WorldWideScience

Sample records for aquatic habitat covariates

  1. A heteroskedastic error covariance matrix estimator using a first-order conditional autoregressive Markov simulation for deriving asympotical efficient estimates from ecological sampled Anopheles arabiensis aquatic habitat covariates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Githure John I

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autoregressive regression coefficients for Anopheles arabiensis aquatic habitat models are usually assessed using global error techniques and are reported as error covariance matrices. A global statistic, however, will summarize error estimates from multiple habitat locations. This makes it difficult to identify where there are clusters of An. arabiensis aquatic habitats of acceptable prediction. It is therefore useful to conduct some form of spatial error analysis to detect clusters of An. arabiensis aquatic habitats based on uncertainty residuals from individual sampled habitats. In this research, a method of error estimation for spatial simulation models was demonstrated using autocorrelation indices and eigenfunction spatial filters to distinguish among the effects of parameter uncertainty on a stochastic simulation of ecological sampled Anopheles aquatic habitat covariates. A test for diagnostic checking error residuals in an An. arabiensis aquatic habitat model may enable intervention efforts targeting productive habitats clusters, based on larval/pupal productivity, by using the asymptotic distribution of parameter estimates from a residual autocovariance matrix. The models considered in this research extends a normal regression analysis previously considered in the literature. Methods Field and remote-sampled data were collected during July 2006 to December 2007 in Karima rice-village complex in Mwea, Kenya. SAS 9.1.4® was used to explore univariate statistics, correlations, distributions, and to generate global autocorrelation statistics from the ecological sampled datasets. A local autocorrelation index was also generated using spatial covariance parameters (i.e., Moran's Indices in a SAS/GIS® database. The Moran's statistic was decomposed into orthogonal and uncorrelated synthetic map pattern components using a Poisson model with a gamma-distributed mean (i.e. negative binomial regression. The eigenfunction

  2. Aquatic Habitats: Exploring Desktop Ponds. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Katharine; Willard, Carolyn

    This book, for grades 2-6, is designed to provide students with a highly motivating and unique opportunity to investigate an aquatic habitat. Students set up, observe, study, and reflect upon their own "desktop ponds." Accessible plants and small animals used in these activities include Elodea, Tubifex worms, snails, mosquito larvae, and fish.…

  3. Fish and Aquatic Habitat Survey: Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To address the need for baseline inventories of biota and abiotic features, the Columbia River Fisheries Program Office (CRFPO) conducted fish and aquatic habitat...

  4. Species management in aquatic habitats WRc RD Interim 1997

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    This is the Species management in aquatic Habitats WRc Interim 1997 document produced by the Environment Agency in 1997. This document reports progress on R&D Project 640, which aims to provide information on species of conservation value of particular relevance to the Environment Agency, in relation to its activities affecting aquatic environments. A range of stand-alone outputs is being produced, comprising Species Action Plans, practical management guidelines for Agency staff and third par...

  5. Biological conservation of aquatic inland habitats: these are better days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J. Winfield

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The biodiversity of aquatic inland habitats currently faces unprecedented threats from human activities. At the same time, although much is known about the functioning of freshwater ecosystems the successful transfer of such knowledge to practical conservation has not been universal. Global awareness of aquatic conservation issues is also hampered by the fact that conditions under the water surface are largely hidden from the direct experience of most members of society. Connectivity, or lack of it, is another challenge to the conservation of freshwater habitats, while urban areas can play a perhaps unexpectedly important positive role. Freshwater habitats frequently enjoy benefits accruing from a sense of ownership or stewardship by local inhabitants, which has led to the development of conservation movements which commonly started life centred on the aquatic inland habitat itself but of which many have now matured into wider catchment-based conservation programmes. A demonstrable need for evidence-based conservation management in turn requires scientific assessments to be increasingly robust and standardised, while at the same time remaining open to the adoption of technological advances and welcoming the rapidly developing citizen science movement. There is evidence of real progress in this context and conservation scientists are now communicating their findings to environmental managers in a way and on a scale that was rarely seen a couple of decades ago. It is only in this way that scientific knowledge can be efficiently transferred to conservation planning, prioritisation and ultimately management in an increasingly scaled-up, joined-up and resource-limited world. The principle of ‘prevention is better than cure’ is particularly appropriate to most biological conservation issues in aquatic inland habitats and is inextricably linked to educating and/or nudging appropriate human behaviours. When prevention fails, some form of emergency

  6. Transcriptome sequencing of three Ranunculus species (Ranunculaceae) reveals candidate genes in adaptation from terrestrial to aquatic habitats

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ling-Yun; Zhao, Shu-Ying; Wang, Qing-Feng; MOODY, MICHAEL L.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to aquatic habitats is a formidable challenge for terrestrial angiosperms that has long intrigued scientists. As part of a suite of work to explore the molecular mechanism of adaptation to aquatic habitats, we here sequenced the transcriptome of the submerged aquatic plant Ranunculus bungei, and two terrestrial relatives R. cantoniensis and R. brotherusii, followed by comparative evolutionary analyses to determine candidate genes for adaption to aquatic habitats. We obtained 126,03...

  7. Selenium in aquatic habitats at Imperial National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During 1991 and 1992, selenium levels were studied in aquatic communities at Imperial National Wildlife Refuge on the lower Colorado River. Composite samples of...

  8. The Occurrence of Bioactive Micromonosporae in Aquatic Habitats of the Sunshine Coast in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ipek Kurtböke

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Screening strategies based on the ecological knowledge of antibiotic producing microorganisms and their roles in the natural environment are being increasingly employed in the search for novel antibiotic agents. Micromonosporae are common inhabitants of aquatic habitats and have proved to be a continuing source of novel bioactive compounds including antibacterial and antitumor agents. The ecological distribution and frequency of bioactive micromonosporae in Sunshine Coast region aquatic habitats were studied through a range of selective isolation procedures designed to negatively select against the isolation of unwanted microbial taxa commonly associated with marine environments. It was revealed that bioactive compound producing species of micromonosporae were present in the aquatic habitats of the Sunshine Coast region in Australia.

  9. Varying energetic costs of Brent Geese along a continuum from aquatic to agricultural habitats: the importance of habitat-specific energy expenditure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Kevin Kuhlmann; Clausen, Preben; Fox, Anthony David;

    2013-01-01

    alert than birds feeding in aquatic areas, and also spent much less time roosting. Frequency of disturbance was found to be higher in terrestrial habitats compared to aquatic habitats. These stress-related behavioural differences between habitats highlight the vulnerability of the species associated...... with adapting to different food sources. Combining time-budgets with activity-specific BMR-multiplicators showed that activity-based metabolic rates ranged from 1.7 to 2.7 × BMR within habitats exploited by Brent Geese, and emphasized that aquatic areas represent the energetically least expensive...... foraging habitat for these birds. This is largely the result of habitat-specific variation in time spent flying. These findings underline the importance of measuring habitat-specific behaviour and disturbance when studying avian energetics, and demonstrate the risk of uncritically using allometric...

  10. Coupling interaction between biodiversity and aquatic habitat area in Western Route Project vicinity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-min TIAN; Zhao-yin WANG; Xiang-jun LIU; Shi-kui LIANG

    2010-01-01

    The Western Route of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project will divert water from the upper Yangtze River and its tributaries,the Dadu River and Yalong River,to the upper Yellow River.The project may ease the water shortage in the Yellow River Basin.However,it may also have some effects on the ecosystem in the upper Yangtze River Basin.Benthic invertebrates play an important role in the river ecosystem,particularly in the circulation of materials and nutrition.Benthic invertebrates are widely used to quickly assess river ecosystems because of their rapid response to changes in the water environment.The diversity of benthic invertebrates is closely associated with the aquatic habitat area.This study examined this interaction by sampling the benthic invertebrates in an expanding area.The conclusions are that the diversity of benthic invertebrates begins to decrease when the aquatic habitat area is reduced to 45% of the original area,and decreases dramatically when the aquatic habitat area is reduced to 10% of the original area.The aquatic habitat area should be kept at more than 45% of the original area in order to maintain the significant diversity of benthic invertebrates.

  11. Freshwater Wetland Habitat Loss and Fragmentation: Implications for Aquatic Biodiversity Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolaver, B. D.; Pierre, J. P.; Labay, B. J.; Ryberg, W. A.; Hibbits, T. J.; Prestridge, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    Anthropogenic land use changes have caused widespread wetland loss and fragmentation. This trend has important implications for aquatic biota conservation, including the semi-aquatic Western Chicken Turtle (Deirochelys reticularia miaria). This species inhabits seasonally inundated, ephemeral water bodies and adjacent uplands in the southeastern U.S. However, wetland conversion to agriculture and urbanization is thought to cause the species' decline, particularly in Texas, which includes the westernmost part of its range. Because the species moves only a few kilometers between wetlands, it particularly sensitive to habitat loss and fragmentation. Thus, as part of the only state-funded species research program, this study provides the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) with scientific data to determine if the species warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). We use a species distribution model to map potentially suitable habitat for most of East Texas. We evaluate landscape-scale anthropogenic activities in this region which may be contributing to the species' decline. We identify areas of urbanization, agricultural expansion, forestry, and resulting wetland loss. We find that between 2001 and 2011 approximately 80 km2 of wetlands were lost in potentially suitable habitat, including the urbanizing Houston area. We use spatial geostatistics to quantify wetland habitat fragmentation. We also introduce the Habitat Alteration Index (HAI), which calculates total landscape alteration and mean probability of occurrence to identify high-quality habitat most at risk of recent anthropogenic alteration. Population surveys by biologists are targeting these areas and future management actions may focus on mitigating anthropogenic activities there. While this study focuses on D. r. miaria, this approach can evaluate wetland habitat of other aquatic organisms.

  12. Assessment of chevron dikes for the enhancement of physical-aquatic habitat within the Middle Mississippi River, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remo, J. W.; Pinter, N.

    2012-12-01

    Along the Middle Mississippi River (MMR), rehabilitation of aquatic habitat is being undertaken using river-training structures such as the blunt-nose chevron dike. Chevron dikes were initially designed to concentrate flow and thus facilitate river navigation, but this new river-training structure is now justified, in part, as a tool for creating aquatic habitat and promoting habitat heterogeneity. The ability of chevrons to create and diversify physical-aquatic habitat has not been verified. In this study, we used 2-D hydrodynamic modeling and reach-scale habitat metrics to assess changes in physical habitat and habitat heterogeneity for pre-chevron and post-chevron along a 2- km reach of the Mississippi River at St. Louis, MO. A historic reference condition (circa 1890) was also modeled to compare physical habitat in a less engineered river channel versus the new physical-habitat patches created by chevron-dike enhancement. This modeling approach quantified changes in habitat availability and diversity among selected reference conditions for a wide range of in-channel flows. Depth-velocity habitat classes were used for assessment of change in physical-habitat patches, and spatial statistical tools were employed to evaluate the reach-scale habitat patch diversity. Modeling of post-chevron channel conditions revealed increases in deep to very deep (>3.0 m) areas of slow moving (3.0 m], low velocity [diversity compared to pre-chevron channel conditions. Comparison of the historic reference condition (less engineered channel, circa 1890) with the post-chevron channel condition, however, revealed historical conditions consisted of a physical-habitat mosaic comprised of a wider and shallower historic river channel with: very little over-wintering habitat (diversity. Thus, while chevrons construction within the study reaches increased over-wintering habitat, shallow-water habitat, and physical-habitat diversity relative to the pre-chevron channel condition, the type of

  13. A Method for the Estimation of Detritus Energy Generation in Aquatic Habitats

    OpenAIRE

    (1), A. Palavesam; (2), S. Beena; *(1), G. Immanuel

    2005-01-01

    Considering the amount of oxygen used for oxidation of detritus organic matter, oxycalorific co-efficient and morphometric feature (Area) of the zones as well as the energy consumed by the dominant detritivores, a method was proposed to estimate the detritus energy generation in aquatic habitats. The conversion of organic matter to energy by oxycalorific co-efficient was also counterchecked by the direct calorimetric energy estimates using Semi-Micro bomb-Calorimeter. The difference between d...

  14. Movements of Alpine newts (Mesotriton alpestris) between small aquatic habitats (ruts) during the breeding season

    OpenAIRE

    Kopecky, Oldrich; Vojar, Jiri; Denoël, Mathieu

    2010-01-01

    Many species with complex life cycles, such as caudate amphibians, migrate from terrestrial to aquatic habitats for reproduction. However, movements between reproductive ponds within a breeding season have rarely been studied and are usually considered to be limited. Our aim was to determine whether this pattern occurs frequently in Alpine newts (Mesotriton alpestris) inhabiting complexes of small ruts on muddy forest tracks. We analysed capture-recapture data for individually marked newts as...

  15. Global biodiversity of aquatic ammonia-oxidizing archaea is partitioned by habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Biller

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Archaea play an important role in nitrification and are, thus, inextricably linked to the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. Since the initial discovery of an ammonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA gene associated with an archaeal metagenomic fragment, archaeal amoA sequences have been detected in a wide variety of nitrifying environments. Recent sequencing efforts have revealed extensive diversity of archaeal amoA sequences within different habitats. In this study, we have examined over 8000 amoA sequences from the literature and public databases in an effort to understand the ecological factors influencing the distribution and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA, with a particular focus on sequences from aquatic habitats. This broad survey provides strong statistical support for the hypothesis that different environments contain distinct clusters of AOA amoA sequences, as surprisingly few sequences are found in more than one habitat type. Within aquatic environments, salinity, depth in the water column, and temperature were significantly correlated with the distribution of sequence types. These findings support the existence of multiple distinct aquatic AOA populations in the environment and suggest some possible selective pressures driving the partitioning of AOA amoA diversity.

