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Sample records for aquatic humic substances

  1. Reaction products of aquatic humic substances with chlorine.

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J D; Christman, R F; Norwood, D L; Millington, D S

    1982-01-01

    A major concern of the chlorination of aquatic humic materials is the ubiquitous production of trihalomethanes. A large number of other chlorinated organic compounds, however, have been shown to be formed by chlorine's reaction with humic substances. In this study, humic material was concentrated from a coastal North Carolina lake and chlorinated at a chlorine to carbon mole ratio of 1.5 at pH 12. A high pH was necessary for complete dissolution of the humic material and for production of ade...

  2. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography method for measuring the composition of aquatic humic substances

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Renqi

    2015-01-01

    A hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) method was developed to measure the composition of humic substances from river, reservoir, and treated wastewater based on their physicochemical properties. The current method fractionates the humic substances into four well-defined groups based on parallel analyses with a neutral and a cationic HILIC column, using mobile phases of varied compositions and pH. The results indicate that: (i) the proportion of carboxylic acids in the humic substances from terrestrial origins is less than half of that from treated wastewater (Jeddah, KSA), (ii) a higher content of basic compounds was observed in the humic substances from treated wastewater and Ribou Reservoir (Cholet, France) than in the sample from Loire River (France), (iii) a higher percentage of hydrophobic macromolecules were found in the humic substances from Loire River than in the other samples, and (iv) humic substances of treated wastewater contained less ionic neutral compounds (i.e., pKa 5-9) than the waters from terrestrial origins. The physicochemical property disparity amongst the compounds in each humic substances sample was also evaluated. The humic substances from the lightly humic Loire river displayed the highest disparity, whereas the highly humic Suwannee river (Georgia, USA) showed the most homogeneous humic substances.

  3. Direct measurement of the fluorescence characteristics of aquatic humic substances by a three-dimensional fluorescence spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic substances play an important role in the transport of trace metals and insoluble organic materials. They are also considered to be precursors of trihalomethane in aquatic environments. The direct measurement of humic substances was carried out with a three-dimensional fluorescence spectrophotometer after filtering natural-water samples through a GF/F glass fiber filter. Because the influence of the humic concentration, pH and ionic strength on the three-dimensional excitation emission matrix spectra is negligible, the proposed method can be directly applied to the characterization of humic substances in freshwater samples (humic concentration 0.5-10 mg 1-1, pH6-9 and ionic strength <0.04 M) and sea-water samples (ionic strength 0.75 M). Humic substances in river, lake and pore water samples exhibit 2-3 peaks at excitation 305-340 nm/emission 415-440 nm and excitation 250-270 nm/emission 440-450 nm. These peak positions correspond to those of fulvic acids isolated from soil. (author)

  4. Interactions of mercury with different molecular weight fractions of humic substances in aquatic systems.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Yao, K.M.; Chennuri, K.; Vudamala, K.; Babu, P.V.R.

    Interactions of mercury (Hg) with different molecular weight fractions of humic substances (HS) play an important role in controlling distribution, diffusion, speciation, and bioavailability of Hg in natural systems. This study suggests that Hg...

  5. Characterization of the interactions between endocrine disruptors and aquatic humic substances from tropical rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botero, Wander G. [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Arapiraca, AL (Brazil); Oliveira, Luciana C. de [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Cunha, Bruno B.; Oliveira, Lilian K. de; Goveia, Danielle; Fraceto, Leonardo F.; Rosa, Andre Henrique, E-mail: ahrosa@sorocaba.unesp.b [UNESP, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia do Meio Ambiente; Rocha, Julio Cesar [UNESP, Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Quimica Analitica

    2011-07-01

    Interactions between two endocrine disruptors (ED) and aquatic humic substances (AHS) from tropical rivers were studied using an ultrafiltration system equipped with a 1 kDa cut-off cellulose membrane to separate free ED from the fraction bound in the AHS. Quantification of 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol and bisphenol A was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The times required for establishment of equilibrium between the AHS and the ED were ca. 30 min, and complexation capacities for 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol and bisphenol A were 18.53 and 2.07 mg g{sup -1} TOC, respectively. The greater interaction of AHS with 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol, compared to bisphenol A, was due to the presence of hydrogen in the structure of 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol, which could interact with ionized oxygenated groups of the AHS. The results indicate that AHS can strongly influence the transport and reactivity of endocrine disruptors in aquatic systems. (author)

  6. Effect of natural aquatic humic substances on the photodegradation of bisphenol A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Manjun; YANG Xi; YANG Hongshen; KONG Lingren

    2007-01-01

    The photochemical degradation of bisphenol A(BPA) was studied in the presence of natural humic substances from different origins under simulated solar irradiation.BPA underwent insignificant direct photolysis in neutral water,but rapid photosensitized degradation in four humic substances solutions via pseudo-first-order reaction occurred.The photodegradation rate of BPA was insensitive to the different initial BPA concentrations and was inhibited in aerated solution compared with the deoxygenated medium.The reactive oxytion of humic substances under irradiation was determined from the quenching kinetic experiment using molecular probe.The five main intermediate photoproducts of BPA in Nordic lake fulvic acid (NOFA) were tentatively identified using gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS).Based on the identification of ROS and the analysis of photoproduct formation,the possible phototransformation pathways of BPA were proposed,involving the direct photolysis due to the energy transfer from the triplet state humic substance (3HS*) to BPA molecules and hydroxyl radical addition and oxidation as well.

  7. Speciation of aquatic Hg2+ in humic substances by time differential perturbed angular correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in waters and soils and act as complexing agents for different heavy metals, e.g. Cd, Hg. Toxicity, reactivity, fixation, and migration are therefore strongly influenced by the interactions between heavy metals and humic substances. Humic substances derive from postmortal materials such as rotten plants, have dark colours and usually a molecular weight between 500 and 10.000 Dalton. Complex formation studies with different heavy metal ions indicate at least two different kinds of metal sites. Usually, these studies are restricted to heavy metal concentrations 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher that the natural heavy metal abundance (i.e. 10-10 molar). This serious limitation can be overcome by the use of suitable radioisotope techniques capable of metal speciation at extreme sensitivity levels such as TDPAC (Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation of γ-Rays). Thus, we studied the interaction of heavy metals with humic substances by monitoring the nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI)of the short-lived radioisotopes 111mCd (τl/2 = 49 min) and 199mHg (τ1/2 = 43 min) supplied by ISOLDE via γ-γ -TDPAC and compared the 111mCd/199mHg-NQIs in humic substances with the known NQI of model compounds (i.e. metal proteins, organometallic compounds). At lowest Hg(II) concentrations (10-10 molar) only linear Hg(ll) coordinations with nitrogen and/or sulfur were observed, with increasing Hg(II) concentration additional distorted trigonal (at 2.5.10-10 molar) and tetrahedral coordinations (at 2.5.10-8 molar) with various ligands show up and start to become dominant at Hg(II) concentrations of 10-7 molar and higher. Contrary to Hg(II), we observed unspecific binding for Cd(lI) in the 111mCd-TDPAC experiments only, even in the 10-10 molar concentration range

  8. Humic substances in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic substances and their importance in groundwater is shortly outlined. A description of a method for isolating humic substances from groundwater in the field and for further characterisation is being tested with commercial humic acid (Aldrich), as well as gel-permeation method for determining the molecular weight. bedrock, it affords the opportunity of studying the stability and alteration of uraninite as an analogue for spent nuclear fuel under various redox conditions. (orig.) (6 refs.)

  9. Influence of seasonality on the interaction of mercury with aquatic humic substances extracted from the Middle Negro River Basin (Amazon)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luciana C. de, E-mail: lcamargo@ufscar.br [Federal University of Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Botero, Wander G. [Federal University of Alagoas (UFAL), Arapiraca, AL (Brazil); Santos, Felipe A. [Institute of Biosciences, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Sargentini Junior, Ezio [National Amazon Research Institute (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil); Rocha, Julio C.; Santos, Ademir dos [Institute of Chemistry of Araraquara, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    High mercury concentrations in different environmental matrices in the Amazon have been attributed to mining activities. However, high concentrations of mercury are also present in the soil and water in places like in the middle of the Negro River Basin, which is far away from any anthropogenic emission sources. The Amazon region is characterized by two different regional seasons, with well-defined flood and low water periods. The objective of this work was to investigate the seasonal influences of the interaction between mercury and aquatic humic substances (AHS), which are the main agents of the natural organic complexation capacity. The results of the multivariate statistical analysis of the data showed that the humic substances had different structural characteristics, depending on each season. The ability of humic substances to form complexes with Hg(II) is not directly related to their carbon content, but to the nature and availability of the functional groups present in its structure. The functional groups are carboxylic and aromatic directly related to the higher complexation capacity of AHS by mercury ions. (author)

  10. Influence of seasonality on the interaction of mercury with aquatic humic substances extracted from the Middle Negro River Basin (Amazon)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High mercury concentrations in different environmental matrices in the Amazon have been attributed to mining activities. However, high concentrations of mercury are also present in the soil and water in places like in the middle of the Negro River Basin, which is far away from any anthropogenic emission sources. The Amazon region is characterized by two different regional seasons, with well-defined flood and low water periods. The objective of this work was to investigate the seasonal influences of the interaction between mercury and aquatic humic substances (AHS), which are the main agents of the natural organic complexation capacity. The results of the multivariate statistical analysis of the data showed that the humic substances had different structural characteristics, depending on each season. The ability of humic substances to form complexes with Hg(II) is not directly related to their carbon content, but to the nature and availability of the functional groups present in its structure. The functional groups are carboxylic and aromatic directly related to the higher complexation capacity of AHS by mercury ions. (author)

  11. Characterization of aquatic humic substances to DBPs formation in advanced treatment processes for conventionally treated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced water treatment demonstration plant consisted of ozone/granular activated carbon processes was operated to study feasibility of the processes. Natural organic matter (NOM) from raw and process waters at the demonstration plant was isolated into humic and non-humic fractions by physicochemical fractionation method to investigate characteristics of humic fraction (i.e., humic substances, HS) as a predominant haloform reactant. Ozone did not significantly oxidize the carboxylic fraction (from 39.1 to 35.9%), while GAC removed some of the carboxylic fraction (from 35.9 to 29.1%). Formation potential of trihalomethanes (THMs) as compared to haloacetic acids formation potential (HAAFP) was highly influenced by HS. Higher yields of THMs resulted from chlorination of HS with a higher phenolic content and phenolic fraction in the HS gradually decreased from 60.5% to 15.8% through the water treatment. The structural and functional changes of HS were identified by elemental, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) analyses, and these results were mutually consistent. The functional distribution data obtained by using A-21 resin could be used to support the interpretation of data obtained from the spectroscopic analyses. Decreases in ratio of UV absorbance at 253 nm and 203 nm (A 253/A 203) and DBPFPs/DOC showed consistent trends, therefore, A 253/A 203 ratio may be a good indicator for the disinfection by-product formation potentials (DBPFPs)

  12. Characterization of aquatic humic substances by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (FFFF) and Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC): A comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquatic humic substances (HS) of different origin are characterized for their molecular size distribution by the flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) technique. The results are compared with those obtained by classical gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The influence of different parameters such as eluent composition, crossflow, and type of membrane on the fractionation is investigated. Molecular weight at peak maximum and corresponding weight- and number averaged molecular weights are determined using polystyrenesulphonate calibration standards. Results obtained by FFFF and GPC are comparable, even though the recovery of HS with FFFF is higher. In accordance with the literature, fulvic acids are found to be somewhat smaller than humic acids. Investigated HS samples show molecular weights at peak maximum in the range of 2 to 3 kilodalton. (authors)

  13. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹⁵N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹⁵N NMR. Liquid state ¹⁵N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹⁵N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  14. Extraction of groundwater humic substances and characterization by synthetic resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater was sampled in depth of about 50m for extraction of humic substances in the groundwater. The extraction and concentration of the humic substances were performed with synthetic adsorption resins. The extracted humic substances and reference humic substances were made a comparison in chemical property. Aquatic humic substances from Nordic Lake and non-aquatic Aldrich Co. humic acids were selected for the reference material. The unprocessed groundwater and the humic substances extracted from the groundwater were compared in UV-vis spectra, fluorescence spectra and the concentration ratio of humic acid and fulvic acid which were important in order to know characteristics of humic substances. Humic substances extracted from the groundwater were compared with Nordic humic substances in molecular weight distribution, IR spectra and NMR spectra from a viewpoint of complexation with radionuclides. This resulted that the extracted humic substances showed similar characteristics to humic substances in the groundwater, and that the extracted humic substances had similar characteristics to Nordic humic substances in containing acidic functional group which contributed to complexation and in americium complexation where americium complexed uniformly, independent of the molecular weight distribution as important characteristics for evaluation of effects on migration of radionuclides. These obtained results imply that employed method was applicable to extract dissolved humic substances from groundwater in a non-destructive manner and the dissolved humic substances occurring in groundwater in Japan are similar to aquatic Nordic humic substances, which are available to purchase at IHSS (International Humic Substances Society), in complexation behavior with some kind of metal ions. (author)

  15. Characterization of typical aquatic humic substances in areas of sugarcane cultivation in Brazil using tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadini, A M; Constantino, I C; Nuzzo, A; Spaccini, R; Piccolo, A; Moreira, A B; Bisinoti, M C

    2015-06-15

    Aquatic humic substances (AHSs) differ from one environment to another depending on land use and occupation. In addition, the effects of planting sugarcane on AHSs are not well known. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize AHSs extracted from a river in a typical region of sugarcane cultivation during dry and rainy seasons. The main characteristics of the AHSs were obtained using Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and off-line pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (off-line tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH)-GC-MS-thermochemolysis). The FTIR and NMR results were used to infer that no distinctions occurred between the sampling periods. The samples were composed of aromatic groups that were potentially associated with the presence of residual vegetable materials (lignin). The results of the off-line TMAH-GC-MS-thermochemolysis indicated that the structures of the AHSs had uniform compositions that were rich in fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), polysaccharide derivatives, aliphatic biopolymers derived from plants, long hydrocarbon chains, branched alkyl groups and methylene carbons. Thus, the results showed that the AHSs obtained from the sugarcane cultivation area during the crop period mainly consisted of resistant aliphatic hydrocarbons, which are derivatives of lignin and FAMEs in compounds rich in humic acid. Therefore, we concluded that sugarcane cultivation produces changes in AHSs because greater amounts of lignin derivatives were observed during the dry season, corresponding to sugarcane cultivation. PMID:25756675

  16. Sources and haloacetic acid/trihalomethane formation potentials of aquatic humic substances in the Wakarusa River and Clinton Lake near Lawrence, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomes, M.L.; Larive, C.K.; Thurman, E.M.; Green, W.R.; Orem, W.H.; Rostad, C.E.; Coplen, T.B.; Cutak, B.J.; Dixon, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Gram quantities of aquatic humic substances (AHS) were extracted from the Wakarusa River-Clinton Lake Reservoir system, near Lawrence, KS, to support nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental studies, report concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and AHS, define sources of the AHS, and determine if the AHS yield sufficient quantities of haloacetic acids (HAA5) and trihalomethanes (THM4) that exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) in drinking water. AHS from the Wakarusa River and Clinton Lake originated from riparian forest vegetation, reflected respective effects of soil organic matter and aquatic algal/bacterial sources, and bore evidence of biological degradation and photodegradation. AHS from the Wakarusa River showed the effect of terrestrial sources, whereas Clinton Lake humicacid also reflected aquatic algal/bacterial sources. Greater amounts of carbon attributable to tannin-derived chemical structures may correspond with higher HAA5 and THM4 yields for Clinton Lake fulvic acid. Prior to appreciable leaf-fall from deciduous trees, the combined (humic and fulvic acid) THM4 formation potentials for the Wakarusa River approached the proposed EPA THM4 Stage I MCL of 80 ??g/L, and the combined THM4 formation potential for Clinton Lake slightly exceeded the proposed THM4 Stage II MCL of 40 ??g/L. Finally, AHS from Clinton Lake could account for most (>70%) of the THM4 concentrations in finished water from the Clinton Lake Water Treatment Plant based on September 23, 1996, THM4 results.Gram quantities of aquatic humic substances (AHS) were extracted from the Wakarusa River-Clinton Lake Reservoir system, near Lawrence, KS, to support nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental studies, report concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and AHS, define sources of the AHS, and determine if the AHS yield sufficient quantities of haloacetic acids (HAA5) and trihalomethanes (THM4) that exceed U

  17. Speciation of Aquatic Heavy Metals in Humic Substances by$^{111m}$Cd/$^{199m}$Hg-TDPAC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in waters and soils and act as complexing agents for different heavy metals, e.g. Cd, Hg. Toxicity, reactivity, fixation and migration are therefore strongly influenced by the interactions between heavy metals and humic substances. Humic substances derive from postmortal materials such as rotten plants, have dark colours and usually a molecular weight between 500 and 10~000 Dalton. Complex formation studies with different heavy metal ions indicate at least two different kinds of metal sites. Usually, these studies are restricted to heavy metal concentrations 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than the natural heavy metal abundance (i.e. 10$^{-10}$ molar). This serious limitation can be overcome by the use of suitable radiosotope techniques capable of metal speciation at extreme sensitivity levels such as TDPAC (Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation of~$\\gamma$-rays). Thus, we studied the interaction of heavy metals with humic substances by monitoring the nuclear quadru...

  18. Characterization of typical aquatic humic substances in areas of sugarcane cultivation in Brazil using tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquatic humic substances (AHSs) differ from one environment to another depending on land use and occupation. In addition, the effects of planting sugarcane on AHSs are not well known. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize AHSs extracted from a river in a typical region of sugarcane cultivation during dry and rainy seasons. The main characteristics of the AHSs were obtained using Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and off-line pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (off-line tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH)-GC–MS-thermochemolysis). The FTIR and NMR results were used to infer that no distinctions occurred between the sampling periods. The samples were composed of aromatic groups that were potentially associated with the presence of residual vegetable materials (lignin). The results of the off-line TMAH-GC–MS-thermochemolysis indicated that the structures of the AHSs had uniform compositions that were rich in fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), polysaccharide derivatives, aliphatic biopolymers derived from plants, long hydrocarbon chains, branched alkyl groups and methylene carbons. Thus, the results showed that the AHSs obtained from the sugarcane cultivation area during the crop period mainly consisted of resistant aliphatic hydrocarbons, which are derivatives of lignin and FAMEs in compounds rich in humic acid. Therefore, we concluded that sugarcane cultivation produces changes in AHSs because greater amounts of lignin derivatives were observed during the dry season, corresponding to sugarcane cultivation. - Highlights: • AHSs differ from one environment to another depending on land use and occupation. • AHSs extracted from a river in a typical region of sugarcane cultivation. • AHSs from the sugarcane area are influenced by the soil use and occupation. • AHSs contain lignin derivatives, fatty acid methyl esters and others. • Lignin was observed with

  19. Characterization of typical aquatic humic substances in areas of sugarcane cultivation in Brazil using tetramethylammonium hydroxide thermochemolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadini, A.M.; Constantino, I.C. [Departamento de Química e Ciências Ambientais, Instituto de Biociências, Letras e Ciências Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista “Júlio de Mesquita Filho”, R. Cristóvão Colombo 2265, 15054-000 São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Nuzzo, A.; Spaccini, R.; Piccolo, A. [Dipartimento Scienze del Suolo, della Pianta, e dell' Ambiente, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Moreira, A.B. [Departamento de Química e Ciências Ambientais, Instituto de Biociências, Letras e Ciências Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista “Júlio de Mesquita Filho”, R. Cristóvão Colombo 2265, 15054-000 São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); and others

    2015-06-15

    Aquatic humic substances (AHSs) differ from one environment to another depending on land use and occupation. In addition, the effects of planting sugarcane on AHSs are not well known. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterize AHSs extracted from a river in a typical region of sugarcane cultivation during dry and rainy seasons. The main characteristics of the AHSs were obtained using Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and off-line pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (off-line tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH)-GC–MS-thermochemolysis). The FTIR and NMR results were used to infer that no distinctions occurred between the sampling periods. The samples were composed of aromatic groups that were potentially associated with the presence of residual vegetable materials (lignin). The results of the off-line TMAH-GC–MS-thermochemolysis indicated that the structures of the AHSs had uniform compositions that were rich in fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), polysaccharide derivatives, aliphatic biopolymers derived from plants, long hydrocarbon chains, branched alkyl groups and methylene carbons. Thus, the results showed that the AHSs obtained from the sugarcane cultivation area during the crop period mainly consisted of resistant aliphatic hydrocarbons, which are derivatives of lignin and FAMEs in compounds rich in humic acid. Therefore, we concluded that sugarcane cultivation produces changes in AHSs because greater amounts of lignin derivatives were observed during the dry season, corresponding to sugarcane cultivation. - Highlights: • AHSs differ from one environment to another depending on land use and occupation. • AHSs extracted from a river in a typical region of sugarcane cultivation. • AHSs from the sugarcane area are influenced by the soil use and occupation. • AHSs contain lignin derivatives, fatty acid methyl esters and others. • Lignin was observed with

  20. Isolation of haloorganic groundwater humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, M.; Grøn, C.

    1995-01-01

    Humic substances were isolated from groundwater according to a revised method designed to avoid organohalogen artefacts. The prepared humic substances exhibited lower halogen contents than humic substances isolated according to the conventionally used method. Excessive oxidation or hydrolysis...

  1. Isolation of haloorganic groundwater humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, M.; Grøn, C.

    Humic substances were isolated from groundwater according to a revised method designed to avoid organohalogen artefacts. The prepared humic substances exhibited lower halogen contents than humic substances isolated according to the conventionally used method. Excessive oxidation or hydrolysis was...

  2. The influence of seasonalness on the structural characteristics of aquatic humic substances extracted from Negro River (Amazon State) waters: interactions with Hg(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luciana C. de; Rocha, Julio C. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: jrocha@iq.unesp.br; Sargentini Junior, Ezio; Serudo, Ricardo L. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM, (Brazil); Rosa, Andre H. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Ambiental; Simoes, Marcelo L.; Martin-Neto, Ladislau; Silva, Wilson T. L. da [EMBRAPA Instrumentacao Agropecuaria, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    In this work, humic substances were extracted from water samples collected monthly from the Negro River basin in the Amazon state (Brazil) to study their properties in the Amazonian environment and interactions with the mercury ion considering the influence of seasonalness in this formation. The C/H, C/N and C/O atomic ratio parameters, functional groups, concentration of semiquinone-type free radicals, pH, pluviometric and fluviometric indices, and mercury concentrations were interpreted using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA). The statistical analyses showed that when the pluviometric index was greater and the fluviometric index was smaller, the degree of humification of aquatic substances was greater. The following decreasing order of the degree of humification of the AHS collected monthly was established: Nov/02 to Feb/03 > Mar/02 to May/02 > Jun/02 to Oct/02. The greatest concentrations of mercury were detected in more humidified samples. These results suggest that due to inter and/or intra-molecular rearrangements, the degree of humification of aquatic humic substances is related to its affinity for Hg(II) ions. (author)

  3. Effects of humic substances on the migration of radionuclides: Complexation of actinides with humic substances. 1. progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present research programme is to study the complexation behaviour of actinide ions with humic substances in natural aquifer systems and hence to quantify the effect of humic substances on the actinide migration. Aquatic humic substances commonly found in all groundwaters in different concentrations have a strong tendency towards complexation with actinide ions. This is one of the major geochemical reactions but hitherto least quantified. Therefore, the effect of humic substances on the actinide migration is poorly understood. In the present research programme the complexation of actinide ions with humic substances will be described thermodynamically. This description will be based on a model being as simple as possible to allow an easy introduction of the resulting constants into geochemical modelling of the actinide migration. This programme is a continuation of the activities of the COCO group in the second phase of the CEC-MIRAGE project. (orig.)

  4. Reduction of mercury (II) by humic substances-influence of pH, salinity of aquatic system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Vudamala, K.; Coulibaly, M.; Ramteke, D.; Chennuri, K.; Lean, D.

    purposely not bubbled with N2 to avoid any kind of physical forcing during Hg-DOC interactions. It is assumed that the diffusion of Hg0 in different humic acid solutions is constant and analysis of Hg0 in headspace represents Hg(II) reduction processes...) The chemistry of atmospheric mercury : a review. Atm Environ 33: 2067–2079 Mason RP, Fitzgerald WF(1991) Mercury speciation in open ocean waters. Water Air & Soil Poll 56:779–789. Mason RP, Fitzgerald WF, Morel FMM(1994) The biogeochemical cycling...

  5. Application of a membrane model to the sorptive interactions of humic substances.

    OpenAIRE

    Wershaw, R L

    1989-01-01

    Humic substances, the dark-colored, natural organic polyelectrolytes that are found in practically all soils, sediments, and natural water, strongly interact with both inorganic and organic pollutants. Inorganic cationic species generally undergo complexation reactions with humic substances. The binding of cations, such as cupric ions, by humic substances often markedly reduces their toxicity to aquatic organisms. Some inorganic anionic species, in the presence of metal ions, are sorbed by hu...

  6. Molecular aggregation of humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) form molecular aggregates in solution and on mineral surfaces. Elucidation of the mechanism of formation of these aggregates is important for an understanding of the interactions of HS in soils arid natural waters. The HS are formed mainly by enzymatic depolymerization and oxidation of plant biopolymers. These reactions transform the aromatic and lipid plant components into amphiphilic molecules, that is, molecules that consist of separate hydrophobic (nonpolar) and hydrophilic (polar) parts. The nonpolar parts of the molecules are composed of relatively unaltered segments of plant polymers and the polar parts of carboxylic acid groups. These amphiphiles form membrane-like aggregates on mineral surfaces and micelle-like aggregates in solution. The exterior surfaces of these aggregates are hydrophilic, and the interiors constitute separate hydrophobic liquid-like phases.

  7. Study of humic substances by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Konecna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine main fluorophores of soil humic substances using 2D and 3D synchronous fluorescencespectroscopy (SFS. The measured synchronous spectra werecompared with standards IHSS. Differences between humic andfulvic acids as well as our and IHSS samples are discussed.

  8. Development in aquatic humic chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Frimmel, Fritz

    2000-01-01

    Développements en chimie des substances humiques aquatiques. Le travail scientifique dépend toujours de savoirs spécifiques déjà acquis. Ceci s'applique notamment au domaine de la chimie des substances aquatiques. Certaines étapes importantes ont été : (1) la standardisation des procédés d'isolement des substances humiques et avec elle la disponibilité de substances de référence ; (2) l'application des outils puissants de la spectroscopie RMN et de la spectrométrie de masse combinés à la pyro...

  9. Proton and metal ion binding to humic substances.

    OpenAIRE

    Wit, de, N.J.W.

    1992-01-01

    Humic substances are polydisperse mixtures of organic molecules which at least to some extent determine the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals in soils, sediments and aquatic systems. In order to make a sound risk assessment of the fate of trace metals a good conception and preferably a sound description is essential. In this thesis mechanistic models are presented that explicitely take into account the dominant factors that determine metal ion binding. These factors are the chemica...

  10. Chemodynamics of soft nanoparticulate complexes: Cu(II) and Ni(II) complexes with fulvic acids and aquatic humic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Town, R.M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.; Buffle, J.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of metal complexation by small humic substances (fulvic acid and aquatic humic acid, collectively denoted as "fulvic-like substance", FS) are explored within the framework of concepts recently developed for soft nanoparticulate complexants. From a comprehensive collection of published e

  11. Removal of humic substances by biosorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VUKOVI(C) Marija; DOMANOVAC Tomislav; BRI(S)KI Felicita

    2008-01-01

    Fungal pellets of Aspergillus niger 405, Aspergillus ustus 326, and Stachybotrys sp. 1103 were used for the removal of humic substances from aqueous solutions. Batchwise biosorption, carried out at pH 6 and 25℃, was monitored spectrophotometrically and the process described with Freundlich's model. Calculated sorption coefficients K/and n showed that A. niger exhibited the highest efficiency. A good match between the model and experimental data and a high correlation coefficient (R2) pointed out to judicious choice of the mechanism for removal of humic substances from the reaction medium. The sorption rate constants (k) for A. ustus and Stachybotrys sp. were almost equal, however higher than that for A. niger. Comparison of test results with the simulated ones demonstrated the applicability of the designed kinetic model for removal of humic substances from natural water by biosorption with fungal pellets. Different morphological structure of the examined fungal pellets showed that faster sorption does not imply the most efficient removal of humic substances. Desorption of humic substances from fungal pellets was complete, rapid, and yielded uniform results.

  12. Lanthanide--humic substances complexation. II. Calibration of humic ion-binding model V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonke, Jeroen E

    2006-12-15

    The experimental complexation of the lanthanides (Sc, Y, and rare earth elements) with Suwannee river fulvic acid, Leonardite coal humic acid, and Elliot soil humic acid is described with Humic Ion-Binding Model V. The fitted intrinsic equilibrium constants for metal-proton exchange, pKMHA, for Eu3+ are similar to previously published experimental fits, and linear free energy relationship (LFER) estimated values. The experimentally observed lanthanide contraction effect in REE-humic complex stability is reflected in the gradual decrease in pKMHA from La to Lu. In Model V, a decrease in pKMHA from La to Lu indicates an increase in complex stability. Fitted pKMHA values for heavy REE are lower than those estimated by LFERs. Consequently, REE fractionation by humic substances complexation could be more pronounced than previously thought. Recommended pKMHA values for lanthanide-fulvic and -humic acid complexation are derived by superimposing the fitted trends in pKMHA for all REE, i.e., the decrease in pKMHA from La to Lu, on the average Eu pKMHA value for all literature datasets. These results will allow modeling assessments of organic matter induced REE fractionation in aquatic environments, taking into account changes in pH, ionic strength, and ion competition. A simulation of dissolved REE speciation in an average world river suggests that organic matter outcompetes carbonate complexation, even under alkaline conditions. PMID:17256484

  13. Redox stability of neptunium(V) in the presence of humic substances of varying functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Naturally occurring aquatic humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) are known to effect the speciation and thus, the migration behavior of actinide contaminants in environmental systems due to their complexing and redox properties and their ability to form colloids. Therefore, to understand and predict the mobility of actinides in natural aquifer systems, amongst others, information on their redox stability in the presence of humic substances is necessary. In the present work, the time dependence of the reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) by humic substances of varying functionality has been studied under anaerobic conditions between pH 3.5 and pH 9. Synthetic humic acids with pronounced redox functionality (type Cat-Gly and Hyd-Glu) [1] were studied in comparison to natural humic substances (Aldrich humic acid, Kranichsee fulvic acid). For Np speciation in solution liquid-liquid extraction, laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LIPAS), NIR absorption spectroscopy, and ultrafiltration were applied. In comparison to the natural humic substances, the synthetic humic acids lead to a much stronger reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) [2]. The Np(IV) formed in the course of the experiments is stabilized as Np(IV) humate. The tetravalent oxidation state of Np remained constant for several months. The redox capacities of the synthetic humic acids, which are significantly higher than those of the natural humic substances, can be attributed to their higher phenolic/acidic OH group contents compared to natural humic substances. The dominating role of phenolic/acidic OH groups for the reduction of Np(V) by humic substances could be verified applying a synthetic humic acid with blocked phenolic/acidic OH groups (type Hyd-Glu-PB). Furthermore, the influence of NO3- on the Np(V) reduction by humic substances was studied. The results have shown that by application of the synthetic humic acids with distinct redox functionalities actinides can be stabilized

  14. On the nature of humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotov, G. N.; Shoba, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    It is argued that the isolation of low-molecular-weight compounds from humic substances does not prove their supramolecular nature, because small molecules can be sorbed on macromolecules by interacting with them due to noncovalent bonds. The relative mobility of molecular segments in humic substances has been proposed to be used as a criterion for the discrimination between the humic substances of supraand macromolecular nature. The macromolecules are characterized by mobility of their segments, whereas supramolecular systems have stiff structure. This difference between macroand supramolecules results in different behaviors of the matrices (gels) formed from them in the processes of segregation. In the macromolecules, the formations of a new phase appearing at the segregation (microphase separation) are of nano size, at least in one dimension. They are incapable of moving within the matrix and form a well-known, limited set of systems. In the supramolecular matrices, the new-phase formations should have higher mobility and ability to move within the matrix with the formation of particles and zones of not only nano, but also micro sizes, as well as a significantly larger set of systems, including fractal configurations. The experimental electron microscopic study of the humic matrices of soil gels shows that the new-phase formations in the matrix of humic substances have not only nano, but also micro sizes and are capable of moving within the matrix, which confirms the supramolecular nature of humic substances. The proposed method has allowed generalizing the supraand macromolecular approaches, because macromolecules can enter into the composition of supramolecular systems. It is no less important that the behavior of HSs can be perceived as the behavior of stiff impenetrable particles that may compose the structures of different types and sizes.

  15. A comprehensive structural evaluation of humic substances using several fluorescence techniques before and after ozonation. Part I: Structural characterization of humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this work (Part I) is to conduct a comprehensive structural characterization of humic substances, using all the current fluorescence techniques: emission scan fluorescence (ESF), synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS), total luminescence spectroscopy (TLS or EEM) through the use of both 2-D contour maps and 3-D plots, fluorescence index and the λ0.5 parameter. Four humic substances were studied in this work: three of them were provided by the International Humic Substances Society (Suwannee River Fulvic Acid Standard, Suwannee River Humic Acid Standard and Nordic Reservoir Fulvic Acid Reference) and the other one was a commercial humic acid widely used as a surrogate for aquatic humic substances in various studies (Aldrich Humic Acid: ALHA). The EEM spectra for the three natural aquatic substances were quite similar, showing two main peaks of maximum fluorescence intensity: one located in the ultraviolet region and centered at around Ex/Em values of 230/437 nm (peak A) and another one in the visible region, centered at around 335/460 nm (peak C); however, the EEM spectrum of ALHA is completely different to those of natural aquatic humic substances, presenting four poorly resolved main peaks with a high degree of spectral overlap, located at 260/462, 300/479, 365/483 and 450/524 nm. The synchronous spectra at Δλ = 18 and 44 nm (especially at Δλ = 18 nm) allowed the identification of a protein-like peak at λsyn around 290 nm, which was not detected in the EEM spectra; as it happened with EEM spectra, the synchronous spectra of ALHA are quite different from those of the aquatic humic substances, presenting a higher number of bands that suggest greater structural complexity and a higher degree of polydispersity. Good correlations were achieved between 13C NMR aromaticity and both fluorescence index and λ0.5 parameter. The different spectra presented by ALHA compared to those shown by the natural aquatic humic substances for all the

  16. Radiocarbon of dissolved humic substances in river waters from the Chernobyl area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Seiya; Aramaki, Takafumi; Fujitake, Nobuhide; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Tkachenko, Yuri

    2004-08-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) was used to study the origin and transport of aquatic humic substances in river waters at the Chernobyl area, which received a pulse input of 14C as a consequence of the nuclear accident. Water samples were collected in April 1999 from the Pripyat and Sakhan Rivers, which flow through the radioactive contaminated area (30 km exclusion zone). The Δ14C values of humic and fulvic acids ranged from -68‰ to +75‰ and were ∼400‰ lower than those of non-contaminated environments. The aquatic humic substances may be derived mainly from those of bog, peat, and podzolic soil with older 14C age, and thereby reflect a larger proportion of older groundwater humic substances. Contribution of 14C by the Chernobyl accident appears to be small because of the long residence time of organic carbon at the surface soil.

  17. Origin and structures of groundwater humic substances from three Danish aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, C.; Wassenaar, L.; Krog, M.

    1996-01-01

    Structural, chemical, and isotopic parameters were used to identify the origins of groundwater humic substances from three Danish aquifers. A variety of analytical techniques (visible light absorption, molecular weight distribution, C-13-NMR spectroscopy, elemental composition with major elements...... geological and hydrogeochemical information. In a third aquifer, source rock identification was inconclusive, and multiple fossil and recent organic carbon sources are suggested....... and halogens, hydrolyzable amino acids and carbohydrates, carbon isotopes) applied to aquatic humic and fulvic acids led to consistent structural interpretations for each of the three aquifers studied. For humic substances in two-aquifers, the analyses suggested source rocks in agreement with...

  18. Lanthanide-humic substances complexation. II. Calibration of humic ion-binding model V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeroen E. Sonke [CNRS/IRD/Universite Paul Sabatier Toulouse III, Toulouse (France). Laboratoire des Mecanismes et Transferts en Geologie

    2006-12-15

    The experimental complexation of the lanthanides (Sc, Y, and rare earth elements) with Suwannee river fulvic acid, Leonardite coal humic acid, and Elliot soil humic acid is described with Humic Ion-Binding Model V. The fitted intrinsic equilibrium constants for metal-proton exchange, pK{sub MHA}, for Eu{sup 3+} are similar to previously published experimental fits, and linear free energy relationship (LFER) estimated values. The experimentally observed lanthanide contraction effect in REE-humic complex stability is reflected in the gradual decrease in pK{sub MHA} from La to Lu. In Model V, a decrease in pK{sub MHA} from La to Lu indicates an increase in complex stability. Fitted pK{sub MHA} values for heavy REE are lower than those estimated by LFERs. Consequently, REE fractionation by humic substances complexation could be more pronounced than previously thought. Recommended pK{sub MHA} values for lanthanide-fulvic and -humic acid complexation are derived by superimposing the fitted trends in pK{sub MHA} for all REE, i.e., the decrease in pK{sub MHA} from La to Lu, on the average Eu pK{sub MHA} value for all literature datasets. These results will allow modeling assessments of organic matter induced REE fractionation in aquatic environments, taking into account changes in pH, ionic strength, and ion competition. A simulation of dissolved REE speciation in an average world river suggests that organic matter out competes carbonate complexation, even under alkaline conditions. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Effects of humic substances on the migration of radionuclides: Complexation of actinides with humic substances. Appendix V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexation of Eu(III) with humic substances was studied by using Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence. Most of the work concentrated on the investigation of competition effects. Actinides in aquatic environments coexist with major and minor components of natural waters, usually present at much higher concentration levels. The competition effect was found to be larger for ions of identical oxidation state, suggesting therefore binding to the same sorption sites. Spectroscopic measurements were made in the system Eu/HA/Cr by looking at the decrease of the fluorescence signal of the pre-formed EuHA complex with increasing concentrations of the non-fluorescent Cr(III) ions. (orig.)

  20. Influence of humic substances on biofilm structure and its microbial diversity in natural waters

    OpenAIRE

    A.L. Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral dissertation for PhD degree in Chemical and Biological Engineering Natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems; it comprises an important source of carbon for river biofilms which are major sites of carbon cycling in streams. NOM may be classified in two main categories: non-humic and humic substances (HSs). About 75 % of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in rivers results from HSs. The presence of HSs in water treatment plants is ...

  1. Humic substances as fully regenerable electron acceptors in recurrently anoxic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klüpfel, Laura; Piepenbrock, Annette; Kappler, Andreas; Sander, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Humic substances form through the degradation of microbial and plant precursors, and make up a significant fraction of natural organic matter in terrestrial and aquatic environments. Humic substances are redox-active and can act as terminal electron acceptors in anaerobic microbial respiration. Reduced humic substances may become re-oxidized during aeration of temporarily anoxic systems, such as wetlands, sediments and many soils. If the transfer of electrons from anaerobic respiration through humic substances to oxygen is sustained over many redox cycles, it may competitively suppress electron transfer to carbon dioxide, and thereby lower the formation of methane in temporarily anoxic systems. Here, we monitor changes in the redox states of four chemically distinct dissolved humic substances over successive cycles of reduction by the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and oxidation by oxygen, in a series of laboratory experiments. We show that electron transfer to and from these substances is fully reversible and sustainable over successive redox cycles. We suggest that redox cycling of humic substances may largely suppress methane production in temporarily anoxic systems.

  2. Chromatography of humic substances on controlled pore glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To check the suitability of controlled pore glass (CPG) for the chromatography of humic substances, a soil extract from an Austrian chernozem and humic fractions prepared from the extract were chromatographed using a column filled with CPG of a pore diameter of 156A. The chromatograms obtained were reproducible, and showed the expected sequence of elution, grey humic acids (GHA) being eluted before brown humic acids (BHA) and fulvic acids (FA). Chromatograms of complex humic systems agreed well with the computed sums of the chromatograms of all its components. This means that all humic substances moved through the column independently of the presence or absence of others. From these findings, the suitability of CPG for chromatography of humic substances was concluded. A structural alteration of GHA during the preparation was detected. This was accompanied by a decrease in molecular weight and an increase in colour intensity. (author)

  3. Interaction of humic substances and hematite: FTIR study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Hong-bo; QUAN Xie; CHEN Shuo; ZHAO Hui-min; ZHAO Ya-zhi

    2005-01-01

    The present work extended the knowledge on the binding and complexation of humic substances( humic acid or fulvic acid) and hematite by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy( FTIR). The FTIR data gained gave the consist evidences by two different sampling preparation methods that the interaction mechanism between humic substances and hematite was mainly conform to the ligand-exchange involving carboxylic functional groups of humic substances and the surfaces sites of hematite. The present method, although associated with some uncertainties, provided an opportunity to increase the knowledge in this field.

  4. Estudo da labilidade de Cu(II, Cd(II, Mn(II e Ni(II em substâncias húmicas aquáticas utilizando-se membranas celulósicas organomodificadas Lability study of Cu(II, Cd(II, Mn(II and Ni(II complexed by aquatic humic substances using organomodified cellulose membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Henrique Rosa

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work commercial filters papers were organomodified with tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTS, aiming at the development of a new analytical procedure for in-situ speciation of labile and inert metal species in aquatic systems. Parameters that exert influence on the metal lability such as pH, chelating time, concentration and characteristics of the organic matter were studied in the laboratory using tests for metal recuperation. The results showed slower kinetics for Cu ion than for Ni, Mn and Cd in the absence of aquatic humic substances (AHS. The relative lability observed for complexed metals in aquatic humic substances using organomodified filter papers was Cu>>Cd>Ni>Mn. The pH values, structural characteristics and concentration of AHS exert strong influence on the lability of the metals. The results obtained showed that the utilization of organomodified filter papers can be an interesting and promising alternative for in situ characterization of metal lability in aquatic systems.

  5. Effects of humic substances on the migration of radionuclides: complexation of actinides with humic substances. A commission of the European Communities program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research program is to study the complexation behavior of actinide ions with humic substances in natural aquifer systems and hence to quantify the effect of humic substances on the actinide migration. In the present research program the complexation of actinide ions with humic substances will be described thermodynamically. This description will be based on a simple model which will allow an easy introduction of the resulting reaction constants into geochemical modeling of actinide migration. To achieve the desired goal, the program is divided into three task; complexation reactions of actinide ions with well characterized reference and site-specific humic and fulvic acids, competition reactions with major cations in natural groundwaters, and validation of the complexation data in natural aquatic systems by comparison of calculation with spectroscopic experiment. This program is a continuation of the activities of the colloid and complexation (COCO) group in the second phase of the CEC-MIRAGE project. (authors). 39 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Molecular size distribution of Pu in the presence of humic substances in river and groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of actinides from fallout and local source is important to predict their migration and distribution in the aquatic environment. The mobility of actinides is controlled by complex physico-chemical interactions. Humic substances are well known to interact with polyvalent metal ions such as actinides. In the present paper, we have shown the characteristics of actinides bound to humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) isolated from river and groundwaters on the basis of molecular size distribution. Humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) were isolated from the Yodo River water in Japan by XAD extraction method. Suwannee and Nordic humic and fulvic acids were purchased from the International Humic Substances Society. Humic substances were concentrated from shallow groundwater samples (GB and WP) in Canada. Complexation experiments were carried out in a medium of 0.01 M NaClO4 at a humus concentration of 10 mg/l and pH6-7. The initial concentration of 239Pu was 3.0 x 10-9 M. After shaking 7 days under shaking in an oven at 25 degree C, the solution was filtered with 450 nm filters and then sequentially ultra filtered with simple ultrafiltration filters (cut-off molecular weight of 5000, 10000, 30000, 100000 Da). In the absence of humic substances, ca 70% of Pu is find in the molecular size above 450 nm (particulate forms) at pH 6-7. On the other hand, in the presence of humic substances, particulate forms of Pu are about 4%. The dominant size fractions of Pu are 100 k-30 k Da (46-57%) at the Suwannee-Nordic HA systems, 30 k-10 k Da (57-64%) at the Suwannee-Nordic FA systems and less than 5 k Da (66%) at the groundwater GB system. The 20% of Pu is present in the molecular size fractions of 30 k-10 k Da and 10 k-5 k Da at the Yodo FA and groundwater WP systems. These results indicate that the complexation of humic substances with Pu may be controlled by the percentage and characteristics of each size fraction.

  7. The impact of humic acid on chromium phytoextraction by aquatic macrophyte Lemna minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalčíková, Gabriela; Zupančič, Marija; Jemec, Anita; Gotvajn, Andreja Žgajnar

    2016-03-01

    Studies assessing chromium phytoextration from natural waters rarely consider potential implications of chromium speciation in the presence of ubiquitous humic substances. Therefore, the present study investigated the influence of environmentally relevant concentration of humic acid (TOC = 10 mg L(-1)) on chromium speciation (Cr = 0.15 mg L(-1)) and consequently on phytoextraction by aquatic macrophyte duckweed Lemna minor. In absence of humic acid, only hexavalent chromium was present in water samples and easily taken up by L. minor. Chromium uptake resulted in a significant reduction of growth rate by 22% and decrease of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b contents by 48% and 43%, respectively. On the other hand, presence of humic acid significantly reduced chromium bioavailability (57% Cr uptake decrease) and consequently it did not cause any measurable effect to duckweed. Such effect was related to abiotic reduction of hexavalent chromium species to trivalent. Hence, findings of our study suggest that presence of humic acid and chromium speciation cannot be neglected during phytoextraction studies. PMID:26766370

  8. Diversity and Ubiquity of Bacteria Capable of Utilizing Humic Substances as Electron Donors for Anaerobic Respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Coates, John D.; Cole, Kimberly A.; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M.; Achenbach, Laurie A.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-a...

  9. Effect of Humic Substance Photodegradation on Bacterial Growth and Respiration in Lake Water

    OpenAIRE

    Anesio, Alexandre M.; Granéli, Wilhelm; Aiken, George R.; Kieber, David J.; Mopper, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses how humic substance (HS) chemical composition and photoreactivity affect bacterial growth, respiration, and growth efficiency (BGE) in lake water. Aqueous solutions of HSs from diverse aquatic environments representing different dissolved organic matter sources (autochthonous and allochthonous) were exposed to artificial solar UV radiation. These solutions were added to lake water passed through a 0.7-μm-pore-size filter (containing grazer-free lake bacteria) followed by ...

  10. The density of humic acids and humic like substances (HULIS from fresh and aged wood burning and pollution aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dinar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols play significant roles in climatic related phenomena. Size, density and shape of particles affect their fluid-dynamic parameters which in turn dictate their transport and lifecycle. Moreover, density and shape are also related to particles' optical properties, influencing their regional and global radiative effects. In the present study we have measured and compared the effective densities of humic like substances (HULIS extracted from smoke and pollution aerosol particles to those of molecular weight-fractionated aquatic and terrestrial Humic Substances (HS. The effective density was measured by comparing the electro mobility and vacuum aerodynamic diameter of aerosol particles composed of these compounds. Characterization of chemical parameters such as molecular weight, aromaticity and elemental composition allow us to test how they affect the effective density of these important environmental macromolecules. It is suggested that atmospheric aging processes increase the effective density of HULIS due to oxidation, while packing due to the aromatic moieties plays important role in determining the density of the aquatic HS substances.

  11. Mechanisms of humic substances degradation by fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Hadar, Y.; Grinhut, T.

    2012-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) are formed by secondary synthesis reactions (humification) during the decay process and transformation of biomolecules originating from plants and other dead organisms. In nature, HS are extremely resistant to biological degradation. Thus, these substances are major components in the C cycle and in the biosphere and therefore, the understanding of the process leading to their formation and transformation and degradation is vital. Fungi active in the decomposition process of HS include mainly ascomycetes and basidiomycetes that are common in the upper layer of forest and grassland soils. Many basidiomycetes belong to the white-rot fungi (WRF) and litter-decomposing fungi (LDF). These fungi are considered to be the most efficient lignin degraders due to their nonspecific oxidizing enzymes: manganese peroxidase (MnP), lignin peroxidase (LiP) and laccase. Although bacteria dominate compost and participate in the turnover of HS, their ability to degrade stable macromolecules such as lignin and HS is limited. The overall objectives of this research were to corroborate biodegradation processes of HS by WRF. The specific objectives were: (i) To isolate, identify and characterize HS degrading WRF from biosolids (BS) compost; (ii) To study the biodegradation process of three types of HS, which differ in their structure, by WRF isolated from BS compost; and (iii) To investigate the mechanisms of HA degradation by WRF using two main approaches: (a) Study the physical and chemical analyses of the organic compounds obtained from direct fungal degradation of HA as well as elucidation of the relevant enzymatic reactions; and (b) Study the enzymatic and biochemical mechanisms involved during HA degradation. In order to study the capability of fungi to degrade HS, seventy fungal strains were isolated from biosolids (BS) compost. Two of the most active fungal species were identified based on rDNA sequences and designated Trametes sp. M23 and Phanerochaetesp., Y6

  12. Humic substances interfere with detection of pathogenic prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christen B.; Booth, Clarissa J.; Wadzinski, Tyler J.; Legname, Giuseppe; Chappell, Rick; Johnson, Christopher J.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies examining the persistence of prions (the etiological agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies) in soil require accurate quantification of pathogenic prion protein (PrPTSE) extracted from or in the presence of soil particles. Here, we demonstrate that natural organic matter (NOM) in soil impacts PrPTSE detection by immunoblotting. Methods commonly used to extract PrPTSE from soils release substantial amounts of NOM, and NOM inhibited PrPTSE immunoblot signal. The degree of immunoblot interference increased with increasing NOM concentration and decreasing NOM polarity. Humic substances affected immunoblot detection of prion protein from both deer and hamsters. We also establish that after interaction with humic acid, PrPTSE remains infectious to hamsters inoculated intracerebrally, and humic acid appeared to slow disease progression. These results provide evidence for interactions between PrPTSE and humic substances that influence both accurate measurement of PrPTSE in soil and disease transmission.

  13. Study of structure and chemical composition of soil humic substances isolated from humic podzol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Enev, V.; Klučáková, M.; Novák, František

    Brno : Masarykova univerzita, 2014, s. 23-27. ISBN 978-80-210-6842-1. [Pracovní setkání fyzikálních chemiků a elektrochemiků /14./. Brno (CZ), 03.06.2014-04.06.2014] Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1211 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : structure * chemical composition * soil humic substances * humic podzol Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science

  14. Stationary and time-resolved fluorescence for humic substances characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Kumke, Michael U.; Frimmel, Fritz Hartmann

    2007-01-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods were applied to investigate the fluorescence properties of humic substances of different origins. Using standard 2D emission and total luminescence spectra, fluorescence maxima, the width of the fluorescence band and a relative fluorescence quantum efficiency were determined. Different trends for fulvic acids and humic acids were observed indicating differences in the heterogeneity of the sample fractions. The complexity of the fluorescence ...

  15. BDE-209: kinetic studies and effect of humic substances on photodegradation in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, J F; Esteves, V I; Santos, E B H

    2013-12-17

    BDE-209 is a brominated flame retardant and a priority contaminant, which has been found in several environmental matrices, namely, in water. To date, there are no quantum yield data for BDE-209 photodegradation by sunlight in water, to allow predicting half-life times in aquatic systems. In this work, the kinetics of BDE-209 photodegradation in water was studied and the influence of different fractions of aquatic humic substances (HS) was evaluated. Aqueous solutions of BDE-209 exposed for different periods of time to simulated sunlight were analyzed by HPLC-UV after being concentrated using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) or solid-phase extraction (SPE). The photodegradation of BDE-209 in aqueous solution followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The average quantum yield obtained of 0.010 ± 0.001 (about 20-fold lower than the quantum yield determined in ethanol) allow to predict an outdoor half-life time of 3.5 h. The photodegradation percentage of BDE-209 was not significantly affected by the XAD-4 fraction of HS, but it decreased substantially in the presence of humic and fulvic acids. Light screening by the humic substances could not explain this delay, which is probably the result of the association of the compound with the hydrophobic sites of the humic material. PMID:24245794

  16. Bromoform formation in ozonated groundwater containing bromide and humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W.J.; Amy, G.L.; Moore, C.A.; Zika, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of bromide ion, organic carbon concentration (natural aquatic humic substances), pH, and solar irradiation on the formation of bromoform in ozonated groundwater has been studied. The studies were conducted on four unique samples of groundwater taken from different regions of the Biscayne Aquifer in southern Florida. All other conditions being equal, increases in bromide ion concentrations resulted in increases in CHBr/sub 3/ formation. In three of the four samples, CHBr/sub 3/ formation decreased as the pH level increased from 5 to 9. The fourth sample exhibited an opposite trend whereby the CHBr/sub 3/ concentration increased with increasing pH. Bromoform concentration increased with increased O/sub 3/ concentration over an ozone dosage range of 3.4 to 6.7 mg/L. Ozonated samples placed in sunlight immediately after ozone addition showed a decrease in the formation of CHBr/sub 3/ presumably due to the photodecomposition of HOBr/OBr.

  17. Bromoform formation in ozonated groundwater containing bromide and humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copper, W.J. (Florida International Univ., Miami (United States)); Amy, G.L. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States)); Moore, C.A.; Zika, R.G. (Univ. of Miami, FL (United States))

    The effect of bromide ion, organic carbon concentration (natural aquatic humic substances), pH, and solar irradiation on the formation of bromoform in ozonated groundwater has been studied. The studies were conducted on four unique samples of groundwater taken from different regions of the Biscayne Aquifer in southern Florida. All other conditions being equal, increases in bromide ion concentrations resulted in increases in CHBr{sub 3} formation. In three of the four samples, CHBr{sub 3} formation decreased as the pH level increased from 5 to 9. The fourth sample exhibited an opposite trend whereby the CHBr{sub 3} concentration increased with increasing pH. Bromoform concentration increased with increased O{sub 3} concentration over an ozone dosage range of 3.4 to 6.7 mg/L. Ozonated samples placed in sunlight immediately after ozone addition showed a decrease in the formation of CHBr{sub 3}, presumably due to the photodecomposition of HOBr/OBr.

  18. Fixation and transport of uranium by humic substances (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One enter upon the study of the part taken by organic substances in ores that contain uranium in a disseminated form, without mineralization, being considered the reaction between uranium and humus. 'Humic acids' are extracted from the peat by ammonia. By the fact of their ability to cationic exchange, these are forming humates with metal cations; monovalent humates, normally soluble in water, can become insoluble after treatment of humic acids with methanal. The polyvalent humates are insoluble in water, especially humates of U (IV) and uranyl U (VI). Action of Li, Na, K, Mg, Ca uranyl carbonates solutions on the humic acids results in the formation of humates containing uranyl and the other cation. 100 g of humic acids give a fixation of no more than 38 g of uranium as uranyl. In contact with uraniferous weakly concentrated solutions, they fix 4 to 8 g according to pH, with a yield in the extraction greater than 95 per cent. The action of a sodium humate solution on a humate of uranyl give a solution containing a soluble sodium and uranyl humate. The solution is precipitated at various degrees by the polyvalent cations and insoluble humic substances. In all cases, the fixation of uranium with such prepared humic acids corresponds to a chemisorption of uranyl cations. (author)

  19. FLUORESCENCE CHARACTERIZATION OF IHSS HUMIC SUBSTANCES: TOTAL LUMINESCENCE SPECTRA WITH ABSORBANCE CORRECTION. (R822251)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total luminescence spectroscopy was applied to the fluorescence characterization of humic substances obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). Results show that total luminescence spectra, represented as excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), may be used to d...

  20. Characteristics of Humic Substances in Paddy Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YEWEI; WENQI-XIAO

    1991-01-01

    In the present paper,the composition of humus and the charateristics of humic acid from seven paddy soils were compared with those of upland (and/or natural) soils.Results show that:(1) in each group of the soil samples for comparison the HA/FA ratio of the humus of a paddy soil,in most cases,was appreciable higher than that of adjacent upland(and/or natural) soil derived from the same parent material;(2) the humic acid extracted from the paddy soils was characterized by a higher C/O ratio,a higher content of methoxyl groups,and a lower content of carboxyl groups than those from the corresponding upland (and/or natural) flooded soils,implying that the humic acid formed under rice cultivation is in a lower degree of humification than that formed under upland(and/or natural) conditions;and (3) the humic acid of paddy soils,however,was not always characterized by a lower aromaticity than that of the corresponding upland(and/or natural) soils.

  1. Effects of humic substances on the migration of radionuclides: Complexation of actinides with humic substances. (6th progress report, project summary). Period covered: January 1994 - July 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the research project is to examine the complexation behaviour of actinide ions with humic substances and thermodynamically describe the binding based upon a simple complexation model. This program is a continuation of the activities of the colloid and complexation group (COCO) in the second phase of the EC-MIRAGE project. A number of different experimental methods are used to determine speciation. The metal ions examined are the trivalent lanthanides, UO22+, NpO2+, Am3+, and Cm3+. The project is divided into three tasks: Task 1: complexation reactions of actinide ions with well characterized reference and site-specific humic and fulvic acids, Task 2: complexation reactions with major cations in natural groundwaters; Task 3: validation of the complexation data in natural aquatic systems by comparison of calculation with spectroscopic experiment. Five European community laboratories participated in the program: Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Fontenay-Aux-Roses and Saclay, Universitaet Mainz, Katolieke Universiteit Leuven, and Joint Research Centre, Ispra. The evaluated stability constants are similar for all laboratories when the same humic substance complexation model is applied. Humic acid is shown to reduce NpO2+ to Np4+, while no reduction of UO22+ is observed. Temperature effects are seen on the Np humate complex. Competition is observed between NpO2+ and Ca2+, but not between the trivalent lanthanides and Ca2+. No influence of humic acid purification on the evaluated stability constants is seen. Using the evaluated constants, calculations are conducted for natural water systems which indicate the trivalent actinide humate complex to be an important species. (orig.)

  2. Complexation of the uranyl ion with aquatic humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexation of the uranyl(VI) ion with aquatic humic acid from Gorleben groundwater (Gohy-573) is studied in 0.1 M NaClO4 at pH 4 under argon atmosphere. The concentration range investigated is from 1 x 10-7 to 1 x 10-5 mol/l for the uranyl ion and from 1 x 10-6 to 1.12 x 10-5 mol/l for the humic acid. Three different experimental methods are applied to separate the uncomplexed uranyl ion from the uranyl humate complex, using differences of the two species in size by ultrafiltration at the pore size of about 1 nm, in charge by anion exchange separation and in spectroscopic properties by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). No reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is observed in the course of the humate complexation process. The experimental results confirm that the prevailing complexation reaction is charge neutralization of the UO2+2 ion with two proton exchanging sites of humic acid. At pH 4 in 0.1 M NaClO4, where the hydrolysis of the uranyl ion appears negligible, the fraction of proton exchanging sites of the humic acid that can be occupied by the uranyl ion (called the loading capacity (LC) of the uranyl ion) is determined to be 0.185±0.003. The complexation constant evaluated by taking the loading capacity into account is found to be logβ = 6.16±0.13, which is a grand average of all values determined by the three experimental procedures under consideration. This value is valid for the humate complexation of the non-hydrolyzed uranyl ion, being independent of pH and ionic strength. (orig.)

  3. Nitrite fixation by humic substances: Nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance evidence for potential intermediates in chemodenitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, K.A.; Mikita, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Studies have suggested that NO2/-, produced during nitrification and denitrification, can become incorporated into soil organic matter and, in one of the processes associated with chemodenitrification, react with organic matter to form trace N gases, including N2O. To gain an understanding of the nitrosation chemistry on a molecular level, soil and aquatic humic substances were reacted with 15N-labeled NaNO2, and analyzed by liquid phase 15N and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) Pahokee peat and peat humic acid were also reacted with Na15NO2 and analyzed by solid-state 15N NMR. In Suwannee River, Armadale, and Laurentian fulvic acids, phenolic rings and activated methylene groups underwent nitrosation to form nitrosophenols (quinone monoximes) and ketoximes, respectively. The oximes underwent Beckmann rearrangements to 2??amides, and Beckmann fragmentations to nitriles. The nitriles in turn underwent hydrolysis to 1??amides. Peaks tentatively identified as imine, indophenol, or azoxybenzene nitrogens were clearly present in spectra of samples nitrosated at pH 6 but diminished at pH 3. The 15N NMR spectrum of the peat humic acid exhibited peaks corresponding with N-nitroso groups in addition to nitrosophenols, ketoximes, and secondary Beckmann reaction products. Formation of N-nitroso groups was more significant in the whole peat compared with the peat humic acid. Carbon-13 NMR analyses also indicated the occurrence of nitrosative demethoxylation in peat and soil humic acids. Reaction of 15N-NH3 fixated fulvic acid with unlabeled NO2/- resulted in nitrosative deamination of aminohydroquinone N, suggesting a previously unrecognized pathway for production of N2 gas in soils fertilized with NH3.Studies have suggested that NO2-, produced during nitrification and denitrification, can become incorporated into soil organic matter and, in one of the processes associated with chemodenitrification, react with organic

  4. Extraction and neutron activation analysis of humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods are described for the isolation of humic substances from a soil sample. The procedures are based on extractions with sodium hydroxide or sodium pyrophosphate. Four of the humic samples were dried and then analyzed by thermal neutron activation analysis. The humic samples along with three standard rocks were irradiated for 15 hours in a flux of approx. 10sup(12)nxcmsup(-2)xssup(-1). Counting was carried out using both a large volume Ge(Li) detector and a high resolution LEP detector. Quantitative analysis was based on the known element concentrations in the standard rocks. The elements determined were Sc, Cr, Fe, Co, As, Se, Br, Mo, Sb, La, Ce, Eu, Hf, Ta, Th and U. Concentrations ranged from 0.02 ppm (La) to 7900 ppm (Fe). (author)

  5. Removal of low level of 239+240Pu in aqueous solution between pH 2-6 by calcium alginate and its variation with aquatic humic substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During this work laboratory simulated experiments were carried out for the removal of low level of 239+240Pu from the aqueous solution. Water samples after filtering through 0.22 mm filter paper were spiked with 250 Bq/1 of 239+240Pu as Pu(NO3)4. The pH of the solutions were controlled between 2-6 by using 0.01M NaOH/HNO3. Spiked samples were kept in the argon atmosphere for a week. The spiked water is passed separately through 20 cm column having about 4 gm of calcium alginate beads. Calcium-alginate beads were prepared by immobilising 2% sodium alginate in 0.2 M calcium chloride solution. At different pH about 95-98% Pu was retained in the beads and significant variation was not observed at pH range studied. To understand the impact of dissolved organic substance on the absorption characteristics of Pu(IV) on calcium-alginate beads, about 0.01% (weight/volume) humic acid solution was mixed in the ratio of 1-4/100 (V/V) experimental solutions. It was observed that the presence of organic matter decreased the absorption by 40% which clearly indicate the complexation of Pu(IV) with humic acid, which was not further forming complex within the alginate beads. The various physicochemical characteristics were measured before and after passing the solution. About 40% of Pu is recovered from sodium alginate beads by using 0.1 M HNO3. (author)

  6. Effect of Sediment Humic Substances on Sorption of Selected Endocrine Disruptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, W. L., E-mail: sunweiling@iee.pku.edu.cn; Ni, J. R.; Liu, T. T. [The Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University (China)

    2006-12-15

    Characterizing sorption processes is essential to understand the environmental distribution and toxicity potential of endocrine disruptors in terrestrial and aquatic systems. The sorption behaviors of three endocrine disruptors (bisphenol A (BPA), 17{beta}-estradiol (E2), and 17{alpha}-ethynylestradiol (EE2)) on sediments were investigated using batch techniques. Samples were taken from some representative reaches in several major Chinese rivers. More attention has been paid to the effect of sediment organic components on the sorption of BPA, E2, and EE2. The results show that the sediment organic carbon-normalized partition coefficients (K{sub oc}(sed)) for three endocrine disruptors are in the order of EE2 > E2 > BPA, which corresponds to the octanol-water partitioning coefficients (logK{sub ow}) of the compounds. Moreover, the K{sub oc} values for humic substances (K{sub oc}(hs)) are comparable with the K{sub oc}(sed) values and highly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of humic substances in sediments. The UV absorptivity at 272 nm (A{sub 272}), which suggests the abundance of aromatic rings in humic substance structure, correlates well with the K{sub oc}(hs) values. In addition, the infrared spectra of the humic substances extracted from sediments show four strong bands centered at 3,400 cm{sup -1}, 1,625 cm{sup -1}, 1,390 cm{sup -1}, and 1,025 cm{sup -1}. The K{sub oc}(hs) values have a positive linear relation with the peak area ratio for peak at 1,025 cm{sup -1} and a negative linear relation with the peak area ratio between peaks at 1,625 cm{sup -1} and 1,025 cm{sup -1}. Hence, the hydrogen bonds play a critical role to the sorption of selected endocrine disruptors.

  7. Removal of humic substances from water by brown coal sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.V. Veprikova; A.V. Rudkovskii; M.L. Shchipko [Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation). Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Siberian Branch

    2007-12-15

    Brown coal sorption materials with high activity toward humic substances were prepared using a larger scale laboratory unit with a spouted-bed system. The effect of thermal treatment conditions on the sorption properties of these materials was studied. It was found that the sorption activity of the resulting samples toward humates was closely related to the limiting sorption volume of the materials with respect to benzene.

  8. Experimental evidence of incomplete fluorescence quenching of pyrene bound to humic substances: implications for Koc measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshin, E A; Budylin, G S; Grechischeva, N Yu; Fadeev, V V; Perminova, I V

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescence quenching (FQ) is extensively used for quantitative assessment of partition coefficients (KOC) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to natural organic materials - humic substances (HS). The presence of bound PAHs with incompletely quenched fluorescence would lead to underestimation of the KOC values measured by this technique. The goal of this work was to prove the validity of this assumption using an original experimental setup, which implied FQ measurements upon excitation into two distinct vibronically coupled electronic states. Pyrene was used as a fluorescent probe, and aquatic fulvic acid (SRFA) and leonardite humic acid (CHP) were used as the humic materials with low and high binding affinity for pyrene, respectively. Excitation of pyrene into the forbidden (S0-S1) and allowed (S0-S2) electronic states yielded two pairs of nonidentical FQ curves. This was indicative of incomplete quenching of the bound pyrene, and the divergence of the two FQ curves was much more pronounced for CHP as compared to SRFA. The two component model of fluorescence response formation was proposed to estimate the KOC values from the data obtained. The resulting pyrene KOC value for CHP (220 ± 20) g L(-1) was a factor 3 higher compared to the KOC value determined with the use of the Stern-Volmer formalism (68 ± 2) g L(-1). At the same time for aquatic FA the difference in FQ curves was almost negligible, which enables the use of the Stern-Volmer formalism for weakly interacting HS and PAHs. PMID:27279258

  9. Tc(IV) interaction with dissolved boom clay humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redox-sensitive fission product technetium-99 is of great interest in nuclear waste disposal studies because of its potential of contaminating the geosphere due to its very long half-life and high mobility. Under oxidising conditions, technetium is present as pertechnetate, a highly soluble, anionic species, that does not sorb significantly on minerals or sediments. Under suitable reducing conditions, eg. in the presence of a reducing solid phase which can act as an electron donor, the solubility can be limited by the reduction of pertechnetate followed by the formation of a surface precipitate with a low solubility. However, in the presence of dissolved humic substances, the solubility may be enhanced due to the formation of Tc-HS complexes. The geochemical behaviour of the redox sensitive Technetium-99 (Tc) in reducing clay environments and in the presence of organic matter, was elucidated with a number of lab-scale Boom Clay batch experiments. In a new set of experiments, the influence of FeS2 on the interaction of Tc with dissolved Boom Clay organic matter was elucidated in batch systems prepared in a similar manner as in Maes et al (2003). In a second set of experiments, the long-term (up to 113 days) behaviour of the Tc interaction with dissolved Boom Clay O.M. was studied. Finally, (ir)reversibility effects concerning the interaction of Tc(IV) with dissolved Boom Clay HS were investigated by examining newly installed equilibrium conditions upon interchanging of supernatants of Tc spiked and not-spiked Boom Clay suspensions. EXAFS measurements (Maes et al., 2004) of different series of experiments were made to further elucidate the nature and kind of Tc(IV)-humic substances species (Gorleben and Boom Clay humic substances ) and to identify Tc(IV) species formed on solid phases (pyrite and magnetite): series 1 consisted of Tc species in presence of 2 different iron-containing surfaces (acting as the necessary reducing solid phase): pyrite and magnetite

  10. Formation of Humic Substances in Weathered MSWI Bottom Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haixia Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at evaluating the humic substances (HSs content from municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI bottom ash and its variation with time and the effect of temperature on HSs formation. The process suggested by IHSS was applied to extract HSs from two different bottom ash samples, and the extracted efficiency with NaOH and Na4P2O7 was compared. MSWI bottom ash samples were incubated at 37∘C and 50∘C for 1 year. HSs and nonhumic substances were extracted from the bottom ash sample with different incubated period by 0.1 M NaOH/Na4P2O7. Results show that the rate of humic acid formation increased originally with incubation time, reached a maximum at 12th week under 37∘C and at 18th week under 50∘C, and then decreased with time. More humic acid in MSWI bottom ash was formed under 50∘C incubated condition compared with that incubated under 37∘C. Also, the elemental compositions of HSs extracted from bottom ash are reported.

