zone. The technique of eluting the residual tritium from an industrial sized bed by H2O washing at high temperature, high humidity and low bed loading has been demonstrated to be a fast and effective way of removing tritium from a molecular sieve bed during regeneration. The isotopic exchange model accurately predicted the exchange between tritiated and non-tritiated water species in a molecular sieve bed where there is no net adsorption or desorption. The model's prediction of the tritium breakthrough trend observed in the NPD tests was poor; however, a forced fit can be achieved if the exchange rates in the MTZ and the unsaturated zone are manipulated. More experiments are needed to determine the relative rates of tritium exchange in the saturated, mass transfer, and unsaturated zones of a dryer bed

  16. Mobile Tritium Removal Facility - an affordable option?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium removal facilities are only likely to be an issue when CANDU plants have matured and the increasing tritium levels in the water have become intolerable from a personnel health physics perspective. Even then some station owners claim that a Tritium removal facility is unnecessary, because improved health physics performance and practices is all that is required to protect against possible personnel exposure. To support this argument it is also true to say that the tritium accumulation does stabilize, and will reach a stage where the tritium content will no longer increase. However for station owners that support the view that they follow an ALARA principle in which only the lowest level achievable is acceptable, a tritium extraction plant when the plant is new or one built later when the plant is operating and in mid life, both have arguments to support the expense. For a CANDU reactor in mid-life, there are two options for siting the Tritium Removal Facility (TRF): Stationary Option which will require permanent structures for each station; and, Mobile Option which considers a complete TRF that can be moved from station to station. In most existing CANDU-6 stations, no provisions have been made to construct and operate a TRF. This would make the Stationary Option costly because space would have to be provided and newly added infrastructure would have to be installed. With appropriate seismic qualification and following the necessary codes and standards, a Mobile TRF unit could be more cost effective, particularly if there were a possibility to share the unit with other stations in like position. (author)

  17. Tritium Transport at the Rulison Site, a Nuclear-stimulated Low-permeability Natural Gas Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Cooper; M. Ye; J. Chapman

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies conducted a program in the 1960s and 1970s that evaluated technology for the nuclear stimulation of low-permeability natural gas reservoirs. The second project in the program, Project Rulison, was located in west-central Colorado. A 40-kiltoton nuclear device was detonated 2,568 m below the land surface in the Williams Fork Formation on September 10, 1969. The natural gas reservoirs in the Williams Fork Formation occur in low permeability, fractured sandstone lenses interbedded with shale. Radionuclides derived from residual fuel products, nuclear reactions, and activation products were generated as a result of the detonation. Most of the radionuclides are contained in a cooled, solidified melt glass phase created from vaporized and melted rock that re-condensed after the test. Of the mobile gas-phase radionuclides released, tritium ({sup 3}H or T) migration is of most concern. The other gas-phase radionuclides ({sup 85}Kr, {sup 14}C) were largely removed during production testing in 1969 and 1970 and are no longer present in appreciable amounts. Substantial tritium remained because it is part of the water molecule, which is present in both the gas and liquid (aqueous) phases. The objectives of this work are to calculate the nature and extent of tritium contamination in the subsurface from the Rulison test from the time of the test to present day (2007), and to evaluate tritium migration under natural-gas production conditions to a hypothetical gas production well in the most vulnerable location outside the DOE drilling restriction. The natural-gas production scenario involves a hypothetical production well located 258 m horizontally away from the detonation point, outside the edge of the current drilling exclusion area. The production interval in the hypothetical well is at the same elevation as the nuclear chimney created by the detonation, in order to evaluate the location most vulnerable to

  18. TFTR tritium accounting system for DT-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TFTR has been using tritium as a fuel gas as part of its Deuterium-Tritium (DT) experimental operations with over 600 kCi processed through the site and over 400 kCi injected. Careful inventory and accounting measures are required to ensure site and regulatory safety tritium limits are not exceeded. Tritium management is accomplished through a database system to coordinate experimental needs within these limits. A TFTR Nuclear Materials Custodian (NMC) oversees Tritium Transfer Operations (TTO) using accounts based on specific system physical locations including tritium product containers, uranium beds (hydration), Gas Holding Tanks (GHT), disposable Molecular Sieve Beds (DMSB), the Tritium Gas Injection System (TGIS), and the Tritium Purification System (TPS). Methods used to coordinate and track TTO's include: single source TTO serial numbers issued by the TFTR Shift Supervisor (TFTRSS) as TTO authorization. TTO verification receipts, and daily NMC database updates with reports issued to appropriate groups. Tokamak tritium operations are controlled and monitored through a computer system that automatically measures and generates tritium injection value reports, as well as providing interlocks between the TGIS and the personnel safety tritium monitors. Details of these areas are discussed with emphasis on the tight controls required for the very low tritium inventory level permitted for TFTR, and lessons learned from the past 23 months of tritium operations

  19. Tritium and radon risks for humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The gaseous and liquid releases into environment from the two CANDU type units of Cernavoda NPP now in operation has more tritium contents than other kind of western power reactors. CANDU type reactor uses heavy water as moderator and primary circuit heat transfer agent. In normal operation deuterium go to tritium by neutron capture, the molecule of tritiated heavy water can escape from nuclear systems in very small amounts and so it is released into environment. After release the tritium follows the way of water into environment. One year ago the antinuclear NGO led a hard attack against Units 3 and 4 during the procedure of public acceptance request. This attack tried to demonstrate the great risk for humans of the tritium released by Cernavoda NPP. Obviously this risk is very low as demonstrated by many years reactor operation. SNN as owner of Cernavoda NPP ensures by all kind of information channels about the radioactive potential risk for humans. By the other hand, ironically, the antinuclear NGO makes nothing to inform the people about radon risk magnitude in some areas. This is a well-known fact but the radon concentration in dwellings can be decreased by some improved building procedures. The radon is the first natural cause of lung cancer. The environmental NGO and Romanian authorities do not have an information service about radon hazard data neither in dwellings or in uranium mining areas. The paper compares the properties and risks for tritium and radon. (authors)

  20. Tritium in the Savannah River Site environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium is released to the environment from many of the operations at the Savannah River Site. The releases from each facility to the atmosphere and to the soil and streams, both from normal operations and inadvertent releases, over the period of operation from the early 1950s through 1988 are presented. The fate of the tritium released is evaluated through environmental monitoring, special studies, and modeling. It is concluded that approximately 91% of the tritium remaining after decay is now in the oceans. A dose and risk assessment to the population around the site is presented. It is concluded that about 0.6 fatal cancers may be associated with the tritium released during all the years of operation to the population of about 625,000. This same population (based on the overall US cancer statistics) is expected to experience about 105,000 cancer fatalities from all types of cancer. Therefore, it is considered unlikely that a relationship between any of the cancer deaths occurring in this population and releases of tritium from the SRS will be found

  1. Low technology high tritium breeding blanket concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main function of this low technology blanket is to produce the necessary tritium for INTOR operation with minimum first wall coverage. The INTOR first wall, blanket, and shield are constrained by the dimensions of the reference design and the protection criteria required for different reactor components and dose equivalent after shutdown in the reactor hall. It is assumed that the blanket operation at commercial power reactor conditions and the proper temperature for power generation can be sacrificed to achieve the highest possible tritium breeding ratio with minimum additional research and developments and minimal impact on reactor design and operation. A set of blanket evaluation criteria has been used to compare possible blanket concepts. Six areas: performance, operating requirements, impact on reactor design and operation, safety and environmental impact, technology assessment, and cost have been defined for the evaluation process. A water-cooled blanket was developed to operate with a low temperature and pressure. The developed blanket contains a 24 cm of beryllium and 6 cm of solid breeder both with a 0.8 density factor. This blanket provides a local tritium breeding ratio of ∼2.0. The water coolant is isolated from the breeder material by several zones which eliminates the tritium buildup in the water by permeation and reduces the changes for water-breeder interaction. This improves the safety and environmental aspects of the blanket and eliminates the costly process of the tritium recovery from the water. 12 refs., 13 tabs