  16. Observations on anopheline breeding in relation to aquatic plants in different breeding habitats of Kheda (Gujarat).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Rajni; Srivastava, H C

    2004-09-01

    Water bodies infested with aquatic vegetations may pose problems in mosquito control through bio-environmental methods. Paucity of information pertaining to association of mosquito breeding with aquatic vegetation was the basis for present investigation. The mosquito breeding sites infested with solitary/dominating plant community viz., Eichhornia crassipes, Ipomoea aquatica, Hydrilla verticillata, Nymphea neuchali, Trapa bispinosa, Lemna paucicostata, Trachelomonas spp., Azolla pinnata, Algae spp. and Cynodon dactylon were selected for the study. The investigation revealed that breeding of eleven anopheline species was associated with Eichhornia in different habitats followed by Hydrilla, algae and Cynodon (8 each), Ipomoea and Trapa (6), Lemna. and Nymphea (5), Azolla and Trachelomonas (4). An. subpictus was associated with all types of vegetation. An. annularis, An. nigerrimus and An. barbirostris were associated with nine plant species. An. culicifacies, the principal malaria vector was found breeding in association with seven aquatic plants and showed strong association with Cynodon, Hydrilla and algae. The species diversity in habitats infested with Hydrilla, algae and Cynodon seems to be most favourable for the breeding of An. culicifacies. It is suggested that thinning or removal of such vegetations at regular interval may help to reduce vector population and enhance the efficacy of biological control agents particularly the larvivorous fishes in such habitats. PMID:16509256

  17. Modeling and simulation of an aquatic habitat for bioregenerative life support research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayer, Gregorio E.; Howard, Ayanna M.

    2014-01-01

    Long duration human spaceflight poses challenges for spacecraft autonomy and the regeneration of life support consumables, such as oxygen and water. Bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS), which make use of biological processes to transform biological byproducts back into consumables, have the ability to recycle organic byproducts and are the preferred option for food production. A limitation in BLSS research is in the non-availability of small-scale experimental capacities that may help to better understand the challenges in system closure, integration, and control. Ground-based aquatic habitats are an option for small-scale research relevant to bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS), given that they can operate as self-contained systems enclosing a habitat composed of various species in a single volume of water. The purpose of this paper is to present the modeling and simulation of a reconfigurable aquatic habitat for experiments in regenerative life support automation; it supports the use of aquatic habitats as a small-scale approach to experiments relevant to larger-scale regenerative life support systems. It presents ground-based aquatic habitats as an option for small-scale BLSS research focusing on the process of respiration, and elaborates on the description of biological processes by introducing models of ecophysiological phenomena for consumers and producers: higher plants of the species Bacopa monnieri produce O2 for snails of the genus Pomacea; the snails consume O2 and generate CO2, which is used by the plants in combination with radiant energy to generate O2 through the process of photosynthesis. Feedback controllers are designed to regulate the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the water. This paper expands the description of biological processes by introducing models of ecophysiological phenomena of the organisms involved. The model of the plants includes a description of the rate of CO2 assimilation as a function of irradiance

  18. Quantifying solar spectral irradiance in aquatic habitats for the assessment of photoenhanced toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, M.G.; Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.; Diamond, S.

    2000-01-01

    The spectra and intensity of solar radiation (solar spectral irradiance [SSI]) was quantified in selected aquatic habitats in the vicinity of an oil field on the California coast. Solar spectral irradiance measurements consisted of spectral scans (280-700 rim) and radiometric measurements of ultraviolet (UV): UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). Solar spectral irradiance measurements were taken at the surface and at various depths in two marsh ponds, a shallow wetland, an estuary lagoon, and the intertidal area of a high-energy sandy beach. Daily fluctuation in SSI showed a general parabolic relationship with time; maximum structure-activity relationship (SAR) was observed at approximate solar noon. Solar spectral irradiance measurements taken at 10-cm depth at approximate solar noon in multiple aquatic habitats exhibited only a twofold variation in visible light and UVA and a 4.5-fold variation in UVB. Visible light ranged from 11,000 to 19,000 ??W/cm2, UVA ranged from 460 to 1,100 ??W/cm2, and UVB ranged from 8.4 to 38 ??W/cm2. In each habitat, the attenuation of light intensity with increasing water depth was differentially affected over specific wavelengths of SSI. The study results allowed the development of environmentally realistic light regimes necessary for photoenhanced toxicity studies.

  19. Planar Covariation of Hindlimb and Forelimb Elevation Angles during Terrestrial and Aquatic Locomotion of Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catavitello, Giovanna; Ivanenko, Yuri P.; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The rich repertoire of locomotor behaviors in quadrupedal animals requires flexible inter-limb and inter-segmental coordination. Here we studied the kinematic coordination of different gaits (walk, trot, gallop, and swim) of six dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) and, in particular, the planar covariation of limb segment elevation angles. The results showed significant variations in the relative duration of rearward limb movement, amplitude of angular motion, and inter-limb coordination, with gait patterns ranging from a lateral sequence of footfalls during walking to a diagonal sequence in swimming. Despite these differences, the planar law of inter-segmental coordination was maintained across different gaits in both forelimbs and hindlimbs. Notably, phase relationships and orientation of the covariation plane were highly limb specific, consistent with the functional differences in their neural control. Factor analysis of published muscle activity data also demonstrated differences in the characteristic timing of basic activation patterns of the forelimbs and hindlimbs. Overall, the results demonstrate that the planar covariation of inter-segmental coordination has emerged for both fore- and hindlimbs and all gaits, although in a limb-specific manner. PMID:26218076

  20. NASDA next-generation aquatic habitat for space shuttle and ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masukawa, M.; Ochiai, T.; Kamigaichi, S.; Uchida, S.; Kono, Y.; Takamatsu, T.; Sakimura, T.

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has more than 20 years of experience developing aquatic animal experiment facilities. These include the Vestibular Function Experiment Unit (VFEU), Aquatic Animal Experiment Unit (AAEU) and another VFEU for marine fish. Each facility had functions such as life support for up to 15 days, water quality control system, gas exchange by artificial lung, video observation through a window by a crewmember, day/night cycle control, feeding system for medaka (AAEU only), and more. We are now studying the next -generation aquatic animal experiment facility or the Aquatic Habitat (AQH) for both Space Shuttle and Space Station use. AQH will have many new capabilities missing in earlier facilities. The following functions are of particular importance: long-term life support for up to 90 days, multigeneration breeding (for medaka and zebrafish), automatic feeding system adaptable for young of fish and amphibians, water quality control for long-term experiments, air-water interface, a computer-driven specimen-monitoring system housed in the facilities, and a specimen sampling system including eggs. A prototype breeding system and the specimen-monitoring system were designed and tested. The prototype breeding system consists of a closed water loop, two 700ml fish chambers with LED lighting, a small artificial lung, and a nitrification bacteria filter. Medaka adult fish were able to mate and spawn in this small breeding system, and the young could grow to adult fish. The water quality control system also worked successfully. For amphibians, the breeding test using tadpoles of xenopus is also starting. We have many difficult technological problems to resolve, but development of AQH is going well. In this paper, we will introduce the results of the component-level test and the concept of AQH. In the future, many space biological experiments will be conducted, especially in the areas of developmental biology, neurophisiology, and

  1. Aquatic habitat modifications in La Plata River basin, Patagonia and associated marine areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugetti, Ana Cristina; Calcagno, Alberto Tomás; Brieva, Carlos Alberto; Giangiobbe, María Silvia; Pagani, Andrea; Gonzalez, Silvia

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes the environmental characteristics and situation of aquatic habitats and communities in southern continental and maritime areas of southeastern South America (Patagonian Shelf GIWA Subregion), resulting from an overall assessment carried out within the framework of a GIWA project, mostly on the basis of publicly available data. The main focus of the analysis was on the current situation of transboundary water resources and anthropogenic impacts. In the inland waters, habitat and community modifications result, principally, from dams and reservoirs built in the main watercourses for hydroelectric power generation and other uses. The transformation of lotic environments into lentic ones have affected habitats and altered biotic communities. In the La Plata River basin, invasive exotic species have displaced native ones. Habitats in the ocean have been degraded, as their biodiversity becomes affected by overfishing and pollution. This article includes a discussion on the causal chain and the policy options elaborated for the Coastal Ecosystem of Buenos Aires province and the Argentinean-Uruguayan Common Fishing Zone, where fishing resources are shared by both countries. PMID:15083653

  2. Simulating riparian disturbance: Reach scale impacts on aquatic habitat in gravel bed streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, S. L.; Eaton, B. C.

    2015-09-01

    Large wood governs channel morphology, as well as the availability of in-stream habitat, in many forested streams. In this paper, we use a stochastic, physically based model to simulate wood recruitment and in-stream geomorphic processes, in order to explore the influence of disturbance history on the availability of aquatic habitat. Specifically, we consider the effects of fire on a range of stream sizes by varying the rate of tree toppling over time in a simulated forest characterized by a tree height of 30 m. We also consider the effects of forest harvesting with various riparian buffer sizes, by limiting the lateral extent of the riparian stand. Our results show that pulsed inputs of wood increase the availability and variability of physical habitat in the postfire period; reach-averaged pool area and deposit area double in small streams, while side channels increase by over 50% in intermediate-sized channels. By contrast, forest harvesting reduces the availability of habitat within the reach, though the effects diminish with increasing buffer size or stream width; in laterally stable streams the effects are minimal so long as buffer width is large enough for key pieces to be recruited to the reach. This research emphasizes the importance of natural disturbance in creating and maintaining habitat heterogeneity and shows that scenario-based numerical modeling provides a useful tool for assessing the historical range of variability associated with natural disturbance, as well as changes in habitat relevant to fish. It can be also used to inform forest harvesting and management.

  3. Fish and aquatic habitat conservation in South America: a continental overview with emphasis on neotropical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, M; Jaureguizar, A J; Baigun, C; Fontoura, N F; Agostinho, A A; Almeida-Val, V M F; Val, A L; Torres, R A; Jimenes-Segura, L F; Giarrizzo, T; Fabré, N N; Batista, V S; Lasso, C; Taphorn, D C; Costa, M F; Chaves, P T; Vieira, J P; Corrêa, M F M

    2010-06-01

    Fish conservation in South America is a pressing issue. The biodiversity of fishes, just as with all other groups of plants and animals, is far from fully known. Continuing habitat loss may result in biodiversity losses before full species diversity is known. In this review, the main river basins of South America (Magdalena, Orinoco, Amazon and Paraná-La Plata system), together with key aquatic habitats (mangrove-fringed estuaries of the tropical humid, tropical semi-arid and subtropical regions) are analysed in terms of their characteristics and main concerns. Habitat loss was the main concern identified for all South American ecosystems. It may be caused by damming of rivers, deforestation, water pollution, mining, poor agricultural practice or inadequate management practice. Habitat loss has a direct consequence, which is a decrease in the availability of living resources, a serious social and economic issue, especially for South American nations which are all developing countries. The introduction of exotic species and overfishing were also identified as widespread across the continent and its main freshwater, coastal and marine ecosystems. Finally, suggestions are made to find ways to overcome these problems. The main suggestion is a change of paradigm and a new design for conservation actions, starting with integrated research and aiming at the co-ordinated and harmonized management of the main transboundary waters of the continent. The actions would be focused on habitat conservation and social rescue of the less well-off populations of indigenous and non-indigenous peoples. Energy and freshwater demands will also have to be rescaled in order to control habitat loss. PMID:20557657

  4. Identifying Linkages Between Land Use, Geomorphology, and Aquatic Habitat in a Mixed-Use Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Susan K.; Montagne, Cliff; Jones, Clain A.; McGlynn, Brian L.

    2008-11-01

    The potential impacts of land use on large woody debris (LWD) were examined in Sourdough Creek Watershed, a rapidly growing area encompassing Bozeman, Montana, USA. We identified six land classes within a 250 m buffer extending on either side of Sourdough Creek and assessed aquatic habitat and geomorphologic variables within each class. All LWD pieces were counted, and we examined 14 other variables, including undercut bank, sinuosity, and substrate composition. LWD numbers were generally low and ranged from 0 to 8.2 pieces per 50 m of stream. Linear regression showed that LWD increased with distance from headwaters, riparian forest width, and sinuosity in four of the six land classes. Statistically significant differences between land classes for many aquatic habitat and geomorphologic variables indicated the impacts of different land uses on stream structure. We also found that practices such as active wood removal played a key role in LWD abundance. This finding suggests that managers should prioritize public education and outreach concerning the importance of in-stream wood, especially in mixed-use watersheds where wood is removed for either aesthetic reasons or to prevent stream flooding.

  5. Hydrologic-Based Ecological Risk Assessment of Urban, Agriculture, and Coal Mining Impacts Upon Aquatic Habitat, Toxicity, and Biodiversity

    OpenAIRE

    Babendreier, Justin Eric

    2000-01-01

    Urban, agriculture and coal mining land use/cover impacts upon aquatic habitat, toxicity and biodiversity were investigated in Leading Creek, a 388 km2 watershed in southeastern Ohio. Abandoned strip mine land (ASML) and active deep underground mines were examined along with abandoned near-surface underground mine land (AUML). The work focused on assessment of aquatic toxicity, water quality, and biodiversity through investigation of associated ecological responses for both treated and untr...

  6. Aquatic Insects of New York Salt Marsh Associated with Mosquito Larval Habitat and their Potential Utility as Bioindicators

    OpenAIRE

    Rochlin, Ilia; Dempsey, Mary E.; Iwanejko, Tom; Ninivaggi, Dominick V.

    2011-01-01

    The aquatic insect fauna of salt marshes is poorly characterized, with the possible exception of biting Diptera. Aquatic insects play a vital role in salt marsh ecology, and have great potential importance as biological indicators for assessing marsh health. In addition, they may be impacted by measures to control mosquitoes such as changes to the marsh habitat, altered hydrology, or the application of pesticides. Given these concerns, the goals of this study were to conduct the first taxonom...

  7. Chironomidae feeding habits in different habitats from a Neotropical floodplain: exploring patterns in aquatic food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butakka, C M M; Ragonha, F H; Train, S; Pinha, G D; Takeda, A M

    2016-02-01

    Ecological studies on food webs have considerably increased in recent decades, especially in aquatic communities. Because Chironomidae family are highly specious, occurring in almost all aquatic habitats is considered organisms-key to initiate studies on ecological relationships and trophic webs. We tested the hypothesis that the diversity of the morphospecies diet reflects differences on both the food items available among habitats and the preferences of larval feeding. We analyzed the gut content of the seven most abundant Chironomidae morphospecies of the different habitats from the Upper Paraná River. We categorized the food items found into algae, fungal spores, fragments of plants, algae and animal fragments and sponge spicules. We observed the algae predominance in the gut content of morphospecies from lakes. Considering the different regions from each lake, we registered the highest food abundance in the littoral regions in relation to the central regions. From the variety of feeding habits (number of item kinds), we classified Chironomus strenzkei, Tanytarsus sp.1, Procladius sp.1 as generalist morphospecies. We found a nested pattern between food items and Chironomidae morphospecies, where some items were common to all taxa (e.g., Bacillariophyceae algae, especially), while others were found in specific morphospecies (e.g., animals fragments found in Procladius sp.1). The algae represented the most percentage of gut contents of Chironomidae larvae. This was especially true for the individuals from littoral regions, which is probably due to the major densities of algae associated to macrophytes, which are abundant in these regions. Therefore, the feeding behavior of these morphospecies was generalist and not selective, depending only of the available resources. PMID:26909630

  8. Conservation of newt guilds in an agricultural landscape of Belgium: the importance of aquatic and terrestrial habitats

    OpenAIRE

    Denoël, Mathieu; Ficetola, G. Francesco

    2008-01-01

    1. Amphibians are declining worldwide in response to local and global pressures. Pond-breeding species are particularly vulnerable to environmental change because they rely on two components of the landscape: aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Agricultural practices are changing rapidly at world and local scales. As a consequence, farm ponds and their surrounding terrestrial landscapes will probably be affected. 2. This study investigated the main habitat determinants for the occurrence of fou...