  11. Spectral and temporal luminescent properties of Eu(III) in humic substance solutions from different origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevet, Julien; Claret, Francis; Reiller, Pascal E.

    2009-10-01

    Although a high heterogeneity of composition is awaited for humic substances, their complexation properties do not seem to greatly depend on their origins. The information on the difference in the structure of these complexes is scarce. To participate in the filling of this lack, a study of the spectral and temporal evolution of the Eu(III) luminescence implied in humic substance (HS) complexes is presented. Seven different extracts, namely Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and humic acid (SRHA), and Leonardite HA (LHA) from the International Humic Substances Society (USA), humic acid from Gorleben (GohyHA), and from the Kleiner Kranichsee bog (KFA, KHA) from Germany, and purified commercial Aldrich HA (PAHA), were made to contact with Eu(III). Eu(III)-HS time-resolved luminescence properties were compared with aqueous Eu 3+ at pH 5. Using an excitation wavelength of 394 nm, the typical bi-exponential luminescence decay for Eu(III)-HS complexes is common to all the samples. The components τ1 and τ2 are in the same order of magnitude for all the samples, i.e., 40 ≤ τ1 (μs) ≤ 60, and 145 ≤ τ2 (μs) ≤ 190, but significantly different. It is shown that different spectra are obtained from the different groups of samples. Terrestrial extract on the one hand, i.e. LHA/GohyHA, plus PAHA, and purely aquatic extracts on the other hand, i.e., SRFA/SRHA/KFA/KHA, induce inner coherent luminescent properties of Eu(III) within each group. The 5D 0 → 7F 2 transition exhibits the most striking differences. A slight blue shift is observed compared to aqueous Eu 3+ ( λmax = 615.4 nm), and the humic samples share almost the same λmax ≈ 614.5 nm. The main differences between the samples reside in a shoulder around λ ≈ 612.5 nm, modelled by a mixed Gaussian-Lorentzian band around λ ≈ 612 nm. SRFA shows the most intense shoulder with an intensity ratio of I612.5/ I614.7 = 1.1, KFA/KHA/SRHA share almost the same ratio I612.5/ I614.7 = 1.2-1.3, whilst the LHA

  12. Spectral and temporal luminescent properties of Eu(III) in humic substance solutions from different origins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claret, F.; Reiller, P.E. [CEA, CE Saclay, DEN DANS DPC SECR, Lab Speciat Radionucleides et Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Brevet, J. [Univ Evry Val Essonne, CNRS, UMR 8587, Lab Anal et Environm Biol et Environm, F-91025 Evry, (France)

    2009-07-01

    Although a high heterogeneity of composition is awaited for humic substances, their complexation properties do not seem to greatly depend on their origins. The information on the difference in the structure of these complexes is scarce. To participate in the filling of this lack, a study of the spectral and temporal evolution of the Eu(III) luminescence implied in humic substance (HS) complexes is presented. Seven different extracts, namely Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and humic acid (SRHA), and Leonardite HA (LHA) from the International Humic Substances Society (USA), humic acid from Gorleben (GohyHA) and from the Kleiner Kranichsee bog (KFA, KHA) from Germany, and purified commercial Aldrich HA (PAHA), were made to contact with Eu(III). Eu(III)-HS time-resolved luminescence properties were compared with aqueous Eu{sup 3+} at pH 5. Using an excitation wavelength of 394 nm, the typical bi-exponential luminescence decay for Eu(III)-HS complexes is common to all the samples. The components {tau}{sub 1}, and {tau}{sub 2} are in the same order of magnitude for all the samples, i.e., 40 {<=} {tau}{sub 1} ({mu}s) {<=} 60, and 145 {<=} {tau}{sub 2} ({mu}s) {<=} 190, but significantly different. It is shown that different spectra are obtained from the different groups of samples. Terrestrial extract on the one hand, i.e. LHA/GohyHA, plus PAHA, and purely aquatic extracts on the other hand, i.e., SRFA/SRHA/KFA/KHA, induce inner coherent luminescent properties of Eu(III) within each group. The {sup 5}D{sub 0} -> {sup 7}F{sub 2} transition exhibits the most striking differences. A slight blue shift is observed compared to aqueous Eu{sup 3+} ({lambda}(max) = 615.4 nm), and the humic samples share almost the same {lambda}(max) approximate to 614.5 nm. The main differences between the samples reside in a shoulder around {lambda} {approx} 612.5 nm, modelled by a mixed Gaussian-Lorentzian band around {lambda} {approx} 612 nm. SRFA shows the most intense shoulder with an

  13. Chirality and the origin of atmospheric humic-like substances

    OpenAIRE

    Salma, I.; T. Mészáros; Maenhaut, W.; Vass, E.; Majer, Z

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol water extracts and atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS) obtained from PM2.5-fraction aerosol samples collected in a rural/continental background environment and in an urban environment in spring and summer, and at a tropical site that was heavily impacted by biomass burning were studied. HULIS was obtained as the water-soluble, methanol-elutable material isolated from a solid-phase extraction procedure. The mean organic matter-to-organic carbon mass convers...

  14. Root growth of tomato seedlings intensified by humic substances from peat bogs

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre Christofaro Silva; Luciano Pasqualoto Canellas; Fábio Lopes Olivares; Leonardo Barros Dobbss; Natalia Oliveira Aguiar; Daniele Ângela Rossinol Frade; Carlos Eduardo Rezende; Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira Peres

    2011-01-01

    Peats are an important reserve of humified carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. The interest in the use of humic substances as plant growth promoters is continuously increasing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioactivity of alkaline soluble humic substances (HS), humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) isolated from peats with different decomposition stages of organic matter (sapric, fibric and hemic) in the Serra do Espinhaço Meridional, state of Minas Gerais. Dose-response curves wer...

  15. Removal of humic substances for coagulation with Alum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the search of better conditions to remove precursory material in the formation of disinfections sub-products with free chlorine, was found that the absorbance to the ultraviolet to 254 nm (AUV 254 nm) it is a parameter that can be used as non-specific measure, to estimate concentrations of precursory material, specifically humic substances, and also, like control instrument in the operations and previous processes to the disinfections with free chlorine. The study tries the importance so that in the handling essays of potable water is included the AUV 254 nm like control parameter. In essays of coagulation with alum was found that the removal of these substances depends on the dose of coagulation and the pH of coagulation

  16. Effect of soil invertebrates on the formation of humic substances under laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouz, J.; Li, X.; Brune, A.; Pizl, V.; Abakumov, E. V.

    2011-08-01

    The complete polymerization of phenols and proteins (one of the processes involved in the formation of humic substances) was explained. It was shown that fly ( Bibio marci) larvae and earthworms ( Aporrectodea caliginosa) participate in the complete polymerization of phenols and proteins. In a laboratory experiment, invertebrates participated in the degradation of organic matter and the synthesis of humic substances, which was proved in experiments with 14C-labeled phenols and proteins. The same organic substances (phenols and proteins) without the impact of invertebrates were used as the control substances. The distributions of the 14C isotope in alkaline extracts separated by solubility in acids (humic and fulvic acids) was compared to those of the control substances. The portion of the 14C isotope in the humic acids in the excrements of Bibio marci was higher than that in the control substances. The content of 14C-labeled humic substances in the excrements of the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa exceeded the control values only in the experiment with proteins. When clay material was added to the organic substances, the portion of the 14C isotope in the humic acids increased in both experiments with phenols and proteins. When these substrates passed through the digestive tracts of the invertebrates, the polymerization of organic substances and the inclusion of proteins and phenols into humic acids occurred.

  17. Production of humic substances through coal-solubilizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Nelson; Gómez, Liliana; Pantoja, Manuel; Ramírez, Ramiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the production of humic substances (HS) through the bacterial solubilization of low rank coal (LRC) was evaluated. The evaluation was carried out by 19 bacterial strains isolated in microenvironments with high contents of coal wastes. The biotransformed LRC and the HS produced were quantified in vitro in a liquid growth medium. The humic acids (HA) obtained from the most active bacterial strain were characterized via elemental composition (C, H, N, O), IR analyses, and the E4/E6 ratio; they were then compared with the HA extracted chemically using NaOH. There was LRC biotransformation ranged from 25 to 37%, and HS production ranged from 127 to 3100 mg.L−1. More activity was detected in the isolated strains of Bacillus mycoides, Microbacterium sp, Acinetobacter sp, and Enterobacter aerogenes. The HA produced by B. mycoides had an IR spectrum and an E4/E6 ratio similar to those of the HA extracted with NAOH, but their elemental composition and their degree of aromatic condensation was different. Results suggest that these bacteria can be used to exploit the LRC resulting from coal mining activities and thus produce HS in order to improve the content of humified organic matter in soils. PMID:25477925

  18. Humic substances-enhanced electroremediation of heavy metals contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahemmat, Mahdi; Farahbakhsh, Mohsen; Kianirad, Mehran

    2016-07-15

    The effects of catholyte conditioning and the use of humic acids (HAs) and fulvic acids (FAs) as chelating agents to improve electrokinetic (EK) remediation efficiency were investigated using a real and highly contaminated soil. By applying a constant voltage (2.0V/cm) to the soil, pH and current changes and heavy metals (HMs) concentration were investigated through a range of durations and positions. The observations demonstrated that both catholyte conditioning with 0.1N HNO3 and using humic substances (HSs) enhance remediation efficiency. After 20 days of EK treatment, the removal efficiency of HMs in HS-enhanced EK remediation was about 2.0-3.0 times greater than when unenhanced. The quantity of HMs moving toward the cathode exceeded the anode, from which it could be reasonably inferred that most negatively charged HM-HS complexes were moved by electroosmotic forces. Further, free HM cations and positively charged complexed HMs migrated to the catholyte compartment by electromigration. The results obtained in this study, demonstrate the suitability of HS-enhanced EK remediation in HMs contaminated soil. PMID:27058638

  19. Production of humic substances through coal-solubilizing bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Valero

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the production of humic substances (HS through the bacterial solubilization of low rank coal (LRC was evaluated. The evaluation was carried out by 19 bacterial strains isolated in microenvironments with high contents of coal wastes. The biotransformed LRC and the HS produced were quantified in vitro in a liquid growth medium. The humic acids (HA obtained from the most active bacterial strain were characterized via elemental composition (C, H, N, O, IR analyses, and the E4/E6 ratio; they were then compared with the HA extracted chemically using NaOH. There was LRC biotransformation ranged from 25 to 37%, and HS production ranged from 127 to 3100 mg.L-1. More activity was detected in the isolated strains of Bacillus mycoides, Microbacterium sp, Acinetobacter sp, and Enterobacter aerogenes. The HA produced by B. mycoides had an IR spectrum and an E4/E6 ratio similar to those of the HA extracted with NAOH, but their elemental composition and their degree of aromatic condensation was different. Results suggest that these bacteria can be used to exploit the LRC resulting from coal mining activities and thus produce HS in order to improve the content of humified organic matter in soils.

  20. Soil humic substances hinder the propagation of prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leita, Liviana; Giachin, Gabriele; Margon, Alja; Narkiewicz, Joanna; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    capacity of clay minerals; however the contribution of soil organic components in adsorption has so far been neglected, as they represent a minor soil fraction on a weight basis. Among organic molecules, humic substances (HSs) are natural polyanions that result among the most reactive compounds in the soil and possess the largest specific surface area. Humic substances make up a large portion of the dark matter in humus and consist of heterogeneous mixtures of transformed biomolecules exhibiting a supramolecular structure. HSs are classified as humic acids (HAs), which are soluble only in alkaline solutions, and fulvic acids (FAs), which are soluble in both alkaline and acid solutions. The amphiphilic characteristics confer to HAs and FAs great versatility to interact with xenobiotics and reasonably also with prion proteins and/or prions too, leading to the formation of adducts with peculiar chemical and biophysical characteristics, thus affecting the transport, fixation and toxicity of prion. Results from our chemical, biophysical and biochemical investigation will be presented and results on anti-prion activity exerted by HAs and FAs will be provided, thus suggesting that amendment of contaminated soil with humic substances could be a strategy to contrast prion diffusion.

  1. Characterization of humic-like substances in Arctic aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quynh; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Hansen, Anne Maria Kaldal;

    2014-01-01

    Humic-like substances (HULIS) are a complex group of relatively high molecular weight organic compounds which contribute considerably to the mass of organic carbon (OC) and influence the light-absorbing properties of aerosols. In this work, HULIS were investigated for the first time in the high...... (November-April) and 4ng C m(-3) during the other months (May-October) with an annual mass concentration of 0.020.01 mu gm(-3). HULIS-C contributed to 3-16% of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), whereas HULIS accounted for 0.7-4.1% of TSP mass, with TSP typically below 1.0 mu gm(-3). Concentrations of OC...

  2. Arsenic redox transformation by humic substances and Fe minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappler, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.kappler@uni-tuebingen.de [Geomicrobiology, Center for Applied Geosciences, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Amstaetter, Katja [Geomicrobiology, Center for Applied Geosciences, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Borch, Thomas [Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1170 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1170 (United States); Larese-Casanova, Philip; Jiang Jie; Bauer, Iris [Geomicrobiology, Center for Applied Geosciences, University of Tuebingen, Sigwartstrasse 10, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Paul, Andrea [IGB, Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Mueggelseedamm 301, 12587 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > As(III) oxidation by reduced humic substance model quinone (AQDS) containing semiquinone radicals. > As(III) oxidation by reactive Fe(II)-goethite systems. > Potential explanation for the presence of As(V) in reduced groundwater aquifers. - Abstract: The toxicity and mobility of the redox-active metalloid As strongly depends on its oxidation state, with As(III) (arsenite) being more toxic and mobile than As(V) (arsenate). It is, therefore, necessary to know the biogeochemical processes potentially influencing As redox state to understand and predict its environmental behavior. The first part of this presentation will discuss the quantification of As redox changes by pH-neutral mineral suspensions of goethite [{alpha}-Fe{sup III}OOH] amended with Fe(II) using wet-chemical and synchrotron X-ray absorption (XANES) analysis (). First, it was found that goethite itself did not oxidize As(III). Second, in contrast to thermodynamic predictions, Fe(II)-goethite systems did not reduce As(V). However, surprisingly, rapid oxidation of As(III) to As(V) was observed in Fe(II)-goethite systems. Iron speciation and mineral analysis by Moessbauer spectroscopy showed rapid formation of {sup 57}Fe-goethite after {sup 57}Fe(II) addition and the formation of a so far unidentified additional Fe(II) phase. No other Fe(III) phase could be detected by Moessbauer spectroscopy, EXAFS, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction or high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. This suggests that reactive Fe(III) species form as an intermediate Fe(III) phase upon Fe(II) addition and electron transfer into bulk goethite but before crystallization of the newly formed Fe(III) as goethite. The second part of the presentation will show that semiquinone radicals produced during microbial or chemical reduction of a humic substance model quinone (AQDS, 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid) can react with As and change its redox state (). The results of these experiments showed

  3. Capillary Electrophoresis and Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix Spectroscopy for Characterization of Humic Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used in natural organic matter (NOM) studies. In this study, we characterized five fulvic acids, six humic acids and two unprocessed NOM samples obtained from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) using these two ana...

  4. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS IN THE ANALYSIS OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES FACTS AND ARTIFACTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humic substances, extracted as mixtures from soil and surface waters according to their solubility in acids and bases, are relatively high-molecular-mass polyelectrolytes containing aromatic, aliphatic and heterocyclic subunits. The degree of ionization of their phenolic and carb...

  5. TRICHLOROETHYLENE ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON PRELOADED WITH HUMIC SUBSTANCES: EFFECTS OF SOLUTION CHEMISTRY. (R828157)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractTrichloroethylene (TCE) adsorption by activated carbon previously loaded ("preloaded") with humic substances was found to decrease with increasing concentrations of monovalent ions (NaCl), calcium (until solubility was exceeded), or dissolved oxygen in...

  6. AFM study on the adsorption and aggregation behavior of dissolved humic substances on mica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE; Xiaopeng

    2006-01-01

    [1]Hayes M H B,Clapp C E.Humic substances:Considerations of compositions,aspects of structure,and environmental influences.Soil Science,2001,166(11):723-737[2]MacCarthy P.The principles of humic substances.Soil Science,2001,166(11):738-751[3]Swift R S.Macromolecular properties of soil humic substances:Fact,fiction,and opinion.Soil Science,1999,164(11):790-802[4]Wershaw R L.Molecular aggregation of humic substances.Soil Science,1999,164(11):803-813[5]Tombacz E.Colloidal properties of humic acids and spontaneous changes of their colloidal state under variable solution conditions.Soil Science,1999,164(11):814-824[6]Tipping E,Higgins D C.The effect of adsorbed humic substances on the colloid stability of haematite particles.Colloid Surf,1982,5(2):85-92[7]Wilkinson K J,Nègre J C,Buffle J.Coagulation of colloidal material in surface waters:The role of natural organic matter.J Contam Hydrol,1997,26(1-4):229-243[8]Garbarini D R,Lion L W.Influence of the nature of soil organics on the sorption of toluene and trichloroethylene.Environ Sci Technol,1986,20(12):1263-1269[9]Gauthler T D,Seitz W R,Grant C L.Effects of structural and compositional variations of dissolved humic materials on pyrene KOC values.Environ Sci Technol,1987,21(3):243-248[10]Chiou C T,Malcolm R L,Brinton T I,et al.Water solubility enhancement of some organic pollutants and pesticides by dissolved humic and fulvic acids.Environ Sci Technol,1986,20(5):502-508[11]Chiou C T,Kile D E,Brinton T I,et al.A comparison of water solubility enhancements of organic solutes by aquatic humic materials and commercial humic acids.Environ Sci Technol,1987,21(12):1231-1234[12]Rutherford D W,Chiou C T,Kile D E.Influence of soil organic matter composition on partition of organic compounds.Environ Sci Technol,1992,26(2):336-340[13]Grathwohl P.Influence of organic matter from soils and sediments from various origins on the sorption of some chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons:Implications on KOC correlations.Environ Sci Technol

  7. Chemical and spectroscopic characterization of humic substances isolated from South- Bohemian peat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Enev, V.; Novák, František; Klučáková, M.

    Ioannina : University of Ioannina, 2014. s. 226-227. [Meeting of the International Humic Substances Society. Natural Organic Matter: Structure-Dynamics-Innovative Applications /17./. 01.09.2014-05.09.2014, Ioannina] Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1211 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : humic substances * UV/ Vis * FTIR spectroscopy * fluorescence spectroscopy * absorption and fluorescence coefficients Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science

  8. Electrochemical removal and recovery of humic-like substances from wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Kliaugaitė, Daina; Yasadi, Kamuran; Euverink, Gert-Jan; Bijmans, Martijn F.M.; Racys, Viktoras

    2013-01-01

    The secondary effluent from paper and food industry wastewater still contains a high chemical oxygen demand and color intensity caused by the presence of difficult degradable organic compounds. These compounds are mostly humic-like substances. This study focused on two promising electrochemical methods for removal and recovery of humic like substances from industrial secondary effluent: membrane electrolysis and electro-coagulation. Membrane electrolysis removed 70% of the color at energy con...

  9. Chirality and origin of atmospheric humic-like substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, I.; Mészáros, T.; Maenhaut, W.; Vass, E.; Majer, Zs.

    2009-09-01

    Aerosol water extracts and atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS) obtained from PM2.5-fraction aerosol samples collected in a rural/continental background environment and in an urban environment in spring and summer, and at a tropical site that was heavily impacted by biomass burning were studied. Mean organic matter-to-organic carbon mass conversion factor and standard deviation of 2.04±0.06 were derived for HULIS from biomass burning. Mean atmospheric concentrations of HULIS for the rural and urban environments, and for the biomass burning during daylight periods and nights were 1.65, 2.2, 43, and 60 μg maromatics. The rural HULIS revealed weak optical activity, which may be associated with one of their important formation pathways by photo-oxidation and oligomerisation, i.e., with the formation from chiral biogenic precursors with one of the enantiomers slightly enriched. The biomass burning HULIS exhibited strong effect in the vibrational circular dichroism as a clear distinction from the other two types. This was related to the contribution of the thermal degradation products of lignins and cellulose. The biomass burning HULIS resemble Suwannee River Fulvic Acid standard more closely in some aspects than the urban and rural types of HULIS, which may be related to their common origin from plant material.

  10. Effect of humic substances on the precipitation of calcium phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yong-hui; Hermann H. HAHN; Erhard HOFFMANN; Peter G. WEIDLER

    2006-01-01

    For phosphorus (P) recovery from wastewater, the effect of humic substances (HS) on the precipitation of calcium phosphate was studied. Batch experiments of calcium phosphate precipitation were undertaken with synthetic water that contained 20 mg/L phosphate (as P) and 20 mg/L HS (as dissolved organic carbon, DOC) at a constant pH value in the range of 8.0-10.0. The concentration variations of phosphate, calcium (Ca) and HS were measured in the precipitation process; the crystalline state and compositions of the precipitates were analysed by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical methods, respectively. It showed that at solution pH 8.0, the precipitation rate and removal efficiency of phosphate were greatly reduced by HS, but at solution pH ≥9.0,the effect of HS was very small. The Ca consumption for the precipitation of phosphate increased when HS was added; HS was also removed from solution with the precipitation of calcium phosphate. At solution pH 8.0 and HS concentrations ≤ 3.5 mg/L, and at pH ≥ 9.0 and HS concentrations ≤ 10 mg/L, the final precipitates were proved to be hydroxyapatite (HAP) by XRD. The increases of solution pH value and initial Ca/P ratio helped reduce the influence of HS on the precipitation of phosphate.

  11. Effects of humic substances on precipitation and aggregation of zinc sulfide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonarine, A.; Lau, B.L.T.; Aiken, G.R.; Ryan, J.N.; Hsu-Kim, H.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticulate metal sulfides such as ZnS can influence the transport and bioavailability of pollutant metals in anaerobic environments. The aim of this work was to investigate how the composition of dissolved natural organic matter (NOM) influences the stability of zinc sulfide nanoparticles as they nucleate and aggregate in water with dissolved NOM. We compared NOM fractions that were isolated from several surface waters and represented a range of characteristics including molecular weight, type of carbon, and ligand density. Dynamic light scattering was employed to monitor the growth and aggregation of Zn-S-NOM nanoparticles in supersaturated solutions containing dissolved aquatic humic substances. The NOM was observed to reduce particle growth rates, depending on solution variables such as type and concentration of NOM, monovalent electrolyte concentration, and pH. The rates of growth increased with increasing ionic strength, indicating that observed growth rates primarily represented aggregation of charged Zn-S-NOM particles. Furthermore, the observed rates decreased with increasing molecular weight and aromatic content of the NOM fractions, while carboxylate and reduced sulfur content had little effect. Differences between NOM were likely due to properties that increased electrosteric hindrances for aggregation. Overall, results of this study suggest that the composition and source of NOM are key factors that contribute to the stabilization and persistence of zinc sulfide nanoparticles in the aquatic environment. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  12. Effects of humic substance on precipitation and aggregation of zinc sulfide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonarine, Amrika; Lau, Boris L.T.; Aiken, George R.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticulate metal sulfides such as ZnS can influence the transport and bioavailability of pollutant metals in anaerobic environments. The aim of this work was to investigate how the composition of dissolved natural organic matter (NOM) influences the stability of zinc sulfide nanoparticles as they nucleate and aggregate in water with dissolved NOM. We compared NOM fractions that were isolated from several surface waters and represented a range of characteristics including molecular weight, type of carbon, and ligand density. Dynamic light scattering was employed to monitor the growth and aggregation of Zn-S-NOM nanoparticles in supersaturated solutions containing dissolved aquatic humic substances. The NOM was observed to reduce particle growth rates, depending on solution variables such as type and concentration of NOM, monovalent electrolyte concentration, and pH. The rates of growth increased with increasing ionic strength, indicating that observed growth rates primarily represented aggregation of charged Zn-S-NOM particles. Furthermore, the observed rates decreased with increasing molecular weight and aromatic content of the NOM fractions, while carboxylate and reduced sulfur content had little effect. Differences between NOM were likely due to properties that increased electrosteric hindrances for aggregation. Overall, results of this study suggest that the composition and source of NOM are key factors that contribute to the stabilization and persistence of zinc sulfide nanoparticles in the aquatic environment.

  13. Role of humic substances in the degradation pathways and residual antibacterial activity during the photodecomposition of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras, Jazmín; Bedoya, Cristina; Silva-Agredo, Javier; Santamaría, Alexander; Fernández, Jhon J; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2016-05-01

    This study focuses on the photo-transformation, in presence of humic substances (HSs), of ciprofloxacin (CIP), a commonly-used fluoroquinolone antibiotic whose presence in aquatic ecosystems is a health hazard for humans and other living organisms. HSs from the International Humic Substances Society (Elliott humic acid and fulvic acid, Pahokee peat humic acid and Nordic lake) and a humic acid extracted from modified coal (HACM) were tested for their ability to photodegrade CIP. Based on kinetic and analytical studies, it was possible to establish an accelerating effect on the rate of CIP decomposition caused by the humic substances. This effect was associated with the photosensitized capacity of the HSs to facilitate energy transfer from an excited humic state to the ground state of ciprofloxacin. Except for Nordic lake, which experienced a lower positive effect, no significant differences in the CIP transformation were found among the different humic acids examined. The photochemistry of CIP can be modified by parameters such as pH, CIP or oxygen concentration. The irradiation of this antibiotic in the presence of HACM showed that antimicrobial activity was negligible after 14 h for E. coli and 24 h for S. aureus. In contrast, the antimicrobial activity was only slightly decreased after 24 h of irradiation by direct photolysis. Although mineralization of CIP irradiation in the presence of a HACM solution was not achieved, biodegradability was achieved after 12 h of irradiation, indicating that microorganisms within the environment can easily degrade CIP photochemical by-products. PMID:26921708

  14. Extraction and isolation of humic substances from two different soil types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of radioiodine in ecosystems is of interest because of the long halflife of Iodine-129 (τ = 1.57x107 a). There are indications that humic substances may have a strong influence on fixation as well as on remobilization of radioiodine in soils. In the framework of the preparation of a research project on radioiodine behavior in the soil/plant system a standard method was tested to extract those compounds. After the solution of humic substances in dilute sodiumhydroxide humic acids are separated from fulvic acid by precipitation with hydrochloric acid. Further purification occurs by dialysation against distilled water. The extraction and the separation of humic acids from two different soil-types, an orthi-humic gleysol and an allochthone soil, were carried out as described above. Using 100 g dry orthi-humic gleysol 7.4 g humic acid is obtained in a first extraction procedure and 1.1 g in a second one. By applying the same conditions to the allochtone soil 0.9 g and 0.4 g, respectively, are extracted. The IR-spectra of the isolated humic acids show the typical bands of those compounds. (orig.)

  15. Persistent toxic substances in Mediterranean aquatic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniero, Roberto; Abate, Vittorio; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Davoli, Enrico; De Felip, Elena; De Filippis, Stefania P; Dellatte, Elena; De Luca, Silvia; Fanelli, Roberto; Fattore, Elena; Ferri, Fabiola; Fochi, Igor; Rita Fulgenzi, Anna; Iacovella, Nicola; Iamiceli, Anna Laura; Lucchetti, Dario; Melotti, Paolo; Moret, Ivo; Piazza, Rossano; Roncarati, Alessandra; Ubaldi, Alessandro; Zambon, Stefano; di Domenico, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Fish and fishery products may represent one of the main sources of dietary exposure to persistent toxic substances (PTSs) such as polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and biphenyls; polybromodiphenyl ethers; organochlorine pesticides; perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctane sulfonate; and inorganic mercury and methyl mercury. In this study, PTS contamination of Mediterranean fish and crustaceans caught in Italian coastal waters was investigated in order to increase the representativeness of the occurrence database for wild species. The objectives were to verify the suitability of regulatory limits for PTSs, identify background concentrations values, if any, and examine the possible sources of variability when assessing the chemical body burdens of aquatic species. Twelve wild species of commercial interest and two farmed fish species were chosen. Excluding methyl mercury, chemical concentrations found in wild species fell generally towards the low ends of the concentration ranges found in Europe according to EFSA database and were quite lower than the tolerable maximum levels established in the European Union; farmed fish always showed contamination levels quite lower than those detected in wild species. The data obtained for wild species seemed to confirm the absence of local sources of contamination in the chosen sampling areas; however, species contamination could exceed regulatory levels even in the absence of specific local sources of contamination as a result of the position in the food web and natural variability in species' lifestyle. A species-specific approach to the management of contamination in aquatic organisms is therefore suggested as an alternative to a general approach based only on contaminant body burden. A chemical-specific analysis performed according to organism position in the food chain strengthened the need to develop this approach. PMID:25020099

  16. Effects of humic substances on plutonium speciation in marine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dominant oxidation state of plutonium in the dissolved phase of seawaters has been shown to be Pu(V). Data are presented that indicate a significant role by humic materials which cause rapid reduction of Pu(VI) to Pu(IV). The latter leaves the solution phase via hydrolysis. The humic material also seems to reduce Pu(V) but at a much slower rate and, in sunlight, this reduction may be negated by an oxidation process of unknown origin at this time. The role of humics sorbed on suspended particulate and sedimentary matter is discussed

  17. The density of humic acids and humic like substances (HULIS) from fresh and aged wood burning and pollution aerosol particles

    OpenAIRE

    Dinar, E.; Mentel, T. F.; Y. Rudich

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play significant roles in climatic related phenomena. Size, density and shape of particles affect their fluid-dynamic parameters which in turn dictate their transport and lifecycle. Moreover, density and shape are also related to particles' optical properties, influencing their regional and global radiative effects. In the present study we have measured and compared the effective densities of humic like substances (HULIS) extracted from smoke and pollution aerosol pa...

  18. Role of dissolved humic substances surrogates on phthalate esters migration from sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Z; He, P J; Zhang, H; Shao, L M

    2008-01-01

    The facilitated transport of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), the priority endocrine disrupting chemicals in sludge, by dissolved humic substances (HS) was evaluated by batch extraction. The DBP, much less hydrophobic than DEHP, was inclined to migrate from sludge matrix into humic substances solutions, while the DEHP could not migrate facilitated by most humic and fulvic acids solutions, except the humic acid surrogate of high humification. This result revealed that the affinity of DEHP in sludge matrix exceeded DBP and was not susceptible by weak HS. The hydrophobic property controlled the association of phthalic acid esters on sludge residual phases. Migration rate of DBP was positively correlated to the weight-average molecular weight of HS surrogates and the aromatic extents of HA. Some functional groups in HS molecules benefited to the facilitated transport of DBP. PMID:18360003

  19. Influence of humic substances of fixation of fission products in silicate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay minerals are exploited in both the land and sea emplacement and as backfill materials for the storage of radioactive waste to increase their radioactive safety. In addition, the influence of inorganic constituents, humic substances may modify the speciation of pollutant cations by solubilization of metal ions and formation of organic coating which may block the ion-exchange sites of clays. The objective of the present work was to characterize the effect of humic acid addition on the capacity of inorganic sorbents to radioactive caesium and strontium. Montmorillonite has been particular studied because the high cation exchange capacity and swelling properties make them sutiable for waste disposal. However, an accumulation of humic acid on disposal containers during the time of waste treatment may change the mobility of fission products. The results are treated in respect of sorption isotherms both of humic substances and sorbed ions. 3 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Effects of humic substances on the migration of radionuclides: Complexation of actinides with humic substances. 5. progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexation study with Am(III) is conducted with humic acid concentrations between 2.5x10-5 mol/L and 3.8x10-5 mol/L ([HA(III)]). The Am(III) concentration is varied to give Am(III) to HA(III) concentration ratios between approximately 0.1 and 2.0. The excess Am concentration allows to determine the loading capacity of humic acid. Taking the loading capacity into account, the complexation constants of the two types of humic acid are evaluated. The loading capacities and the complexation constants do not differ from one another and agree well with previous results on the site specific COCO-group standard humic acid from the same groundwater (Gohy-573(HA)). The mean value of the Am(III) complexation constants for the natural and purified humic acids is found to be logβ=6.26±0.05. The results show that the purification of humic acid has no significant influence on its complexation behaviour with Am(III) and thus thermodynamic data from purified humic acid can be applied readily for geochemical modelling. (orig.)

  1. Humic substances increase survival of freshwater shrimp Caridina sp. D to acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Aleicia; Duivenvoorden, Leo J; Kinnear, Susan H W

    2013-02-01

    Humic substances (HS) are known to decrease the toxicity of heavy metals to aquatic organisms, and it has been suggested that they can provide buffering protection in low pH conditions. Despite this, little is known about the ability for HS to increase survival to acid mine drainage (AMD). In this study, the ability of HS to increase survival of the freshwater shrimp (Caridina sp. D sensu Page et al. in Biol Lett 1:139-142, 2005) to acid mine drainage was investigated using test waters collected from the Mount Morgan open pit in Central Queensland with the addition of Aldrich humic acid (AHA). The AMD water from the Mount Morgan open pit is highly acidic (pH 2.67) as well as contaminated with heavy metals (1780 mg/L aluminum, 101 mg/L copper [Cu], 173 mg/L manganese, 51.8 mg/L zinc [Zn], and 51.8 mg/L iron). Freshwater shrimp were exposed to dilutions in the range of 0.5 % to 5 % AMD water with and without the addition of 10 or 20 mg/L AHA. In the absence of HS, all shrimp died in the 2.5 % AMD treatment. In contrast, addition of HS increased survival in the 2.5 % AMD treatment by ≤66 % as well as significantly decreased the concentration of dissolved Cu, cobalt, cadmium, and Zn. The decreased toxicity of AMD in the presence of HS is likely to be due to complexation and precipitation of heavy metals with the HS; it is also possible that HS caused changes to the physiological condition of the shrimp, thus increasing their survival. These results are valuable in contributing to an improved understanding of potential role of HS in ameliorating the toxicity of AMD environments. PMID:23135152

  2. Characterization of humic substances from deep groundwaters in granitic bedrock in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic substances were isolated from deep groundwaters sampled at depths between 100 and 800 m at Finnsjoen, Fjaellveden, Forsmark, Gidea, Lansjaerv, Stripa and Aespoe. The humic fraction, which largely consisted of fulvic acid in all the samples, was characterized with respect to elemental composition, molecular weight, acid capacity (COOH and OH) as well as age (14C). The differences in composition and capacity between old (1270-9675 y) and fresh (reference fulvic acid from surface water, Bersbo) were minor. (orig.)

  3. Anaerobic decomposition of humic substances by Clostridium from the deep subsurface

    OpenAIRE

    Akio Ueno; Satoru Shimizu; Shuji Tamamura; Hidetoshi Okuyama; Takeshi Naganuma; Katsuhiko Kaneko

    2016-01-01

    Decomposition of humic substances (HSs) is a slow and cryptic but non-negligible component of carbon cycling in sediments. Aerobic decomposition of HSs by microorganisms in the surface environment has been well documented; however, the mechanism of anaerobic microbial decomposition of HSs is not completely understood. Moreover, no microorganisms capable of anaerobic decomposition of HSs have been isolated. Here, we report the anaerobic decomposition of humic acids (HAs) by the anaerobic bacte...

  4. Humic-Like Substances from Different Compost Extracts Could Significantly Promote Cucumber Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Da-Bing; WANG Qiu-Jun; WU Yun-Cheng; YU Guang-Hui; SHEN Qi-Rong; HUANG Qi-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The effects of direct extracts of compost (DEC),aerated fermentation extracts of compost (AFEC) and non-aerated fermentation extracts of compost (NAFEC) on cucumber growth and the action mechanisms were evaluated based on the structure and activity analysis of humic-like substances.AFEC increased cucumber growth most significantly,followed by DEC and NAFEC,which was insignificant compared to the control treatment.Humic-like substances from compost extracts played an important role in promoting cucumber growth.Application of humic-like substances stimulated auxin-like activity and increased chlorophyll content and nitrogen accumulation in plants.The positive auxin-like activity of humic-like substances could be attributed to the relative distribution of special carbon groups,such as those with a large amount of peptidic and carbohydratic groups or with a low content of phenolic groups.In conclusion,the best growth promotion by application of AFEC was mainly attributed to the humic-like substances in the AFEC.

  5. Identification and characterization of humic substances-degrading bacterial isolates from an estuarine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esham; Ye; Moran

    2000-12-01

    Bacterial isolates were obtained from enrichment cultures containing humic substances extracted from estuarine water using an XAD-8 resin. Eighteen isolates were chosen for phylogenetic and physiological characterization based on numerical importance in serial dilutions of the enrichment culture and unique colony morphology. Partial sequences of the 16S rRNA genes indicated that six of the isolates were associated with the alpha subclass of Proteobacteria, three with the gamma-Proteobacteria, and nine with the Gram-positive bacteria. Ten isolates degraded at least one (and up to six) selected aromatic single-ring compounds. Six isolates showed ability to degrade [(14)C]humic substances derived from the dominant salt marsh grass in the estuary from which they were isolated (Spartina alterniflora), mineralizing 0.4-1.1% of the humic substances over 4 weeks. A mixture of all 18 isolates did not degrade humic substances significantly faster than any of the individual strains, however, and no isolate degraded humic substances to the same extent as the natural marine bacterial community (3.0%). Similar studies with a radiolabeled synthetic lignin ([beta-(14)C]dehydropolymerisate) showed measurable levels of degradation by all 18 bacteria (3.0-8.8% in 4 weeks), but mineralization levels were again lower than that observed for the natural marine bacterial community (28.2%). Metabolic capabilities of the 18 isolates were highly variable and generally did not map to phylogenetic affiliation. PMID:11102687

  6. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a means of distinguishing fulvic and humic acids from dissolved and sedimentary aquatic sources and terrestrial sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senesi, Nicola; Miano, Teodoro M.; Provenzano, Maria Rosaria

    Thirteen fulvic acids (FA) and humic acids (HA) isolated from river waters and sediment, marine sediments, leonardite, soils, and paleosol, have been investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy in the emission, excitation and, partly, synchronous scan excitation modes. Emission spectra are generally characterized by a unique broad band, whereas excitation spectra exhibit a variable number of peaks or shoulders of various intensity; these peaks are particularly well-resolved for sedimentary HA samples. A decrease in the relative intensity of fluorescence, which is associated with a red-shift (longer wavelengths) of both the emission maximum and the main excitation peaks, is observed when passing from dissolved aquatic and soil FA to river and marine sedimentary HA, to leonardite and soil HA, and, finally, to paleosol HA. Evident differences are shown in the relative intensity and wavelength maxima, measured in any mode, between soil FA and HA from the same source. For FA and HA of various nature and origin, the fluorescence is suggested to be caused by chemically different structural units. These units fluoresce from the blue-violet to the green and consist of variously extended, condensed, aromatic and/or heterocyclic ring systems, with a high degree of electronic conjugation and bearing suitable hydroxyl, alkoxyl and carbonyl groups (e.g. salicyl, cinnamic and hydroxybenzoic derivatives, naphtols, naphtoquinones, coumarin), and quinoline-derivatives, flavonoids and Schiffbase derivatives. Fluorescence properties of humic substances may represent an additional diagnostic criterium useful in distinguishing between FA and HA from the same or various natural sources.

  7. Chirality and origin of atmospheric humic-like substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Salma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol water extracts and atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS obtained from PM2.5-fraction aerosol samples collected in a rural/continental background environment and in an urban environment in spring and summer, and at a tropical site that was heavily impacted by biomass burning were studied. Mean organic matter-to-organic carbon mass conversion factor and standard deviation of 2.04±0.06 were derived for HULIS from biomass burning. Mean atmospheric concentrations of HULIS for the rural and urban environments, and for the biomass burning during daylight periods and nights were 1.65, 2.2, 43, and 60 μg m, respectively. This indicates that intense emission sources and/or formation mechanisms of HULIS operate in biomass burning. Mean contributions of C in HULIS (HULIS-C to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC were 35, 48, 63, and 76%, respectively, for the sample set listed. The data suggest that HULIS-C is the major component of the WSOC in tropical biomass burning, and that HULIS most likely do not share common origin in the three environments studied. Differentiation among the possible formation processes was attempted by investigating the optical activity of HULIS through their (electronic and vibrational circular dichroism properties. The urban HULIS did not show optical activity, which is in line with the concept of their major airborne formation from anthropogenic aromatics. The rural HULIS revealed weak optical activity, which may be associated with one of their important formation pathways by photo-oxidation and oligomerisation, i.e., with the formation from chiral biogenic precursors with one of the enantiomers slightly enriched. The biomass burning HULIS exhibited strong effect in the vibrational circular dichroism as a clear distinction from the other two types. This was related to the contribution of the thermal degradation products of lignins and cellulose. The biomass burning HULIS resemble Suwannee

  8. Chirality and the origin of atmospheric humic-like substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Salma

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol water extracts and atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS obtained from PM2.5-fraction aerosol samples collected in a rural/continental background environment and in an urban environment in spring and summer, and at a tropical site that was heavily impacted by biomass burning were studied. HULIS was obtained as the water-soluble, methanol-elutable material isolated from a solid-phase extraction procedure. The mean organic matter-to-organic carbon mass conversion factor and the standard deviation of 2.04±0.06 were derived for HULIS from biomass burning. Mean atmospheric concentrations of HULIS for the rural and urban environments and for the biomass burning during daylight periods and nights, were 1.65, 2.2, 43, and 60 μg m−3, respectively. This and other abundances indicate that intense emission sources and/or formation mechanisms of HULIS operate in biomass burning. Mean contributions of C in HULIS (HULIS-C to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC were 35, 48, 63, and 76%, respectively, for the sample set listed. HULIS-C is the major component of the WSOC in tropical biomass burning. The data also suggest that HULIS most likely do not share common origin in the three environments studied. Differentiation among the possible formation processes was attempted by investigating the optical activity of HULIS through their (electronic and vibrational circular dichroism properties. The urban HULIS did not show optical activity, which is in line with the concept of their major airborne formation from anthropogenic aromatics. The rural HULIS revealed weak optical activity, which may be associated with one of their important formation pathways by photo-oxidation and oligomerisation, i.e., with the formation from chiral biogenic precursors with one of the enantiomers slightly enriched. The The biomass burning of HULIS exhibited a strong effect in the vibrational circular dichroism as a clear distinction from the other two

  9. Chirality and the origin of atmospheric humic-like substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salma, I.; Mészáros, T.; Maenhaut, W.; Vass, E.; Majer, Z.

    2010-02-01

    Aerosol water extracts and atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS) obtained from PM2.5-fraction aerosol samples collected in a rural/continental background environment and in an urban environment in spring and summer, and at a tropical site that was heavily impacted by biomass burning were studied. HULIS was obtained as the water-soluble, methanol-elutable material isolated from a solid-phase extraction procedure. The mean organic matter-to-organic carbon mass conversion factor and the standard deviation of 2.04±0.06 were derived for HULIS from biomass burning. Mean atmospheric concentrations of HULIS for the rural and urban environments and for the biomass burning during daylight periods and nights, were 1.65, 2.2, 43, and 60 μg m-3, respectively. This and other abundances indicate that intense emission sources and/or formation mechanisms of HULIS operate in biomass burning. Mean contributions of C in HULIS (HULIS-C) to water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were 35, 48, 63, and 76%, respectively, for the sample set listed. HULIS-C is the major component of the WSOC in tropical biomass burning. The data also suggest that HULIS most likely do not share common origin in the three environments studied. Differentiation among the possible formation processes was attempted by investigating the optical activity of HULIS through their (electronic and vibrational) circular dichroism properties. The urban HULIS did not show optical activity, which is in line with the concept of their major airborne formation from anthropogenic aromatics. The rural HULIS revealed weak optical activity, which may be associated with one of their important formation pathways by photo-oxidation and oligomerisation, i.e., with the formation from chiral biogenic precursors with one of the enantiomers slightly enriched. The The biomass burning of HULIS exhibited a strong effect in the vibrational circular dichroism as a clear distinction from the other two types. This was related to the

  10. Variations in Δ14C of humic substances in the Lake Biwa waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon isotopes (13C and 14C) were used to study the characteristics and origin of humic substances in water samples from Lake Biwa in Japan. Humic substances were isolated from surface lake waters in each season by the XAD extraction method and their carbon isotopic ratios were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry. The Δ14C values of Biwa humic and fulvic acids indicate that these substances consist mainly of pre-bomb 14C. There is a negative correlation between Δ14C and δ 13C values for the Biwa fulvic acids. The fulvic acid consists of younger organic materials with lower δ 13C value in January, but older organics with higher δ 13C in April and October. The major part of fulvic acid may be supplied from soil solution and/or groundwater in the watershed and their contribution varies with season

  11. Humic substances from Manila Bay and Bolinao Bay sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C, H, N composition of sedimentary humic acids (HA) extracted from three sites in Manila Bay and six sites in Bolinao Bay yielded H/C atomic ratios of 1.1-1.4 and N/C atomic ratios of 0.09-0.16. The Manila Bay HA's had lower H/C and C/C ratios compared to those from Bolinao Bay. The IR spectra showed prominent aliphatic C-H amide I and II bands. Manila Bay HA's also had less diverse molecular composition based on the GC-MS analysis of the CuO and alkaline permanganate oxidation products of the humic acids. (Author)

  12. Calcite crystal growth inhibition by humic substances with emphasis on hydrophobic acids from the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, A.R.; Reddy, M.M.; Aiken, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    The crystallization of calcium carbonate minerals plays an integral role in the water chemistry of terrestrial ecosystems. Humic substances, which are ubiquitous in natural waters, have been shown to reduce or inhibit calcite crystal growth in experiments. The purpose of this study is to quantify and understand the kinetic effects of hydrophobic organic acids isolated from the Florida Everglades and a fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell, Antarctica, on the crystal growth of calcite (CaCO3). Highly reproducible calcite growth experiments were performed in a sealed reactor at constant pH, temperature, supersaturation (?? = 4.5), P(CO2) (10-3.5atm), and ionic strength (0.1 M) with various concentrations of organic acids. Higher plant-derived aquatic hydrophobic acids from the Everglades were more effective growth inhibitors than microbially derived fulvic acid from Lake Fryxell. Organic acid aromaticity correlated strongly with growth inhibition. Molecular weight and heteroatom content correlated well with growth inhibition, whereas carboxyl content and aliphatic nature did not. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  13. Photoreduction of Terrigenous Fe-Humic Substances Leads to Bioavailable Iron in Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazevic, Amir; Orlowska, Ewelina; Kandioller, Wolfgang; Jirsa, Franz; Keppler, Bernhard K; Tafili-Kryeziu, Myrvete; Linert, Wolfgang; Krachler, Rudolf F; Krachler, Regina; Rompel, Annette

    2016-05-23

    Humic substances (HS) are important iron chelators responsible for the transport of iron from freshwater systems to the open sea, where iron is essential for marine organisms. Evidence suggests that iron complexed to HS comprises the bulk of the iron ligand pool in near-coastal waters and shelf seas. River-derived HS have been investigated to study their transport to, and dwell in oceanic waters. A library of iron model compounds and river-derived Fe-HS samples were probed in a combined X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (VtC-XES) study at the Fe K-edge. The analyses performed revealed that iron complexation in HS samples is only dependent on oxygen-containing HS functional groups, such as carboxyl and phenol. The photoreduction mechanism of Fe(III) -HS in oceanic conditions into bioavailable aquatic Fe(II) forms, highlights the importance of river-derived HS as an iron source for marine organisms. Consequently, such mechanisms are a vital component of the upper-ocean iron biogeochemistry cycle. PMID:27100573

  14. Determination of molecular weights of humic substances by analytical (UV scanning) ultracentrifugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, P.M.; Wilkinson, A.E.; Tipping, E.; Jones, M.N. (Univ. of Manchester (England) Freshwater Biological Association, Ambleside, Cumbria (England))

    1990-01-01

    Samples of peat humic acid (PHA) and surface water humic (WBHA) and fulvic (WBFA) acids have been extracted from Whitray Beck in North Yorkshire, U.K. The molecular weights of the extracts have been investigated by sedimentation equilibrium using an analytical ultracentrifuge equipped with a UV scanning system. The system allows measurements to be made at low concentrations of humic substances, comparable to those existing in natural humic-rich water. A method is described for correcting UV scanning data for changes in the optical properties of the materials with changing molecular weight. Measurements have also been made on reference samples of Suwannee river humic (SRHA) and fulvic (SRFA) acids from the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). The weight-average moleuclar weights of the extracted samples range from approximately 2,000 to 17,000 and follow a series PHA > WBHA > WBFA. Apparent specific volumes of these materials were in a range from 0.45 to 0.58 cm{sup 3} g{sup {minus}1} as measured by digital densimetry. Al the samples studied were analysed by gel filtration, but the molecular weights determined by this method based on a globular protein calibration are not in good accord with the absolute determinations by the sedimentation-equilibrium technique. The molecular weight of the SRHA determined by sedimentation equilibrium is in good agreement with that reported by BECKETT (1987) et al., based on flow field-flow fractionation.

  15. Complexation of transuranic ions by humic substances: Application of laboratory results to the natural system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental investigations show transuranic ions sorb to humic substances. The resulting species are often mobile and are expected to be important vectors in the migration of transuranic ions in natural systems. However, these environmental studies yield no quantitative data useful for modeling. Laboratory complexation experiments with transuranic ions and humic substances generate thermodynamic data required for complexation modeling. The data presented in this work are based on the metal ion charge neutralization model, which is briefly described. When a consistent complexation model is used, similar results are obtained from different experimental conditions, techniques, and laboratories. Trivalent transuranic ions (Cm(III), Am(III)) have been extensively studied with respect to pH, ionic strength, origin of humic acid, and mixed species formation. The complexation of Np(V) has been examined over a large pH and metal ion concentration range with different humic acids. Some data does exist on the complexation ion concentration range with different humic acids. Some data does exist on the complexation of plutonium with humic acid, however further work is needed. Calculations on the Gorleben aquifer system using the thermodynamic data are presented. Critical information lacking from the thermodynamic database is identified. 55 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Fouling of enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactors by humic-like substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; König, Katja; Fojan, Peter; Keiding, Kristian; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2014-12-01

    Fouling by free extracellular polymeric substances was studied in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor. It was demonstrated that the free extracellular polymeric substances, primarily consisting of humic-like substances, were adsorbed to the membrane used in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor plant. Infrared analyses indicated the presence of the humic-like substances on the membrane's active surface after filtration of the free extracellular polymeric substances suspension. Scanning electron microscopy showed the presence of a gel layer on the membrane surface after filtration of the free extracellular polymeric substances suspension. The gel layer caused a significant decline in water flux. This layer was not entirely removed by a backwashing, and the membrane's water flux could not be re-established. The membrane used in the enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor plant showed infrared spectra similar to that fouled by the free extracellular polymeric substances suspension in the laboratory. Thus, the results of this study show the importance of humic-like substances in irreversible fouling of enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor systems. PMID:25014564

  17. Dissolution and Mobilization of Uranium in a Reduced Sediment by Natural Humic Substances under Anaerobic Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological reduction and precipitation of uranium (U) has been proposed as a remedial option for immobilizing uranium at contaminated sites, but the long-term stability and mobility of uranium remain a concern because it is neither removed nor destroyed. In this study, the dissolution and mobilization of reduced and oxidized forms of uranium [U(IV) and U(VI)] by natural humic substances were investigated in batch and column flow systems using a bioreduced sediment containing both U(IV) and U(VI). The addition of humic substances significantly increased the dissolution of U(IV) under anaerobic conditions. Humic acid (HA) was found to be more effective than fulvic acid (FA) in dissolving U(IV) in either 1 mM KCl or KHCO3 background solution. However, more U(VI) was dissolved in 1 mM KHCO3 than in 1 mM KCl background electrolytes. The HA also was found to be more effective than FA in mobilizing uranium under reducing and column flow conditions, although an accumulative amount of eluted U(VI) and U(IV) was relatively low (<60 μg) after leaching with ∼97 pore volumes of the humic solution in 1 mM KHCO3. These observations suggest that natural humic substances could potentially influence the long-term stability of bioreduced U(IV) even under strong reducing environments.

  18. Characteristics of Soil Humic Substances as Determined by Conventional and Synchrotron Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Song, X. Y.; Wang, N.; Li, C. X.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J. J.

    2014-11-01

    Humic substances (HS) play an important role in soil fertility and carbon sequestration in soil. The structural characteristics of soil HS, extracted from two natural soils and a laboratory-incubated soil, were investigated by conventional beamline-based Fourier transform infrared radiation (CB-FTIR), a common FTIR technique based on a conventional thermal source, and synchrotron radiation-based (SR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The relative area of absorbance peaks that appeared at 2930, 2860, 1711, and 1635 cm-1 were calculated to make a comparison of the absorbance intensities. The absorption of aromatic functional groups of HS was stronger in SR-FTIR spectroscopy than in CB-FTIR spectroscopy. Compared with humic acid extracted with a 0.1 mol/l Na4P2O7 solution, the level of aliphaticity in humic acid extracted with a 0.1 mol/l NaOH solution was higher. The aliphaticity of humin associated with clay (HMc) was higher than that of humin associated with iron (HMi). These results suggest that SR-FTIR spectroscopy is a useful and nondestructive technique to study the structural characteristics of soil humic substances. Sequential extraction of soil humic substances with NaOH and Na4P2O7 solutions may be helpful in providing additional information in cases where differences in the material obtained from different extraction solutions occur. The aliphaticity and complexity of HMc were higher than those of HMi.

  19. Humic substances in natural waters and their complexation with trace metals and radionuclides: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissolved humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) occur in surface waters and groundwaters in concentrations ranging from less than 1 mg(C)/L to more than 100 mg(C)/L. Humic substances are strong complexing agents for many trace metals in the environment and are also capable of forming stable soluble complexes or chelates with radionuclides. Concentrations of humic materials as low as 1 mg(C)/L can produce a detectable increase in the mobility of some actinide elements by forming soluble complexes that inhibit sorption of the radionuclides onto rock materials. The stability of trace metal- or radionuclide-organic complexes is commonly measured by an empirically determined conditional stability constant (K'), which is based on the ratio of complexed metal (radionuclide) in solution to the product concentration of uncomplexed metal and humic complexant. Larger values of stability constants indicate greater complex stability. The stability of radionuclide-organic complexes is affected both by concentration variables and envionmental factors. In general, complexing is favored by increased of radionuclide, increased pH, and decreased ionic strength. Actinide elements are generally most soluble in their higher oxidation states. Radionuclides can also form stable, insoluble complexes with humic materials that tend to reduce radionuclide mobility. These insoluble complexes may be radionuclide-humate colloids that subsequently precipitate from solution, or complexes of radionuclides and humic substances that sorb to clay minerals or other soil particulates strongly enough to immobilize the radionuclides. Colloid formation appears to be favored by increased radionuclide concentration and lowered pH; however, the conditions that favor formation of insoluble complexes that sorb to particulates are still poorly understood. 129 refs., 25 figs., 19 tabs

  20. The migration behavior of Np(V) in sandy soil and granite media in the presence of humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migration behavior of Np(V) in sandy soil and granite media was studied in the presence of humic substances using a column method. Two kinds of naturally occurring fulvics were isolated from groundwater at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL (hereafter, CRL-fulvics) and at the Underground Research Laboratory of AECL (hereafter, URL-fulvics). The commercial humics from Aldrich Co. (hereafter, Aldrich-humics) was also used to compare the influence of humics from different origin on the migration behavior of Np(V). The dominant molecular size of these humic substances was under 5,000 daltons for the fulvics, and in the range from 30,000 to 100,000 daltons for Aldrich-humics. An enhanced elution of Np(V) from the sandy soil column under coexistence of CRL-fulvics at 20 mg/L was observed in comparison with the studies in the absence of humic substances. On the other hand, Np(V) under coexistence of Aldrich-humics was retarded. The difference in the effects of the humic substances on the migration behavior of Np(V) may be caused by the difference in the molecular size distribution of the humic substances. That is, the CRL-fulvics, being smaller in size, has lower sorption ability on the sandy soil than the Aldrich-humics, and thereby Np-fulvics complexes may be able to easily migrate through the sandy soil column. In the case of granite column experiments, again an enhanced elution of Np(V) under the coexistence of URL-fulvics was found and this observation was similar to that found with the CRL-fulvics. From these observations, it is likely that the migration behavior of Np(V) is influenced by the presence of humic substances. (orig.)

  1. Humic Substances from Manila Bay and Bolinao Bay Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elma Llaguno

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The C,H,N composition of sedimentary humic acids (HA extracted from three sites in Manila Bay and six sites in Bolinao Bay yielded H/C atomic ratios of 1.1-1.4 and N/C atomic ratios of 0.09 - 0.16. The Manila Bay HA's had lower H/C and N/C ratios compared to those from Bolinao Bay. The IR spectra showed prominent aliphatic C-H and amide I and II bands. Manila Bay HA's also had less diverse molecular composition based on the GC-MS analysis of the CuO and alkaline permanganate oxidation products of the humic acids.

  2. Comparative study of humic substances in groundwaters: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic and fulvic acids were extracted from Drigg groundwater using the weak anion exchanger, DEAE cellulose. Two different methods of elution from the DEAE cellulose were investigated. These were elution with 0.1M NaOH and elution with a 50:50 mixture of MeCN and 0.5M HCl. The latter method proved to be operationally more difficult and suffered from the disadvantage that it was impossible to determine the concentration of extracted matter until late in the purification procedure. Co- and Ni-humic/fulvic conditional stability constants were determined on different fractions extracted from the groundwater using an ion-exchange-equilibrium method. Measurements were made in 0.005 M NaCl at pH values of 6.5 and 5.0. Conditional stability constants are reported in units of 1/g because of the difficulties inherent in obtaining an unequivocal molecular weight or complexation capacity. Values ranged from 1 to 4 1/g for cobalt and from 2 to 5 1/g for nickel. The purity of the material had a significant effect and values for humic acids were higher than for fulvic acids from the same source. Values at pH 6.5 were higher than at pH=5.0. The stoichiometry of the complexes appeared to be mainly 1:1. Although both the humic and fulvic acids prepared after elution with MeCN/HCl were significantly purer than the corresponding materials prepared after elution with NaOH the stability constants were lower. (author)

  3. Role of aromaticity in humic substances degradation kinetics using non-arrhenius temperature functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kislinger, J.; Novák, František; Kučerík, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 15 (2008), s1086-s1088. ISSN 0009-2770 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : aromaticity * humic substances degradation kinetics * non-arrhenius temperature Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.593, year: 2008

  4. The effect of humic substances on germination and early growth of Lamb's Quarters (Chenopodium album agg.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šerá, Božena; Novák, František

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2011), s. 470-476. ISSN 0006-3088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : Chenopodium album * growth stimulation * humic substance * lignite * seed germination Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.557, year: 2011

  5. Structure and dynamics of humic substances and model poly-electrolytes in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of a study about the feasibility of an underground storage of radioactive wastes, we focused on the role of degraded natural organic matter in the eventual transport of radionuclides in the environment. We are more interested by the determination of electro kinetic properties of these humic substances rather than the description of speciation reaction already widely discussed in the literature. We chose to determine the size and the charge of these humic substances thanks to an original method: high precision conductometry. This technique, associated to a suited transport theory, allows to describe the mobility of charged species in solution when taking into account the pairs interactions. We have participated in the development of this transport theory and we use it in order to determine the size and the charge of humic substances and a reference polyelectrolyte in different conditions of pH and ionic strength. All these experimental results obtained by conductometry were correlated with other experimental and theoretical methods: Atomic Force Microscopy, dynamic light scattering, laser zeta-metry and Monte-Carlo simulations. The obtained results confirm the generally admitted idea that humic substances are nano-metric entities having complexing properties towards cations and that can aggregate to form supra molecular structures. The effect of the ions present in the environment (sodium, calcium, magnesium) has been investigated. Finally the complexation of europium (which is considered as a good analogue of americium 241) has also been analysed by square wave voltammetry. (author)

  6. The effects of humic substances on the activity of metalaxyl+mancozeb, fungicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, C.; Li, S.; Li, B.; Zhang, Q. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). State Key Lab of Coal Conversion

    1999-07-01

    The effects of three dissolved humic substances on the activity of the fungicide metalaxy+mancozeb against the phytophthora were studied. The zone of inhibition technique was used. A synergistic effect was observed and the mechanism of the interaction is discussed. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy: a tool to characterize humic substances in soil colonized by microorganisms?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, Veronika; Gryndler, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 3 (2006), s. 215-221. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/03/0188 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : fluorescence spectroscopy * humic substances * microorganism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2006

  8. Development of an automated system for isolation and purification of humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomeren, van A.; Weij-Zuiver, van der E.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of humic substances (HS) in environmental samples generally involves labor-intensive and time-consuming isolation and purification procedures. In this paper, the development of an automated system for HS isolation and purification is described. The novelty of the developed system li

  9. Clay surface catalysis of formation of humic substances: potential role of maillard reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mechanisms of the formation of humic substances are poorly understood, especially the condensation of amino acids and reducing sugars products (Maillard reaction) in soil environments. Clay minerals behave as Lewis and Brönsted acids and catalyze several reactions and likely to catalyze the Mai...

  10. Humic substance charge determination by titration with a flexible cationic polyelectrolyte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Wen-Feng; Norde, Willem; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2011-01-01

    The anionic charge of humic substances (HS) plays a major role in the interaction of HS with other components. Therefore, the potential of the polyelectrolyte titration technique to obtain the charge density of HS in simple 1-1 electrolyte solutions has been investigated. Titrations are carried out

  11. Humic substance charge determination by titration with a flexible cationic polyelectrolyte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, W.F.; Norde, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    The anionic charge of humic substances (HS) plays a major role in the interaction of HS with other components. Therefore, the potential of the polyelectrolyte titration technique to obtain the charge density of HS in simple 1–1 electrolyte solutions has been investigated. Titrations are carried out

  12. Isotope exchange study of the dissociation of metal - humic substance complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, J.; Jansová, A.; Hvoždová, I.; Beneš, P.; Novák, František

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 53, A (2003), s. A97-A101. ISSN 0011-4626 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911; CEZ:MSM 210000019 Keywords : isotope exchange * dissociation of metal * humic substance complexes Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.263, year: 2003

  13. Electrochemical removal and recovery of humic-like substances from wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kliaugaitė, Daina; Yasadi, Kamuran; Euverink, Gert-Jan; Bijmans, Martijn F.M.; Racys, Viktoras

    2013-01-01

    The secondary effluent from paper and food industry wastewater still contains a high chemical oxygen demand and color intensity caused by the presence of difficult degradable organic compounds. These compounds are mostly humic-like substances. This study focused on two promising electrochemical meth

  14. Redox stability of neptunium(V) and neptunium(IV) in the presence of humic substances of varying functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reducing properties of humic substances (humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA)) of varying functionality towards Np(V) have been studied under anaerobic conditions between pH 3.5 and pH 9.0 in batch experiments. For Np redox speciation in solution solvent extraction, NIR absorption spectroscopy and ultrafiltration were applied. The reduction rate varied with type of humic substances, solution pH. HA to Np concentration ratio, and equilibration time. In comparison to natural humic substances, synthetic HA with designed redox properties lead to a stronger reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV). The reducing capacities of humic substances towards Np(V) could be correlated to their phenolic/acidic OH group content, which includes both hydroquinone-like moieties and non-quinoid phenols. By applying a synthetic HA with blocked phenolic/acidic OH groups, the dominance of phenolic/acidic OH groups as the redox-active moieties of humic substances was verified. The Np(IV) formed in the course of the experiments is predominantly humic colloid-bound. Np(IV) oxo/hydroxide colloids, that might be formed in addition, are stabilized by adsorbed humic substances. The remaining Np(V) occurs as NpO2+ ion or Np(V) humate depending on pH. The ability of synthetic HA to effectively maintain Np in the tetravalent state during humate complexation experiments could be shown. (orig.)

  15. Redox stability of neptunium(V) and neptunium(IV) in the presence of humic substances of varying functionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeide, K.; Bernhard, G. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Inst. of Radiochemistry, Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The reducing properties of humic substances (humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA)) of varying functionality towards Np(V) have been studied under anaerobic conditions between pH 3.5 and pH 9.0 in batch experiments. For Np redox speciation in solution solvent extraction, NIR absorption spectroscopy and ultrafiltration were applied. The reduction rate varied with type of humic substances, solution pH. HA to Np concentration ratio, and equilibration time. In comparison to natural humic substances, synthetic HA with designed redox properties lead to a stronger reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV). The reducing capacities of humic substances towards Np(V) could be correlated to their phenolic/acidic OH group content, which includes both hydroquinone-like moieties and non-quinoid phenols. By applying a synthetic HA with blocked phenolic/acidic OH groups, the dominance of phenolic/acidic OH groups as the redox-active moieties of humic substances was verified. The Np(IV) formed in the course of the experiments is predominantly humic colloid-bound. Np(IV) oxo/hydroxide colloids, that might be formed in addition, are stabilized by adsorbed humic substances. The remaining Np(V) occurs as NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ion or Np(V) humate depending on pH. The ability of synthetic HA to effectively maintain Np in the tetravalent state during humate complexation experiments could be shown. (orig.)

  16. Influence of humic-acid complexing on the mobility of Americium in the soil aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion data indicate the Am, Cm and Np migrate 1.2, 0.8, and 26 centimeters, respectively, in a thousand years. Thus, excluding mass transport by moving water or wind, actinide elements, such as Cm, Am, and Np that find their way to the soil-aquatic environment are relatively immobile. Measured diffusion coefficients, corrected for distribution between the aqueous and soil phases, tortuosity, negative absorption, and relative fluidity are in reasonable agreement with aqueous diffusion coefficients. However, agreement depends strongly on measurement method used to determine distribution ratios. Two sets of experiments with 241Am and 152Eu tracers have been done to measure distribution ratios as a function of the aqueous humic acid concentration. In the first experiments the solid phase was kaolinite and in the second series of distribution ratios were measured with Burbank sandy loam. Both of these experiments indicated that Am(III) and Eu(III) form very strong humic acid complexes with formation constants of approximately 105. Additional experiments are being done to establish the average number of Am(III)s or Eu(III)s bound to the humic acid polymer

  17. Recent findings on the characterization of humic substances extracted from soils from widely differing climatic zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain information on the effect of climate on the analytical characteristics and chemical structure of humic substances, humic and fulvic acids were extracted from soils formed under Arctic, cool temperate, subtropical and tropical climates. All humic materials were extracted, fractionated, purified and analysed by the same methods. These included elementary and functional group analyses, spectrophotometry in the ultra-violet, visible and i.r. regions, Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectrometry and chemical degradation with alkaline KMnO4 and alkaline CuO. The oxidation products were separated by solvent extraction and chromatographic methods, and identified by mass spectrometry and micro-i.r. spectrophotometry. The analytical, spectrophotometric and spectrometric data, and the information provided by chemical degradation, showed that humic substances formed under widely differing climatic conditions had essentially similar chemical structures and characteristics. Major humic 'building blocks' were in all instances complex phenolic and benzene-carboxylic structures. Most of the aliphatics were n-fatty acids which appeared to be esterified to phenolic OH groups. Recent physico-chemical studies done in our laboratory show that humic and fulvic acids behave like linear, flexible polyelectrolytes that are readily aggregated, most likely with the aid of H-bonding, at low pH but dispersed, because of increased dissociation of functional groups, at higher pH. Thus, it becomes apparent at this time that humic and fulvic acids are not single molecules but molecular associations of phenolic and benzene-carboxylic compounds ('buildings blocks') of microbiological, polyphenolic, lignin and condensed lignin origins. The 'building blocks' appear to be held together by weak linkages, mainly H-bonds. (author)

  18. Coating of AFM probes with aquatic humic and non-humic NOM to study their adhesion properties

    KAUST Repository

    Aubry, Cyril

    2013-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study interaction forces between four Natural Organic Matter (NOM) samples of different physicochemical characteristics and origins and mica surface at a wide range of ionic strength. All NOM samples were strongly adsorbed on positively charged iron oxide-coated silica colloidal probe. Cross-sectioning by focused ion beam milling technique and elemental mapping by energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy indicated coating completeness of the NOM-coated colloidal probes. AFM-generated force-distance curves were analyzed to elucidate the nature and mechanisms of these interacting forces. Electrostatics and steric interactions were important contributors to repulsive forces during approach, although the latter became more influential with increasing ionic strength. Retracting force profiles showed a NOM adhesion behavior on mica consistent with its physicochemical characteristics. Humic-like substances, referred as the least hydrophilic NOM fraction, i.e., so called hydrophobic NOM, poorly adsorbed on hydrophilic mica due to their high content of ionized carboxyl groups and aromatic/hydrophobic character. However, adhesion force increased with increasing ionic strength, suggesting double layer compression. Conversely, polysaccharide-like substances showed high adhesion to mica. Hydrogen-bonding between hydroxyl groups on polysaccharide-like substances and highly electronegative elements on mica was suggested as the main adsorption mechanism, where the adhesion force decreased with increasing ionic strength. Results from this investigation indicated that all NOM samples retained their characteristics after the coating procedure. The experimental approach followed in this study can potentially be extended to investigate interactions between NOM and clean or fouled membranes as a function of NOM physicochemical characteristics and solution chemistry. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Comparative study of humic and fulvic substances in groundwaters. Pt. 3. Metal complexation with humic substances. V. 2. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic and fulvic acids were extracted from large volumes of three different groundwaters. After purification they were characterised in terms of proton-binding properties, molecular weight, UV spectra and trace impurities. Conditional stability constants were measured for fulvic and humic binding with cobalt, nickel and uranium. From these, intrinsic binding constants were calculated using Model V which was found to describe the dependence of binding strength on pH and ionic strength reasonably well. Species distributions in the groundwaters were calculated and the effects of competition with alkali earths is discussed. All the experimental data are reported in this Volume (Appendices A and B) so that they are available for testing other models. (author)

  20. Study on the complexation of humic substances with calcium ion by ion selective electrode method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Humic substances (HS), which are one of main organic components in soil and aquatic environment, can influence the migration and fate of nuclides through formation of complexes. To quantitatively describe such complex formation, it is essential to consider the formation of major dissolved constituents ions, such as alkali or alkali earth ions, with HSUI. This paper reports the result on the study of the complex formation of calcium ion with soil HS and polyacrylic acid, where polyacrylic acid is selected to observed the effect of heterogeneous composition of HS. Experimental: As an initial solution for the titration experiment, the fixed amounts of calcium ion, NaNO3 solution and HS or PAA were mixed in a 150 mL plastic bottle, which was covered with Laboatory Film (Parafilm 'M'). Then, a fixed amount of NaOH solution was added step by step and the concentration of calcium ion and pH in solution were measured (IM-40S ion meter, DKK.TOA CORP. Japan) simultaneously after each addition. All the experiments were conducted in the 0.01 mol/L NaNO3 solution at 298.2 K in temperature under Ar atmosphere. The humic substances, Elliott soil humic acid (HA) (Cat.No.1sl02H) and Elliott soil Fulvic acid (FA) (Cat.No. lsl02H ), were obtained from International Humic Substances Society(IHSS). Polyacrylic acids (PAA) were obtained from polyscience Inc.(M.W. ca. 450.000). The other chemicals are of analytical grade. De-ionized water (Milli-Q Pureline, Yamato, Japan) was used to prepare the solution. Results and discussion: Fig. 1. shows tile typical titration curves of 500 mg/L HA containing 0.00, 6.24, 20.4, 41.6 mg/L total calcium ion in 0.010 mol/L NaN3 at 298.2 K under Ar atmosphere. The differences between the titration curves of the solution with and without calcium ion indicate the formation of complex with HA. Fig. 1 also shows the plots of the concentration of free calcium ion versus the amounts of added NaOH obtained from the titration of the solution with

  1. Effects of humic substances on the migration of radionuclides: Complexation of actinides with humic substances. 4. progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report a number of methodical developments are in progress. The effective ligand concentration is one of the important parameters for the evaluation of the metal ion complexation behaviour of bulk polyelectrolytes like humic or fulvic acids. Studies by KUL and TUM show that the effective ligand concentration of humic acid is related to the protonation of the ion exchanging groups. For a precise evaluation of the complexation reaction, however, a direct measurement of the effective ligand capacity under given experimental conditions is neccessary. The humate complexation has been studied for pentavalent neptunium (UM), hexavalent uranium (TUM) and trivalent lanthanide ions (CEA, UM and KUL) under different experimental conditions. The pH is varied between 3.0 and 9.0, the ionic strength between 0.01 and 0.1 M with metal ion concentrations between 10-13 and 10-5 mol/L. Competition of Al3+, [Co(NH3)6]3+, Ca2+, Cu2+, Fe2+ and Na+ on the Eu humate interaction is investigated by KUL. CEA-FAR has studied the influence of temperature on the Dy(III) humate complexation as well as the Dy(III) complexation with EDTA for the purpose of comparison. Studies by KUL on the influence of different competing ligands show that in such a ternary system (metal ion, humic acid and competing ligand) mixed complexes are generated. (orig.)