  2. Tritium in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Marter, W.L.; Zeigler, C.C.; Stephenson, D.E.; Hoel, D.D.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-05-01

    Tritium is released to the environment from many of the operations at the Savannah River Site. The releases from each facility to the atmosphere and to the soil and streams, both from normal operations and inadvertent releases, over the period of operation from the early 1950s through 1988 are presented. The fate of the tritium released is evaluated through environmental monitoring, special studies, and modeling. It is concluded that approximately 91% of the tritium remaining after decay is now in the oceans. A dose and risk assessment to the population around the site is presented. It is concluded that about 0.6 fatal cancers may be associated with the tritium released during all the years of operation to the population of about 625,000. This same population (based on the overall US cancer statistics) is expected to experience about 105,000 cancer fatalities from all types of cancer. Therefore, it is considered unlikely that a relationship between any of the cancer deaths occurring in this population and releases of tritium from the SRS will be found.

  3. Tritium management in PWR fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activity, quantity and nature of tritium compounds obtained during head end process (cutting and dissolution) are determined to estimate environmental release hazards in fuel reprocessing plants. Measurements on representative PWR reactor fuels (burnup 33,000 MWdt-1, specific power 30 MW dt-1) show that about 60% of the tritium produced in the reactor diffuses in the cladding where it is fixed. Remaining tritium stays in the irradiated oxide and is found as tritiated water in the solution obtained during fuel dissolution. In the UP3 plant at La Hague (France) tritiated water is disposed into the sea without environmental problems. In the case of a reprocessing plant far from the sea, the PUREX process is slightly modified for concentration of tritium in a limited amount of water (TRILEX process). It is verified experimentally in αβγ lab on actual fuel and by simulation at the pilot seale that the supplementary step ''tritium washing'' of the solvent can be obtained in pulsed columns. 4 tables, 7 figs

  4. Behavior of tritium in soil and hydrosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HT, HTO and organic tritium are the chemical formula of tritium emitted from the nuclear installation and fusion reactor at the accident or the normal conditions. HTO is absorbed in body more four figures than HT. HT is insoluble in water. So that it moves in the gas phase of pore in soil and it is oxidized into HTO by actinomycetes of Streptomyces and then HTO moves in the liquid phase of soil. The reaction velocity from HT in the atmosphere to HTO in soil is 0.001-0.1 cm/s. HTO is deposited in the soil from the water vapor in the atmosphere. A part of HTO deposited in the soil is recycled into the atmosphere by evaporation or transpiration. The concentration of tritium in rainfall increased from 1952 to 1963 and then it decreased. Now it becomes the back ground level. Deposition of tritium in sea is larger than it in land. The most of them is dry deposition. The concentrations of tritium in the tissues of aquatic lives show the same values in the environmental water, if it is discharged for some hours or more. (S.Y.)

  5. A compact tritium AMS system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarappa, M L; Dingley, K H; Hamm, R W; Love, A H; Roberts, M L

    1999-09-23

    Tritium ({sup 3}H) is a radioisotope that is extensively utilized in biological and environmental research. For biological research, {sup 3}H is generally quantified by liquid scintillation counting requiring gram-sized samples and counting times of several hours. For environmental research, {sup 3}H is usually quantified by {sup 3}He in-growth which requires gram-sized samples and in-growth times of several months. In contrast, provisional studies at LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry have demonstrated that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be used to quantify {sup 3}H in milligram-sized biological samples with a 100 to 1000-fold improvement in detection limits when compared to scintillation counting. This increased sensitivity is expected to have great impact in the biological and environmental research community. However in order to make the {sup 3}H AMS technique more broadly accessible, smaller, simpler, and less expensive AMS instrumentation must be developed. To meet this need, a compact, relatively low cost prototype {sup 3}H AMS system has been designed and built based on a LLNL ion source/sample changer and an AccSys Technology, Inc. Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac. With the prototype system, {sup 3}/{sup 1}H ratios ranging from 1 x 10{sup -10} to 1 x 10{sup -13} have to be measured from milligram sized samples. With improvements in system operation and sample preparation methodology, the sensitivity limit of the system is expected to increase to approximately 1 x 10{sup -15}.

  6. Tritium in surface water of the Yenisei river Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reports an investigation of the tritium content in the surface waters of the Yenisei River basin near the Mining-and-Chemical Combine (MCC). In 2001-2003 the maximum tritium concentration in the Yenisei River did not exceed 4±1 Bq/L. It has been found that there are surface waters containing enhanced tritium, up to 168 Bq/L, as compared with the background values for the Yenisei River. There are two possible sources of tritium input. First, the last operating reactor of the MCC, which still uses the Yenisei water as coolant. Second, tritium may come from the deep aquifers at the Severny testing site. For the first time tritium has been found in two aquatic plant species of the Yenisei River with maximal tritium concentration 304 Bq/Kg wet weight. Concentration factors of tritium for aquatic plants are much higher than 1

  7. Mapping of tritium in drinking water from various Indian states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium in fresh water used for drinking purpose across five state of India was analyzed for tritium activity. The tritium data obtained were compared with the monitoring data of tritium in drinking water sources at Tarapur site, which houses a number of nuclear facilities. It is observed that the tritium activity in the water sample from various out station locations were in the range of < 0.48 to 1.33 Bq/l. The tritium value obtained in the drinking water sources at Tarapur was found to be in the range of 0.91 to 3.10 Bq/l. The monitoring of tritium in drinking water from Tarapur and from various out station location indicate that the level is negligible compared to the USEPA limit of 10000 Bq/l and the contribution of operation nuclear facilities to the tritium activity in drinking water source at Tarapur is insignificant. (author)

  8. The study of long-lived tritium-luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium is a common nuclear material. The gaseous tritium is pure beta ray source. This paper presents the β-ray source of tritium, by which activating the phosphors to shine. Compared by experiment to determine the common phosphors, red light phosphor is Y2O2S: Eu; green light phosphor is ZnS: Cu, Al; blue light phosphor is ZnS: Ag. Developing the long life phosphors, which inhaling the tritium in the condition of microvacuum and high temperature. Developing the tritium light source with glass tube that whirl smeared the phosphors and filled with tritium. At last the vacuum system be sealed off after the tritium is filled. The tritium light source have two main advantages : its useful life over ten years and could incandescence without extra external power-driven, so it can be used for indication and security. (authors)