  9. Mapping and Monitoring Stream Aquatic Habitat With a Narrow-Beam Green Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, J.; Wright, W.; Kinzel, P.; Isaak, D.

    2006-12-01

    Stream environments are structured by complex biophysical processes that operate across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Disentangling these multiscalar and multicausal relationships is difficult, but fundamental to understanding, managing, and monitoring channel aquatic ecosystems. Standard field wading surveys of stream physical habitat are limited by cost and logistics to relatively small, isolated samples. Traditional remotely sensed surveys, including methods such as photogrammetry and near-infrared lidar, suffer from attenuation by water and do not directly map submerged channel topography. The Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) is a full-waveform lidar with a unique ability to simultaneously map, with relatively high resolution, subaqueous and subaerial topography and the vegetation canopy. We have used the EAARL instrument to investigate two dissimilar stream ecosystems. We mapped 40km of low gradient, meandering, gravel-bed streams in central Idaho that are spawning habitat for threatened Chinook salmon. We are using the continuous three-dimensional channel maps to quantitatively explore how channel features affect the distribution of salmon spawning at multiple spatial scales and how modern stream and floodplain topography is related to post-glacial valley evolution. In contrast, the Platte River in central Nebraska is a wide and shallow, sand-bedded river that provides habitat for migratory water birds, including endangered species such as the whooping crane and least tern. Multi-temporal EAARL data are being used to map and monitor the physical response of the Platte River to habitat improvement projects that include in-channel and riparian vegetation removal and river flow augmentation to limit vegetation encroachment.

  10. Biological filter capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification for Aquatic Habitat in International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemoto, H.; Shoji, T.; Uchida, S.

    2014-04-01

    The biological filter capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification was constructed for aquatic animal experiments in the International Space Station (ISS). The biological filter will be used to remove harmful ammonia excreted from aquatic animals in a closed water circulation system (Aquatic Habitat). The biological filter is a cylindrical tank packed with porous glass beads for nitrification and dual plastic bags for denitrification. The porous beads are supporting media for Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi. The N. europaea cells and N. winogradskyi cells on the porous beads, oxidize the excreted ammonia to nitrate via nitrite. On the other hand, the dual bag is composed of an outer non-woven fabric bag and an inner non-porous polyethylene film bag. The outer bag is supporting media for Paracoccus pantotrophus. The inner bag, in which 99.5% ethanol is packed, releases the ethanol slowly, since ethanol can permeate through the non-porous polyethylene film. The P. pantotrophus cells on the outer bag reduce the produced nitrate to nitrogen gas by using the released ethanol as an electron donor for denitrification. The biological filter constructed in this study consequently removed the ammonia without accumulating nitrate. Most of the excess ethanol was consumed and did not affect the nitrification activity of the N. europaea cells and N. winogradskyi cells severely. In accordance with the aquatic animal experiments in the ISS, small freshwater fish had been bred in the closed water circulation system equipped with the biological filter for 90 days. Ammonia concentration daily excreted from fish is assumed to be 1.7 mg-N/L in the recirculation water. Under such conditions, the harmful ammonia and nitrite concentrations were kept below 0.1 mg-N/L in the recirculation water. Nitrate and total organic carbon concentrations in the recirculation water were kept below 5 mg-N/L and 3 mg-C/L, respectively. All breeding fish were alive and ate

  11. A Qualitative Assessment of Lontra longicaudis annectens Aquatic Habitats in Alvarado, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Silva-López,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory screening study following USEPA SW-846 test methods allowed the detection of organic compounds in the aquatic habitat of the Neotropical river otter (Lontra longicaudis annectens, in the Alvarado Lagoon System, Veracruz, Mexico. The compounds detected included 2-chlorocyclohexanol, phenylethylene glycol, benzophenone, ethanol-2-butoxyphosphate, styrene, p-xylene, ethylbenzene, trans-1,2- cyclohexanediol, di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate, benzeneacetaldehyde, hexadecane, tetracosane, docosane, triacontane, sitosterol, hexadecanoic acid, 1-eicosanol, chlorobenzene, and phosphorothioic acid trimethyl ester. Literature review showed a lack of data on the compounds´ potential effects on wildlife, although some of them could be considered harmful to the otters and their prey. The different compounds detected needs follow-up.

  12. Ecological risks of shale oil and gas development to wildlife, aquatic resources and their habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittingham, Margaret C.; Maloney, Kelly O.; Farag, Aida M.; Harper, David D.; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have led to the exploration and exploitation of shale oil and gas both nationally and internationally. Extensive development of shale resources has occurred within the United States over the past decade, yet full build out is not expected to occur for years. Moreover, countries across the globe have large shale resources and are beginning to explore extraction of these resources. Extraction of shale resources is a multistep process that includes site identification, well pad and infrastructure development, well drilling, high-volume hydraulic fracturing and production; each with its own propensity to affect associated ecosystems. Some potential effects, for example from well pad, road and pipeline development, will likely be similar to other anthropogenic activities like conventional gas drilling, land clearing, exurban and agricultural development and surface mining (e.g., habitat fragmentation and sedimentation). Therefore, we can use the large body of literature available on the ecological effects of these activities to estimate potential effects from shale development on nearby ecosystems. However, other effects, such as accidental release of wastewaters, are novel to the shale gas extraction process making it harder to predict potential outcomes. Here, we review current knowledge of the effects of high-volume hydraulic fracturing coupled with horizontal drilling on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in the contiguous United States, an area that includes 20 shale plays many of which have experienced extensive development over the past decade. We conclude that species and habitats most at risk are ones where there is an extensive overlap between a species range or habitat type and one of the shale plays (leading to high vulnerability) coupled with intrinsic characteristics such as limited range, small population size, specialized habitat requirements, and high sensitivity to disturbance

  13. Aquatic Biodiversity in the Amazon: Habitat Specialization and Geographic Isolation Promote Species Richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, James S.; Carvalho, Tiago P.; Petry, Paulo; Holder, Meghan A.; Maxime, Emmanuel L.; Espino, Jessica; Corahua, Isabel; Quispe, Roberto; Rengifo, Blanca; Ortega, Hernan; Reis, Roberto E.

    2011-01-01

    Simple Summary The immense rainforest ecosystems of tropical America represent some of the greatest concentrations of biodiversity on the planet. Prominent among these are evolutionary radiations of freshwater fishes, including electric eels, piranhas, stingrays, and a myriad of small-bodied and colorful tetras, cichlids, and armored catfishes. In all, the many thousands of these forms account for nearly 10% of all the vertebrate species on Earth. This article explores the complimentary roles that ecological and geographic filters play in limiting dispersal in aquatic species, and how these factors contribute to the accumulation of species richness over broad geographic and evolutionary time scales. Abstract The Neotropical freshwater ichthyofauna has among the highest species richness and density of any vertebrate fauna on Earth, with more than 5,600 species compressed into less than 12% of the world's land surface area, and less than 0.002% of the world's total liquid water supply. How have so many species come to co-exist in such a small amount of total habitat space? Here we report results of an aquatic faunal survey of the Fitzcarrald region in southeastern Peru, an area of low-elevation upland (200–500 m above sea level) rainforest in the Western Amazon, that straddles the headwaters of four large Amazonian tributaries; the Juruá (Yurúa), Ucayali, Purús, and Madre de Dios rivers. All measures of fish species diversity in this region are high; there is high alpha diversity with many species coexisting in the same locality, high beta diversity with high turnover between habitats, and high gamma diversity with high turnover between adjacent tributary basins. Current data show little species endemism, and no known examples of sympatric sister species, within the Fitzcarrald region, suggesting a lack of localized or recent adaptive divergences. These results support the hypothesis that the fish species of the Fitzcarrald region are relatively ancient

  14. Aquatic Biodiversity in the Amazon: Habitat Specialization and Geographic Isolation Promote Species Richness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto E. Reis

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Neotropical freshwater ichthyofauna has among the highest species richness and density of any vertebrate fauna on Earth, with more than 5,600 species compressed into less than 12% of the world’s land surface area, and less than 0.002% of the world’s total liquid water supply. How have so many species come to co-exist in such a small amount of total habitat space? Here we report results of an aquatic faunal survey of the Fitzcarrald region in southeastern Peru, an area of low-elevation upland (200–500 m above sea level rainforest in the Western Amazon, that straddles the headwaters of four large Amazonian tributaries; the Juruá (Yurúa, Ucayali, Purús, and Madre de Dios rivers. All measures of fish species diversity in this region are high; there is high alpha diversity with many species coexisting in the same locality, high beta diversity with high turnover between habitats, and high gamma diversity with high turnover between adjacent tributary basins. Current data show little species endemism, and no known examples of sympatric sister species, within the Fitzcarrald region, suggesting a lack of localized or recent adaptive divergences. These results support the hypothesis that the fish species of the Fitzcarrald region are relatively ancient, predating the Late Miocene-Pliocene (c. 4 Ma uplift that isolated its several headwater basins. The results also suggest that habitat specialization (phylogenetic niche conservatism and geographic isolation (dispersal limitation have contributed to the maintenance of high species richness in this region of the Amazon Basin.

  15. Taxonomic survey and characterization of the habitat of aquatic insects in protected areas in a subtropical island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica da Rosa Pires

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Taxonomic inventories are the basis of several ecological studies and they enable a better understanding of the local and regional biodiversity. This paper aimed to survey the aquatic insect fauna in a subtropical island, as well as to generate information on the habitats used by the taxa found. Two regions showing a good state of environmental conservation in the Santa Catarina Island, in Santa Catarina, Brazil, were selected: “Lagoa do Peri” Municipal Park and “Desterro” Environmental Protected Area. Aquatic invertebrates were collected by using a Surber sampler (in a lotic environment and an Eckman-Birge dredger (in a lentic environment between 2009 and 2012. Sixty taxa were found, belonging to eight taxonomic orders. Thus, there were 19 new registers of aquatic insect families for Santa Catarina. At the sites of this study, 13 families already known for Santa Catarina were not observed, according to a comparison with articles published until July 2014. As for the habitat, richness differed between the types of the habitats sampled, with lower richness in the substrate “sand”. The study represents a significant contribution to knowledge on aquatic insects in Santa Catarina, especially regarding the biodiversity in islands.

  16. Evaluating the feasibility of planting aquatic plants for habitat restoration in shallow Mississippi lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planting aquatic plants is a technique used to restore native aquatic plant communities in lakes lacking aquatic plants. However, the feasibility of using this restoration technique in Mississippi lakes has not been evaluated. We conducted two exclosure experiments to evaluate the success of planti...

  17. CEPF Western Ghats Special Series: Metazoan community composition in tree hole aquatic habitats of Silent Valley National Park and New Amarambalam Reserve Forest of the Western Ghats, India

    OpenAIRE

    Nishadh, K. A.; K.S.A. Das

    2012-01-01

    In a study of the metazoan community composition in tree hole aquatic habitat of a tropical rainforest, Silent Valley National Park, and the adjacent moist deciduous forest, New Amarambalam Reserve Forest, of the Western Ghats, 28 different species were recorded from 150 tree hole aquatic habitats with an average of 3-5 species per tree hole. Most of the recorded organisms (96.8%) belong to Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies), Heteroptera (bugs), Diptera (flies), Coleoptera (beetles) and T...

  18. Benthic primary production and mineralization in a High Arctic fjord: in situ assessments by aquatic eddy covariance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attard, Karl; Hancke, Kasper; Sejr, Mikael K.;

    2016-01-01

    Coastal and shelf systems likely exert major influence on Arctic Ocean functioning, yet key ecosystem processes remain poorly quantified. We employed the aquatic eddy covariance (AEC) oxygen (O2) flux method to estimate benthic primary production and mineralization in a High Arctic Greenland fjord...... seabed light data, we estimate an annual Arctic Ocean benthic GPP of 11.5 × 107 t C yr−1. On average, this value represents 26% of the Arctic Ocean annual net phytoplankton production estimates. This scarcely considered component is thus potentially important for contemporary and future Arctic ecosystem...

  19. Aquatic plant and waterfowl habitat survey, 1988 : Stillwater Wildlife Management Area and vicinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aquatic vegetation surveys were conducted on Stillwater Wildlife Management Area, Canvasback Club, Carson Lake, and several other wetlands in Lahontan Valley,...

  20. Implications of Geomorphic Change on Salmonid Habitat Using a Narrow-Beam Terrestrial-Aquatic Lidar and DEM Uncertainty Accounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, J. M.; McKean, J. A.; Tonina, D.; Garrard, C.