  2. Humic Substances from Manila Bay and Bolinao Bay Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Elma Llaguno

    1997-01-01

    The C,H,N composition of sedimentary humic acids (HA) extracted from three sites in Manila Bay and six sites in Bolinao Bay yielded H/C atomic ratios of 1.1-1.4 and N/C atomic ratios of 0.09 - 0.16. The Manila Bay HA's had lower H/C and N/C ratios compared to those from Bolinao Bay. The IR spectra showed prominent aliphatic C-H and amide I and II bands. Manila Bay HA's also had less diverse molecular composition based on the GC-MS analysis of the CuO and alkaline permanganate oxidation produc...

  3. Double-walled carbon nanotubes suspending by natural active substances (saponins and humic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafour-Hadj-Ziane A.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs discovered over the past fifteen years are very interesting materials because of their structural, mechanical, chemical and electronic properties. However, their poor dispersion after synthesis constitutes a real obstacle to their use in varied fields. To respond to a topical issue, we proposed a new concept based on the use of natural active substances such a saponins; biosurfactant extracted from the tree Sapindus Mukorossiand humic acids. The results showed that for a concentration of 1.5 mg/l of saponin and 5 mg/l of humic acids, the stable suspensions were obtained; the zeta potential measurements have justified these results.

  4. Extraction Kinetics and Molecular Size Fractionation of Humic Substances From Two Brazilian Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Dick Deborah Pinheiro; Burba Peter

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, the extraction behaviour of humic substances (HS) from an Oxisol and a Mollisol from South Brazil, by using 0.1 and 0.5 mol L-1 NaOH and 0.15 mol L-1 neutral pyrophosphate solutions, respectively, was systematically studied. The kinetics and efficiency of HS extraction were evaluated by means of UV/Vis spectroscopy. The isolated humic acids (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) were size-classified by multistage ultrafiltration (six fractions) in the molecular weight range of 1 to ...

  5. Effect of compost amendment on soil organic matter and humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca-Pérez, L.; Gil, C.; Jurado, M.; Pons, V.; Boluda, R.

    2009-04-01

    Organic soil amendments are increasingly being examined for their potential use to improve soil functions and quality. We studied the effect of compost amendment on soil organic matter (SOM) and humic substances. The study was carried out on Luvic Calcisol in the Valencian Community (East Spain) used as a citrus fruit orchard. Four plots were amended at dose 0, 6, 12 and 36 Mg ha-1 of rice residue and sewage sludge compost. Seven soil samples for each treatment at depths of 0-10 and 10-20 cm were taken in the first seven months after application. Soil characteristics, SOM, mineral nitrogen, total nitrogen, NH4+-N, and fulvic and humic acids were determined. The results demonstrated that the use of organic compost considerably increases SOM, total nitrogen and the humic substances such as the applied dose. The level of humic substances remained without significant variations during the experimental period. The dose of 36 Mg ha-1 proved the most efficient. We would like to thank Spanish government-MICINN for partial funding and support (MIMAN project 4.3-141/2005/3-B and MICINN project CGL2006-09776).

  6. Influence of humic substances on Co 2+ sorption by a subsurface mineral separate and its mineralogic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachara, J. M.; Resch, C. T.; Smith, S. C.

    1994-01-01

    The sorption of Co 2+ (10 -6 mol/L) was measured on subsurface mineral materials in the absence and presence of a sorbed leonardite humic acid (LHA) to (1) evaluate the sorptive role of mineral-bound humic substances, and (2) establish approaches to model metal ion binding in composite materials. The subsurface materials were a humic-mineral association acted as a noninteractive sorbent mixture at low aqueous Co concentrations.

  7. Methodology to extract of humic substances of lombricompost and evaluation of their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present works was developed at the facultad de ciencias agropecuarias of the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, located in Palmira City Valle del Cauca. The research consisted in the development of the appropriate methodology to extract humic substances contained in lombricompost and on the other hand to evaluate the performance in organic carbon of the fulvic and humic acids. The lombricompost source consisted in organic matter such as: dug cow, filter press cake, coffee pulp and Paspalum notatum with and without application of lime. The results showed sixteen steps, which are completely described in the work, obtain the proposal methodology. By the other hand this method showed that humic acids in the lombricompost are richer than fulvic ones; besides among the four sources used in the experiment the filter press cake was different and higher in carbon yield than coffee pulp and Paspalum notatum

  8. Comparison between humic substances from soil and peats using TMAH and TEAAc thermochemolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deport, C.; Lemee, L.; Ambles, A. [UMR-CNRS, Poitiers (France). Laboratoire de Synthese et Reactivite des Substances Naturelles

    2006-06-15

    Humic substances, mainly humic acids and humin, from a calcic peat (MP), an acid peat (CAL) and a calcic soil (MAT) were investigated. Important differences in the relative abundance of the various organic fractions were observed between the four samples. As shown by the HU/FA + HA ratio, the calcic peat contains the most humified organic matter, the degree of humification decreasing with pH. The organic matter in MAT was much less humified due to cultivation. Bulk information from spectroscopy showed similarities between the various humic acids and the various humins in the four samples: the presence of ester and ether groups, a marked aliphatic character and the presence of aromatic moieties. The major products of TMAH thermochemolysis were aromatic compounds derived from lignin, tannins and bark, and fatty acids of bacterial or plant origin, as the methyl esters (FAMEs). The compounds were mainly incorporated via ester or ether bonds and n-alkene/n-alkane doublets in the pyrolysate of CAL arose from resistant aliphatic biopolymers. The study of FAME distributions indicated that the bacterial contribution was higher in humic acids than in humin for all the samples. This contribution was much higher in MAT, as shown by prominent iso- and anteiso-C{sub 15} carboxylic acids and the presence of {alpha}-hydroxyacids. Bifunctional linear dicarboxylic acids were also incorporated into the humic structure (MAT and CAL), contributing to alkyl bridges. The C{sub 21}-C{sub 33} n-alkanes with a Gaussian distribution found in MAT and MP samples were initially retained in the humic structure via non-covalent bonds. TEAAc thermochemolysis showed that a fraction of the aliphatic acids (with a different distribution) was not covalently bound, having been sterically trapped in the humic structure. Trapped fatty acid methyl esters were minor. (author)

  9. Interaction between pesticides and humic substances from tropical coastal lagoons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HS that enter the lagoons with freshwater runoff tend to precipitate with salinity. Experiments were done in laboratory to determine the effect of HS (isolated from coastal lagoons) and humic acids (HA) (Aldrich) on the partition of selected pesticides between water and sediment phases. Due to the accurate results obtained with radio-labelled compounds, 14C-labelled pesticides were used for the experiments. The selected pesticides were: chlorpyrifos (o,o-di-[1-14C]ethyl o-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridil phosphorotioate), DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chloro-[ring-U-14C]-phenyl)ethane) and parathion (o,o-diethyl o-4-nitro-[ring-U-14C]-phenyl phosphorotioate)

  10. Structure-Property-Function Relationship in Humic Substances to Explain the Biological Activity in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Andrés Calderín; de Souza, Luiz Gilberto Ambrosio; Pereira, Marcos Gervasio; Castro, Rosane Nora; García-Mina, José María; Zonta, Everaldo; Lisboa, Francy Junior Gonçalves; Berbara, Ricardo Luis Louro

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge of the structure-property-function relationship of humic substances (HSs) is key for understanding their role in soil. Despite progress, studies on this topic are still under discussion. We analyzed 37 humic fractions with respect to their isotopic composition, structural characteristics, and properties responsible for stimulating plant root parameters. We showed that regardless of the source of origin of the carbon (C3 or C4), soil-extracted HSs and humic acids (HAs) are structurally similar to each other. The more labile and functionalized HS fraction is responsible for root emission, whereas the more recalcitrant and less functionalized HA fraction is related to root growth. Labile structures promote root stimulation at lower concentrations, while recalcitrant structures require higher concentrations to promote a similar stimulus. These findings show that lability and recalcitrance, which are derived properties of humic fractions, are related to the type and intensity of their bioactivity. In summary, the comparison of humic fractions allowed a better understanding of the relationship between the source of origin of plant carbon and the structure, properties, and type and intensity of the bioactivity of HSs in plants. In this study, scientific concepts are unified and the basis for the agronomic use of HSs is established.

  11. The role of humic substances in Pu(V) sorption onto low-temperature hematite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Actinides are found to interact strongly with humic substances (HS). HS play an important role in speciation of actinides due to complexing, redox and sportive interactions. This work is devoted to plutonium speciation studies on hematite (α-Fe2O3) -natural water interface in the presence of humic substances. Sorption of Pu(V) onto low-temperature hematite was studied in the presence of natural and synthetic humic acid (HA) at different concentrations of HA. The sorption was conducted at pH 6.0 - 6.1 in 0.01 M NH4ClO4 (as a background electrolyte) over the HA concentration range from 57.0 to 0.57 ppm. Solvent extraction revealed that all Pu adsorbed onto hematite surface in presence of HA was present in the Pu(IV) oxidation state. To study the reduction of Pu(V) by natural HS, humic and fulvic acids (FA) were eluted from sod-podzol and chernozem soils sampled near the 'Mayak' Production Association (Russia) using the conventional method, and separated into fractions in dependence on their nature (FA or HA), solubility and affinity for the mineral part of soil. The fractions of humic substances were then separated according to their molecular size for a more detail study of their reducing ability. The kinetic curves were obtained for each fraction and compared with the results obtained for synthetic HS. Based on the curve slope, the reducing ability increases in order: HA < FA < low molecular size fraction. The data obtained show that different HS can play different roles in Pu(V) migration ability due to the different reducing and complexing properties that allow us to estimate the influence of the different HS on the behaviour of actinides in an actual geological system (prevention or promotion of their sorption on minerals and clays) and, in turn, on their spreading in the environment

  12. Monitoring transitory profiles of leachate humic substances in landfill aeration reactors in mesophilic and thermophilic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Huanhuan [Residues and Resource Reclamation Centre, Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Cleantech Loop, CleanTech One, 637141 (Singapore); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Yin, Ke; Ge, Liya; Giannis, Apostolos [Residues and Resource Reclamation Centre, Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Cleantech Loop, CleanTech One, 637141 (Singapore); Chuan, Valerie W.L. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Jing-Yuan, E-mail: JYWANG@ntu.edu.sg [Residues and Resource Reclamation Centre, Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Cleantech Loop, CleanTech One, 637141 (Singapore); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Polymerization and condensation of humic substances (HS) were enhanced by aeration. • Carboxylic group was enriched in HS by aeration presenting improved hydrophilicity. • Mobility of humic acid, as a result was enhanced by aeration especially in young landfill. • Waste age plays an important role in leachate management during aeration. - Abstract: The presence of humic substances (HS) in landfill leachate is of great interest because of their structural stability and potential toxicity. This study examined the effects of temperature and waste age on the transformation of HS during in situ aeration of bioreactor landfills. By establishing aerobic conditions, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) rapidly accumulated in the bioreactor leachate. Fractional analysis showed that the elevated concentration of humic acids (HAs) was primarily responsible for the increment of leachate strength. Further structural characterization indicated that the molecular weight (MW) and aromacity of HS were enhanced by aeration in conjunction with thermophilic temperature. Interestingly, elevation of HAs concentration was not observed in the aeration reactor with a prolonged waste age, as the mobility of HAs was lowered by the high MW derived from extended waste age. Based on these results, aeration may be more favorable in aged landfills, since dissolution of HAs could be minimized by the evolution to larger MW compared to young landfills. Moreover, increased operation temperature during aeration likely offers benefits for the rapid maturation of HS.

  13. Distinguishing black carbon from biogenic humic substances in soil clay fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, D.A.; Chappell, M.A.; Martens, D.A.; Wershaw, R. L.; Thompson, M.

    2008-01-01

    Most models of soil humic substances include a substantial component of aromatic C either as the backbone of humic heteropolymers or as a significant component of supramolecular aggregates of degraded biopolymers. We physically separated coarse (0.2-2.0????m e.s.d.), medium (0.02-0.2????m e.s.d.), and fine (> 0.02????m e.s.d.) clay subfractions from three Midwestern soils and characterized the organic material associated with these subfractions using 13C-CPMAS-NMR, DTG, SEM-EDX, incubations, and radiocarbon age. Most of the C in the coarse clay subfraction was present as discrete particles (0.2-5????m as seen in SEM images) of black carbon (BC) and consisted of approximately 60% aromatic C, with the remainder being a mixture of aliphatic, anomeric and carboxylic C. We hypothesize that BC particles were originally charcoal formed during prairie fires. As the BC particles aged in soil their surfaces were oxidized to form carboxylic groups and anomeric and aliphatic C accumulated in the BC particles either by adsorption of dissolved biogenic compounds from the soil solution or by direct deposition of biogenic materials from microbes living within the BC particles. The biogenic soil organic matter was physically separated with the medium and fine clay subfractions and was dominated by aliphatic, anomeric, and carboxylic C. The results indicate that the biogenic humic materials in our soils have little aromatic C, which is inconsistent with the traditional heteropolymer model of humic substances.

  14. Monitoring transitory profiles of leachate humic substances in landfill aeration reactors in mesophilic and thermophilic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Polymerization and condensation of humic substances (HS) were enhanced by aeration. • Carboxylic group was enriched in HS by aeration presenting improved hydrophilicity. • Mobility of humic acid, as a result was enhanced by aeration especially in young landfill. • Waste age plays an important role in leachate management during aeration. - Abstract: The presence of humic substances (HS) in landfill leachate is of great interest because of their structural stability and potential toxicity. This study examined the effects of temperature and waste age on the transformation of HS during in situ aeration of bioreactor landfills. By establishing aerobic conditions, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) rapidly accumulated in the bioreactor leachate. Fractional analysis showed that the elevated concentration of humic acids (HAs) was primarily responsible for the increment of leachate strength. Further structural characterization indicated that the molecular weight (MW) and aromacity of HS were enhanced by aeration in conjunction with thermophilic temperature. Interestingly, elevation of HAs concentration was not observed in the aeration reactor with a prolonged waste age, as the mobility of HAs was lowered by the high MW derived from extended waste age. Based on these results, aeration may be more favorable in aged landfills, since dissolution of HAs could be minimized by the evolution to larger MW compared to young landfills. Moreover, increased operation temperature during aeration likely offers benefits for the rapid maturation of HS

  15. SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES EXTRACTED FROM WATER, SOIL AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES OF THE PATOS LAKE, MS, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio César R Azevedo, Mariana Carolina Teixeira e Jorge Nozaki

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Humic substances (HSs were extracted from samples collected in 4 areas of sediment, water and soil from Patos´ lake - MS. The humic substances from the water were extracted according to Thurman and Malcolm methods (1981 and, those from sediment and soil were extracted as proposed by the International Society of Humic Substances (ISHS. The following spectroscopic techniques were performed in this study: ultraviolet and visible (UV-Vis and fluorescence emission. The effects of ambient factors as concentration and variations of pH in fluorescence emission of humic substances (fulvic and humic acids were evaluated. It was observed that the UV-Vis technique and the intensity of emitted fluorescence from humic substances extracted from water has shown linear correlation with the variation of fulvic acid (7.3 the 35.5 mg L-1 and of humic acid (4.8 the 23.9 mg L-1 concentrations, considering just dissolved organic carbon. However, for pH variation (acid, neutral and alkaline media significant variations were not observed in both, UV-Vis and fluorescence emission techniques.

  16. Replenishment of the Reference Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter (NOM): Final Report on a Proposal to International Humic Substances Society

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on International Humic Substances Society findings of natural organic matter content along the Suwannee River sill in Southeastern Georgia.

  17. The molecular properties of humic substances isolated from a UK upland peat system: a temporal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, M J; Jones, M N; Woof, C; Simon, B; Tipping, E

    2001-12-01

    The study concerns the possible changes in the molecular characteristics of humic materials isolated from the same source as a function of time. A great deal of data has been reported concerning the contrast in molecular characteristics of humic substances isolated from different environments. This has primarily been an attempt to identify source-specific molecular characteristics. However, data presented in this paper suggests that humic substances isolated from a single catchment have significant changes in molecular characteristics over time. Two naturally occurring peat pools (X and Y) situated upon a small organic catchment on Great Dun Fell, Cumbria, UK were sampled monthly between November 1994 and November 1996. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the pool water samples was fractionated using macroporous nonionic resins (XAD8 and 4), and the humic, fulvic and hydrophilic acids were collected. These fractions were analysed for elemental composition (C, H and N), weight average molecular weight, functional group content and adsorption (340 nm) of a 1 g l(-1) solution measured in a 1-cm spectrophotometer cell. The molecular characteristics were compared to those of natural DOM described by Scott et al. (1998). Scott et al. reported that drought conditions and seasonal climatic changes could have appreciable effects upon molecular characteristics of natural DOM. Results showed that the atomic H/C ratio of the humic substances increased immediately after strong drought conditions experienced in the summer of 1995. This change was temporary with atomic H/C ratio decreasing gradually over the following months. A similar decrease was observed in the carboxyl group content of the isolated compounds. The data set suggested that atomic H/C ratio in the fulvic and hydrophilic fractions exhibited seasonal characteristics of higher ratios during the late summer/early autumn months. This was not observed in the humic fraction. Humic acids exhibited a seasonal pattern of

  18. Apparent formation constants of actinide complexes with humic substances determined by solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparent formation constants of Pu(IV) with two kinds of humic substances (HSs) were determined in 0.1M NaClO4 at 25°C using a back-solvent extraction method. The effect of solution conditions, such as the pH, the initial metal and HS concentrations, and the ionic strength, on the formation constants was investigated. The obtained data were compared with the other actinide series. (author)

  19. Enzymatic transformation and bonding of sulfonamide antibiotics to model humic substances

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 J. Schwarz et al. Sulfonamides are consumed as pharmaceutical antibiotics and reach agricultural soils with excreta used as fertilizer. Subsequently, nonextractable residues rapidly form in soil, which has been researched in a couple of studies. To further elucidate conditions, strength, and mechanisms of the fixation to soil humic substances, three selected sulfonamides were investigated using the biochemical oligomerization of substituted phenols as a model for the humification proce...

  20. EFFECT OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES AND PROBIOTICS ON GROWTH PERFORMANCE AND MEAT QUALITY OF RABBITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Parkányi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4  The aim of this work was determined effect of supplemental humic substances and probiotics on growth performance and meat quality of rabbits.  The growth performances were observed on two hundred and twelve growing rabbits assigned randomly by weight to two treatments. The treatments included: 1 Control group: in this group were rabbits fed with basal diet during all experiment (35th – 77th day, 2 experimental group: the animals were fed with basal diet+3kg/t humic substances – Humac Nature during whole experiment.  In this group was during fattening period (35th – 49th and 63rd – 70th days of age added to feed the probiotic preparation – Propoul (Lactobacillus fermentum CCM 7158 1x108 CFU 2 g per ten pieces. Body weight and feed intake were measured weekly in order to determine the average daily gain, average daily feed intake and gain/feed. The characteristics of meat quality were determined on twelve rabbit males at the age of 77 days, when the rabbits achieved average slaughter weight 2500g. Results of the whole experimental period showed that addition humic substances and probiotic preparation to the diet had positive effect (not significantly on intensity of growth live weight in the last phase of fattening period. The results of this study suggest that humic substances with probiotics might be utilized as a feed additive in the rabbit diet. It could not significantly improve growth performance and meat quality of rabbits.doi:10.5219/192 

  1. Supplementation with humic substances affects the innate immunity in layer hens in posfasting phase

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Sanmiguel P.; Iang Rondón B

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective. Asses the effect of supplementation with Humic substances (HS) over some innate immunity parameters (serum bactericidal activity, phagocytosis, bacterial agglutination, respiratory burst and lisozyme activity) in phase after fasting of layer hens. Materials and methods. 120 posfasting phase Hy Line Brown layer hens were taken which were distributed into four groups: The first and the second were supplemented with 0.1 and 0.2% of HS, respectively. The third group was suppl...

  2. Effect of Dissolved Humic Substances on the Photochemical Degradation Rate of 1-Aminopyrene and Atrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Yuzuri

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Humic substances (HS are ubiquitous in the environment, and can act as photosensitizers in the redox reactions of some photochemical processes. The influence of HS in these reactions varies with the HS type and concentration. The total organic carbon content (TOC of some commercial HS (such as soil and river humic acid, and fulvic acid was studied. 1-Aminopyrene (1-AP and 1-hydoxypyrene (1-HP are carcinogenic and slightly water-soluble polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH. The impact of PAH on natural environment is related to their photolysis rates and photoproducts; therefore, it is of interest to study the photolysis of these compounds. Our previous study showed that the photolysis rate of 1-HP was inhibited by HS. In this study, photolysis of 1-AP was conducted with pure water, natural river water, and pure water containing commercial HS. It was found that the photolysis rate of 1-AP can be inhibited or enhanced by HS, depending on the type and concentration. The first order photolysis rate constant of 1-AP (10 μM in phosphate buffer (pH 7.0, 1 mM containing a humic acid (20-80 ppm was enhanced by up to 5 folds. With a fulvic acid (20-80 ppm, it was enhanced by about 2 folds. With a soil humic acid, it was enhanced by about 2 folds at the concentration of 20 ppm and was inhibited by up to 4 folds at the concentration of 80 ppm. Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamine-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine is a widely used herbicide. It is toxic, often bioaccumulative and persistent. In this study, the effect of HS on the photochemical fate of atrazine was also studied. The results showed that photolysis of atrazine can be enhanced by humic acid, depending on the type and concentration of humic acid. The fulvic acid has no effect on its photolysis within 10 days.

  3. Diversity and ubiquity of bacteria capable of utilizing humic substances as electron donors for anaerobic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, John D; Cole, Kimberly A; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M; Achenbach, Laurie A

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHDS), an analog for reduced HS, as the electron donor with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic organisms capable of utilizing reduced HS as an electron donor were found in all environments tested and ranged from a low of 2.31 x 10(1) in aquifer sediments to a high of 9.33 x 10(6) in lake sediments. As part of this study we isolated six novel organisms capable of anaerobic AHDS oxidation. All of the isolates coupled the oxidation of AHDS to the reduction of nitrate with acetate (0.1 mM) as the carbon source. In the absence of cells, no AHDS oxidation was apparent, and in the absence of AHDS, no cell density increase was observed. Generally, nitrate was reduced to N(2). Analysis of the AHDS and its oxidized form, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), in the medium during growth revealed that the anthraquinone was not being biodegraded as a carbon source and was simply being oxidized as an energy source. Determination of the AHDS oxidized and nitrate reduced accounted for 109% of the theoretical electron transfer. In addition to AHDS, all of these isolates could also couple the oxidation of reduced humic substances to the reduction of nitrate. No HS oxidation occurred in the absence of cells and in the absence of a suitable electron acceptor, demonstrating that these organisms were capable of utilizing natural HS as an energy source and that AHDS serves as a suitable analog for studying this metabolism. Alternative electron donors included

  4. Metal distribution and spectroscopic analysis after soil washing with chelating agents and humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Hartley, Neil R

    2014-03-01

    Biodegradable chelating agents ([S,S]-ethylenediamine-N,N-disuccinic acid (EDDS) and glutamic-N,N-diacetic acid (GLDA)) and natural humic substances (lignite-derived, standard, and commercially available humic acids) are potentially useful for enhancing soil remediation of timber treatment sites. This study integrated macroscopic and spectroscopic analyses to assess their influence on the distribution and chemical speciation of the remaining metals as well as their interaction with the soil surface after 48-h washing of a field-contaminated soil. The results demonstrated that EDDS and GLDA were an appealing alternative to non-biodegradable ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid, but the three humic substances were less effective. As shown by sequential extractions, Cu was primarily extracted from the carbonate fraction while Cr and As extraction resulted from (co-)dissolution of the oxide fraction. As a result, the relative proportion of strongly bound organic matter and residual fractions increased by 7-16 %. However, it was noteworthy that the exchangeable fraction also increased by 5-11 %, signifying that a portion of the remaining metals was destabilized by chelating agents and transformed to be more labile in the treated soil. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra confirmed the substantial removal of readily accessible Cu from the soil surface, but Cr maintained its original chemical forms of trivalent chromium oxides and iron-chromium coprecipitates, whereas As remained as arsenic trioxide/pentoxide and copper arsenate precipitates. On the other hand, the absence of characteristic peaks of adsorbed carboxylate groups in the Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra inferred that the extent of adsorption of chelating agents and humic substances on the bulk soil was insufficient to be characterized by FTIR analysis. These results suggested that attention should be paid to the exchangeable fraction of Cu and oxides/coprecipitates of As prior to possible on

  5. Spectral and temporal luminescent properties of Eu(III) in humic substance solutions from different origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevet, Julien; Claret, Francis; Reiller, Pascal E

    2009-10-01

    Although a high heterogeneity of composition is awaited for humic substances, their complexation properties do not seem to greatly depend on their origins. The information on the difference in the structure of these complexes is scarce. To participate in the filling of this lack, a study of the spectral and temporal evolution of the Eu(III) luminescence implied in humic substance (HS) complexes is presented. Seven different extracts, namely Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and humic acid (SRHA), and Leonardite HA (LHA) from the International Humic Substances Society (USA), humic acid from Gorleben (GohyHA), and from the Kleiner Kranichsee bog (KFA, KHA) from Germany, and purified commercial Aldrich HA (PAHA), were made to contact with Eu(III). Eu(III)-HS time-resolved luminescence properties were compared with aqueous Eu(3+) at pH 5. Using an excitation wavelength of 394 nm, the typical bi-exponential luminescence decay for Eu(III)-HS complexes is common to all the samples. The components tau(1) and tau(2) are in the same order of magnitude for all the samples, i.e., 40 (7)F(2) transition exhibits the most striking differences. A slight blue shift is observed compared to aqueous Eu(3+) (lambda(max) = 615.4 nm), and the humic samples share almost the same lambda(max) approximately 614.5 nm. The main differences between the samples reside in a shoulder around lambda approximately 612.5 nm, modelled by a mixed Gaussian-Lorentzian band around lambda approximately 612 nm. SRFA shows the most intense shoulder with an intensity ratio of I(612.5)/I(614.7) = 1.1, KFA/KHA/SRHA share almost the same ratio I(612.5)/I(614.7) = 1.2-1.3, whilst the LHA/GohyHA/PAHA group has a I(612.5)/I(614.5) = 1.5-1.6. This shows that for the two groups of complexes, despite comparable complexing properties, slightly different symmetries are awaited. PMID:19632145

  6. Root growth of tomato seedlings intensified by humic substances from peat bogs

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    Alexandre Christofaro Silva

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Peats are an important reserve of humified carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. The interest in the use of humic substances as plant growth promoters is continuously increasing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioactivity of alkaline soluble humic substances (HS, humic (HA and fulvic acids (FA isolated from peats with different decomposition stages of organic matter (sapric, fibric and hemic in the Serra do Espinhaço Meridional, state of Minas Gerais. Dose-response curves were established for the number of lateral roots growing from the main plant axis of tomato seedlings. The bioactivity of HA was greatest (highest response in lateral roots at lowest concentration while FA did not intensify root growth. Both HS and HA stimulated root hair formation. At low concentrations, HS and HA induced root hair formation near the root cap, a typical hormonal imbalance effect in plants. Transgenic tomato with reporter gene DR5::GUS allowed the observation that the auxin-related signalling pathway was involved in root growth promotion by HA.

  7. Interaction between uranium and humic acid (II): complexation, precipitation and migration behavior of U(VI) in the presence of humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexation, precipitation, and migration behavior of uranium in the presence of humic acid (HA) or fulvic acid (FA) were investigated by cation exchange, ultrafiltration and dynamic experiment, respectively. The results showed that (i) complex equilibrium between the uranium and humic substances was achieved at approximately 72 h, (ii) the coordination number varied from 1:1 to 1:2 (U(VI): humic acid) as pH increased from 3 to 6; and (iii), while the complex stability constant decreased when temperature increased, but increased with pH value. We found that the precipitation of uranyl could only be observed in presence of HA, and the precipitation was influenced by conditions, such as pH, uranium concentration, temperature, and the HA concentration. The maximum precipitation proportion up to 60% could be achieved in the condition of 40 mg/L HA solution at pH 6. We further observed that the migration behavior of uranium in soil in the presence of humic acid (HA) or fulvic acid (FA) was different from that in the presence of inorganic colloid, and the effect of humic substances (HS) was limited. (authors)

  8. Structure-reactivity relationships in the interactions between humic substances, pollutants from the nuclear cycle, and mineral surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document proposes an analysis of the structure-reactivity relationships in the interaction between humic substances, metallic pollutants from the nuclear cycle, and mineral surfaces. It composes the scientific document, which allowed the author to defend a Habilitation degree. It is mainly focused on the research works into which the author have been involved in on this particular thematic. Humic substances are issued from the degradation of the living. They have an important influence onto migration of metals in the environment. They are showing particular intrinsic physic and chemical, metal complexation, and adsorption onto mineral surfaces properties, which render the global comprehension of the different mechanisms somehow difficult. These three aspects are covered in this document. The first part is dedicated to the studies on composition, structure, and organization of humic substances, which cannot be considered as a well-defined type of chemical. They are a heterogeneous degradation product with a supramolecular organization, which is showing fractal properties from fractions up to several nanometers. Second part is on the complexation reactions. The different modelling strategies come from the difficulties on apprehending composition, structure, and organization of humic substances. The different models used are showing more or less strongly empiric characteristics. They can be derived from the mass action law, or explicitly account for heterogeneity, acid-basic, or ionic strength related parameters. The third and latter part covers the adsorption studies. The main property is adsorptive fractionation, which induces modification of chemical composition of humic substances between the surface and the solution. It also induces modification of complexation properties between the adsorbed and non-adsorbed fractions. Because of adsorptive fractionation, and the particular influence of ionic strength on humic substances, and of complexed metals, adsorption

  9. Chemiluminescent determination of humic substances based on the oxidation by peroxymonosulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intensity of emission radiation produced by humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) in the presence of SO52- in basic medium was used to determine HA and FA in the range of 0.5-20.0 mg l-1. The detection limit was 0.24 mg l-1. A comparative study was carried out using H2O2 in the presence of CH2O as oxidizing agent. Humic substances (HS) from several soil sources, different extraction and purifying procedures led to different calibration sensitivities and selectivity. Cations and anions such as Cu(II), Cr(III), Ca(II), Cl-, EDTA2-, NO3-, PO43- and CO32-, did not interfere with the determination of HA. Although it was not possible to confirm the accuracy of the chemiluminescent method, low concentrations of HS in natural waters can be detected

  10. Effect of utlrasonics on reduction-oxidation properties of Kansk-Achinsk brown coal humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandelaki, G.I.; Aleksandrov, I.V.; Kamneva, A.I.

    1988-09-01

    Carries out complex assessment of reduction-oxidation properties of humic acids obtained from brown coal, and establishes effect of ultrasonic treatment on changes in redox characteristics during storage. The investigations into redox properties of potassium humate solutions included the study of chemical activity of preparations separated from Kansk-Achinsk brown coal with various oxidation characteristics. Discusses tests carried out into the dynamics of reduction-oxidation potential changes during storage. States that reduction-oxidation systems in potassium humates separated from ultrasonically treated coal differ in chemical activity to those in humates separated from coal without ultrasonic treatment and indicates that oxidizing potential parameters chacterize redox properties of humic substances. Shows that spontaneous increase in reduction-oxidation potential of humate solutions occurs regardless of humate separation methods. 11 refs.

  11. Investigating Nitrate-Dependent Humic Substance Oxidation and In-Service K-12 Teachers' Understanding of Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nastassia N.

    2011-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) are the humified portions of totally decomposed soil organic matter that are ubiquitous in nature. Although these substances have been studied for more than 200 years, neither their metabolic capabilities nor a specific chemical structure has yet to be determined. HS have been studied as a carbon source in many environments…

  12. Influence of humic acids on the migration behavior of radioactive and non-radioactive substances under conditions close to nature. Synthesis, radiometric determination of functional groups, complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction behavior of humic acids with uranium(VI) and the influence of humic substances on the migration behavior of uranium was investigated. A main focus of this work was the synthesis of four different humic acid model substances and their characterization and comparison to the natural humic acid from Aldrich. A radiometric method for the determination of humic acid functional groups was applied in addition to conventional methods for the determination of the functionality of humic acids. The humic acid model substances show functional and structural properties comparable to natural humic acids. Modified humic acids with blocked phenolic OH were synthesized to determine the influence of phenolic OH groups on the complexation behavior of humic acids. A synthesis method for 14C-labeled humic acids with high specific activity was developed. The complexation behavior of synthetic and natural humic acids with uranium(VI) was investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. The synthetic model substances show an interaction behavior with uranium(VI) that is comparable to natural humic acids. This points to the fact that the synthetic humic acids simulate the functionality of their natural analogues very well. For the first time the influence of phenolic OH groups on the complexation behavior of humic acids was investigated by applying a modified humic acid with blocked phenolic OH groups. The formation of a uranyl hydroxy humate complex was identified by laserspectroscopic investigations of the complexation of Aldrich humic acid with uranium(VI) at pH7. The migration behavior of uranium in a sandy aquifer system rich in humic substances was investigated in column experiments. A part of uranium migrates non-retarded through the sediment, bound to humic colloids. The uranium migration behavior is strongly influenced by the kinetically controlled interaction processes of uranium with the humic colloids

  13. Rapid method for separation of bacterial DNA from humic substances in sediments for polymerase chain reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Y L; Olson, B H

    1992-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify an Escherichia coli 16S ribosomal gene fragment from sediments with high contents of humic substances. Total DNA was extracted from 1 g of E. coli seeded or unseeded samples by a rapid freeze-and-thaw method. Several approaches (use of Bio-Gel P-6 and P-30 and Sephadex G-50 and G-200 columns, as well as use of the Stoffel fragment) were used to reduce interference with the PCR. The best results were obtained when crude DNA extracts conta...

  14. Chemical speciation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediments: Partitioning and extraction of humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the chemical speciation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in sediments endowed with different characteristics. To achieve this purpose and because the nature of the sediments influences the distribution of PAHs, we have analyzed four different types of sediments. To study the role of organic matter in the sequestration of PAHs, we fractionated humic substances into humic acids and humin-mineral fractions. After their separation and purification, the humic components were examined for their sorptive reactivity by extracting them with organic solvents; these extracts were subsequently subjected to GC/MS analysis. Our results show that PAHs are distributed between labile and sequestered fractions in sediments. A slower uptake of PAHs occurs when the sequestered fraction is formed, and this process can be prolonged and may be influenced by the characteristics if the sediment. Our study suggests that organic contaminants are available in muddy sediments for a longer period of time than in sandy sediments.

  15. Lanthanide humic substances complexation. I. Experimental evidence for a lanthanide contraction effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonke, Jeroen E.; Salters, Vincent J. M.

    2006-03-01

    The interaction of the lanthanides (Ln) with humic substances (HS) was investigated with a novel chemical speciation tool, Capillary Electrophoresis-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (CE-ICP-MS). By using an EDTA-ligand competition method, a bi-modal species distribution of LnEDTA and LnHS is attained, separated by CE, and detected online by sector field ICP-MS. We quantified the binding of all 14 rare earth elements (REEs), Sc and Y with Suwannee river fulvic acid, Leonardite coal humic acid, and Elliot soil humic acid under environmental conditions (pH 6-9, 0.001-0.1 mol L -1 NaNO 3, 1-1000 nmol L -1 Ln, 10-20 mg L -1 HS). Conditional binding constants for REE-HS interaction ( Kc) ranged from 8.9 acids, we suggest that HS form a range of tri- to tetra-dentate complexes under environmental conditions. These results confirm HS to be a strong complexing agent for Ln, and show rigorous experimental evidence for potential REE fractionation by HS complexation.

  16. The physico-chemical properties and biostimulative activities of humic substances regenerated from lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Jan; Smejkalová, Daniela; Hudecová, Sárka; Zmeškal, Oldřich; von Wandruszka, Ray; Gregor, Tomáš; Kučerík, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    The positive effect of humic acids on the growth of plant roots is well known, however, the mechanisms and role of their physical structure in these processes have not been fully explained yet. In this work, South-Moravian lignite was oxidized by means of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to produce a set of regenerated humic acids. The elemental composition, solid state stability and solution characteristics were determined and correlated in vitro with their biological activity. A modified hydroponic method was applied to determine the effects of their potassium salts on Zea mays seedlings roots with respect to the plant weight, root length, root division, and starch and protein content. The relations between the determined parameters were evaluated through Principal Component Analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficients. The results indicated that the most important factor determining the biological activity of South-Moravian lignite potassium humates is related to the nature of self-assemblies, while the chemical composition had no direct connection with the root growth of Zea mays seedlings. It was demonstrated a controlled processing that provided humic substances with different chemical and physicochemical properties and variable biological activity. PMID:24790812

  17. Enzymatic Transformation and Bonding of Sulfonamide Antibiotics to Model Humic Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schwarz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfonamides are consumed as pharmaceutical antibiotics and reach agricultural soils with excreta used as fertilizer. Subsequently, nonextractable residues rapidly form in soil, which has been researched in a couple of studies. To further elucidate conditions, strength, and mechanisms of the fixation to soil humic substances, three selected sulfonamides were investigated using the biochemical oligomerization of substituted phenols as a model for the humification process. Catechol, guaiacol, and vanillin were enzymatically reacted using laccase from Trametes versicolor. In the presence of the substituted phenols alone, the concentration of sulfonamides decreased. This decrease was even more pronounced when additional laccase was present. Upon the enzymatic oligomerization of the substituted phenols to a humic-like structure the sulfonamides were sorbed, transformed, sequestered, and nonextractable bound. Sulfonamides were transformed depending on their molecular properties. Fractions of different bonding strength were determined using a sequential extraction procedure. Isolated nonextractable products were analyzed by chromatographic, spectroscopic, and calorimetric methods to identify coupling and bonding mechanisms of the sulfonamides. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements suggested cross-linking of such incorporated sulfonamides in humic oligomers. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements showed clear differences between the vanillin-sulfapyridine oligomer and the parent sulfapyridine indicating bound residue formation through covalent binding.

  18. Fouling of a microfiltration membrane by humic-like substances: a mathematical approach to modelling permeate flux and membrane retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorasgari, Eskandar; Farsi, Ali; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2016-01-01

    Membrane retention of the humic-like substances present in a soluble microbial products (SMP) suspension was studied by using a dead-end filtration system. The SMP suspension was extracted from the sludge of an enhanced biological phosphorus removal-membrane bioreactor. Our results showed that both adsorption and steric retention of the humic-like substances governed their transport through the membrane during the filtration. The adsorption, which followed pseudo-first order kinetics, did not cause substantial decline of permeate flux. The steric retention, on the other hand, formed a gel layer, which in turn led to a major decrease in the flux. The reduction of permeate flux was well predicted by cake filtration theory. Based on the adsorption and the steric retention, a new model was developed for predicting the overall membrane retention of the humic-like substances. The general trend of the modelled overall retention was in partial agreement with the experimental results. PMID:27332850

  19. Quantitative and mid-infrared changes of humic substances from burned soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnoux, A; Guiliano, M; Di Rocco, R; Domeizel, M; Théraulaz, F; Doumenq, P

    2011-02-01

    The humic substances are an abundant and important part of soil organic matter which plays many roles in ecosystems. On the other hand, forest fires are known to have a potential impact on the soil organic matter. Consequently, we chose to study the impact of forest fires on humic substances and the three relevant fractions, e.g. humic acids (HA), fulvic acids (FA) and non-humified fraction (NHF), NHF being the fulvic acids not adsorbed on XAD-8 resins. The studied site is a Mediterranean forest called "Maures Mountains", in France, where 30 sites were sampled in two layers: 0-5 and -5 to 15 cm. In order to validate the method, the 2 horizons from 5 sites randomly chosen were analyzed in triplicates. The extraction and fractionation procedures were achieved using alkali- and acid-solutions. The measurement of total organic carbon (TOC) using the TOC-meter and the use of Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy gave us quantitative and qualitative results to evaluate the impact of forest fires and the role of their repetition. The results show that the fires led to significant decreases (Student test, P=0.05) of humic substances (HS), HA and of the fulvic fractions (FF=FA+NHF) in surface layers, corresponding to 40%, 34% and 35%, respectively. Moreover, the significant HA/FF ratio increases (Student test, P=0.05), as a result of the fire, indicate that NHF was probably transformed in FA-like compounds. About the qualitative impact, the results showed a significant decrease of alkyl and hydroxyl groups (OH), carboxylic acids and carbohydrates in HA after a wildfire, whereas the decrease was significant only for alkyl groups and carboxylic acids in FA. Lastly, the design of this work (control and burned sites, number of samples, time elapsed after fires, etc.) enables one to show the recovery of the Mediterranean forest ecosystem. FA quality and OH groups in HA are recovered between 3 and 16 years after the fire whereas alkyl groups, carboxylic acids and

  20. Humic substances and its distribution in coffee crop under cover crops and weed control methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Henrique Martins

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Humic substances (HS comprise the passive element in soil organic matter (SOM, and represent one of the soil carbon pools which may be altered by different cover crops and weed control methods. This study aimed to assess HS distribution and characteristics in an experimental coffee crop area subjected to cover crops and cultural, mechanical, and chemical weed control. The study was carried out at Londrina, in the state of Paraná, southern Brazil (23°21’30” S; 51°10’17” W. In 2008, seven weed control/cover crops were established in a randomized block design between two coffee rows as the main-plot factor per plot and soil sampling depths (0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm and 30-40 cm as a split-plot. HS were extracted through alkaline and acid solutions and analyzed by chromic acid wet oxidation and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Chemical attributes presented variations in the topsoil between the field conditions analyzed. Cover crop cutting and coffee tree pruning residues left on the soil surface may have interfered in nutrient cycling and the humification process. Data showed that humic substances comprised about 50 % of SOM. Although different cover crops and weed control methods did not alter humic and fulvic acid carbon content, a possible incidence of condensed aromatic structures at depth increments in fulvic acids was observed, leading to an average decrease of 53 % in the E4/E6 ratio. Humin carbon content increased 25 % in the topsoil, particularly under crop weed-control methods, probably due to high incorporation of recalcitrant structures from coffee tree pruning residues and cover crops.

  1. Liquid organomineral fertilizer containing humic substances on soybean grown under water stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo R. V. Prado

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study evaluated the effect of an organomineral fertilizer enriched with humic substances on soybean grown under water stress. The experiment was performed in a greenhouse using a Red Latosol (Oxisol with adequate fertility as substrate, in which soybean plants were cultivated with and without water stress. The experimental design was randomized blocks, in a 2 x 5 factorial scheme (two moisture levels and five fertilizer doses: 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mL dm-3, totaling 10 treatments, with four replicates. The organomineral fertilizer was applied in the soil 21 days after plant emergence and the water regimes were established one week thereafter. The fertilizer was not able to attenuate the effects of water stress, reducing soybean grain yield by more than 50% compared with plants cultivated under no stress. Fertilizer doses caused positive response on soybean nutrition and grain yield and, under water stress condition, the most efficient dose was 5.4 mL dm-3. There were lower leaf concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium and higher concentrations of sulfur in plants under stress. Humic substances favor the absorption of micronutrients.

  2. Improving Lowland Rice (O. sativa L. cv. MR219 Plant Growth Variables, Nutrients Uptake, and Nutrients Recovery Using Crude Humic Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perumal Palanivell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High cation exchange capacity and organic matter content of crude humic substances from compost could be exploited to reduce ammonia loss from urea and to as well improve rice growth and soil chemical properties for efficient nutrients utilization in lowland rice cultivation. Close-dynamic air flow system was used to determine the effects of crude humic substances on ammonia volatilization. A pot experiment was conducted to determine the effects of crude humic substances on rice plant growth, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil chemical properties using an acid soil mixed with three rates of crude humic substances (20, 40, and 60 g pot−1. Standard procedures were used to evaluate rice plant dry matter production, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil chemical properties. Application of crude humic substances increased ammonia volatilization. However, the lowest rate of crude humic substances (20 g pot−1 significantly improved total dry matter, nutrients uptake, nutrients recovery, and soil nutrients availability compared with crude humic substances (40 and 60 g pot−1 and the normal fertilization. Apart from improving growth of rice plants, crude humic substances can be used to ameliorate acid soils in rice cultivation. The findings of this study are being validated in our ongoing field trials.

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for quality assessment of humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguta, Patrycja

    2016-04-01

    *The studies were partly carried out within the framework of a research project. The project was financed from funds of National Science Center on the base of decision number DEC-2013/11/D/NZ9/02545. Fluorescence spectroscopy belongs to modern, non-destructive, rapid and relatively cheap methods, as well as for many years it was successfully used in studies of organic compounds in the fields of medicine, biology and chemistry. On the other hand, soil organic matter is a group of compounds with a complex spatial structure showing a large number of groups with different kinds of fluorophores. This could suggest the possibility of application of fluorescence spectroscopy in assessing the quality of humic substances as well as in monitoring of their chemical transformations. The aim of study was chemical description of humic and fulvic acids based on fluorescence spectra, as well as an attempt of evaluation of changes occurring under the influence of different pH and during interactions with various concentrations of metal. The humic and fulvic acids were isolated from chemically different soils. The measurements were carried out on Hitachi fluorescence spectrometer in solutions with a concentration of humic acids 40mg dm-3, at pH from 3 to 7, and for the evaluation of the metal impact: with increasing Zn concentrations (0-50mg dm-3). The fluorescence spectra were recorded in the form of synchronous and emission-excitation matrices (EEM). Studies have shown the presence of different groups of fluorophores. Synchronous spectra were characterized by a well-separated bands showing fluorescence in the area of low, medium and high wavelengths, suggesting the presence of structures, both weakly and strongly humified. EEM spectra revealed map of fluorophores within wide ranges of emission and excitation. Fluorophores differed in both position and intensity. The highest intensity was observed for compounds with the lowest humification degree which might be due to high amount

  4. Selectivity and efficiency of three extracting agents in the extraction of humic substances in amazonic soils, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the soil humic substances requires its separation from the mineral fraction. To accomplish this diverse methods and procedures based specially on the extractant efficiency have been used. Different results have been obtained according to the method used. In order to know the efficiency and selectivity of extraction of the humic substances, successive extractions with sodium tetraborate, sodium pyrophosphate and sodium hydroxide, in comparison to the sodium hydroxide used as only extractant were carried out. The study was performed in the Oa horizons of two argillaceous soils: typical paleudults and typical Dystrudepts and in the Oi, Oe, Oa and Ch horizons of a sandy soil classified as typical quartzipsamments, all located in the Lomerio in the Amazon Department, Colombia. The results indicated greater rate of carbon extraction and greater selectivity by means of the successive extractions than the obtained with the sodium hydroxideas only extractant. The highest rate of total extraction was obtained in sandy soils T. Quartzipsamments. The E4/E6 ratios values of the obtained extracts, allowed to state minor degree of condensation of humic acids of the typical quartzipsamments than those of argillaceous: T Dystrudepts, Typic Paleudults and Ch horizons T. Quartzipsamments. The highest value of total acidity was found in the Typical Quartzipsamments using NaOH in successive extractions after sodium tetraborate and sodium pyrophosphate; this amount was minor when this extractant was used alone. There were greater differences of total acidity obtained humic substances by means of the successive extraction, in relation to the obtained one with NaOH like only extractant, but was not seen definite tendency the selective extractions with the acidity. Among the humic substances obtained by means of successive extraction there were greater differences of total acidity values than among the humic substances obtained using NaOH as only extractant. However a defined

  5. Measuring and modeling the hygroscopic growth of two humic substances in mixed aerosol particles of atmospheric relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Zamora

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The hygroscopic growth of atmospheric particles affects atmospheric chemistry and Earth's climate. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC constitutes a significant fraction of the dry submicron mass of atmospheric aerosols, thus affecting their water uptake properties. Although the WSOC fraction is comprised of many compounds, a set of model substances can be used to describe its behavior. For this study, mixtures of Nordic aquatic fulvic acid reference (NAFA and Fluka humic acid (HA, with various combinations of inorganic salts (sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate and other representative organic compounds (levoglucosan and succinic acid, were studied. We measured the equilibrium water vapor pressure over bulk solutions of these mixtures as a function of temperature and solute concentration. New water activity (aw parameterizations and hygroscopic growth curves at 25 °C were calculated from these data for particles of equivalent composition. We examined the effect of temperature on the water activity and found a maximum variation of 9% in the 0–30 °C range, and 2% in the 20–30 °C range. Five two-component mixtures were studied to understand the effect of adding a humic substance (HS, such as NAFA and HA, to an inorganic salt or a saccharide. The deliquescence point at 25 °C for HS-inorganic mixtures did not change significantly from that of the pure inorganic species. However, the hygroscopic growth of HA / inorganic mixtures was lower than that exhibited by the pure salt, in proportion to the added mass of HA. The addition of NAFA to a highly soluble solute (ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride or levoglucosan in water had the same effect as the addition of HA to the inorganic species for most of the water activity range studied. Yet, the water uptake of these NAFA mixtures transitioned to match the growth of the pure salt or saccharide at high aw values. The remaining four mixtures were based on chemical composition data for different

  6. Humic substances in natural waters and their complexation with trace metals and radionuclides: a review. [129 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boggs, S. Jr.; Livermore, D.; Seitz, M.G.

    1985-07-01

    Dissolved humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) occur in surface waters and groundwaters in concentrations ranging from less than 1 mg(C)/L to more than 100 mg(C)/L. Humic substances are strong complexing agents for many trace metals in the environment and are also capable of forming stable soluble complexes or chelates with radionuclides. Concentrations of humic materials as low as 1 mg(C)/L can produce a detectable increase in the mobility of some actinide elements by forming soluble complexes that inhibit sorption of the radionuclides onto rock materials. The stability of trace metal- or radionuclide-organic complexes is commonly measured by an empirically determined conditional stability constant (K'), which is based on the ratio of complexed metal (radionuclide) in solution to the product concentration of uncomplexed metal and humic complexant. Larger values of stability constants indicate greater complex stability. The stability of radionuclide-organic complexes is affected both by concentration variables and envionmental factors. In general, complexing is favored by increased of radionuclide, increased pH, and decreased ionic strength. Actinide elements are generally most soluble in their higher oxidation states. Radionuclides can also form stable, insoluble complexes with humic materials that tend to reduce radionuclide mobility. These insoluble complexes may be radionuclide-humate colloids that subsequently precipitate from solution, or complexes of radionuclides and humic substances that sorb to clay minerals or other soil particulates strongly enough to immobilize the radionuclides. Colloid formation appears to be favored by increased radionuclide concentration and lowered pH; however, the conditions that favor formation of insoluble complexes that sorb to particulates are still poorly understood. 129 refs., 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  7. Discrete fragment model for apparent formation constants of actinide ions with humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Yoshida, Hatsumi; Aoyama, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Taishi; Takagi, Ikuji [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Moriyama, Hirotake [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    2015-09-01

    A semi-empirical thermodynamic model was applied to estimate the apparent formation constants of actinide ions, i.e., Th(IV), Pu(IV) and Np(V), with humic substances (HSs), including humic and fulvic acids, over a wide range of solution conditions, i.e., pH, ionic strength, and HS and metal concentrations. The hypothetical HSs consist of humic and fulvic acids with nine types of simple organic ligands, which include aromatic and aliphatic carboxyl groups and phenol groups, as binding sites. The abundance of each binding site in the hypothetical HSs was determined via a fitting analysis using an acid-dissociation dataset for several HSs. To determine the apparent formation constant of a given metal ion with HSs, 54 specific binding sites were considered, including nine monodentate sites (1:1 metal/ligand complexes) and 45 bidentate sites (1:2 metal/ligand complexes). The formation constant of each monodentate binding was determined from the experimental data, while those of the bidentate bindings were determined by considering two monodentate bindings and the chelating effect, for which one of the adjustable parameters was introduced in the model. Introduction of the other parameter, which is related to the fraction of monodentate to bidentate sites (i.e., the heterogeneity), afforded the parameter values with good correlation with the apparent formation constant data. The present model with adjusted parameter values well reproduced the experimental apparent complex formation constants for actinide ion interaction with HSs in a wide range of solution conditions except for those obtained at trace concentrations.

  8. Discrete fragment model for apparent formation constants of actinide ions with humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A semi-empirical thermodynamic model was applied to estimate the apparent formation constants of actinide ions, i.e., Th(IV), Pu(IV) and Np(V), with humic substances (HSs), including humic and fulvic acids, over a wide range of solution conditions, i.e., pH, ionic strength, and HS and metal concentrations. The hypothetical HSs consist of humic and fulvic acids with nine types of simple organic ligands, which include aromatic and aliphatic carboxyl groups and phenol groups, as binding sites. The abundance of each binding site in the hypothetical HSs was determined via a fitting analysis using an acid-dissociation dataset for several HSs. To determine the apparent formation constant of a given metal ion with HSs, 54 specific binding sites were considered, including nine monodentate sites (1:1 metal/ligand complexes) and 45 bidentate sites (1:2 metal/ligand complexes). The formation constant of each monodentate binding was determined from the experimental data, while those of the bidentate bindings were determined by considering two monodentate bindings and the chelating effect, for which one of the adjustable parameters was introduced in the model. Introduction of the other parameter, which is related to the fraction of monodentate to bidentate sites (i.e., the heterogeneity), afforded the parameter values with good correlation with the apparent formation constant data. The present model with adjusted parameter values well reproduced the experimental apparent complex formation constants for actinide ion interaction with HSs in a wide range of solution conditions except for those obtained at trace concentrations.

  9. Comparable investigation of the molecular size distribution and the amount of humic substances isolated from ONKALO, Olkiluoto, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luste, S.; Maekelae, J.; Manninen, P. [Ramboll Finland Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    The humic substances (HS) at groundwater from ONKALO, Olkiluoto were studied in order to determine the apparent molecular size distribution and the amount of humic substances. Humic substances were isolated from the water sample using DAX-8 resin and eluted with 0.1 M NaOH. The molecular size distribution was defined using high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and ultraviolet (UV) and refractive index (RI) detector. In the SEC calibration (polystyrene sulfonate) sodium salts (PSS) were employed. Different eluents (NaNO{sub 3}, Na-acetate and asetonitrile) with phosphate buffer and distinct ionic strengths were studied in order to optimize the determination method. The amount of humic substances was determined using total organic carbon (TOC) measurements. The results were compared with the previous ones in order to find out the variation of different methods (HPSEC) and to follow up the HS quantity (TOC). The method developed during the study is considered to be suitable for the HS molecular size distribution follow up, although the method development is suggested to be continued. (orig.)

  10. A humic substance analogue AQDS stimulates Geobacter sp. abundance and enhances pentachlorophenol transformation in a paddy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Manjia; Tong, Hui; Liu, Chengshuai; Chen, Dandan; Li, Fangbai; Qiao, Jiangtao

    2016-10-01

    Soil humic substances can be used as redox mediators in accelerating the biotransformation of organic pollutants, and humus-respiring bacteria are widely distributed in soils. However, the impact of humic substances on the soil microbial community during the biotransformation of organic pollutants is expected to be crucial while remains to be unclear. In this study, the biostimulation of indigenous microbial communities and the consequent effects on anaerobic transformation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by a model humic substance, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), were systematically investigated in a paddy soil. The addition of AQDS was observed to increase the production of HCl-extractable Fe(II) and enhance the PCP transformation rates consequently. The pseudo-first-order rate constants of the PCP transformation showed a positive exponential relationship with the AQDS dosage. The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) results indicated the substantial effect of added AQDS on soil microbial community. The enhanced abundance of Geobacter sp. was disclosed to be most critical for accelerated PCP transformation when with AQDS, in which Geobacter sp. functioned for promoting the generation of active Fe(II) and consequently enhancing the PCP transformation rates. The transformation rates of PCP were exponentially correlated with the abundance of Geobacter sp. positively. The findings are expected to improve the understanding of diversity and ubiquity of microorganisms in humic substances-rich soils for accelerating the transformations of soil chlorinated pollutants. PMID:27372263

  11. Electrophoresis and size-exclusion chromatography of humic substances extracted from detritus and soils of different geneses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskaya, O. E.; Trubetskoi, O. A.; Borisov, B. A.; Ganzhara, N. F.

    2008-02-01

    Electrophoresis in 10% polyacrylamide gel in the presence of denaturants and size-exclusion chromatography in Sephadex G-75 in 7 M urea were used for the comparative analysis of humic substances isolated from a typical chernozem, soddy-podzolic soil, and chestnut soil and from the easily decomposable organic matter (plant detritus) contained in these soils. After the electrophoresis, the gel with naturally colored bands of humic substances was further stained with a dye specific for proteins by immersing into a solution containing Coomassie Brilliant Blue R-250 and CuSO4. The electrophoretic and chromatographic analyses showed that humic substances from the soils and the corresponding detritus fractions significantly differed in the intensity of the natural color of the electrophoretic fractions, the molecular-weight distribution, and the color of the electrophoretic fractions colored by the protein-specific dye (which was first discovered in this study). The hypothesis of Tyurin and Aleksandrova suggesting that the transformation of humus sources (plant detritus) into humic substances proceeds in the direction from the high-molecular compounds to the low-molecular compounds was experimentally confirmed.

  12. PREDICTING CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF HUMIC SUBSTANCES FOR MINERALS AND XENOBIOTICS: USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY AND VIRTUAL REALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this chapter we review the literature on scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (VR), and computational chemistry and our earlier work dealing with modeling lignin, lignin-carbohydrate complexes (LCC), humic substances (HSs) and non-bonded organo-mineral interactions...

  13. The influence of agitation on aggregates formed during treatment of water with a content of humic substances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivokonská, Lenka; Pivokonský, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2006), s. 211-218. ISSN 1606-9749 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB200600501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Aggregation * humic substances * particle size distribution Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  14. The size-controllable, one-step synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles protected by synthetic humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvin, Valentina A., E-mail: litvin_valentina@ukr.net [Department of Chemistry, Bohdan Khmelnitsky National University, Shevchenka Street 81, Cherkassy 18031 (Ukraine); Minaev, Boris F. [Department of Chemistry, Bohdan Khmelnitsky National University, Shevchenka Street 81, Cherkassy 18031 (Ukraine); Theoretical Chemistry, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of synthetic humic substances (HSs) in the synthesis of gold nanoparticles in which the unprecedented control of particle size and shape is achieved by varying the experimental conditions. In this reaction, the synthetic HSs are used as a reductive and protective reagent. A number synthetic HSs from different fenol precursors are tested. The nanoparticles formation processes were monitored by UV–visible spectroscopy, and the results were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The preference of synthetic HSs over natural HSs is determined by a standardization problem resolution due to the strict control of the HSs formation conditions that expand the areas of application of the gold nanoparticles fabricated with such technique. These nanodispersions are aggregately stable for more than one year. The possible formation mechanism of primary gold nanoclusters is proposed. - Highlights: • The gold nanoparticles are obtained using different types of synthetic humic substances. • Synthetic humic substances act as a reducing and stabilizing agents. • The advantage of synthetic humic substances consists in their reproduced properties. • The experimental conditions were optimized to attain better yield, controlled size, form and high stability. • The possible formation mechanism of primary gold nanoclusters is proposed.

  15. Relationships between humic substance-bound mercury contents and soil properties in subtropical zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Gui-fen; WU Hong-tao; JIANG Xin; HE Wen-xiang; QING Chang-le

    2006-01-01

    The bioavailability of humic substance-bound mercury (HS-Hg) has been established, while the distribution of HS-Hg in soils in relation to soil properties remains obscure. Path analysis and principal component analysis were employed in present study to investigate how soil factors influence the contents of HS-Hg in soils. Results showed that HS-Hg ranged from 0.0192 to 0.2051 mg/kg in soils. The two fractions existed in soils as humic acid-bound mercury (HA-Hg) > fulvic acid-bound mercury (FA-Hg) and the ratio of HA-Hg/FA-Hg was 1.61 on the average. Soil organic carbon (OC) and HS favorably determined soil HS-Hg and the two fractions.The mercury source forming HS-Hg derived from soil total mercury and HS-Hg. FA-Hg and HA-Hg served as mercury source for each other. In acidic soils, FA-Hg and HA-Hg consistently rose with the increase of OC, and generally HA-Hg increased more dramatically.Soils with lower pH and lighter texture contained more HS-Hg, particularly fraction of FA-Hg. Among all influencing factors, organic material source showed the strongest effect, followed by other soil properties and soil mercury source.

  16. Reducing capacities and redox potentials of humic substances extracted from sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Du, Mengchan; Jiang, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Humic substances (HS) are redox active organic materials that can be extracted from sewage sludge generated in wastewater treatment processes. Due to the poor understanding of reducing capacity, redox potentials and redox active functional groups of HS in sewage sludge, the potential contribution of sludge HS in transformation of wastewater contaminants is unclear. In the present study, the number of electrons donated or accepted by sewage sludge HS were quantified before and after reduction by iron compounds that possess different redox potentials and defined as the reducing capacity of the sewage sludge. In contrast to previous studies of soil and commercial humic acids (HA), reduced sludge HA showed a lower reducing capacity than that of native HA, which implies formation of semiquinone radicals since the semiquinone radical/hydroquinone pair has a much higher redox potential than the quinone/hydroquinone pair. It is novel that reducing capacities of sludge HA were determined in the redox potential range from -314 to 430 mV. The formation of semiquinone radicals formed during the reduction of quinone moieties in sludge HA is shown by three-dimensional excitation/emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopies information, increasing fluorescence intensities and blue-shifting of the excitation/emission peak of reduced sludge HA. Knowledge of sludge HS redox potentials and corresponding reducing capacities makes it possible to predict the transformation of redox active pollutants and facilitate manipulation and optimization of sludge loading wastewater treatment processes. PMID:26432531

  17. How many carboxyl groups does an average molecule of humic-like substances contain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Salma

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The carboxyl groups of atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS are of special interest because they influence the solubility in water, affect the water activity and surface tension of droplets in the air, and allow formation of chelates with biologically active elements. Experimentally determined abundances of the carboxyl group within HULIS by functional group analysis are consistent with our knowledge on the average molecular mass of HULIS if the number of dissociable carboxyl groups is assumed to be rather small. The best agreement between the average molecular mass derived from the existing abundance data and the average molecular mass published earlier occurs for assuming approximately one dissociable carboxyl group only. This implies that HULIS can not be regarded as polycarboxilic acid in diluted solutions. The average molecular mass of HULIS derived from our electrochemical measurements with the assumption of one dissociable carboxyl group or equivalently, one dissociable sulphate ester per molecule ranges from 250 to 310 Da. It was concluded that HULIS are a moderately strong/weak acid with a dissociation constant of about pK=3.4, which fits well into the interval represented by fulvic and humic acids. The mean number of dissociable hydrogen (i.e. of carboxyl groups and sulphate esters jointly in HULIS molecules was refined to be between 1.1 and 1.4 in acidic solutions.

  18. How many carboxyl groups does an average molecule of humic-like substances contain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Salma

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The carboxyl groups of atmospheric humic-like substances (HULIS are of special interest because they influence the solubility in water, affect the water activity and surface tension of droplets in the air, and allow formation of chelates with biologically active elements. Experimentally determined abundances of the carboxyl group within HULIS by functional group analysis are consistent with our knowledge on the average molecular mass of HULIS if the number of dissociable carboxyl groups is assumed to be rather small. The best agreement between the average molecular mass derived from the existing abundance data and the average molecular mass published earlier occurs for assuming approximately one dissociable carboxyl group only. This implies that HULIS can not be regarded as polycarboxilic acid. The average molecular mass of HULIS derived from our electrochemical measurements with the assumption of one dissociable carboxyl group per molecule ranges from 248 to 305 Da. It was concluded that HULIS are a moderately strong/weak acid with a dissociation constant of about pK=3.4, which fits well into the interval represented by fulvic and humic acids. The mean number of dissociable carboxyl groups in HULIS molecules was refined to be between 1.1 and 1.4.

  19. Comparative sorption and desorption behaviors of PFHxS and PFOS on sequentially extracted humic substances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lixia Zhao; Yifeng Zhang; Shuhong Fang; Lingyan Zhu; Zhengtao Liu

    2014-01-01

    The sorption and desorption behaviors of two perfluoroalkane sulfonates (PFSAs),including perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on two humic acids (HAs) and humin (HM),which were extracted from a peat soil,were investigated.The sorption kinetics and isotherms showed that the sorption of PFOS on the humic substances (HSs) was much higher than PFHxS.For the same PFSA compound,the sorption on HSs followed the order of HM > HA2 > HA1.These suggest that hydrophobic interaction plays a key role in the sorption of PFSAs on HSs.The sorption capacities of PFSAs on HSs were significantly related to their aliphaticity,but negatively correlated to aromatic carbons,indicating the importance of aliphatic groups in the sorption of PFSAs.Compared to PFOS,PFHxS displayed distinct desorption hysteresis,probably due to irreversible pore deformation after sorption of PFHxS.The sorption of the two PFSAs on HSs decreased with an increase in pH in the solution.This is ascribed to the electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding at lower pH.Hydrophobic interaction might also be stronger at lower pH due to the aggregation of HSs.