  9. Atmospheric tritium 1968-1984. Tritium Laboratory data report No. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium in the form of water, HTO, from the atmospheric testing of nuclear devices in the 60s has now mainly disappeared from the atmosphere and entered the ocean. The additions of such tritium from Chinese and French tests in the 70s were observed but did not make a big impression on the diminishing inventory of atmospheric HTO. Tritium in elemental form, HT, went through a maximum in the mid 70s, apparently primarily as a results of some underground testing of large nuclear devices and releases from civilian and military nuclear industry. The mid 70s maximum was 1.3 kg of tritium in this form, and in 1984 0.5 kg remain. The disappearance is slower than the decay rate of tritium, so sources must still have been present during this time. The global distribution shows, not unexpectedly, smaller inventory in the Southern Hemisphere across the equator and thus southward transport of HT. The chemical lifetime of hydrogen gas in the atmosphere, assuming the elemental tritium being in the form of HT, not T2, has been estimated between 6 and 10 years. It is to be expected that increasing activity of nuclear fuel reprocessing would in the near future again increase the global tritium gas inventory. Tritium in the form of light hydrocarbons, primarily methane, has also been measured, and in this form a quantity of 200 g of tritium resided in the global atmosphere 1956 to 1976. By 1982 it had decreased to 50 g. 25 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs

  10. An alternative approach to major tritium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two schemes have been proposed to replace the aging tritium production facilities at Savannah River, South Carolina. The U.S. Department of Energy and the federal government have reiterated their plan to build a heavy water reactor and a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at a cost of about $7 billion as replacements for the Savannah River facility. A group of scientists from national laboratories, on the other hand, have proposed the use of a linear accelerator to accelerate protons to produce neutrons to be used to produce tritium in lithium targets. Yet another scheme is proposed that is safe and potentially less expensive than the other two. It relies on existing or rapidly developing laser technology to drive a magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion device, which has already produced copious amounts of neutrons that could readily be used in producing tritium

  11. Validation of tritium measurements in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maximum deviation of experimental R value from its real value, which is defined as the ratio of tissue bound to tissue water tritium, has been calculated and verified experimentally by taking consideration of isotopic fractionation arised in the course of water separation. Experimental procedures examined for the purpose are the azeotropic distillation and lyophilization for the removal of tissue water and the oxidative combustion of organic residue either by thermal process or by low temperature plasma generation. Each procedure optimalized by obviating or correcting isotope effects as well as other sources of error has been tested with mixed standards and biological samples. By washing out the exchangeable tritium and also physically bound tritium, the precision and accuracy of R values are further improved

  12. Tritium releases, birth defects and infant deaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECB has published a report 'Tritium releases from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and Birth Defects and Infant Mortality in Nearby Communities 1971-1988' (report number INFO-0401). This presents the results of a detailed analysis of deaths and birth defects occurring in infants born to mothers living in the area (25 Km radius) of the Pickering nuclear power plant, over an 18-year period. The analysis looked at the frequency of these defects and deaths in comparison to the general rate for Ontario, and also in relation to airborne and waterborne releases of tritium from the power plant. The overall conclusion was that the rates of infant death and birth defects were generally not higher in the study population than in all of Ontario. There was no prevalent relationship between these deaths and defects and tritium releases measured either at the power plant or by ground monitoring stations t some distance from the facility

  13. A review of tritium conversion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical processes by which elemental tritium can be converted to tritiated water have been examined by reviewing the available literature on these processes. It would appear that gas phase conversion reactions at room temperature are slow and that they do not contribute significantly to any observed conversion following releases of elemental tritium. The effects of surfaces are not clearly understood. Metals, however, can increase the rate over the gas phase processes, but the magnitude of this increase is not well documented. Further work is necessary to examine the effects of various materials, elevated temperatures, and other parameters on conversion reactions in order to more closely reflect conditions in reactor buildings and other tritium containing facilities

  14. Handbook of tritium NMR spectroscopy and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a brief introduction, highlighting the importance of 3H nmr spectroscopy for tritium tracer studies, Chapter 1 deals with the theory of the method, the interpretation of spectra and other experimental aspects, emphasizing the importance of careful sample preparation and the special relationship of 3H nmr spectral detail to the wealth of published data for proton spectra. Chapter 2 reviews the current methods for labelling compounds with tritium and the relationship of observed patterns of labelling to these methods. Chapter 3 describes applications of 3H nmr spectroscopy to research in the life sciences which illustrate the power of the technique. Studies employing this analytical tool have revealed numerous interesting and indeed unexpected results in the behaviour of tritium atoms in labelled molecules. These studies have included applications of tritiated compounds in analytical and biochemical problems, in problems of catalysis and reaction mechanisms, and in other areas of scientific research. (author)

  15. Low-exposure tritium radiotoxicity in mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, R.L.

    1982-02-11

    Studies of tritium radiotoxicity involving chronic /sup 3/H0H exposures in mammals demonstrate in both mice and monkeys that biological effects can be measured following remarkably low levels of exposure - levels in the range of serious practical interest to radiation protection. These studies demonstrate also that deleterious effects of /sup 3/H beta radiation do not differ significantly from those of gamma radiation at high exposures. In contrast, however, at low exposures tritium is significantly more effective than gamma rays, rad for rad, by a factor approaching 3. This is important for hazard evaluation and radiation protection because knowledge concerning biological effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure has come mainly from gamma-ray data; and predictions based on gamma-ray data will underestimate tritium effects - especially at low exposures - unless the RBE is fully taken into account.

  16. Sublethal effects of tritium on aquatic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In continuing studies on enhanced susceptibility to infection of fish following irradiation, antibody synthesis in response to the pathogen, Flexibacter columnaris, was employed to investigate the effects of tritium irradiation (0, 0.04, 0.4, 4.0, and 40.0 rad total dose during embryogenesis) on primary immune responsiveness in juvenile rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri. Additional studies were developed which focused attention on the nature of the stressing effect of tritium irradiation on immune competence. These latter studies emphasized electrophoretic separation of blood serum proteins to assess the potential for qualitative and quantitative changes in blood serum components which conceivably accounted for suppressed immune responsiveness in tritium-irradiated test fish

  17. Advancement Of Tritium Powered Betavoltaic Battery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staack, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gaillard, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hitchcock, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peters, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Teprovich, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coughlin, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Neikirk, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fisher, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-14

    Due to their decades-long service life and reliable power output under extreme conditions, betavoltaic batteries offer distinct advantages over traditional chemical batteries, especially in applications where frequent battery replacement is hazardous, or cost prohibitive. Although many beta emitting isotopes exist, tritium is considered ideal in betavoltaic applications for several reasons: 1) it is a “pure” beta emitter, 2) the beta is not energetic enough to damage the semiconductor, 3) it has a moderately long half-life, and 4) it is readily available. Unfortunately, the widespread application of tritium powered betavoltaics is limited, in part, by their low power output. This research targets improving the power output of betavoltaics by increasing the flux of beta particles to the energy conversion device (the p-n junction) through the use of low Z nanostructured tritium trapping materials.