    2009-12-01

    The high-density of airborne LiDaR data has paved the way for a wide range of multi-scalar analyses of watersheds, some of which elegantly highlight abiotic-faunal interactions. However, most LiDaR sensors do not penetrate the water surface, and in-channel habitat in the fluvial environment cannot typically be characterized with traditional LiDaR. Airborne-LiDaR has also been touted for its potential in monitoring change through time, but to date, very few studies have explicitly used repeat LiDaR surveys for monitoring geomorphic change (i.e. morphological sediment budgeting) nor established that the changes of interest are above minimum level of detection thresholds, given the uncertainty in the data. Two new technological advances are helping to address these shortcomings and may highlight its utility at monitoring change in fluvial environments. The first is the emergence of green-LiDaR, which is capable of penetrating the water surface of many rivers and providing returns off the bed, which can be used to model bathymetry and in-channel habitat. The second is the development of new methods and software for characterizing the spatial variability of uncertainty in digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from this new terrestrial/aquatic green-LiDaR and propagating that through to DEMs of difference to differentiate between changes due to noise and actual geomorphic changes. In this study, we report the application of these two technologies to looking at changes in physical habitat for salmonids between 2004 and 2007 on Bear Creek in the headwaters of the Salmon River Watershed in Idaho. The analyses show that although the individual terrestrial-aquatic LiDaR surveys provide a broad coverage and enable a rich characterization of in-channel habitat, that uncertainties in the data limit the spatial coverage of areas where we can be confident about the magnitude of geomorphic change. However, due to the incorporation of a spatially-variable establishment of minimum

  1. Metal toxicity differently affects the Iris pseudacorus-arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi symbiosis in terrestrial and semi-aquatic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wężowicz, K; Turnau, K; Anielska, T; Zhebrak, I; Gołuszka, K; Błaszkowski, J; Rozpądek, P

    2015-12-01

    Phytoremediation offers an environmental friendly alternative to conventional cleanup techniques. In this study, mycorrhizal fungi isolated from the roots of Mentha longifolia grown in the basin of the Centuria River (S Poland) were used. Iris pseudacorus was grown in substratum from an industrial waste, enriched in Pb, Fe, Zn, and Cd in a terrestrial and water-logged habitat. Plant yield and photosynthetic performance was the highest in the aquatic environment; however, the presence of toxic metals (TM) negatively affected photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry as shown by the JIP test. Fungi colonization and Cd accumulation within plant tissues was decreased. In the terrestrial habitat, neither arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) nor metal toxicity affected plant growth, although metal uptake, Cd in particular, as well as photosynthesis were affected. Inoculated plants accumulated significantly more Cd, and photosynthesis was downregulated. The results presented in this study clearly indicate that the I. pseudacorus-AMF symbiosis adapts itself to the presence of toxic metals in the environment, optimizing resource supply, energy fluxes, and possibly stress tolerance mechanisms. Plant/AMF consortia grown in terrestrial and water-logged habitats utilize different strategies to cope with metal toxicity. The use of AMF in improving the phytoremediation potential of I. pseudacorus needs, however, further research. PMID:26585452

  2. Heavy metals and metallothionein in vespertilionid bats foraging over aquatic habitats in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pikula, J.; Zukal, Jan; Adam, V.; Bandouchová, H.; Beklová, M.; Hájková, P.; Horáková, J.; Kizek, R.; Valentíková, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2010), s. 501-506. ISSN 0730-7268. [International Workshop on Aquatic Toxicology and Biomonitoring /1./. Vodňany, 27.08.2008-29.08.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Microchiroptera * insect foraging * metallic elements * bioaccumulation Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.026, year: 2010

  3. CEPF Western Ghats Special Series: Metazoan community composition in tree hole aquatic habitats of Silent Valley National Park and New Amarambalam Reserve Forest of the Western Ghats, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Nishadh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In a study of the metazoan community composition in tree hole aquatic habitat of a tropical rainforest, Silent Valley National Park, and the adjacent moist deciduous forest, New Amarambalam Reserve Forest, of the Western Ghats, 28 different species were recorded from 150 tree hole aquatic habitats with an average of 3-5 species per tree hole. Most of the recorded organisms (96.8% belong to Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies, Heteroptera (bugs, Diptera (flies, Coleoptera (beetles and Trichoptera (caddisflies. The study reports the first record of toe-winged beetle larvae (Ptilodactylidae in a tree hole aquatic habitat. The most significant observation is the prolific occurrence of trichopteran larvae as the second most abundant taxa in tree holes of Silent Valley National Park, and this stands as the first comprehensive record of the entire order in the habitat studied. The study upholds the importance of less explored microhabitats in the Western Ghats region in terms of sustaining unique community composition in the most delicate and extreme habitat conditions. It also puts forward important ecological research questions on biodiversity ecosystem functionality which could impart important lessons for managing and conserving the diminishing tropical evergreen forests which are significant for these unique habitats.

  4. Morphological and physico-chemical properties of British aquatic habitats potentially exposed to pesticides.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Colin D.; Turner, Nigel; Hollis, John; Bellamy, Patricia H.; Biggs, Jeremy; Williams, Penny; Arnold, Dave; Pepper, Tim; Maund, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Approaches to describe the exposure of non-target aquatic organisms to agricultural pesticides can be limited by insufficient knowledge of the environmental conditions where the compounds are used. This study analysed information from national and regional datasets gathered in the UK describing the morphological and physico-chemical properties of rivers, streams, ponds and ditches. An aggregation approach was adopted, whereby the landscape was divided into 12 hydrogeological classes for agric...

  5. Aquatic insects of New York salt marsh associated with mosquito larval habitat and their potential utility as bioindicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlin, Ilia; Dempsey, Mary E; Iwanejko, Tom; Ninivaggi, Dominick V

    2011-01-01

    The aquatic insect fauna of salt marshes is poorly characterized, with the possible exception of biting Diptera. Aquatic insects play a vital role in salt marsh ecology, and have great potential importance as biological indicators for assessing marsh health. In addition, they may be impacted by measures to control mosquitoes such as changes to the marsh habitat, altered hydrology, or the application of pesticides. Given these concerns, the goals of this study were to conduct the first taxonomic survey of salt marsh aquatic insects on Long Island, New York, USA and to evaluate their utility for non-target pesticide impacts and environmental biomonitoring. A total of 18 species from 11 families and five orders were collected repeatedly during the five month study period. Diptera was the most diverse order with nine species from four families, followed by Coleoptera with four species from two families, Heteroptera with three species from three families, then Odonata and the hexapod Collembola with one species each. Water boatmen, Trichocorixa verticalis Fieber (Heteroptera: Corixidae) and a shore fly, Ephydra subopaca Loew (Diptera: Ephydridae), were the two most commonly encountered species. An additional six species; Anurida maritima Guérin-Méneville (Collembola: Neanuridae), Mesovelia mulsanti White (Heteroptera: Mesovelidae), Enochrus hamiltoni Horn (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae), Tropisternus quadristriatus Horn (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae), Dasyhelea pseudocincta Waugh and Wirth (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), and Brachydeutera argentata Walker (Diptera: Ephydridae), were found regularly. Together with the less common Erythrodiplax berenice Drury (Odonata: Libellulidae), these nine species were identified as the most suitable candidates for pesticide and environmental impact monitoring due to abundance, position in the food chain, and extended seasonal occurrence. This study represents a first step towards developing an insect-based index of biological integrity for

  6. Integrated assessment of river health based on the conditions of water quality,aquatic life and physical habitat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Wei; ZHANG Nan; ZHANG Yuan; ZHENG Binghui

    2009-01-01

    The health conditions of Liao River were assessed using 25 sampling sites in April 2005, with water quality index, biotic index and physical habitat quality index.Based on the method of cluster analysis (CA) for water quality indices, it reveals that heavily polluted sites of Liao River are located at estuary and mainstream.The aquatic species surveyed were attached algae and benthic invertebrates.The result shows that the diversity and biomass of attached algae and benthic index of biotic integrity (B-IBI) are degrading as the chemical and physical quality of water bodies deteriorating.Physiochemical parameters, BOD5, CODCr, TN, TP, NH3-N, DO, petroleum hydrocarbon and conductivity, were statistically analyzed with principal component analysis and correlation analysis.The statistical results were incorporated into the integrated assessing water quality index, combining fecal coliform count, attached algae diversity, B-IBI and physical habitat quality score, a comprehensive integrated assessing system of river ecological health was established.Based on the systimetic assesment, the assessed sites are categorized into 9 "healthy" and "sub-healthy" sites and 8 "sub-sick" and "sick" sites.

  7. Estimating fish exploitation and aquatic habitat loss across diffuse inland recreational fisheries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrick Tupper de Kerckhove

    Full Text Available The current state of many freshwater fish stocks worldwide is largely unknown but suspected to be vulnerable to exploitation from recreational fisheries and habitat degradation. Both these factors, combined with complex ecological dynamics and the diffuse nature of inland fisheries could lead to an invisible collapse: the drastic decline in fish stocks without great public or management awareness. In this study we provide a method to address the pervasive knowledge gaps in regional rates of exploitation and habitat degradation, and demonstrate its use in one of North America's largest and most diffuse recreational freshwater fisheries (Ontario, Canada. We estimated that (1 fish stocks were highly exploited and in apparent danger of collapse in management zones close to large population centres, and (2 fish habitat was under a low but constant threat of degradation at rates comparable to deforestation in Ontario and throughout Canada. These findings confirm some commonly held, but difficult to quantify, beliefs in inland fisheries management but also provide some further insights including (1 large anthropogenic projects greater than one hectare could contribute much more to fish habitat loss on an area basis than the cumulative effect of smaller projects within one year, (2 hooking mortality from catch-and-release fisheries is likely a greater source of mortality than the harvest itself, and (3 in most northern management zones over 50% of the fisheries resources are not yet accessible to anglers. While this model primarily provides a framework to prioritize management decisions and further targeted stock assessments, we note that our regional estimates of fisheries productivity and exploitation were similar to broadscale monitoring efforts by the Province of Ontario. We discuss the policy implications from our results and extending the model to other jurisdictions and countries.

  8. Global biodiversity of aquatic ammonia-oxidizing archaea is partitioned by habitat

    OpenAIRE

    Biller, Steven J.; Mosier, Annika C.; Wells, George F.; Francis, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Archaea play an important role in nitrification and are, thus, inextricably linked to the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. Since the initial discovery of an ammonia monooxygenase α-subunit (amoA) gene associated with an archaeal metagenomic fragment, archaeal amoA sequences have been detected in a wide variety of nitrifying environments. Recent sequencing efforts have revealed extensive diversity of archaeal amoA sequences within different habitats. In this study, we have examined over 800...

  9. Two mechanisms of aquatic and terrestrial habitat change along an Alaskan Arctic coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arp, Christopher D.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Urban, Frank E.; Jorgenson, M. Torre

    2010-01-01

    Arctic habitats at the interface between land and sea are particularly vulnerable to climate change. The northern Teshekpuk Lake Special Area (N-TLSA), a coastal plain ecosystem along the Beaufort Sea in northern Alaska, provides habitat for migratory waterbirds, caribou, and potentially, denning polar bears. The 60-km coastline of N-TLSA is experiencing increasing rates of coastline erosion and storm surge flooding far inland resulting in lake drainage and conversion of freshwater lakes to estuaries. These physical mechanisms are affecting upland tundra as well. To better understand how these processes are affecting habitat, we analyzed long-term observational records coupled with recent short-term monitoring. Nearly the entire coastline has accelerating rates of erosion ranging from 6 m/year from 1955 to 1979 and most recently peaking at 17 m/year from 2007 to 2009, yet an intensive monitoring site along a higher bluff (3–6 masl) suggested high interannual variability. The frequency and magnitude of storm events appears to be increasing along this coastline and these patterns correspond to a greater number of lake tapping and flooding events since 2000. For the entire N-TLSA, we estimate that 6% of the landscape consists of salt-burned tundra, while 41% is prone to storm surge flooding. This offset may indicate the relative frequency of low-magnitude flood events along the coastal fringe. Monitoring of coastline lakes confirms that moderate westerly storms create extensive flooding, while easterly storms have negligible effects on lakes and low-lying tundra. This study of two interacting physical mechanisms, coastal erosion and storm surge flooding, provides an important example of the complexities and data needs for predicting habitat change and biological responses along Arctic land–ocean interfaces.

  10. Numerical Model of Channel and Aquatic Habitat Response to Sediment Pulses in Mountain Rivers of Central Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, M.; Buffington, J. M.; Thurow, R. F.; Isaak, D. J.

    2006-12-01

    Mountain rivers in central Idaho receive pulsed sediment inputs from a variety of mass wasting processes (side-slope landslides, rockfalls, and tributary debris flows). Tributary debris flows and hyperconcentrated flows are particularly common due to winter "rain-on-snow" events and summer thunderstorms, the effects of which are amplified by frequent wildfire and resultant changes in vegetation, soil characteristics, and basin hydrology. Tributary confluences in the study area are commonly characterized by debris fans built by these repeated sediment pulses, providing long-term controls on channel slope, hydraulics and sediment transport capacity in the mainstem channel network. These long-term impacts are magnified during debris-flow events, which deliver additional sediment and wood debris to the fan and may block the mainstem river. These changes in physical conditions also influence local and downstream habitat for aquatic species, and can impact local human infrastructure (roads, bridges). Here, we conduct numerical simulations using a modified version of Cui's [2005] network routing model to examine bedload transport and debris-fan evolution in medium- sized watersheds (65-570 km2) of south-central Idaho. We test and calibrate the model using data from a series of postfire debris-flow events that occurred from 2003-4. We investigate model sensitivity to different controlling factors (location of the pulse within the stream network, volume of the pulse, and size distribution of the input material). We predict that on decadal time scales, sediment pulses cause a local coarsening of the channel bed in the vicinity of the sediment input, and a wave of downstream fining over several kilometers of the river (as long as the pulse material is not coarser than the stream bed itself). The grain-size distribution of the pulse influences its rate of erosion, the rate and magnitude of downstream fining, and the time required for system recovery. The effects of textural

  11. Modeling Changes in Bed Surface Texture and Aquatic Habitat Caused by Run-of-River Hydropower Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, T. K.; Venditti, J. G.; Nelson, P. A.; Popescu, V.; Palen, W.