  20. Novel electrochemical approach to assess the redox properties of humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschbacher, Michael; Sander, Michael; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2010-01-01

    Two electrochemical methods to assess the redox properties of humic substances (HS) are presented: direct electrochemical reduction (DER) on glassy carbon working electrodes (WE) and mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO) using organic radicals to facilitate electron transfer between HS and the WE. DER allows for continuous monitoring of electron and proton transfer to HS by chronocoulometry and automated acid titration, respectively, and of changes in bulk HS redox potential E(h). Leonardite Humic Acid (LHA) showed an H(+)/e(-) ratio of unity and a decrease in potential from E(h) = +0.18 to -0.23 V upon transfer of 822 mumol(e-) g(LHA)(-1) at pH 7, consistent with quinones as major redox-active functional moieties in LHA. MER and MEO quantitatively detected electrons in LHA samples that were prereduced by DER to different extents. MER and MEO therefore accurately quantify the redox state of HS. Cyclic DER and O(2)-reoxidation revealed that electron transfer to LHA was largely reversible. However, LHA contained a small pool of moieties that were not reoxidized, likely due to endergonic first electron transfer to O(2). Electron accepting capacities of 13 different HS, determined by MER, strongly correlated with their C/H ratios and aromaticities and with previously published values, which, however, were a factor of 3 smaller due to methodological limitations. PMID:19950897

  1. Characterization of humic substances in salt marsh soils under sea rush ( Juncus maritimus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santín, C.; González-Pérez, M.; Otero, X. L.; Vidal-Torrado, P.; Macías, F.; Álvarez, M. Á.

    2008-09-01

    Humic substances (HS) from salt marsh soils were characterized and the relationships among HS composition and some geochemical factors were analysed. For this, three salt marshes with the same vegetation cover ( Juncus maritimus), but with different geochemical characteristics, were selected. The qualitative characterization of the soil humic acids and fulvic acids was carried out by elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and VACP/MAS 13C NMR spectroscopy. HS from salt marsh soils under sea rush ( Juncus maritimus) displayed some shared characteristics such as low degree of humification, low aromatic content and high proportion of labile compounds, mainly polysaccharides and proteins. However, although the three salt marsh soils under study were covered by the same type of vegetation, the HS showed some important differences. HS composition was found to be determined not only by the nature of the original organic material, but also by environmental factors such as soil texture, redox conditions and tidal influence. In general, an increase in the humification process appeared to be related to aerobic conditions and predominance of sand in the mineral fraction of the soil, while the preservation of labile organic compounds may be associated with low redox potential values and fine soil texture.

  2. Chemistry and transport of soluble humic substances in forested watersheds of the Adirondack Park, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronan, Christopher S.; Aiken, George R.

    1985-08-01

    Studies were conducted in conjunction with the Integrated Lake-Watershed Acidification Study (ILWAS) to examine the chemistry and leaching patterns of soluble humic substances in forested watersheds of the Adirondack region. During the summer growing season, mean dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in the ILWAS watersheds ranged from 21-32 mg C l-1 in O/A horizon leachates, from 5-7 mg C l-1 in B horizon leachates, from 2-4 mg C l-1 in groundwater solutions, from 6-8 mg C l-1 in first order streams, from 3-8 mg C l-1 in lake inlets, and from 2-7 mg C l-1 in lake outlets. During the winter, mean DOC concentrations dropped significantly in the upper soil profile. Soil solutions from mixed and coniferous stands contained as much as twice the DOC concentration of lysimeter samples from hardwood stands. Results of DOC fractionation analysis showed that hydrophobia and hydrophilic acids dominate the organic solute composition of natural waters in these watersheds. Charge balance and titration results indicated that the general acid-base characteristics of the dissolved humic mixture in these natural waters can be accounted for by a model organic acid having an averagepKa of 3.85, an average charge density of 4-5 μeq mg-1 C at ambient pH, and a total of 6-7 meq COOH per gram carbon.

  3. Complexation of radionuclides with natural polyelectrolytes - proteins, polysaccharides and humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various approaches to the modeling of metal and radionuclide interactions with macromolecular ligands, proteins, polysaccharides and humic substances in particular, their chemical and sorption equilibria, and the techniques used for their investigation are concisely compared. To predict radionuclide mobility in the natural and semi-natural aqueous environment, the estimation of the effective interaction constants, related to specific species of polyelectrolytes which are linked with the absorbancy or absorbancy ratio in their electronic absorption spectra, should probably be preferred and developed as standard. For characterization of the binding sites of specific molecular forms of polyelectrolyte ligands, the Scatchard plot analysis at macroconcentrations of the metal and also, though not so effectively, the two-phase distribution at trace concentrations of radionuclide or metal can be applied. (author)

  4. Alkaline extraction of humic substances from peat applied to organic-mineral fertilizer production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Saito

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An organic-mineral fertilizer based on humic substances (HSs and potassium was developed based on the alkaline extraction of HSs from peat. The HSs have interesting properties for use as a fertilizer since they improve the physical and chemical structure of the soil and provide a source of organic carbon which is readily absorbable by the plants, whereas potassium is a primary nutrient for plants. It was found that highly decomposed peats containing a small inorganic fraction are more favorable for the extraction of HSs. Using these peats, organic-mineral fertilizers that meet the Brazilian legislation have been obtained for a peat-extractant mixture containing 2.57 wt% total organic content (TOC, a K2O/TOC ratio of 1 wt% and an extraction time of 12 hours.

  5. The possible use of soluble humic substances for remediation of heavy metal polluted soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggaard, Ole K.; Jensen, Julie Katrine; Holm, Peter Engelund;

    2008-01-01

    Polluted soil is a common and serious environmental problem. While reliable methods exist for cleaning soil contaminated by organic compounds through degradation, remediation of heavy metal polluted soils awaits an appropriate solution. This is because heavy metals are nondegradable and generally....... Therefore, the potential of soluble natural humic substances (HS) to extract heavy metals from contaminated soils is tested as an environmental friendly substitute for EDTA. A strongly polluted urban soil and a moderately polluted agricultural soil were extracted at neutral pH in batch mode by three HS...... solutions from beech and Norway spruce litter and processed cow slurry, all containing 25 mM dissolved organic carbon (DOC). After 10 weeks, 8 % to 39 % of the total Cd, Cu, Ni and Pb soil contents were extracted. Increasing the DOC concentration to 100 mM resulted in markedly increased heavy metals...

  6. A meta-analysis of plant-growth response to humic substance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Antonio; Rose, Michael; Little, Karen; Jackson, Roy; Cavagnaro, Tim

    2013-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) are a category of naturally occurring organic compounds that arise from the decomposition and transformation of plant, animal and microbial residues (Maccarthy 2001). The loss of humic material, together with overall reductions in soil organic matter, is of concern because they play important roles in maintaining key soil functions and plant productivity (Lal 2004). Consequently, there is interest in the application of HS-based amendments, often derived from agricultural wastes (e.g composts) to remediate and/or maintain soil health (Quilty and Cattle 2011). In light of the potential benefits of HS, together with their inconsistent performance under field conditions, we sought to quantitatively review the effects of HS on plant growth, by undertaking a meta-analysis of the literature. A total of 390 papers were originally selected from the current literature. A number of criteria were applied to reduce this number to 81, from which the meta-analysis was undertaken. The 81 papers comprised 57 studies presenting data on shoot (or total) dry weight and 39 studies reporting root dry weight. As part of the meta-analysis we attempted: (i) to quantify the magnitude and likelihood of plant growth promotion, in terms of shoot and root biomass, resulting from HS application, (ii) to determine the influence of environmental conditions, plant type, humic substance properties, and the manner of application on plant growth response to HS, (iii) to identify gaps in our understanding of the interaction of HS with plants, and (iv) to provide some general recommendations for the practical use of HS in agronomic systems and suggestions for future work. Some of the key findings from this meta-analysis included: Many papers lack details on HS chemical characteristics The application of HS needs to be tailored to the environmental conditions in which they will be used. The effect of HS on shoot biomass was not only dependent on the source and rate of application

  7. Impact of humic substances on the aqueous solubility, uptake and bioaccumulation of platinum, palladium and rhodium in exposure studies with Dreissena polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sures, Bernd; Zimmermann, Sonja

    2007-03-01

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were exposed to different types of water containing PGE salts (PtCl4, PdSO4, RhCl3) to investigate the influence of humic substances on the aqueous solubility, uptake and bioaccumulation of noble metals. The results showed a time dependent decrease of the aqueous PGE concentrations in tank water for all groups. This could mainly be related to non-biological processes. The aqueous solubility of Pd and Rh was higher in humic water compared with non-chlorinated tap water, whereas Pt showed opposing results. Highest metal uptake rates and highest bioaccumulation plateaus were found for Pd, followed by Pt and Rh. Pd uptake and bioaccumulation was significantly hampered by humic substances, whose presence appear to increase Pt uptake and bioaccumulation. No clear trend emerged for Rh. Differences in effects of humic matter among the PGE may be explained by formation of metal complexes with different fractions of humic substances. PMID:17018243

  8. Investigations on humic substances from two different soil-types and their influence on the migration of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a project, financially supported by the BMU, the influence of physical, physicochemical, and biological processes on migration and plant-availability of iodine-129 in different soil-types (orthi-humic gleysol and allochthone soil) are investigated. In order to evaluate the influence of humic substances on the mobility of iodine, these compounds have been extracted with different solvents as a first step of planned investigations. Fulvic acids were obtained by soil extraction with distilled water, whereas humic acids were precipitated with hydrochloric acid after extracting the soil with a mixture of sodiumhydroxide and sodiumpyrophosphate. In the first case the resulting soil is reduced in fulvic acid concentration. The profiles of orthi-humic gleysol (0-20 cm) were subdivided into 5-cm sections. The extraction of 100 g soil and the described purification (Jakob 1991) yielded humic acid contents of 6.8 g, 5.2 g, 4.7 g, and 5.8 g, respectively. In batch experiments the addition of fulvic acid led in both soil types to lower Rd-values as compared to the control sample, whereas after the addition of humic acid only the allochtone soil showed higher Rd-values. As a result of the reduction of fulvic acid content by water extraction, the Rd-values of both soils were higher than those of untreated controls. Chromatographic tests on thin layer plates with reversed phase material (RP-8 and RP-18) were not successful, whereas the use of aluminiumoxid on thin layer plates as well as in columns showed the possibility to fractionate humic acids. (orig.)

  9. Molecular size distribution and structure investigations of humic substances in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-ionic macroporous polymeric sorbent DAX-8 was applied to the isolation of humic and fulvic acids from groundwater. This procedure was able to isolate approximately 40% of the DOC as humic solutes. For the investigation of the structure and molecular size distribution of the isolated humic solutes, the hyphenated SEC-ESIMS system with a quadrupole mass spectrometer and a UV detector were utilized. For the higher-molecular-weight humic acids, the ESI-MS loses sensitivity compared with the parallel UV detection, because of the difficulty in getting the ionized humic compounds to fly efficiently through the mass spectrometer. (orig.)

  10. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic characterization of humic substances from municipal refuse decomposing in a landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Municipal refuse was disposed of in simulated landfills and left for periods of more than 20 months. Three different 40 m3 systems of disposals were studied, namely (i) where the refuse was compacted, (ii) where it was mixed with sewage sludge and left uncompacted, and (iii) where it was compacted with sewage sludge. At 2, 6, 12 and 20 months, the humic substances were extracted from each system, purified, and characterised by cross-polarisation 13C NMR spectroscopy with 'magic-angle' sample spinning. The areas under the various signals were related to carbon percentages in different structural categories. The aromaticity of the humic acids increased with time of decomposition; those from refuse mixed with sewage sludge were particularly high in phenolic content. A signal at 174 p.p.m., assigned primarily to secondary amide linkages, reached maximum strength after 6 to 12 months decomposition. The carbohydrate contents of the humic acids showed only small variations as decomposition progressed. Polymethylene chains in lipids, particularly for the uncompacted system, accounted for a diminishing fraction of total carbon as time of refuse disposal increased. The spectrum of a soil humic acid showed features similar to those observed in spectra of humic acids derived from refuse, but the signals were less well resolved. 19 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  11. Hydrogeochemical and mineralogical investigations of arsenic- and humic substance-enriched aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Wuing; Lai, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Yen-Yu; Lu, Kuang-Liang

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the hydrogeochemical and mineralogical characteristics of arsenic-contaminated and humic-substance-enriched aquifers in the Chianan Plain, Taiwan, which is an endemic area for blackfoot disease (BFD). Factorial analysis (FA) was used to evaluate the hydrochemical characteristics of 83 groundwater samples in the Chianan Plain, and 462 geological core samples obtained from 9 drilling wells were collected to analyze their arsenic and iron contents. The major mineral phases and chemical components were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS). Partition of arsenic among various hosting solids in sediments was determined by sequential extraction. The results of FA showed that the hydrochemical characteristics of the groundwater samples could be grouped by 4 factors: salinization, arsenic, sulfide, and iron. Arsenic was positively correlated with alkalinity, dissolved organic/inorganic carbon, and fluorescence intensity [humic acids, (HAs)]. As(V) has a higher chelating affinity with HAs than does As(III), resulting in higher As(V) concentrations distributed throughout the reducing environment. High levels and correlations of As and HAs may cause BFD in the Chianan Plain. No correlation was found between the measured and calculated redox potentials of the various redox couples. The As(III)/As(V) was under a chemical non-equilibrium condition. The vertical distribution of the sedimentary As (solid phase) typically increased with depth, but the aqueous As concentrations were higher in the second aquifer (depth of 80-120 m). Arsenic content (solid phase) was higher in the clay/silt sediments and marine formations. The major minerals identified by XPS and SEM-EDS were goethite, hematite, magnetite, pyrite, and siderite, agreeing with the SI values calculated by PHREEQC. Arsenic content was strongly correlated with sulfur (weight%; R2

  12. Sorption and diffusion of Eu in sedimentary rock in the presence of humic substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption and diffusion behaviors of Eu in sedimentary rock in the presence of humic substance were investigated. The sedimentary rock collected from 500 m depth of HDB-6 bore hole at horonobe URL site of Japan and Aldrich humic acid (HA) were used in the present study. Sorption behaviors of Eu and the HA on the sedimentary rocks with and without the rock organic matter (ROM) were elucidated as a function of HA concentration. The HA reduced the sorption of Eu on the rock with the increase of HA. Eu and HA sorption on the rock with the ROM was larger than on the rock after removing the ROM, indicating that the ROM plays an important role on the sorption of Eu and HA. The diffusion of Eu in the presence of HA was examined as a function of HA concentration and molecular weight of the HA (∝ 150 kDa or below 10 kDa) by means of a reservoir depletion test method with the intact rock core of the sedimentary rock. Depletion of Eu concentration in the reservoir was reduced with the increase of HA concentration. On the other hand, slight depletion of HA concentration in the reservoir was observed, indicating that the larger HA molecule diffused less into the rock. From the depletion curve and indiffusion profile of Eu in the rock, the effective diffusion coefficient, De, and distribution coefficient, Kd, in the intact system were estimated based on the profile fitting of the diffusion data with the conventional simple diffusion-sorption model. It was elucidated that the HA reduced the Kd and De of Eu in the intact system with the increase of HA. The contribution of the HA with smaller molecular weight to both the Eu sorption and diffusion was examined. (orig.)

  13. The influence of organic matter on sorption and fate of glyphosate in soil - Comparing different soils and humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albers, Christian N., E-mail: calbers@ruc.d [Dept. of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, DK-1350 Copenhagen (Denmark); Dept. of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Banta, Gary T. [Dept. of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Hansen, Poul Erik [Dept. of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Jacobsen, Ole S. [Dept. of Geochemistry, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, DK-1350 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2009-10-15

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is generally believed not to influence the sorption of glyphosate in soil. To get a closer look on the dynamics between glyphosate and SOM, we used three approaches: I. Sorption studies with seven purified soil humic fractions showed that these could sorb glyphosate and that the aromatic content, possibly phenolic groups, seems to aid the sorption. II. Sorption studies with six whole soils and with SOM removed showed that several soil parameters including SOM are responsible for the strong sorption of glyphosate in soils. III. After an 80 day fate experiment, approx40% of the added glyphosate was associated with the humic and fulvic acid fractions in the sandy soils, while this was the case for only approx10% of the added glyphosate in the clayey soils. Glyphosate sorbed to humic substances in the natural soils seemed to be easier desorbed than glyphosate sorbed to amorphous Fe/Al-oxides. - Glyphosate was sorbed by purified humic substances and a significant amount of glyphosate was found to be associated with soil organic matter in whole soils.

  14. The influence of organic matter on sorption and fate of glyphosate in soil - Comparing different soils and humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is generally believed not to influence the sorption of glyphosate in soil. To get a closer look on the dynamics between glyphosate and SOM, we used three approaches: I. Sorption studies with seven purified soil humic fractions showed that these could sorb glyphosate and that the aromatic content, possibly phenolic groups, seems to aid the sorption. II. Sorption studies with six whole soils and with SOM removed showed that several soil parameters including SOM are responsible for the strong sorption of glyphosate in soils. III. After an 80 day fate experiment, ∼40% of the added glyphosate was associated with the humic and fulvic acid fractions in the sandy soils, while this was the case for only ∼10% of the added glyphosate in the clayey soils. Glyphosate sorbed to humic substances in the natural soils seemed to be easier desorbed than glyphosate sorbed to amorphous Fe/Al-oxides. - Glyphosate was sorbed by purified humic substances and a significant amount of glyphosate was found to be associated with soil organic matter in whole soils.

  15. Cd2+ and Zn2+ sorption on apatite in the presence of EDTA and humic substance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viipsi K.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of Cd2+ and Zn2+ on hydroxyapatite [HAP- Ca10(PO46(OH2] and fluorapatite [FAP- Ca10( PO46(F2] with different specific surface area and stoichiometry was investigated in batch experiments in the pH range 4 to 11 (25 ◦C; 0.1 M KNO3. The impact of different conditions was concerned: solution pH, the presence of complexing ligands (EDTA and humic substance and competing metal ions, as well as reaction kinetic and equilibrium conditions. To evaluate the reversibility of Cd2+ sorption onto HAP, desorption characteristics in water, Ca, EDTA, and HUM-solutions were determined. Additionally to solution analysis the surface composition of solid phases was analysed by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy XPS. The information from the chemical analyses was used to design an equilibration model that takes into account dissolution, surface potential, solution and surface complexation, as well as possible phase transformations. It was revealed that apatites effectively sorb Cd2+ and Zn2+ by ion exchange reactions on surface by formation of new surface phases. Using XPS the formation of a Me-enriched HAP surface was found, which was interpreted as the formation of a solid solution with the general formula: Ca8.4-xMex(HPO41.6(PO44.4(OH0.4. In a binary solution (Cd+Zn the competition of metals reduced individual sorbed amount compared with the single component solutions but the total adsorption maximum was approximately constant. The presence of EDTA reduces the metal sorption on apatite due to [CdEDTA]2- and [ZnEDTA]2- complexes and increases apatite solubility due to [CaEDTA]2- complex formation. The dissolved humic substance was bound on apatite in suspensions but the amount of Cd2+ bound was not changed. The results showed that the solution pH and the presence of complexing ligands have a significant effect on heavy metal sorption on apatite and must be considered if apatites are used as remediation agent. The proposed model can be used to predict

  16. Competitive Complexation of Copper and Zinc by Sequentially Extracted Humic Substances from Manure Compost

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shuai; WANG Xu-dong; LU Li-lan; DIAO Shi-rong; ZHANG Jun-feng

    2008-01-01

    Chicken manure with similar content of copper and zinc was chosen to conduct a composting experiment to investigate the changes of organic carbon and humus substance complexed copper (HS-Cu) and zinc (HS-Zn), which were extracted by water (H2O), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and sodium pyrophate-NaOH mixture (Na4P2O7-NaOH), sequentially. Distributions of copper and zinc in fulvic acids (FA) and humic acids (HA) in the three extracts were studied. During manure composting, the concentrations of copper and zinc increased from about 500 mg kg-' in the raw material to 1100 mg kg-1 in the final products. HS-Cu in H2O, NaOH, and Na4P2O7-NaOH extracts occupied 6.7, 26.7, and 19% averagely of total copper and HS-Zn represented 2.7, 13.7, and 17% averagely of total zinc in compost, respectively. In water extracts, both HA and FA mainly complexed with Cu and the mole ratio of Cu to Zn was 2.8 in HA fractions and was 2.6 in FA fractions, respectively. HA mainly complexed with copper, so that the ratios of HA-Cu to HA-Zn averaged 3.4 in NaOH extracts. FA had a similar potential to complex with copper and zinc, so that the ratio of FA-Cu to FA-Zn was close to 1. In Na4P2O7-NaOH extracts, HA or FA had a similar potential to complex with copper and zinc. The ratio of HS-Cu to HS-Zn was close to 1. With manure composting, Na4P2O7-NaOH extractable HS-Zn increased to a level as high as HS-Cu. This indicated that more and more stable complexes of HS-Zn were formed in the late decomposition period. The competition between copper and zinc to be complexed with humic substance became weaker and weaker with the decomposition process.

  17. Humic substances and crude oil induce cytochrome P450 1A expression in the Amazonian fish species Colossoma macropomum (Tambaqui).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Aline Y O; Woodin, Bruce R; Reddy, Christopher M; Val, Adalberto L; Stegeman, John J

    2006-04-15

    Cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) induction is used widely as a biomarker of exposure to pollutants, such as petroleum hydrocarbons, yet CYP1A inducibility has been characterized in few tropical fish. Using Western blot analysis, catalytic assay, and immunohistochemistry, we evaluated CYP1A induction in an Amazonian fish (tambaqui; Colossoma macropomum) acclimated to humic substances (HS) and acutely exposed to crude oil. HS are ubiquitous in Amazonian waters, and they are known to affect the bioavailability of pollutants. CYP1A activity was also measured in fish exposed for 10 days to a range of concentrations of HS from both natural and commercial sources. Crude oil induced CYP1A expression in tambaqui, as expected. Exposure to both HS and crude oil resulted in greater levels of CYP1A expression relative to that in fish exposed to petroleum alone. Interestingly, CYP1A induction was also observed in fish exposed to HS alone. Induction by HS was concentration-dependent, and activity was higher in fish exposed to HS from the commercial source than in fish exposed to the HS from the natural source. The use of CYP1A as a biomarker of exposure to pollutants such as petroleum hydrocarbons in fish living in environments rich in humic substances should be considered with caution given that HS themselves induce CYP1A expression. Our results suggest that there may be as yet unknown CYP1A inducing components (aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists) in humic substances. PMID:16683634

  18. Comparison of isolation and quantification methods to measure humic-like substances (HULIS) in atmospheric particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xingjun; Song, Jianzhong; Peng, Ping'an

    2012-12-01

    Humic-like Substances (HULIS) comprise a significant fraction of the water-soluble organic aerosol mass and influence the cloud microphysical properties and climate effects of aerosols in the atmosphere. In this work, the most frequently used HULIS isolation and quantification methods including ENVI-18, HLB, XAD-8 and DEAE were comparatively characterized with two model standards, ten interfering compounds, and five ambient aerosol samples. Quantification of HULIS is performed with a TOC analyzer, complemented by an investigation of the chemical structure of the extracted fractions by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results show that the four isolation methods were all characterized by high reliability, high reproducibility, and low limit of detection (LOD), indicating that each method can be used to efficiently recover Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) and be applied to the quantification of the lower amount of HULIS in atmospheric particles. The analytical results of the UV-Vis spectra of HULIS fractions isolated also indicate that they are all favorable for extraction of compounds of high UV absorbance, high MW, and high aromaticity and that the DEAE protocol is the most significant one. Compared with the DEAE method that favors extraction of highly UV-absorbing and more aromatic compounds, SRFA isolated by the ENVI-18, HLB, and XAD-8 protocols were more representative of the global matrix. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages and is suitable for a particular application. No single method is ideal for both isolation and quantification of HULIS in atmospheric samples.

  19. Maillard Chemistry in Clouds and Aqueous Aerosol As a Source of Atmospheric Humic-Like Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Lelia N; Lemire, Amanda N; Galloway, Melissa M; Corrigan, Ashley L; Turley, Jacob J; Espelien, Brenna M; De Haan, David O

    2016-07-19

    The reported optical, physical, and chemical properties of aqueous Maillard reaction mixtures of small aldehydes (glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and glycolaldehyde) with ammonium sulfate and amines are compared with those of aqueous extracts of ambient aerosol (water-soluble organic carbon, WSOC) and the humic-like substances (HULIS) fraction of WSOC. Using a combination of new and previously published measurements, we examine fluorescence, X-ray absorbance, UV/vis, and IR spectra, complex refractive indices, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra, thermograms, aerosol and electrospray ionization mass spectra, surface activity, and hygroscopicity. Atmospheric WSOC and HULIS encompass a range of properties, but in almost every case aqueous aldehyde-amine reaction mixtures are squarely within this range. Notable exceptions are the higher UV/visible absorbance wavelength dependence (Angström coefficients) observed for methylglyoxal reaction mixtures, the lack of surface activity of glyoxal reaction mixtures, and the higher N/C ratios of aldehyde-amine reaction products relative to atmospheric WSOC and HULIS extracts. The overall optical, physical, and chemical similarities are consistent with, but not demonstrative of, Maillard chemistry being a significant secondary source of atmospheric HULIS. However, the higher N/C ratios of aldehyde-amine reaction products limits the source strength to ≤50% of atmospheric HULIS, assuming that other sources of HULIS incorporate only negligible quantities of nitrogen. PMID:27227348

  20. Removal of humic substances (HS) from water by electro-microfiltration (EMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yu-Hsiang; Li, Kung-Cheh; Chaung-Hsieh, Lin Han; Huang, C P

    2006-05-01

    Humic substances (HS) represent the common agents contributing to flux decline during membrane filtration of natural water. In order to minimize the fouling during microfiltration (MF) of HS, modifying the operation of MF presents a promising alternative. A laboratory-scale electro-microfiltration (EMF) module was used to separate Aldrich HS from water by applying a voltage across the membrane. The presence of an electric field significantly reduced the flux decline. A flux comparable to that of ion-free water was attained when the voltage was near the critical electric field strength (Ecritical), i.e., the electrical field gradient that balances the advective and electrophoretic velocities of solute. At an applied voltage of 100 V (approximately 110 V/cm), it was able to reduce UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV254), total organic carbon (TOC) and trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) by over 50% in the permeate. Results from 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) analysis suggest that the aromatic and functionalized aliphatic fractions decreased significantly in the permeate. The charged HS have large molecule weight compared with those passing through membrane. Results clearly indicate that a combination of electric force with MF can increase HS rejection and decrease flux decline. Electrophoretic attraction was the major mechanism for the improvement of flux and rejection over time. PMID:16616771

  1. Contribution of capillary electrophoresis to an integrated vision of humic substances size and charge characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physicochemical properties of three different humic substances (HS) are probed using capillary zone electrophoresis in alkaline carbonate buffers, pH 10. Special attention is drawn to the impact of the electrolyte ionic strength and counter-ion nature, chosen within the alkali-metal series, on HS electrophoretic mobility. Taylor-Aris dispersion analysis provides insights into the hydrodynamic radius (R-H) distributions of HS. The smallest characterized entities are of nano-metric dimensions, showing neither ionic strength- nor alkali-metal-induced aggregation. These results are compared with the entities evidenced in dynamic light scattering measurements, the size of which is two order of magnitude higher, ca. 100 nm. The extended Onsager model provides a reasonable description of measured electrophoretic mobilities in the ionic strength range 1-50 mM, thus allowing the estimation of limiting mobilities and ionic charge numbers for the different HS samples. An unexpected HS electrophoretic mobility increase (in absolute value) is observed in the order Li+ ≤ Na+ ≤ K+ ≤ Cs+ and discussed either in terms of retarding forces or in terms of ion-ion interactions. (authors)

  2. Supplementation with humic substances affects the innate immunity in layer hens in posfasting phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Sanmiguel P.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Asses the effect of supplementation with Humic substances (HS over some innate immunity parameters (serum bactericidal activity, phagocytosis, bacterial agglutination, respiratory burst and lisozyme activity in phase after fasting of layer hens. Materials and methods. 120 posfasting phase Hy Line Brown layer hens were taken which were distributed into four groups: The first and the second were supplemented with 0.1 and 0.2% of HS, respectively. The third group was supplemented with 0.25 mg/kg on levamisole hydrochloride and fourth group have no supplementation; during sixty days period. Blood samples were collected on 8th, 30th and 60th of experiment day. Results. The phagocytic index and respiratory burst increased significantly at day 30th in HS supplemented groups. Alike, serum bactericidal activity and lisozyme activity improved on 8 th day, nevertheless, changes were no evident latter. The bacterial agglutination was high in supplemented groups evaluated at everyone times. Conclusions. Results showed that HS behave as immunostimulant in the early phase after fasting layer hens.

  3. Terrestrial humic substances in Daliao River and its estuary: optical signatures and photoreactivity to UVA light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Lei, Kun; Wang, Xuechun

    2016-04-01

    Fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) components were identified by Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) in surface water of Daliao River and its estuary with a focus on terrestrial humic substance-(HS)-like FDOM identified under two contrasting hydrological conditions. The hydrological conditions did not have noticeable effect on the spectral features of the terrestrial HS-like FDOM, but did affect the components' intensities and photoreactivity: (1) the intensities of terrestrial HS-like components were higher in the normal flow period than in the high flow period, and (2) a spectrally similar terrestrial HS-like FDOM identified under the two contrasting hydrological conditions showed distinct photoreactivity to the same dose of UVA illumination. The findings indicated that terrestrial HS was generated at lower intensities at the terrestrial sources during the high flow period than during the normal flow period and that the transport of terrestrial HS material through the river-estuary system was affected dominantly by seawater dilution along the salinity gradient while fine-tuned by solar UVA illumination. This study exemplifies the effect of hydrological conditions on optical signatures of terrestrial HS-like FDOM and their photoreactivity towards UVA illumination, improving our understanding of the dynamics of terrestrial HS material in river-estuary systems in the framework of the currently proposed new conceptual model for terrestrial organic matter. PMID:26627698

  4. Effects of pH value and coagulant dosage on contact filtration of humic substances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋绍阶; 刘宗源; 梁建军

    2009-01-01

    Humic substances (especially fulvic acid (FA)) are the major components of natural organic matter (NOM) that widely exist in drinking water source. Due to their potential effects on public health,the removal of FA was one of the main concerns during the water treatment. Therefore,the contact filtration of FA by using aluminum sulfate as coagulant on the basis of jar tests was carried out. The effects of pH and coagulant dosage on the FA removal and the development of head loss were investigated. The results show that the range of pH value during the FA contact filtration can be effectively influenced by the dosage of aluminum sulfate,and the high aluminum sulfate dosage is an important factor that can result in early filter breakthrough. The FA filtration by deep-bed filtration or by membrane filtration is sometimes disparate under the same coagulation conditions. The choice of aluminum sulfate dosage by the method of membrane filtration,i.e. the "true color measurement",may result in inappropriate filter run,whereas it can be determined with simple jar tests by observing the formation of micro flocs. Considering the effects of pH on aluminum sulfate dosage and FA removal,the optimal pH range of 5.5?6.0 is suggested.

  5. Electropulse treatment of water solution of humic substances in a layer iron granules in process of water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanova, G. L.; Yurmazova, T. A.; Shiyan, L. N.; Machekhina, K. I.

    2016-02-01

    The present work is a part of a continuations study of the physical and chemical processes complex in natural waters containing humic-type organic substances at the influence of pulsed electrical discharges in a layer of iron pellets. The study of humic substances processing in the iron granules layer by means of pulsed electric discharge for the purpose of water purification from organic compounds humic origin from natural water of the northern regions of Russia is relevant for the water treatment technologies. In case of molar humate sodium - iron ions (II) at the ratio 2:3, reduction of solution colour and chemical oxygen demand occur due to the humate sodium ions and iron (II) participation in oxidation-reduction reactions followed by coagulation insoluble compounds formation at a pH of 6.5. In order to achieve this molar ratio and the time of pulsed electric discharge, equal to 10 seconds is experimentally identified. The role of secondary processes that occur after disconnection of the discharge is shown. The time of contact in active erosion products with sodium humate, equal to 1 hour is established. During this time, the value of permanganate oxidation and iron concentration in solution achieves the value of maximum permissible concentrations and further contact time increase does not lead to the controlled parameters change.

  6. Plant biostimulants: physiological responses induced by protein hydrolyzed-based products and humic substances in plant metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenella Nardi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In recent years, the use of biostimulants in sustainable agriculture has been growing. Biostimulants can be obtained from different organic materials and include humic substances (HS, complex organic materials, beneficial chemical elements, peptides and amino acids, inorganic salts, seaweed extracts, chitin and chitosan derivatives, antitranspirants, amino acids and other N-containing substances. The application of biostimulants to plants leads to higher content of nutrients in their tissue and positive metabolic changes. For these reasons, the development of new biostimulants has become a focus of scientific interest. Among their different functions, biostimulants influence plant growth and nitrogen metabolism, especially because of their content in hormones and other signalling molecules. A significant increase in root hair length and density is often observed in plants treated with biostimulants, suggesting that these substances induce a “nutrient acquisition response” that favors nutrient uptake in plants via an increase in the absorptive surface area. Furthermore, biostimulants positively influence the activity and gene expression of enzymes functioning in the primary and secondary plant metabolism. This article reviews the current literature on two main classes of biostimulants: humic substances and protein-based biostimulants. The characteristic of these biostimulants and their effects on plants are thoroughly described.

  7. Influence of humic substances on the 63Ni migration through crushed rock media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Column experiments were performed to study effects of humic acid on the mobility of 63Ni(II) through crushed granite media. The 63Ni concentration passing the column increased with increasing the concentration of humic acid. The migration behavior of 63Ni, either retarded or non-retarded, could not be simulated by the widely-accepted, instantaneous equilibrium sorption model. The rate limited transformation model, taking into account non-equilibrium complexation of 63Ni with humic acid facilitates the description of the observed migration behavior of 63Ni. (orig.)

  8. Carbonaceous species and humic like substances (HULIS) in Arctic snowpack during OASIS field campaign in Barrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Didier; Jaffrezo, Jean-Luc; Houdier, StéPhan; Barret, Manuel; Cozic, Julie; King, Martin D.; France, James L.; Reay, Holly J.; Grannas, Amanda; Kos, Gregor; Ariya, Parisa A.; Beine, Harry J.; Domine, Florent

    2012-07-01

    Snowpacks contain many carbonaceous species that can potentially impact on snow albedo and arctic atmospheric chemistry. During the OASIS field campaign, in March and April 2009, Elemental Carbon (EC), Water insoluble Organic Carbon (WinOC) and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) were investigated in various types of snow: precipitating snows, remobilized snows, wind slabs and depth hoars. EC was found to represent less than 5% of the Total Carbon Content (TCC = EC + WinOC + DOC), whereas WinOC was found to represent an unusual 28 to 42% of TCC. Snow type was used to infer physical processes influencing the evolution of different fractions of DOC. DOC is highest in soil influenced indurated depth hoar layers due to specific wind related formation mechanisms in the early season. Apart from this specific snow type, DOC is found to decrease from precipitating snow to remobilized snow to regular depth hoar. This decrease is interpreted as due to cleaving photochemistry and physical equilibration of the most volatile fraction of DOC. Depending on the relative proportions of diamond dust and fresh snow in the deposition of the seasonal snowpack, we estimate that 31 to 76% of DOC deposited to the snowpack is reemitted back to the boundary layer. Under the assumption that this reemission is purely photochemical, we estimate an average flux of VOC out of the snowpack of 20 to 170 μgC m-2 h-1. Humic like substances (HULIS), short chain diacids and aldehydes are quantified, and showed to represent altogether a modest (WinOC. HULIS optical properties are measured and could be consistent with aged biomass burning or a possible marine source.

  9. HPLC studies of aquatic humic compounds and complexes from the Drigg Research Site, Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an investigation into the applicability of high performance liquid chromatographic techniques for the separation of the complex mixtures of organic acids commonly found in groundwaters. This work has shown that reverse phase ion-pair chromatography using a large pore stationary phase can be successfully applied to humic material in both natural and concentrated groundwater from the Drigg Research Site. The methodology separates the organic species into a number of well resolved components the majority of which have a molecular weight of greater than 500 Dalton. Separations obtained have been qualitatively and quantitatively analysed using a Diode array spectrophotometer. The components in excess of 500 Dalton show UV absorption spectra similar to humic and fulvic acids where as the component with a molecular weight of less than 500 Dalton shows a sharp UV absorption cutoff at 230 nm. It was noted that this component was not removed by passage through DEAEA cellulose. Reverse phase HPLC was also investigated, and results were found to be consistent with a separation based on an ion-repulsion/size exclusion mechanism. It was concluded that any separation based on this mechanism is likely to suffer from poor inter run reproducibility and must therefore be discounted as a suitable method. Similarly, ion-suppression reverse phase was shown to be equally impracticable, requiring a mobile phase pH of less than 2 to obtain separation (this low pH renders a silica based stationary phase unstable). (author)

  10. The physico-chemical properties and biostimulative activities of humic substances regenerated from lignite

    OpenAIRE

    David, Jan; Šmejkalová, Daniela; Hudecová, Šárka; Zmeškal, Oldřich; von Wandruszka, Ray; Gregor, Tomáš; Kučerík, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    The positive effect of humic acids on the growth of plant roots is well known, however, the mechanisms and role of their physical structure in these processes have not been fully explained yet. In this work, South-Moravian lignite was oxidized by means of nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to produce a set of regenerated humic acids. The elemental composition, solid state stability and solution characteristics were determined and correlated in vitro with their biological activity. A modified h...

  11. Perspectives of humic substances application in remediation of highly heavy metals contaminated soils in Kola Subarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregubova, Polina; Turbaevskaya, Valeria; Zakharenko, Andrey; Kadulin, Maksim; Smirnova, Irina; Stepanov, Andrey; Koptsik, Galina

    2016-04-01

    Northwestern part of Russia, the Kola Peninsula, is one of the most heavy metals (HM) contaminated areas in the northern hemisphere. The main polluters, mining-and-metallurgical integrated works "Pechenganikel" and "Severonikel", are surrounded by heavily damaged barren lands that require remediation. The main contaminating metals are Ni and Cu. Using of exogenous humic substances could be possible effective and cost-efficient solution of HM contamination problem. Rational application of humates (Na-K salts of humic acids) can result in improvement of soil properties, localization of contamination and decreasing bioavailability through binding HM in relatively immobile organic complexes. Our research aim was to evaluate the influence of increasing doses of different origin humates on i) basic properties of contaminated soils; ii) mobility and bioavailability of HMs; iii) vegetation state and chemistry. In summer 2013 a model field experiment was provided in natural conditions of the Kola Peninsula. We investigated the Al-Fe-humus abrazem, soil type that dominates in technogenic barren lands around the "Severonikel" work. These soils are strongly acid: pHH2O was 3.7-4.1; pHKCl was 3.4-4.0. The exchangeable acidity is low (0.8-1.6 cmol(+)/kg) due to the depletion of fine particles and organic matter, being the carriers of exchange positions. The abrazems of barrens had lost organic horizon. 12 sites were created in 1 km from the work. In those sites, except 2 controls, various amendments were added: i) two different by it's origin types of humates: peat-humates and coal-humates, the last were in concentrations 0.5% and 1%; ii) lime; iii) NPK-fertilizer; iv) biomates (organic degradable cover for saving warm and erosion protection). As a test-culture a grass mixture with predominance of Festuca rubra and Festuca ovina was sowed. As a result we concluded that humates of different origin have unequal influence on soil properties and cause decreasing as well as

  12. Development of an innovative peat lipstick based on the UV-B protective effect of humic substances

    OpenAIRE

    R. Klöcking; Y. Felber; M. Guhr; Meyer, G.; Schubert, R.; J.I. Schoenherr

    2013-01-01

    Humic acids (HA) are known for their antiviral and UV-B protecting effects, and are considered promising as ingredients for a UV-protective lipstick which is being developed to minimise or even prevent recurrences of UV- induced herpes. In this study, the UV/Vis spectra of three natural HA and three synthetic HA-like substances are analysed to determine the appropriateness of their UV-absorbing characteristics for the product under development. The contribution of a matrix component (castor o...

  13. Influence of dissolved humic substances on the mass transfer of organic compounds across the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramus, Ksenia; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Georgi, Anett

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dissolved humic substances (DHS) on the rate of water-gas exchange of two volatile organic compounds was studied under various conditions of agitation intensity, solution pH and ionic strength. Mass-transfer coefficients were determined from the rate of depletion of model compounds from an apparatus containing a stirred aqueous solution with continuous purging of the headspace above the solution (dynamic system). Under these conditions, the overall transfer rate is controlled by the mass-transfer resistance on the water side of the water-gas interface. The experimental results show that the presence of DHS hinders the transport of the organic molecules from the water into the gas phase under all investigated conditions. Mass-transfer coefficients were significantly reduced even by low, environmentally relevant concentrations of DHS. The retardation effect increased with increasing DHS concentration. The magnitude of the retardation effect on water-gas exchange was compared for Suwannee River fulvic and humic acids, a commercially available leonardite humic acid and two synthetic surfactants. The observed results are in accordance with the concept of hydrodynamic effects. Surface pressure forces due to surface film formation change the hydrodynamic characteristics of water motion at the water-air interface and thus impede surface renewal. PMID:22051345

  14. Complexation humic substances of soils with metal ions as the main way migration of matals from soil to water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinu, Marina

    2013-04-01

    Organic matter (OM) of natural waters can bind with the ions metals (IM) entering the system, thus reducing their toxic properties. OM in water consists predominantly (up to 80%) of humic acids (HA), represented by highmolecular, dyed, polyfunctional compounds. The natural-climatic zones feature various ratios of fulvic (FA) and humic acids. An important specific feature of metals as contamination elements is the fact that when they occur in the environment, their potential toxicity and bioavailability depend significantly on their speciation. In recent years, lakes have been continuously enriched in hazardous elements such as Pb, Cd, Al, and Cr on a global (regional) basis. The most important organic ligands are humic matter (HM) washed out from soils in water and metals occur in natural waters as free ions, simple complexes with inorganic and organic ligands, and mineral and organic particles of molecules and ions sorbed on the surface. The occurrence of soluble metal forms in natural waters depends on the presence of organic and inorganic anions. However, direct determinations are rather difficult. The goal was the calculation and analysis of the forms of metals in the system catchment basin, based on the chemical composition of the water body and the structural features of soil humic substances (HS).We used the following analytical techniques - leaching of humic substances from soil and sample preparation (Orlov DS, 1985), the functional characteristics of humic substances - spectral analysis methods, the definition of conditional stability constants of complexes - electrochemical methods of analysis. Our results show thet HAs of selected soil types are different in functions, and these differences effect substantially the complexing process. When analyzing the results obtained in the course of spectrometric investigation of HMs in selected soil types, we determined the following main HA characteristics: (1) predominance of oxygen bearing groups in HM of the

  15. Facilitated transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by humic substances in saturated porous media under acidic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruichang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science (China); Zhang, Haibo; Tu, Chen; Hu, Xuefeng; Li, Lianzhen [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research (China); Luo, Yongming, E-mail: ymluo@yic.ac.cn; Christie, Peter [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science (China)

    2015-04-15

    The transport behavior of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2} NPs, 30 nm in diameter) was studied in well-defined porous media composed of clean quartz sand over a range of solution chemistry under acidic conditions. Transport of TiO{sub 2} NPs was dramatically enhanced by humic substances (HS) at acidic pH (4.0, 5.0 and 6.0), even at a low HS concentration of 0.5 mg L{sup −1}. Facilitated transport of TiO{sub 2} NPs was likely attributable to the increased stability of TiO{sub 2} NPs and repulsive interaction between TiO{sub 2} NPs and quartz sands due to the adsorbed HS. The mobility of TiO{sub 2} NPs was also increased with increasing pH from 4.0 to 6.0. Although transport of TiO{sub 2} NPs was insensitive to low ionic strength, it was significantly inhibited by high concentrations of NaCl and CaCl{sub 2}. In addition, calculated Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energy indicated that high energy barriers were responsible for the high mobility of TiO{sub 2} NPs, while the secondary energy minimum could play an important role in the retention of TiO{sub 2} NPs at 100 mmol L{sup −1} NaCl. Straining and gravitational settlement of larger TiO{sub 2} NPs aggregates at 1 mg L{sup −1} HS, pH 5.0, and 2 mmol L{sup −1} CaCl{sub 2} could be responsible for the significant retention even in the presence of high energy barriers. Moreover, more favorable interaction between approaching TiO{sub 2} NPs and TiO{sub 2} NPs that had been already deposited on the collector resulted in a ripening-shape breakthrough curve at 2 mmol L{sup −1} CaCl{sub 2}. Overall, a combination of mechanisms including DLVO-type force, straining, and physical filtration was involved in the retention of TiO{sub 2} NPs over the range of solution chemistry examined in this study.

  16. Facilitated transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by humic substances in saturated porous media under acidic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transport behavior of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs, 30 nm in diameter) was studied in well-defined porous media composed of clean quartz sand over a range of solution chemistry under acidic conditions. Transport of TiO2 NPs was dramatically enhanced by humic substances (HS) at acidic pH (4.0, 5.0 and 6.0), even at a low HS concentration of 0.5 mg L−1. Facilitated transport of TiO2 NPs was likely attributable to the increased stability of TiO2 NPs and repulsive interaction between TiO2 NPs and quartz sands due to the adsorbed HS. The mobility of TiO2 NPs was also increased with increasing pH from 4.0 to 6.0. Although transport of TiO2 NPs was insensitive to low ionic strength, it was significantly inhibited by high concentrations of NaCl and CaCl2. In addition, calculated Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energy indicated that high energy barriers were responsible for the high mobility of TiO2 NPs, while the secondary energy minimum could play an important role in the retention of TiO2 NPs at 100 mmol L−1 NaCl. Straining and gravitational settlement of larger TiO2 NPs aggregates at 1 mg L−1 HS, pH 5.0, and 2 mmol L−1 CaCl2 could be responsible for the significant retention even in the presence of high energy barriers. Moreover, more favorable interaction between approaching TiO2 NPs and TiO2 NPs that had been already deposited on the collector resulted in a ripening-shape breakthrough curve at 2 mmol L−1 CaCl2. Overall, a combination of mechanisms including DLVO-type force, straining, and physical filtration was involved in the retention of TiO2 NPs over the range of solution chemistry examined in this study

  17. Contrasting cellular stress responses of Baikalian and Palearctic amphipods upon exposure to humic substances: environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopopova, Marina V; Pavlichenko, Vasiliy V; Menzel, Ralph; Putschew, Anke; Luckenbach, Till; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2014-12-01

    The species-rich, endemic amphipod fauna of Lake Baikal does not overlap with the common Palearctic fauna; however, the underlying mechanisms for this are poorly understood. Considering that Palearctic lakes have a higher relative input of natural organic compounds with a dominance of humic substances (HSs) than Lake Baikal, we addressed the question whether HSs are candidate factors that affect the different species compositions in these water bodies. We hypothesized that interspecies differences in stress defense might reveal that Baikalian amphipods are inferior to Palearctic amphipods in dealing with HS-mediated stress. In this study, two key mechanisms of general stress response were examined: heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70) and multixenobiotic resistance-associated transporters (ABCB1). The results of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) showed that the basal levels (in 3-day acclimated animals) of hsp70 and abcb1 transcripts were lower in Baikalian species (Eulimnogammarus cyaneus, Eulimnogammarus verrucosus, Eulimnogammarus vittatus-the most typical littoral species) than in the Palearctic amphipod (Gammarus lacustris-the only Palearctic species distributed in the Baikalian region). In the amphipods, the stress response was induced using HSs at 10 mg L(-1) dissolved organic carbon, which was higher than in sampling sites of the studied species, but well within the range (3-10 mg L(-1)) in the surrounding water bodies populated by G. lacustris. The results of qPCR and western blotting (n = 5) showed that HS exposure led to increased hsp70/abcb1 transcripts and HSP70 protein levels in G. lacustris, whereas these transcript levels remained constant or decreased in the Baikalian species. The decreased level of stress transcripts is probably not able to confer an effective tolerance to Baikalian species against further environmental stressors in conditions with elevated HS levels. Thus, our results suggest a greater robustness of Palearctic amphipods and

  18. Comparative study of humic and fulvic substances in groundwaters. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic and fulvic acids were extracted from large volumes of three different groundwaters. After purification they were characterised in terms of proton-binding properties, molecular weight, UV spectra and trace impurities. Conditional stability constants were measured for fulvic and humic binding with cobalt, nickel, calcium and uranium. From these, intrinsic binding constants were calculated using Humic Ion-Binding Model V which was found to describe the dependence of binding strength on pH and ionic strength reasonably well. Species distributions in the groundwaters were calculated and the effects of competition with alkali earths are discussed. All the experimental data are reported in a separate volume (Appendix A and B) so that they are available for testing other models. (author)

  19. Surfactant-Wrapped Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes in Aquatic Systems: Surfactant Displacement in the Presence of Humic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiaojun; Bouchard, Dermont C

    2016-09-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) facilitates multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) debundling and enhances nanotube stability in the aqueous environment by adsorbing on the nanotube surfaces, thereby increasing repulsive electrostatic forces and steric effects. The resulting SDS-wrapped MWCNTs are utilized in industrial applications and have been widely employed in environmental studies. In the present study, MWCNTs adsorbed SDS during ultrasonication to form stable MWCNTs suspensions. Desorption of SDS from MWCNTs surfaces was then investigated as a function of Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) and background electrolyte concentrations. Due to hydrophobic effects and π-π interactions, MWCNTs exhibit higher affinity for SRHA than SDS. In the presence of SRHA, SDS adsorbed on MWCNTs was displaced. Cations (Na(+), Ca(2+)) decreased SDS desorption from MWCNTs due to charge screening effects. Interestingly, the presence of the divalent calcium cation facilitated multilayered SRHA adsorption on MWCNTs through bridging effects, while monovalent sodium reduced SRHA adsorption. Results of the present study suggest that properties of MWCNTs wrapped with commercial surfactants will be altered when these materials are released to surface waters and the surfactant coating will be displaced by natural organic matter (NOM). Changes on their surfaces will significantly affect MWCNTs fate in aquatic environments. PMID:27500910

  20. Catalytic Potential of Nano-Magnesium Oxide on Degradation of Humic Acids From Aquatic Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorban Asgari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic ozonation is a new and promising process used to remove the contaminants from drinking water and wastewater. This study aimed to evaluate the catalytic potential of nano-magnesium oxide (nano-MgO for the removal of humic acids (HA from water. Mg (NO32 solution was used to prepare MgO powder by the calcination method. In a semi-batch reactor, the catalytic ozonation was carried out. The effects of the various operating parameters, including pH, reaction time, T-butyl alcohol (TBA and phosphate on HA degradation were evaluated. Experimental results indicated that degradation of HA was increased as the pH solution and reaction time were increased. Maximum HA degradation was obtained at pH = 10 and the reaction time of 10 minutes in the catalytic process. The calculated catalytic potential of nano-MgO on ozonation of HA was 60%. Moreover, catalytic ozonation process was not affected by TBA and the main reaction on HA degradation HA have effect take place on MgO surface. According to the results of this study, the developed MgO catalyst is the active and proficient catalyst in HA degradation using the catalytic ozonation process.

  1. Separation of photosensitive substances in humic acids using molecular imprinting method based on electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Xiaoxia; Yu, Chunyan; Wang, Chong; Zhang, Fengjie

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding of the existence of photosensitive structure in humic acids (HAs) that are extracted from Changbai Mountain soils. Molecular imprinting technique was used to separate phthalocyanine-like substances from HAs with the mechanisms of electrostatic interactions and intermolecular hydrogen bond. Copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) was used as template molecule and the fraction bound by CuPc-imprinted polymers (MIP) named F (bind) presented higher spectroscopic activity than that of effluent fraction named F (eff). The fluorescence intensity of F(bind) at emission wavelength of 462 nm was 5.5 times as high as that of F(eff) at 458 nm, and the UV-vis absorbance at 254 nm of F(bind) had been increased to 2.5 times as compared with F(eff). The results of this work show the key role of humic substances with special structures in the light or photo involved process.

  2. Nutritional Value of Rice Bran Fermented by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Humic Substances and Its Utilization as a Feed Ingredient for Broiler Chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Supriyati; T Haryati; T Susanti; Susana, I. W. R.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to increase the quality of rice bran by fermentation using Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and humic substances and its utilization as a feed ingredient for broiler chickens. The experiment was carried out in two steps. First, the fermentation process was done using a completely randomized design in factorial with 16 treatments: i) Dosage of B. amyloliquefaciens (2.108 cfu/g), 10 and 20 g/kg; ii) Graded levels of humic substances, 0, 100, 200, and 400 ppm; iii) Length o...

  3. Modelling metal-humic substances-surface systems: reasons for success, failure and possible routes for peace of mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron oxides and oxy-hydroxides are commonly of considerable importance in the sorption of ions onto rocks, soils and sediments. They can be the controlling sorptive phases even if they are present in relatively small quantities. In common with other oxides and clay minerals, the sorption pH-edge of metals is directly linked to their hydrolysis: the higher the residual charge on the metal ion, the lower the pH-edge. Modelling of this process has been successfully carried out using different microscopic or macroscopic definitions of the interface (e.g. surface complexation or ion exchange models that may or may not include mineralogical descriptions). The influence of organic material on the sorption of many metals is of significant. This organic material includes simple organic molecules and more complex exo-polymeric substances (e.g. humic substances) produced by the decay of natural organic matter. Sorption of this organic material to mineral surfaces has been the subject of a large body of work. The various types of organic substances do not share the same affinities for mineral surfaces in general, and for iron oxides and oxy-hydroxides in particular. In those cases in which successful models of the component binary systems (i.e. metal-surface, metal-organic, organic-surface) have been developed, the formation of mixed surface complexes, the evolution of the surface itself, the addition order in laboratory systems, and the evolution of natural organic matter fractions during sorption, have often precluded a satisfactory description of metal-surface-organic ternary systems over a sufficiently wide range of parameter values (i.e. pH, ionic strength, concentration of humic substances). This manuscript describes the reasons for some successes and failures in the modelling of the ternary systems. Promising recent advances and possible methods of providing more complete descriptions of these intricate systems are also discussed. (author)

  4. Atmospheric HULIS: How humic-like are they? A comprehensive and critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. R. Graber

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A class of organic molecules extracted from atmospheric aerosol particles and isolated from fog and cloud water has been termed HUmic-LIke Substances (HULIS due to a certain resemblance to terrestrial and aquatic humic and fulvic acids. In light of the interest that this class of atmospheric compounds currently attracts, we comprehensively review HULIS properties, as well as laboratory and field investigations concerning their formation and characterization in atmospheric samples. While sharing some important features such as polyacidic nature, accumulating evidence suggests that atmospheric HULIS differ substantially from terrestrial and aquatic humic substances. Major differences between HULIS and humic substances, including smaller average molecular weight, lower aromatic moiety content, greater surface activity, better droplet activation ability, as well as others, are highlighted. Several alternatives are proposed that may explain such differences: (1 the possibility that mono- and di-carboxylic acids and mineral acids abundant in the atmosphere prevent the formation of large humic 'supramolecular associations'; (2 that large humic macromolecules are destroyed in the atmosphere by UV radiation, O3, and OH- radicals; (3 that 'HULIS' actually consists of a complex, unresolved mixture of relatively small molecules rather than macromolecular entities; and (4 that HULIS formed via abiotic and short-lived oxidative reaction pathways differ substantially from humic substances formed over long time periods via biologically-mediated reactions. It should also be recalled that the vast majority of studies of HULIS relate to the water soluble fraction, which would include only the fulvic acid fraction of humic substances, and exclude the humic acid (base-soluble and humin (insoluble fractions of humic substances. A significant effort towards adopting standard extraction and characterization methods is required to develop a better and meaningful

  5. Measurement of associations of pharmaceuticals with dissolved humic substances using solid phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yunjie; Teppen, Brian J; Boyd, Stephen A; Li, Hui

    2013-04-01

    An innovative method was developed to determine association of carbadox, lincomycin and tetracycline with dissolved humic acids using solid phase extraction (SPE). Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and DOM-bound pharmaceuticals passed through the SPE cartridge while the cartridge retained freely dissolved pharmaceuticals from water. This method was validated by comparison with the results measured using the common equilibrium dialysis technique. For the SPE method pharmaceutical interaction with DOM required ∼30h to approach the equilibration, whereas 50-120h was needed for the equilibrium dialysis technique. The uneven distributions of freely membrane-penetrating pharmaceuticals and protons inside vs. outside of the dialysis cell due to the Donnan effect resulted in overestimates of pharmaceutical affinity with DOM for the equilibrium dialysis method. The SPE technique eliminates the Donnan effect, and demonstrates itself as a more efficient, less laborious and more accurate method. The measured binding coefficients with DOM followed the order of carbadoxLeonardite humic acid were greater than those with Aldrich humic acid due to more interaction sites, i.e. carboxylic and phenolic functional moieties, present in the Leonardite humic acid. The results obtained suggest that many pharmaceuticals could be significantly bound to DOM, which alters their fate and mobility in the environment. PMID:23260244

  6. REMOVAL OF TASTE- AND ODOR-CAUSING COMPOUNDS BY BIOFILMS GROWN ON HUMIC SUBSTANCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory experiments showed that biodegradation of taste- and odor-causing compounds by biofilms grown on natural humic materials is feasible. Although the mineralization of peat fulvic acid (PFA) was relatively low (about 10 percent), long-term application of the PFA resulted ...

  7. Fixation and transport of uranium by humic substances (1962); Fixation et transport de l'uranium par les substances humiques (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1962-03-15

    One enter upon the study of the part taken by organic substances in ores that contain uranium in a disseminated form, without mineralization, being considered the reaction between uranium and humus. 'Humic acids' are extracted from the peat by ammonia. By the fact of their ability to cationic exchange, these are forming humates with metal cations; monovalent humates, normally soluble in water, can become insoluble after treatment of humic acids with methanal. The polyvalent humates are insoluble in water, especially humates of U (IV) and uranyl U (VI). Action of Li, Na, K, Mg, Ca uranyl carbonates solutions on the humic acids results in the formation of humates containing uranyl and the other cation. 100 g of humic acids give a fixation of no more than 38 g of uranium as uranyl. In contact with uraniferous weakly concentrated solutions, they fix 4 to 8 g according to pH, with a yield in the extraction greater than 95 per cent. The action of a sodium humate solution on a humate of uranyl give a solution containing a soluble sodium and uranyl humate. The solution is precipitated at various degrees by the polyvalent cations and insoluble humic substances. In all cases, the fixation of uranium with such prepared humic acids corresponds to a chemisorption of uranyl cations. (author) [French] L'etude du role des matieres organiques dans les minerais contenant de l'uranium sous une forme disseminee, sans mineralisation, est abordee en envisageant les reactions de l'uranium et de l'humus. Des 'acides humiques' sont extraits de la tourbe par l'ammoniaque. Par leur capacite d'echange cationique, ils forment des humates avec les cations metalliques; les humates de metaux monovalents, normalement solubles dans l'eau, peuvent etre rendus insolubles apres traitement des acides humiques par le methanal. Les humates de metaux plurivalents sont insolubles dans l'eau, en particulier ceux de U (IV) et d'uranyle U (VI

  8. Spectroscopic study (DRIFT, SERS and 1H NMR) of peat, leonardite and lignite humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francioso, O.; Sànchez-Cortés, S.; Tugnoli, V.; Marzadori, C.; Ciavatta, C.

    2001-05-01

    Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform, surface-enhanced Raman and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies were applied to investigate the structure of humic acids (HA) extracted from peat (P-HA), leonardite (Le-HA) and lignite (Li-HA) samples. The combined use of these techniques has shown a specific pattern of functional groups for each sample. P-HA was characterised by a greater content of oxygenate (COOH, C-OH in carbohydrates and phenols) and aliphatic groups. Le-HA and Li-HA showed a lower content of sugar-like components and polyethers. On the other hand, the aromatic structures were ubiquitous in all samples, although the different composition in Le-HA and Li-HA could be employed to identify and distinguish the HA in these two kinds of humic materials.

  9. Stability and mobility of cerium oxide nanoparticles in soils: effects of humic substances, pH and ionic strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yirui; Mu, Linlin; Li, Chunyan; Bai, Lingyun; Jacobson, Astrid; Darnault, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Among the large number of types of nanomaterials used in the field of nanotechnology, cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) are among the top five most commonly utilized by industry, agriculture and nanomedicine for their unique physico-chemical properties. They are used, for example, in the production of catalysts, as fuel additives, and as polishing agents. Therefore, the release and encounter of CeO2 NPs in the environment following their application, waste disposal, life-cycle and accidents is inevitable. It is critical to examine the behavior of CeO2 NPs released in the environment to assess the risk they pose to the environmental and public health. In particular, little is known about the fate and transport of CeO2 NPs in soils and groundwater. To assess the behavior of CeO2 NPs, it is important to investigate the factors that affect their stability and mobility. Humic substances are a major component of soils and have been shown to have the potential to impact the transport and retention of nanoparticles in soils. Consequently, our study characterizes the impacts of humic and fulvic acids on the stability and mobility of cerium oxides in model porous media under various pH and ionic strength conditions. Batch experiments conducted at various concentrations of humic and fulvic acids coupled with a wide range of pHs and ionic strengths were investigated. Selected parameters from these batch studies were then used as experimental conditions representative of environmental systems to perform column transport experiments to assess of the mobility of CeO2 NPs in saturated porous media, which is the first step in simulating their behavior in soil and groundwater systems.

  10. Influence of humic substances on Co[sup 2+] sorption by a subsurface mineral separate and its mineralogic components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, J.M.; Resch, C.T.; Smith, S.C. (Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The sorption of Co[sup 2+] (10[sup [minus]6] mol/L) was measured on subsurface mineral materials in the absence and presence of a sorbed leonardite humic acid (LHA) to (1) evaluate the sorptive role of mineral-bound humic substances, and (2) establish approaches to model metal ion binding in composite materials. The subsurface materials were a <2.0 [mu]m size fraction of an ultisol saprolite (CP) and this same material treated with dithonite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) to remove Fe-oxides (DCP). Comparable experiments (with and without LHA) were also performed with mineral sorbents representing dominant phases in the CP separate (gibbsite, Al-geothite, and kalonite) to evaluate their potential contributions to Co sorption. The mineral-bound LHA ranged in concentration between 0.1-0.4 mg-C/m[sup 2], representing approximately 0.7% of the subsurface isolate by mass. In solid-free suspensions, the affinity of LHA for Co increased with pH and decreasing I (K[sub d] ranging 20-450 L/g). Mineral-bound LHA increased Co sorption on all the sorbents by factors of 10-60%, with the greatest augmentation noted at pH values (4.5-6.5) where (1) maximum LHA sorption occurred, and (2) Co sorption to the mineral phase was weak and dominated by ion exchange. The LHA appeared simply to augment, rather than to change the intrinsic adsorption behavior of the mineral sorbents. Accordingly, predictions of the K[sub d] for Co on the LHA-coated subsurface materials (DCP, CP) based on a linear additivity model agreed well with the experimental data, suggesting that the complex humic-mineral association acted as a noninterative sorbent mixture at low aqueous Co concentrations.

  11. Speciation of Pu(III) in the environmental system humic substances-groundwater-kaolinite

    OpenAIRE

    Buda, Razvan Aurel

    2006-01-01

    For the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories, the possible migration of the radiotoxic waste into environment must be considered. Since plutonium is the major contribution at the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear waste, it requires special care with respect to its mobilization into the groundwater. Plutonium has one of the most complicated chemistry of all elements. It can coexist in 4 oxidation states parallel in one solution. In this work is shown that in the presence of humic ...

  12. Determination of dynamic metal complexes and their diffusion coefficients in the presence of different humic substances by combining two analytical techniques.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Manek, A.; Niyogi, S.; Hudson, J.

    The combined use of a competing ligand exchange (CLE) method and a diffusive gradient in thin films (DGT) technique in a quasi-labile system provides a better understanding of dynamic metal (Cu and Ni) complexes in the presence of humic substances...

  13. The effects of humic substances on the transport of radionuclides: Recent improvements in the prediction of behaviour and the understanding of mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bryan, N.D.; Abrahamsen, L.; Evans, N.; Warwick, P.; Buckau, G.; Weng, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    Some recent developments made during the European Union 6th Framework Integrated Project FUNMIG in the understanding and prediction of behaviour in ternary systems of radionuclides, humic substances and mineral surfaces are described. These developments are placed in the context of the existing lite

  14. Stimulative effect of five humic substances on seed growth of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) poppy (Papaver somniferum L ), pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and rape (Brassica napus subsp. napus)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šerá, Božena; Novák, František; Gajdová, Iveta

    Bari: University of Bari, 2012. s. 2039. [International Congress Eurosoil 2012. Soil Science for the Benefit of Mankind and Environment /4./. 02.07.2012-06.07.2012, Bari] Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : humic substances * seed growth * selected agricultural crops Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  15. Application of a constrained regularization method to extraction of affinity distributions: proton and metal binding to humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsetti, Silvia; Andrade, Estela María; Molina, Fernando V

    2009-08-15

    The binding of proton and metal cations to humic substances has been analyzed with a regularized fitting procedure (using the CONTIN software package) to extract conditional affinity distributions, valid at a given ionic strength, from binding (titration) curves. The procedure was previously tested with simulated titration curves using a simple bi-Gaussian model, the NICA-Donnan model, and the Stockholm humic model. Application to literature data for proton binding shows that in several cases the affinity distribution found is bimodal (carboxylic and phenolic sites) as usually assumed; however in other cases, specially for fulvic acids, a trimodal distribution is clearly discerned, with a smaller peak between the two noted above attributed to the presence of vicinal carboxylic groups. The analysis of metal binding curves has been performed in a few cases where the available data could be reliably processed, separating the proton affinity distribution and obtaining the conditional affinity spectra. For Cd(II) and Pb(II) a bimodal distribution is found, attributed in principle to mono- and bidentate binding, based on spectroscopic data. In the case of Cu(II), a more complex affinity distribution is found showing 3-4 peaks; this is consistent with spectroscopic studies, where different binding modes, up to tetradentate, have been observed. PMID:19477457

  16. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, stress and aging: Identifying the complex interplay of genetic pathways following the treatment with humic substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph eMenzel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Low concentrations of the dissolved leonardite humic acid HuminFeed® (HF prolonged the lifespan and enhanced the thermal stress resistance of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. However, growth was impaired and reproduction delayed, effects which have also been identified in response to other polyphenolic monomers, including Tannic acid, Rosmarinic acid, and Caffeic acid. Moreover, a chemical modification of HF, which increases its phenolic/quinonoid moieties, magnified the biological impact on C. elegans. To gain a deep insight into the molecular basis of these effects, we performed global transcriptomics on young adult (3 d and old adult (11 d nematodes exposed to two different concentrations of HF. We also studied several C. elegans mutant strains in respect to HF derived longevity and compared all results with data obtained for the chemically modified HF. The gene expression pattern of young HF treated nematodes displayed a significant overlap to other conditions known to provoke longevity, including various plant polyphenol monomers. Besides the regulation of parts of the metabolism, TGF- signaling and Insulin-like signaling, lysosomal activities seem to contribute most to HF’s and modified HF’s lifespan prolonging action. These results support the notion that the phenolic/quinonoid moieties of humic substances are major building blocks that drive the physiological effects observed in C. elegans.