  18. Tritium barrier material study in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a tritium barrier material study in China. The program include : (1)development of resistance hydrogen stainless steel 316L and HR-1 by vacuum induction metallurgy (VIM) and electroslag refining (ER), (2)preparation of coating films (TiC, TiN, TiC+TiN, etc.) on the stainless steel surface by improved technology of the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and physical vapor deposition (PVD), (3)experiments of hydrogen and tritium permeation through 316L SS and HR-1 SS as well as their coating materials at temperatures 300 to 500degC and pressures 500 to 1300Pa for tritium, but at 400 at 600degC and 103 to 105Pa for hydrogen. Since 1986, a lot of important progresses in both material research and permeation experiments have been made. (author)

  19. The operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Tritium Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, C.A.; LaMarche, P.H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Anderson, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The TFTR tritium operations staff has successfully received, stored, handled, and processed over five hundred thousand curies of tritium for the purpose of supporting D-T (Deuterium-Tritium) operations at TFTR. Tritium operations personnel nominally provide continuous round the clock coverage (24 hours/day, 7 days/week) in shift complements consisting of I supervisor and 3 operators. Tritium Shift Supervisors and operators are required to have 5 years of operational experience in either the nuclear or chemical industry and to become certified for their positions. The certification program provides formal instruction, as well as on the job training. The certification process requires 4 to 6 months to complete, which includes an oral board lasting up to 4 hours at which time the candidate is tested on their knowledge of Tritium Technology and TFTR Tritium systems. Once an operator is certified, the training process continues with scheduled training weeks occurring once every 5 weeks. During D-T operations at TFTR the operators must evacuate the tritium area due to direct radiation from TFTR D-T pulses. During `` time operators maintain cognizance over tritium systems via a real time TV camera system. Operators are able to gain access to the Tritium area between TFTR D-T pulses, but have been excluded from die tritium area during D-T pulsing for periods up to 30 minutes. Tritium operators are responsible for delivering tritium gas to TFRR as well as processing plasma exhaust gases which lead to the deposition of tritium oxide on disposable molecular sieve beds (DMSB). Once a DMSB is loaded, the operations staff remove the expended DMSB, and replace it with a new DMSB container. The TFIR tritium system is operated via detailed procedures which require operator sign off for system manipulation. There are >300 procedures controlling the operation of the tritium systems.

  20. Current operations and experiments at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) has continued to move toward operation of a fully-integrated, full-sized, computer-controlled fusion fuel processing loop. Concurrent, nonloop experiments have answered important questions on new components and issues such as palladium diffusion membranes, ceramic electrolysis cells, regenerable tritium getters, laser Raman spectroscopy, unregenerable tritium inventory on molecular sieves, tritium contamination problems and decontamination methods, and operating data on reliability, emissions, doses, and wastes generated. 4 refs., 2 figs

  1. Technology and component development for a closed tritium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief summary on recent advances in the field of tritium technology concerning the most important subsystems of the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor, i.e. the plasma exhaust pumping system, the exhaust gas clean up system, the isotope separation, the tritium storage and the tritium extraction from a blanket is provided. Experimental results, single component developments, and technical tests including those with relevants amounts of tritium that constitute the basis of proposed integral process concepts are described. 48 refs

  2. The solid-state synthesis of tritium labelled heterocyclic bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorov, G.V.; Myasoedov, N.F. (AN SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Molekulyarnoj Genetiki)

    1994-04-01

    The results of a study of the solid-state catalytic hydrogenation and the synthesis of tritium labelled native heterocyclic bases are presented. The effect of different palladium catalysts and reaction conditions on yield and molar radioactivity of final compounds was investigated. For some compounds, data on the intramolecular distribution of tritium were obtained by using the isotope exchange reaction and tritium NMR. Tritium labelled purine and pyrimidine bases (25-180 Ci/mmol.) were synthesized. (Author).

  3. Tritium Research Laboratory safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and operational philosophy has been evolved to keep radiation exposures to personnel and radiation releases to the environment as low as reasonably achievable. Each experiment will be doubly contained in a glove box and will be limited to 10 grams of tritium gas. Specially designed solid-hydride storage beds may be used to store temporarily up to 25 grams of tritium in the form of tritides. To evaluate possible risks to the public or the environment, a review of the Sandia Laboratories Livermore (SLL) site was carried out. Considered were location, population, land use, meteorology, hydrology, geology, and seismology. The risks and the extent of damage to the TRL and vital systems were evaluated for flooding, lightning, severe winds, earthquakes, explosions, and fires. All of the natural phenomena and human error accidents were considered credible, although the extent of potential damage varied. However, rather than address the myriad of specific individual consequences of each accident scenario, a worst-case tritium release caused indirectly by an unspecified natural phenomenon or human error was evaluated. The maximum credible radiological accident is postulated to result from the release of the maximum quantity of gas from one experiment. Thus 10 grams of tritium gas was used in the analysis to conservatively estimate the maximum whole-body dose of 1 rem at the site boundary and a maximum population dose of 600 man-rem. Accidental release of this amount of tritium implies simultaneous failure of two doubly contained systems, an occurrence considered not credible. Nuclear criticality is impossible in this facility. Based upon the analyses performed for this report, we conclude that the Tritium Research Laboratory can be operated without undue risk to employees, the general public, or the environment

  4. Tritium effects on germ cells and fertility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primordial oocytes in juvenile mice show acute gamma-ray LD50 as low as 6 rad. This provides opportunities for determining dose-response relations at low doses and chronic exposure in the intact animal - conditions of particular interest for hazard evaluation. Examined in this way, 3HOH in body water is found to kill murine oocytes exponentially with dose, the LD50 level for chronic exposure being only 2μCi/ml (delivering 0.4 rad/day). At very low doses and dose rates, where comparisons between tritium and other radiations are of special significance for radiological protection, the RBE of tritium compared with 60Co gamma radiation reaches approximately 3. Effects on murine fertility from tritium-induced oocyte loss have been quantified by reproductive capacity measurements. Chronic low-level exposure has been examined also in three primate species - squirrel, rhesus, and bonnet monkeys. In squirrel monkeys the ovarian germ-cell supply is 99% destroyed by the time of birth from prenatal exposure to body-water levels of 3HOH (administered in maternal drinking water) of only 3 μCi/ml, the LD50 level being 0.5 μCi/ml (giving 0.1 rad/day), one fourth that in mice. Though not completely ruled out, similar high sensitivity of female germ cells has not been found in macaques; and it probably does not occur in man. The exquisite radiosensitivity of primordial oocytes in mice is apparently due to vulnerability of the plasma membrane (or something of similar geometry and location), not DNA. Evidence for this comes from tritium data as well as neutron studies. Tritium administered as 3HOH, and therefore generally distributed, is much more effective in killing murine oocytes than is tritium administered as 3H-TdR, localized in the nucleus. This situation in the mouse may have implications for estimating radiation genetic risk in the human female

  5. Global environmental transport models for tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we discuss some of the obstacles to the construction of credible models of global tritium transport for use in dose assessments. We illustrate these difficulties by comparing model predictions of environmental tritium levels with measurements. Monitoring of tritium has shown that specific activities in precipitation over land are typically higher by a factor of three to four than those in precipitation over the oceans. Experience with modeling CO2 turnover in the oceans has led to the conclusion that two-box reservoir models of the ocean often give unsatisfactory representations of transient solutions. Failure to consider these factors in global models can lead to distorted estimates of collective dose and create difficulties in validation of the model against real data. We illustrate these problems with a seven-box model recommended by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements in which we forced the atmospheric compartment to reproduce an exogenous function based on historic observations of HTO in precipitation at 500N. The fresh water response underestimates data from the Ottawa River by a factor of about five, and the ocean surface response overestimates tritium data from the surface waters of the Northern Pacific by nearly an order of magnitude. Revision of the model to include (1) separate over-land and over-ocean compartments of the atmosphere and (2) a box-diffusion model of the subsurface ocean brings the discrepant responses into good agreement with the environmental data. In a second exercise, we used a latitudinally disaggregated model and replaced a tropospheric compartment in the northern hemisphere by historic precipitation data. The model's response greatly underestimates the tritium specific activity in the southern hemisphere. These exercises lead us to doubt that a proper global transport model for tritium is available at present for collective dose assessment. 12 refs., 3 figs