    2014-12-01

    Run-of-river (RoR) hydropower has emerged as an important alternative to large reservoir-based dams in the renewable energy portfolios of China, India, Canada, and other areas around the globe. RoR projects generate electricity by diverting a portion of the channel discharge through a large pipe for several kilometers downhill where it is used to drive turbines before being returned to the channel. Individual RoR projects are thought to be less disruptive to local ecosystems than large hydropower because they involve minimal water storage, more closely match the natural hydrograph downstream of the project, and are capable of bypassing trapped sediment. However, there is concern that temporary sediment supply disruption may degrade the productivity of salmon spawning habitat downstream of the dam by causing changes in the grain size distribution of bed surface sediment. We hypothesize that salmon populations will be most susceptible to disruptions in sediment supply in channels where; 1) sediment supply is high relative to transport capacity prior to RoR development, and 2) project design creates substantial sediment storage volume. Determining the geomorphic effect of RoR development on aquatic habitat requires many years of field data collection, and even then it can be difficult to link geomorphic change to RoR development alone. As an alternative, we used a one-dimensional morphodynamic model to test our hypothesis across a range of pre-development sediment supply conditions and sediment storage volumes. Our results confirm that coarsening of the median surface grain-size is greatest in cases where pre-development sediment supply was highest and sediment storage volumes were large enough to disrupt supply over the course of the annual hydrograph or longer. In cases where the pre-development sediment supply is low, coarsening of the median surface grain-size is less than 2 mm over a multiple-year disruption period. When sediment supply is restored, our results

  12. Aquatic microbial habitats within a neotropical rainforest: bromeliads and pH-associated trends in bacterial diversity and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffredi, Shana K; Kantor, Adam H; Woodside, Walter T

    2011-04-01

    Tank-forming bromeliads, suspended in the rainforest canopy, possess foliage arranged in compact rosettes capable of long-term retention of rainwater. This large and unique aquatic habitat is inhabited by microorganisms involved in the important decomposition of impounded material. Moreover, these communities are likely influenced by environmental factors such as pH, oxygen, and light. Bacterial community composition and diversity was determined for the tanks of several bromeliad species (Aechmea and Werauhia) from northern Costa Rica, which span a range of parameters, including tank morphology and pH. These were compared with a nearby forest soil sample, an artificial tank (amber bottle), and a commercially available species (Aechmea). Bacterial community diversity, as measured by 16S rRNA analysis and tRFLP, showed a significant positive correlation with tank pH. A majority of 16S rRNA bacterial phylotypes found in association with acidic bromeliad tanks of pH  5.3, including the commercial bromeliad with the highest pH (6.7), were dominated by Betaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. To empirically determine the effect of pH on bacterial community, the tank pH of a specimen of Aechmea was depressed, in the field, from 6.5 to 4.5, for 62 days. The resulting community changed predictably with decreased abundance of Betaproteobacteria and Firmicutes and a concomitant increase in Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria. Collectively, these results suggest that bromeliad tanks provide important habitats for a diverse microbial community, distinct from the surrounding environment, which are influenced greatly by acid-base conditions. Additionally, total organic carbon (∼46%) and nitrogen (∼2%) of bromeliad-impounded sediment was elevated relative to soil and gene surveys confirmed the presence of both chitinases and nitrogenases, suggesting that bromeliad tanks may provide important habitats for microbes involved in the biological cycling of carbon and

  13. Fatty acid composition at the base of aquatic food webs is influenced by habitat type and watershed land use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H Larson

    Full Text Available Spatial variation in food resources strongly influences many aspects of aquatic consumer ecology. Although large-scale controls over spatial variation in many aspects of food resources are well known, others have received little study. Here we investigated variation in the fatty acid (FA composition of seston and primary consumers within (i.e., among habitats and among tributary systems of Lake Michigan, USA. FA composition of food is important because all metazoans require certain FAs for proper growth and development that cannot be produced de novo, including many polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs. Here we sampled three habitat types (river, rivermouth and nearshore zone in 11 tributaries of Lake Michigan to assess the amount of FA in seston and primary consumers of seston. We hypothesize that among-system and among-habitat variation in FAs at the base of food webs would be related to algal production, which in turn is influenced by three land cover characteristics: 1 combined agriculture and urban lands (an indication of anthropogenic nutrient inputs that fuel algal production, 2 the proportion of surface waters (an indication of water residence times that allow algal producers to accumulate and 3 the extent of riparian forested buffers (an indication of stream shading that reduces algal production. Of these three land cover characteristics, only intense land use appeared to strongly related to seston and consumer FA and this effect was only strong in rivermouth and nearshore lake sites. River seston and consumer FA composition was highly variable, but that variation does not appear to be driven by the watershed land cover characteristics investigated here. Whether the spatial variation in FA content at the base of these food webs significantly influences the production of economically important species higher in the food web should be a focus of future research.

  14. Aquatic food webs in mangrove and seagrass habitats of Centla Wetland, a Biosphere Reserve in Southeastern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Mendoza-Carranza

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove and seagrass habitats are important components of tropical coastal zones worldwide, and are conspicuous habitats of Centla Wetland Biosphere Reserve (CWBR in Tabasco, Mexico. In this study, we examine food webs in mangrove- and seagrass-dominated habitats of CWBR using stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen. Our objective was to identify the importance of carbon derived from mangroves and seagrasses to secondary production of aquatic consumers in this poorly studied conservation area. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of basal sources and aquatic consumers indicated that the species-rich food webs of both habitats are dependent on riparian production sources. The abundant Red mangrove Rhizophora mangle appears to be a primary source of carbon for the mangrove creek food web. Even though dense seagrass beds were ubiquitous, most consumers in the lagoon food web appeared to rely on carbon derived from riparian vegetation (e.g. Phragmites australis. The introduced Amazon sailfin catfish Pterygoplichthys pardalis had isotope signatures overlapping with native species (including high-value fisheries species, suggesting potential competition for resources. Future research should examine the role played by terrestrial insects in linking riparian and aquatic food webs, and impacts of the expanding P. pardalis population on ecosystem function and fisheries in CWBR. Our findings can be used as a baseline to reinforce the conservation and management of this important reserve in the face of diverse external and internal human impacts.Manguezais e pradarias de gramíneas são importantes componentes das zonas costeiras tropicais em todo o mundo, sendo habitats comuns nos ''Pântanos de Centla'', uma Reserva da Biosfera localizada em Tabasco, México. Nesse trabalho, são investigadas as teias alimentares de habitats dominados por manguezais e pradarias de gramíneas, através de isótopos estáveis de carbono e nitrogênio, tendo como

  15. Fishes and aquatic habitats of the Orinoco River Basin: diversity and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasso, C A; Machado-Allison, A; Taphorn, D C

    2016-07-01

    About 1000 freshwater fishes have been found so far in the Orinoco River Basin of Venezuela and Colombia. This high ichthyological diversity reflects the wide range of landscapes and aquatic ecosystems included in the basin. Mountain streams descend from the high Andes to become rapid-flowing foothill rivers that burst out upon vast savannah flatlands where they slowly make their way to the sea. These white-water rivers are heavily laden with sediments from the geologically young Andes. Because their sediment deposits have formed the richest soils of the basin, they have attracted the highest density of human populations, along with the greatest levels of deforestation, wildfires, agricultural biocides and fertilizers, sewage and all the other impacts associated with urban centres, agriculture and cattle ranching. In the southern portion of the basin, human populations are much smaller, where often the only inhabitants are indigenous peoples. The ancient rocks and sands of the Guiana Shield yield clear and black water streams of very different quality. Here, sediment loads are miniscule, pH is very acid and fish biomass is only a fraction of that observed in the rich Andean tributaries to the north. For each region of the basin, the current state of knowledge about fish diversity is assessed, fish sampling density evaluated, the presence of endemic species and economically important species (for human consumption or ornamental purposes) described and gaps in knowledge are pointed out. Current trends in the fishery for human consumption are analysed, noting that stocks of many species are in steep decline, and that current fishing practices are not sustainable. Finally, the major impacts and threats faced by the fishes and aquatic ecosystems of the Orinoco River Basin are summarized, and the creation of bi-national commissions to promote standardized fishing laws in both countries is recommended. PMID:27250805

  16. A conservation plan for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and anadromous brown trout (Salmo trutta) in a region with intensive industrial use of aquatic habitats, the Hardangerfjord, western Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Skaala, Øystein; Johnsen, Geir Helge; Lo, Håvard; Borgstrøm, Reidar; Wennevik, Vidar; Hansen, Michael Møller; Merz, Joseph E.; Glover, Kevin A.; Barlaup, Bjørn T.

    2013-01-01

    Extensive use of aquatic habitats, mainly for hydropower and aquaculture, has a negative impact on anadromous salmonid populations of the Hardangerfjord region, western Norway. High infection levels of salmon lice, and high proportions of escaped farmed salmon in spawning rivers, appear to violate the goals in the Strategy for an Environmentally Sustainable Aquaculture Industry' set by the Norwegian government. An overview of the anadromous populations in the fjord, their status and the major...

  17. Epidemiological Study on Frequency of Myxosporidian Diseases in Freshwater Fish Stemming from Aquatic Habitats Pertaining to the Danubian Delta Biosphere Reservation

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Daniela Urdeş; Cristiana Diaconescu; Marius Hangan; Marin Monica; Ştefan Diaconescu

    2010-01-01

    order to measure their frequencies and distributions within populations of Esox lucius, Sander lucioperca(Henneguyosis) and Perca fluviatilis (Myxoboliosis) originating from Sontea-Fortuna (S.F.) and Gorgova-Uzlina(G.U.) aquatic habitats, within the Biosphere Reservation of Danubian Delta, Romania.The biologic material was selected without prior knowledge of the disease status. Prevalence was determined byclassifying fishes as either diseased/infected or not, at one moment in time (Point prev...

  18. Bacterial and eukaryotic biodiversity patterns in terrestrial and aquatic habitats in the Sør Rondane Mountains, Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obbels, Dagmar; Verleyen, Elie; Mano, Marie-José; Namsaraev, Zorigto; Sweetlove, Maxime; Tytgat, Bjorn; Fernandez-Carazo, Rafael; De Wever, Aaike; D'hondt, Sofie; Ertz, Damien; Elster, Josef; Sabbe, Koen; Willems, Anne; Wilmotte, Annick; Vyverman, Wim

    2016-06-01

    The bacterial and microeukaryotic biodiversity were studied using pyrosequencing analysis on a 454 GS FLX+ platform of partial SSU rRNA genes in terrestrial and aquatic habitats of the Sør Rondane Mountains, including soils, on mosses, endolithic communities, cryoconite holes and supraglacial and subglacial meltwater lenses. This inventory was complemented with Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis targeting Chlorophyta and Cyanobacteria. OTUs belonging to the Rotifera, Chlorophyta, Tardigrada, Ciliophora, Cercozoa, Fungi, Bryophyta, Bacillariophyta, Collembola and Nematoda were present with a relative abundance of at least 0.1% in the eukaryotic communities. Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, FBP and Actinobacteria were the most abundant bacterial phyla. Multivariate analyses of the pyrosequencing data revealed a general lack of differentiation of both eukaryotes and prokaryotes according to habitat type. However, the bacterial community structure in the aquatic habitats was dominated by the filamentous cyanobacteria Leptolyngbya and appeared to be significantly different compared with those in dry soils, on mosses, and in endolithic habitats. A striking feature in all datasets was the detection of a relatively large amount of sequences new to science, which underscores the need for additional biodiversity assessments in Antarctic inland locations. PMID:26936447

  19. Mapping freshwater deltaic wetlands and aquatic habitats at multiple scales with high-resolution multispectral WorldView-2 imagery and Indicator Species Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, C.; Liu, H.; Anenkhonov, O.; Autrey, B.; Chepinoga, V.

    2012-12-01

    Remote sensing technology has long been used in wetland inventory and monitoring though derived wetland maps were limited in applicability and often unsatisfactory largely due to the relatively coarse spatial resolution of conventional satellite imagery. The advent of high-resolution multispectral satellite systems presents new and exciting capabilities in mapping wetland systems with unprecedented accuracy and spatial detail. This research explores and evaluates the use of high-resolution WorldView-2 (WV2) multispectral imagery in identifying and classifying freshwater deltaic wetland vegetation and aquatic habitats in the Selenga River Delta, a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance that drains into Lake Baikal, Russia - a United Nations World Heritage site. A hybrid approach was designed and applied for WV2 image classification consisting of initial unsupervised classification, training data acquisition and analysis, indicator species analysis, and final supervised classification. A hierarchical scheme was defined and adopted for classifying aquatic habitats and wetland vegetation at genus and community levels at a fine scale, while at a coarser scale representing wetland systems as broad substrate and vegetation classes for regional comparisons under various existing wetland classification systems. Rigorous radiometric correction of WV2 images and orthorectification based on GPS-derived ground control points and an ASTER global digital elevation model resulted in 2- to 3-m positional accuracy. We achieved overall classification accuracy of 86.5% for 22 classes of wetland and aquatic habitats at the finest scale and >91% accuracy for broad vegetation and aquatic classes at more generalized scales. At the finest scale, the addition of four new WV2 spectral bands contributed to a classification accuracy increase of 3.5%. The coastal band of WV2 was found to increase the separation between different open water and aquatic habitats, while yellow, red-edge, and

  20. Abiotic and biotic factors associated with the presence of Anopheles arabiensis immatures and their abundance in naturally occurring and man-made aquatic habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouagna Louis

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles arabiensis (Diptera: Culicidae is a potential malaria vector commonly present at low altitudes in remote areas in Reunion Island. Little attention has been paid to the environmental conditions driving larval development and abundance patterns in potential habitats. Two field surveys were designed to determine whether factors that discriminate between aquatic habitats with and without An. arabiensis larvae also drive larval abundance, comparatively in man-made and naturally occurring habitats. Methods In an initial preliminary survey, a representative sample of aquatic habitats that would be amenable to an intensive long-term study were selected and divided into positive and negative sites based on the presence or absence of Anopheles arabiensis larvae. Subsequently, a second survey was prompted to gain a better understanding of biotic and abiotic drivers of larval abundance, comparatively in man-made and naturally occurring habitats in the two studied locations. In both surveys, weekly sampling was performed to record mosquito species composition and larval density within individual habitats, as well as in situ biological characteristics and physico-chemical properties. Results Whilst virtually any stagnant water body could be a potential breeding ground for An. arabiensis, habitats occupied by their immatures had different structural and biological characteristics when compared to those where larvae were absent. Larval occurrence seemed to be influenced by flow velocity, macrofauna diversity and predation pressure. Interestingly, the relative abundance of larvae in man-made habitats (average: 0.55 larvae per dip, 95%CI [0.3–0.7] was significantly lower than that recorded in naturally occurring ones (0.74, 95%CI [0.5–0.8]. Such differences may be accounted for in part by varying pressures that could be linked to a specific habitat. Conclusions If the larval ecology of An. arabiensis is in general very complex

  1. Effects of recent volcanic eruptions on aquatic habitat in the Drift River, Alaska, USA: Implications at other Cook Inlet region volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorava, J.M.; Milner, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Numerous drainages supporting productive salmon habitat are surrounded by active volcanoes on the west side of Cook Inlet in south-central Alaska. Eruptions have caused massive quantities of flowing water and sediment to enter the river channels emanating from glaciers and snowfields on these volcanoes. Extensive damage to riparian and aquatic habitat has commonly resulted, and benthic macroinvertebrate and salmonid communities can be affected. Because of the economic importance of Alaska's fisheries, detrimental effects on salmonid habitat can have significant economic implications. The Drift River drains glaciers on the northern and eastern flanks of Redoubt Volcano: During and following eruptions in 1989-1990, severe physical disturbances to the habitat features of the river adversely affected the fishery. Frequent eruptions at other Cook Inlet region volcanoes exemplify the potential effects of volcanic activity on Alaska's important commercial, sport, and subsistence fisheries. Few studies have documented the recovery of aquatic habitat following volcanic eruptions. The eruptions of Redoubt Volcano in 1989-1990 offered an opportunity to examine the recovery of the macroinvertebrate community. Macroinvertebrate community composition and structure in the Drift River were similar in both undisturbed and recently disturbed sites. Additionally, macroinvertebrate samples from sites in nearby undisturbed streams were highly similar to those from some Drift River sites. This similarity and the agreement between the Drift River macroinvertebrate community composition and that predicted by a qualitative model of typical macroinvertebrate communities in glacier-fed rivers indicate that the Drift River macroinvertebrate community is recovering five years after the disturbances associated with the most recent eruptions of Redoubt Volcano.