  17. The Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, Stress and Aging: Identifying the Complex Interplay of Genetic Pathways Following the Treatment with Humic Substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Ralph; Menzel, Stefanie; Swain, Suresh C; Pietsch, Kerstin; Tiedt, Sophie; Witczak, Jördis; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2012-01-01

    Low concentrations of the dissolved leonardite humic acid HuminFeed(®) (HF) prolonged the lifespan and enhanced the thermal stress resistance of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. However, growth was impaired and reproduction delayed, effects which have also been identified in response to other polyphenolic monomers, including Tannic acid, Rosmarinic acid, and Caffeic acid. Moreover, a chemical modification of HF, which increases its phenolic/quinonoid moieties, magnified the biological impact on C. elegans. To gain a deep insight into the molecular basis of these effects, we performed global transcriptomics on young adult (3 days) and old adult (11 days) nematodes exposed to two different concentrations of HF. We also studied several C. elegans mutant strains in respect to HF derived longevity and compared all results with data obtained for the chemically modified HF. The gene expression pattern of young HF-treated nematodes displayed a significant overlap to other conditions known to provoke longevity, including various plant polyphenol monomers. Besides the regulation of parts of the metabolism, transforming growth factor-beta signaling, and Insulin-like signaling, lysosomal activities seem to contribute most to HF's and modified HF's lifespan prolonging action. These results support the notion that the phenolic/quinonoid moieties of humic substances are major building blocks that drive the physiological effects observed in C. elegans. PMID:22529848

  18. Effects of humic substances derived from organic waste enhancement on the growth and mineral nutrition of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyheraguibel, B; Silvestre, J; Morard, P

    2008-07-01

    A physico-chemical process has been developed to transform and enhance lignocellulosic waste in liquid humic extracts: humic-like substances (HLS). The aim of this study was to determine the effects of HLS on plant physiology in order to consider their agricultural use as organic fertilizers. The effects of HLS were evaluated on maize seed germination, and their impact on growth, development and mineral nutrition was studied on maize plants cultivated under hydroponic conditions. The experimental results showed that HLS do not increase the percentage and rate of germination but enhance the root elongation of seeds thus treated. Positive effects were also observed on the whole plant growth as well as on root, shoot and leaf biomass. These effects can be related to the high water and mineral consumption of plants undergoing this treatment. The high water efficiency indicated that such plants produce more biomass than non-treated plants for the same consumption of the nutrient solution. Furthermore, the use of HLS induced a flowering precocity and modified root development suggesting a possible interaction of HLS with developmental processes. Considering the beneficial effect of HLS on different stages of plant growth, their use may present various scientific and economic advantages. The physico-chemical transformation of sawdust is an interesting way of enhancing organic waste materials. PMID:17962015

  19. Effect of humic substances aggregation on the determination of fluoride in water using an ion selective electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Junjie; Gagliardi, Simona; McCoustra, Martin R S; Arrighi, Valeria

    2016-09-01

    The control of drinking water quality is critical in preventing fluorosis. In this study humic substances (HS) are considered as representative of natural organic matter (NOM) in water. We show that when HS aggregate the response of fluoride ion selective electrodes (ISE) may be perturbed. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) results of both synthetic solutions and natural water sample suggest that low pH and high ionic strength induce HS aggregation. In the presence of HS aggregates, fluoride concentration measured by ISE has a reduction up to 19%. A new "open cage" concept has been developed to explain this reversible phenomenon. The interference of HS aggregation on fluoride measurement can be effectively removed by centrifugation pretreatment. PMID:27276164

  20. Development of an innovative peat lipstick based on the UV-B protective effect of humic substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Klöcking

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Humic acids (HA are known for their antiviral and UV-B protecting effects, and are considered promising as ingredients for a UV-protective lipstick which is being developed to minimise or even prevent recurrences of UV- induced herpes. In this study, the UV/Vis spectra of three natural HA and three synthetic HA-like substances are analysed to determine the appropriateness of their UV-absorbing characteristics for the product under development. The contribution of a matrix component (castor oil to the total UV absorption of the lipstick is also assessed. The results confirm the expected high UV-B absorption of the individual test substances, but reveal considerable differences in the UV-A wavelength range. Castor oil absorbs only UV-B radiation; and when mixed with HA it enhances total absorption in the UV-B range, but reduces it in the UV-A range. This is probably due to molecular interactions between castor oil and HA. Preliminary results from cultures of human U937 cells assayed for survival 24 hours after exposure to UV-B radiation show that both HA and castor oil exert a significant concentration-dependent UV-B protective filter effect similar to that of the UV-B absorbing reference substance p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA.

  1. Atmospheric HULIS: how humic-like are they? A comprehensive and critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Graber, E. R.; Y. Rudich

    2005-01-01

    A class of organic molecules extracted from atmospheric aerosol particles and isolated from fog and cloud water has been termed HUmic-LIke Substances (HULIS) due to a certain resemblance to terrestrial and aquatic humic and fulvic acids. In light of the interest that this class of atmospheric compounds currently attracts, we comprehensively review HULIS properties, as well as laboratory and field investigations concerning their formation and characterization in atmospheric s...

  2. Characterization of the humic substances isolated from postfire soils of scotch pine forest in Togljatty city, Samara region by the 13C-NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, Ekaterina; Abakumov, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    Postpyrogenic soil dynamics is an informative tool for studying of soil elementary processes in extreme temperature conditions and for predicting of short time environmental changes in conditions of catastrophic landscape changes. Soil organic matter (SOM) system evolution is the most rapid process of postpyrogenic soil development. In this relation the evaluation of humus accumulation rates and humification trend were conducted with use of the classical chemical and modern spectroscopy methods. Soil restoration after spontaneous forest fires near Togljatty city (Samara region, Russia) was abandoned in 2010, and further monitoring over the next four years was organized to evaluate the speed of biogenic processes and humus accumulation dynamics. Three key soil plots were studied for estimating SOM quality changes under the forest fire effect: surface forest fire, crown forest fire and control. Total carbon and nitrogen content as well as Cha/Cfa ratios (content of humic acids/ content of fulvic acids), were estimated to assess the dynamics of soil restoration. Humic acid powders were extracted and analyzed by elemental composition and 13C-NMR spectroscopy to assess changes in humic substance structure and composition. The data obtained indicate that burning of a forest floor and sod (humic) horizon led to humus losses and decreases in total carbon stocks. As a result of the fires, the content of humic acids in the pyrogenic horizon increased, leading alterations of humus type. Greater increases in the degree of organic matter humification were observed for surface fires than crown fires. It was shown that the humus molecular composition was substantially affected by the wildfires. The data show an increase in aromaticity, a loss of oxygen-containing groups and dehydrogenation of humic acids. Humic acids in the soils of the control plots and after wildfires were significantly different, especially in the ratios of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon. The increase in the

  3. Effects of water-extratable humic substances on molecular physiology of nitrate uptake in two maize inbred lines with different nitrogen use efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasi, Nicola; Monte, Rossella; Rizzardo, Cecilia; Venuti, Silvia; Zamboni, Anita; Cesco, Stefano; Pinton, Roberto; Varanini, Zeno

    2009-01-01

    Soil humic substances are known to positively influence plant growth and nutrition. In particular, low-molecular fractions have been shown to increase NO3- uptake and PM H+-ATPase activity and alter expression of related genes. In this work, a water-extractable low-molecular humic fraction (WEHS) has been tested for its ability to affect molecular physiology of nitrate uptake in two maize inbred lines with different NUE. WEHS causes an acceleration of the increase in net nitrate uptake rate i...

  4. Aquatic toxicity of forty industrial chemicals: Testing in support of hazardous substance spill prevention regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, M. W.; Ward, C. H.

    1981-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is presently developing hazardous substance spill regulations to help prevent water pollution. Aquatic animal toxicity data are used as criteria for the designation and categorization of substances as hazardous, even though this type of data is not available for many industrial chemicals. Static 96-hr. toxicity tests were conducted with 40 such chemicals to provide basic toxicity data for regulatory decision making. Thirty-two of the 40 chemicals tested were hazardous to aquatic life as determined by 96-hr. LC 50's less than or equal to 500 mg/l. All 40 chemicals were tested with the fresh-water fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, and ten chemicals were also tested with the salt-water grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio.

  5. Number of independent parameters in the potentiometric titration of humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Thomas; Manceau, Alain

    2010-03-16

    With the advent of high-precision automatic titrators operating in pH stat mode, measuring the mass balance of protons in solid-solution mixtures against the pH of natural and synthetic polyelectrolytes is now routine. However, titration curves of complex molecules typically lack obvious inflection points, which complicates their analysis despite the high-precision measurements. The calculation of site densities and median proton affinity constants (pK) from such data can lead to considerable covariance between fit parameters. Knowing the number of independent parameters that can be freely varied during the least-squares minimization of a model fit to titration data is necessary to improve the model's applicability. This number was calculated for natural organic matter by applying principal component analysis (PCA) to a reference data set of 47 independent titration curves from fulvic and humic acids measured at I = 0.1 M. The complete data set was reconstructed statistically from pH 3.5 to 9.8 with only six parameters, compared to seven or eight generally adjusted with common semi-empirical speciation models for organic matter, and explains correlations that occur with the higher number of parameters. Existing proton-binding models are not necessarily overparametrized, but instead titration data lack the sensitivity needed to quantify the full set of binding properties of humic materials. Model-independent conditional pK values can be obtained directly from the derivative of titration data, and this approach is the most conservative. The apparent proton-binding constants of the 23 fulvic acids (FA) and 24 humic acids (HA) derived from a high-quality polynomial parametrization of the data set are pK(H,COOH)(FA) = 4.18 +/- 0.21, pK(H,Ph-OH)(FA) = 9.29 +/- 0.33, pK(H,COOH)(HA) = 4.49 +/- 0.18, and pK(H,Ph-OH)(HA) = 9.29 +/- 0.38. Their values at other ionic strengths are more reliably calculated with the empirical Davies equation than any existing model fit. PMID

  6. Critical analysis of the data on complexation of lanthanides and actinides by natural organic matter: particular case of humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document proposes a critical analysis of the models that describe the actinides and lanthanides complexation by natural organic matter in general and by humic substances in particular. In order to better delimit the particular properties of these substances the most influent physical and chemical properties on complexation are recalled as a preamble. Models as well as data that has been used are reviewed, compiled, and eventually compared to independent data in order to identify (i) their application domain, (ii) the possible simplifications which permit to obtain operational models, (iii) the conditions in which simplifications cannot be ascertained yet, and (iv) the data or fields of knowledge which are still too uncertain. A comparison between the different models is proposed in order to adapt parameters from one model to another minimising the experimental acquisitions, or at least to focus on missing data. Usually, data on the complexation of free ions Mz+ are reliable; as soon as hydrolysis, or competition with another ligand in general, in at stake data are much less reliable. Predictions from models are much more uncertain: formation of mixed complexes with hydroxide or carbonate anions is not univocal whatever the modelling strategy. Hints for transfer functions between models which are believed to be incompatible could be explored in order to justify necessary simplifications for using operational modelling. Influence on the solubility of oxides could be quantified, but it is difficult to clearly separate it from colloidal particles stabilisation. The account of the competition between cations by the models has also been tested. In view of the small number of available experimental data there still lie some uncertainties especially for the media that are close to neutrality and in the case of competition with magnesium, but overall in the case of the competition with aluminium and iron. The influence of redox activity of humic substances is also

  7. Heavy metal sequestration by humic substances during phyto-treatment of sewage sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of heavy metals in sludges stabilized in a reed bed system, may affect their use for agricultural purposes; however, the environmental impact of sludges depends on the availability and phyto toxicity of their heavy metal. The aim of this paper was to determine the effectiveness of a reed bed (Phragmites Australia) sludge treatment system in two urban wastewater treatment plants in Italy after two-year period of operation: by estimating the process of sludge stabilization, following conventional and non conventional parameters related with the evolution of organic matter quality Water soluble Carbon, Dehydrogenase activity, Fulvic Acids, Humic Acids, Pyrolytic indices or organic matter Mineralization and Humification); by following the heavy metal speciation bioavailability in sludges. (Author)

  8. The extraction and characterization of humic substances from Philippine sources. Part 2: Philippine waters and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) from freshwater estuarine and marine sediment and water samples were extracted and characterized by ash content, elemental composition and UV-visible and IR spectroscopy. The H/C and N/C atomic ratios for marine sediment HAs were in the range (1.14-1.42) and (0.094-0.160) respectively; the H/C and N/C ratios for freshwater sediment HAs were (1.24-1.30) and (0.074-0.120) respectively. The IR spectra for the FAs showed a greater proportion of polar oxygen containing functional groups compared to the HAs. (author). 21 refs.; 19 figs.; 6 tabs

  9. Compost and crude humic substances produced from selected wastes and their effects on Zea mays L. nutrient uptake and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanivell, Perumal; Susilawati, Kasim; Ahmed, Osumanu Haruna; Majid, Nik Muhamad

    2013-01-01

    Production of agriculture and timber commodities leads generation of enormous quantity of wastes. Improper disposal of these agroindustrial wastes pollutes the environment. This problem could be reduced by adding value to them. Therefore, a study was carried out to analyse and compare the nutrients content of RS, RH, SD, and EFB of composts and crude humic substances; furthermore, their effect on growth, dry matter production, and nutrient uptake for Zea mays L., and selected soil chemical properties were evaluated. Standard procedures were used to analyze humic acids (HA), crude fulvic acids (CFA), crude humin (CH), soil, dry matter production and nutrient uptake. Sawdust and RS compost matured at 42 and 47 days, respectively, while RH and EFB composts were less matured at 49th day of composting. Rice straw compost had higher ash, N, P, CEC, HA, K, and Fe contents with lower organic matter, total organic carbon, and C/N and C/P ratios. The HA of sawdust compost showed higher carbon, carboxylic, K, and Ca contents compared to those of RS, RH, and EFB. Crude FA of RS compost showed highest pH, total K, Ca, Mg, and Na contents. Crude humin from RS compost had higher contents of ash, N, P, and CEC. Rice straw was superior in compost, CFA, and CH, while sawdust compost was superior in HA. Application of sawdust compost significantly increased maize plants' diameter, height, dry matter production, N, P, and cations uptake. It also reduced N, P, and K based chemical fertilizer use by 90%. Application of CH and the composts evaluated in this study could be used as an alternative for chemical fertilizers in maize cultivation. PMID:24319353

  10. Compost and Crude Humic Substances Produced from Selected Wastes and Their Effects on Zea mays L. Nutrient Uptake and Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perumal Palanivell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Production of agriculture and timber commodities leads generation of enormous quantity of wastes. Improper disposal of these agroindustrial wastes pollutes the environment. This problem could be reduced by adding value to them. Therefore, a study was carried out to analyse and compare the nutrients content of RS, RH, SD, and EFB of composts and crude humic substances; furthermore, their effect on growth, dry matter production, and nutrient uptake for Zea mays L., and selected soil chemical properties were evaluated. Standard procedures were used to analyze humic acids (HA, crude fulvic acids (CFA, crude humin (CH, soil, dry matter production and nutrient uptake. Sawdust and RS compost matured at 42 and 47 days, respectively, while RH and EFB composts were less matured at 49th day of composting. Rice straw compost had higher ash, N, P, CEC, HA, K, and Fe contents with lower organic matter, total organic carbon, and C/N and C/P ratios. The HA of sawdust compost showed higher carbon, carboxylic, K, and Ca contents compared to those of RS, RH, and EFB. Crude FA of RS compost showed highest pH, total K, Ca, Mg, and Na contents. Crude humin from RS compost had higher contents of ash, N, P, and CEC. Rice straw was superior in compost, CFA, and CH, while sawdust compost was superior in HA. Application of sawdust compost significantly increased maize plants’ diameter, height, dry matter production, N, P, and cations uptake. It also reduced N, P, and K based chemical fertilizer use by 90%. Application of CH and the composts evaluated in this study could be used as an alternative for chemical fertilizers in maize cultivation.

  11. Natural humic substances effects on the life history traits of Latonopsis australis SARS (1888) (Cladocera--Crustacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho-Pereira, Ticiana Soares de Andrade; Santos, Thirza de Santana; Pestana, Edilene M S; Souza, Fábio Neves; Lage, Vivian Marina Gomes Barbosa; Nunesmaia, Bárbara Janaína Bezerra; Sena, Palloma Thaís Souza; Mariano-Neto, Eduardo; da Silva, Eduardo Mendes

    2015-02-01

    Cultivation medium is one of the first aspects to be considered in zooplankton laboratory cultivation. The use of artificial media does not concern to reproduce natural conditions to the cultivations, which may be achieved by using natural organic compounds like humic substances (HS). This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a concentrate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the Negro River (NR(1)) and an extraction of humic acids (HA) from humus produced by Eisenia andrei on the life history traits of laboratory-based Latonopsis australis SARS (1888). A cohort life table approach was used to provide information about the effectiveness of NR and HA as supplements for the artificial cultivation of L. australis. Additionally, we seek to observe a maximization of L. australis artificial cultivation fitness by expanding the range of HS concentrations. The first experiment demonstrated that the females of L. australis reared under NR10 (mgDOCL(-1)) may have experienced an acceleration of the population life cycle, as the females have proportionally reproduced more and lived shorter than controls. By contrast, the use of the HA did not improve life history traits considered. The expansion of the concentration range (5, 10, 20 and 50 mgDOCL(-1)) corroborated the patterns observed on the first assay. Results for the fitness estimates combined with shorter lifespans than controls demonstrated trade-offs between reproductive output and female longevity reared under NR conditions, with NR20 been suggested as the best L. australis cultivation medium. This response might be associated with hormone-like effects. PMID:25025739

  12. Short-column anion-exchange chromatography for soil and peat humic substances profiling by step-wise gradient of high pH aqueous sodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutta, Milan; Ráczová, Janka; Góra, Róbert; Pessl, Juraj

    2015-08-21

    Novel anion-exchange liquid chromatographic method with step gradient of aqueous EDTA(4-) based mobile phase elution has been developed to profile available Slovak soil humic substances and alkaline extracts of various soils. The method utilize short glass column (30mm×3mm) filled in with hydrolytically stable particles (60μm diameter) Separon HEMA-BIO 1000 having (diethylamino)ethyl functional groups. Step gradient was programmed by mixing mobile phase composed of aqueous solution of sodium EDTA (pH 12.0; 5mmolL(-1)) and mobile phase constituted of aqueous solution of sodium EDTA (pH 12.0, 500mmolL(-1)). The FLD of HSs was set to excitation wavelength 480nm and emission wavelength 530nm (λem). Separation mechanism was studied by use of selected aromatic acids related to humic acids with the aid of UV spectrophotometric detection at 280nm. The proposed method benefits from high ionic strength (I=5molL(-1)) of the end mobile phase buffer and provides high recovery of humic acids (98%). Accurate and reproducible profiling of studied humic substances, alkaline extracts of various types of soils enables straightforward characterization and differentiation of HSs in arable and forest soils. Selected model aromatic acids were used for separation mechanism elucidation. PMID:26143606

  13. Effect of Humic Substances on the Trapping and Transformations of U(VI) by Ferrihydrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dublet, G.; Brown, G. E.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.; Janot, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Old Rifle DOE site in Colorado was a major site for milling uranium ore. U concentrations up to 1.8 uM persist in the Rifle aquifer, even after 'cleaning' the waste source of contaminations [1]. Understanding the behavior of U(VI) in this anthropogenically perturbed system is crucial for controlling the level of U contamination. Direct investigations of U speciation at this site have shown that U is associated with a wide variety of minerals as well as with natural organic matter (NOM) [2]. NOM has multiple functional groups which can be highly reactive with respect to aqueous metal ions, including actinides. Such interactions result in the formation of organo-mineral-metal (ternary) complexes and catalyze redox transformations; in addition, they can enhance mineral dissolution and metal transport [3,4,5]. In the complex soil/sediment system, aqueous, mineral, and organic phases are intimately mixed and their interactions are difficult to characterize by direct investigation [1]. The nanoparticulate iron hydroxide ferrihydrite (Fh), which is ubiquitous in many natural soils and highly reactive toward metal ions, is expected to significantly influence the fate of U in natural soils and is abundant in the subsurface at the Rifle site. NOM is also abundant at this site; however, little is known about the effect of NOM associated with ferrihydrite on the fate of U in such subsurface environments. To date, simple model systems composed mainly of two components (Fh and NOM) [6], (U and NOM or simple organic molecules) [7], or (Fh and U) [8,9], and more rarely composed of three components [10,11] have been studied in an effort to understand interactions among these components. In order to extend this earlier work to ternary systems, we have carried out batch reactions of U, a humic acid standard - Eliott soil humic acid (ESHA), and Fh under conditions that mimic those in the subsurface at Rifle. We have used U L3- and Fe K-edge XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy coupled

  14. Interactions between radionuclides and organic colloids. Structure and reactivity of humic compounds; Interactions entre radionucleides et colloides organiques. Structure et reactivite des substances humiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plancque, G

    2001-09-01

    Humic compounds are the main organic colloids present in natural waters. These compounds can significantly modify the speciation of metals and control their properties, like migration, toxicity or bio-availability. It is thus important to study their speciation in conditions representative to those encountered in the natural environment. The aim of this work is to analyze the reactivity of these humic compounds. Two spectroscopic techniques have been used: the time-resolution laser spectro-fluorimetry, limited to the study of fluorescent elements, and the electro-spray source mass spectroscopy which requires the development of specific protocols for all elements of the periodic classification system. Europium, a fluorescent element analogue to trivalent actinides, has been chosen as test-metal for the intercomparison of both spectroscopic techniques. The first technique has permitted to determine the inorganic and organic speciation (spectra and lifetime of europium hydroxides and carbonates, and constants of interaction with humic acids, respectively). The limitations of this technique in the study of inorganic speciation has been evidenced. Humic compounds have a badly defined structure. The use of high-resolution mass spectroscopy has permitted to propose in a direct and experimental way, a molecular structure of aquatic fulvic acids in agreement with their known physico-chemical properties. (J.S.)

  15. Adsorption of insecticidal Cry1Ab protein to humic substances. 1. Experimental approach and mechanistic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Michael; Tomaszewski, Jeanne E; Madliger, Michael; Schwarzenbach, René P

    2012-09-18

    Adsorption is a key process affecting the fate of insecticidal Cry proteins (Bt toxins), produced by genetically modified Bt crops, in soils. However, the mechanisms of adsorption to soil organic matter (SOM) remain poorly understood. This work assesses the forces driving the adsorption of Cry1Ab to Leonardite humic acid (LHA), used as a model for SOM. We studied the effects of solution pH and ionic strength (I) on adsorption using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopy. Initial Cry1Ab adsorption rates were close to diffusion-limited and resulted in extensive adsorption, even at pH >6, at which LHA and Cry1Ab carry negative net charges. Adsorption increased with decreasing I at pH >6, indicating Cry1Ab-LHA patch-controlled electrostatic attraction via positively charged domains of Cry1Ab. Upon rinsing, only a fraction of Cry1Ab desorbed, suggesting a range of interaction energies of Cry1Ab with LHA. Different interaction energies likely resulted from nonuniformity in the LHA surface polarity, with higher Cry1Ab affinities to more apolar LHA regions due to the hydrophobic effect. Contributions from the hydrophobic effect were substantiated by comparison of the adsorption of Cry1Ab and the reference proteins albumin and lysozyme to LHA and to apolar and polar model surfaces. PMID:22862304

  16. Humic substances and the biogeochemical arsenic cycle in groundwater of the Blackfoot Disease endemic area, southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulp, T. R.; Jean, J.

    2009-12-01

    (V) reduction in these sediments was not stimulated by amendment with lactate, or when hydrogen was supplied as a possible electron donor. However, As(V)-reduction was stimulated by the addition of the reduced humics analogue AHQDS, demonstrating that reduced humic substances in the aquifer can serve as electron donors for biological As(V) reduction. These findings suggest that the population of As(V) reducing bacteria in the aquifer are well suited to use endogenous organic compounds as heterotrophic electron donors and that this process is not electron-donor limited at in-situ conditions. The potential for reduced humic compounds to serve as electron donors for microbiological As(V) reduction may have considerable environmental significance with respect to the mobilization of adsorbed As from sediments in aquifers that are rich in dissolved organic matter. Further work should focus on identifying the precise nature of arsenic-organic matter interaction in the aquifer and the predominant As species that is associated with these compounds.

  17. ENHANCING THE ECONOMIC LIABILITY OF BIOREFINERIES BY TRANSFORMING LIGNIN FROM LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASSES INTO HUMIC-LIKE SUBSTANCES WITH PLANT PROMOTING BIOACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Savy, Davide

    2013-01-01

    In this study, lignin from three biomasses (miscanthus, giant reed and a pre-treated giant reed) has been isolated by two different methodologies and thoroughly characterized to produce humic-like substances, which were shown to positively affect plant growth and physiology. The techniques employed concerned the use of either sulfuric acid (SAL) or hydrogen peroxide at alkaline pH (Ox). Low yields were obtained by the Ox-method (less than 30% of Klason lignin), whereas the amount of materials...

  18. 40 CFR 795.70 - Indirect photolysis screening test: Sunlight photolysis in waters containing dissolved humic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... present protocol, it is not necessary to know kDE; it will be determined under conditions that... different seasons and latitudes, kIE only applies to the season and latitude for which it is determined... body as the amount and quality of dissolved aquatic humic substances change. Studies have...

  19. A comparison of f-element dissociation kinetics from synthetic polyelectrolytes and humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to their large complexing capacities, natural humic substances have been proposed as scavengers of toxic metals in aquatic systems. We studied f-element dissociation rates from naturally occurring and well characterized synthetic polyelectrolytes as a function of ph, aging time of the metal complex, and polyacid molecular weight

  20. Nutritional Value of Rice Bran Fermented by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Humic Substances and Its Utilization as a Feed Ingredient for Broiler Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriyati; Haryati, T; Susanti, T; Susana, I W R

    2015-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to increase the quality of rice bran by fermentation using Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and humic substances and its utilization as a feed ingredient for broiler chickens. The experiment was carried out in two steps. First, the fermentation process was done using a completely randomized design in factorial with 16 treatments: i) Dosage of B. amyloliquefaciens (2.10(8) cfu/g), 10 and 20 g/kg; ii) Graded levels of humic substances, 0, 100, 200, and 400 ppm; iii) Length of fermentation, three and five days. The results showed that the fermentation significantly (price bran: 20 g/kg dosage of inoculums B. amyloliquefaciens, 100 ppm level of humic substances and three days fermentation period. The second step was a feeding trial to evaluate the fermented rice bran (FRB) as a feed ingredient for broiler chickens. Three hundred and seventy-five one-day-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned into five treatment diets. Arrangement of the diets as follows: 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% level of FRB and the diets formulation based on equal amounts of energy and protein. The results showed that 15% inclusion of FRB in the diet provided the best bodyweight gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR) values. In conclusion, the nutrient content of rice bran improved after fermentation and the utilization of FRB as a feed ingredient for broiler chickens could be included up to 15% of the broiler diet. PMID:25557819

  1. Humic substances extraction, characterization and interaction with U(VI) at Ruprechtov site (CZ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extent of complexation between natural humic acid (HA) and uranium(VI) has been investigated at the Ruprechtov natural analogue site, Czech Republic. Natural HA was extracted from the clay sediments enriched by organic matter and then characterized for their elemental composition, UV/Vis and infrared spectroscopic properties, exchange capacity and protonation constants. Moreover, the reference sample HA-leonardite was selected and studied for comparison. Complexation between natural HA and U(VI) was studied using the cation exchange technique at pH 5-6. The experimental work was focused on study dependence of U(VI) complexation with HA: (i) on the concentration of HA 1-40 mg/l, and (ii) on the concentration of U(VI) 1 x 10-5-1 x 10-7 M. The charge neutralization model (CNM) was used for evaluation of the experimental data, modified in a way, that the total charge was divided among the individual U(VI) species in solution under given conditions. The stability constant value was determined to be log β = 4.32 ± 0.50, LC=50-60%, being independent on the HA concentration at U(VI) concentrations of 1 x 10-4 M. On the other hand, a dependence on the stability constant for the different U(VI) concentrations was observed. At close to real conditions of the site (U(VI) = 1 x 10-7 M and mHA = 5 mg/l) the stability constant log β=6.16, LC=50.3-52.7%. (orig.)

  2. Humic substances extraction, characterization and interaction with U(VI) at Ruprechtov site (CZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervinka, R.; Havlova, V. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez (NRI) plc, Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic). Waste Disposal Dept.; Stamberg, K. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic). Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering; Noseck, U. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The extent of complexation between natural humic acid (HA) and uranium(VI) has been investigated at the Ruprechtov natural analogue site, Czech Republic. Natural HA was extracted from the clay sediments enriched by organic matter and then characterized for their elemental composition, UV/Vis and infrared spectroscopic properties, exchange capacity and protonation constants. Moreover, the reference sample HA-leonardite was selected and studied for comparison. Complexation between natural HA and U(VI) was studied using the cation exchange technique at pH 5-6. The experimental work was focused on study dependence of U(VI) complexation with HA: (i) on the concentration of HA 1-40 mg/l, and (ii) on the concentration of U(VI) 1 x 10{sup -5}-1 x 10{sup -7} M. The charge neutralization model (CNM) was used for evaluation of the experimental data, modified in a way, that the total charge was divided among the individual U(VI) species in solution under given conditions. The stability constant value was determined to be log {beta} = 4.32 {+-} 0.50, LC=50-60%, being independent on the HA concentration at U(VI) concentrations of 1 x 10{sup -4} M. On the other hand, a dependence on the stability constant for the different U(VI) concentrations was observed. At close to real conditions of the site (U(VI) = 1 x 10{sup -7} M and mHA = 5 mg/l) the stability constant log {beta}=6.16, LC=50.3-52.7%. (orig.)

  3. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on particles composed of humic-like substances impacted by O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2011-02-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation plays important roles in cirrus and mixed-phase cloud formation, but the efficiency of organic particles to act as ice nuclei (IN) is still not well understood. Furthermore, the effect of particle oxidation by O3 on corresponding IN efficiencies has not yet been sufficiently assessed. We present heterogeneous ice nucleation on kaolinite, Suwannee River standard fulvic acid (SRFA), and leonardite standard humic acid particles as a function of particle temperature (Tp), relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice), nucleation mode, and O3 exposure. Ice nucleation and water uptake were studied for Tp >203 K and RHice up to water saturation using a novel ice nucleation apparatus. This study shows that SRFA, leonardite, and corresponding O3-exposed particles can nucleate ice via different modes at relevant atmospheric conditions. These particles nucleated ice via deposition mode at Tp ≤ 231 K, and for higher Tp water was taken up or ice was nucleated via deposition or immersion mode. Oxidation of leonardite and SRFA particles by O3 led to a decrease in deposition nucleation efficiency and to water uptake at lower temperatures for the former and to an increase in the lowest temperature at which deposition nucleation was observed for the latter. Activated IN fractions and heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficients (Jhet) were derived, and corresponding contact angles (θ) were calculated. A parameterization of θ as a function of RHice is presented which allows derivation of Jhet for various deposition IN and corresponding ice crystal production rates for application in cloud-resolving models.

  4. Effects of humic substances on the migration of raidionuclides : Complexation of actinides with humic substances in natural aquatic systems. Appendix IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction constants obtained by the Dialysis Equilibrium Technique are smaller than those obtained by the Schubert Method. This difference is ascribed to the diffusion of organic matter through the membrane. This effects an overestimation of the free Eu concentration, and further results in an underestimation of the interaction constant. Corrections failed. However, by using a competitive ligand as e.g. oxalate it was proven that in the future interaction constants can be measured accurately using the Dialysis Technique. Both methods allowed to conclude the following: 1) By using the Eu complexation capacity, determined at the considered pH, as ligand concentration, the pH dependency seems to vanish. 2) A dependency of the interaction constant with the ionic strength cannot a priori be rejected. Lower ionic strength conditions result in higher interaction constants. 3) The interaction constants depend on the Eu occupancy below 1% Eu occupancy. Lower Europium loadings give rise to slightly higher interaction constants. At high Europium occupancy (Dialysis Equilibrium Technique), the occupancy dependency was clearly demonstrated. (orig.)

  5. Polyphenolic compounds progress during olive mill wastewater sludge and poultry manure co-composting, and humic substances building (Southeastern Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigane, Hafedh; Chtourou, Mohamed; Ben Mahmoud, Imen; Medhioub, Khaled; Ammar, Emna

    2015-01-01

    In Mediterranean areas, olive mill wastes pose a major environmental problem owing to their important production and their high polyphenolic compounds and organic acids concentrations. In this work, the evolution of polyphenolic compounds was studied during co-composting of olive mill wastewater sludge and poultry manure, based on qualitative (G-50 sephadex) and quantitative (Folin-Ciocalteu), as well as high pressure liquid chromatography analyses. Results showed a significant polyphenolic content decrease of 99% and a noticeable transformation of low to high molecular weight fraction during the compost maturation period. During this step, polyphenols disappearance suggested their assimilation by thermophilic bacteria as a carbon and energy source, and contributed to humic substances synthesis. Polyphenolic compounds, identified initially by high pressure liquid chromatography, disappeared by composting and only traces of caffeic, coumaric and ferulic acids were detected in the compost. In the soil, the produced compost application improved the chemical and physico-chemical soil properties, mainly fertilising elements such as calcium, magnesium, nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus. Consequently, a higher potato production was harvested in comparison with manure amendment. PMID:25502693

  6. Physico-chemical characterization of secondary organic aerosol derived from catechol and guaiacol as a model substance for atmospheric humic-like substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ofner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol was produced from the aromatic precursors catechol and guaiacol by reaction with ozone in the presence and absence of simulated sunlight and humidity and investigated for its properties as a proxy for humic-like substances (HULIS. Beside a small particle size, a relatively low molecular weight and typical optical features in the UV/VIS spectral range, HULIS contain a typical aromatic and/or olefinic chemical structure and highly oxidized functional groups within a high chemical diversity. Various methods were used to characterize the secondary organic aerosols obtained: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR demonstrated the formation of different carbonyl containing functional groups as well as structural and functional differences between aerosols formed at different environmental conditions. UV/VIS spectroscopy of filter samples showed that the particulate matter absorbs far into the visible range up to more than 500 nm. Ultrahigh resolved mass spectroscopy (ICR-FT/MS determined O/C-ratios between 0.3 and 1 and main molecular weights between 200 and 500 Da. Temperature-programmed-pyrolysis mass spectroscopy identified carboxylic acids and lactones as major functional groups. Particle sizing using CNC-DMPS demonstrated the formation of small particles during a secondary organic aerosol formation process. Particle imaging using field-emission-gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM showed spherical particles, forming clusters and chains. Hence, secondary organic aerosols from catechol and guaiacol are appropriate model substances for studies of the processing of aromatic secondary organic aerosols and atmospheric HULIS on the laboratory scale.

  7. Distribuição de metais e caracterização das constantes de troca entre espécies metálicas e frações húmicas aquáticas de diferentes tamanhos moleculares Metal distribution and characterization of exchange constants between metal species and aquatic humic fractions with different molecular sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Barbosa Araújo

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work the metal distribution and exchange constants between metal species and aquatic humic fractions with different molecular sizes were studied. The aquatic humic substances (AHS were extracted by XAD-8 resin from water sample collected from Itapitanguí river, São Paulo State, Brazil. The AHS were fractionated in six fractions with different molecular sizes (>100 - <5 kDa and characterized by several techniques. Molar ratios H/C suggested higher aromaticity for fractions F1 and F6 whereas molar ratios C/N didn´t show any differences regarding the humification degree between the fractions. The UV-Vis absorbance a254/a436 ratio showed higher results for F4 and F5, probably by less condensed features. FTIR studies showed high similarity in the functional groups in the fractions. The highest percentage of traces of Co, Al, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn and Ni (determined by ICP-AES was preferably complexed by fractions F3 and F4 with a greater amount of dissolved organic carbon (DOC. In addition, the exchange constants, determined by ultrafiltration method, showed complexes AHS-Fe and AHS-Al with higher stability than complexes AHS-Co in all fractions.

  8. Determination of Humic Like Substance (HULIS) in Absorbing Aerosols by FTIR Spectroscopy: CARES and Other Field Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, N. A.; Gaffney, J. S.; Sarkar, A.

    2011-12-01

    In past work, black carbon (BC) emitted from fossil fuel combustion (i.e. diesel engines) was assumed to be the only major absorbing species in atmospheric aerosols. Now other absorbing carbonaceous aerosol species have been found that can add to the overall aerosol absorption with enhanced absorption primarily at shorter wavelengths and in the mid-IR. The most important absorbing species other than BC is the water soluble humic-like substances, or HULIS. These aerosol species can become internally mixed with black carbon resulting in enhanced Ångstrom absorption exponents (AAEs), enhanced hygroscopicities and enhanced removal of the aerosols through cloud formation and rainout. They are produced from both primary biomass burning and from secondary biogenic aerosol formation from reactive plant VOC emission precursors. Fine mode (filters at several locations, including Mexico City, Little Rock, Chicago, and Cool, CA, with high volume impactor samplers. The IR absorbing aerosol species have been identified by using diffuse reflectance FTIR after removal of the aerosols from the filter medium. Comparison of the FTIR spectra with Raman microscopy indicates the presence of internal mixtures of BC and HULIS. FTIR Spectra are presented and results from rural and urban sites are compared. These results are discussed in terms of their potential importance in climate forcing, particularly their role in nighttime boundary layer warming. This work was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64328 and Grant No. DE-FG02-07-ER64329 as part of the Atmospheric Science Program.

  9. Effects of americium-241 and humic substances on Photobacterium phosphoreum: Bioluminescence and diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.; Tugarova, Anna V.; Selivanova, Maria A.; Tarantilis, Petros A.; Polissiou, Moschos G.; Kudryasheva, Nadezhda S.

    The integral bioluminescence (BL) intensity of live Photobacterium phosphoreum cells (strain 1883 IBSO), sampled at the stationary growth stage (20 h), was monitored for further 300 h in the absence (control) and presence of 241Am (an α-emitting radionuclide of a high specific activity) in the growth medium. The activity concentration of 241Am was 2 kBq l-1; [241Am] = 6.5 × 10-11 M. Parallel experiments were also performed with water-soluble humic substances (HS, 2.5 mg l-1; containing over 70% potassium humate) added to the culture medium as a possible detoxifying agent. The BL spectra of all the bacterial samples were very similar (λmax = 481 ± 3 nm; FWHM = 83 ± 3 nm) showing that 241Am (also with HS) influenced the bacterial BL system at stages prior to the formation of electronically excited states. The HS added per se virtually did not influence the integral BL intensity. In the presence of 241Am, BL was initially activated but inhibited after 180 h, while the system 241Am + HS showed an effective activation of BL up to 300 h which slowly decreased with time. Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy, applied to dry cell biomass sampled at the stationary growth phase, was used to control possible metabolic responses of the bacteria to the α-radioactivity stress (observed earlier for other bacteria under other stresses). The DRIFT spectra were all very similar showing a low content of intracellular poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (at the level of a few percent of dry biomass) and no or negligible spectroscopic changes in the presence of 241Am and/or HS. This assumes the α-radioactivity effect to be transmitted by live cells mainly to the bacterial BL enzyme system, with negligible structural or compositional changes in cellular macrocomponents at the stationary growth phase.

  10. Mass spectrometric investigations of the kinetic stability of chromium and copper complexes with humic substances by isotope-labelling experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, G.; Heumann, K.G. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie und Analytische Chemie

    1999-07-01

    Isotope-labelling exchange experiments were carried out to investigate the kinetic stability of Cr(III) complexes with humic substances (HS). To compare the results with those of an ion, not expected to form kinetically stable HS complexes with respect to its electron configuration, Cu(II) was investigated under the same conditions. HS solutions of different origin were therefore spiked with {sup 53}Cr(III) or {sup 65}Cu(II) after saturation of HS with chromium and copper of natural isotopic composition. In fractions of metal/HS complexes with different molecular weight, obtained by ultrafiltration and HPLC/ICP-MS using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), respectively, the isotope ratios of chromium and copper were determined by ICP and thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. Distinct differences in the isotopic composition of chromium were found in the permeate of the ultrafiltration compared with the corresponding unseparated solution, which indicates kinetically stable Cr(III)/HS complexes. On the other hand, the copper isotopic composition was identical in the permeate and the unseparated solution, which shows that a total exchange of Cu{sup 2+} ions took place between free and HS complexed copper ions. The SEC/ ICP-MS experiments also resulted in a different isotopic distribution of chromium in the chromatographically separated complexes whereas the copper complexes, separated by SEC, showed identical isotopic composition. The kinetic stability of Cr(III)/HS complexes could be explained by the d{sup 3} electron configuration of Cr{sup 3+} ions, a fact which is well known from classical Cr(III) complexes, and influences substantially the mobility of this heavy metal in the environment. (orig.) With 4 figs., 4 tabs., 10 refs.

  11. Application of Spectroscopic Techniques (FT-IR, 13C NMR) to the analysis of humic substances in volcanic soils along an environmental gradient (Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Rodriguez, Antonio; María Armas Herrera, Cecilia; González Pérez, José Antonio; González-Vila, Francisco Javier; Arbelo Rodríguez, Carmen Dolores; Mora Hernández, Juan Luis; Polvillo Polo, Oliva

    2010-05-01

    Andosols and andic soils are considered as efficient C-sinks in terms of C sequestration. These soils are usually developed from volcanic materials, and are characterized by a predominance of short-range ordered minerals like allophanes, imogolite and other Fe and Al oxyhydroxides. Such materials occur commonly associated with organic compounds, thus generating highly stable organo-mineral complexes and leading to the accumulation of a high amount of organic carbon. Spectroscopic methods like FT-IR and 13C NMR are suitable for the analysis of the chemical structure of soil humic substances, and allow identifying distinct functional groups and protein, lipids, lignin, carbohydrate-derived fragments. In this work we study the structural features of four soils developed on Pleistocene basaltic lavae in Tenerife (Canary Island, Spain), distributed along an altitudinal climatic gradient. The soil sequence comprises soils with different degree of geochemical evolution and andic character, including a mineral ‘Hypersalic Solonchak' (Tabaibal de Rasca), a slightly vitric ‘Luvic Phaeozem' (Los Frailes), a degraded and shallow ‘Endoleptic, fulvic, silandic Andosol' (Siete Lomas), and a well-developed and deep ‘Fulvic, silandic, Andosol' (Ravelo). Samples of the raw soil and humic and fulvic acids isolated from the surface horizons were analyzed. The results show a low content of organic carbon in the mineral soil, the inherited humin predominating, and a very high content of humic and fulvic acids in Andosols. The FT-IR and 13C NMR spectra of the raw soil samples show a low resolution, related to interferences from mineral complexes signals, particularly in soils with lower organic carbon content. 13C NMR shows a predominance of O-alkyl carbon (derived of carbohydrates) in andic soils, whereas O-alkyl and aromatic fractions are most evident in the mineral soil. The humic acids spectra are characterized by a dominance of alkyl and aromatic fractions with a high degree

  12. Fe+2 and H2O2 synergic effect on fenton’s reaction applied in drinking water treatment with humic substances

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Di Bernardo; Tatiane Sakamoto De Julio; Marcelo De Julio

    2009-01-01

    In order to know more on the action mechanisms of Fenton’s reagent, the present work had the objective to evaluate the chemical products – ferrous sulphate and hydrogen peroxide – contribution on Fenton’s reaction efficiency for the removal of apparent color and absorbance at 253,7 nm, using synthetic water prepared with humic substances, which presented high true color (100 ± 5 uH). Tests of oxidation and/or coagulation, flocculation and flotation using flotest equipment were realized. From ...

  13. Contribution of carbohydrate and amino acids to the formation of aromatic structure of synthetic melanoidin (model sedimentary humic substance). A study using 13C-labeled glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of study to elucidate the source of aromatic structure in sedimentary humic substances (SHS), we synthesized melanoidins (a model SHS) from 13C-labeled glucose and non-labeled amino acids and examined how glucose and amino acids are involved in the formation of their aromatic structures. The synthesized melanoidin was oxidized by alkaline perman ganate and benzenecarboxylic acids in their degradation products were analyzed by Chemical Ionization-GC/MS. The results indicate that aromatic structures are formed in melanoidin as a result of both selfcondensation of glucose and a reaction between glucose and amino acids. (author)

  14. Chemical and spectroscopic characterization of dissolved humic substances in a mangrove-fringed estuary in the eastern coast of Hainan Island, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yaoling; DU Jinzhou; PENG Bo; ZHANG Fenfen; ZHAO Xin; ZHANG Jing

    2013-01-01

    Mangrove-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) has an important effect on estuarine and coastal area on a large scale.In order to improve the understanding of origin,composition,and fate of DOM in mangrove-fringed estuarine and coastal areas,dissolved humic substances (DHS) were isolated from one mangrove pore-water sample and one near-shore seawater sample downstream the mangrove pore-water site in the eastern coast of Hainan Island,South China.Fulvic acids,humic acids and XAD-4 fractions were obtained from the two water samples by using a two-column array of XAD-8 and XAD-4 resins.Chemical and spectroscopic methods were used to analyze the features of these DHS.Compared to the mangrovepore-water DHS,the near-shore seawater DHS were found rich in 13C with lower C/N ratios and more aliphatic compounds and carbohydrates,but less aromatic structures and carboxyl groups.As for the three fractions of the two DHS,XAD-4 fractions contain more aliphatics,carbohydrates,carboxyl groups,and enrich in 13C with respect to both fulvic and humic acids.Photo-oxidation transformation and contribution from marine-derived DOM were considered as the main reasons resulted in the difference in compositional features for these DHS in this study.

  15. Solubility of Heavy Metals/Metalloid on Multi-Metal Contaminated Soil Samples from a Gold Ore Processing Area: Effects of Humic Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cácio Luiz Boechat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bioavailability of heavy metals at contaminated sites is largely controlled by the physicochemical properties of the environmental media such as dissolved organic matter, hydroxides and clay colloids, pH, soil cation exchange capacity and oxidation-reduction potential. The aim of this study was to investigate soil pH and heavy metal solubility effect by levels of humic and fulvic acids applied in soil samples with different levels of contamination by heavy metals. The soil samples used in this study were collected in a known metal-contaminated site. Humic acid (HA and fulvic acid (FA were purchased as a commercially available liquid material extracted from Leonardite. The experiment was carried out in a factorial scheme of 4 × (4 + 1, with four contaminated soil samples and four treatments, comprised of two levels of HA, two levels of FA and a control. The HA treatments increased the solubility of Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Cd, Pb, As and Ba from soils, while FA treatments decreased, thus raising or not their availability and mobility in soil. Humic acid concentration did not influence soil pH and FA decreased soil pH until 0.7 units. The initial heavy metal concentration in soil affects the magnitude of the processes involving humic substances. The lower releases of heavy metals by FA verified the importance of the complexation properties of organic compounds. These results appear to encourage the use of HA for increased plant-availability of heavy metals in remediation projects and the use of FA for decreased plant-availability of heavy metals at contaminated sites with a risk of introducing metals into the food chain.

  16. Humic substances in performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal: Actinide and iodine migration in the far-field. Third technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report describes progress within the third and final year of the EC-project 'Humic Substances in Performance Assessment of Nuclear Waste Disposal: Actinide and Iodine Migration in the Far-Field'. The work conducted within the present project builds on a number of previous activities/project supported by the Commission. It finds its continuation within different EC FP 6 instruments and also provides for additional continued cooperation through network structures resulting from the broad cooperation within the project. Without being a formal requirement of the Commission or co-funding bodies, this report documents results in great technical detail and makes the results available to a broad scientific community. The report contains an executive summary written by the coordinator. More detailed results are given as individual contributions in the form of 12 annexes. Not all results are discussed or referred to in the executive summary report and thus readers with a deeper interest also need to consult the annexes. The overall objectives were to generate knowledge about the impact of humic substances on the migration of actinides and iodine in the far-field of a nuclear waste repository. In the beginning, focus was rather on the potential enhancement due to humic colloid mediated radionuclide transport. Thereby, sources, inventory, stability and mobility of dissolved humic substances in their colloidal form formed a key topic. Other key topics were the interaction with actinides and iodine, transport studies under near-natural conditions in the laboratory, rationalization of knowledge in models and application to three migration cases for visualization of the overall outcome. Changes relative to the original objectives were given by moving emphasis of natural chemical analogue studies from the question of kinetic exchange constants for different inventories in natural and laboratory systems to the study of anthropogenic actinide contaminants in the Irish Sea

  17. Selected pioneering works on humus in soils and sediments during the 20th century: A retrospective look from the International Humic Substances Society view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Christian; Brossard, Michel; Chen, Yona; Landa, Edward R.; Trichet, Jean

    Organic matter in general, and humic substances (HS) in particular, are involved in many processes in soils, sediments, rocks and natural waters. These include rock weathering, plant nutrition, pH buffering, trace metal mobility and toxicity, bioavailability, degradation and transport of hydrophobic organic chemicals, formation of disinfection by-products during water treatment, heterotrophic production in blackwater ecosystems and, more generally, the global carbon cycle. Before the 1970s, natural organic matter of different ecosystem pools ( i.e., soils, sediments, and natural waters) was often studied in isolation, although many similarities exist between them. This is particularly so for HS. In this historical context, a need appeared at the international level for bringing together environmental chemists, soil scientists, hydrologists, and geologists who were interested in HS to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas, to standardize analytical procedures and agree on definitions of HS. The International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) was founded in Denver, Colorado (USA) in 1981 with several objectives among them “to bring together scientists in the coal, soil, and water sciences with interests in humic substances” (home page of the IHSS web site: http://ihss.gatech.edu/ihss2/index.html). This paper presents selected pioneering works on humus in soils and sediments during the 20th century with a special focus on the links between the studies of soil HS and the formation, during early diagenesis, of the precursors of kerogens. Temporal coverage includes key contributions preceding the founding of the IHSS, and a brief history of the organization is presented.

  18. Determination of heavy metal complexes with humic substances by HPLC/ICP-MS coupling using on-line isotope dilution technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, J.; Heumann, K.G. [Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Becherweg 24, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    An isotope dilution mass spectrometric (IDMS) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of the complexes of 11 heavy metals (Ag, Cd, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Tl, U, W, Zn and Zr) with humic substances (HS) by coupling HPLC with ICP-MS and applying the on-line isotope dilution technique. The HPLC separation was carried out with size exclusion chromatography. This HPLC/ICP-IDMS method was applied to samples from a brown water, ground water, sewage and seepage water as well as for a sample containing isolated fulvic acids. The total contents of heavy metals and of their complexes were analyzed in these samples with detection limits in the range of 5-110 ng/L. The analysis of heavy metal/HS complexes from the different waters resulted in characteristic fingerprints of the distribution pattern of heavy metals in the separated HS fractions. A comparison between the total heavy metal concentrations and their portions bound to humic substances showed distinct differences for the various metals. Simultaneous {sup 12}C detection was used for the characterization of HS complexes not identified by UV detection and for the determination of relative DOC concentrations of chromatographic peaks. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 10 refs.

  19. Surfactant properties and tetrachloroethene (PCE) solubilisation ability of humic acid-like substances extracted from maize plant and from organic wastes: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adani, Fabrizio; Tambone, Fulvia; Davoli, Enrico; Scaglia, Barbara

    2010-02-01

    Humic acid-like substance (HA-like substance) extracted from maize plant residue at an yield of 81.1+/-4.9gkg(-1) of dry matter (dm) was tested for surfactant properties and ability to solubilise tetrachloroethene (PCE). Critical micelle concentration (CMC) of HA-like substance was detected to be 1986mgL(-1). Both, HA-like substance composition and average molecular weight [MW] affected CMC and a multiple linear regression model was proposed: CMC=12246-56.19 alkyl-C - 0.532MW (R(2)=0.90; Pleonardite. Taking into consideration the two-site model of solubilisation of PCE in surfactant (i.e., solute partitioning into the micellar hydrophobic core and dissolution and/or binding into the hydrophilic non-ionic shell) and macromolecular composition of HA-like substance, the non-ionic hydrophile-alkyl lipophile balance was expected to control PCE solubilisation as the good multiple linear regression indicated: logK(dom)=-1.37+0.062 alkyl-C +0.055 O-alkyl-C (R(2)=0.93, P<0.05, n=6), where logK(dom) represents the micelle-water partitioning of PCE (mLg(-1)) and alkyl-C and O-alkyl-C represent the content of these two kinds of C detected by CP MAS (13)C NMR (as % of the total C). PMID:20044126

  20. 13C-NMR chemical shift databases as a quick tool to evaluate structural models of humic substances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyrop Albers, Christian; Hansen, Poul Erik

    2010-01-01

    Models for humic and fulvic acids are discussed based on 13C liquid state NMR spectra combined with results from elemental analysis and titration studies. The analysis of NMR spectra is based on a full reconstruction of the NMR spectrum done with help of 13C-NMR data bases by adding up chemical s...

  1. Size distribution and sources of humic-like substances in particulate matter at an urban site during winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungshik; Son, Se-Chang

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the size distribution and possible sources of humic-like substances (HULIS) in ambient aerosol particles collected at an urban site in Gwangju, Korea during the winter of 2015. A total of 10 sets of size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI), and the samples were analyzed to determine the mass as well as the presence of ionic species (Na(+), NH4(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cl(-), NO3(-), and SO4(2-)), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and HULIS. The separation and quantification of the size-resolved HULIS components from the MOUDI samples was accomplished using a Hydrophilic-Lipophilic Balanced (HLB) solid phase extraction method and a total organic carbon analyzer, respectively. The entire sampling period was divided into two periods: non-Asian dust (NAD) and Asian dust (AD) periods. The contributions of water-soluble organic mass (WSOM = 1.9 × WSOC) and HULIS (=1.9 × HULIS-C) to fine particles (PM1.8) were approximately two times higher in the NAD samples (23.2 and 8.0%) than in the AD samples (12.8 and 4.2%). However, the HULIS-C/WSOC ratio in PM1.8 showed little difference between the NAD (0.35 ± 0.07) and AD (0.35 ± 0.05) samples. The HULIS exhibited a uni-modal size distribution (@0.55 μm) during NAD and a bimodal distribution (@0.32 and 1.8 μm) during AD, which was quite similar to the mass size distributions of particulate matter, WSOC, NO3(-), SO4(2-), and NH4(+) in both the NAD and AD samples. The size distribution characteristics and the results of the correlation analyses indicate that the sources of HULIS varied according to the particle size. In the fine mode (≤1.8 μm), the HULIS composition during the NAD period was strongly associated with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation processes similar to those of secondary ionic species (cloud processing and/or heterogeneous reactions) and primary emissions during the biomass burning period, and during

  2. Chemical and light absorption properties of humic-like substances from biomass burning emissions under controlled combustion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Shik; Yu, Jaemyeong

    2016-07-01

    PM2.5 samples from biomass burning (BB) emissions of three types - rice straw (RS), pine needles (PN), and sesame stems (SS) - were collected through laboratory-controlled combustion experiments and analyzed for the mass, organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), humic-like substances (HULIS), and water soluble inorganic species (Na+, NH4+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, and oxalate). The combustion experiments were carried out at smoldering conditions. Water-soluble HULIS in BB samples was isolated using a one-step solid phase extraction method, followed by quantification with a total organic carbon analyzer. This study aims to explore chemical and light absorption characteristics of HULIS from BB emissions. The contributions of HULIS (=1.94 × HULIS-C) to PM2.5 emissions were observed to be 29.5 ± 2.0, 15.3 ± 3.1, and 25.8 ± 4.0%, respectively, for RS, PN, and SS smoke samples. Contributions of HULIS-C to OC and WSOC for the RS, PN, and SS burning emissions were 0.26 ± 0.03 and 0.63 ± 0.05, 0.15 ± 0.04 and 0.36 ± 0.08, and 0.29 ± 0.08 and 0.51 ± 0.08, respectively. Light absorption by the water extracts from BB aerosols exhibited strong wavelength dependence, which is characteristic of brown carbon spectra with a sharply increasing absorption as wavelength decreases. The average absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) of the water extracts (WSOC) fitted between wavelengths of 300-400 nm were 8.3 (7.4-9.0), 7.4 (6.2-8.5), and 8.0 (7.1-9.3) for the RS, PN, and SS burning samples, which are comparable to the AAE values of BB samples reported in previous publications (e.g., field and laboratory chamber studies). The average mass absorption efficiencies of WSOC measured at 365 nm (MAE365) were 1.37 ± 0.23, 0.86 ± 0.09, and 1.38 ± 0.21 m2/gṡC for RS, PN, and SS burning aerosols, respectively. Correlations of total WSOC, hydrophilic WSOC (= total WSOC-HULIS-C), and HULIS-C concentrations in solution with the light

  3. Assessment of the ecotoxicological risk of combined sewer overflows for an aquatic system using a coupled "substance and bioassay" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooré Bi, Eustache; Monette, Frederic; Gasperi, Johnny; Perrodin, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Very few tools are available for assessing the impact of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) on receiving aquatic environments. The main goal of the study was to assess the ecotoxicological risk of CSOs for a surface aquatic ecosystem using a coupled "substance and bioassay" approach. Wastewater samples from the city of Longueuil, Canada CSO were collected for various rainfall events during one summer season and analyzed for a large panel of substances (n = 116). Four bioassays were also conducted on representative organisms of surface aquatic systems (Pimephales promelas, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia magna, and Oncorhynchus mykiss). The analytical data did not reveal any ecotoxicological risk for St. Lawrence River organisms, mainly due to strong effluent dilution. However, the substance approach showed that, because of their contribution to the ecotoxicological hazard posed by the effluent, total phosphorus (Ptot), aluminum (Al), total residual chlorine, chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), pyrene, ammonia (N-NH4 (+)), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) require more targeted monitoring. While chronic ecotoxicity tests revealed a potential impact of CSO discharges on P. promelas and C. dubia, acute toxicity tests did not show any effect on D. magna or O. mykiss, thus underscoring the importance of chronic toxicity tests as part of efforts aimed at characterizing effluent toxicity. Ultimately, the study leads to the conclusion that the coupled "substance and bioassay" approach is a reliable and robust method for assessing the ecotoxicological risk associated with complex discharges such as CSOs. PMID:25315929

  4. Humic Substances-dependent Aggregation and Transport of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Porous Media at Different pHs and Ionic Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, L.; Jacobson, A. R.; Darnault, C. J. G.

    2015-12-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) are commonly used in several fields and industries, such as chemical and pharmaceutical, due to both their physical and chemical properties. For example, they are employed in the manufacturing of catalysts, as fuel additives, and as polishing agents. The release and exposure to CeO2 NPs can occur during their fabrication, application, and waste disposal, as well as through their life-cycle and accidents. Therefore, the assessment of the dynamic nature of CeO2 NPs stability and mobilty in the environment is of paramount importance to establish the environmental and public health risks associated with their inevitable release in the environment. Humic substances are a key element of soils and have been revealed to possibly affect the fate and transport of nanoparticles in soils. Consequently, our present research aims at investigating the influence that different pHs, monovalent and divalent cations, Suwannee River humic acid, and Suwanee River fulvic acid have on the aggregation, transport, and deposition of CeO2 NPs. Batch studies performed with different concentrations of humic and fulvic acids associated with a wide spectrum of pHs and ionic strengths were examined. Key variables from these batch studies were then examined to simulate experimental conditions commonly encountered in the soil-water system to conduct column transport experiments in order to establish the fate and transport of CeO2 NPs in saturated porous media, which is a critical phase in characterizing the behavior of CeO2 NPs in subsurface environmental systems.

  5. Hyphal growt and mycorrhiza formation by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus claroideum BEG 23 is stimulated by humic substances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryndler, Milan; Hršelová, Hana; Sudová, Radka; Gryndlerová, Hana; Řezáčová, Veronika; Merhautová, Věra

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 15, - (2005), s. 483-488. ISSN 0940-6360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/03/0188; GA ČR GA526/00/1276 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : fulvic acid * humic acid * iron Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.753, year: 2005

  6. Effect of organic amendments on the mobility of trace elements in phytoremediated techno-soils: role of the humic substances

    OpenAIRE

    Hattab, Nour; Soubrand, Maryline; Guégan, Régis; Motelica-Heino, Mikael; Bourrat, Xavier; Faure, O.; Bouchardon, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of aided phytostabilization using organic amendments such as ramial chipped wood (RCW) and composted sewage sludge (CSS) was studied on contaminated techno-soils, on nine experimental plots. The objective was to characterize the role of fulvic (FA) and humic acids (HA) on the mobilization of trace elements, specifically As, Cu, Mo, Pb and Zn. Results showed that the addition of CSS increased the total organic carbon and nitrogen content more than with RCW and as a result, the C...

  7. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, stress and aging: Identifying the complex interplay of genetic pathways following the treatment with humic substances

    OpenAIRE

    Ralph eMenzel; Stefanie eMenzel; Swain, Suresh C.; Kerstin ePietsch; Sophie eTiedt; Jördis eWitczak; Sturzenbaum, Stephen R.; Steinberg, Christian E. W.

    2012-01-01

    Low concentrations of the dissolved leonardite humic acid HuminFeed® (HF) prolonged the lifespan and enhanced the thermal stress resistance of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. However, growth was impaired and reproduction delayed, effects which have also been identified in response to other polyphenolic monomers, including Tannic acid, Rosmarinic acid, and Caffeic acid. Moreover, a chemical modification of HF, which increases its phenolic/quinonoid moieties, magnified the biolo...

  8. The Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, Stress and Aging: Identifying the Complex Interplay of Genetic Pathways Following the Treatment with Humic Substances

    OpenAIRE

    Menzel, Ralph; Menzel, Stefanie; Swain, Suresh C.; Pietsch, Kerstin; Tiedt, Sophie; Witczak, Jördis; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R; Steinberg, Christian E. W.

    2012-01-01

    Low concentrations of the dissolved leonardite humic acid HuminFeed® (HF) prolonged the lifespan and enhanced the thermal stress resistance of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. However, growth was impaired and reproduction delayed, effects which have also been identified in response to other polyphenolic monomers, including Tannic acid, Rosmarinic acid, and Caffeic acid. Moreover, a chemical modification of HF, which increases its phenolic/quinonoid moieties, magnified the biological...

  9. Thresholds of toxicological concern for endocrine active substances in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Melanie; Daginnus, Klaus; Deviller, Genevieve; de Wolf, Watze; Dungey, Stephen; Galli, Corrado; Gourmelon, Anne; Jacobs, Miriam; Matthiessen, Peter; Micheletti, Christian; Nestmann, Earle; Pavan, Manuela; Paya-Perez, Ana; Ratte, Hans-Toni; Safford, Bob; Sokull-Klüttgen, Birgit; Stock, Frauke; Stolzenberg, Hans-Christian; Wheeler, James; Willuhn, Marc; Worth, Andrew; Comenges, Jose Manuel Zaldivar; Crane, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The threshold of toxicological concern (TTC) concept proposes that an exposure threshold value can be derived for chemicals, below which no significant risk to human health or the environment is expected. This concept goes further than setting acceptable exposure levels for individual chemicals, because it attempts to set a de minimis value for chemicals, including those of unknown toxicity, by taking the chemical's structure or mode of action (MOA) into consideration. This study examines the use of the TTC concern concept for endocrine active substances (EAS) with an estrogenic MOA. A case study formed the basis for a workshop of regulatory, industry and academic scientists held to discuss the use of the TTC in aquatic environmental risk assessment. The feasibility and acceptability, general advantages and disadvantages, and the specific issues that need to be considered when applying the TTC concept for EAS in risk assessment were addressed. Issues surrounding the statistical approaches used to derive TTCs were also discussed. This study presents discussion points and consensus findings of the workshop. PMID:19558199

  10. Effects of ionic strength on the binding of phenanthrene and pyrene to humic substances: three-stage variation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chon-Lin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wang, Huei-Ling; Hsieh, Ping-Chieh

    2003-10-01

    This study compared the effects of ionic strength on the binding constants (K(doc)) of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (phenanthrene and pyrene) and a terrestrial humic acid (Leonardite Humic Acid) in different electrolyte solutions (KCl, KBr, MgCl(2) and MgSO(4)). Distinct trends were found in K(doc) variation depending upon the range of ionic strength resulting from added electrolytes. These trends demonstrated similar shapes for all the systems studied, while degree of variation increased with hydrophobicity of the PAHs. Furthermore, different types of electrolytes had different effects on the interactions between humic acid (HA) and the PAHs. These differences were primarily caused by types of cation, not anion. To describe the complicated effects of ionic strength on K(doc), we developed a three-stage variation model that encompasses increasing and decreasing trends and plateaus in K(doc) associated with ionic strength, as well as the mechanisms behind these trends, including the variation of HA structure configuration, HA aggregation and the salting-out effect. This model illustrated the importance of sufficient experimental data when interpreting the influence of ionic strength on the trends in K(doc) variation. PMID:12946908

  11. Humic substances in leachates of sewage sludge mono-landfills. Analysis and assessment of the effects on heavy metal exchange on bentonite; Huminstoffe im Sickerwasser von Klaerschlamm-Monodeponien. Analytische Bestimmung und Auswirkungen auf den Austausch von Schwermetallen an Bentonit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, S.

    2002-07-01

    After proving that the XAD process developed by the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) can be applied to leachate of sewage sludge landfills provided that TOC fractions are quantified and the adsorption material is conditioned for reuse, it was applied for isolating humic substances contained in the leachates. The base-acid characteristics and spectral absorption characteristics were identified. Batch experiments with the humic substance - heavy metal - bentonite system were carried out in order to assess their influence on heavy metal exchange. [German] Nach dem zunaechst bestaetigt werden konnte, dass das von der International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) entwickelte XAD-Verfahren bei Quantifizierung der einzelnen Fraktion an TOC und Konditionierung des Adsorptionsmaterials (Mehrfachverwendung) auch auf Sickerwaesser aus Klaerschlamm-Monodeponien angewendet werden kann, wurde es fuer die Isolierung der in diesen Waessern enthaltenen Huminstoffe eingesetzt. Daran schlossen sich die Charakterisierung der Huminstoffe anhand ihrer Saeure-Base-Eigenschaften und ihres spektralen Absorptionsverhalten an. Zur Beschreibung ihres Einflusses auf den Austausch von Schwermetallen an Tonminerale wurden Batch-Versuche mit dem System Huminstoff-Schwermetall-Bentonit durchgefuehrt. (orig.)

  12. Sorption of 63Ni(II) to montmorillonite as a function of pH, ionic strength, foreign ions and humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different kinds of clay minerals have been studied extensively in the removal of radionuclides from large volumes of aqueous solutions because of their high sorption capacity. Herein, the Na-montmorillonite was characterized by using XRD and FTIR in detail. The sorption of 63Ni(II) from aqueous solution to montmorillonite as a function of pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, humic substances and temperature was studied by batch technique. The sorption of 63Ni(II) on montmorillonite achieved equilibration quickly. The sorption of 63Ni(II) to montmorillonite was strongly dependent on pH, and dependent on ionic strength at low pH and independent of ionic strength at high pH values. The sorption of 63Ni(II) on montmorillonite was enhanced at low pH in the presence of humic acid (HA), while a negative effect of HA on 63Ni(II) sorption was found at high pH values. At low pH values, the sorption of 63Ni(II) was attributed to outer-sphere surface complexation or ion exchange, whereas the sorption was dominated by inner-sphere surface complexation at high pH values. The montmorillonite sample is a suitable material in the preconcentration of radionuclides from large volumes and the material can be used as backfill material in nuclear waste repository. (author)

  13. The role of humic substances in the anaerobic reductive dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by Comamonas koreensis strain CY01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yibo [College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangdong Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, Guangzhou, 510631 (China)] [Guangdong Institute of Eco-environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou, 510650 (China)] [College of Life Science and Chemistry, Tianshui Normal University, Tianshui, 741000 (China); Wu Chunyuan [Guangdong Institute of Eco-environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou, 510650 (China); Wang Xiaojing, E-mail: wangyb02@163.com [College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangdong Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, Guangzhou, 510631 (China); Zhou Shungui, E-mail: sgzhou@soil.gd.cn [Guangdong Institute of Eco-environment and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou, 510650 (China)

    2009-05-30

    The role of the humic model compound, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), in the anaerobic reductive dechlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) by the Fe(III)- and humic substances (HS)-reducing bacterium, Comamonas koreensis strain CY01 was investigated. The results taken as a whole indicated that (i) strain CY01 could couple glucose oxidation to 2,4-D reductive dechlorination; (ii) reductive dechlorination of 2,4-D by strain CY01 was greatly stimulated by the addition of AQDS; (iii) the transfer of electrons from biogenic AH{sub 2}QDS to 2,4-D was an abiotic process which can take place in the absence of microorganisms; and (iv) AH{sub 2}QDS was reoxidized during the chemical reaction, AQDS can serve again as electron acceptor for microorganisms, thus acting as electron shuttles. All the results suggested that 2,4-D reductive dechlorination by CY01 strain was a biochemical process that oxidizes the electron donors and transfers the electron to the acceptors through redox mediator, AQDS. We proposed the possible mechanism for the HS dependent reduction of 2,4-D. Our results suggested that microbial reduction of HS and subsequent chemical reduction of organic pollutants represent an important path of electron flow in anoxic natural environments. This work is a necessary preliminary step for better understanding the biodegradation of 2,4-D in subsurface soil.

  14. Re-evaluation and reconstruction of water purification system using soil. I. Assessment of soil as a sorbent of humic substances and phosphate ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Y; Hamasaki, T; Sugahara, M; Ozaki, H; Prasai, G; Yano, T; Imada, R; Tainaka, Y; Nakamura, W; Haruki, F

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to develop a treatment procedure for humic substances (HS hereafter) and phosphate ion in wastewater and environmental water by percolation of the water through a constructed soil layer at the hydraulic loading of a few metres per day. In the present work, batch sorption tests were conducted for more than 80 samples of soil, sludge, mineral and organic materials in order to find good sorbents for fulvic acid (FA hereafter) and phosphate ion. The results showed that the sorption of FA was high for some charcoal, and apatite and goethite minerals. Comparatively high sorption of FA was found for some Andosols and volcanic ash soil. Significant sorption of phosphate ion, on the other hand, was found for various types of soil, sludge from water treatment plants and some waste materials. The linear isotherm was obtained for the sorption of FA to a charcoal, apatite and goethite minerals, and Andosols. PMID:15497870

  15. Sorption and desorption of uranium(VI) on GMZ bentonite. Effect of pH, ionic strength, foreign ions and humic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption and desorption of uranium(VI) on GMZ bentonite was investigated as functions of contact time, pH, ionic strength, foreign ions, HSs and initial U(VI) using batch experiments. It is revealed that the sorption strongly depended on pH, cations (Li+, Na+ and K+) and anions (CO32-, SO42- and PO43-). HA benefits the sorption at pH <7.0, while inhibited the sorption at higher pH. Moreover, the hysteresis occurred in the sorption-desorption process in the presence/absence of humic substances. The results could provide data base for the safety assessment of the deep geological disposal repository of high radioactive waste. (author)

  16. Interfaces in aquatic ecosystems: Implications for transport and impact of anthropogenic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knulst, J.