  6. Tritium Research Laboratory safety analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, D.A.

    1979-03-01

    Design and operational philosophy has been evolved to keep radiation exposures to personnel and radiation releases to the environment as low as reasonably achievable. Each experiment will be doubly contained in a glove box and will be limited to 10 grams of tritium gas. Specially designed solid-hydride storage beds may be used to store temporarily up to 25 grams of tritium in the form of tritides. To evaluate possible risks to the public or the environment, a review of the Sandia Laboratories Livermore (SLL) site was carried out. Considered were location, population, land use, meteorology, hydrology, geology, and seismology. The risks and the extent of damage to the TRL and vital systems were evaluated for flooding, lightning, severe winds, earthquakes, explosions, and fires. All of the natural phenomena and human error accidents were considered credible, although the extent of potential damage varied. However, rather than address the myriad of specific individual consequences of each accident scenario, a worst-case tritium release caused indirectly by an unspecified natural phenomenon or human error was evaluated. The maximum credible radiological accident is postulated to result from the release of the maximum quantity of gas from one experiment. Thus 10 grams of tritium gas was used in the analysis to conservatively estimate the maximum whole-body dose of 1 rem at the site boundary and a maximum population dose of 600 man-rem. Accidental release of this amount of tritium implies simultaneous failure of two doubly contained systems, an occurrence considered not credible. Nuclear criticality is impossible in this facility. Based upon the analyses performed for this report, we conclude that the Tritium Research Laboratory can be operated without undue risk to employees, the general public, or the environment. (ERB)

  7. Tritium contamination of concrete walls and floors in tritium-handling laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tritium handling laboratory was constructed at the National Institute for Fusion Science about twenty years ago and it was recently closed down. We completed the necessary work that is legally required in Japan at the laboratory, when the use of radioisotopes is discontinued, involving measurements of radioactive contamination. We mainly used smear and direct-immersion methods for the measurements. In applying the smear method, we used a piece of filter paper to wipe up the tritium staining the surfaces. The filter paper containing the tritium was placed directly into a dedicated vial, a scintillation cocktail was then poured over it, and the tritium was measured with a liquid scintillation counter. With the direct-immersion method, a piece of concrete was placed directly into a vial containing a scintillation cocktail, and the tritium in the concrete was measured with a liquid scintillation counter. As well as these measurements, we investigated water-extraction and heating-cooling methods for measuring tritium contamination in concrete. With the former, a piece of concrete was placed into water in a tube to extract the tritium, the water containing the extracted tritium was then poured into a dedicated vial containing a scintillation cocktail, and the tritium contamination was measured. With the latter, a piece of concrete was placed into a furnace and heated to 800 degrees centigrade to vaporize the tritiated water into flowing dry air. The flowing air was then cooled to collect the vaporized tritiated water in a tube. The collected water was placed in a vial for scintillation counting. To evaluate the direct-immersion method, ratios were determined by dividing the contamination measured with the heating-cooling method by that measured with the direct-immersion method. The average ratio was about 2.5, meaning a conversion factor from contamination obtained with the direct-immersion method to that with the heating-cooling method. We also investigated the

  8. Status of R&D on Tritium Permeation Barrier Coatings for Tritium Breeding Blanket of Fusion Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The paper overviewed the recent progress in the application of several typical tritium permeation barrier (TPB) coatings and their corresponding fabrication technologies for tritium breeding blanket of fusion reactor. According to the design requirements of

  9. Tritium migration studies at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emanation of tritium from waste containers is a commonly known phenomenon. Release of tritium from buried waste packages was anticipated; therefore, a research program was developed to study both the rate of tritium release from buried containers and subsequent migration of tritium through soil. Migration of tritium away from low-level radioactive wastes buried in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site was studied. Four distinct disposal events were investigated. The oldest burial event studied was a 1976 emplacement of 3.5 million curies of tritium in a shallow land burial trench. In another event, 248 thousand curies of tritium was disposed of in an overpack emplaced 6 m below the floor of a low-level waste disposal pit. Measurement of the emanation rate of tritium out of 55 gallon drums to the overpack was studied, and an annual doubling of the emanation rate over a seven year period, ending in 1990, was found. In a third study, upward tritium migration in the soil, resulting in releases in the atmosphere were observed in a greater confinement disposal test. Releases of tritium to the atmosphere were found to be insignificant. The fourth event consisted of burial of 2.2 million curies of tritium in a greater confinement disposal operation. Emanation of tritium from the buried containers has been increasing since disposal, but no significant migration was found four years following backfilling of the disposal hole

  10. Atmospheric tritium. Progress report, July 1, 1975--March 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in the development of field equipment for sampling tritium in environmental samples. The performance of prototype tritiated hydrocarbon samples is discussed. Data are presented on the content of tritium in samples of rain water collected in Miami, Florida, Western Samoa, and Barbados during 1975, and tritium compounds in atmospheric samples collected at various world locations during 1975

  11. Tritium handling experience at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suppiah, S.; McCrimmon, K.; Lalonde, S.; Ryland, D.; Boniface, H.; Muirhead, C.; Castillo, I. [Atomic Energy of Canad Limited - AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Canada has been a leader in tritium handling technologies as a result of the successful CANDU reactor technology used for power production. Over the last 50 to 60 years, capabilities have been established in tritium handling and tritium management in CANDU stations, tritium removal processes for heavy and light water, tritium measurement and monitoring, and understanding the effects of tritium on the environment. This paper outlines details of tritium-related work currently being carried out at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). It concerns the CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) process for detritiation, tritium-compatible electrolysers, tritium permeation studies, and tritium powered batteries. It is worth noting that AECL offers a Tritium Safe-Handling Course to national and international participants, the course is a mixture of classroom sessions and hands-on practical exercises. The expertise and facilities available at AECL is ready to address technological needs of nuclear fusion and next-generation nuclear fission reactors related to tritium handling and related issues.

  12. Tritium handling experience at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada has been a leader in tritium handling technologies as a result of the successful CANDU reactor technology used for power production. Over the last 50 to 60 years, capabilities have been established in tritium handling and tritium management in CANDU stations, tritium removal processes for heavy and light water, tritium measurement and monitoring, and understanding the effects of tritium on the environment. This paper outlines details of tritium-related work currently being carried out at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). It concerns the CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) process for detritiation, tritium-compatible electrolysers, tritium permeation studies, and tritium powered batteries. It is worth noting that AECL offers a Tritium Safe-Handling Course to national and international participants, the course is a mixture of classroom sessions and hands-on practical exercises. The expertise and facilities available at AECL is ready to address technological needs of nuclear fusion and next-generation nuclear fission reactors related to tritium handling and related issues

  13. Studying of tritium content in snowpack of Degelen mountain range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results of investigation of tritium content in the layers of snow located in the streambeds of the “Degelen” massif contaminated with tritium. The objects of investigation were selected watercourses Karabulak, Uzynbulak, Aktybai located beyond the “Degelen” site. We studied the spatial distribution of tritium relative to the streambed of watercourses and defined the borders of the snow cover contamination. In the centre of the creek watercourses the snow contamination in the surface layer is as high as 40 000 Bq/L. The values of the background levels of tritium in areas not related to the streambed, which range from 40 to 50 Bq/L. The results of snow cover measurements in different seasonal periods were compared. The main mechanisms causing tritium transfer in snow were examined and identified. The most important mechanism of tritium transfer in the streams is tritium emanation from ice or soil surface. - Highlights: • We studied the spatial distribution of tritium relative to the streambed of watercourses. • In the center of the watercourses the snow contamination in the surface layer is as high as 40 000 Bq/L. • The values of the background levels of tritium in areas not related to the streambed, which range from 40 to 50 Bq/L. • Studied the dynamics of concentration changes of tritium at different watercourses Delegen site. • The most important mechanism of tritium transfer in the streams is tritium emanation from ice or soil surface