  2. A unique application of the instream flow incremental methodology (IFIM) to predict impacts on riverine aquatic habitat, resulting from construction of a proposed hydropower reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, proposed to construct a new low-head hydroelectric project on the Susquehanna River in the central part of the state in 1986, about 108 km upstream of the river mouth. As part of the licensing process, the city was required by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to carry out studies that would forecast the impacts on riverine aquatic habitat as a result of construction of the proposed 13 km long by 1.5 km wide reservoir. The methodology selected by the city and its consultants was to use the IFIM to model the habitat conditions in the project reach both before and after construction of the proposed reservoir.The IFIM is usually used to model instream flow releases downstream of dams and diversions, and had not been used before to model habitat conditions within the proposed reservoir area. The study team hydraulically modelled the project reach using existing hydraulic data, and a HEC-2 backwater analysis to determine post-project water surface elevations. The IFG-4 model was used to simulate both pre- and post-project water velocities, by distributing velocities across transects based on known discharges and cell depth. Effects on aquatic habitat were determined using the IFIM PHABSIM program, in which criteria for several evaluation species and life stages were used to yield estimates of Weighted Usable Area. The analysis showed, based on trends in WUA from pre- and post-project conditions, that habitat conditions would improve for several species and life stages, and would be negatively affected for fewer life stages and species. Some agency concerns that construction of the proposed reservoir would have significant adverse effects on the resident and anadromous fish populations were responded to using these results

  3. Inland aquatic habitats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uzunov, Y.; Vadineanu, A.; Adamescu, M.; Beltram, G.; David, S.; Květ, Jan; Ott, I.; Piorkowki, H.; Sedlaková, J.; Ulevicius, A.; Young, J.

    Banchory, Scotland, UK : Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Natural Environment Research Council, 2004 - (Young, Y.; Halada, L.; Kull, T.; Kuzniar, A.; Tartes, U.; Uzunov, Y.; Watt, A.), s. 57-74 Grant ostatní: XE(XE) EVK2-CT-1999-2006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : Wetlands . Inland waters * Sustainable management Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  4. Sustaining America's Aquatic Biodiversity. Why is Aquatic Biodiversity Declining?

    OpenAIRE

    Helfrich, Louis A.; Neves, Richard J.; Parkhurst, James A. (James Albert)

    2005-01-01

    Discusses reasons for declining aquatic biodiversity and focuses mainly on the issues of habitat loss, introduced species (aquatic exotics), and water pollution; document also includes web links to more information on exotic, invasive species and endangered animals.

  5. A riverscape perspective of Pacific salmonids and aquatic habitats prior to large-scale dam removal in the Elwha River, Washington, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenkman, S.J.; Duda, J.J.; Torgersen, C.E.; Welty, E.; Pess, G.R.; Peters, R.; McHenry, M.L.

    2012-01-01

     Dam removal has been increasingly proposed as a river restoration technique. In 2011, two large hydroelectric dams will be removed from Washington State’s Elwha River. Ten anadromous fish populations are expected to recolonise historical habitats after dam removal. A key to understanding watershed recolonisation is the collection of spatially continuous information on fish and aquatic habitats. A riverscape approach with an emphasis on biological data has rarely been applied in mid-sized, wilderness rivers, particularly in consecutive years prior to dam removal. Concurrent snorkel and habitat surveys were conducted from the headwaters to the mouth (rkm 65–0) of the Elwha River in 2007 and 2008. This riverscape approach characterised the spatial extent, assemblage structure and patterns of relative density of Pacific salmonids. The presence of dams influenced the longitudinal patterns of fish assemblages, and species richness was the highest downstream of the dams, where anadromous salmonids still have access. The percent composition of salmonids was similar in both years for rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum), coastal cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarkii clarkii (Richardson) (89%; 88%), Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum) (8%; 9%), and bull trout, Salvelinus confluentus (Suckley) (3% in both years). Spatial patterns of abundance for rainbow and cutthroat trout (r = 0.76) and bull trout (r = 0.70) were also consistent between years. Multivariate and univariate methods detected differences in habitat structure along the river profile caused by natural and anthropogenic factors. The riverscape view highlighted species-specific biological hotspots and revealed that 60–69% of federally threatened bull trout occurred near or below the dams. Spatially continuous surveys will be vital in evaluating the effectiveness of upcoming dam removal projects at restoring anadromous salmonids.

  6. Unifying research on the fragmentation of terrestrial and aquatic habitats: patches, connectivity and the matrix in riverscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eros, Tibor; Grant, Evan H. Campbell

    2015-01-01

    While there is an increasing emphasis in terrestrial ecology on determining the influence of the area that surrounds habitat patches (the landscape ‘matrix’) relative to the characteristics of the patches themselves, research on these aspects in running waters is still rather underrepresented.

  7. Assessment of Lower Missouri River Physical Aquatic Habitat and Its Use by Adult Sturgeon (Genus Scaphirhynchus), 2005-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Joanna M.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Elliott, Caroline M.; DeLonay, Aaron J.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents an exploratory analysis of habitat availability and use by adult Scaphirhynchus sturgeon on the Lower Missouri River from Gavins Point Dam, South Dakota, to the junction with the Mississippi River. The analysis is based on two main data sources collected from 2005 to 2007: (1) a compilation of 153 reach-scale habitat maps (mean reach length, 2.4 kilometers) derived from boat-collected hydroacoustic data and (2) a sturgeon location dataset from which 378 sturgeon telemetry locations are associated with the maps (within 7 days of the mapping and within 10 percent of the discharge). The report focuses on: (1) longitudinal patterns of geomorphic and hydraulic characteristics revealed by the collection of reach maps; (2) assessment of environmental characteristics at sturgeon locations in the context of the mapped reaches; and (3) consideration of spatial distribution of habitat conditions that sturgeon appear to select. Longitudinal patterns of geomorphology, hydraulics, and associated habitats relate strongly to the engineered state of the river. Reaches within each of the following river sections tended to share similar geomorphic, hydrologic, and hydraulic characteristics: the Minimally Engineered section (Gavins Point Dam to Sioux City, Iowa), the Upstream Channelized section (Sioux City, Iowa, to the junction with the Kansas River), and the Downstream Channelized section (Kansas River to the junction with the Mississippi River). Adult sturgeon occupy nearly the full range of available values for each continuous variable assessed: depth, depth slope, depth-averaged velocity, velocity gradient, and Froude number (a dimensionless number relating velocity to depth). However, in the context of habitat available in a reach, sturgeon tend to select some areas over others. Reproductive female shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus), in particular, were often found in parts of the reach with one or more of the following characteristics: high

  8. Diet of Tadpoles of Microhyla Ornata from A Freshwater System in Rosekandy Tea Estate, Cachar, Assam and Significance of Conservation of Aquatic Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithra Dey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anuran tadpoles are gregarious in nature and knowledge of food and feeding behavior of the tadpoles is very essential for their successful breeding and survival. Dramatic declines in amphibian populations have been noted since 1980 from all over the world and are thus perceived to be one of the most critical threats to global biodiversity. Microhyla ornata commonly known as Ornamented Pygmy Frog, belongs to Family- Microhylidae and is widespread species occurring throughout South Asian countries like Bangladesh, India, Myanmar, Pakistan, Sri Lanka as well as in Japan. Considering the occurrence of tea plantation in the region and the presence of aquatic bodies in tea estates it is necessary to know the feeding habit of the anuran tadpoles and impact of unavailability of suitable food items which will affect the survival and completion of life cycle of the tadpoles. In the present study it was observed that Microhyla ornata tadpoles feed mainly on various algal (25 genera and detrital material. Hence, it may be concluded that aquatic habitats must be conserved and maintained so that conservation of anurans can be ensured.

  9. FRAGMENTATION OF POLYTENE CHROMOSOMES OF CHIRONOMUS STRIATIPENNIS (KIEFFER AS A MARK OF HEAVY METAL TOXICITY IN AQUATIC HABITATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. MAZUMDAR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The adults of Chironomids are though terrestrial, but in immature stages they pass their days in water. In aquaticbodies the flies at their larval stages live about 18-20 days and any incompatible situation in the habitats affectsgrowth and development of the larvae. A study on the polytene chromosomes of the salivary gland cells of thelarvae of C. striatipennis indicated that high level of toxicity due to heavy metals in the habitats led to fragmentationof their polytene chromosomes. Culturing of the larvae of this species in the laboratory with 30 mg/Kg of Cd withsoil in the culture bed exhibited fragmentation of their polytene chromosomes in certain cases. In this toxicityimpact the fourth polytene chromosome appeared to be more affected. Hence, a variation of response of differentchromosomes of the fly to toxicity may be suggested.

  10. Allelopathy of Aquatic Autotrophs

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    Allelopathy in aquatic environments may provide a competitive advantage to angiosperms, algae, or cyanobacteria in their interaction with other primary producers. Allelopathy can influence the competition between different photoautotrophs for resources and change the succession of species, for exarnple, in phytoplankton cornmunities. Field evidence and laboratory studies indicate that allelopathy occurs in all aquatic habitats (marine and freshwater), and that ail prirnary producing organisms...

  11. Preliminary survey of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in aquatic habitats and Great Blue Herons on the Hanford Site. [Ardea herodias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, R.G.; Bean, R.M.; Fitzner, R.E.; Neitzel, D.A.; Rickard, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), constituents of insulating fluids used in electrical transformers and capacitors, were identified during a preliminary survey of waters, sediments, and fish from five locations on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State: Gable Mountain Pond, B Pond, West Pond, White Bluffs Slough on the Columbia River, and a pond on the Wahluke Slope. These aquatic areas are all within the foraging range of great blue herons (Ardea herodias) that nest on the Hanford Site. Of those waters that contained PCBs, concentrations were found to be somewhat over 1 ng/L, but less than 20 ng/L, and equal to or less than concentrations reported for other freshwater regions of the United States. The PCBs in sediments and fish closely resembled the chromatographic profile of Aroclor 1260, a commercial PCB mixture produced in the United States by the Monsanto Company. Concentrations of PCBs detected in the sediments were 10 to 100 times lower than those found in soils and sediments from other areas of the nation. Concentrations of PCBs in fat from Hanford great blue herons ranged from 3.6 to 10.6 ppM, while PCB concentrations in herons from other areas of the Pacific Northwest ranged from 0.6 to 15.6 ppM. Great blue herons at Hanford contained PCB isomer distributions closely matching that of Aroclor 1260; great blue herons from other locations contained isomer distributions indicating the presence of a mixture of aroclors. 21 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Differential mercury transfer in the aquatic food web of a double basined lake associated with selenium and habitat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Food web trophodynamics of total mercury (THg) and selenium (Se) were assessed for the double-basined ultraoligotrophic system of Lake Moreno, Patagonia. Each basin has differing proportions of littoral and pelagic habitats, thereby providing an opportunity to assess the importance of habitat (e.g. food web structure or benthic MeHg production) in the transfer of Hg and Se to top trophic fish species. Pelagic plankton, analyzed in three size classes (10–53, 53–200, and > 200 μm), had very high [THg], exceeding 200 μg g−1 dry weight (DW) in the smallest, and a low ratio of MeHg to THg (0.1 to 3%). In contrast, [THg] in littoral macroinvertebrates showed lower values (0.3 to 1.8 μg g−1 DW). Juvenile and small fish species feeding upon plankton had higher [THg] (0.2 to 8 μg g−1 muscle DW) compared to large piscivore fish species (0.1 to 1.6 μg g−1 muscle DW). Selenium concentrations exhibited a much narrower variation range than THg in the food web, varying from 0.5 to 2.7 μg g−1 DW. Molar Se:Hg ratios exceeded 1 for the majority of organisms in both basins, with most ratios exceeding 10. Using stable nitrogen isotopes as indicator of trophic level, no significant correlations were found with [THg], [Se] or Se:Hg. The apparent lack of biomagnification trends was attributed to elevated [THg] in plankton in the inorganic form mostly, as well as the possibility of consistent Se supply reducing the biomagnification in the food web of the organic portion of THg. Highlights: • Mercury was studied in the food web of Lake Moreno, Nahuel Huapi National Park. • Mercury trophic transfer was assessed by nitrogen stable isotope (δ15N) analysis. • Selenium was determined showing consistent source in pelagic and littoral organisms. • High mercury concentrations, mostly inorganic, were determined in plankton. • No mercury biomagnification was observed in Lake Moreno food web

  13. Differential mercury transfer in the aquatic food web of a double basined lake associated with selenium and habitat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcagni, Marina [Laboratorio de Análisis por Activación Neutrónica, Centro Atómico Bariloche, CNEA, Av. Bustillo km 9.5, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Campbell, Linda [Faculty of Science, Saint Mary' s University, 923 Robie Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3C3 (Canada); Arribére, María A. [Laboratorio de Análisis por Activación Neutrónica, Centro Atómico Bariloche, CNEA, Av. Bustillo km 9.5, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo and Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark [U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd./MS 480, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Rizzo, Andrea [Laboratorio de Análisis por Activación Neutrónica, Centro Atómico Bariloche, CNEA, Av. Bustillo km 9.5, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina); Ribeiro Guevara, Sergio, E-mail: ribeiro@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Laboratorio de Análisis por Activación Neutrónica, Centro Atómico Bariloche, CNEA, Av. Bustillo km 9.5, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    2013-06-01