    1996-11-01

    Mechanisms that govern transport, accumulation and toxicity of persistent pollutants at interfaces in aquatic ecosystems were the foci of this thesis. Specific attention was paid to humic substances, their occurrence, composition, and role in exchange processes across interfaces. It was concluded that: The composition of humic substances in aquatic surface microlayers is different from that of the subsurface water and terrestrial humic matter. Levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the aquatic surface microlayer reflect the DOC levels in the subsurface water. While the levels and enrichment of DOC in the microlayer generally show small variations, the levels and enrichment of particulate organic carbon (POC) vary to a great extent. Similarities exist between aquatic surface films, artificial semi-permeable and biological membranes regarding their structure and functioning. Acidification and liming of freshwater ecosystems affect DOC:POC ratio and humic composition of the surface film, thus influencing the partitioning of pollutants across aquatic interfaces. Properties of lake catchment areas extensively govern DOC:POC ratio both in the surface film and subsurface water. Increased UV-B irradiation changes the DOC:POC ratio in the surface film and thus affect transfer of matter across the interface. Transport of lipophilic, persistent organic pollutants across semi-permeable membranes is influenced by the solutes organic composition. 106 refs, 11 figs, 1 tab

  17. Detection of endocrine active substances in the aquatic environment in southern Taiwan using bioassays and LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuang-Yu; Chou, Pei-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    Endocrine active substances, including naturally occurring hormones and various synthetic chemicals have received much concern owing to their endocrine disrupting potencies. It is essential to monitor their environmental occurrence since these compounds may pose potential threats to biota and human health. In this study, yeast-based reporter assays were carried out to investigate the presence of (anti-)androgenic, (anti-)estrogenic, and (anti-)thyroid compounds in the aquatic environment in southern Taiwan. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was also used to measure the environmental concentrations of selected endocrine active substances for assessing potential ecological risks and characterizing contributions to the endocrine disrupting activities. Bioassay results showed that anti-androgenic (ND-7489 μg L(-1) flutamide equivalent), estrogenic (ND-347 ng L(-1) 17β-estradiol equivalent), and anti-thyroid activities were detected in the dissolved and particulate phases of river water samples, while anti-estrogenic activities (ND-10 μg L(-1) 4-hydroxytamoxifen equivalent) were less often found. LC-MS/MS analysis revealed that anti-androgenic and estrogenic contaminants, such as bisphenol A, triclosan, and estrone were frequently detected in Taiwanese rivers. In addition, their risk quotient values were often higher than 1, suggesting that they may pose an ecological risk to the aquatic biota. Further identification of unknown anti-androgenic and estrogenic contaminants in Taiwanese rivers may be necessary to protect Taiwan's aquatic environment. PMID:26971174

  18. A comparative study of the character and complexation properties of in-situ and extracted humic and fulvic substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The character and complexation properties of humic and fulvic acids, derived from a moorland water, have been studied, both under ''in-situ'' conditions and also after extraction. The characterisation studies involved determinations of UV-visible properties, fluorescence properties. size ranges, molecular weights and proton capacities. Complexation studies were conducted using High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography, Fluorescence Reduction and the Schubert Ion Exchange Method. A strong and weak site ligand model was used to interpret the data. The effects of pH, ionic strength, side reactions, ligand type, purity and nature of the cation were considered. No major differences in the character or complexation properties of the in-situ and extracted materials were found. (Author)

  19. Reappraisal of soil C storage processes. The controversy on structural diversity of humic substances as biogeochemical driver for soil C fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, Gonzalo; Gonzalez-Vila, Francisco J.; Gonzalez-Perez, Jose Antonio; Knicker, Heike

    2016-04-01

    The functional relationships between the macromolecular structure of the humic substances (HS) and a series of biogeochemical processes related with the C sequestration performance in soils have been recently questioned. In this communication we collect recent data from a wide array of different ecosystems where the C storage in soils has been studied and explained as a possible cause-to-effect relationship or has been found significantly correlated (multivariate statistical models) with a series of structural characteristics of humic materials. The study of humic materials has methodological analytical limitations that are derived from its complex, chaotic and not completely understood structure, that reflects its manifold precursors as well as the local impact of environmental/depositional factors. In this work we attempt to design an exploratory, multiomic approach based on the information provided by the molecular characterization of the soil organic matter (SOM). Massive data harvesting was carried out of statistical variables, to infer biogeochemical proxies (spectroscopic, chromatographic, mass spectrometric quantitative descriptors). The experimental data were acquired from advanced instrumental methodologies, viz, analytical pyrolysis, compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA), derivative infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, solid-state C-13 and N-15 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) data after direct injection (thermoevaporation), previous pyrolysis, or ion averaging of specific m/z ranges from classical GC/MS chromatograms. In the transversal exploratory analysis of the multianalytical information, the data were coded for on-line processing in a stage in which there is no need for interpretation, in molecular or structural terms, of the quantitative data consisting of e.g., peak intensities, signal areas, chromatographic (GC) total abundances, etc. A series of forecasting chemometric approaches (aiming to express SOM

  20. Stabilization process within a sewage sludge landfill determined through both particle size distribution and content of humic substances as well as by FT-IR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Zhao, Youcai

    2011-04-01

    Landfill is largely considered as a reliable option for sewage sludge disposal in most metropolitan areas worldwide due to the huge quantities of this waste to be disposed of and the relatively low costs of such a kind of sludge management. It has been found that the sludge in the landfill degrades rapidly and becomes stabilized within a few years. In the present study, the sludge from different landfill stages was characterized by particle size distribution, humic substances contents and elemental composition, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), as the landfill time increased. In general, the mean particle size of the sludge increased from 37 μm at day 0 to 143 μm at 300 days and the corresponding median particle size increased from 13 to 70 μm. The stability of particle size distribution can be assessed by the mean or median particle size. The humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) contents extracted from dry sludge after different landfill periods increased from 4.2 and 2.7% of day 0 to 5.6 and 3.1%, respectively, at 400 days, thereby indicating that the stabilization process of sludge in a landfill is also a humification process. The HA samples contained more carbon and nitrogen, and less hydrogen and oxygen than the FA samples, indicating a high degree of maturity and humification of these HA samples. The FT-IR spectra indicated that easily degradable organic matter components, such as aliphatic chains and protein, were distinctly decomposed during landfill. Based on the changes in the band relative intensity, it was concluded that after 300 days in a landfill the sludge is still in the process of degradation and maturity. PMID:21030423

  1. Off-line TMAH-GC/MS and NMR characterization of humic substances extracted from river sediments of northwestern São Paulo under different soil uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic substances (HS) vary according to the physical and chemical factors present in the environment. Thus, the characterization of HS is very important because it improves the understanding of the groups that comprise the chemical structure. Sediment HS were extracted from four locations representative of sugar cane cultivation, pasture, urban area and the impoundment of the Água Vermelha Hydroelectric Power Plant. Characterization using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) allowed us to infer that the HS from an area predominantly characterized by sugar cane cultivation (41.9%) and a typical rural area (35.0%) showed the highest aromaticity percentage. Using the off-line TMAH-thermochemolysis-GC-MS, we inferred that the HS of a typical rural area had a structure rich in plant waxes, plant biopolyester and a large amount of fatty acid methyl ester, which are related to the large amount of humic acid in the structure. The HS samples from the sugar cane cultivation area and the impoundment receiving all of the pollution load from the Turvo/Grande Hydrographic Basin (Bacia Hidrográfica do Turvo/Grande—BHTG) contained contributions from compounds rich in lipids and fatty acid methyl esters, highlighting the presence of the breakdown of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons in the area receiving the entire pollution load. We conclude that the HS extracted from the sediments of the Preto, Turvo and Grande rivers showed well-defined characteristics that varied depending on soil use and occupation, especially the HS extracted from sediments sampled in areas typically planted with sugar cane and rural areas, whose structures contained more aromatic groups. - Highlights: • The characterization of HS allows the understanding of the chemical structure. • HS of sediment in areas planted with sugar cane and rural areas contained more aromatic groups. • Influence of soil use and occupation on the chemical structure of the HS

  2. Off-line TMAH-GC/MS and NMR characterization of humic substances extracted from river sediments of northwestern São Paulo under different soil uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadini, Amanda Maria; Pantano, Glaucia; de Toffoli, Ana Lúcia; Fontaine, Barbara; Spaccini, Riccardo; Piccolo, Alessandro; Moreira, Altair Benedito; Bisinoti, Márcia Cristina

    2015-02-15

    Humic substances (HS) vary according to the physical and chemical factors present in the environment. Thus, the characterization of HS is very important because it improves the understanding of the groups that comprise the chemical structure. Sediment HS were extracted from four locations representative of sugar cane cultivation, pasture, urban area and the impoundment of the Água Vermelha Hydroelectric Power Plant. Characterization using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) allowed us to infer that the HS from an area predominantly characterized by sugar cane cultivation (41.9%) and a typical rural area (35.0%) showed the highest aromaticity percentage. Using the off-line TMAH-thermochemolysis-GC-MS, we inferred that the HS of a typical rural area had a structure rich in plant waxes, plant biopolyester and a large amount of fatty acid methyl ester, which are related to the large amount of humic acid in the structure. The HS samples from the sugar cane cultivation area and the impoundment receiving all of the pollution load from the Turvo/Grande Hydrographic Basin (Bacia Hidrográfica do Turvo/Grande-BHTG) contained contributions from compounds rich in lipids and fatty acid methyl esters, highlighting the presence of the breakdown of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons in the area receiving the entire pollution load. We conclude that the HS extracted from the sediments of the Preto, Turvo and Grande rivers showed well-defined characteristics that varied depending on soil use and occupation, especially the HS extracted from sediments sampled in areas typically planted with sugar cane and rural areas, whose structures contained more aromatic groups. PMID:25460956

  3. Off-line TMAH-GC/MS and NMR characterization of humic substances extracted from river sediments of northwestern São Paulo under different soil uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadini, Amanda Maria, E-mail: amandatadini@hotmail.com [Departamento de Química e Ciências Ambientais, Instituto de Biociências, Letras e Ciências Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista “Júlio de Mesquita Filho”, R. Cristóvão Colombo 2265, 15054-000 São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Pantano, Glaucia; Toffoli, Ana Lúcia de [Departamento de Química e Ciências Ambientais, Instituto de Biociências, Letras e Ciências Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista “Júlio de Mesquita Filho”, R. Cristóvão Colombo 2265, 15054-000 São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil); Fontaine, Barbara; Spaccini, Riccardo; Piccolo, Alessandro [Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sulla Risonanza Magnetica Nucleare (NMR) per L' ambiente, l' Agro-Alimentare ed i Nuovi Materiali, CERMANU, Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); and others

    2015-02-15

    Humic substances (HS) vary according to the physical and chemical factors present in the environment. Thus, the characterization of HS is very important because it improves the understanding of the groups that comprise the chemical structure. Sediment HS were extracted from four locations representative of sugar cane cultivation, pasture, urban area and the impoundment of the Água Vermelha Hydroelectric Power Plant. Characterization using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) allowed us to infer that the HS from an area predominantly characterized by sugar cane cultivation (41.9%) and a typical rural area (35.0%) showed the highest aromaticity percentage. Using the off-line TMAH-thermochemolysis-GC-MS, we inferred that the HS of a typical rural area had a structure rich in plant waxes, plant biopolyester and a large amount of fatty acid methyl ester, which are related to the large amount of humic acid in the structure. The HS samples from the sugar cane cultivation area and the impoundment receiving all of the pollution load from the Turvo/Grande Hydrographic Basin (Bacia Hidrográfica do Turvo/Grande—BHTG) contained contributions from compounds rich in lipids and fatty acid methyl esters, highlighting the presence of the breakdown of petroleum-derived hydrocarbons in the area receiving the entire pollution load. We conclude that the HS extracted from the sediments of the Preto, Turvo and Grande rivers showed well-defined characteristics that varied depending on soil use and occupation, especially the HS extracted from sediments sampled in areas typically planted with sugar cane and rural areas, whose structures contained more aromatic groups. - Highlights: • The characterization of HS allows the understanding of the chemical structure. • HS of sediment in areas planted with sugar cane and rural areas contained more aromatic groups. • Influence of soil use and occupation on the chemical structure of the HS.

  4. Characteristics of humic and fulvic acids in Arabian Sea sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.

    Humic and fulvic acids isolated from some of the shelf, slope and offshore sediments of the Arabian Sea were studied. The molecular weight, functional groups, elemental composition and infrared spectra were examined. Humic substances, dominated...

  5. Effect of organic amendments on the mobility of trace elements in phytoremediated techno-soils: role of the humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattab, N; Soubrand, M; Guégan, R; Motelica-Heino, M; Bourrat, X; Faure, O; Bouchardon, J L

    2014-09-01

    The efficiency of aided phytostabilization using organic amendments such as ramial chipped wood (RCW) and composted sewage sludge (CSS) was studied on contaminated techno-soils, on nine experimental plots. The objective was to characterize the role of fulvic (FA) and humic acids (HA) on the mobilization of trace elements, specifically As, Cu, Mo, Pb and Zn. Results showed that the addition of CSS increased the total organic carbon and nitrogen content more than with RCW and as a result, the C/N ratio in the CSS soil was higher than in the RCW and non-amended (NE) soil, reflecting the high decomposition of soil organic matter in the CSS soil compared with the other soils. The RCW and CSS amendments increased the hydrogen index (HI) values and the oxygen index (OI) values compared with the NE soil, especially for the soil treated with CSS which contained more aliphatic than aromatic compounds. The addition of CSS to the techno-soil significantly increased the percentage of C org associated with the HA fractions compared with the RCW and NE soils. The soil amended with CSS showed the highest E 4/E 6 ratio and the lowest E 2/E 3 ratio of FA. Zn and As were more abundant in the FA fraction than in the HA fraction, whereas Pb, Cu and Mo were more associated to HA than to FA in the treated and untreated soils, which may explain the difference in their mobility and availability. PMID:24854499

  6. Critical analysis of the data on complexation of lanthanides and actinides by natural organic matter: particular case of humic substances; Analyse critique des donnees de complexation des lanthanides et actinides par la matiere organique naturelle: cas des substances humiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiller, P.

    2010-07-01

    This document proposes a critical analysis of the models that describe the actinides and lanthanides complexation by natural organic matter in general and by humic substances in particular. In order to better delimit the particular properties of these substances the most influent physical and chemical properties on complexation are recalled as a preamble. Models as well as data that has been used are reviewed, compiled, and eventually compared to independent data in order to identify (i) their application domain, (ii) the possible simplifications which permit to obtain operational models, (iii) the conditions in which simplifications cannot be ascertained yet, and (iv) the data or fields of knowledge which are still too uncertain. A comparison between the different models is proposed in order to adapt parameters from one model to another minimising the experimental acquisitions, or at least to focus on missing data. Usually, data on the complexation of free ions M{sup z+} are reliable; as soon as hydrolysis, or competition with another ligand in general, in at stake data are much less reliable. Predictions from models are much more uncertain: formation of mixed complexes with hydroxide or carbonate anions is not univocal whatever the modelling strategy. Hints for transfer functions between models which are believed to be incompatible could be explored in order to justify necessary simplifications for using operational modelling. Influence on the solubility of oxides could be quantified, but it is difficult to clearly separate it from colloidal particles stabilisation. The account of the competition between cations by the models has also been tested. In view of the small number of available experimental data there still lie some uncertainties especially for the media that are close to neutrality and in the case of competition with magnesium, but overall in the case of the competition with aluminium and iron. The influence of redox activity of humic substances is

  7. Fractionating ambient humic-like substances (HULIS) for their reactive oxygen species activity - Assessing the importance of quinones and atmospheric aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vishal; Wang, Ying; El-Afifi, Rawan; Fang, Ting; Rowland, Janessa; Russell, Armistead G.; Weber, Rodney J.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we present a technique to identify the redox-active components of fine organic aerosols by fractionating humic-like substances (HULIS). We applied this technique to a dithiothreitol (DTT) assay - a measure of the capability of PM to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), and assessed the contribution of quinones to the DTT activity of ambient water-soluble PM. Filter samples from the Southeastern Center for Air Pollution & Epidemiology (SCAPE) were extracted in water and then passed-through a C-18 column to isolate the HULIS fraction by retention on the column. The HULIS was then eluted with a sequence of solvents of increasing polarity, i.e., hexane, dichloromethane (DCM) and then methanol. Each of these eluted fractions was analyzed for DTT activity. The methanol fraction was found to possess most of the DTT activity (>70%), while the hexane fraction had the least activity (60%) eluted in methanol. The results demonstrate the importance of atmospheric aging (oxidation) of organic aerosols in enhancing the ROS activity of ambient PM.

  8. Fe+2 and H2O2 synergic effect on fenton’s reaction applied in drinking water treatment with humic substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Di Bernardo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to know more on the action mechanisms of Fenton’s reagent, the present work had the objective to evaluate the chemical products – ferrous sulphate and hydrogen peroxide – contribution on Fenton’s reaction efficiency for the removal of apparent color and absorbance at 253,7 nm, using synthetic water prepared with humic substances, which presented high true color (100 ± 5 uH. Tests of oxidation and/or coagulation, flocculation and flotation using flotest equipment were realized. From the obtained results, it seems to have a synergic effect between Fe+2 and H2O2, because when hydrogen peroxide was applied alone, it was achieved apparent color maximum removal efficiency of 18% and with ferrous sulphate alone, the apparent color maximum removal efficiency resulted of 34%. On the other hand, when applying both chemical products (Fenton’s reagent, it was reached apparent color removal of 68% with much lower ferrous sulphate dosages. The maximum removals efficiencies of the 253,7 nm absorbance were even lower: 12% for hydrogen peroxide; 9% for ferrous sulphate; and with Fenton’s reagent this efficiency resulted up to 63%.

  9. Influence of humic substances on the removal of pentachlorophenol by a biomimetic catalytic system with a water-soluble iron(III)-porphyrin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Masami; Sawada, Akira; Kawasaki, Mikio; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Morimoto, Kengo; Tatsumi, Kenji; Aoyama, Masakazu

    2003-03-01

    To investigate some basic aspects of soil remediation using biomimetic catalysts, the effects of humic substances (HSs) on the removal of xenobiotics, such as pentachlorophenol (PCP), were investigated. The use of a biomimetic catalytic system using tetra(p-sulfophenyl)porphine-iron(III) (Fe(III)-TPPS) and potassium monopersulfate (KHSO5) resulted in the disappearance of PCP, accompanied by dechlorination. In addition, this process was enhanced by the presence of several types of HSs. The degrees of enhancement (% delta(PCP)60) achieved by the presence of HSs from peat and compost soils were larger than those in the presence of other types of HSs (tropical peat, brown forest, and ando soils). In control experiments, no PCP disappearance and dechlorination were observed in the presence of only KHSO5, only Fe(III)-TPPS, or combinations of HSs and either KHSO5 or Fe(III)-TPPS. To better understand the role of added HS in enhancing or inhibiting PCP disappearance, correlations between the chemical parameters of the HSs and % delta(PCP)60 were investigated. The most effective HSs had lower carboxylic acid contents and lower degrees of unsaturation. The carboxylic acid content and degree of unsaturation increase with the extent of humification. Therefore, HSs of a lower degree of humification would be predicted to be more useful in enhancing the disappearance of PCP in an Fe(III)-TPPS/KHSO5 system. PMID:12666937

  10. A simple simulation of adsorption equilibrium of Pb(II) on Andosols in the presence of dissolved humic substances for monitoring soil contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuyu; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yukari; Kameya, Takashi; Urano, Kohei

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption equilibrium of Pb(II) on Andosols was investigated and described quantitatively in order to develop a simple method for the rapid monitoring of heavy metals in soils. The effect of solution pH on adsorption isotherms was investigated experimentally and in simulations. At pH 7, the considerable desorption of Pb(II) due to the extensive dissolution of humic substances (HS) from soils into aqueous phases is known to be an obstacle to carrying out simulations. In batch experiments, the total organic carbon (TOC) of the aqueous phases was shown to be enhanced by the addition of pre-extracted HS to soil suspensions. By combining the ion-exchange and Freundlich models, the adsorption equilibriums of free Pb(2+) ions and Pb(2+)-HS were simulated and were shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. By estimating the concentrations and adsorption amounts of Pb(2+) and Pb(2+)-HS from measured CPb and TOC, it is possible to accurately simulate the soil contamination status even in in the presence of dissolved HS in the water in the solid-liquid extraction samples. PMID:23947708

  11. Dynamics and sources of reduced sulfur, humic substances and dissolved organic carbon in a temperate river system affected by agricultural practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Lauriane; Pernet-Coudrier, Benoît; Waeles, Matthieu; Gabon, Marine; Riso, Ricardo

    2015-12-15

    Although reduced organic sulfur substances (RSS) as well as humic substances (HS) are widely suspected to play a role in, for example, metal speciation or used as a model of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in laboratory studies, reports of their quantification in natural waters are scarce. We have examined the dynamics and sources of reduced sulfur, HS and DOC over an annual cycle in a river system affected by agricultural practices. The new differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry was successfully applied to measure glutathione-like compounds (GSHs), thioacetamide-like compounds (TAs) and the liquid chromatography coupled to organic detector to analyze HS and DOC at high frequency in the Penzé River (NW France). The streamflow-concentration patterns, principal components analysis and flux analysis allowed discrimination of the source of each organic compound type. Surprisingly, the two RSS and HS detected in all samples, displayed different behavior. As previously shown, manuring practice is the main source of DOC and HS in this watershed where agricultural activity is predominant. The HS were then transferred to the river systems via runoff, particularly during the spring and autumn floods, which are responsible of >60% of the annual flux. TAs had a clear groundwater source and may be formed underground, whereas GSHs displayed two sources: one aquagenic in spring and summer probably linked to the primary productivity and a second, which may be related to bacterial degradation. High sampling frequency allowed a more accurate assessment of the flux values which were 280 tC y(-1) for DOC representing 20 kg C ha(-1) y(-1). HS, TAs and GSHs fluxes represented 60, 13, and 4% of the total annual DOC export, respectively. PMID:26278374

  12. Soluble Iron as an In Situ Indicator of the Redox State of Humic Substances in Arctic Soil: Implications for Seasonal Regeneration of Oxidized Terminal Electron Acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, D.; Zlamal, J. E.; Srinivas, A. J.; Raab, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    Ferric iron (Fe(III)) and humic substances (HS) are important terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration in wet tundra soils of the Arctic Coastal Plain near Barrow, Alaska. These soils are rich in both solid phase Fe minerals (including oxides such as ferrihydrite and goethite and other minerals with reduced or mixed valence such as siderite and magnetite) and soluble Fe, chelated by siderophores and other small organic molecules. This latter pool may also include nanocolloidal Fe: extremely fine-grained minerals that pass through a 0.2 micron filter. Both the solid phase and aqueous Fe pools undergo seasonal changes in redox state as a result of biological reduction by Fe-reducing microorganisms and oxidation by a variety of potential mechanisms, both abiotic and biotic. These redox cycles of solid and aqueous pools are not in phase: solid phase Fe became progressively more reduced from mid- to late summer, while aqueous phase Fe became reduced over the first half of the summer. It is well-known that HS interact with Fe, and that HS can act as electron shuttles in the reduction of Fe oxides. In other ecosystems chelated Fe(III) has been incubated with soil samples and the resulting Fe(II) produced is used as an indicator of the reducing power of HS. In these Fe-rich Arctic soils, HS are continuously in contact with chelated Fe, and therefore we interpret the redox state of this pool as an indicator of HS redox status. To verify this we conducted redox titrations of extracted HS with both reduced and oxidized Fe chelates and showed that chelated Fe could interact with HS both as electron acceptor and donator. In a field experiment, the addition of oxidized humic acids to soils resulted in an immediate oxidation of the aqueous Fe pool within 24 hours, which we attribute to abiotic oxidation of Fe by HS, followed by a slow reduction of this pool over the next week, presumably due to biological Fe reduction of the HS/aqueous Fe pool. At the end of summer

  13. Conformational behaviour of humic substances at different depths along a profile of a Lithosol under loblolly (Pinus taeda) plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, P.; Maia, C. M. B. F.; de Pasquale, C.; Alonzo, G.

    2009-04-01

    The conformation of natural organic matter (NOM) plays a key role in many physical and chemical processes including interactions with organic and inorganic pollutants and soil aggregates stability thus directly influencing soil quality. NOM conformation can be studied by solid state NMR spectroscopy with cross polarization and magic angle spinning (CPMAS NMR). In the present study we applied CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy on three humic acid fractions (HA) each extracted from a different horizon in a Lithosol profile under Pinus taeda. Results showed that the most superficial HA was also the most aliphatic in character. Amount of aromatic moieties and hydrophilic HA constituents increased along the profile. Cross polarization (TCH) and longitudinal relaxation protons times in the rotating frame (T1rho(H)) were measured and compared only for the NMR signals generated by carboxyls and alkyls. This because the signal intensity for the aromatic, C-O and C-N systems was very low, thereby preventing suitable evaluation of TCH and T1rho(H) values for such systems. The cross polarization times of carboxyls decreased, whereas those of the alkyl moieties increased with depth. Conversely, T1rho(H) values increased for both COOH and alkyl groups along the profile. Polarization transfer from protons to carbons is affected by the dipolar interactions among the nuclei. The stronger the H-C dipolar interaction, the faster is the rate of the energy exchange. All the factors affecting the dipolar interaction strength also influence the rate of magnetization transfer. Among the others, fast molecular tumbling and poor proton density around the carbons are responsible for long TCH values. Molecular tumbling and proton density also affect T1rho(H) values. Namely, the larger the molecular tumbling and the proton density, the faster is the proton longitudinal relaxation rate in the rotating frame (shorter T1rho(H) values). The decrease of TCH values of COOH groups along the profile was

  14. Change in ATP-binding cassette B1/19, glutamine synthetase and alcohol dehydrogenase gene expression during root elongation in Betula pendula Roth and Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn in response to leachate and leonardite humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, Abdelghani; Delporte, Fabienne; Muhovski, Yordan; Ongena, Marc; Thonart, Philippe; Druart, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous compounds of humified organic matter resulting from the chemical and microbiological decomposition of organic residues. HS have a positive effect on plant growth and development by improving soil structure and fertility. They have long been recognized as plant growth-promoting substances, particularly with regard to influencing nutrient uptake, root growth and architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms through which HS influence plant physiology are not well understood. This study evaluated the bioactivity of landfill leachate and leonardite HS on alder (Alnus glutinosa L. Gaertn) and birch (Betula pendula Roth) during root elongation in vitro. Changes in root development were studied in relation to auxin, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms, as well as to the stress adaptive response. The cDNA fragments of putative genes encoding two ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters (ABCB1 and ABCB19) belonging to the B subfamily of plant ABC auxin transporters were cloned and sequenced. Molecular data indicate that HS and their humic acid (HA) fractions induce root growth by influencing polar auxin transport (PAT), as illustrated by the modulation of the ABCB transporter transcript levels (ABCB1 and ABCB19). There were also changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glutamine synthetase (GS) gene transcript levels in response to HS exposure. These findings confirmed that humic matter affects plant growth and development through various metabolic pathways, including hormonal, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms and stress response or signalization. PMID:26595095

  15. Copper binding to soil fulvic and humic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Jinling; Tan, Wenfeng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Mingxia; Fang, Linchuan; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of Cu(II) to soil fulvic acid (JGFA), soil humic acids (JGHA, JLHA), and lignite-based humic acid (PAHA) was investigated through NICA-Donnan modeling and conditional affinity spectrum (CAS). It is to extend the knowledge of copper binding by soil humic substances (HS) both in respect of

  16. Identification of humic-like substances (HULIS) in oxygenated organic aerosols using NMR and AMS factor analyses and liquid chromatographic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglione, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Mensah, A. A.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Sandrini, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.; Schlag, P.; Piazzalunga, A.; Tagliavini, E.; Henzing, J. S.; Decesari, S.

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric organic aerosol composition is characterized by a great diversity of functional groups and chemical species, challenging simple classification schemes. Traditional offline chemical methods identify chemical classes based on the retention behaviour on chromatographic columns and absorbing beds. Such an approach led to the isolation of complex mixtures of compounds such as the humic-like substances (HULIS). More recently, online aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) was employed to identify chemical classes by extracting fragmentation patterns from experimental data series using statistical methods (factor analysis), providing simplified schemes for the classification of oxygenated organic aerosols (OOAs) on the basis of the distribution of oxygen-containing functionalities. The analysis of numerous AMS data sets suggested the occurrence of very oxidized OOAs which were postulated to correspond to HULIS. However, only a few efforts were made to test the correspondence of the AMS classes of OOAs with the traditional classifications from the offline methods. In this paper, we consider a case study representative of polluted continental regional background environments. We examine the AMS factors for OOAs identified by positive matrix factorization (PMF) and compare them to chemical classes of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) analysed offline on a set of filters collected in parallel. WSOC fractionation was performed by means of factor analysis applied to proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic data, and by applying an ion-exchange chromatographic method for direct quantification of HULIS. Results show that the very oxidized low-volatility OOAs from AMS correlate with the NMR factor showing HULIS features and also with true "chromatographic" HULIS. On the other hand, UV/VIS-absorbing polyacids (or HULIS {sensu stricto}) isolated on ion-exchange beds were only a fraction of the AMS and NMR organic carbon fractions showing functional groups

  17. Temporal variations of the abundance and optical properties of water soluble Humic-Like Substances (HULIS) in PM2.5 at Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xingjun; Song, Jianzhong; Peng, Ping'an

    2016-05-01

    Humic-Like Substances (HULIS) are important macromolecular compounds that are present in PM2.5 and play significant roles in the atmospheric environment. In this study, 48 PM2.5 samples were collected from February 2010 to January 2011 at an urban site in Guangzhou, southern China. The water soluble HULIS fractions in PM2.5 were analyzed to explore the temporal variation of abundance and optical properties and to identify their possible sources. The HULIS concentrations were in the range of 0.4 to 8.2 μg C m- 3, with a mean of 2.4 μg C m- 3. HULIS are important components in organic aerosols, accounting for 17 ± 5% of the organic carbon (OC), and 49 ± 6 and 68 ± 5% of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) as determined with a total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer and UV absorbance at 250 nm, respectively. The special UV absorbance (SUVA) at 254 nm and 280 nm and the E250/E365 ratio of HULIS were 3.2 ± 0.5 L (m mg C)- 1, 2.2 ± 0.4 L (m mg C)- 1, and 5.9 ± 0.9, respectively. The HULIS fractions had higher concentrations, slightly higher SUVA values, and lower E250/E365 ratios from November to January, indicating the important contribution of aromatic compounds to HULIS in the dry season. The concentrations of HULIS were positively correlated with water soluble K+, secondary organic carbon (SOC), and secondary inorganic ions (NH4+, NO3-, and SO42 -). These results suggest that biomass burning and secondary photochemical formation are both sources of HULIS in our study area. In addition, the SUVA280 of HULIS was strongly correlated with K+ and SOC, suggesting that HULIS properties were also influenced by their primary source of biomass burning and secondary atmospheric formation.

  18. Fluorescence of aqueous solutions of commercial humic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosteva, O. Yu.; Izosimov, A. A.; Patsaeva, S. V.; Yuzhakov, V. I.; Yakimenko, O. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the spectral luminescence characteristics of aqueous solutions of humic products obtained from different raw material sources, and their behavior as the excitation wavelength increases from 270 nm to 355 nm. We have identified differences in the spectral properties of industrial humic products from coalified materials, lignin-containing organic waste, and humic products from plant raw material (peat, sapropel, vermicompost). We have shown that humic products from plant raw material have spectral properties closer to those for humic substances in natural water or soil than humic products from coalified materials.

  19. Determination of humic and fulvic acids in commercial solid and liquid humic products by alkaline extraction and gravimetric determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased use of humic substances in agriculture has generated intense interest among producers, consumers, and regulators for an accurate and reliable method for quantification of humic (HA) and fulvic acids (FA) in raw ores and products. Here we present a thoroughly validated method, the Humic Pro...

  20. Toxic effect of a marine bacterium on aquatic organisms and its algicidal substances against Phaeocystis globosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuchan Yang

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms have caused enormous damage to the marine ecosystem and the coastal economy in China. In this paper, a bacterial strain B1, which had strong algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa, was isolated from the coastal waters of Zhuhai in China. The strain B1 was identified as Bacillus sp. on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequence and morphological characteristics. To evaluate the ecological safety of the algicidal substances produced by strain B1, their toxic effects on marine organisms were tested. Results showed that there were no adverse effects observed in the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, Chaetoceros muelleri, and Isochrystis galbana after exposure to the algicidal substances at a concentration of 1.0% (v/v for 96 h. The 48h LC50 values for Brachionus plicatilis, Moina mongolica Daday and Paralichthys olivaceus were 5.7, 9.0 and 12.1% (v/v, respectively. Subsequently, the algicidal substances from strain B1 culture were isolated and purified by silica gel column, Sephadex G-15 column and high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and PeakView Software, the purified substances were identified as prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine. Algicidal mechanism indicated that prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine inhibited the growth of P. globosa by disrupting the antioxidant systems. In the acute toxicity assessment using M. mongolica, 24h LC50 values of prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine were 7.0 and 13.8 g/L, respectively. The active substances produced by strain B1 can be considered as ecologically and environmentally biological agents for controlling harmful algal blooms.

  1. Carbon isotope composition of dissolved humic and fulvic acids in the Tokachi river system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports carbon isotopic ratios (Δ14C and δ13C) of dissolved humic and fulvic acids in the Tokachi River system, northern Japan. These acids have a refractory feature and they represent the largest fraction of dissolved organic matter in aquatic environments. The acids were isolated using the XAD extraction method from river water samples collected at three sites (on the upper and lower Tokachi River, and from one of its tributaries) in June 2004 and 2005. δ13C values were -27.8 to -26.9 per mil for humic and fulvic acids. On the other hand, the Δ14C values ranged from -247 to +26 per mil and the average values were -170±79 per mil for humic acid and -44±73 per mil for fulvic acid. The difference was attributed to the residence time of fulvic acid in the watershed being shorter than that of humic acid. The large variation suggested that humic substances have a different pathway in each watershed environment. (authors)

  2. Isolation of humic acids from leonardite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, S.B.; Tartamella, T.L.; Lee, S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Kulik, C.J. [Ancon International, Newark, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The primary interest in humic acid is its use as an effective fertilizer. Humic substances, found commonly in low-rank coals, enhance plant growth directly through positive physiological effects and indirectly by affecting the properties of the soil. Humic acids have traditionally been defined as the dark-colored organic matter that can be extracted from soil by dilute alkali and other reagents and which is insoluble in dilute acid. This paper discusses the isolation of humic acid from leonardite using the alkaline extraction method and the subsequent characterization using elemental analysis and infrared spectroscopy techniques. In this study, yields of more than 60% were obtained.

  3. Potential accumulation of estrogenic substances in biofilms and aquatic plants collected in sewage treatment plant (STP) and receiving water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultis, T.; Kuch, B.; Kern, A.; Metzger, J.W. [Inst. for Sanitary Engineering, Water Quality and Solid Waste Management ISWA, Stuttgart Univ. (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    During the past years the estrogenic potency of natural (e.g. estrone and 17{beta}-estradiol E2) and synthetic hormones (e.g. ethinylestradiol EE2) and xenoestrogens (e.g. pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dioxins (PCDDs) and furans (PCDFs), alkylphenolic compounds or bisphenol A (BPA)) has attracted increasing scientific attention. Especially the occurrence and behaviour of these substances in waste water of sewage treatment plants (STPs) were often investigated. Andersen et al. found steroid estrogen concentrations in the effluent of a municipal STP always below the limit of quantification of 1 ng/l. However, Aerni et al. detected E2 and EE2 concentrations up to 6 ng/l and 2 ng/l, and alkylphenols, alkylphenolmonoand diethoxylates even at {mu}g/l concentrations in the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant with a significant industrial impact3. In activated and digested sewage sludge concentrations of estrone and E2 up to 37 ng/g and 49 ng/g, of the synthetic EE2 up to 17 ng/g were observed4. In river sediments the concentrations detected were lower with up to 2 ng/g estrone and 0,9 ng/g EE24. In the meantime many studies exist about raw and treated water in STPs, but there is little knowledge about the influence of estrogenic active substances on aquatic plants so far. In this study we investigated therefore the potency of estrogenic substances to accumulate in the duckweed Lemna minor from STP in comparison to the estrogenicity of duckweed from a natural pond, biofilms in drain and microsieve of the STP by the in vitro E-Screen- and LYES-assay (yeast estrogen screen-assay assisted by enzymatic digestion with lyticase). In addition, we tested the estrogenic activity of moss-like aquatic plants collected at different sites of the receiving water and analyzed the concentrations of four phenolic xenoestrogens in the effluent by GC/MS.

  4. 腐殖质的光化学降解及其对环境污染物环境行为的影响%Photodegradation of humic substance and its effects on the environmental pollutant behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    楼涛; 汪学军; 何昆鹏; 杨臻

    2014-01-01

    Humic substance is the key organic component, and also one of the main light absorbents in ecosystem, which impacts on the environmental pollutants’ conformation, migration, toxicity and bioavailability significantly. This paper reviews the structure, and photochemical degradation reaction process and mechanism of humic substance. In general, humic substance promotes the photodegradation of pollutants at low concentration, especially with certain iron. However it depresses the photodegradation at high concentration due to the competition of sunlight and reactive oxygen species. Photodegradation of humic substance results in the decrease of molecular weight, aromatic ring and changes of absorbance of ultraviolet and visible region which lead to the lower binding capacity of pollutants and the higher free pollutant concentration. It would be more harmful to the ecosystem. Although it is clear of the mechanism of photodegradation of humic substance and pollutants, more attentions should be paid on the factors of humic substance photodegradation in water and soil system, the mechanism of photosensitive reaction and photodegradation of humic substance, and the relationship between the structure of humic substance and binding capacity of pollutants in the near future. With the increase of stratospheric ozone hole, it enhances the intensity of ultraviolet radiation to the earth's surface. To study the influences of ultraviolet radiation enhancement on the photodegradation of humic substance and pollutants and their impacts on the ecosystem would deep our understandings to the environmental pollutant behavior caused by sunlight radiation.%腐殖质是地表环境中最重要的有机组分,也是生态环境中最主要的吸光物质之一,对环境污染物的形态、迁移、毒性和生物可利用性有着重要的影响。文章综述了腐殖质的结构特征和光化学降解反应过程和机理,指出腐殖质的光敏化和光化学降解过程对环

  5. LC-MS analysis in the aquatic environment and in water treatment technology--a critical review. Part II: Applications for emerging contaminants and related pollutants, microorganisms and humic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwiener, Christian; Frimmel, Fritz H

    2004-02-01

    Environmental contaminants of recent concern are pharmaceuticals, estrogens and other endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) such as degradation products of surfactants, algal and cyanobacterial toxins, disinfection by-products (DBPs) and metalloids. In addition, pesticides (especially their transformation products), microorganisms, and humic substances (HS), in their function as vehicles for contaminants and as precursors for by-products in water treatment, traditionally play an important role. The present status of the application of LC-MS techniques for these water constituents are discussed and examples of application are given. Solid-phase extraction with various non-selective materials in combination with liquid chromatography (LC) on reversed-phase columns have been the most widely used methods for sample preconcentration and separation for different compound classes like pesticides, pharmaceuticals or estrogens. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure ionization (APCI) are the most frequently used ionization techniques for polar and ionic compounds, as well as for less polar non-ionic ones. The facilities of LC-MS have been successfully demonstrated for different compound classes. Polar compounds from pharmaceuticals used as betablockers, iodinated X-ray contrast media, or estrogens have been determined without derivatization down to ultratrace concentrations. LC-MS can be viewed as a prerequisite for the determination of algal and cyanobacterial toxins and the homologues and oligomers of alkylphenol ethoxylates and their metabolites. Tandem mass spectrometric techniques and the use of diagnostic ions reveal their usefulness for compound-class specific screening and unknown identification, and are also valid for the analysis of pesticides and especially for their transformation products. Structural information has been gained by the application of LC-MS methods to organometallic species. New insights into the structural variety of humic

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species Production Mediated by Humic-like Substances in Atmospheric Aerosols: Enhancement Effects by Pyridine, Imidazole, and Their Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jing; Lin, Peng; Kuang, Bin-Yu; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2015-06-01

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can cause adverse health effects via their ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Humic-like substances (HULIS), a complex mixture of amphiphilic organic compounds, have been demonstrated to contain the majority of redox activity in the water-extractable organic fraction of PM. Reduced organic nitrogen compounds, such as alkaloids resulting from biomass burning emissions, are among HULIS constituents. In this study, we examined the redox activities of pyridine, imidazole and their alkyl derivatives using a cell-free dithiothreitol (DTT) assay under simulated physiological conditions (37 °C, pH = 7.40). These compounds were found to have little redox activity on their own as measured by the DTT assay, but they enhanced ROS generation catalyzed by 1,4-naphthoquinone (as a model quinone compound) and HULIS isolated from multiple aerosol samples. The enhancement effect by the individual nitrogen-containing bases was determined to be proportional to their amount in the assay solutions. It is postulated that the underlying mechanism involves the unprotonated N atom acting as a H-bonding acceptor to facilitate hydrogen-atom transfer in the ROS generation cycle. The enhancement capability was found to increase with their basicity (i.e., pKa of their conjugated acids, BH(+)), consistent with the proposed mechanism for enhancement. Among the imidazole homologues, a linear relationship was observed between the enhancement factors (in log scale) of the unprotonated form of the imidazole compounds (B) and the pKa of their conjugated acids (BH(+)). This relationship predicts that the range of alkylimidazole homologues (C6-C13) observed in atmospheric HULIS would be 1.5-4.4 times more effective than imidazole in facilitating HULIS-mediated ROS generation. Our work reveals that the ability of atmospheric PM organics to catalyze generation of ROS in cells could be affected by coexisting redox inactive organic constituents and suggests

  7. Sources of humic-like substances in the Pearl River Delta, China: positive matrix factorization analysis of PM2.5 major components and source markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, B. Y.; Lin, P.; Huang, X. H. H.; Yu, J. Z.

    2015-02-01

    Humic-like substances (HULIS), the hydrophobic part of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), account for a significant fraction of PM2.5 mass. Their source studies are so far largely qualitative. In this study, HULIS and WSOC were determined in 100 PM2.5 samples collected in 2009 at an urban site (Guangzhou) and a suburban site (Nansha) in the Pearl River Delta in South China. The annual average concentration of HULIS was 4.83 and 4.71 μg m-3, constituting 8.5 and 10.2% of the PM2.5 mass, while HULIS-C (the carbon component of HULIS) contributed 48 and 57% of WSOC at the two sites, respectively. HULIS were found to correlate with biomass burning (BB) tracers (i.e., levoglucosan and K) and secondary species (e.g., SO42- and NH4+), suggesting its association with BB emissions and secondary formation processes. Sources of HULIS were investigated using positive matrix factorization analysis of PM2.5 chemical composition data, including major components and source markers. In addition to secondary formation process and BB emissions, residual oil combustion related to shipping was identified for the first time as a significant source of HULIS. Secondary formation process contributed the most, accounting for 49-82% of ambient HULIS at the two sites in different seasons. BB emissions contributed a seasonal average of 8-28%, with more contributions observed in the winter months (November-February) due to crop residue burning during harvest season. Residual oil combustion was revealed to be an important source at the suburban site in summer (44% of HULIS-C) due to its proximity to one of the ports and the shipping lane in the region. Vehicle emissions were found to contribute little to HULIS, but had contributions to the hydrophilic WSOC fraction. The contrast in contributions from different combustion sources to HULIS and hydrophilic WSOC suggests that primary sources of HULIS are linked to inefficient combustion. This source analysis suggests further study of HULIS be

  8. Sources of humic-like substances in the Pearl River Delta, China: positive matrix factorization analysis of PM2.5 major components and source markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Y. Kuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available HUmic-LIke Substances (HULIS, the hydrophobic part of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC, account for a significant fraction of PM2.5 mass. Their source studies are so far largely qualitative. In this study, HULIS and WSOC were determined in 100 PM2.5 samples collected in 2009 at an urban site (Guangzhou and a suburban site (Nansha in the Pearl River Delta in South China. The annual average concentration of HULIS was 4.83 and 4.71 μg m−3, constituting 8.5 and 10.2% of the PM2.5 mass, while HULIS-C (the carbon component of HULIS contributed 48 and 57% of WSOC at the two sites, respectively. HULIS was found to correlate with biomass burning (BB tracers (i.e., levoglucosan and K and secondary species (e.g., sulfate and ammonium, suggesting its association with BB emissions and secondary formation processes. Sources of HULIS were investigated using positive matrix factorization analysis of PM2.5 chemical composition data, including major components and source markers. In addition to secondary formation process and BB emissions, residual oil combustion related to shipping was identified for the first time as a significant source of HULIS. Secondary formation process contributed the most, accounting for 49–82% of ambient HULIS at the two sites in different seasons. BB emissions contributed a seasonal average of 8–28%, with more contributions observed in the winter months (November–February due to crop residue burning during harvest season. Residual oil combustion was revealed to be an important source at the suburban site in summer (44% of HULIS-C due to its proximity to one of the ports and the shipping lane in the region. Vehicle emissions were found to contribute little to HULIS but had contributions to the hydrophilic WSOC fraction. The contrast in contributions from different combustion sources to HULIS and hydrophilic WSOC suggests that primary sources of HULIS are linked to inefficient combustion. This source analysis suggests further

  9. Substâncias húmicas de turfa: estudo dos parâmetros que influenciam no processo de extração alcalina Humic substances of peat: study of the parameters that influence on the process of alkaline e extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Henrique Rosa

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the parameters which influence on extraction of humic substances (HS from peat. The yield, organic and inorganic contend, E4/E6 ratio and elemental composition (C,H,N of the extracted HS have been determined. The functional groups were identified by Fourier-transform infrared espectroscopy. The results showed influence of the extractor type, concentration, time, temperature and granular texture of the sample in the extraction. This work contributes to better understanding of the extraction process showing the necessity of the standard method to extract humic substances from soil

  10. Analysis of humic colloid borne trace elements by flow field-flow fractionation, gel permeation chromatography and icp-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundwater samples containing aquatic humic substances are analyzed by flow field- flow fractionation (FFFF) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Natural concentrations of U, Th and rare earth elements (REE) in a size-fractionated groundwater sample are analyzed by on-line coupling of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to either FFFF or GPC. The uranium, thorium, and REE are found to be quantitatively attached to colloidal species in the investigated groundwater sample. Their distribution in different colloid size fractions, however, is quite heterogeneous. Both, FFFF and GPC reveal that Th and REE are preferentially located in the size fraction > 50 kDalton. U is also attached to low molecular weight humic acid, similar to Fe and Al. This finding could be qualitatively reproduced by sequential ultrafiltration. The results are interpreted in terms of different binding mechanisms for the individual elements in the heterogeneous humic macromolecules. The inclusion of actinides into larger aggregates of aquatic humic acid might explain the considerable kinetic hindrance of actinide-humic acid dissociation reactions described in the literature. (authors)

  11. Enzymatically mediated incorporation of 2-chlorophenol 4-chlorophenol into humic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, P.; Randall, A.; Jørgensen, O.;

    1994-01-01

    A possible route to chlorinated humic substances in the environment, is an indirect chlorination of humic material by enzymatically mediated incorporation of low molecular weight organo-chlorine compounds into the humic skeleton. The enzymatically mediated incorporation of 2-chlorophenol and 4......-chlorophenol into humic acids by Horseradish Peroxidase is reported. The incorporation is accompanied by a significant polymerization of the chlorophenols. The stability of the chlorinated humic acids as well as the environmental implication are discussed....

  12. Capillary Electrophoresis Profiles and Fluorophore Components of Humic Acids in Nebraska Corn and Philippine Rice Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    As humic substances represent relatively high molecular mass polyelectrolytes containing aromatic, aliphatic and heterocyclic subunits, capillary electrophoresis (CE) has become an attractive method for “finger-print” characterization of humic acids. In addition, fluorescence excitation-emission ma...

  13. Remediation of highly contaminated soils from an industrial site by employing a combined treatment with exogeneous humic substances and oxidative biomimetic catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sannino, Filomena, E-mail: fsannino@unina.it [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Spaccini, Riccardo [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sulla Risonanza Magnetica Nucleare per l’Ambiente, l’Agro-Alimentare ed i Nuovi Materiali (CERMANU), Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Savy, Davide [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Piccolo, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Agraria, Università di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca sulla Risonanza Magnetica Nucleare per l’Ambiente, l’Agro-Alimentare ed i Nuovi Materiali (CERMANU), Via Università 100, 80055 Portici (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Remediation of two polluted soils from a highly contaminated industrial site in Italy. • Restoration of soil quality by introducing additional carbon into polluted soil with humic matter amendments. • Detoxification of contaminants by covalent binding to humic molecules. • Prevention of environmental transport of pollutants. -- Abstract: Remediation of two polluted soils from a northern Italian industrial site heavily contaminated with organic contaminants was attempted here by subjecting soils first to addition with an exogenous humic acid (HA), and, then, to an oxidation reaction catalyzed by a water-soluble iron-porphyrin (FeP). An expected decrease of detectable organic pollutants (>50%) was already observed when soils were treated only with the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidant. This reduction was substantially enhanced when oxidation was catalyzed by iron-porphyrin (FeP + H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and the largest effect was observed for the most highly polluted soil. Even more significant was the decrease in detectable pollutants (70–90%) when soils were first amended with HA and then subjected to the FeP + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. This reduction in extractable pollutants after the combined HA + FeP + H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment was due to formation of covalent C-C and C-O-C bonds between soil contaminants and amended humic molecules. Moreover, the concomitant detection of condensation products in soil extracts following FeP addition confirmed the occurrence of free-radical coupling reactions catalyzed by FeP. These findings indicate that a combined technique based on the action of both humic matter and a metal-porhyrin catalyst, may become useful to quantitatively reduce the toxicity of heavily contaminated soils and prevent the environmental transport of pollutants.

  14. Remediation of highly contaminated soils from an industrial site by employing a combined treatment with exogeneous humic substances and oxidative biomimetic catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Remediation of two polluted soils from a highly contaminated industrial site in Italy. • Restoration of soil quality by introducing additional carbon into polluted soil with humic matter amendments. • Detoxification of contaminants by covalent binding to humic molecules. • Prevention of environmental transport of pollutants. -- Abstract: Remediation of two polluted soils from a northern Italian industrial site heavily contaminated with organic contaminants was attempted here by subjecting soils first to addition with an exogenous humic acid (HA), and, then, to an oxidation reaction catalyzed by a water-soluble iron-porphyrin (FeP). An expected decrease of detectable organic pollutants (>50%) was already observed when soils were treated only with the H2O2 oxidant. This reduction was substantially enhanced when oxidation was catalyzed by iron-porphyrin (FeP + H2O2) and the largest effect was observed for the most highly polluted soil. Even more significant was the decrease in detectable pollutants (70–90%) when soils were first amended with HA and then subjected to the FeP + H2O2 treatment. This reduction in extractable pollutants after the combined HA + FeP + H2O2 treatment was due to formation of covalent C-C and C-O-C bonds between soil contaminants and amended humic molecules. Moreover, the concomitant detection of condensation products in soil extracts following FeP addition confirmed the occurrence of free-radical coupling reactions catalyzed by FeP. These findings indicate that a combined technique based on the action of both humic matter and a metal-porhyrin catalyst, may become useful to quantitatively reduce the toxicity of heavily contaminated soils and prevent the environmental transport of pollutants

  15. Surface Activity of Humic Acids Depending on Their Origin and Humification Degree

    OpenAIRE

    Klaviņš Māris; Purmalis Oskars

    2014-01-01

    Humic substances are able to reduce the surface tension of their solutions and thus can act as surface-active substances in the natural environment, which may have industrial application. The ability to influence the surface tension of humic acid solutions depends on the origin of the humic acids. The objective of this study was comparison of the ability of humic acids of different origin (soil, water, peat, lignite etc.) to influence the surface tension of their solutions, and identification...

  16. Solubility of Heavy Metals/Metalloid on Multi-Metal Contaminated Soil Samples from a Gold Ore Processing Area: Effects of Humic Substances

    OpenAIRE

    Cácio Luiz Boechat; Vítor Caçula Pistóia; Ana Cristina Ludtke; Clesio Gianello; Flávio Anastácio de Oliveira Camargo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bioavailability of heavy metals at contaminated sites is largely controlled by the physicochemical properties of the environmental media such as dissolved organic matter, hydroxides and clay colloids, pH, soil cation exchange capacity and oxidation-reduction potential. The aim of this study was to investigate soil pH and heavy metal solubility effect by levels of humic and fulvic acids applied in soil samples with different levels of contamination by heavy metals. The soil samples us...

  17. Stocks of carbon, total nitrogen and humic substances in soil under different cropping systemsEstoques de carbono e nitrogênio totais nas substâncias húmicas do solo sob diferentes sistemas de manejo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diovany Doffinger Ramos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate total carbon and nitrogen and stocks of the humic fractions of soil organic matter under different cropping systems at the experimental farm at the Federal University at Grande Dourados – UFGD. Soil samples were collected from two layers (0-10 and 10-20 cm from an oxisol with a clay texture. The systems studied were as follows: non-tillage (NTS, tillage (TS, eucalyptus and pasture. Natural vegetation from Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil was used for comparison. For statistical analysis of the C and N stocks, the model: Y = ? + Ai + rep (A ik + Eijk was used. The replacement of TN one for CT decreased the total organic carbon and C in the stocks of humic substances (fulvic acid, humic acid and humin in the soil just three years after adoption, especially in the 0-10 cm layer. However, soils under eucalyptus trees acquired increased carbon stock in the most active fractions, such as the fractions of fulvic and humic acids (0-20 cm layer. Regardless of the cropping system, the largest C and N stocks were measured for the humin fraction, followed by humic acid and fulvic acid. The total N and humic and fulvic acid levels under the conditions of maintenance of TN for 15 years increased when compared with CT, but not in soils under eucalyptus trees.O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar os estoques de C e N totais nas frações húmicas da matéria orgânica, em diferentes sistemas de manejo do solo na fazenda experimental da Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados – UFGD. Para isso, foram coletadas amostras (0-10 e 10-20 cm em um Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico, textura argilosa, nos sistemas de plantio direto (SPD e convencional (SPC, e os solos cultivados com pastagem e com eucalipto, como referência foi utilizado solo coletado em área de floresta nativa, em Dourados-MS. Para análise estatística dos estoques de C e N foi utilizado o modelo estatístico: Y = ? + Ai + rep(Aik + Eijk. A substituição do

  18. Fractal nature of humic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractals are geometric representatives of strongly disordered systems whose structure is described by nonintegral dimensions. A fundamental tenet of fractal geometry is that disorder persists at any characterization scale-length used to describe the system. The nonintegral nature of these fractal dimensions is the result of the realization that a disordered system must possess more structural detail than an ordered system with classical dimensions of 1, 2, or 3 in order to accommodate this ''disorder within disorder.'' Thus from a fractal perspective, disorder is seen as an inherent characteristic of the system rather than as a perturbative phenomena forced upon it. Humic materials are organic substances that are formed by the profound alteration of organic matter in a natural environment. They can be operationally divided into 3 fractions; humic acid (soluble in base), fulvic acid (soluble in acid or base), and humin (insoluble in acid or base). Each of these fraction has been shown to be an extremely heterogeneous mixture. These mixtures have proven so intractable that they may represent the ultimate in molecular disorder. In fact, based on the characteristics that humic materials must possess in order to perform their functions in natural systems, it has been proposed that the fundamental chemical characteristic of a humic material is not a discrete chemical structure but a pronounced lack of order on a molecular level. If the fundamental chemical characteristic of a humic material is a strongly disordered nature, as has been proposed, then humic materials should be amenable to characterization by fractal geometry. The purpose of this paper is to test this hypothesis

  19. Reduction of Pu(V) and Np(V) by leonardite humic acids and their quinonoid-enriched derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Humic substances (HS) are natural poly-electrolytes ubiquitous in aquatic environment responsible for complexation of metal ions. The presence of phenolic and quinonoid moieties in the structure of HS provide for their ability to take part in redox interactions. Capability of HS to reduce plutonium from higher oxidation states (Pu(V) and Pu(VI)) to tetravalent state was reported in several studies. However, the disparate results were reported for Np(V). The contradicting results on the redox behavior of HS could originate from the structural differences of the humic materials tested, in particular, from varying content of the redox-active quinonoid moieties. To test this hypothesis, the goal of this research was to evaluate reducing performance of leonardite humic acids and of their quinonoid-enriched derivatives with respect to Pu(V) and Np(V). The quinonoid-enriched humic derivatives were obtained using the reaction of formaldehyde co-poly-condensation between parent humic material - leonardite humic acid - and model dihydroxybenzenes - hydroquinone, catechol and 1,4-benzoquinone. The humic material: quinonoid monomer ration of 1 g per 250 mg was used. The reduction of Np(V) was studied at micro- and macro-concentration level: 10-7 M and 10-4 M, respectively. In case of Pu(V) the concentration was about 10-10 M. The HS concentrations varied from 1 to 100 ppm, while ionic strength was zero. All experiments were conducted in anaerobic conditions and in the darkness. The kinetics of Pu(V) reduction was studied using solvent extraction (TTA in toluene); to monitor Np(V) reduction two independent techniques were used: solvent extraction and VIS-NIR spectrophotometry. The latter allows measuring absorbance of NpO2+ and Np-humate complexes at 981.3 and 987.4 nm, respectively. Fast reduction of Pu(V) by the parent humic material was observed and the reduction rate increased with a decrease in pH. In case of Np(V), there was no reduction

  20. Reduction of Pu(V) and Np(V) by leonardite humic acids and their quinonoid-enriched derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbina, N.S.; Kalmykov, St.N.; Perminova, I.V.; Kovalenko, A.N. [Department of Chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Humic substances (HS) are natural poly-electrolytes ubiquitous in aquatic environment responsible for complexation of metal ions. The presence of phenolic and quinonoid moieties in the structure of HS provide for their ability to take part in redox interactions. Capability of HS to reduce plutonium from higher oxidation states (Pu(V) and Pu(VI)) to tetravalent state was reported in several studies. However, the disparate results were reported for Np(V). The contradicting results on the redox behavior of HS could originate from the structural differences of the humic materials tested, in particular, from varying content of the redox-active quinonoid moieties. To test this hypothesis, the goal of this research was to evaluate reducing performance of leonardite humic acids and of their quinonoid-enriched derivatives with respect to Pu(V) and Np(V). The quinonoid-enriched humic derivatives were obtained using the reaction of formaldehyde co-poly-condensation between parent humic material - leonardite humic acid - and model dihydroxybenzenes - hydroquinone, catechol and 1,4-benzoquinone. The humic material: quinonoid monomer ration of 1 g per 250 mg was used. The reduction of Np(V) was studied at micro- and macro-concentration level: 10{sup -7} M and 10{sup -4} M, respectively. In case of Pu(V) the concentration was about 10{sup -10} M. The HS concentrations varied from 1 to 100 ppm, while ionic strength was zero. All experiments were conducted in anaerobic conditions and in the darkness. The kinetics of Pu(V) reduction was studied using solvent extraction (TTA in toluene); to monitor Np(V) reduction two independent techniques were used: solvent extraction and VIS-NIR spectrophotometry. The latter allows measuring absorbance of NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and Np-humate complexes at 981.3 and 987.4 nm, respectively. Fast reduction of Pu(V) by the parent humic material was observed and the reduction rate increased with a decrease in pH. In case of

  1. Study on the Interaction between Humic Substances in Soil and Carbamate Pesticides Using Fluorescence Quenching Titration Method%荧光猝灭滴定法研究土壤腐殖质与氨基甲酸酯类农药相互作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施国兰; 郑博福; 白英臣; 吴丰昌; 吴代赦

    2012-01-01

    为研究氨基甲酸酯类农药在溶解有机质参与下的迁移转化过程,利用荧光猝灭滴定法研究了土壤HS(腐殖质)与氨基甲酸酯类农药的相互作用.结果表明,呋喃丹和西维因的荧光都能不同程度地被FA(富里酸)和HA(腐殖酸)猝灭,主要猝灭机理为静电结合猝灭.采用静态猝灭模型计算出氨基甲酸酯类农药与HS的K(结合常数),lg K由大到小为呋喃丹-HA(4.96)>西维因-HA(4.93)>呋喃丹-FA(4.72)>西维因-FA(4.68).HA与氨基甲酸酯类农药的lgK明显大于FA与氨基甲酸酯类农药,表明HS与氨基甲酸酯类农药间的作用力有疏水作用.进一步研究表明,氢键作用对HS与氨基甲酯类农药结合有一定的影响.%To reveal the mechanisms of transport and conversion of carbamate pesticides in the presence of dissolved organic matters, the fluorescence quenching titration method was applied to investigate the interactions between carbamate pesticides and humic substances in soil. The results showed that the intrinsic fluorescence of carbofuran and carbaryl was quenched by the fulvic and humic acids to varying degrees. Static quenching was the primary mechanism during this process. The binding constants (K) of carbamate pesticides and humic substances were estimated using the fluorescence static quenching model. The order of lg K were: those of carbofuran and humic acid (4. 96) > those of carbaryl and humic acid (4. 93) > those of carbofuran and fulvic acid (4. 72) > those of carbaryl and fulvic acid (4. 68). The values of lg K of carbamate pesticides and humic acids were clearly higher than those of carbamate pesticides and fulvic acids. This result indicated that the hydrophobic force is one of the main interactions between carbamate pesticides and humic substances, and further proved that hydrogen bonding could slightly affect the bonding of carbamate pesticides and humic substances.

  2. Humic substances can modulate the allelopathic potential of caffeic, ferulic, and salicylic acids for seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffredo, Elisabetta; Monaci, Linda; Senesi, Nicola

    2005-11-30

    The capacity of a leonardite humic acid (LHA), a soil humic acid (SHA), and a soil fulvic acid (SFA) in modulating the allelopathic potential of caffeic acid (CA), ferulic acid (FA), and salicylic acid (SA) on seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was investigated. Lettuce showed a sensitivity greater than that of tomato to CA, FA, and SA phytotoxicity, which was significantly reduced or even suppressed in the presence of SHA or SFA, especially at the highest dose, but not LHA. In general, SFA was slightly more active than SHA, and the efficiency of the action depended on their concentration, the plant species and the organ examined, and the allelochemical. The daily measured residual concentration of CA and FA decreased drastically and that of SA slightly in the presence of germinating seeds of lettuce, which were thus able to absorb and/or enhance the degradation of CA and FA. The adsorption capacity of SHA for the three allelochemicals was small and decreased in the order FA > CA > SA, thus suggesting that adsorption could be a relevant mechanism, but not the only one, involved in the "antiallelopathic" action. PMID:16302757

  3. Properties and structure of raised bog peat humic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-10-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic components of soil, peat and natural waters, and their structure and properties differ very much depending on their source. The aims of this study are to characterize humic acids (HAs) from raised bog peat, to evaluate the homogeneity of peat HAs within peat profiles, and to study peat humification impact on properties of HAs. A major impact on the structure of peat HAs have lignin-free raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin). On diagenesis scale, peat HAs have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter, and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, while thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge as a result of abiotic synthesis. However, in comparison with soil, aquatic and other HAs, aromaticity of peat HAs is much lower. Comparatively, the raised bog peat HAs are at the beginning of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups change depending on the peat age and decomposition degree from where HAs have been isolated, and carboxylic acidity of peat HAs increases with peat depth and humification degree.

  4. Investigation of the complexation and the migration of actinides and non-radioactive substances with humic acids under geogenic conditions. Complexation of humic acids with actinides in the ocidation state IV Th, U, Np

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, S.; Schmeide, K.; Brendler, V.; Krepelova, A.; Mibus, J.; Geipel, G.; Heise, K.H.; Bernhard, G.

    2004-03-01

    Objective of this project was the study of basic interaction and migration processes of actinides in the environment in presence of humic acids (HA). To obtain more basic knowledge on these interaction processes synthetic HA with specific functional properties as well as {sup 14}C-labeled HA were synthesized and applied in comparison to the natural HA Aldrich. One focus of the work was on the synthesis of HA with distinct redox functionalities. The obtained synthetic products that are characterized by significantly higher Fe(III) redox capacities than Aldrich HA were applied to study the redox properties of HA and the redox stability of U(VI) humate complexes. It was confirmed that phenolic OH groups play an important role for the redox properties of HA. However, the results indicate that there are also other processes than the single oxidation of phenolic OH groups and/or other functional groups contributing to the redox behavior of HA. A first direct-spectroscopic proof for the reduction of U(VI) by synthetic HA with distinct redox functionality was obtained. The complexation behavior of synthetic and natural HA with actinides (Th, Np, Pu) was studied. Structural parameters of Pu(III), Th(IV), Np(IV) and Np(V) humates were determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The results show that carboxylate groups dominate the interaction between HA and actinide ions. These are predominant monodentately bound. The influence of phenolic OH groups on the Np(V) complexation by HA was studied with modified HA (blocked phenolic OH groups). The blocking of phenolic OH groups induces a decrease of the number of maximal available complexing sites of HA, whereas complex stability constant and Np(V) near-neighbor surrounding are not affected. The effects of HA on the sorption and migration behavior of actinides was studied in batch and column experiments. Th(IV) sorption onto quartz and Np(V) sorption onto granite and its mineral constituents are affected by the pH value

  5. Investigation of the complexation and the migration of actinides and non-radioactive substances with humic acids under geogenic conditions. Complexation of humic acids with actinides in the oxidation state IV Th, U, Np

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective of this project was the study of basic interaction and migration processes of actinides in the environment in presence of humic acids (HA). To obtain more basic knowledge on these interaction processes synthetic HA with specific functional properties as well as 14C-labeled HA were synthesized and applied in comparison to the natural HA Aldrich. One focus of the work was on the synthesis of HA with distinct redox functionalities. The obtained synthetic products that are characterized by significantly higher Fe(III) redox capacities than Aldrich HA were applied to study the redox properties of HA and the redox stability of U(VI) humate complexes. It was confirmed that phenolic OH groups play an important role for the redox properties of HA. However, the results indicate that there are also other processes than the single oxidation of phenolic OH groups and/or other functional groups contributing to the redox behavior of HA. A first direct-spectroscopic proof for the reduction of U(VI) by synthetic HA with distinct redox functionality was obtained. The complexation behavior of synthetic and natural HA with actinides (Th, Np, Pu) was studied. Structural parameters of Pu(III), Th(IV), Np(IV) and Np(V) humates were determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The results show that carboxylate groups dominate the interaction between HA and actinide ions. These are predominant monodentately bound. The influence of phenolic OH groups on the Np(V) complexation by HA was studied with modified HA (blocked phenolic OH groups). The blocking of phenolic OH groups induces a decrease of the number of maximal available complexing sites of HA, whereas complex stability constant and Np(V) near-neighbor surrounding are not affected. The effects of HA on the sorption and migration behavior of actinides was studied in batch and column experiments. Th(IV) sorption onto quartz and Np(V) sorption onto granite and its mineral constituents are affected by the pH value and the

  6. Distribuição e caracterização de substâncias húmicas em vermicompostos de origem animal e vegetal Distribution and characterization of humic substances in animal and plant vermicompost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Vargas Castilhos

    2008-12-01

    residues to human health and soil. The stability and maturity degrees of a given vermicompost are usually inferred from the quantity and quality of the humic substances in the resulting compost. This study aimed to evaluate the quality and maturity of vermicomposts from six different residues: cattle manure (CM, sheep manure (SM, pig manure (PM, quail manure (QM, coffee dregs (CD and mate-tee dregs (MD, by determining the content of humic substances (humic, HA, and fulvic acids (FA and their chemical composition, after 70 days of composting. The humic substances were chemically fractionated according to their solubility in basic and acidic medium. The distribution of total C in the different humic fractions was determined, and the humification indices HA percentage and HA/FA ratio were calculated. The elemental composition (CHNO and chemical composition by infrared spectroscopy (IRSP were determined in the purified HA and FA. An aromaticity index (I1(630/I2920 was calculated based on the IRSP spectra. The vermicomposts differed in humic substance content (FA+HA, which decreased in the order CD > SM ≈ MD ≈ CM > PM > QM. The maturity degree was greater in the vermicomposts of vegetal residues (coffee and mate-tee dregs. The HA showed that the proportion of O containing functional groups and the aromatic degree were lowest in these two vermicomposts.