  14. Experiment of hydrogen embrittlement of tritium storage vessel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tritium storage is one of the most important problems for the safety of tritium removal facility. In current, many researches for tritium immobilization have been carried out. The research for tritium storage could be divided into two parts, one is for the metal getter of tritium and another is for the integrity of tritium storage vessel. Especially, the integrity of tritium storage vessel is up to the tritium embrittlement of vessel material, for tritium vessel is mostly made of metal material. In this work, the evaluation of the tritium embrittlement for the tritium storage vessel material is performed with the equipment that is made for high temperature and high vacuum. However, tritium is the radioactivity material, so hydrogen is used for this work. In this work, three metals were chosen for the vessel candidate material, carbon steel, austenitic stainless steel (SUS) 304 and 316L. The experiment was carried out for the several conditions of temperature and pressure. The property change of metal was investigated through the tensile test. Austenitic stainless steel has a high resistance for the hydrogen embrittlement from the result. But the obvious gap between SUS 304 and SUS 316L is not revealed, because the experiment condition may be not sufficient to show the difference between SUS 304 and SUS 316L

  15. CANDU 6 nuclear power plant tritium control and release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The issues drawing people's attention, such as ways of CANDU plant tritium generation, measures to control tritium release to environment in the design of nuclear power plants as well as public dose due to tritium released to the environment are presented

  16. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited monitoring tritiated water in air and water effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current on-line methods of monitoring effluents for tritium (as tritiated water, HTO) measure concentrations in air above 250 nCi/m3 (approx. 10 kBq/m3) and in water above 1 uCi/kg (approx. 40 kBq/kg). Some of the problems encountered in such monitoring are the presence of fission and activation products in the effluents and, particularly in water monitoring, the often dirty quality of the sample. In a new design of monitor, HTO is collected directly from air by a flow of liquid scintillator (LS). For water monitoring a flow of air continuously samples the water and transports HTO to the LS. The key features of the new design are that the high detection efficiency of LS is realizable, that the rate of use of LS is only approx. 2 mm3/s, that the controlled evaporation and metering of air provides the low flow of HTO needed for mixing with LS, and that accurate metering of a dirty effluent is not needed. The sensitivities for detecing tritium on-line are improved by at least an order of magnitude

  17. Tritium transport in lithium ceramics porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, S.W.; Ambrose, V.

    1991-12-31

    A random network model has been utilized to analyze the problem of tritium percolation through porous Li ceramic breeders. Local transport in each pore channel is described by a set of convection-diffusion-reaction equations. Long range transport is described by a matrix technique. The heterogeneous structure of the porous medium is accounted for via Monte Carlo methods. The model was then applied to an analysis of the relative contribution of diffusion and convective flow to tritium transport in porous lithium ceramics. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Tritium transport in lithium ceramics porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, S.W.; Ambrose, V.

    1991-01-01

    A random network model has been utilized to analyze the problem of tritium percolation through porous Li ceramic breeders. Local transport in each pore channel is described by a set of convection-diffusion-reaction equations. Long range transport is described by a matrix technique. The heterogeneous structure of the porous medium is accounted for via Monte Carlo methods. The model was then applied to an analysis of the relative contribution of diffusion and convective flow to tritium transport in porous lithium ceramics. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Bomb Tritium in the Pacific Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1959--1973 bomb-produced tritium was monitored in surface seawater from 15 stations in the Pacific Ocean. Some 500 tritium determinations were carried out. Between 1965 and 1972 a series of subsurface samples from 49 locations in the Pacific Ocean was measured, and tritium concentrations as a function of depth were determined. The determinations had a standard error of +-4% and an uncertainty in the zero value of about 0.17 tritium unit. The most significant oceanographic conclusions that must be drawn from these data can be summarized in the following way: (1) Lateral flow along contours of constant density is the major factor controlling the tritium distribution in the surface and subsurface waters of the Pacific Ocean. Input of tritium into the water below the mixed layer occurs between 45 degree and 30 degree N and south of 60 degree S. The sinking of water in the mid-Pacific at 30 degree N and its flow toward the equator was previously recognized from the presence of a salinity maximum below the thermocline. The southward component of the rate of this flow is estimated to be 1.3+-0.5 cm/s. In many other areas the tritium content of water under the mixed layer is undoubtedly also due to local sinking of surface water and subsequent lateral subsurface flow. (2) An upper limit for the coefficient of vertical eddy diffusion can be calculated. This upper limit of 0.3 cm2/s is well below estimates derived by other methods, but it agrees well with the upper limit of 0.2 cm2/s derived from tritium measurements in the Sargasso Sea. It appears that transport across lines of constant density is much slower than previously assumed. (3) The mean lifetime of water in the mixed layer of the North Pacific Ocean varies greatly with geographical location. North of 10 degree N the average residence time is between 9 and 15 years, depending on the assumed rate of the molecular exchange of water between atmosphere and ocean

  20. Tritium transport in lithium ceramics porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A random network model has been utilized to analyze the problem of tritium percolation through porous Li ceramic breeders. Local transport in each pore channel is described by a set of convection-diffusion-reaction equations. Long range transport is described by a matrix technique. The heterogeneous structure of the porous medium is accounted for via Monte Carlo methods. The model was then applied to an analysis of the relative contribution of diffusion and convective flow to tritium transport in porous lithium ceramics. 15 refs., 4 figs

  1. Tritium Systems Test Assembly operator training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proper operator training is needed to help ensure the safe operation of fusion facilities by personnel who are qualified to carry out their assigned responsibilities. Operators control and monitor the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) during normal, emergency, and maintenance phases. Their performance is critical both to operational safety, assuring no release of tritium to the atmosphere, and to the successful simulation of the fusion reaction progress. Through proper training we are helping assure that TSTA facility operators perform their assignments in a safe and efficient manner and that the operators maintain high levels of operational proficiency through continuing training, retraining, requalification, and recertification

  2. Decommissioning of a tritium-contaminated laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tritium laboratory facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decommissioned in 1979. The project involved dismantling the laboratory equipment and disposing of the equipment and debris at an on-site waste disposal/storage area. The laboratory was constructed in 1953 and was in service for tritium research and fabrication of lithium tritide components until 1974. The major features of the laboratory included some 25 meters of gloveboxes and hoods, associated vacuum lines, utility lines, exhaust ducts, electrodryers, blowers, and laboratory benches. This report presents details on the decommissioning, health physics, waste management, environmental surveillance, and costs for the operation

  3. Tritium in austenitic stainless steel vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vessel used for the long-term storage of tritium (titanium tritide) will be of welded 316L stainless steel construction. The 316L stainless is chosen partially because of its excellent resistance, in the wrought condition, to any degradation of mechanical properties from contact with hydrogen isotopes. The work reported here was undertaken to check that the welds in the vessel would have a satisfactory response to the hydrogen isotopes. A satisfactory response has been demonstrated, leading to a general conclusion that the titanium tritide/316L stainless steel vessel combination provides an extremely reliable storage facility for the tritium

  4. Development of ITER Tritium Storage Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. C.; Kim, K. R.; Paek, S. W.; Shim, M.; Noh, B

    2007-01-15

    The ZrCo getter beds are built of a primary vessel which contains the ZrCo powder and of a secondary outer vessel. The purpose of the secondary outer vessel is to capture permeated or leaked tritium and to present a good thermal insulation when properly evacuated. A third volume, a helium filled loop, is installed in the primary volume to remove the decay heat and is used to perform tritium accountancy measurements. In this report the authors verified that ZrCo can be used safely under a low pressure and temperature.