    Food web trophodynamics of total mercury (THg) and selenium (Se) were assessed for the double-basined ultraoligotrophic system of Lake Moreno, Patagonia. Each basin has differing proportions of littoral and pelagic habitats, thereby providing an opportunity to assess the importance of habitat (e.g. food web structure or benthic MeHg production) in the transfer of Hg and Se to top trophic fish species. Pelagic plankton, analyzed in three size classes (10–53, 53–200, and > 200 μm), had very high [THg], exceeding 200 μg g{sup −1} dry weight (DW) in the smallest, and a low ratio of MeHg to THg (0.1 to 3%). In contrast, [THg] in littoral macroinvertebrates showed lower values (0.3 to 1.8 μg g{sup −1} DW). Juvenile and small fish species feeding upon plankton had higher [THg] (0.2 to 8 μg g{sup −1} muscle DW) compared to large piscivore fish species (0.1 to 1.6 μg g{sup −1} muscle DW). Selenium concentrations exhibited a much narrower variation range than THg in the food web, varying from 0.5 to 2.7 μg g{sup −1} DW. Molar Se:Hg ratios exceeded 1 for the majority of organisms in both basins, with most ratios exceeding 10. Using stable nitrogen isotopes as indicator of trophic level, no significant correlations were found with [THg], [Se] or Se:Hg. The apparent lack of biomagnification trends was attributed to elevated [THg] in plankton in the inorganic form mostly, as well as the possibility of consistent Se supply reducing the biomagnification in the food web of the organic portion of THg. Highlights: • Mercury was studied in the food web of Lake Moreno, Nahuel Huapi National Park. • Mercury trophic transfer was assessed by nitrogen stable isotope (δ{sup 15}N) analysis. • Selenium was determined showing consistent source in pelagic and littoral organisms. • High mercury concentrations, mostly inorganic, were determined in plankton. • No mercury biomagnification was observed in Lake Moreno food web.

  14. Stream classification of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River System to support modeling of aquatic habitat response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Freeman, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    A stream classification and associated datasets were developed for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin to support biological modeling of species response to climate change in the southeastern United States. The U.S. Geological Survey and the Department of the Interior’s National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center established the Southeast Regional Assessment Project (SERAP) which used downscaled general circulation models to develop landscape-scale assessments of climate change and subsequent effects on land cover, ecosystems, and priority species in the southeastern United States. The SERAP aquatic and hydrologic dynamics modeling efforts involve multiscale watershed hydrology, stream-temperature, and fish-occupancy models, which all are based on the same stream network. Models were developed for the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin and subbasins in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia, and for the Upper Roanoke River Basin in Virginia. The stream network was used as the spatial scheme through which information was shared across the various models within SERAP. Because these models operate at different scales, coordinated pair versions of the network were delineated, characterized, and parameterized for coarse- and fine-scale hydrologic and biologic modeling. The stream network used for the SERAP aquatic models was extracted from a 30-meter (m) scale digital elevation model (DEM) using standard topographic analysis of flow accumulation. At the finer scale, reaches were delineated to represent lengths of stream channel with fairly homogenous physical characteristics (mean reach length = 350 m). Every reach in the network is designated with geomorphic attributes including upstream drainage basin area, channel gradient, channel width, valley width, Strahler and Shreve stream order, stream power, and measures of stream confinement. The reach network was aggregated from tributary junction to tributary junction to define segments for the

  15. Effects of changing climate on aquatic habitat and connectivity for remnant populations of a wide-ranging frog species in an arid landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilliod, David S; Arkle, Robert S; Robertson, Jeanne M; Murphy, Melanie A; Funk, W Chris

    2015-09-01

    Amphibian species persisting in isolated streams and wetlands in desert environments can be susceptible to low connectivity, genetic isolation, and climate changes. We evaluated the past (1900-1930), recent (1981-2010), and future (2071-2100) climate suitability of the arid Great Basin (USA) for the Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris) and assessed whether changes in surface water may affect connectivity for remaining populations. We developed a predictive model of current climate suitability and used it to predict the historic and future distribution of suitable climates. We then modeled changes in surface water availability at each time period. Finally, we quantified connectivity among existing populations on the basis of hydrology and correlated it with interpopulation genetic distance. We found that the area of the Great Basin with suitable climate conditions has declined by approximately 49% over the last century and will likely continue to decline under future climate scenarios. Climate conditions at currently occupied locations have been relatively stable over the last century, which may explain persistence at these sites. However, future climates at these currently occupied locations are predicted to become warmer throughout the year and drier during the frog's activity period (May - September). Fall and winter precipitation may increase, but as rain instead of snow. Earlier runoff and lower summer base flows may reduce connectivity between neighboring populations, which is already limited. Many of these changes could have negative effects on remaining populations over the next 50-80 years, but milder winters, longer growing seasons, and wetter falls might positively affect survival and dispersal. Collectively, however, seasonal shifts in temperature, precipitation, and stream flow patterns could reduce habitat suitability and connectivity for frogs and possibly other aquatic species inhabiting streams in this arid region. PMID:26445654

  16. Is the European pond turtle Emys orbicularis strictly aquatic? – Habitats where the turtle lives in central Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Sławomir Mitrus

    2010-01-01

    Based on ecological characteristics and phylogenetic analysis, it is possible to try to reconstruct the evolution of ecological traits in turtles. However, the European pond turtle is treated by different scientists as aquatic or as semi-aquatic species. The importance of terrestrial behaviour for this species is discussed.

  17. Non-parametric methods – Tree and P-CFA – for the ecological evaluation and assessment of suitable aquatic habitats: A contribution to fish psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas H. Melcher

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses multidimensional spawning habitat suitability of the fish species “Nase” (latin: Chondrostoma nasus. This is the first time non-parametric methods were used to better understand biotic habitat use in theory and practice. In particular, we tested (1 the Decision Tree technique, Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detectors (CHAID, to identify specific habitat types and (2 Prediction-Configural Frequency Analysis (P-CFA to test for statistical significance. The combination of both non-parametric methods, CHAID and P-CFA, enabled the identification, prediction and interpretation of most typical significant spawning habitats, and we were also able to determine non-typical habitat types, e.g., types in contrast to antitypes. The gradual combination of these two methods underlined three significant habitat types: shaded habitat, fine and coarse substrate habitat depending on high flow velocity. The study affirmed the importance for fish species of shading and riparian vegetation along river banks. In addition, this method provides a weighting of interactions between specific habitat characteristics. The results demonstrate that efficient river restoration requires re-establishing riparian vegetation as well as the open river continuum and hydro-morphological improvements to habitats.

  18. Investigation of oil drilling impacts to aquatic habitat resources: In Situ biological assessment of the photoinduced toxicity of environmental releases of crude oil

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This study proposed a biological assessment of a recent crude oil spill for potential impacts to aquatic resources due to petroleum hydrocarbon wastes. The...

  19. Complex Covariance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Kleefeld

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to some generalized correspondence principle the classical limit of a non-Hermitian quantum theory describing quantum degrees of freedom is expected to be the well known classical mechanics of classical degrees of freedom in the complex phase space, i.e., some phase space spanned by complex-valued space and momentum coordinates. As special relativity was developed by Einstein merely for real-valued space-time and four-momentum, we will try to understand how special relativity and covariance can be extended to complex-valued space-time and four-momentum. Our considerations will lead us not only to some unconventional derivation of Lorentz transformations for complex-valued velocities, but also to the non-Hermitian Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations, which are to lay the foundations of a non-Hermitian quantum theory.

  20. Habitat Restoration of a Constructed Ohio River Embayment

    OpenAIRE

    Rennaker, Caleb Michael

    2013-01-01

    Backwater habitats of large rivers provide habitat for aquatic biota and influence important predator-prey interactions in fishes and other aquatic organisms. However, these areas often exhibit turbid conditions and lack habitat complexity. Restoration of lentic habitats through direct habitat manipulations has shown success in prior efforts, but these methods have not been tested in backwater habitats of large rivers. I attempted to create habitat in an Ohio River embayment by establishing f...

  1. 2008 High-Flow Experiment at Glen Canyon Dam-Morphologic Response of Eddy-Deposited Sandbars and Associated Aquatic Backwater Habitats along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Paul E.; Schmidt, John C.; Andersen, Matthew E.

    2010-01-01

    The March 2008 high-flow experiment (HFE) at Glen Canyon Dam resulted in sandbar deposition and sandbar reshaping such that the area and volume of associated backwater aquatic habitat in Grand Canyon National Park was greater following the HFE. Analysis of backwater habitat area and volume for 116 locations at 86 study sites, comparing one month before and one month after the HFE, shows that total habitat area increased by 30 percent to as much as a factor of 3 and that volume increased by 80 percent to as much as a factor of 15. These changes resulted from an increase in the area and elevation of sandbars, which isolate backwaters from the main channel, and the scour of eddy return-current channels along the bank where the habitat occurs. Because of this greater relief on the sandbars, backwaters were present across a broader range of flows following the HFE than before the experiment. Reworking of sandbars during diurnal fluctuating flow operations in the first 6 months following the HFE caused sandbar erosion and a reduction of backwater size and abundance to conditions that were 5 to 14 percent greater than existed before the HFE. In the months following the HFE, erosion of sandbars and deposition in eddy return-current channels caused reductions of backwater area and volume. However, sandbar relief was still greater in October 2008 such that backwaters were present across a broader range of discharges than in February 2008. Topographic analyses of the sandbar and backwater morphologic data collected in this study demonstrate that steady flows are associated with a greater amount of continuously available backwater habitat than fluctuating flows, which result in a greater amount of intermittently available habitat. With the exception of the period immediately following the HFE, backwater habitat in 2008 was greater for steady flows associated with dam operations of relatively lower monthly volume (about 227 m3/s) than steady flows associated with dam operations

  2. Manifestly Covariant Relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    According to Einstein's principle of general covariance, all laws of nature are to be expressed by manifestly covariant equations. In recent work, the covariant law of energy-momentum conservation has been established. Here, we show that this law gives rise to a fully covariant theory of gravitation and that Einstein's field equations yield total energy-momentum conservation.

  3. Hydraena (Hydraenopsis) ateneo, new species (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae) and other aquatic Polyphaga from a small habitat patch in a highly urbanized landscape of Metro Manila, Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrik Freitag

    2013-01-01

    Seven species of Hydraenidae, Hydrophilidae and Elmidae are recorded from temporary freshwater habitats at the Ateneo de Manila University Campus in the metropolitan area of Manila, Philippines. They were identified as Enochrus (Lumetus) fragiloides d’Orchymont, Helochares (Hydrobaticus) lepidus d’Orchymont, Helochares (Helochares) pallens (MacLeay), Hydraena (Hydraenopsis) scabra d’Orchymont, Hydraena (Hydraenopsis) palawanensis Freitag & Jäch (new record for Luzon...

  4. Survey of wildlife, including aquatic mammals, associated with riparian habitat on the Syncrude Canada Ltd. Aurora Mine environmental impact assessment local study area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general overview of the wildlife associated with riparian habitats at Syncrude's proposed Aurora Mine, located 70 km northeast of Fort McMurray, Alberta on the east side of the Athabasca River, was presented. The area is underlain by bitumen and is being considered for bitumen extraction and production of synthetic crude oil. Two surveys were conducted with the help of experienced trappers from the community at Fort McKay. One was an aerial survey on November 3, 1995, the other a ground survey on November 29-30, 1995. The two surveys yielded 248 observed tracks on four 500 metre transects. The study area was comprised of boreal forest with natural drainage via Stanley Creek into the Muskeg River and via Fort Creek into the Athabasca River. Beavers, fox, weasel, mink, rabbit, wolf, moose, deer, ptarmigan, sharp-tailed grouse and ruffed grouse, lynx, coyote, river otter and mice were associated with riparian habitat on the study area. There was no sign of muskrat in the study area. It was concluded that in order to develop an understanding of reclamation alternatives for mined areas in the region, future detailed examination of the site should be approached through the integration of traditional ecological knowledge and conventional scientific methodology. 26 refs., 12 tabs., 2 figs

  5. Sylphella puccoon gen. n., sp. n. and two additional new species of aquatic oligochaetes (Lumbriculidae, Clitellata from poorly-known lotic habitats in North Carolina (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Rodriguez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Three new species of Lumbriculidae were collected from floodplain seeps and small streams in southeastern North America. Some of these habitats are naturally acidic. Sylphella puccoon gen. n., sp. n. has prosoporous male ducts in X–XI, and spermathecae in XII–XIII. Muscular, spherical atrial ampullae and acuminate penial sheaths distinguish this monotypic new genus from other lumbriculid genera having similar arrangements of reproductive organs. Cookidrilus pocosinus sp. n. resembles its two subterranean, Palearctic congeners in the arrangement of reproductive organs, but is easily distinguished by the position of the spermathecal pores in front of the chaetae in X–XIII. Stylodrilus coreyi sp. n. differs from congeners having simple-pointed chaetae and elongate atria primarily by the structure of the male duct and the large clusters of prostate cells. Streams and wetlands of Southeastern USA have a remarkably high diversity of endemic lumbriculids, and these poorly-known invertebrates should be considered in conservation efforts.

  6. Aquatic plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, T. V.; Sand-Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic fl owering plants form a relatively young plant group on an evolutionary timescale. The group has developed over the past 80 million years from terrestrial fl owering plants that re-colonised the aquatic environment after 60-100 million years on land. The exchange of species between...... terrestrial and aquatic environments continues today and is very intensive along stream banks. In this chapter we describe the physical and chemical barriers to the exchange of plants between land and water....