  7. Comparison of Antibiotic Resistance Removal Efficiencies Using Ozone Disinfection under Different pH and Suspended Solids and Humic Substance Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Gijung; Salcedo, Dennis Espineli; Lee, Hansaem; Oh, Junsik; Maeng, Sung Kyu; Song, Kyung Guen; Hong, Seok Won; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo

    2016-07-19

    This study mainly evaluated the effectiveness of ozonation toward the enhancement of the removal efficiencies of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), pB10 plasmid transfer, and pB10 plasmids under different pH and suspended solids (SS) and humic acid concentrations. First, chlorination was tested as a reference disinfection process. Chlorination at a very high dose concentration of Cl2 (75 mg L(-1)) and a long contact time (10 min) were required to achieve approximately 90% ARB and pB10 plasmid transfer removal efficiencies. However, even these stringent conditions only resulted in a 78.8% reduction of pB10 plasmid concentrations. In case of ozonation, the estimated CT (concentration × contact time) value (at C0 = 7 mg L(-1)) for achieving 4-log pB10 plasmid removal efficiency was 127.15 mg·min L(-1), which was 1.04- and 1.25-fold higher than those required for ARB (122.73 mg·min L(-1)) and a model nonantibiotic resistant bacterial strain, E. coli K-12, (101.4 mg·min L(-1)), respectively. In preventing pB10 plasmid transfer, ozonation achieved better performance under conditions of higher concentrations of humic acid and lower pH. Our study results demonstrated that the applicability of CT concept in practice, conventionally used for disinfection, might not be appropriate for antibiotic resistance control in the wastewater treatment process. Further studies should be conducted in wastewater engineering on how to implement multiple barriers including disinfection to prevent ARB and ARG discharge into the environment. PMID:27389869

  8. Np(V) reduction by humic acid: Contribution of reduced sulfur functionalities to the redox behavior of humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of sulfur-containing functional groups in humic acids for the Np(V) reduction in aqueous solution has been studied with the objective to specify individual processes contributing to the overall redox activity of humic substances. For this, humic acid model substances type M1-S containing different amounts of sulfur (1.9, 3.9, 6.9 wt.%) were applied. The sulfur functionalities in these humic acids are dominated by reduced-sulfur species, such as thiols, dialkylsulfides and/or disulfides. The Np(V) reduction behavior of these humic acids has been studied in comparison to that of the sulfur-free humic acid type M1 at pH 5.0, 7.0 and 9.0 under anaerobic conditions by means of batch experiments. For Np redox speciation in solution, solvent extraction and ultrafiltration were applied. In addition, redox potentials of the sample solutions were monitored. At pH 5.0, both rate and extent of Np(V) to Np(IV) reduction were found to increase with increasing sulfur content of the humic acids. At pH 7.0 and 9.0, sulfur functional groups had only a slight influence on the reduction behavior of humic acid toward Np(V). Thus, in addition to quinoid moieties and non-quinoid phenolic OH groups, generally acknowledged as main redox-active sites in humic substances, sulfur functional groups have been identified as further redox-active moieties of humic substances being active especially in the slightly acidic pH range as shown for Np(V). Due to the low sulfur content of up to 2 wt.% in natural humic substances, their contribution to the total reducing capacity is smaller than that of the other redox-active functional groups. - Highlights: ► Redox processes of humic substances control the speciation and mobility of metal ions in the environment. ► Sulfur functional groups were identified as further redox-active sites in humic substances toward Np(V). ► The specification of processes contributing to the redox capacity of humics improves the prediction of actinide migration.

  9. Influência das características das substâncias húmicas na eficiência da coagulação com sulfato de alumínio The influence of humic substances characteristics on the coagulation efficiency using aluminum sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Xavier Campos

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foi estudada a influência das características das substâncias húmicas (SH, em especial a massa molar das moléculas, na eficiência da coagulação com o uso do sulfato de alumínio. Utilizando-se de água proveniente de poço profundo, foram preparadas quatro águas de estudo, todas com cor verdadeira de aproximadamente 100 uH. As SH foram extraídas de turfa e fracionadas em massas molares: i SH filtradas em membranas de 0,45 µm; ii SH filtradas em membranas de 0,45 µm e maiores que 100 kDa, iii SH com moléculas entre 30 e 100 kDa; iv SH com moléculas menores do que 30 kDa. Verificou-se que quanto maior a massa molar das SH maior foi a eficiência de remoção da cor aparente, com as menores dosagens de coagulante.O pH de coagulação ótimo, esteve entre 6,0 e 7,0, para todas as águas de estudo. Os estudos da porcentagem de ácido húmico (AH e ácido fúlvico (AF presentes em cada fração de diferente massa molar mostraram que quanto maior foi à porcentagem de AF presente, maior foi à dosagem de coagulante exigida para se obter os melhores resultados de remoção da cor aparente.The influence of the molecular weight of soil humic substances on the coagulation efficiency with aluminum sulfate was studied in this work. Four types of water were studied, with the same true color of approximately 100 HU, but prepared with different fractions of molecular weights: Water Type 1 (humic substances filtered in membrane of 0,45 µm; Water Type 2 (humic substances filtered in membrane of 0,45 µm and with molecular weight > 100 KDa; Water Type 3 (humic substances with molecular weight between 100 and 30 KDa; Water Type 4 (humic substances with molecular weight < 30 KDa. It was conclude that the higher the molecular weight of the molecules, the lower the coagulant dosages required for efficient coagulation, at the coagulation pH range 6 - 7. The types of water prepared with the fractions of humic substances containing higher

  10. THE OVERLOOKED ECOSYSTEM DRIVING FORCE IN NON-EUTROPHICATED FRESHWATER SYSTEMS: DISSOLVED HUMIC SUBSTANCES-A SHORT REVIEW AND OUTLOOK%非富营养化淡水系统中被忽略的生态系统驱动因素:可溶性腐殖质-简要的回顾与展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian E.W.Steinberg

    2006-01-01

    This review starts with the description of the quantitative significance of dissolved organic material in general and dissolved humic substances (HS) in particular in various ecosystems. Despite their high quantities, the knowledge about the role of HS is still very low and full of old, but still recycled paradigms. HS are thought to be inert or at least refractory and too large to be taken up by aquatic organisms. Instead, I present evidence that dissolved HS that mainly derives from the terrestrial environment, are taken up and directly and/or indirectly interfere with freshwater organisms and, thus, structure biocenoses.Relatively well known is in the meantime the fuelling function of allochthonous HS, which, upon irradiation, release fatty acids, which serve as substrates for microbial growth. This is an indirect effect of HS. Microbes, in turn, are food for mixotrophic algae and (heterotrophic) zooplankton. Thus, non-eutrophicated freshwaters are net-heterotrophic, meaning that respiration exceeds primary production. Furthermore, model calculations exemplify that only a very small portion of the terrestrial production is sufficient to cause net-heterotrophy in these freshwater bodies. But, recent papers show also that due to different stoichiometries the maximal plankton biomass production with algae or mixotrophs is higher than with bacteria.Very recently, several direct effects of HS have been elucidated. Among them are: induction of chaperons ( stress shock proteins), induction and modulation of biotransformation enzymes, modulation (mainly inhibition) of photosynthetic oxygen release of aquatic plants, production of an internal oxidative stress, modulation of the offspring numbers in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, feminization of fish and amphibs, interference within the thyroid system, and action as chemical attractant to C. elegans.We are still in the phase of identifying the various physiological, biochemical, and molecular-biological effects

  11. Photodegradation behaviour of estriol: An insight on natural aquatic organic matter influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cindy; Lima, Diana L D; Silva, Carla Patrícia; Otero, Marta; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2016-09-01

    Estriol (E3) is one of the steroidal estrogens ubiquitously found in the aquatic environment, photodegradation being an important pathway for the elimination of such endocrine disrupting compounds. However, it is important to understand how environmentally important components present in aquatic matrices, such as organic matter, may affect their photodegradation. The main objective of this work was to investigate the photodegradation of E3 in water, under simulated solar radiation, as well as the effect of humic substances (HS - humic acids (HA), fulvic acids (FA) and XAD-4 fraction) in E3 photodegradation. Moreover, the photodegradation behaviour of E3 when present in different environmental aquatic matrices (fresh, estuarine and waste water samples) was also assessed. Results showed a completely different E3 degradation rate depending on the aquatic matrix. In ultrapure water the half-life obtained was about 50 h, while in presence of HS it varied between 5 and 10 h. Then, half-life times between 1.6 and 9.5 h were determined in environmental samples, in which it was observed that the matrix composition contributed up to 97% for the overall E3 photodegradation. Therefore, E3 photodegradation in the considered aquatic matrices was mostly caused by photosensitizing reactions (indirect photodegradation). PMID:27341158

  12. Radio-labelled humic materials in migration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic- and fulvic acids are able to complex polyvalent metal ions, e.g. radionuclides, leading to soluble complexes of significant strength, thereby decreasing the sorption of these compounds to soils and sediments. The interaction of humic materials with radionuclides may significantly influence the availability and transport of the latter in the environment. Typically, studies along these lines have focussed almost exclusively on the radionuclides, whereas the actual role of the humic material has been elucidated only indirectly. In order directly to study the behavior of the naturally occurring organic macro-molecules in relation to the environmental fate of radionuclides, radio-labelled humic- and fulvic acids can advantageously be applied. Radio-labels such as 14C and 125I have successfully been covalently incorporated in humic- and fulvic-acids. Labelling of humic substances as well as preliminary migration studies are discussed

  13. Isolation and characterization of humics from natural waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed for quantitative recovery of humic substances from aqueous systems based on ion exchange on DEAE-cellulose. A scheme is suggested for the characterization of dissolved humic substances (UV-, IR- and 1H NMR-spectroscopy, elemental analysis, molecular weight determination, 14C-age, functionality, carbohydrate content and acid-base properties) as a routine in the chemical analysis of natural waters. (orig.)

  14. - and Cross-Polarization 13C NMR Evidence of Alterations in Molecular Composition of Humic Substances Following Afforestation with Eucalypt in Distinct Brazilian Biomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, I. R.; Soares, E. M.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Novais, R.; Barros, N.; Fernandes, S.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of planting fast growing tree species on SOM quality in tropical regions has been overlooked. In the present study 13C-NMR approaches were used to evaluate the impact of eucalypt cultivation on humic and fulvic acids molecular composition. The results indicate that the replacement of native vegetation by eucalypt plantations increased the relative contribution of aliphatic groups in HA from soils previously under Atlantic Forest, Grassland, and the Cerrado (Curvelo site only). The same trend was observed for FA, except in the Curvelo site. A trend for degradation and smaller contribution of O-alkyl C (carbohydrates) in HA was observed in soils under eucalyptus in Atlantic Forest and Cerrado. For FA such decreases were seen in Cerrado and Grassland biomes after eucalypt planting. In the area cultivated with pasture in the Atlantic Forest biome and in the Grassland soil, the largest contributions of lignin-derived compounds were detected in HA. The HA from the Cerrado at the Curvelo site, where the woody vegetation is virtually devoid of grassy species, showed the lowest intensity of lignin signal then those from the Cerrado sensu stricto in Itacambira, where grass species are more abundant. At our study sites, charred material are most likely derived from burning of the native vegetation, as naturally occurs in the Cerrado region, or anthropogenic fires in the Grassland biome. Burning of harvest residues in eucalypt fields was also a common practice in the early rotations. The replacement of native vegetation by eucalypt plantations increases the relative contribution of nonpolar alkyl groups in HA from soils previously under Atlantic Forest, Grassland, and the Cerrado (Curvelo site only) biomes. There is evidence of substantial contribution of lignin-derived C to HA and FA, especially in sites planted with Brachiaria sp pastures. Eucalypt introduction decreases the relative contribution of carbohydrates in HA and FA. 13C DP/MAS NMR functional groups in

  15. Effect of pH, ionic strength, foreign ions and humic substances on Th(IV) sorption to GMZ bentonite studied by batch experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentonite has been studied extensively because of its strong sorption and complexation ability. Herein, GMZ bentonite from Gaomiaozi county (Inner Mongolia, China) was investigated as the candidate of backfill material for the removal of Th(IV) ions from aqueous solutions. The results indicate that the sorption of Th(IV) is strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength at pH 5. Outer-sphere surface complexation or ion-exchange are the main mechanism of Th(IV) sorption on GMZ bentonite at low pH values, whereas the sorption of Th(IV) at pH > 5 is mainly dominated by inner-sphere surface complexation or surface precipitation. Soil fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA) have a positive influence on the sorption of Th(IV) on bentonite at pH < 5. The different addition sequences of HA and Th(IV) to GMZ bentonite suspensions have no obvious effect on Th(IV) sorption to HA-bentonite hybrids. The high sorption capacity of Th(IV) on GMZ bentonite suggests that the GMZ bentonite can remove Th(IV) ions from large volumes of aqueous solutions in real work. (author)

  16. Prospective outcome of the influence of complexation by natural organic matter on enhanced or retarded transport of radionuclides: case of humic substances retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document takes a prospective stock of the natural organic matter influence on the possible effects on radionuclide migration, as well as a brief critical analysis of the literature data. A comparison with the retention of the 'simple' organic complexing agents is done in order to fix the limit of the 'simplistic' analogies done in the literature very often. It appears that the magnitude of the effects is function of the residence time in the medium, and of the possibilities for the organic complexes to be retained on the mineral surfaces. The contact time between radionuclides and the natural organic matter is also an influent parameter, as it influences part of the reversibility of this interaction vis-a-vis surface retention. Modelling of the metal-organic-surface systems is only satisfying up to now when accounting fractions of organic matter that are less susceptible to form colloidal aggregates, i.e., fulvic acids. These non-aggregated fractions could be considered as simple ligands in a first approximation. Conversely, when it comes to aggregated colloids of organic origin, i.e., humic acids, modelling are limited by the lack of theoretical understanding of their structure and of their evolution in response to geochemical condition variations, as ionic strength (harsh meteoric events), acidity or water composition (non-saturated water table). (author)

  17. Stability and biodegradability of humic substances from Arctic soils of Western Siberia: insights from 13C-NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejarque, E.; Abakumov, E.

    2015-11-01

    Arctic soils contain large amounts of organic matter which, globally, exceed the amount of carbon stored in vegetation biomass and in the atmosphere. Recent studies emphasize the potential sensitivity for this soil organic matter (SOM) to be mineralised when faced with increasing ambient temperatures. In order to better refine the predictions about the response of SOM to climate warming, there is a need to increase the spatial coverage of empirical data on SOM quantity and quality in the Arctic area. This study provides, for the first time, a characterisation of SOM from the Gydan Peninsula in the Yamal Region, Western Siberia, Russia. On the one hand, soil humic acids and their humification state were characterised by measuring the elemental composition and diversity of functional groups using solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Also, the total mineralisable carbon was measured. Our results show that there is a uniformity of SOM characteristics throughout the studied region, as well as within soil profiles. Such in-depth homogeneity, together with a predominance of aliphatic carbon structures, suggests the accumulation in soil of raw and slightly decomposed organic matter. Moreover, results on total mineralisable carbon suggest a high lability of these compounds. The mineralisation rate was found to be independent of SOM quality, and to be mainly explained solely by the total carbon content. Overall, our results provide further evidence on the fundamental role that the soils of Western Siberia may have on regulating the global carbon balance when faced with increasing ambient temperatures.

  18. Humic fractions of forest, pasture and maize crop soils resulting from microbial activity

    OpenAIRE

    Rose Luiza Moraes Tavares; Ely Nahas

    2014-01-01

    Humic substances result from the degradation of biopolymers of organic residues in the soil due to microbial activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different ecosystems: forest, pasture and maize crop on the formation of soil humic substances relating to their biological and chemical attributes. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial respiratory activity, nitrification potential, total organic carbon, soluble carbon, humic and fulvic acid fractions and...

  19. Bi-exponential decay of Eu(III) complexed by Suwannee River humic substances: Spectroscopic evidence of two different excited species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiller, P. E.; Brevet, J. [CEA, CE Saclay, DEN, DANS, DPC, SECR, Lab Speciat Radionucleides and Mol, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Reiller, P. E.; Brevet, J. [Univ Evry Val Essonne, Lab Anal and Environm Biol abd Environm, CNRS, UMR 8587, F-91025 Evry (France)

    2010-07-01

    The bi-exponential luminescence decay of europium (III) complexed by Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and humic acid (SRHA), is studied in time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy using two different gratings at varying delay after the laser pulse, increasing accumulation time in order to obtain comparable signals. The two hypotheses found in the literature to interpret this bi-exponential decay are (i) a back transfer from the metal to the triplet state of the organic ligand and (ii) the radiative decay of two different excited species. It is shown that evolutions of the {sup 5}D{sub 0} -> {sup 7}F{sub 0} and {sup 5}D{sub 0} -> {sup 7}F{sub 2} luminescent transitions are occurring between 10 and 300 {mu}s delay. First, the {sup 5}D{sub 0} -> {sup 7}F{sub 0} transition is decreasing relative to the {sup 5}D{sub 0} -> {sup 7}F{sub 1} showing a slightly greater symmetry of the 'slow' component, and is also slightly red shifted. Second, a slight modification of the {sup 5}D{sub 0} -> {sup 7}F{sub 2} transition is also evidencing a slightly different ligand field splitting. No significant modification of the {sup 5}D{sub 0} -> {sup 7}F{sub 1} magnetic dipole, which is less susceptible to symmetry changes, is noted in line with expectations. The {sup 5}D{sub 0} -> {sup 7}F{sub 0} transitions are adjusted with either one or two components. The use of a simple component fit seems to be well adapted for representing an average comportment of these heterogeneous compounds, and a two-component fit constrained by the bi-exponential decay parameters and accumulation times yields in the proposition of the spectra for the fast and slow components. (authors)

  20. Bi-exponential decay of Eu(III) complexed by Suwannee River humic substances: spectroscopic evidence of two different excited species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiller, Pascal E; Brevet, Julien

    2010-02-01

    The bi-exponential luminescence decay of europium (III) complexed by Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and humic acid (SRHA), is studied in time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy using two different gratings at varying delay after the laser pulse, increasing accumulation time in order to obtain comparable signals. The two hypotheses found in the literature to interpret this bi-exponential decay are (i) a back transfer from the metal to the triplet state of the organic ligand and (ii) the radiative decay of two different excited species. It is shown that evolutions of the (5)D(0)-->(7)F(0) and (5)D(0)-->(7)F(2) luminescent transitions are occurring between 10 and 300 micros delay. First, the (5)D(0)-->(7)F(0) transition is decreasing relative to the (5)D(0)-->(7)F(1) showing a slightly greater symmetry of the 'slow' component, and is also slightly red shifted. Second, a slight modification of the (5)D(0)-->(7)F(2) transition is also evidencing a slightly different ligand field splitting. No significant modification of the (5)D(0)-->(7)F(1) magnetic dipole, which is less susceptible to symmetry changes, is noted in line with expectations. The (5)D(0)-->(7)F(0) transitions are adjusted with either one or two components. The use of a simple component fit seems to be well adapted for representing an average comportment of these heterogeneous compounds, and a two-component fit constrained by the bi-exponential decay parameters and accumulation times yields in the proposition of the spectra for the fast and slow components. PMID:20022291

  1. Migration of humic acid through silicate-packed columns considering filtration effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic acid, which is one of the humic substances, plays an important role in the migration of hazardous chemicals and heavy metal ions in soil and groundwater. In this work, the migration of humic acid labeled with C-14 through silicate-packed columns was studied and the concentration profiles of the humic acid in the columns were observed. Using the sorption distribution coefficients of humic acid on silicate obtained by batch experiments, and assuming that the filtration coefficients of humic acid were identical to those of latex particles, we qualitatively simulated the concentration profiles of humic acid. This suggests that the model used in this work will be used for predicting the environmental behavior of chemicals and heavy metals associated with humic acid through further improvement in future. (author)

  2. Oxidizable carbon and humic substances in rotation systems with brachiaria/livestock and pearl millet/no livestock in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Loss

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The crop-livestock integration system significantly increases the carbon content in chemical fractions of soil organic matter (SOM. This study aimed to evaluate chemical indicators of SOM attributes for sites under brachiaria/livestock and pearl millet/no livestock in Goias, Brazil. A third area covered with natural Cerrado vegetation (Cerradão served as reference. Soil was randomly sampled at 0-5, 5-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm. Total organic carbon stocks (TOC, oxidizable carbon fractions (OCF (F1>F2>F3>F4, carbon content in the humin (C-HUM, humic acid (C-HAF and fulvic acid (C-FAF fractions were evaluated. F1/F4, F1+F2/F3+F4, C-HAF/C-FAF and (C-HAF+C-FAF/C-HUM indices were calculated, as well as stocks chemical SOM fractions. Brachiaria/livestock produced greater TOC stocks than pearl millet/no livestock (0-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm. In terms of OCF, brachiaria/livestock generally exhibited higher levels in F1, F2, F4 and F1/F4 than pearl millet/no livestock. C-HUM (0-10 cm and C-HAF (0-20 cm stocks were larger in brachiaria/livestock than pearl millet/no livestock. Compared to the Cerradão, brachiaria/livestock locations displayed higher values for TOC (5-10 and 10-20 cm, C-HAF and C-HAF/C-FAF (5-10 cm stocks. TOC, C-HAF stock and OCF show that land management with brachiaria/livestock was more efficient in increasing SOM than pearl millet/no livestock. Moreover, when compared with pearl millet/no livestock, brachiaria/livestock provided a more balanced distribution of very labile (F1 and recalcitrant (F4 carbon throughout soil layers, greater SOM humification. Brachiaria/livestock leads to higher values of F1 and F4 in depth when compared to pearl millet/livestock and provides a more homogeneous distribution of C-FAF and C-HAF in depth compared to Cerradão.

  3. Compound-specific isotope analysis. Application to archaelogy, biomedical sciences, biosynthesis, environment, extraterrestrial chemistry, food science, forensic science, humic substances, microbiology, organic geochemistry, soil science and sport.

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtfouse, Eric

    2000-01-01

    The isotopic composition, for example, 14C/12C, 13C/12C, 2H/1H, 15N/14N and 18O/16O, of the elements of matter is heterogeneous. It is ruled by physical, chemical and biological mechanisms. Isotopes can be employed to follow the fate of mineral and organic compounds during biogeochemical transformations. The determination of the isotopic composition of organic substances occurring at trace level in very complex mixtures such as sediments, soils and blood, has been made possible during the las...

  4. Application of the NICADonnan model for proton, copper and uranyl binding to humic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saito, T.; Nagasaki, S.; Tanaka, S.; Koopal, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Humic acids are natural organic materials that play an important role in the migration of heavy metal and actinide ions in aquatic and soil systems. In the present study, the binding of protons, copper ions and uranyl ions to the purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) is investigated and the results are

  5. Comparative study for separation of atmospheric humic-like substance (HULIS) by ENVI-18, HLB, XAD-8 and DEAE sorbents: elemental composition, FT-IR, 1H NMR and off-line thermochemolysis with tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xingjun; Song, Jianzhong; Peng, Ping'an

    2013-11-01

    Humic-like substances (HULIS) are significant constituents of aerosols, and the isolation and characterization of HULIS by solid-phase extraction methods are dependent on the sorbents used. In this study, we used the following five methods: ENVI-18, HLB-M, HLB-N, XAD-8 and DEAE, to isolate atmospheric HULIS at an urban site. Then we conducted a comparative investigation of the HULIS chemical characteristics by means of elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and off-line thermochemolysis with tetramethylammonium hydroxide. The results indicate that HULIS isolated using different methods show many similarities in chemical composition and structure. Some differences were however also observed between the five isolated HULIS: HULISHLB-M contains a relatively high content of OCH group, compared to HULISENVI-18 and HULISXAD-8; HULISXAD-8 contains a relatively high content of hydrophobic and aromatic components, compared to HULISENVI-18 and HULISHLB-M; HULISDEAE contains the highest content of aromatic functional groups, as inferred by (1)H NMR spectra, but a great amount of salts generally present in the HULISDEAE and thereby limited the choices for characterizing the materials (i.e., elemental analysis and TMAH thermochemolysis); HULISHLB-N has relatively high levels of H and N, a high N/C atomic ratio, and includes N-containing functional groups, which suggests that it has been altered by 2% ammonia introduced in the eluents. In summary, we found that ENVI-18, HLB-M, and XAD-8 are preferable methods for isolation and characterization of HULIS in atmospheric aerosols. These results also suggest that caution is required when applying DEAE and HLB-N isolating methods for characterizing atmospheric HULIS. PMID:23773442

  6. Molecular characteristics of humic acids isolated from vermicomposts and their relationship to bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Balmori, Dariellys; Spaccini, Riccardo; Aguiar, Natália Oliveira; Novotny, Etelvino Henrique; Olivares, Fábio Lopes; Canellas, Luciano Pasqualoto

    2014-11-26

    Vermitechnology is an effective composting method, which transforms biomass into nutrient-rich organic fertilizer. Mature vermicompost is a renewable organic product containing humic substances with high biological activity. The aim of this study was to assess the chemical characteristics and the bioactivity of humic acids isolated from different vermicomposts produced with either cattle manure, sugar cane bagasse, sunflower cake from seed oil extraction, or filter cake from a sugar cane factory. More than 200 different molecules were found, and it was possible to identify chemical markers on humic acids according to the nature of the organic source. The large hydrophobic character of humic extracts and the preservation of altered lignin derivatives confer to humic acids the ability to induce lateral root emergence in maize seedlings. Humic acid-like substances extracted from plant biomass residues represent an additional valuable product of vermicomposting that can be used as a plant growth promoter. PMID:25379603

  7. Teor e qualidade de substâncias húmicas de planossolo sob diferentes sistemas de cultivo Content and quality of humic substances of a Albaqualf under different management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Machado da Rosa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar e comparar os teores e as características químicas das substâncias húmicas (SHs de um Planossolo háplico submetido a diferentes sistemas de cultivos de arroz. Amostras de solo foram coletadas em um experimento de longa duração (19 anos nas profundidades de 0-0,025, 0,025-0,05, 0,05-0,20m e no topo do horizonte B. Os tratamentos avaliados foram: APC-Sistema de cultivo contínuo de arroz (preparo convencional e controle de invasoras com herbicida, APD-Sucessão de azevém x arroz sob plantio direto e SN-Solo mantido em condições naturais (pastagem nativa. As SHs e a fração não-húmica (NH foram obtidas por meio de fracionamento químico. O teor de carbono do solo e na forma de SHs e NH foram determinados, respectivamente, pelos métodos Walkley-Black e espectrofotométrico. As características químicas e moleculares das SHs foram avaliadas por espectroscopias de infravermelho e UV/Vis e por análise elementar. Em comparação ao solo natural, o sistema APD preservou os teores de carbono orgânico total e de todas as frações húmicas, enquanto que o sistema APC provocou perdas de carbono orgânico total e de todas as frações húmicas nas camadas superficiais (The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the content and chemical characteristics of humic substances (SHs of an Albaqualf under different soil management systems. Soil samples were collected in a long-term field experiment (19 years from the 0-0.025; 0.025-0.05 and 0.05-0.20m layers and from the top of the B horizon. The following treatments were evaluated: APC-continuous rice crop system under conventional tillage and weed control with herbicides; APD-no-tillage system with rye-grass in the winter and rice in the summer, and SN-soil under natural condition with native grassland. The SHs and the non-humic fraction (NH were obtained by chemical fractioning. The content of total soil carbon and those occurring as SHs and NH

  8. Surface Activity of Humic Acids Depending on Their Origin and Humification Degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaviņš Māris

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Humic substances are able to reduce the surface tension of their solutions and thus can act as surface-active substances in the natural environment, which may have industrial application. The ability to influence the surface tension of humic acid solutions depends on the origin of the humic acids. The objective of this study was comparison of the ability of humic acids of different origin (soil, water, peat, lignite etc. to influence the surface tension of their solutions, and identification of the structural characteristics of peat humic acids that determine their surfactant properties. Industrially produced humic materials demonstrated no or insignificant impact on the surface tension of their solutions. However, humic acids isolated from peat had significant impact of the surface tension of their solutions, acting as weak surfactants. The surface tension of humic acid solutions decreased with increasing concentration, and depended on solution pH. Using a well-characterised bog profile, the ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids was shown to depend on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age, molecular complexity of humic acids and their ability to influence surface tension decreased; but nevertheless, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants could be identified.

  9. Determination of the protonation enthalpy of humic acid by calorimetric titration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The thermodynamic quantities of protonation of humic acid were determined by the combination of potentiometric titration and calorimetric titration. It was observed that the protonation enthalpy and Gibbs free energy had been affected by pH of solution. As a result, the thermodynamics of the protonation reaction of humic acid is influenced by the polyelectrolyte effect and the heterogeneity. - Highlights: • We applied calorimetric titration technique to the protonation of humic acid. • The thermodynamic quantities of protonation of humic acid were determined. • The protonation enthalpy of humic acid is affected by the heterogeneity. • Gibbs free energy of the protonation is affected by the polyelectrolyte effect. - Abstract: In this study, the calorimetric titration technique was used to determine the protonation enthalpy of two reference humic acids and polyacrylic acid. First, we obtained the apparent protonation constant of two kinds of humic acid purchased from IHSS (International Humic Substances Society) and polyacrylic acid by potentiometric titration. Second, we obtained the protonation enthalpy of them by calorimetric titration. The protonation enthalpy of humic acid was affected by pH and the ionic strength of bulk solution. From the comparison of ΔH between humic acid and polyacrylic acid, it was concluded that the pH dependence of ΔH is attributed to the heterogeneity of humic acid. And ΔH of phenolic hydroxyl group in humic acid is strongly influenced by the electric double layer of humic acid’s surface. This is considered to be a reason of the ionic strength dependence of ΔH. On the other hand, Gibbs free energy of the protonation of humic acid is affected by the electrostatic attraction with the progress of dissociation of functional groups such as carboxyl group and phenolic hydroxyl group. Consequently, the thermodynamics of the protonation of humic acid is affected by the polyelectrolyte effect and the

  10. Physical speciation of thorium in aquatic subsurface environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During this work laboratory simulated experiments were conducted to study the physical speciation of thorium by using ultrafiltration technique. Thorium has only one stable oxidation state i.e. IV, under all redox conditions in natural waters and therefore, its speciation is dominated by its interaction with various fraction of aquatic humic substances(AHS). Samples of water were collected from oligotropic environment having DOC in the range of 60 - 70 ppm. Th(IV) ions are extremely particle reactive having Kd value of the order of 106, hence to avoid adsorption on suspended particulate matter, spiking of the solution with Th(NO3)4 was carried out in ground water samples after filtering through 0.22 μm pore size using suction filtration. Experimental results show that 70% of the spiked Th is in association with low molecular weight colloids i.e 500 NMWL followed by < 500 NMWL. (author)

  11. Enrichment of humic material with hydroxybenzene moieties intensifies its physiological effects on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Ralph; Menzel, Stefanie; Tiedt, Sophie; Kubsch, Georg; Stösser, Reinhardt; Bährs, Hanno; Putschew, Anke; Saul, Nadine; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2011-10-15

    Dissolved humic substances are taken up by organisms and interact on various molecular and biochemical levels. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, such material can promote longevity and increase its reproductive capacity; moreover, the worms tend to stay for longer in humic-enriched environments. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the chemical enrichment of humic substances with hydroxybenzene moieties intensifies these physiological effects. Based on the leonardite humic acid HuminFeed (HF), we followed a polycondensation reaction in which this natural humic substance and a dihydroxybenzene (hydroquinone or benzoquinone) served as reaction partners. Several analytical methods showed the formation of the corresponding copolymers. The chemical modification boosted the antioxidant properties of HF both in vitro and in vivo. Humic substances enriched with hydroxybenzene moieties caused a significantly increased tolerance to thermal stress in C. elegans and extended its lifespan. Exposed nematodes showed delayed linear growth and onset of reproduction and a stronger pumping activity of the pharynx. Thus, treated nematodes act younger than they really are. In this feature the modified HF replicated the biological impact of hydroquinone-homopolymers and various plant polyphenol monomers, thereby supporting the hydroxybenzene moieties of humic substances as major effective structures for the physiological effects observed in C. elegans. PMID:21902274

  12. Humic colloid-borne Np migration: influence of the oxidation state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The migration behavior of Np(IV/V) is investigated by column experiments using a sandy sediment with groundwater rich in humic substances. NIR spectroscopy, redox speciation by TTA extraction and ultrafiltration are used for the Np speciation in the groundwater prior to its introduction into the column and after elution. Np is found to be transported as humic colloid-bound species which are eluted slightly faster than the water flow velocity. The fraction of humic colloid-borne Np increases with the reduction progress of Np(V) to Np(IV), because the interaction of Np(IV) with humic substances is much stronger than Np(V). The results demonstrate the importance of the speciation of redox sensitive actinides in natural aquifers for the assessment of the humic colloid facilitated migration. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of some spectroscopic and physico-chemical properties of humic acids extracted from sewage sludge and bottom sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, J.; Bartoszek, M.; Sułkowski, W. W.

    2009-04-01

    Comparison of the physico-chemical properties was carried out for humic acids extracted from sewage sludge and bottom sediments. The isolated humic acids were investigated by means of EPR, IR, UV/vis spectroscopic methods and elementary analysis AE. On the basis of earlier studies it was stated that humic acids extracted from sewage sludge can be divided into humic acids extracted from raw sewage sludge and from sewage sludge after the digestion process. The digestion process was found to have the most significant effect on the physico-chemical properties of humic acids extracted from sludge during sewage treatment. Humic acids extracted from sewage sludge had higher free radical concentration than humic acid extracted from bottom sediments. Values of the g-factor were similar for all studied samples. However, it is noteworthy that g-factor values for humic acid extracted from raw sewage sludge and from bottom sediments were lower in comparison to the humic acid extracted from sewage sludge after the fermentation processes. The IR spectra of all studied humic acids confirmed the presence of functional groups characteristic for humic substances. It was also observed that humic acids extracted from bottom sediments had a more aromatic character and contained less carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen than those extracted from the sewage sludge.

  14. Identification of sources of priority substances set out in Article 16 of the Water Framework Directive and estimation of their discharges into the German aquatic environment; Ermittlung der Quellen fuer die prioritaeren Stoffe nach Artikel 16 der Wasserrahmenrichtlinie und Abschaetzung ihrer Eintragsmengen in die Gewaesser in Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, E.; Hillenbrand, T.; Marscheider-Weidemann, F.; Mueller, B.; Wiederhold, J.; Herrchen, M.; Klein, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) is a new instrument, that inter alia has replaced, harmonized and further developed the control and reduction of point and diffuse discharges of dangerous substances according to Council Directive 76/464/EEC. Article 16 of the Water Framework Directive set out a 'Strategy against pollution of water' which demands specific measures against pollution of water by individual pollutants or groups of pollutants presenting a significant risk to or via the aquatic environment (e.g. by drinking water consumed). For these priority substances community-wide water quality standards and emission controls have to be established. On the basis of Article 16 of Directive 2000/60/EC a list of 33 priority substances has been adopted by the decision of the European Parliament and of the Council of November 2001. This list identifies 11 priority hazardous substances, 14 substances subject to a review for identification as possible priority hazardous substance and 8 priority substances. The Commission will make a proposal for the final classification of the 'substances subject to a review' (priority hazardous or priority substances) not later than 12 months after adoption of this list. The planned measures aim at the cessation or phasing out of discharges, emissions and losses to the aquatic environment within 20 years for the priority hazardous substances and at the progressive reduction for the priority substances. In this project the available data for these 33 substances resp. groups of substances for the Federal Republic of Germany were put forward and described in a standardized pattern. This pattern includes the following items: nomenclature and properties of the substances, monitoring data, production and fields of application of these substances, existing regulations in Germany, releases to environment and possibilities to reduce discharges to the aquatic environment. The basis of the data is the year 2000 as far as

  15. Capillary zone electrophoresis of humic acids from the American continent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Maria de Lourdes; Havel, Josef

    2002-01-01

    A multicomponent background electrolyte (BGE) was developed and its composition optimized using artificial neural networks (ANN). The optimal BGE composition was found to be 90 mM boric acid, 115 mM Tris, and 0.75 mM EDTA (pH 8.4). A separation voltage of 20 kV, 20 degrees C and detection at 210 nm were used. The method was applied to characterize several humic acids originating from various countries of the American continent: soil (Argentina), peat (Brazil), leonardite (Guatemala and Mexico) and coal (United States). Comparison with humic acids of International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) standard samples was also done. Well reproducible electropherograms showing a relatively high number of peaks were obtained. Characterization of the samples by elemental analysis and UV spectrophotometry was also done. In spite of the very different origins, the similarities between humic acids are high and by matrix assisted desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry it was shown that most of the m/z patterns are the same in all humic acids. This means that humic acids of different origin have the same structural units or that they contain the same components. PMID:11840535

  16. Influence of humic acids of different origins on oxidation of phenol and chlorophenols by permanganate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Di, E-mail: hedy1997@hotmail.com [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment (HIT), Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Guan Xiaohong, E-mail: hitgxh@126.com [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment (HIT), Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Ma Jun, E-mail: majun@hit.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment (HIT), Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Yang Xue, E-mail: yangxue1_ok@163.com [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment (HIT), Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Cui Chongwei, E-mail: cuichongwei1991@126.com [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment (HIT), Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2010-10-15

    The influences of humic acids (HAs) of different origins, including two commercial HAs, three soil HAs and one aquatic HA, on phenols oxidation by permanganate were studied. The apparent second-order rate constants of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP)/phenol oxidation by permanganate in the presence of HAs at pH 7 followed the order of commercial HA (Shanghai) > soil HAs > commercial HA (Fluka) > aquatic HA. Moreover, the commercial HA (Shanghai) could accelerate the oxidation of different chlorophenols (CP) significantly under neutral condition. The FTIR analysis demonstrated greater content of C=C moieties and less amount of carboxylate, aliphatic groups and polysaccharide-like substances in soil HAs than in aqueous HA, suggesting that the increase of aromaticity in HA was beneficial to the oxidation of phenols by permanganate. The apparent second-order rate constants of 2-CP/phenol oxidation by permanganate in the presence of HAs correlated well with specific visible absorption (SVA) at 665 nm of HAs. High positive correlation coefficients (R{sup 2} > 0.75) implied that {pi}-electrons of HA strongly influenced the reactivity of 2-CP/phenol towards permanganate oxidation, which agreed well with positive correlation between Fluorescence Regional Integration (FRI) and the apparent second-order rate constants. The {pi}-{pi} interaction between HAs and phenols, the steric hindrance effect and the dissociation of phenols may affect the oxidation of phenols by permanganate in the presence of HA at pH = 7.0.

  17. Influence of humic acids of different origins on oxidation of phenol and chlorophenols by permanganate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influences of humic acids (HAs) of different origins, including two commercial HAs, three soil HAs and one aquatic HA, on phenols oxidation by permanganate were studied. The apparent second-order rate constants of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP)/phenol oxidation by permanganate in the presence of HAs at pH 7 followed the order of commercial HA (Shanghai) > soil HAs > commercial HA (Fluka) > aquatic HA. Moreover, the commercial HA (Shanghai) could accelerate the oxidation of different chlorophenols (CP) significantly under neutral condition. The FTIR analysis demonstrated greater content of C=C moieties and less amount of carboxylate, aliphatic groups and polysaccharide-like substances in soil HAs than in aqueous HA, suggesting that the increase of aromaticity in HA was beneficial to the oxidation of phenols by permanganate. The apparent second-order rate constants of 2-CP/phenol oxidation by permanganate in the presence of HAs correlated well with specific visible absorption (SVA) at 665 nm of HAs. High positive correlation coefficients (R2 > 0.75) implied that π-electrons of HA strongly influenced the reactivity of 2-CP/phenol towards permanganate oxidation, which agreed well with positive correlation between Fluorescence Regional Integration (FRI) and the apparent second-order rate constants. The π-π interaction between HAs and phenols, the steric hindrance effect and the dissociation of phenols may affect the oxidation of phenols by permanganate in the presence of HA at pH = 7.0.

  18. Phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles containing humic acid and mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, C. L.; George, I.; Griffiths, P. T.; Braban, C. F.; Cox, R. A.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2006-03-01

    The phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of two humic acid aerosols (Aldrich sodium salt and Leonardite Standard (IHSS)) and their mixtures with ammonium sulphate have been investigated using a combination of two techniques, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA). A growth factor of 1.16 at 85% relative humidity (RH) was found for the Aldrich humic acid which can be regarded as an upper limit for growth factors of humic-like substances (HULIS) found in atmospheric aerosol and is significantly smaller than that of typical atmospheric inorganics. We find that the humic acid aerosols exhibit water uptake over all relative humidities with no apparent phase changes, suggesting that these aerosols readily form supersaturated droplets. In the mixed particles, the humic acid component decreases the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) and increases the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of the ammonium sulphate component, and there is some degree of water uptake prior to ammonium sulphate deliquescence. In addition, at low RH, the FTIR spectra show that the ammonium is present in a different chemical environment in the mixed aerosols than in crystalline ammonium sulphate, perhaps existing as a complex with the humic materials. The growth factors of the mixed aerosols are intermediate between those of the single-component aerosols and can be predicted assuming that the inorganic and organic fractions take up water independently.

  19. Phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles containing humic acid and mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Badger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The phase transitions and hygroscopic growth of two humic acid aerosols (Aldrich sodium salt and Leonardite Standard (IHSS and their mixtures with ammonium sulphate have been investigated using a combination of two techniques, Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR spectroscopy and tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA. A growth factor of 1.16 at 85% relative humidity (RH was found for the Aldrich humic acid which can be regarded as an upper limit for growth factors of humic-like substances (HULIS found in atmospheric aerosol and is significantly smaller than that of typical atmospheric inorganics. We find that the humic acid aerosols exhibit water uptake over all relative humidities with no apparent phase changes, suggesting that these aerosols readily form supersaturated droplets. In the mixed particles, the humic acid component decreases the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH and increases the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH of the ammonium sulphate component, and there is some degree of water uptake prior to ammonium sulphate deliquescence. In addition, at low RH, the FTIR spectra show that the ammonium is present in a different chemical environment in the mixed aerosols than in crystalline ammonium sulphate, perhaps existing as a complex with the humic materials. The growth factors of the mixed aerosols are intermediate between those of the single-component aerosols and can be predicted assuming that the inorganic and organic fractions take up water independently.

  20. Studies on the structure of peat humic acid (II). Study on the determination of the aromatic skeletons in peat humic acid by zinc-dust distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, H.; Sasaki, M.

    1979-01-01

    In order to determine aromatic skeletons in the chemical structure of peat humic acid, zinc-dust distillation was carried out at 500 C for 2 hours in a stream of hydrogen, and the results compared to those from other substances such as phtholic acid, cumarin, naphthoquinone and ..cap alpha..-lactone. Subsequently, methods for the identification and semi-quantitative determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were applied. The total yield of polycyclic hydrocarbon having anthracene, pyrene and perylene rings was 1.9% of the original peat humic acid. However, the yield of aromatic hydrocarbons containing 3 to 5 rings from peat humic acid was approximately equal to those from the other substances. From the results, it is assumed that peat humic acid has no polycyclic ring systems as the aromatic structure, and that the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons produced by zinc-dust distillation were formed by a rearrangement and condensation of oxygen containing structures during the reaction.

  1. Humic first, A new theory on the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daei, Mohammad Ali; Daei, Manijeh

    2016-04-01

    In 1953, Miller &Urey through a brilliant experiment demonstrated that the building blocks of life could evolve in primitive earth conditions1. In recent years scientists revealed that organic matters are not very rare compounds in comets, asteroids, and meteorites2. These facts show simple organic molecules on early earth could be quite enough to start development of life. But, how? Many theorists have tried to explain how life emerged from non life, but failed2. There is a huge gap between the simple building blocks, like amino acid, sugar, and lipid molecules, to a living cell with a very sophisticated structure and organization. Obviously, creation of a cell needed a qualified production line which had to be durable and active, can gather all biochemical ingredients, protect them from degradation, have catalyzing ability, provide numerous opportunities for interaction between basic molecules, and above all, have capability to react to different sources of energy. We are sure this perfect factory was available on primitive earth and is nothing except humic substance! At the moment, HS, are doing nearly all of these duties, among the others, under your feet in agricultural soils4. What are humic substances? According to IHSS definition "Humic substances (HS) are major components of the natural organic matter (NOM) in soil and water as well as in geological organic deposits such as lake sediments, peats, brown coals, and shales5." They come from polymerization of organic molecules, but looking at them like a simple aggregation of different organic molecules, is a huge mistake6! It seems they do not come together except for making a capable structure! HS are the first organic machinery which appeared in proplanetary disk, more than four billion years ago. Derived from simple inorganic molecules, humic substances construct a firm intermediate structure which connects none life to life. In other word, life road pass over the humic bridge. This does not mean that

  2. Modelling the role of humic acid in radiocaesium distribution in a British upland peat soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significance of exchange sites on organic matter in the retention of radiocaesium in highly organic soils remains unclear. To quantify this retention, we measured the binding of 134Cs to a humic acid isolated from a British upland peat soil, under a range of chemical conditions. We interpreted our results using Humic Ion Binding Model V, a model of humic substance chemistry which simulates ion exchange by non-specific accumulation of cations adjacent to the humic molecules. Model V could simulate the humic acid-solution partitioning of Cs under all the solution conditions used. The model was used to estimate the contribution of organic matter to Cs sorption by the whole soil composite. An estimate of Cs sorption by illite frayed edge sites was also made. These simulations show that organic matter may play only a minor role in binding Cs, even in highly organic soils

  3. Humic first, A new theory on the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daei, Mohammad Ali; Daei, Manijeh

    2016-04-01

    In 1953, Miller &Urey through a brilliant experiment demonstrated that the building blocks of life could evolve in primitive earth conditions1. In recent years scientists revealed that organic matters are not very rare compounds in comets, asteroids, and meteorites2. These facts show simple organic molecules on early earth could be quite enough to start development of life. But, how? Many theorists have tried to explain how life emerged from non life, but failed2. There is a huge gap between the simple building blocks, like amino acid, sugar, and lipid molecules, to a living cell with a very sophisticated structure and organization. Obviously, creation of a cell needed a qualified production line which had to be durable and active, can gather all biochemical ingredients, protect them from degradation, have catalyzing ability, provide numerous opportunities for interaction between basic molecules, and above all, have capability to react to different sources of energy. We are sure this perfect factory was available on primitive earth and is nothing except humic substance! At the moment, HS, are doing nearly all of these duties, among the others, under your feet in agricultural soils4. What are humic substances? According to IHSS definition "Humic substances (HS) are major components of the natural organic matter (NOM) in soil and water as well as in geological organic deposits such as lake sediments, peats, brown coals, and shales5." They come from polymerization of organic molecules, but looking at them like a simple aggregation of different organic molecules, is a huge mistake6! It seems they do not come together except for making a capable structure! HS are the first organic machinery which appeared in proplanetary disk, more than four billion years ago. Derived from simple inorganic molecules, humic substances construct a firm intermediate structure which connects none life to life. In other word, life road pass over the humic bridge. This does not mean that

  4. Reducing Ammonia Loss from Urea by Mixing with Humic and Fulvic Acids Isolated from Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameera A. Reeza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Ammonia volatilization is a major pathway for nitrogen loss from surface applied urea. While all top-dressed ammonia and ammonium based N fertilizers can volatilize, the potential loss is greatest with urea and fluids containing urea. As much as 20-50% of N applied to soils is lost through volatilization alone. Thus, the objective of this laboratory study was to reduce ammonia loss from urea via mixing with humic and fulvic acids isolated from coal. Approach: This study compared four different types of treatments which were urea without additives (T1, urea with humic acid-powdered form (T2, urea with fulvic acid-liquid form (T3 and urea with humic and fulvic acids-liquid form (T4. Comparisons were made based on ammonia loss, soil NH4 and NO3- contents as well as exchangeable cations in the treated soils. Soil samples from typic paleudults (Bekenu series were used. Humic substances were isolated using standard procedures. Daily ammonia loss from soil was measured using a modified closed-dynamic air flow system method. Results: All of the treatments with humic substances significantly reduced ammonia loss ranging between 13 and 25% compared to urea alone. The treatment with both humic and fulvic acids (T4 showed pronounced ammonia loss reduction. All treatments with humic substances significantly increased NH4+ and NO3- content in soil samples compared to urea alone except for treatment having humic acid alone (T2. Treatments with fulvic acid (T3 and T4 also showed significant increase in exchangeable K+ and Na+ compared to urea alone. The increase in the formation of NH4+ over NH3, soil exchangeable cations and temporary reduction of soil pH may had retarded urea hydrolysis in the immediate vicinity of the fertilizer. Conclusion: Surface applied urea fertilizer efficiency could be increased if applied together with humic and fulvic acids.

  5. Humic substances isolated from residues of sugar cane industry as root growth promoter Substâncias húmicas isoladas de resíduos da indústria da cana-de-açúcar como promotoras de crescimento radicular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jader Galba Busato

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting substances are widely used in modern agriculture. Several products in the market are humic substances isolated from different sources. The filter cake, a residue of sugar production, is a rich and renewable source of organic matter and these characteristics place the filter cake as a possible source of plant growth promoting substances. Humic acids (HA from filter cake were characterized, and their effects as root growth promoters were evaluated. Chemical features of the HA were evaluated through elemental composition, acidic functional groups, E4/E6 ratio and infrared spectroscopy analyzes. The biological activity of the HA was assessed using root architecture parameters and the P-type H+-ATPase activity. The lateral root development was directly related to the stimulation of plasma membrane ATPase activity. The ability of HA to promote root development indicate that HA from filter cake can be used as environmental plant growth stimulators.Substâncias promotoras do crescimento vegetal são amplamente utilizadas na agricultura moderna. Existem vários produtos no mercado, muitos dos quais são substâncias húmicas isoladas de diferentes fontes. A torta de filtro, um resíduo da produção do açúcar, é uma fonte rica e renovável de matéria orgânica e essas características a tornam uma possível fonte de substâncias promotoras do crescimento vegetal. Ácidos húmicos (AH da torta de filtro foram caracterizados, e foi avaliado seu efeito como promotor de crescimento radicular. As características químicas dos AH foram avaliadas por meio da composição elementar, grupos funcionais ácidos, relação E4/E6 e espectroscopia de infravermelho. A atividade biológica dos AH foi acessada avaliando-se a arquitetura radicular e a atividade da H+-ATPase de membrana plasmática. O desenvolvimento de raízes laterais foi diretamente relacionado ao estímulo da atividade da H+-ATPase. A habilidade dos AH em promover o

  6. Peat humic acids and their complex forming properties as influenced by peat humification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudare, D.; Klavins, M.

    2012-04-01

    To study paleoenvironmental changes of importance is understanding of processes of organic matter diagenesis, especially changes of refractory part of natural organic substances - humic substances. Studies of the living organic matter humification process are also essential for understanding of the carbon biogeochemical cycle. The aim of this study was to analyze peat organic matter diagenesis: changes of properties of humic acids, relations between the humification process, properties of peat, peat humic acids, their ability to interact with metal ions, as well ability to accumulate metals. The analysis were carried out on samples of humic substances preparatively extracted from three ombrotrophic bog peat profiles to identify the links between peat age, decomposition and humification degree, botanical composition and properties of peat humic acids elemental (C, H, N, O), functional (-COOH, -OH) composition, structural characteristics - UV, fluorescence, FTIR. The found variability of peat properties is less significant than differences in the properties of peat-forming living matter, thus revealing the dominant impact of humification process on the properties of peat. Correspondingly, composition of peat humic acids is little affected by differences in the properties of precursor living organic material, and such indicators as decomposition degree, humification degree, humic acid elemental ratio and concentrations of acidic functional groups are the best descriptors of changes in organic matter during the process of organic matter diagenesis and humification. Peat ability to accumulate major and trace elements depends on the character of element supply, potency of metal ions to bind functionalities in the peat, with an emphasis on the structure of peat humic acid, pH reaction, oxygen presence, presence of complexing compounds, inorganic ions and many other factors. Major and trace element presence in peat is of importance as an indicator of peat genesis and

  7. Estoque de carbono e quantificação de substâncias húmicas em Latossolo submetido a aplicação contínua de lodo de esgoto Organic carbon stock and quantification of humic substances of an oxisol under continuous sewage sludge application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno de Oliveira Dias

    2007-08-01

    . The following accumulated SS doses (dry base were tested: 0, 30, 60, 120, and 240 Mg ha-1 and the treatments were: control without SS addition(L0; SS application to supply one (L1, two (L2, four (L4 and eight (L8 times the N corn requirement. Carbon contents and stocks were evaluated in the soil layers 0-10, 10-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm, and the C associated to humic substances 0-10 cm deep. As the SS applications increased, the C content and stock rose in the 0-20 cm soil layer. Most soil C (50-66 % is associated to the humin pool, followed by fulvic acid fraction-C and then humic acid fraction-C. Sewage sludge applications result in higher contents of C-humic substances in soil, though the proportion of mineralized C in soil humus remained unchanged.

  8. Label Distribution in Tissues of Wheat Seedlings Cultivated with Tritium-Labeled Leonardite Humic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikova, Natalia A.; Dmitry P. Abroskin; Badun, Gennady A; Chernysheva, Maria G.; Viktor I. Korobkov; Beer, Anton S.; Tsvetkova, Eugenia A.; Senik, Svetlana V.; Klein, Olga I.; Perminova, Irina V.

    2016-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) play important roles in the biotic-abiotic interactions of the root plant and soil contributing to plant adaptation to external environments. However, their mode of action on plants remains largely unknown. In this study the HS distribution in tissues of wheat seedlings was examined using tritium-labeled humic acid (HA) derived from leonardite (a variety of lignites) and microautoradiography (MAR). Preferential accumulation of labeled products from tritiated HA was found...

  9. Humic and fluvic acids and organic colloidal materials in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Clark, S.B. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment, occurring in all soils, waters, and sediments of the ecosphere. Humic substances arise from the decomposition of plant and animal tissues yet are more stable than their precursors. Their size, molecular weight, elemental composition, structure, and the number and position of functional groups vary, depending on the origin and age of the material. Humic and fulvic substances have been studied extensively for more than 200 years; however, much remains unknown regarding their structure and properties. Humic substances are those organic compounds found in the environment that cannot be classified as any other chemical class of compounds. They are traditionally defined according to their solubilities. Fulvic acids are those organic materials that are soluble in water at all pH values. Humic acids are those materials that are insoluble at acidic pH values (pH < 2) but are soluble at higher pH values. Humin is the fraction of natural organic materials that is insoluble in water at all pH values. These definitions reflect the traditional methods for separating the different fractions from the original mixture. The humic content of soils varies from 0 to almost 10%. In surface waters, the humic content, expressed as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), varies from 0.1 to 50 ppm in dark-water swamps. In ocean waters, the DOC varies from 0.5 to 1.2 ppm at the surface, and the DOC in samples from deep groundwaters varies from 0.1 to 10 ppm. In addition, about 10% of the DOC in surface waters is found in suspended matter, either as organic or organically coated inorganic particulates. Humic materials function as surfactants, with the ability to bind both hydrophobic and hydrophyllic materials, making numic and fluvic materials effective agents in transporting both organic and inorganic contaminants in the environment.

  10. Identification of bound alcohols in soil humic acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Berthier, Gersende; Dou, Sen; Peakman, Torren; Lichtfouse, Eric

    2000-01-01

    International audience Humic acids are complex, partly macromolecular, yellow-brownish substances occurring in soils, waters and sediments. In order to shed some light on their molecular structure, crop humic acids were cleaved by alkaline hydrolysis (KOH). The products were fractionated by thin layer chromatography to give mono-alcohols which were analysed as acetate derivatives by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Linear alcohols, sterols, stanols and plant-derived triterp...

  11. Humic fractions of forest, pasture and maize crop soils resulting from microbial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Rose Luiza Moraes; Nahas, Ely

    2014-01-01

    Humic substances result from the degradation of biopolymers of organic residues in the soil due to microbial activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different ecosystems: forest, pasture and maize crop on the formation of soil humic substances relating to their biological and chemical attributes. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial respiratory activity, nitrification potential, total organic carbon, soluble carbon, humic and fulvic acid fractions and the rate and degree of humification were determined. Organic carbon and soluble carbon contents decreased in the order: forest > pasture > maize; humic and fulvic acids decreased in the order forest > pasture = maize. The MBC and respiratory activity were not influenced by the ecosystems; however, the nitrification potential was higher in the forest than in other soils. The rate and degree of humification were higher in maize soil indicating greater humification of organic matter in this system. All attributes studied decreased significantly with increasing soil depth, with the exception of the rate and degree of humification. Significant and positive correlations were found between humic and fulvic acids contents with MBC, microbial respiration and nitrification potential, suggesting the microbial influence on the differential formation of humic substances of the different ecosystems. PMID:25477932

  12. Humic fractions of forest, pasture and maize crop soils resulting from microbial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Luiza Moraes Tavares

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Humic substances result from the degradation of biopolymers of organic residues in the soil due to microbial activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different ecosystems: forest, pasture and maize crop on the formation of soil humic substances relating to their biological and chemical attributes. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC, microbial respiratory activity, nitrification potential, total organic carbon, soluble carbon, humic and fulvic acid fractions and the rate and degree of humification were determined. Organic carbon and soluble carbon contents decreased in the order: forest > pasture > maize; humic and fulvic acids decreased in the order forest > pasture=maize. The MBC and respiratory activity were not influenced by the ecosystems; however, the nitrification potential was higher in the forest than in other soils. The rate and degree of humification were higher in maize soil indicating greater humification of organic matter in this system. All attributes studied decreased significantly with increasing soil depth, with the exception of the rate and degree of humification. Significant and positive correlations were found between humic and fulvic acids contents with MBC, microbial respiration and nitrification potential, suggesting the microbial influence on the differential formation of humic substances of the different ecosystems.

  13. Modeling of neptunium(V), plutonium(IV) and americium(III) sorption on soils in the presence of humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption experiments of 237Np(V)O2+, 238Pu(IV)4+ and 241Am(III)3+ onto soils in the presence of humic acid have been performed by a batch system, in order to clarify effects of humic acid on sorption of the radionuclides on soils. Soils used in the present experiments were a coastal sand which does not sorb humic acid, and an ando soil which sorbs humic acid very well and is known to have a high content of humic substances. The distribution coefficient of 237Np for both soils was not affected by the presence of humic acid, since 237Np much little interact with humic acid. The distribution coefficient of 241Am for both soils decreased as the humic acid concentration increased. Also the distribution coefficient of 238Pu for the coastal sand decreased with increasing humic acid concentration. On the other hand, as to the ando soil, the distribution coefficient of 238Pu in the presence of humic acid was larger than that in the absence of humic acid, in the humic acid concentration range below 5 mg/dm3, although it decreased with increasing humic acid concentration over 5 mg/dm3. These results suggest that apparent sorption behavior of 238Pu and 241Am on the soils may be dependent on the sorption ability of their humic complexes. The distribution coefficient of the three radionuclides for the soils could be evaluated by the sorption equilibrium model taking account of the effects of the sorption of both humic acid itself and humic complexes of radionuclide on the value of the distribution coefficient, besides the complexation in aqueous phase. (author)

  14. Remoção de substâncias húmicas por meio da oxidação com ozônio e peróxido de hidrogênio e FiME Removal of humic substances by means of oxidation with ozone and hydrogen peroxide and FiME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Pereira Tangerino

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A filtração em múltiplas etapas (FiME se apresenta como uma alternativa para realizar o tratamento de água de comunidades de pequeno porte, entretanto, a eficiência quanto à remoção de cor verdadeira associada ao carbono orgânico dissolvido (COD ou às substâncias húmicas, tem sido questionada ou relatada como baixa. A presente pesquisa avaliou a remoção de substâncias húmicas na FiME com pré-oxidação, com ozônio e peróxido de hidrogênio, utilizando para essa avaliação parâmetros indiretos como cor verdadeira, absorvância UV (254 nm e COD. Foram realizados cinco ensaios, utilizando quatro filtros lentos, sendo dois com camada de carvão ativado granular (CAG. Foram ensaiadas várias alternativas de pré-oxidação com ozônio e peróxido de hidrogênio. Foram obtidos bons resultados, tendo como principal conclusão que os filtros lentos com CAG, precedidos de oxidação com ozônio e depois peróxido de hidrogênio, apresentaram remoção média de cor verdadeira de 64%, mas que o peróxido de hidrogênio afeta o desenvolvimento da camada biológica, interferindo no desenvolvimento da perda de carga, na remoção de turbidez, na remoção de coliformes e na remoção de substâncias húmicas.The multistage filtration (FiME is an alternative to accomplish water treatment for small communities, however, as for removal of true color associated to dissolved organic carbon (DOC or humic substances, it have been questioned or reported as low efficiency. The present research evaluated the removal of humic substances in the FiME using ozone and hydrogen peroxide as a pre-oxidation, using for this indirect parameters how true color, UV absorbance (254nm and DOC. Five experiments were conducted using four slow filters, from this two were composed the intermediate layer of granulate activated carbon (GAC. The assays were conducted with pre-oxidation alternatives using ozone and hydrogen peroxide in several applications forms. It

  15. Priority ranking of substances hazardous to the aquatic system according to their exposure and effects for 1993/94; Reihung gewaesserrelevanter, gefaehrlicher Stoffe aufgrund ihrer Exposition und Wirkung fuer 1993/94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrchen, M.; Mueller, M.; Storm, U.; Storm, A.

    1997-10-01

    For the identification of substances occuring in surface waters and being hazardous to the aquatic ecosystem a tiered selection scheme has been developed and applied in a previous project (Application of a selection scheme for the identification of substances hazardous to the acquatic system, No.: 102 04 109). On the first tier, substances occuring in surface waters were identified by comparison with substances in international lists (such as lists I and II of the Directive 76 464 EEC and annex 1A and 1D of the 3. International North Sea Conference). For substances which are detected in monitoring programs but are not listed in the international lists as well as for substances which are detected in monitoring programs but are not listed in the above lists, the second tier was applied. That comprised a substance ranking according to their hazard for aquatic organisms using a scoring system. For the exposure assessment monitored concentrations are used in order to avoid false positive or negative results. For the effect assessment the respective part of the IPS-system (developed within the EU for the ranking of Existing Chemicals) was used. Direct and indirect effects (bioaccumulation) are considered. On the third tier a source identification was performed identifying point and diffuse sources. Within the framework of the actual project an actualisation of the above feasibility study was performed: monitoring data were taken from 1993 and 1994; additionally, data from the North Sea as well as sediment data were considered. The software was improved in order to enable an easy calculation and assessment of the different results (e.g. use of mean or median values as input for the second tier, differentiation according to various streams; consideration of the statement `not detectable`). The software programme also enables a further implementation of actual data in the near future. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zur Identifizierung von gewaesserrelevanten, gefaehrlichen Stoffen wurde

  16. Priority ranking of substances hazardous to the aquatic system according to their exposure and effects for 1993/94; Reihung gewaesserrelevanter, gefaehrlicher Stoffe aufgrund ihrer Exposition und Wirkung fuer 1993/94

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrchen, M.; Mueller, M.; Storm, U.; Storm, A.

    1997-10-01

    For the identification of substances occuring in surface waters and being hazardous to the aquatic ecosystem a tiered selection scheme has been developed and applied in a previous project (Application of a selection scheme for the identification of substances hazardous to the acquatic system, No.: 102 04 109). On the first tier, substances occuring in surface waters were identified by comparison with substances in international lists (such as lists I and II of the Directive 76 464 EEC and annex 1A and 1D of the 3. International North Sea Conference). For substances which are detected in monitoring programs but are not listed in the international lists as well as for substances which are detected in monitoring programs but are not listed in the above lists, the second tier was applied. That comprised a substance ranking according to their hazard for aquatic organisms using a scoring system. For the exposure assessment monitored concentrations are used in order to avoid false positive or negative results. For the effect assessment the respective part of the IPS-system (developed within the EU for the ranking of Existing Chemicals) was used. Direct and indirect effects (bioaccumulation) are considered. On the third tier a source identification was performed identifying point and diffuse sources. Within the framework of the actual project an actualisation of the above feasibility study was performed: monitoring data were taken from 1993 and 1994; additionally, data from the North Sea as well as sediment data were considered. The software was improved in order to enable an easy calculation and assessment of the different results (e.g. use of mean or median values as input for the second tier, differentiation according to various streams; consideration of the statement `not detectable`). The software programme also enables a further implementation of actual data in the near future. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zur Identifizierung von gewaesserrelevanten, gefaehrlichen Stoffen wurde

  17. UV photoinitiated changes of humic fluorophores, influence of metal ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klementová, Š.; Kříž, D.; Kopáček, Jiří; Novák, František; Porcal, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 5 (2009), s. 582-586. ISSN 1474-905X. [European Meeting on Solar Chemistry & Photochemistry /5./. Palermo, 04.10.2008-08.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/06/0410 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517; CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : humic substances * UV radiation * fluorescence Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.708, year: 2009

  18. Substâncias húmicas e suas relações com o grau de subsidência em Organossolos de diferentes ambientes de formação no Brasil Humic substances and their relationship to the degree of subsidence of histosols in different formation environments in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adierson Gilvani Ebeling

    2013-06-01

    of organic compounds. The objective of this study was to quantify and assess the distribution of humic fractions in histosols in different environments and regions of Brazil, relating them to the processes of subsidence. The carbon (C content in humic substances indicated a predominance of C from the humic-acid fraction (HAF-C of 22.1g kg-1 to 153.7g kg-1 in soils from high altitude mountainous regions and upland areas. Possibly the colder climate, coupled with improved fertility, favored the formation of this fraction at the expense of the fulvic acid and humin fractions. On the other hand, the higher humic-acid content makes organosols in these environments more susceptible to the processes of subsidence, especially when under agricultural management. Whereas in flood and coastal-plain environments, there was a greater formation of C from the humin fraction (HUM-C from 79.2 to 267.2g kg-1, being the fraction of humic substances most resistant to decomposition. The sum of the humic fractions represented 89% of the total carbon, these two variables being highly correlated. The relationship between alkaline extract and humin (AE / HUM groups classes of histosols by their formation environment, and is suggested as a diagnostic attribute at the lower levels of the Brazilian System for Soil Classification (SiBCS, allowing differentiation of the histosols as to their potential for subsidence.

  19. Studies of Tc oxidation states in humic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation state of Tc is an important aspect of the speciation in groundwater which contained organic substances due to it control the precipitation, complexation, sorption and colloid formation behavior of the Tc under HWL geological disposal conditions. In present work, the oxidation states of Tc were investigated using the LaCl3 coagulation method and solution extraction method in aqueous solutions in which the humic acid concentration range is from 0 to 20 mg/L and the Tc (VII) concentration is about 10-8 mol/L. The radiocounting of 99Tc was determined using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The humic acid will influence the radiocounting ratio of 99Tc apparently, however, the quenching effect can be restrained once keep the volume of the cocktail to about twenty times of the sample volume. The LaCl3 coagulation method was carried out for the investigation of Tc oxidation states in humic acid aqueous systems at about pH 8. The tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPA)-chloroform extraction method was used also simultaneously to investigation the concentrations of Tc (IV) and Tc (VII) for the availability of the LaCl3 precipitation method, and the experimental results demonstrate that tetravalent technetium and pertechnetate concentration are well agreement with the LaCl3 precipitation method. These two experimental results demonstrated that Tc (VII) is very stable in the Tc (VII)-humic acid system during a 350 days experimental period, and the Tc (IV) concentrations are very lower, that is indicate that there didn't oxidizing reactions between the Fluka humic acid and Tc (VII) in aqueous solutions under anaerobic conditions. That means the presence of humic acids even in anaerobic groundwater is disadvantage for the retardance of radionuclides. (authors)

  20. Photochemical Disinfection of Escherichia coli in the Presence of Natural Aquatic Sensitizers: Influence of Solution Chemistry and Extracellular Polymeric Substances

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Amy Shin Hwei

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation study was to elucidate how the level and composition of bacterial surface extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) contribute to indirect photochemical disinfection processes. This study was developed to generate mechanistic information on EPS function in bacterial die-off under natural occurring sensitizing environments to inform future process design. Specifically, this researchfocused on whether EPS promotes or prohibits disinfection, or be able to facili...

  1. Aquatic plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T. V.; Sand-Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic fl owering plants form a relatively young plant group on an evolutionary timescale. The group has developed over the past 80 million years from terrestrial fl owering plants that re-colonised the aquatic environment after 60-100 million years on land. The exchange of species between...... terrestrial and aquatic environments continues today and is very intensive along stream banks. In this chapter we describe the physical and chemical barriers to the exchange of plants between land and water....