  5. Procurement of tritium for fusion reactor. A design study of facility for production of fusion fuel tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium, a developmental fuel for use in fusion reactors, has been produced in fission research reactors in Japan by extraction from neutron-irradiated 6Li-targets. This paper describes the preliminary design of a large-scale production facility capable of producing 500 g of tritium annually. The present status of tritium production technology in Japan is also discussed. (author)

  6. Flow of Aqueous Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Google Plus Email Print this page Flow of Aqueous Humor Most, but not all, forms ... aqueous humor) produced by the eye's ciliary body flows out freely (follow blue arrow). Aqueous humor flows ...

  7. Development of tritium transport package for ITER SDS supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ITER is the next generation fusion machine with the fuel of deuterium and tritium. The transport of large amounts of tritium is an important issue from viewpoints of fuel supply and safety. For the shipment of tritium to the ITER site, a transport container needs to be developed and licensed as type B(U) package. It is an ITER requirement to transport tritium as metal tritide, which has been considered to be the safest way for tritium transport. There are not many available licensed packages on the market today. Examples are the WSRC Hydride Transport Vessel (HTV), which can be loaded with up to 18 g tritium in uranium tritide powder and JAERI Type B(U) package with capacity up to 25 g tritium in ZrCo tritide material. JAERI (now JAEA) has proposed a 250 g capacity tritium transport package for future fusion reactors. The design would utilize ZrCo to form the metal tritide to store the tritium. This new package would have a volume of only approximately 50% more than that of the 25 g capacity package and would be capable of repeated use. The tritium will be transported from tritium production sites, mainly the CANDU type reactor sites to ITER tritium plant building. According to the tritium supply plan derived from the operation and experiment plan of ITER, it is necessary to develop a large capacity tritium transport package which is licensed for international transportation. In 2009, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) was commissioned the work of developing the tritium transport package from ITER Organization and the first stage of the development has been just finished. The interfaces of the package with related equipment/facilities were identified and the basic design and preliminary safety analyses were successfully performed. This paper describes the design requirements, basic design and the structural and thermal evaluation results of the developed package under the hypothetical accident conditions

  8. Biological effects of tritium releases from fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium released as tritium oxide is a much more significant potential hazard to the environment than is elemental tritium. Although most biochemical reactions discriminate against the incorporation of tritium in favor of hydrogen, the possibility of some concentration should not be overlooked. A fraction of tritium accumulated as tritiated water becomes organically bound, that is, exchanges with hydrogen bound in organic molecules. The rate and extent of incorporation are dependent upon metabolic activity of the organism. On this basis, the highest concentration of organically-bound tritium would be expected in tissues and population segments which are in formative or growth stages at the time of exposure. Furthermore, as exposure duration increases from acute to chronic situations, tritium concentrations are shown to approach equilibrium levels with a single tritium-to-hydrogen ratio common to all parts of the hydrogen pool. Organic binding would not be expected to result in significant bioaccumulation of tritium from tritiated water. Tritium loss, both from tissue-free water and the tissue-bound fraction, depends upon metabolic activity. Processes that allow accumulation and incorporation of tritium also assist its elimination. Tritium which is organically bound demonstrates a longer half-time, but it would appear to constitute a small fraction of the total tritium label. The radiation exposure of all living organisms by environmentally dispersed tritium, in whatever form, is essentially a whole body exposure. Uncertainties in the individual parameters, involved in converting measured intake to estimated dose equivalent are probably no larger than a factor of three or four. If fusion reactors hold tritium releases with ICRP standards, no significant adverse impact to the environment from those releases are expected

  9. INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENT TREATMENT USING IONIZING RADIATION COMBINED TO TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, C.L.; Oikawa, H.; Mori, M.N.; Sampa, M.H.O.

    2004-10-04

    The Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) with OH radicals are the most efficient to mineralize organic compounds, and there are various methods to generate OH radicals as the use of ozone, hydrogen peroxide and ultra-violet radiation and ionizing radiation. The irradiation of aqueous solutions with high-energy electrons results in the excitation and ionizing of the molecules and rapid (10{sup -14} - 10{sup -9} s) formation of reactive intermediates. These reactive species will react with organic compounds present in industrial effluent inducing their decomposition. Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) catalyzed photoreaction is used to remove a wide range of pollutants in air and water media, combined to UV/VIS light, FeO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, but as far as known there is no report on the combination with ionizing radiation. In some recent studies, the removal of organic pollutants in industrial effluent, such as Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene from petroleum production using ionizing radiation was investigated. It has been ob served that none of the methods can be used individually in wastewater treatment applications with good economics and high degree of energy efficiency. In the present work, the efficiency of ionizing radiation in presence of TiO{sub 2} to treat industrial effluent was evaluated. The main aim to combine these technologies is to improve the efficiency for very hard effluents and to reduce the processing cost for future implementation to large-scale design.

  10. Tritium dynamics in soils and plants at a tritium processing facility in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of tritium released as tritiated water (HTO) have been studied extensively with results incorporated into environmental models such as CSA N288.1 used for regulatory purposes in Canada. The dispersion of tritiated gas (HT) and rates of oxidation to HTO have been studied under controlled conditions, but there are few studies under natural conditions. HT is a major component of the tritium released from a gaseous tritium light manufacturing facility in Canada (CNSC INFO-0798). To support the improvement of models, a garden was set up in one summer near this facility in a spot with tritium in air averaging ∼ 5 Bq/m3 HTO (passive diffusion monitors). Atmospheric stack releases (575 GBq/week) were recorded weekly. HT releases occur mainly during working hours with an HT:HTO ratio of 2.6 as measured at the stack. Soils and plants (leaves/stems and roots/tubers) were sampled for HTO and organically-bound tritium (OBT) weekly. Active day-night monitoring of air was conducted to interpret tritium dynamics relative to weather and solar radiation. The experimental design included a plot of natural grass/soil, contrasted with grass (sod) and Swiss chard, pole beans and potatoes grown in barrels under different irrigation regimes (in local topsoil at 29 Bq/L HTO, 105 Bq/L OBT). All treatments were exposed to rain (80 Bq/L) and atmospheric releases of tritium (weekdays), and reflux of tritium from soils (initial conditions of 284 Bq/L HTO, 3,644 Bq/L OBT) from 20 years of operations. Three irrigation regimes were used for barrel plants to mimic home garden management: rain only, low tritium tap water (5 Bq/L), and high tritium well water (mean 10,013 Bq/L). This design provided a range of plants and starting conditions with contrasts in initial HTO/OBT activity in soils, and major tritium inputs from air versus water. Controls were two home gardens far from any tritium sources. Active air monitoring indicated that the plume was only occasionally present for

  11. Incorporation of tritium in milk lipids after feeding organically bound tritium to cows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay labelled with organically bound tritium was given to two cows for a period of 26 to 28 days. During hay feeding and at different times thereafter, lipids (fatty acids, cholesterol, glycerol, choline phospholipids, other phospholipids, flycolipids and gangliosides) were isolated from milk fat, and their total and specific activities were determined. During tritium administration, fatty acids and cholesterol contained the highest total activity, but the specific activity was highest in cholesterol and choline phospholipids. Activity decreased most rapidly for fatty acids and cholesterol, so that at 56 and 182 days after termination of 3H feedings, phospholipids and glycolipids made an important contribution to lipid activity in milk. Regression analysis of the values for tritium activity in milk fat samples after stopping tritium administration, showed that three components with different half lives could be distinguished. The differences in metabolic behaviour of the various lipids in milk fat are mainly concerned with their relative participation in these components. (author)