  2. Lability of copper bound to humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lingchen; Young, Scott D; Bailey, Elizabeth H

    2015-07-01

    Geochemical speciation models generally include the assumption that all metal bound to humic acid and fulvic acid (HA, FA) is labile. However, in the current study, we determined the presence of a soluble 'non-labile' Cu fraction bound to HA extracted from grassland and peat soils. This was quantified by determining isotopically-exchangeable Cu (E-value) and EDTA-extraction of HA-bound Cu, separated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and assayed by coupled ICP-MS. Evidence of time-dependent Cu fixation by HA was found during the course of an incubation study (160 d); up to 50% of dissolved HA-bound Cu was not isotopically exchangeable. This result was supported by extraction with EDTA where approximately 40% of Cu remained bound to HA despite dissolution in 0.05 M Na2-EDTA. The presence of a substantial non-labile metal fraction held by HA challenges the assumption of wholly reversible equilibrium which is central to current geochemical models of metal binding to humic substances. PMID:25863164

  3. Frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime measurements via frequency segmentation and recombination as applied to pyrene with dissolved humic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwani, Hadi M; Lowry, Mark; Xing, Baoshan; Warner, Isiah M; Cook, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the association behavior of pyrene with different dissolved humic materials (DHM) was investigated utilizing the recently developed segmented frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime method. The humic materials involved in this study consisted of three commercially available International Humic Substances Society standards (Suwannee River fulvic acid reference, SRFAR, Leonardite humic acid standard, LHAS, and Florida peat humic acid standard, FPHAS), the peat derived Amherst humic acid (AHA), and a chemically bleached Amherst humic acid (BAHA). It was found that the three commercial humic materials displayed three lifetime components, while both Amherst samples displayed only two lifetime components. In addition, it was found that the chemical bleaching procedure preferentially removed red wavelength emitting fluorophores from AHA. In regards to pyrene association with the DHM, different behavior was found for all commercially available humics, while AHA and BAHA, which displayed strikingly similar behavior in terms of fluorescence lifetimes. It was also found that there was an enhancement of pyrene's measured lifetime (combined with a decrease in pyrene emission) in the presence of FPHAS. The implications of this long lifetime are discussed in terms of (1) quenching mechanism and (2) use of the fluorescence quenching method used to determine the binding of compounds to DHM. PMID:18546063

  4. Effect of soil fulvic and humic acid on binding of Pb to goethite–water interface: Linear additivity and volume fractions of HS in the Stern layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiong, J.; Koopal, L.K.; Weng, L.; Wang, J.; Tan, W.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of soil fulvic (JGFA) and humic acid (JGHA) on Pb binding to goethite were investigated with batch experiments and modeling. The CD-MUSIC and NICA-Donnan model could describe the Pb binding to, respectively, the binary Pb–goethite and Pb–HS systems. The adsorption of humic substances (HS

  5. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF HUMIC ACID SOILS OF THE KRASNODAR REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobanov V. G.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The structural and functional properties of humic acids of different types of poorly studied soils of the Krasnodar Region: ordinary black soil or chernozem (carbonated, meadowish chernozem and gray forest soils are investigated. We define the type of humus of the soil samples studied as fulvate-humate. Using traditional indicators of humus soil conditions the regularities of soil and ecological processes involving organic matter in soils under natural and anthropogenically factorial changes in the monitoring sites are revealed. The relationship of the optical properties of humic acids with the intensity of the processes of transformation of humic substances by increasing the depth of the soil sample is shown. By NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and spectrophotometry in the visible spectrum differences and similarities in the structure of macromolecules of humic acids in soil samples. In terms of soil contamination with oil in a field experiment, on the monitoring site we have set a trend towards to redistribution in the ratio of functional groups of humic acid macromolecules: the proportion of aliphatic fragments increases. We have revealed an increase in the share of the mobile fraction of humic substances in terms of oil pollution. The article has the most suitable justification for these processes. The results can be used for prediction the environmental state of the soil under anthropogenic pollution

  6. Composition of Humic Acids of the Lake Baikal Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnyakova, O.; Chimitdorzhieva, G.; Andreeva, D.

    2012-04-01

    Humic substances are the final stage of the biogeochemical transformation of organic matter in the biosphere. Its natural compounds are found not only in soil, peat, coal, and sediments of basins. Chemical composition and properties of humic substances are determined by the functioning of the ecosystem as a whole. Therefore the study of the unique Lake Baikal sediments can provide information about their genesis, as well as the processes of organic matter transformation. For this purpose, preparations of humic acids (HA) were isolated by alkaline extraction method. The composition of HA was investigated by the elemental analyzer CHNS/O PerkinElmer Series II. Various located sediments of the Lake Baikal were the objects of the study: 1 - Chivyrkuisky Bay, 2 - Kotovo Bay, 3 - Selenga river delta near Dubinino village, 4 - Selenga river delta near Murzino village. Data on the elemental composition of HA in terms of ash-free portion show that the carbon content (CC) is of 50-53% with a maximum value in a sample 3, and minimum - in a sample 2. Such values are characteristic also for the soils with low biochemical activity. The hydrogen content is of 4,2-5,3%, a maximum value is in a sample 1. Data recalculation to the atomic percentages identified following regularities. The CC of HA is of 35-39 at. %. Hydrogen content is of 37-43 at. %. According to the content of these elements investigated substances are clearly divided into two groups: HA of the sediments of the Lake Baikal and river Selenga delta. The magnitude of the atomic ratio H/C can be seen varying degrees of condensation of the molecules of humic acids. The high atomic ratio H/C in HA of the former group indicates the predominance of aliphatic structures in the molecules. Humic acids of the later group are characterized by a low value H/C (acids such as cystine, cysteine, methionine, which is reflected in the composition of HA. Oxygen content is about 33,8-39,1% (17-22 at. %). Data analysis of the elemental

  7. Mutagenic activity of some coal-derived humic compounds evaluated by the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchi, F; Ponzanelli, I; Barale, R; Loprieno, N

    1996-07-10

    Two coal-derived humic substances (Sulcis and South Africa, Eniricerche, Italy) have been evaluated for their mutagenic activity on TA98 and TA100 Salmonella typhimurium strains, either in presence or in absence of metabolic activation (S9). Both compounds showed no effect on the two strains, as observed with natural humic acid (Fluka). After chlorination, coal-derived humic acids induced a strong dose-related increase in the number of revertants on TA100 without S9, whose extent was directly proportional to the chlorination ratios. Such effect was completely suppressed when a sodium thiosulfate solution (10%) was added at the end of the chlorination period (about 90 h). The analogies with natural humic acid mutagenicity are discussed. PMID:8700175

  8. Mutagenic activity of some coal-derived humic compunds evaluated by the Ames test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacchi, F.; Ponzanelli, I.; Barale, R.; Loprieno, N. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Pisa (Italy). Dipt. Scienze dell`Ambiente e del Territorilo

    1996-07-10

    Two coal-derived humic substances were evaluated for their mutagenic activity on TA98 and TA100 Salmonella typhimurium strains, either in the presence or absence of metabolic activation (S9). Both compounds showed no effect on the two strains, as observed with natural humic acid (Fluka). After chlorination, coal-derived humic acids induced a strong dose-related increase in the number of revertants on TA100 without S9, whose extent was directly proportional to the chlorination ratios. Such effect was completely suppressed when a sodium thiosulphate solution (10%) was added at the end of the chlorination period (about 90 h). The analogies with natural humic acid mutagenicity are discussed. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  9. Microbial release of 2,4-dichlorophenyl bound to humic acid or incorporated during humification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbial release of 14C-labeled 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) bound to synthetic and natural humic materials or polymerized by enzymes was investigated to evaluate the possibility of future adverse effects if binding or polymerization is used for decontamination purposes. After 12 wk of incubation with microorganisms obtained from a forest soil, the amounts of substances released into the media were very small (maximum 2.2% of the initially bound 14C) without regard to the kind of the polymer into which 14C-DCP was incorporated. Most of the radioactivity (46.2 to 80.8%) remained bound to the precipitated humic materials or in the DCP-polymer (90.1 to 97.0%). Certain amounts of the released substances evolved in the form of 14CO2 (1.0 to 9.4% from humic materials and 0 to 0.5% from a DCP-polymer). The rate of mineralization differed depending on the type of DCP binding - surface-bound or incorporated during synthesis of humic acid - and on the kind of polymer to which 14C-DCP was attached. The release into the media and 14CO2 evolution for synthetic and natural humic acids was essentially the same. When only DCP was present in the growth medium, the formation of 14CO2 was less than from a DCP-humic acid complex; this may indicate that 14CO2 from a DCP-humic acid complex originated mostly from DCP derivatives. The data obtained for DCP did not provide any evidence for a delayed pollution problem associated with polymerization or binding of xenobiotics to humic acids

  10. Corn initial vigor in response to humic acids from bovine manure and poultry litter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Oliveira de Melo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Corn is grown throughout the country, with its yields varying according to the technology investment. Among the technologies that seek to optimize productivity, the focus is on the use of improved seeds, which is associated with the properly integrated management of production factors such as pH adjustment and soil fertilization, irrigation, pest control and competitors, and more recently, the use of plant growth regulators. Analogous to synthetic growth regulators such as auxins, humic substances in organic matter have a stimulating effect on plants. However, the bioactivity and optimum concentration of humic substances vary with the type of plant and the type of raw materials used for their isolation. This work aimed to study the growth and development of maize in response to the treatment of seeds by different concentrations of humic acids. The treatments involved the application of two sources of humic acid (bovine manure and poultry litter and five concentrations (0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mmol L-1 of C of humic acid solutions to seeds in a bioassay carried out in a greenhouse. At the end of the experiment (45 days after germination, plants were evaluated biometrically and nutritionally. The results showed a significant increase in the growth and development of shoots and roots, and there was a significant accumulation of N and P after the application of humic acid isolated from bovine manure. These effects did not occur with the application of humic acid isolated from poultry litter. Therefore, biostimulation by humic acids isolated from bovine manure showed positive results and was complementary as compared to the effects of other inputs commonly used in the treatment of maize seeds.

  11. Effects of heating on composition, degree of darkness, and stacking nanostructure of soil humic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumi, Naoya; Yonebayashi, Koyo; Okazaki, Masanori

    2016-01-15

    Wildfires and prescribed burning can affect both the quality and the quantity of organic matter in soils. In this study, we investigated qualitative and quantitative changes of soil humic substances in two different soils (an Entisol from a paddy field and an Inceptisol from a cedar forest) under several controlled heating conditions. Soil samples were heated in a muffle furnace at 200, 250, or 300 °C for 1, 3, 5, or 12h. The humic acid and fulvic acid contents of the soil samples prior to and after heating were determined. The degree of darkness, elemental composition, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and X-ray diffraction patterns of humic acids extracted from the soils before and after heating were measured. The proportion of humic acids in total carbon decreased with increasing heating time at high temperature (300 °C), but increased with increasing heating time at ≤ 250 °C. The degree of darkness of the humic acids increased with increasing heating time and temperature. During darkening, the H/C atomic ratios, the proportion of aromatic C, and the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios increased, whereas the proportions of alkyl C and O-alkyl C decreased. X-ray diffraction analysis verified that a stacking nanostructure developed by heating. Changes in the chemical structure of the humic acids from the heated soils depended on the type of soil. The major structural components of the humic acids from the heated Entisol were aromatic C and carboxylic C, whereas aliphatic C, aromatic C, and carboxylic C structural components were found in the humic acids from the heated Inceptisol. These results suggest that the heat-induced changes in the chemical structure of the humic acids depended on the source plant. PMID:26398447

  12. Properties and structure of peat humic acids depending on humification and precursor biota in bogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavins, Maris; Purmalis, Oskars

    2013-04-01

    Humic substances form most of the organic component of soil, peat and natural waters, but their structure and properties very much differs depending on their source. The aim of this study is to characterize humic acids from raised bog peat profiles to evaluate the homogeneity of humic acids isolated from the bog bodies and study peat humification impact on properties of humic acids. A major impact on the structure of peat humic acids have raised bog biota (dominantly represented by bryophytes of different origin) void of lignin. For characterization of peat humic acids their elemental (CHNOS), functional (-COOH, phenolic OH) analysis, spectroscopic characterization (UV, fluorescence, FTIR, 1H NMR, CP/MAS 13C NMR, ESR) and degradation studies (Py-GC/MS) were done. Peat humic acids (HA) have an intermediate position between the living organic matter and coal organic matter and their structure is formed in a process in which more labile structures (carbohydrates, amino acids, etc.) are destroyed, but thermodynamically more stable aromatic and polyaromatic structures emerge. Comparatively, the studied peat HAs are at the start of the transformation process of living organic matter. Concentrations of carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl groups changes depending on the depth of peat from which HAs have been isolated: and carboxylic acidity is increasing with depth of peat location and the humification degree. The ability to influence the surface tension of peat humic acids isolated from a well-characterized bog profile demonstrates dependence on age and humification degree. With increase of the humification degree and age of humic acids, their molecular complexity and ability to influence surface tension decreases; even so, the impact of the biological precursor (peat-forming bryophytes and plants) can be identified.

  13. Growth of silver catfish ( Rhamdia quelen exposed to acidic pH at different humic acid levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Teixeira da Costa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Humic substances are organic compounds that possess high molecular weight and are formed by the decomposition of plant materials. Humic substances comprise humic acids, fulvic acids and humin. Humic acids (HA have shown to be able to provide some protection to biological membranes of fish in water with low pH, replacing the protective action of Ca2+. Thus, this studyaimed to observe growth of silver catfish ( Rhamdia quelen juveniles exposed to pHs 5.5 and 6.5 and to different levels of HA: 0, 10, 25 and 50mg L-1. Results showed that, irrespective of pH, HA was highly detrimental to silver catfish growth, since the higher the concentration of HA, the lower the weight gain and feed intake, resulting in lower biomass and lower specific growth rate of juveniles. Hence, HA is extremely damaging to the performance of silver catfish juveniles in the tested concentrations.

  14. Determination of stability constants of weathered coal fulvic acid, red earth fulvic acid and humic acid with Eu(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stability constants of weathered coal fulvic acid, red earth fulvic acid and humic acid with Eu(III) are determined by the modified Stevenson's cation exchange method. It is found that 1 : 1 type complexes of the three humic substances with Eu(III) are mainly formed, respectively under the experimental conditions (pH = 5 +- 0.2, I = 0.01 mol/kg, the concentrations of three humic substances range from 10-4 mol/L to 10-3 mol/L and free Eu(III) concentrations range from 10-7 mol/L to 10-6 mol/L). The averages of stability constants of Eu(III) complexes with the weathered coal fulvic acid, the red earth fulvic acid and the humic acid are 4.76 +- 0.12, 3.78 +- 0.11 and 4.48 +- 0.17, respectively

  15. A new standardized method for quantification of humic and fulvic acids in humic ores and commercial products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, Richard T; Olk, Daniel C; Mayhew, Lawrence; Bloom, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Increased use of humic substances in agriculture has generated intense interest among producers, consumers, and regulators for an accurate and reliable method to quantify humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) in raw ores and products. Here we present a thoroughly validated method, the new standardized method for determination of HA and FA contents in raw humate ores and in solid and liquid products produced from them. The methods used for preparation of HA and FA were adapted according to the guidelines of the International Humic Substances Society involving alkaline extraction followed by acidification to separate HA from the fulvic fraction. This is followed by separation of FA from the fulvic fraction by adsorption on a nonionic macroporous acrylic ester resin at acid pH. It differs from previous methods in that it determines HA and FA concentrations gravimetrically on an ash-free basis. Critical steps in the method, e.g., initial test portion mass, test portion to extract volume ratio, extraction time, and acidification of alkaline extract, were optimized for maximum and consistent recovery of HA and FA. The method detection limits for HA and FA were 4.62 and 4.8 mg/L, respectively. The method quantitation limits for HA and FA were 14.7 and 15.3 mg/L, respectively. PMID:25051616

  16. Speciation of sulfur in humic and fulvic acids using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Matthew J.; Fendorf, Scott E.; Brown, Paul D.

    1997-02-01

    Sulfur species in soils and sediments have previously been determined indirectly using destructive techniques. A direct and more accurate method for S speciation would improve our understanding of S biogeochemistry. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was performed on purified humic and fulvic acids from terrestrial and aquatic environments. This methodology allows direct determination of S species using the relationship that exists with the energy required for core electron transitions and in some cases, correlation with additional spectral features. Soil, peat, and aquatic humic acids were dominated by sulfonates with an oxidation state of +5, but also contained ester-bonded sulfates with an oxidation state of +6. Leonardite humic acid contained ester-bonded sulfate and an unidentified S compound with an oxidation state of +4.0. In contrast, high-valent S in soil, peat, and aquatic fulvic acids was exclusively in the form of sulfonic acids. Reduced S species were also present in both humic and fulvic acids. XANES is a valuable method for the speciation of S in humic materials and of potential use in S speciation of unfractionated soils.

  17. Speciation of sulfur in humic and fulvic acids using X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structures (XANES) spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morra, M.J.; Fendorf, S.E.; Brown, P.D. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Sulfur species in soils and sediments have previously been determined indirectly using destructive techniques. A direct and more accurate method for S speciation would improve our understanding of S biogeochemistry. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was performed on purified humic and fulvic acids from terrestrial and aquatic environments. This methodology allows direct determination of S species using the relationship that exists with the energy required for core electron transitions and in some cases, correlation with additional spectral features. Soil, peat, and aquatic humic acids were dominated by sulfonates with an oxidation state of +5, but also contained ester-bonded sulfates with an oxidation state of +6. Leonardite humic acid contained ester-bonded sulfate and an unidentified S compound with an oxidation state of +4.0. In contrast, high-valent S in soil, peat, and aquatic fulvic acids was exclusively in the form of sulfonic acids. Reduced S species were also present in both humic and fulvic acids. XANES is a valuable method for the speciation of S in humic materials and of potential use in S speciation of unfractionated soils. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Triad method for assessing the remediation effect of humic preparations on urbanozems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukalchik, M. A.; Terekhova, V. A.; Yakimenko, O. S.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Akulova, M. I.

    2015-06-01

    The data on the pollutant content, ecological toxicity, and structural and functional specifics of soil microbial communities in urbanozem sampled in the city of Kirov were used to describe the remediation effect of humic substances (lignohumate and nanomagnetitohumate). The integral index of environmental risk on contaminated and background soil sites was calculated using the triad method. Based on varying Chemical Risk Index, Ecotoxicological Risk Index, and Ecological Risk Index, this method proved that humic substances are able to reduce ecological toxicity and transform the ecophysiological indices of biota in urban soils. The most vivid effect of humic products has been revealed on introduction of 0.0025 and 0.01% mass. The biological activity of nanomagnetitohumate and lignohumate, rather than their ability to bind toxicants, is apparently the principal factor controlling their remediating effect.

  19. Interaction and transport of actinides in natural clay rock with consideration of humic substances and clay organics. Characterization and quantification of the influence of clay organics on the interaction and diffusion of uranium and americium in the clay. Joint project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernhard, Gert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany). Inst. of Radiochemistry; Schmeide, Katja; Joseph, Claudia; Sachs, Susanne; Steudtner, Robin; Raditzky, Bianca; Guenther, Alix

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this project was the study of basic interaction processes in the systems actinide - clay organics - aquifer and actinide - natural clay - clay organics - aquifer. Thus, complexation, redox, sorption and diffusion studies were performed. To evaluate the influence of nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur containing functional groups of humic acid (HA) on the complexation of actinides in comparison to carboxylic groups, the Am(III) and U(VI) complexation by model ligands was studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TRLFS. The results show that Am(III) is mainly coordinated via carboxylic groups, however, probably stabilized by nitrogen groups. The U(VI) complexation is dominated by carboxylic groups, whereas nitrogen and sulfur containing groups play a minor role. Phosphorus containing groups may contribute to the U(VI) complexation by HA, however, due to their low concentration in HA they play only a subordinate role compared to carboxylic groups. Applying synthetic HA with varying sulfur contents (0 to 6.9 wt.%), the role of sulfur functionalities of HA for the U(VI) complexation and Np(V) reduction was studied. The results have shown that sulfur functionalities can be involved in U(VI) humate complexation and act as redox-active sites in HA for the Np(V) reduction. However, due to the low content of sulfur in natural HA, its influence is less pronounced. In the presence of carbonate, the U(VI) complexation by HA was studied in the alkaline pH range by means of cryo-TRLFS (-120 C) and ATR FT-IR spectroscopy. The formation of the ternary UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}HA(II){sup 4-} complex was detected. The complex formation constant was determined with log {beta}{sub 0.1} M = 24.57 {+-} 0.17. For aqueous U(VI) citrate and oxalate species, luminescence emission properties were determined by cryo-TRLFS and used to determine stability constants. The existing data base could be validated. The U(VI) complexation by lactate, studied in the temperature range 7 to 65 C

  20. Chemical behaviour of Np, Pu and Am in aquatic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical behaviour of Np, Am and Pu has been studied in aquatic systems of various ionic strength and NaCl concentrations as well as in natural groundwaters. Basic chemical reactions investigated are hydrolysis reaction of Np(V), Pu(IV) and Am(III), carbonate complexation of Pu(IV) and Am(III), and redox reaction of Pu and Am induced by α-radiolysis in brine solutions. The α-induced radiolysis reactions in NaCl solutions are carefully evaluated. The generation of real-colloids of Am(III) and Pu(IV) and the generation of Am(III)-pseudo-colloids through sorption of Am3+ on groundwater-colloids have been also investigated. The natural groundwater-colloids and humic substances, being present in Gorleben groundwaters, are characterized systematically in order to facilate a better understanding of colloid generation in a given groundwater. Transuranium ions in solution have been speciated either by UV-VIS spectroscopy for relatively high concentrations or by Laser-induced photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) for sub-μmol concentrations. (orig.)

  1. Phosphorus in chronosequence of burnt sugar cane in Brazilian cerrado: humic acid analysis by 31P NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to identify, with the use of 31P NMR spectroscopy, organic P species in humic acids (HA) in samples from Oxisol cultivated in chronosequence with sugar cane, pasture and Cerrado. The main forms of P-type found were orthophosphate, monoester-P (phosphate sugars) and P-diester (orthophosphate). The 31P NMR technique proved capable of identifying changes in the areas studied as a function of sugar cane burning time. In areas with 1 and 5 years of burnt cane, a decrease in recalcitrant organic P in humic acids indicated the need for use of P-humic substances for plant nutrition (author)

  2. Humic and fulvic acids in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-ionic polymeric sorbent DAX-8 (XAD-8) was applied to the isolation of humic and fulvic acids from groundwater. This procedure was able to isolate approximately 40% of the DOC as humic solutes. For the investigation of the structure and molecular size distribution of the isolated humic solutes, the hyphenated SEC-ESI-MS system with a quadrupole mass spectrometer and SEC-UV and fluorescence detectors was utilized. For the higher-molecular-weight humic acids, the ESI-MS loses sensitivity compared with the parallel UV detection, because of the difficulty in getting the ionized humic compounds to fly efficiently through the mass spectrometer. (orig.)

  3. Pyrolysis-GC-MS of humic materials from peat: in the search of Holocene environrnental change

    OpenAIRE

    González-Vila, Francisco Javier; Zancada, M.C.; Polvillo, Oliva; Martín Martínez, Francisco; González-Pérez, José Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Peat bog deposits were formed in peculiar palaeoecosystems where the biodegradation of plant residues was retarded because of a combination of pedo-climatic and topographic factors, which have led to a continuous accumulation of organic matter in different evolutionary stages. Humic-type substances constitute the major components of the peat organic deposits.

  4. Evaluation of NaOH leaching techniques to extract humic acids from palaeosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It can be shown quite conclusively that the often used technique (AAA) of leaching palaeosol samples with hot or boiling dilute HCl solution, followed by treatment with up to 2% NaOH solution and a further treatment with dilute HCl solution may not remove all of the so-called humic acids from palaeosol samples. In fact, in many cases it does not remove any of the humic acids, only carbohydrates, amino acids and other organic compounds. This can be shown by examination of the visible spectrum (400-700 nm) of the 'humic acid' extract in alkaline solution. Hence, many of the reported 14C results from the 'humin' fraction of palaeosols are actually from the humic acid fraction which is tightly bound to the clay component of the palaeosol. The NaOH leach also has the potential to introduce carboxylic acid groups from atmospheric CO2 into phenol groups. A reevaluation of humic acid extracts of palaeosols collected from the Loess Plateau in China has been made, with analyses comparing the properties of the various organic extracts. Also, an extraction technique based on recommendations from the International Humic Substances Society, incorporating removal of impurities by chromatography plus a decarboxylation step is proposed

  5. Composição lignocelulósica e isótopica da vegetação e da matéria orgânica do solo de uma turfeira tropical: II - substâncias húmicas e processos de humificação Lignocellulosic and isotopic composition of vegetation and soil organic matter of a tropical peat: II humic substances and humification processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Christofaro Silva

    2013-02-01

    sob a FES, em relação ao CLU. O δ13C da lignina apresenta similaridade elevada em relação ao δ13C da humina, dos ácidos húmicos e dos ácidos fúlvicos. As variações na composição lignocelulósica das espécies que colonizam o CLU e a FES promovem diferenças nas taxas e nos produtos da humificação da MOS.Much of the organic matter of a typical peat consists of humic substances, mainly formed via humification of organic residues, decomposed by soil microorganisms, and by the polymerization of organic compounds to functional macromolecules, which are normally more resistant to degradation. The fundamental pathways governing the humification of soil organic matter (SOM are not well understood so far, and most available data about the identified chemical precursors of humic substances and the main chemical routes by which they are transformed in the peat environment are still poorly understood. What is clear is that all routes involve lignin as a chemical intermediate. Stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N can be used to trace humification processes of the soil organic matter (SOM, by identifying their precursors. The purpose of this study was to compare the isotopic composition of vegetation materials from the two bog vegetation types that colonize a tropical highland peatland: moist grassland (CLU and semideciduous forest (FES, based on the isotopic composition of humic substances of SOM. The whole area of the studied peatland occupies 81.75 ha. To identify the isotopic and lignocellulosic vegetation composition, materials of the dominant species of each vegetation type were sampled. Soil samples were collected from three representative sites per vegetation type, at intervals of 5 cm from the surface down to a depth of 50 cm. The humic substances were isolated from these samples; signals of δ13C and δ15N were determined for the humic fractions. The lignin and and δ13C values were higher in vegetation and SOM under FES than in SOM under CLU. Humin contents were

  6. The role of humic and fulvic acids in the phototransformation of phenolic compounds in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic substances (HS) are known to act as photosensitizers toward the transformation of pollutants in the surface layer of natural waters. This study focused on the role played by HS toward the transformation of xenobiotics in seawater, with the purpose of assessing the prevailing degradation routes. Phenol was chosen as model xenobiotic and its transformation was investigated under simulated sunlight in the presence of terrestrial or marine humic and fulvic acids, in pure water at pH 8, artificial seawater (ASW) or natural seawater (NSW). The following parameters were determined: (1) the phenol degradation rate; (2) the variation in HS concentration with irradiation time; (3) the production of transformation products; (4) the influence of iron species on the transformation process. Faster transformation of phenol was observed with humic acids (HA) compared to fulvic acids (SRFA), and transformation induced by both HA and SRFA was faster in ASW than that in pure water. These observations can be explained by assuming an interplay between different competing and sometimes opposite processes, including the competition between chloride, bromide and dissolved oxygen for reaction with HS triplet states. The analysis of intermediates formed in the different matrices under study showed the formation of several hydroxylated (hydroquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone, resorcinol) and condensed compounds (2,2′-bisphenol, 4,4′-bisphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol). Although 1,4-benzoquinone was the main transformation product, formation of condensed molecules was significant with both HA and SRFA. Experiments on natural seawater spiked with HS confirmed the favored formation of condensed products, suggesting a key role of humic matter in dimerization reactions occurring in saline water. - Highlights: • Phenol transformation in seawater can be photosensitized by humic substances. • Dimeric species are peculiar intermediates formed in the process. • Phenol degradation occurred faster with

  7. The role of humic and fulvic acids in the phototransformation of phenolic compounds in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calza, P., E-mail: paola.calza@unito.it; Vione, D.; Minero, C.

    2014-09-15

    Humic substances (HS) are known to act as photosensitizers toward the transformation of pollutants in the surface layer of natural waters. This study focused on the role played by HS toward the transformation of xenobiotics in seawater, with the purpose of assessing the prevailing degradation routes. Phenol was chosen as model xenobiotic and its transformation was investigated under simulated sunlight in the presence of terrestrial or marine humic and fulvic acids, in pure water at pH 8, artificial seawater (ASW) or natural seawater (NSW). The following parameters were determined: (1) the phenol degradation rate; (2) the variation in HS concentration with irradiation time; (3) the production of transformation products; (4) the influence of iron species on the transformation process. Faster transformation of phenol was observed with humic acids (HA) compared to fulvic acids (SRFA), and transformation induced by both HA and SRFA was faster in ASW than that in pure water. These observations can be explained by assuming an interplay between different competing and sometimes opposite processes, including the competition between chloride, bromide and dissolved oxygen for reaction with HS triplet states. The analysis of intermediates formed in the different matrices under study showed the formation of several hydroxylated (hydroquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone, resorcinol) and condensed compounds (2,2′-bisphenol, 4,4′-bisphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol). Although 1,4-benzoquinone was the main transformation product, formation of condensed molecules was significant with both HA and SRFA. Experiments on natural seawater spiked with HS confirmed the favored formation of condensed products, suggesting a key role of humic matter in dimerization reactions occurring in saline water. - Highlights: • Phenol transformation in seawater can be photosensitized by humic substances. • Dimeric species are peculiar intermediates formed in the process. • Phenol degradation occurred faster with

  8. Environmental conditions that influence the ability of humic acids to induce permeability in model biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojwang', Loice M; Cook, Robert L

    2013-08-01

    The interaction of humic acids (HAs) with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-Sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) model biomembrane system was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. HAs from aquatic and terrestrial (including coal) sources were studied. The effects of HA concentration and temperature over environmentally relevant ranges of 0 to 20 mg C/L and 10 to 30 °C, respectively, were investigated. The dosage studies revealed that the aquatic Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) causes an increased biomembrane perturbation (percent leakage of the fluorescent dye, Sulforhodamine B) over the entire studied concentration range. The two terrestrial HAs, namely Leonardite humic acid (LAHA) and Florida peat humic acid (FPHA), at concentrations above 5 mg C/L, show a decrease or a plateau effect attributable to the competition within the HA mixture and/or the formation of "partial aggregates". The temperature studies revealed that biomembrane perturbation increases with decreasing temperature for all three HAs. Kinetic studies showed that the membrane perturbation process is complex with both fast and slow absorption (sorption into the bilayer) components and that the slow component could be fitted by first order kinetics. A mechanism based on "lattice errors" within the POPC LUVs is put forward to explain the fast and slow components. A rationale behind the concentration and temperature findings is provided, and the environmental implications are discussed. PMID:23805776

  9. Impacto da conversão floresta - pastagem nos estoques e na dinâmica do carbono e substâncias húmicas do solo no bioma Amazônico Impact of forest-pasture conversion on stocks and dynamics of soil carbon and humic substances in the Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Alves de Araújo

    2011-03-01

    of Rio Branco and comprises an area of bamboo- and palm-dominated open forest with two B. brizantha pastures of 3 and 10 years old. The second site, dominated by a dystrophic Red Yellow Latosol (Oxisol, is located in the municipality of Senador Guiomard and comprises an area of dense forest and a 20-year old B. brizantha pasture. In each site soil samples were collected in triplicate at depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm. Samples were evaluated for physical and chemical characteristics, C of humic substances and light organic matter, and the isotopic composition of soil and its organic fractions to 1 m depth, determining the percentage of C derived of both grassland and forest. There were increases in stocks of soil C and δ13C soil with the time of grazing in both sites. The percentage of C derived from pasture was much higher in the surface layer of the Senador Guiomard site following 20 years of grazing, with proportions that reached 70% of the total C. δ13C values for the humic acids ranged from -12.19 to -17.57 ‰, indicating a higher proportion of C derived from pasture. The MOS structural stability inferred by the relationship of the humin with both fulvic acid and humic acid fractions (HUM / FAF + FAH tended to decrease in grassland ecosystems when compared with native forests.

  10. Promoção de enraizamento de microtoletes de cana-de-açúcar pelo uso conjunto de substâncias húmicas e bactérias diazotróficas endofíticas Rooting of micro seed pieces by combined use of humic substances and endophytic diazotrophic bacteria in sugar cane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Batista Marques Júnior

    2008-06-01

    éficos da inoculação de estirpes selecionadas de H. seropedicae, já para ácidos húmicos, as respostas positivas independem da termoterapia. A promoção do crescimento radicular por AH e a fixação biológica de N2 podem representar uma estratégia inovadora para produção sustentada em sistemas agrícolas.Besides the direct nutritional effect of mineralization of organic matter or by biological nitrogen fixation activity, the humic substances and endophytic diazotrophic bacteria can directly influence plant metabolism, modifying plant growth and development patterns. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the combined use of humic acid (HA and Herbaspirillum seropedicae, an endophytic nitrogen-fixing bacteria, on the root growth of seed pieces - heat-treated or not - of the sugarcane variety RB 72 454. After hot water treatment, the cane cuttings were immersed for 12 hours as follows: in water (control plant, in HA solution (20 mg L-1 of C from vermicompost, in bacterial inoculant of H. seropedicae, strain HRC54 (10(8 cells mL-1, and in a combination of bacteria and HA. Root growth was improved by 60 to 118 % in length and from 33 % to 233 % in surface area on sugarcane plant treatments compared to control, with more pronounced effect in plants under heat treatment. Likewise, the positive effect of the combinded treatment (bacteria inoculation and humic acid on shoot and root biomass was significant compared to the control with heat-treated cuts. For non-heated seed pieces, bacteria inoculation did not result in a positive plant growth effect, but only in the presence of humic acid. The combined or isolated use of both HA and bacteria did not significantly modify the bacteria population in the root tissue of heat-untreated sugarcane. For heat-treated cuts, bacteria inoculation, combined or not with HA, increased the size of diazotrophic bacteria population on roots. The results highlight the importance of thermotherapy to increase the positive

  11. Complexation of americium with humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the interlaboratory comparison exercise for the complexation of humic acid and colloid generation (COCO-Club activities) in the CEC project MIRAGE-II, the complexation of americium with humic acid has been studied in our laboratory. Two humic acids were used for the study: Aldrich-HA(H+) which is a reference humic acid of the COCO-Club and Bradford-HA(H+) from Lake Bradford, Florida. A wide concentration range of humic acid and different ratios of Am to humic acid have been investigated between pH 5 and 6 with the ionic strength of 0.1 M and 1.0 M. The complexation has been studied by UV-spectroscopy, Laser-induced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (LPAS) and ultrafiltration. LPAS is used for the submicromolar concentration range where the sensitivity of UV spectroscopy is not accessible. Ultrafiltration is used for low Am to humic acid ratios where both spectroscopic methods are not applicable. Varying the humic acid concentration over three orders of magnitude, only a 1:1 type of binding is observed. No significant variation of the stability constant is found in the investigated range of pH and ionic strength. However, the precipitation tendency and the loading capacity of humic acid are found to depend sensitively on pH and ionic strength. The complexation study provides a deep insight into the influence of humic acid on the migration behaviour of fission products and actinides in the geosphere. (orig.)

  12. Aquatic Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanville, W. D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of aquatic sediments and its effect upon water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) sediment water interchange; (2) chemical and physical characterization; and (3) heavy water in sediments. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  13. Influence of Humic Acid on 1-Aminopyrene Ecotoxicity During Solar Photolysis Process

    OpenAIRE

    Huey-Min Hwang; Hongtao Yu; Veleka N. Jones; Balarezo, Ana L.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract: 1-Aminopyrene (1-AP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) compound, is a major metabolite during biotransformation of 1-nitropyrene by microflora in natural environment and in the guts of animals and humans. Under UV-A irradiation, 1-AP has been shown to cause light-induced DNA single strand cleavage. Humic acids (HA) in aquatic ecosystems can influence the bioavailability, toxicity, and fate of organic xenobiotics. Therefore, photochemical fate and effect of PAH in natural aqu...

  14. Use of humic acids derived from peat and lignite as phenanthrene sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofikitis, Elias; Giannouli, Andriana; Kalaitzidis, Stavros; Christanis, Kimon; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Papanicolaou, Cassiani

    2015-04-01

    A broad range of materials is being applied for environmental remediation of water, among them sorbents such as humic acids. Being natural substances, the extraction and purification of humic acids might be cheaper than the production of synthetic sorbents. Having higher absorbing capacity than most of the sorbents used to date, humic acids have a competitive advantage against commonly used sorbents such as active charcoals and biochar. Humic acids are "complex colloidal super-mixtures" that are characterized by their functional groups. Therefore, composition and molecular formula can vary depending on the properties of the parent material. The aim of this project was (a) to study the sorption capacity of humic acids derived from peat and lignite samples picked up from deposits spread throughout Greece and (b) to compare the results with these of the parent materials. This comparison provides an insight to which matrix samples are suitable for further chemical treatment for the isolation of humic acids to be used as sorbents. The selected model pollutant was phenanthrene, which is a PAH that consists of three fused benzene rings. Humic acids were extracted according to the methodology proposed by the IHSS, slightly modified, in order to fit better to the properties of organic sediments. Sorption experiments were conducted by mixing 0.004 g of the sorbent (peat or lignite or humic acid) with aqueous solutions of phenanthrene at different concentrations of 30, 50, 100, 300, and 500 μg/L. The results show that phenanthrene sorption is higher for the humic acid than for the original lignite and peat samples. The original samples display higher sorption at the lower phenanthere solutions (30 μg/L; Kd ranges from 15,000 to 47,000 L/kg) than at the higher one (500 μg/L; Kd ranges from 4,100 to 13,000 L/Kg) suggesting non-linear sorption. The humic acids display mainly linear isotherms with Kd ranges from 6,600 to 120,000 L/kg. Concerning the suitability of the studied

  15. complex formation of americium (III) with humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of humic substances in natural waters will modify the migration behavior of actinides in the geosphere due to the strong reaction properties of these ligands with actinides. Therefore, the possible reactions of humic acid with actinides have been studied widely in recent years. The complex formation of Am(III) with humic acid is studied with solvent extraction technique. The experiments are performed in the pH range from 4.0 to 8.0 in 0.1 mol/kg NaClO4 solution at ambient temperature. Experimental results show that the complex formation constants of Am(III) with humic acid are varied with the variation of pH value in solution. 1:2 complex is obtained in the experiments and the complex formation constants determined at each pH are: lgβ1 = 6.56 +- 0.05, lgβ2 = 10.77 +- 0.31 at pH 4.0. lgβ1 = 7.94 +- 0.11, lgβ2 = 11.80 +- 0.21 at pH = 5.0. lgβ1 = 10.74 +- 0.28, lgβ2 = 12.88 +- 0.49 at pH = 6.0. lgβ1 = 12.85 +- 0.30, lgβ2 = 14.80 +- 0.62 at pH = 7.0. lgβ1 = 14.88 +- 0.48, lgβ2 = 15.65 +- 0.69 at pH = 8.0, respectively. The dependence of the complex formation constant on pH is: lgβ1 = 2.16 (+-0.98)pH-2.34(+-0.93),lgβ2 1.28(+-1.04)pH+5.52(+-1.21), respectively

  16. Spectroscopic studies of humic acids from subsurface sediment samples collected across the Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. SAKELLARIADOU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural humic acids are biogenic, structurally complex and heterogeneous, refractory, acidic, yellow-to black-coloured organic polyelectrolytes of relatively high molecular weight. They occur in all soils, sediments, fresh waters, and seawaters. Humic acids represent the largest portion of nonliving soil organic matter. In the present paper, humic substances were isolated from marine subsurface sediment samples collected across the Aegean sea (in Greece and especially from a marine area extending northwards of the Samothraki plateau towards the north-eastern part of the island of Crete. In a following step, humic preparations were studied using infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy (emission, excitation and synchronous-scan excitation spectra were obtained. The infrared spectra suggested functional chemical groups such as as OH-, C-H aliphatic, C=C, C=O/COO-, salts of carboxylic acids, and also, in some cases, silicate anions or C-O from alcohols, esters and ethers. Fluorescence emission, excitation and synchronous scan excitation provided some valuable information concerning a probable origin (marine and/or terrestrial for the isolated humics.

  17. ORGANIC MATTER AND HUMIC FRACTIONS OF A HAPLIC ACRISOL AS AFFECTED BY COMPOSTED PIG SLURRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Lüdtke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of composted pig slurry (PS on the organic matter concentration and distribution of humic acid (HA, fulvic acid (FA and humin (HU fractions. The fractions were quantified following the addition of composted PS to the soil, which was produced with no acidification (T2 or with acidification with H3PO4 (T3; and in soil without compost addition (T1. The HA chemical composition was analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. The addition of the two composts did not change the soil carbon concentration but affected the distribution of the humic fractions. For the three treatments, the carbon concentration of humic substances increased until 52 days following compost addition, with more pronounced increases with the addition of non-acidified PS compost (14.5 g kg-1 and acidified PS compost (15.1 g kg-1. This increase was reflected in both the FA and HA concentrations. The addition of compost with PS acidification resulted in the formation of larger humic micelles (HA with higher aromatic content and fewer functional groups than the non-acidified PS compost. These findings, together with a lower proportion of carbohydrate-type structures, indicated the presence of more stable humic micelles in the soil treated with acidified PS compost.

  18. Humic acid from Shilajit – a physico-chemical and spectroscopic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURAJ P. AGARWAL

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Shilajit is a blackish–brown exudation, consisting of organic substances, metal ions and minerals, from different formations, commonly found in the Himalayan region (1000–3000 m from Nepal to Kashmir. Shilajit can also be collected throughout the mountain regions in Afghanistan, Bhutan, China, Bajkal, throughout Ural, Caucasus and Altai mountains also, at altitudes between 1000 to 5000 m. The major physiological action of shilajit has been attributed to the presence of bioactive dibenzo-α-pyrones together with humic and fulvic acids, which act as carrier molecules for the active ingredients. In this work, the aim was to extract humic acid from Shilajit from various sources and characterised these humic acids based on their physicochemical properties, elemental analysis, UV/Vis and FTIR spectra, X-ray diffraction pattern and DSC thermograms. The spectral features obtained from UV/Vis, FTIR, XRD and DSC studies for samples of different origins showed a distinct similarity amongst themselves and in comparison to soil humic acids. The surfactant properties of the extracted fulvic acids were investigated by determining the effect of increasing concentration on the surface tension of water. The study demonstrated that humic acids extracted from shilajit indeed possessed surfactant properties.

  19. Relevant role of dissolved humic matter in phosphorus bioavailability in natural and agronomical ecosystems through the formation of Humic-(Metal)-Phosphate complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baigorri, Roberto; Urrutia, Óscar; Erro, Javier; Pazos-Pérez, Nicolás; María García-Mina, José

    2016-04-01

    Natural Organic Matter (NOM) and the NOM fraction present in soil solution (dissolved organic matter: DOM) are currently considered as fundamental actors in soil fertility and crop mineral nutrition. Indeed, decreases in crop yields as well as soil erosion are closely related to low values of NOM and, in fact, the use of organic amendments as both soil improvers and plant growth enhancers is very usual in countries with soils poor in NOM. This role of NOM (and DOM) seems to be associated with the presence of bio-transformed organic molecules (humic substances) with high cation chelating-complexing ability. In fact, bioavailable micronutrients with metallic character in soil solutions of alkaline and calcareous soils are forming stable complexes with DOM. This beneficial action of DOM also concerns other plant nutrients such as inorganic phosphate (Pi). Among the different mechanisms involved in the beneficial action of DOM on P bioavailability, the possible formation of poly-nuclear complexes including stable chemical bonds between negative binding sites in humic substances and Pi through metal bridges in soil solution might be relevant, especially in acidic soils. In fact, several studies have proven that these complexes can be obtained in the laboratory and are very efficient in prevent Pi soil fixation and improve Pi root uptake. However, clear experimental evidence about their presence in soil solutions of natural and agronomical soil ecosystems has not published yet. We present here experimental results supporting the real presence of stable Pi-metal-Humic (PMH) complexes in the soil solution of several acidic soils. The study is based on the physico-chemical characterization (31P-NMR, FTIR, TEM-EDAX, ICP-OES) of the DOM fraction isolated by ultrafiltration from the soil solution of several representative acidic soils. In average, more than 60 % of Pi was found in the soil solution humic fraction forming stable humic-metal (Fe, Al) complexes.

  20. Equivalent weight of humic acid from peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, A.M.; Breger, I.A.

    1960-01-01

    By means of discontinuous titration, the equivalent weight of humic acid isolated from a peat was found to increase from 144 to 183 between the third and fifty-second day after the humic acid was dissolved. Infra-red studies showed that the material had probably condensed with loss of carbonyl groups. ?? 1960.

  1. Spectroscopic evidence for biochar amendment promoting humic acid synthesis and intensifying humification during composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Tu, Qiaoping; Dong, Da; Strong, P J; Wang, Hailong; Sun, Bin; Wu, Weixiang

    2014-09-15

    Despite the many benefits of biochar amendment in composting, little information is available about its effects on organic matter humification during the process. In this study the analytical results for two in-vessel composting piles were compared, one amended with biochar (VPSB, pig manure+sawdust+biochar) and the other serving as a control (VPS, pig manure+sawdust). During the 74 days of humification, the increased content of humic acid carbon in VPSB is 16.9% more than that of the control. Spectroscopic analyses show a higher O-alkyl C/alkyl C ratio and aromaticity in VPSB at the thermophilic phase, and peak intensities of fulvic-like and humic-like substances were achieved faster in VPSB than VPS. These data inferred that biochar amendment promoted the neo-synthesis of humic acids and intensified the humification of pig manure. Increase in carboxylic groups of biochar as a result of oxidation reactions and sorption of humic substances may correspond to the faster formation of aromatic polymers in biochar-supplemented composting pile. The results suggest that biochar amendment might be a potential method to enhance humification during pig manure composting. PMID:25194558

  2. Effects of a sedimentary humic acid on plant growth: study of the general mechanisms of action upon root application in cucumber plants (Cucumis Sativus l. Cv Ashley).

    OpenAIRE

    Olaetxea-Indaburu, M. (Maite); Baigorri-Ekisoáin, R. (Roberto); Garcia-Mina, J.M. (José María)

    2015-01-01

    HS (humic substances) constitute one of the most abundant forms of organic matter in the biosphere. Many studies reported the ability of humic acids (HAs) isolated from HS to affect plant the plant development of diverse plant species. However, the mechanism of action that is behind these events is scarcely understood and it is not integrated into a holistic view. To this end, the aim of this work was to study the mechanism of action of an specific sedimentary humic acid (SHA) under roots ...

  3. Bioavailability of radionuclides and dose rate in aquatic ecosystems within the Chernobyl accident exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Our studies were carried out during 1997-2007 within Krasnensky flood-lands on the left bank of the Pripyat River, which is the most contaminated region of the Ukrainian part of the Chernobyl accident exclusion zone. During 1991-1993 the complex of hydraulic engineering structures as flood protection dams was constructed within the Krasnensky flood-lands, which preventing washing away of radioactive substances from soils and changing a hydrological mode of flood plain flows during a high water. In its turn it was by the reason of strengthening of over-moistening and swamping processes within embankment territories. As a result - on a background of the common tendencies of increase of the mobile forms of 90Sr in soils of catchment territories and bottom sediments of the exclusion zone, there is an increase of humic acids concentrations in waterlogged soils of Krasnensky flood-lands. It is also raises the content of the water-soluble forms of 90Sr forming with acids the soluble complexes. Thus the increase of concentrations of the mobile radionuclide forms and their inclusion into biotic circulation of aquatic ecosystems is observed. It confirms also an increase of 90Sr specific activity in water of lakes within Krasnensky flood-lands, against a background of stabilisation of this parameter for 137Cs last years. Such dynamics of 90Sr and 137Cs contents is significantly reflected on dose rate for hydrobionts due to incorporated radionuclides. However if in running water bodies the decrease of radionuclide contents defines, accordingly, and the decrease of dose rates, in lakes of the left-bank flood-lands of the Pripyat River the situation has an absolutely other character. At rather stable internal absorbed dose rate, caused by 137Cs during 1993-2007, the dose, caused by the 90Sr content, has grown more than in 20 times for some species of higher aquatic plants and fish in comparison with the beginning of 1990-s. As a result the total internal dose of

  4. Remediation of 153Gd-contaminated sand by fulvic and humic materials extracted from fallen cherry leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The remediation of sand contaminated with 153Gd has been investigated using natural organic substances extracted from fallen cherry leaves instead of artificial reagents. The initial fulvic and humic acid isolated from organic substances through acidic and basic treatments have a concentration of total organic carbon of 4500 mgC/L and 3340 mgC/L, and the capacities of their functional groups are 7.23 meq/gC and 2.76 meq/gC, respectively. The remediation capacity of both fulvic and humic acid is effective in the weakly acidic region. Remediation with a natural organic substance requires a much higher carbon concentration than EDTA owing to its weak complexation with metal ions. In comparison with the EDTA complexation constant, the experimental complexation constant (log β) of gadolinium with a natural organic substance at pH 5.5 was determined to be 10 at most. (author)

  5. Humic Acid-Like and Fulvic Acid-Like Inhibition on the Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Tributyrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, T.V.; Lier, van J.B.; Zeeman, Grietje

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of complex wastes is a critical step for efficient biogas production in anaerobic digesters. Inhibition of this hydrolytic step was studied by addition of humic acid-like (HAL) and fulvic acid-like (FAL) substances, extracted from maize silage and fresh cow manure, to batch t

  6. Interactions between radionuclides and organic colloids. Structure and reactivity of humic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic compounds are the main organic colloids present in natural waters. These compounds can significantly modify the speciation of metals and control their properties, like migration, toxicity or bio-availability. It is thus important to study their speciation in conditions representative to those encountered in the natural environment. The aim of this work is to analyze the reactivity of these humic compounds. Two spectroscopic techniques have been used: the time-resolution laser spectro-fluorimetry, limited to the study of fluorescent elements, and the electro-spray source mass spectroscopy which requires the development of specific protocols for all elements of the periodic classification system. Europium, a fluorescent element analogue to trivalent actinides, has been chosen as test-metal for the intercomparison of both spectroscopic techniques. The first technique has permitted to determine the inorganic and organic speciation (spectra and lifetime of europium hydroxides and carbonates, and constants of interaction with humic acids, respectively). The limitations of this technique in the study of inorganic speciation has been evidenced. Humic compounds have a badly defined structure. The use of high-resolution mass spectroscopy has permitted to propose in a direct and experimental way, a molecular structure of aquatic fulvic acids in agreement with their known physico-chemical properties. (J.S.)

  7. HUMIC ACID-LIKE MATTER ISOLATED FROM GREEN URBAN WASTES. PART I: STRUCTURE AND SURFACTANT PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Montoneri

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A humic acid-like substance (cHAL2 isolated from urban green wastes before composting was compared to a humic acid-like substance (cHAL isolated from a mix of urban organic humid waste fraction and green residues composted for 15 days. cHAL2 was found to contain more aliphatic and O-alkyl C atoms relative to aromatic, phenol, and carboxyl C atoms, and to yield higher critical micellar concentration (cmc = 0.97 g L-1 and surface tension at the cmc (cmc = 37.8 mN/min water than cHAL (cmc = 0.40 g L-1; cmc = 36.1 mN/m. The results point out that biomass wastes may be an interesting source of biosurfactants with diversified properties that depend on the nature of waste and on its process of treatment.

  8. Potential origin and formation for molecular components of humic acids in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Patrick; DiDonato, Nicole; Waggoner, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Humification is defined as the process by which plant and microbial debris are transformed in to humic substances. Proposed pathways for the formation of humic substances, include the lignin and lignin decomposition theories, the lignin-polyphenol theory as well as the melanoidin pathway. It is generally accepted that a combination of several of these pathways with some modifications may be responsible for producing humic substances. The current study examines humic acids from numerous soil samples to demonstrate their molecular composition. In addition we provide an explanation for the formation of these molecules that introduces a new perspective of the humification process. Our work utilizes advanced analytical techniques such as ESI-FTICR-MS and solid state NMR to more completely characterize humic acids at the molecular level. Methods Humic acids were extracted from soils using 0.5 M NaOH followed by treatment with a Dowex™ ion-exchange resin to remove sodium ions. Solid State 13C NMR spectra were obtained on a Bruker 400 MHz Avance II spectrometer equipped with a 4 mm solid state MAS probe. ESI-FTICR-MS analysis was conducted in the negative ion mode on a Bruker Daltonics 12 Tesla Apex Qe FTICR-MS instrument equipped with an Apollo II ESI source. Results: Soil humic acids from numerous soils were investigated in this study. The molecular formulas calculated from ultrahigh resolution mass spectra of well humified soils fall clearly into two predominant regions consisting of condensed aromatic molecules as well as high H/C, low O/C carboxyl-containing aliphatic molecules (CCAM). In contrast, the spectral data for humic acids from a poorly humified spodosol soil show a less dramatic separation of these regions, with relatively more molecular formula plotting in the lignin-like region and relatively fewer condensed aromatic molecules. From the mass spectral observations made for the humic acids, we can readily discern a relationship based on degree of

  9. Radiotracer study of europium interaction with humic acid using electrophoresis, ultrafiltration, and dialysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Mizerová, Gabriela; Beneš, P.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 263, č. 1 (2005), s. 75-80. ISSN 0236-5731. [International Conference on Methods and Applications of Radioanalytical Chemistry, MARC VI. Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, 07.04.2003-11.04.02003] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : humic substances * europium * radiotracer technique Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.460, year: 2005

  10. Implications of aquatic animal health for human health.

    OpenAIRE

    Dawe, C J

    1990-01-01

    Human health and aquatic animal health are organically related at three distinct interfaces. Aquatic animals serve as important contributors to the nutritional protein, lipid, and vitamin requirements of humans; as carriers and transmitters of many infectious and parasitic diseases to which humans are susceptible; and as indicators of toxic and carcinogenic substances that they can convey, in some part, from aquatic environments to man and other terrestrial animals. Transcending these relatio...

  11. Binding of uranyl by humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of tracer level UO2+2 to a soil humic acid was measured by a solvent extraction technique. The binding is interpreted as involving only the carboxylate groups of the humate and both 1:1 and 1:2 UO2+2:CO2-binding is observed. Estimates based on these values indicate that uranyl complexing by humic and/or fulvic materials is not significant in sea water but may play a role in fresh water systems. Retention of uranyl from ground water by soil humics would be strong. (author)

  12. Characteristic properties and CM(3) complexation of humic and fulvic acids from callovo-oxfordian and opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay is foreseen both as back-fill material and host rock for nuclear waste disposal. It contains organic matter that can be released and form dissolved organic matter (DOC). Part of this DOC consists of humic and fulvic acids. Humic substances in natural water are present in the form of humic colloids, consisting of the organic entities, associated mineral structures and complexed metal ions. These humic colloids can play a major role in the radionuclide migration in natural aquifer systems. Cement may be present in a nuclear waste repository as a waste form or as part of engineered structures. In case of water intrusion, cement dissolution will, amongst others, lead to high pH values (initial pH>13). On a short time scale, a minor fraction (few percent) of the clay organic matter is dissolved. With prolonged contact time with alkaline solution, the hydrophobic clay organic matter becomes chemically converted and a large portion (up to around 50% after about 1.5 years) is forming hydrophilic humic and fulvic acids. In this paper, humic and fulvic acids initially released from Callovo-Oxfordian and Opalinus Clay under near-field high pH conditions are quantified and characterised. Furthermore, their complexation with Cm3+ is investigated. The humic and fulvic acids are characterised by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AFFFF) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The latter technique can offer practically the same level of information as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) but require very low amount of samples (∼ 10-3 mg). The complexation with the Cm3+ ion is studied by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFLS). It is shown that humic and fulvic acids may result in enhanced radionuclide migration in clay under cement dissolution conditions. (authors)

  13. Simple method of isolating humic acids from organic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, O. H.; Susilawati, K.; Nik Muhamad, A. B.; Khanif, M. Y.

    2009-04-01

    Humic substances particularly humic acids (HA) play a major role in soil conditioning e.g. erosion control, soil cation exchange capacity, complexation of heavy metal ions and pesticides, carbon and nitrogen cycles, plant growth and reduction of ammonia volatilization from urea. Humified substances such as coal, composts, and peat soils have substantial amounts of HA but the isolation of these acids is expensive, laborious, and time consuming. Factors that affect the quality and yield of HA isolated from these materials include extraction, fractionation, and purification periods. This work developed a simple, rapid, and cost effective method of isolating HA from peat soils. There was a quadratic relationship between extraction period and HA yield. Optimum extraction period was estimated at 4 h instead of the usual range of 12 to 48 h. There was no relationship between fractionation period and HA yield. As such 2 h instead of the usual range of 12 to 24 h fractionation period could be considered optimum. Low ash content (5%), remarkable reduction in K, coupled with the fact that organic C, E4/E6, carboxylic COOH, phenolic OH, and total acidity values of the HA were consistent with those reported by other authors suggest that the HA dealt with were free from mineral matter. This was possible because the distilled water used to purify the HA served as Bronsted-Lowry acid during the purification process of the HA. Optimum purification period using distilled waster was 1 h instead of the usual range of 1 and 7 days (uses HF and HCl and dialysis). Humic acids could be isolated from tropical peat soils within 7 h (i.e. 4 h extraction, 2 h fractionation, and 1 h purification) instead of the existing period of 2 and 7 days. This could facilitate the idea of producing organic fertilizers such as ammonium-humate and potassium-humate from humified substances since techniques devised in this study did not alter the true nature of the HA. Besides, the technique is rapid, simple

  14. Characterization and complexation of humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes the research contributions to the CEC project MIRAGE II, particularly the research area: complexation and colloids (COCO). The first part of the paper comprises the characterization of humic and fulvic acids from different origins: a commercial product from Aldrich Co. used as a reference humic acid and site specific humic acids from Gorleben (FRG), Boom Clay (B) and Fanay Augeres (F) aquifer systems. The second part includes the complexation of trivalent actinides: Am(III) and Cm(III) with various humic acids. A number of different methods have been applied for the complexation study: spectrophotometry, ultrafiltration, laser-indused photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) and time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The evaluation process of complexation constant is discussed extensively and the well consolidated results are presented, which can be directly used for the geochemical modelling of the radionuclide migration. (orig.)

  15. Study of americium sorption by humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of investigation of influence of the cation content and acidity of soil solution on americium sorption by the humic acids have been shown. The most influence on the interphase distribution coefficient in the system 'humic acid - model soil solution' is caused by the presence of the iron (III), calcium ions and acidity of the solution. The increase of the sodium ions concentration in the solution makes an insignificant impact on the americium sorption. (Authors)

  16. Interaction between uranium and humic acid (Ⅰ): Adsorption behaviors of U(Ⅵ) in soil humic acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Min; LIAO Jiali; LIU Ning; ZHANG Dong; KANG Houjun; YANG Yuanyou; YANG Yong; JIN Jiannan

    2007-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of uranium on three soil humic acids (HAs), which were extracted from soils of different depths at the same site, were investigated under various experimental conditions. The adsorption results showed that U(Ⅵ) in solutions can be adsorbed by the three soil HAs, with the order of FHA (HA from 5 m depth of soil) >SHA (HA from the surface) >THA (HA from 10 m depth of soil) for adsorption efficiency in each desirable condition, and the adsorption reached equilibrium in about 240 min. Although the maximum adsorption efficiency was adsorption could be described with Langmiur isotherm or Freundlich isotherm equation. The L/S (liquid/solid, mL/g)ratio and pH were important factors influencing the adsorption in our adsorption system besides uranium concentration. The adsorption efficiency decreased with the increase of the L/S ratio and pH at the pH range of 2.0-3.0 for SHA and THA or 2.5 - 6.0 for FHA. However, no significant difference in adsorption of U(Ⅵ) was observed at the experimental temperature. All the results implied that humic substances have different characteristics in samples even collected at the same site.

  17. Interaction between uranium and humic acid. Pt.1: Adsorption behaviors of U(VI) in soil humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adsorption behaviors of uranium on three soil humic acids (HAs), which were extracted from soils of different depths at the same site, were investigated under various experimental conditions. The adsorption results showed that U(VI) in solutions can be adsorbed by the three soil HAs, with the order of FHA (HA from 5 m depth of soil) >SHA (HA from the surface) >THA (HA from 10 m depth of soil) for adsorption efficiency in each desirable condition, and the adsorption reached equilibrium in about 240 min. Although the maximum adsorption efficiency was achieved at a suitable uranium concentration (10 mg·L-1 U(VI) for SHA and THA, 20 mg·L-l U(VI) for FHA), the adsorption could be described with Langmiur isotherm or Freundlich isotherm equation. The L/S (liquid/solid, mL/g) ratio and pH were important factors influencing the adsorption in our adsorption system besides uranium concentration. The adsorption efficiency decreased with the increase of the L/S ratio and pH at the pH range of 2.0-3.0 for SHA and THA or 2.5-6.0 for FHA. However, no significant difference in adsorption of U(VI) was observed at the experimental temperature. All the results implied that humic substances have different characteristics in samples even collected at the same site. (authors)

  18. Complex formation of americium (III) with humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of humic substances in natural waters will modify the migration behavior of actinides in the geosphere due to the strong reaction properties of these ligands with actinides. Therefore, the possible reactions of humic acid with actinides have been studied widely in recent years. The complex formation of Am (III) with humic acid is studied with solvent extraction technique in this paper. The experiments are performed in the pH range from 4.0 to 8.0 in 0.1 M NaClO4 solution at ambient temperature. Experimental results show that the complex formation constants of Am (III) with humic acid are varied with the variation of pH value in solution. 1:2 complex is obtained in the experiments and the complex formation constants determined at each pH are: lgβ1=6.56±0.05, lgβ2=10.77±0.31 at pH=4.0; lgβ1=7.94±0.11, lgβ2=11.80±0.21 at pH=5.0; lgβ1=10.74±0.28, lgβ2=12.88±0.49 at pH=6.0; lgβ1=12.85±0.30, lgβ2=14.80±0.62 at pH=7.0; lgβ1=14.88±0.48, lgβ2=15.65±0.69 at pH=8.0, respectively. The dependence of the complex of the complex formation constant on pH is: lgβ1=2.16(±0.98)pH-2.34(±1.03), lgβ2=1.28(±1.04)pH+5.52(±1.21), respectively. (author)

  19. Usage of humic materials for formulation of stable microbial inoculants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydralieva, K. A.; Khudaibergenova, B. M.; Elchin, A. A.; Gorbunova, N. V.; Muratov, V. S.; Jorobekova, Sh. J.

    2009-04-01

    of the product. It is known that humic substances can increase of live organism resistance to stress loads, in particular to chemical stress, low and high temperature. Spray- and fluidized-bed drying and addition of humate-based drying protectants were evaluated for the development of dry formulations of biocontrol and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. The drying protectants - humic acids and sodium humate gave the highest initial survival rates and the most stable formulations, without significant losses of viability after storage for 1 month at 30oC. As a result, the specific plant growth promoting effect is retained. Thus, humic materials have an unfulfilled potential for biotechnology industries based on such applications. Acknowledgement. This research was supported by the grant of ISTC KR-993.2.

  20. Separation of Gd-humic complexes and Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent in river water with QAE-Sephadex A-25 for the fractionation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Inoue, Hiroto; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-10-01

    Gadolinium complexed with naturally occurring, negatively charged humic substances (humic and fulvic acids) was collected from 500 mL of sample solution onto a column packed with 150 mg of a strongly basic anion-exchanger (QAE-Sephadex A-25). A Gd-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent (diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N″,N″-pentaacetato aquo gadolinium(III), Gd-DTPA(2-)) was simultaneously collected on the same column. The Gd-DTPA complex was desorbed by anion-exchange with 50mM tetramethylammonium sulfate, leaving the Gd-humic complexes on the column. The Gd-humic complexes were subsequently dissociated with 1M nitric acid to desorb the humic fraction of Gd. The two-step desorption with small volumes of the eluting agents allowed the 100-fold preconcentration for the fractionation analysis of Gd at low ng L(-1) levels by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). On the other hand, Gd(III) neither complexed with humic substances nor DTPA, i.e., free species, was not sorbed on the column. The free Gd in the effluent was preconcentrated 100-fold by a conventional solid-phase extraction with an iminodiacetic acid-type chelating resin and determined by ICP-MS. The proposed analytical fractionation method was applied to river water samples. PMID:25059192

  1. Stability constants of some complexes of Argentine humic acids and micronutrients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main aims in the study of the complexes of humic substances and plant mineral nutrients in the soil is to obtain thermodynamic data which, compared with known systems, can give the necessary information to calculate the element activity in solution. This information is essential for predicting the dynamics of such nutrients in the soil solution, since the latter is one of the main locations of fundamental reactions related to soil genesis and fertility. The distribution of radioactive 65Zn and non-radioactive Cu between a cation exchange resin and the humic systems was used to calculate the stability constants of these elements and the humic acids (HA) extracted from various Argentine soils. On the basis of these stability constants, the following conclusions were obtained: (1) Copper was more strongly complexed than zinc by the humic acid of a Solod soil. Copper had also almost the same value of the logarithm of the stability constant for several soils (8.1 to 9.1); (2) The value of the stability constant of the Zn-HA complex was higher for a Chestnut soil (Petrocalcic Paleustoll) than for the other soils studied; (3) Since HA is an important insoluble fraction in normal soil conditions, it is suggested that the mobility of Cu is low in the soil solution of these soils. Therefore, a Cu deficiency may be predicted or expected. (author)

  2. Prophylactic effects of humic acid AND#8211; glucan combination against experimental liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Vetvicka

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Despite intensive research, liver diseases represent a significant health problem and current medicine does not offer a substance able to significantly inhibit the hepatotoxicity leading to various stages of liver disease. Based on our previously published studies showing the protective effects of a glucan-humic acid combination, we focused on the hypothesis that combination of these two natural molecules can offer prophylactic protection against experimentally induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: lipopolysaccharide (LPS, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 and ethanol were used to experimentally damage the liver. Levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine transaminase (ALT, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase (SOD and malondialdehyde (MDA, known to correspond to the liver damage, were assayed. Results: Using three different hepatotoxins, we found that in all cases, some samples of humic acid and most of all the glucan-humic acid combination, offer strong protection against liver damage. Conclusion: glucan-humic acid combination is a promising agent for use in liver protection. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 249-255

  3. Cd(II) Sorption on Montmorillonite-Humic acid-Bacteria Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huihui; Chen, Wenli; Cai, Peng; Rong, Xingmin; Dai, Ke; Peacock, Caroline L.; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    Soil components (e.g., clays, bacteria and humic substances) are known to produce mineral-organic composites in natural systems. Herein, batch sorption isotherms, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and Cd K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy were applied to investigate the binding characteristics of Cd on montmorillonite(Mont)-humic acid(HA)-bacteria composites. Additive sorption and non-additive Cd(II) sorption behaviour is observed for the binary Mont-bacteria and ternary Mont-HA-bacteria composite, respectively. Specifically, in the ternary composite, the coexistence of HA and bacteria inhibits Cd adsorption, suggesting a “blocking effect” between humic acid and bacterial cells. Large positive entropies (68.1 ~ 114.4 J/mol/K), and linear combination fitting of the EXAFS spectra for Cd adsorbed onto Mont-bacteria and Mont-HA-bacteria composites, demonstrate that Cd is mostly bound to bacterial surface functional groups by forming inner-sphere complexes. All our results together support the assertion that there is a degree of site masking in the ternary clay mineral-humic acid-bacteria composite. Because of this, in the ternary composite, Cd preferentially binds to the higher affinity components-i.e., the bacteria. PMID:26792640

  4. Adsorption of U(VI) by humic acid extracted from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humic acid (HA) was extracted from the soil by using the procedure recommeded by International Humic Substance Society (IHSS) with minor modifications. It was characterized by the element analysis and the IR spectra. Then the adsorption behaviors of U(VI) on the extracted HA were investigated by the static experimental method. The results show that more than 80% of the total U(VI) can be adsorbed by 5 mg humic acid at pH=3 from 20 mL aqueous solution of 0.84 x 10-4 mol/L U(VI) and the adsorption is increased with increasing pH in the range of 1-3 and decreased with increasing pH in the range of 3-10. The relationship between the concentration of U(VI) in aqueous solution and the adsorbed U(VI) is in accord with the Langmuir equation in the U(VI) concentration range from 10-6 to 10-4 mol/L. In the presence of Al3+, Ca2+, Nd3+, Eu3+, CO32- , SO42-, citric acid and EDTA, the adsorption of U(VI) on the humic acid is decreased relative to that in the absence of these ligands and bivalent and trivalent cations, while the effects of K+ and NO3- are insignificant. The effect of temperature in the range of 0-40 degree C on the adsorption of U(VI) was investigated. (authors)

  5. CHARGE DEVELOPMENT AND ACID-BASE CHARACTERISTICS OF SOIL AND COMPOST HUMIC ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. CAMPITELLI

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous works, the acid-base properties, charging behavior and chemical heterogeneity of humic substances have been studied using different mathematical equations to fit the experimental data. The objective of this research is to study the charge behavior, acid-base properties and analyze the chemical heterogeneity of humic acids (HA extracted from soil and composted municipal solid waste by potentiometric titrations. The humic acids extracted from compost have some characteristics and behavior similar to those obtained from soil. The negative charge development of HA extracted from composted material are lower than those extracted from soil and increase as ionic strength increase. The amount of carboxylic groups is lower in compost HA than in soil HA The heterogeneity of HA extracted from compost is higher than those extracted from soil. As the time of composting period increase the humification processes that take place trends to produce compost HA that has similar characteristics to soil HA. We suggest that HA extracted from composted material are macromolecules "like soil humic acids", i.e. "humiclike fraction"

  6. Humic derivatives as promising hormone-like materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, R. P.; Khudaibergenova, E. M.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Jorobekova, Sh. J.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this research is to prepare novel bio-inoculants derived from coal humic substances (HS) using bio-solubilization technique. This approach can be considered to some extent as model for supply plants with available nutrients throw the mineralisation of organic matter in soils by bacteria and fungi. Screening for the stable and active microorganisms' strains possessing ability to degrade humic substances was performed. The following subjects were examined using different isolation methods: natural microbial population from city soil, wood rot of Ulmis Pamila and biohumus of vermiculture of Eisenia foetida. Approaches for monitoring the humics-solubilizing fungi growth under liquid surface conditions in the presence of HS, proper conditions of bio-solubilization technique were elaborated. Coal humic acids (HA) from oxidized brown coal (Kyrgyz deposits) were isolated and added to a Czapek nutrient broth which was used either in full strength or without nitrogen source. The individual flasks were inoculated with natural microbial populations of corresponding cultivated soil, biohumus and wood rot samples for 12 months. Evaluation of phyto-hormonal activity of the produced HS and their derivatives in respect to higher plants with