  12. Tritium dynamics in soils and plants at a tritium processing facility in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihok, S.; St-Amanat, N.; Kwamena, N.O. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (Canada); Clark, I.; Wilk, M.; Lapp, A. [University of Ottawa (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The dynamics of tritium released as tritiated water (HTO) have been studied extensively with results incorporated into environmental models such as CSA N288.1 used for regulatory purposes in Canada. The dispersion of tritiated gas (HT) and rates of oxidation to HTO have been studied under controlled conditions, but there are few studies under natural conditions. HT is a major component of the tritium released from a gaseous tritium light manufacturing facility in Canada (CNSC INFO-0798). To support the improvement of models, a garden was set up in one summer near this facility in a spot with tritium in air averaging ∼ 5 Bq/m{sup 3} HTO (passive diffusion monitors). Atmospheric stack releases (575 GBq/week) were recorded weekly. HT releases occur mainly during working hours with an HT:HTO ratio of 2.6 as measured at the stack. Soils and plants (leaves/stems and roots/tubers) were sampled for HTO and organically-bound tritium (OBT) weekly. Active day-night monitoring of air was conducted to interpret tritium dynamics relative to weather and solar radiation. The experimental design included a plot of natural grass/soil, contrasted with grass (sod) and Swiss chard, pole beans and potatoes grown in barrels under different irrigation regimes (in local topsoil at 29 Bq/L HTO, 105 Bq/L OBT). All treatments were exposed to rain (80 Bq/L) and atmospheric releases of tritium (weekdays), and reflux of tritium from soils (initial conditions of 284 Bq/L HTO, 3,644 Bq/L OBT) from 20 years of operations. Three irrigation regimes were used for barrel plants to mimic home garden management: rain only, low tritium tap water (5 Bq/L), and high tritium well water (mean 10,013 Bq/L). This design provided a range of plants and starting conditions with contrasts in initial HTO/OBT activity in soils, and major tritium inputs from air versus water. Controls were two home gardens far from any tritium sources. Active air monitoring indicated that the plume was only occasionally present for

  13. Comparative study of the tritium distribution in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevezentsev, A.N. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: alexander.perevezentsev@iter.org; Bell, A.C. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rivkis, L.A.; Filin, V.M.; Gushin, V.V.; Belyakov, M.I.; Bulkin, V.I.; Kravchenko, I.M.; Ionessian, I.A. [All-Russia Institute of Inorganic Materials, 123060, P.O. Box 369, VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation); Torikai, Y.; Matsuyama, M.; Watanabe, K. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Gofuku 3190, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Markin, A.I. [State Scientific Center TRINITI, 142190 Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2008-01-31

    Coupons of stainless steel, Inconel, beryllium, copper and aluminium bronze were exposed to tritium in hydrogen gas mixtures over a wide range of parameters: temperature up to 770 K, pressure from 1 x 10{sup -4} MPa to 0.05 MPa, tritium concentration from 1 at.% to 98 at.%. The tritium concentration on the surface and distribution through the metals were measured using radiography, radioluminography, {beta}-ray induced X-ray spectroscopy and acid etching methods. The effect of metal processing, such as forging, polishing and heat treatment on the tritium distribution was studied along with parameters relating to the exposure of the metal to tritium.

  14. Tritium rainout over the United States in 1962 and 1963

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, G.L.; Hoffman, C.M.

    1966-01-01

    The magnitude and frequency of floods are defined regionally for small streams (drainage This report describes the tritium sampling network established by the U.S. Geological Survey. Tritium rainout data are included for 1962 and 1963 precipitation collected at 15 stations in the United States and Puerto Rico. These data are presented graphically to show seasonal variations and geographic distribution patterns for 1963 tritium rainout. Total tritium rainout during 1963 was considerably higher than it was in previous years. Peak tritium concentrations in late spring or early summer of 1963 were higher by a factor of three or more over concentrations measured in 1962.

  15. Tritium contaminated surface monitoring with a solid-state device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low energy of betas makes tritium difficult to detect. However, there are several methods used in tritium detection, such as liquid scintillation and ionization chambers. Tritium on or near a surface can be also detected using proportional counter and, recently, solid state devices. The paper presents our results in the design and achievement of a surface tritium monitor using a PIN photodiode as a solid state charged particle detector to count betas emitted from the surface. That method allows continuous, real-time and non-destructively measuring of tritium. (author)

  16. Development of nuclear micro-battery with solid tritium source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A micro-battery powered by tritium is being developed to utilize tritium produced from the Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility. The 3D p-n junction device has been designed and fabricated for energy conversion. Titanium tritide is adopted to increase tritium density and safety. Sub micron films or nano-powders of titanium tritide is applied on silicon semiconductor device to reduce the self absorption of beta rays. Until now protium has been used instead of tritium for safety. Hydrogen was absorbed up to atomic ratio of ∼1.3 and ∼1.7 in titanium powders and films, respectively.

  17. Quantitative determination of tritium in metals and oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic samples are analyzed for tritium by heating the sample at 1225 K in a moist oxygen stream. The volatile products are trapped and the tritium is quantitatively determined by scintillation spectroscopy. The method is used to determine less than 1 ppb of tritium in 100-mg samples of lithium, iron, nickel, cerium, plutonium, and plutonium dioxide. Analysis of 18 cuts of a tritium-zirconium, copper foil standard over a 3-yr period showed a tritium content of 45 ppM and a standard deviation of 6 ppM

  18. Elements of thought on the health risk associated to tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses and analyses the health problematic set by tritium and assesses the robustness of the radiation protection system with respect to this radionuclide by highlighting the lack of scientific knowledge on biological effects, and researches to be promoted. After a presentation of epidemiologic and dosimetric approaches of the radiological risk assessment, the authors discuss results and knowledge gained by epidemiologic studies on the risk associated to tritium for mankind, and discuss the knowledge on biological effects of tritium and on the relative biological effectiveness of tritium. The report finally discusses the possibility of reconsidering the radiation weighting factor in the case of tritium

  19. Tritium test of the tritium processing components under the Annex III US-Japan Collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process ready components for Fuel Cleanup System were tested at the TSTA under the US-Japan Collaboration program. Palladium diffuser for tritium purification and Ceramic Electrolysis Cell for decomposition of tritiated water respectively were tested with pure tritium for years. The characteristics of the components with hydrogen isotopes, effects of impurities, and long-term reliability of the components were studied. It was concluded that these components are suitable and attractive for fusion fuel processing systems. (author)

  20. Role of livestock effluent suspended particulate in sealing effluent ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J McL; Warren, B R

    2015-05-01

    Intensive livestock feed-lots have become more prevalent in recent years to help in meeting the predicted food production targets based on expected population growth. Effluent from these is stored in ponds, representing a potential concern for seepage and contamination of groundwater. Whilst previous literature suggests that effluent particulate can limit seepage adequately in combination with a clay liner, this research addresses potential concerns for sealing of ponds with low concentration fine and then evaluates this against proposed filter-cake based methodologies to describe and predict hydraulic reduction. Short soil cores were compacted to 98% of the maximum dry density and subject to ponded head percolation with unfiltered-sediment-reduced effluent, effluent filtered to sealing was shown to follow mathematical models of filter-cake formation, but without the formation of a physical seal on top of the soil surface. Management considerations based on the results are presented. PMID:25721977