  7. Tool use by aquatic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Janet; Patterson, Eric M

    2013-11-19

    Tool-use research has focused primarily on land-based animals, with less consideration given to aquatic animals and the environmental challenges and conditions they face. Here, we review aquatic tool use and examine the contributing ecological, physiological, cognitive and social factors. Tool use among aquatic animals is rare but taxonomically diverse, occurring in fish, cephalopods, mammals, crabs, urchins and possibly gastropods. While additional research is required, the scarcity of tool use can likely be attributable to the characteristics of aquatic habitats, which are generally not conducive to tool use. Nonetheless, studying tool use by aquatic animals provides insights into the conditions that promote and inhibit tool-use behaviour across biomes. Like land-based tool users, aquatic animals tend to find tools on the substrate and use tools during foraging. However, unlike on land, tool users in water often use other animals (and their products) and water itself as a tool. Among sea otters and dolphins, the two aquatic tool users studied in greatest detail, some individuals specialize in tool use, which is vertically socially transmitted possibly because of their long dependency periods. In all, the contrasts between aquatic- and land-based tool users enlighten our understanding of the adaptive value of tool-use behaviour. PMID:24101631

  8. Production in aquatic macrophyte communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binzer, Thomas; Sand-Jensen, Kaj

    2002-01-01

    combined a simple mechanistic model and empirical measurements on artificially structured macroalgal communities (Ulva lactuca) with varying thallus absorptance and community density. Predicted and measured values corresponded closely and revealed that gross production in high-light environments...... that inefficient distribution of light can account for the low community production rates in aquatic habitats and the depth distribution of form-functional groups of macroalgae with different canopy structure.......-dimensional structure because of the strong drag and shear forces of moving water. This difference in canopy structure has been suggested to account for the three- to fivefold higher gross production rates in terrestrial than aquatic communities. To evaluate the effect of community structure in aquatic habitats, we...

  9. Brownian distance covariance

    OpenAIRE

    Székely, Gábor J.; Rizzo, Maria L.

    2009-01-01

    Distance correlation is a new class of multivariate dependence coefficients applicable to random vectors of arbitrary and not necessarily equal dimension. Distance covariance and distance correlation are analogous to product-moment covariance and correlation, but generalize and extend these classical bivariate measures of dependence. Distance correlation characterizes independence: it is zero if and only if the random vectors are independent. The notion of covariance with respect to a stochas...

  10. Modelling Realized Covariances

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Jin; John M Maheu

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a new dynamic model of realized covariance (RCOV) matrices based on recent work in time-varying Wishart distributions. The specifications can be linked to returns for a joint multivariate model of returns and covariance dynamics that is both easy to estimate and forecast. Realized covariance matrices are constructed for 5 stocks using high-frequency intraday prices based on positive semi-definite realized kernel estimates. We extend the model to capture the strong persiste...

  11. Covariant Schwinger terms

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, C.; Ekstrand, C.; Sykora, T.

    2000-01-01

    There exist two versions of the covariant Schwinger term in the literature. They only differ by a sign. However, we shall show that this is an essential difference. We shall carefully (taking all signs into account) review the existing quantum field theoretical computations for the covariant Schwinger term in order to determine the correct expression.

  12. The role of macrophytes in habitat structuring in aquatic ecosystems: methods of measurement, causes and consequences on animal assemblages' composition and biodiversity O papel das macrófitas na estruturação de habitat em ambientes aquáticos: métodos de medida, causas e consequências para a composição das assembléias animais e biodiversidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidinei Magela Thomaz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic macrophytes play an important role in structuring communities in aquatic environments. These plants provide physical structure, increase habitat complexity and heterogeneity and affect various organisms like invertebrates, fishes and waterbirds. The complexity provided by macrophytes has been exhaustively studied in aquatic environments. However, macrophyte complexity has rarely been measured in a standardized fashion, making comparisons among different studies and the establishment of general conclusions difficult. To address this issue, this review is focused on questions related to the habitat structural complexity provided by these plants, exploring: i how complexity has been viewed by ecologists, with an emphasis on macrophyte studies; ii the pros and cons of several methods used to quantify plant complexity; iii the consequences of habitat structuring by macrophytes on invertebrates and fish and possible causes, mediated by habitat complexity, that lead to changes in these animal assemblages; iv potential impacts of non-native macrophyte species on habitat complexity and v the importance of complexity provided by macrophytes to management strategies for maintaining aquatic biodiversity. We examined literature produced in both temperate and tropical regions, but prioritized the latter. We found a great variety of habitat complexity measurements that are applied to aquatic macrophytes to understand their influence on attached animal assemblages. A lack of standardization (considering the wide range of techniques and scales of resolution used limits comparisons between different studies exploring this subject, in which biological samples and physical substrates were used to explore these relationships. Macrophytes affect animal assemblages and promote biodiversity through a chain of mechanisms, related to habitat complexity, that involve the availability of shelter and feeding sites. Invasive macrophyte species may modify habitat

  13. Covariant Noncommutative Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The covariant approach to noncommutative field and gauge theories is revisited. In the process the formalism is applied to field theories invariant under diffeomorphisms. Local differentiable forms are defined in this context. The lagrangian and hamiltonian formalism is consistently introduced

  14. Covariance Applications with Kiwi

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott J.B.; Brown D.; Mattoon C.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Computational Nuclear Physics group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a new tool, named ‘Kiwi’, that is intended as an interface between the covariance data increasingly available in major nuclear reaction libraries (including ENDF and ENDL) and large-scale Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) studies. Kiwi is designed to integrate smoothly into large UQ studies, using the covariance matrix to generate multiple variations of nuclear data. The code has been tested u...

  15. Aquatic Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanville, W. D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of aquatic sediments and its effect upon water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) sediment water interchange; (2) chemical and physical characterization; and (3) heavy water in sediments. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  16. Two-dimensional physical habitat modeling of effects of habitat structures on urban stream restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongkyun IM

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available River corridors, even if highly modified or degraded, still provide important habitats for numerous biological species, and carry high aesthetic and economic values. One of the keys to urban stream restoration is recovery and maintenance of ecological flows sufficient to sustain aquatic ecosystems. In this study, the Hongje Stream in the Seoul metropolitan area of Korea was selected for evaluating a physically-based habitat with and without habitat structures. The potential value of the aquatic habitat was evaluated by a weighted usable area (WUA using River2D, a two-dimensional hydraulic model. The habitat suitability for Zacco platypus in the Hongje Stream was simulated with and without habitat structures. The computed WUA values for the boulder, spur dike, and riffle increased by about 2%, 7%, and 131%, respectively, after their construction. Also, the three habitat structures, especially the riffle, can contribute to increasing hydraulic heterogeneity and enhancing habitat diversity.

  17. Covariance mapping techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasinski, Leszek J.

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances in the generation of intense femtosecond pulses have made covariance mapping an attractive analytical technique. The laser pulses available are so intense that often thousands of ionisation and Coulomb explosion events will occur within each pulse. To understand the physics of these processes the photoelectrons and photoions need to be correlated, and covariance mapping is well suited for operating at the high counting rates of these laser sources. Partial covariance is particularly useful in experiments with x-ray free electron lasers, because it is capable of suppressing pulse fluctuation effects. A variety of covariance mapping methods is described: simple, partial (single- and multi-parameter), sliced, contingent and multi-dimensional. The relationship to coincidence techniques is discussed. Covariance mapping has been used in many areas of science and technology: inner-shell excitation and Auger decay, multiphoton and multielectron ionisation, time-of-flight and angle-resolved spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, stimulated Raman scattering, directional gamma ray sensing, welding diagnostics and brain connectivity studies (connectomics). This review gives practical advice for implementing the technique and interpreting the results, including its limitations and instrumental constraints. It also summarises recent theoretical studies, highlights unsolved problems and outlines a personal view on the most promising research directions.

  18. Misunderstanding analysis of covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G A; Chapman, J P

    2001-02-01

    Despite numerous technical treatments in many venues, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) remains a widely misused approach to dealing with substantive group differences on potential covariates, particularly in psychopathology research. Published articles reach unfounded conclusions, and some statistics texts neglect the issue. The problem with ANCOVA in such cases is reviewed. In many cases, there is no means of achieving the superficially appealing goal of "correcting" or "controlling for" real group differences on a potential covariate. In hopes of curtailing misuse of ANCOVA and promoting appropriate use, a nontechnical discussion is provided, emphasizing a substantive confound rarely articulated in textbooks and other general presentations, to complement the mathematical critiques already available. Some alternatives are discussed for contexts in which ANCOVA is inappropriate or questionable. PMID:11261398

  19. Galilean covariant Lagrangian models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We construct non-relativistic Lagrangian field models by enforcing Galilean covariance with a (4, 1) Minkowski manifold followed by a projection onto the (3, 1) Newtonian spacetime. We discuss scalar, Fermi and gauge fields, as well as interactions between these fields, preparing the stage for their quantization. We show that the Galilean covariant formalism provides an elegant construction of the Lagrangians which describe the electric and magnetic limits of Galilean electromagnetism. Similarly we obtain non-relativistic limits for the Proca field. Then we study Dirac Lagrangians and retrieve the Levy-Leblond wave equations when the Fermi field interacts with an Abelian gauge field

  20. Covariance Applications with Kiwi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoon, C. M.; Brown, D.; Elliott, J. B.

    2012-05-01

    The Computational Nuclear Physics group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing a new tool, named `Kiwi', that is intended as an interface between the covariance data increasingly available in major nuclear reaction libraries (including ENDF and ENDL) and large-scale Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) studies. Kiwi is designed to integrate smoothly into large UQ studies, using the covariance matrix to generate multiple variations of nuclear data. The code has been tested using critical assemblies as a test case, and is being integrated into LLNL's quality assurance and benchmarking for nuclear data.

  1. Covariance Applications with Kiwi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott J.B.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Computational Nuclear Physics group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL is developing a new tool, named ‘Kiwi’, that is intended as an interface between the covariance data increasingly available in major nuclear reaction libraries (including ENDF and ENDL and large-scale Uncertainty Quantification (UQ studies. Kiwi is designed to integrate smoothly into large UQ studies, using the covariance matrix to generate multiple variations of nuclear data. The code has been tested using critical assemblies as a test case, and is being integrated into LLNL's quality assurance and benchmarking for nuclear data.

  2. Habitat capacity for Sacramento delta - Life Cycle Modeling of Life History Diversity and Habitat Relationships

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goals of this project are to examine 1) the relative importance of multiple aquatic habitats (streams, estuaries, and nearshore areas, for example) used by...

  3. Coastal Maine Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Data 1993-1997 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Maine's eelgrass (SAV) meadows form an important aquatic habitat for the state. These meadows provide shelter for juvenile fish, and invertebrates. In certain...

  4. Generalized Linear Covariance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, James R.; Markley, F. Landis

    2014-01-01

    This talk presents a comprehensive approach to filter modeling for generalized covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. We review and extend in two directions the results of prior work that allowed for partitioning of the state space into solve-for'' and consider'' parameters, accounted for differences between the formal values and the true values of the measurement noise, process noise, and textita priori solve-for and consider covariances, and explicitly partitioned the errors into subspaces containing only the influence of the measurement noise, process noise, and solve-for and consider covariances. In this work, we explicitly add sensitivity analysis to this prior work, and relax an implicit assumption that the batch estimator's epoch time occurs prior to the definitive span. We also apply the method to an integrated orbit and attitude problem, in which gyro and accelerometer errors, though not estimated, influence the orbit determination performance. We illustrate our results using two graphical presentations, which we call the variance sandpile'' and the sensitivity mosaic,'' and we compare the linear covariance results to confidence intervals associated with ensemble statistics from a Monte Carlo analysis.

  5. Reproductive habitat selection in alien and native populations of the genus Discoglossus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoriza, Daniel; Boix, Dani

    2014-08-01

    The existence of suitable breeding habitats is an important factor explaining the regional presence of an anuran species. This study examined patterns of habitat selection in populations of three species of the genus Discoglossus: Discoglossusgalganoi (south-western Iberian Peninsula), Discoglossusscovazzi (Morocco) and Discoglossuspictus (three different areas were included in the study: Sicily, Tunisia and north-eastern Iberian Peninsula). The populations of D. pictus on the Iberian Peninsula are allochthonous, and analysis of these patterns may provide insights into the processes that regulate the invasion phase. The hypotheses tested were: (i) congeneric species show the same patterns of habitat selection, and alien species have been established following these patterns; (ii) there are differences in species associations between assemblages structured deterministically and by chance, i.e. native versus invaded assemblages. The larval habitats of three species of this genus were characterized by measuring physical and chemical parameters of the water bodies. We examined the covariation between the presence of Discoglossus species and the species richness of sympatric anurans, and investigated a possible relationship between morphological similarity (as a proxy of functional group) and overlap in habitat use. The results showed that congeneric species are morphologically conservative and also select very similar types of aquatic habitat. The alien population and other sympatric species showed a high degree of overlap in habitat use, which was greater than that observed in the native assemblage with a similar functional richness. Species associations were not structured on the basis of morphological similarity in any of the assemblages. Among native populations, the presence of Discoglossus was either negatively correlated or not significantly correlated with species richness. Only the alien population showed a positive correlation between its presence and species

  6. Land use effects on ecological linkages between small streams and their surrounding terrestrial habitats

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Adult aquatic insects are important vectors for aquatic transfers to terrestrial consumers and an integral component of riparian and terrestrial food webs. Incorporation of aquatic subsidies into terrestrial food webs depends heavily on the dispersal and life history traits of aquatic insects. Agricultural land use often results in the degradation of in-stream and riparian habitats which may affect the efficiency of cross-habitat exchanges. In this thesis I studied; (i) how land use (for...

  7. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Physical Aquatic Habitat Availability for Pallid Sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River, at Yankton, South Dakota, Kenslers Bend, Nebraska, Little Sioux, Iowa, and Miami, Missouri, 2006-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Johnson, Harold E., III; Dietsch, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity of habitat availability in the Lower Missouri River to discharge variation, with emphasis on habitats that might support spawning of the endangered pallid sturgeon. We constructed computational hydrodynamic models for four reaches that were selected because of evidence that sturgeon have spawned in them. The reaches are located at Miami, Missouri (river mile 259.6-263.5), Little Sioux, Iowa (river mile 669.6-673.5), Kenslers Bend, Nebraska (river mile 743.9-748.1), and Yankton, South Dakota reach (river mile 804.8-808.4). The models were calibrated for a range of measured flow conditions, and run for a range of discharges that might be affected by flow modifications from Gavins Point Dam. Model performance was assessed by comparing modeled and measured water velocities. A selection of derived habitat units was assessed for sensitivity to hydraulic input parameters (drag coefficient and lateral eddy viscosity). Overall, model results were minimally sensitive to varying eddy viscosity; varying lateral eddy viscosity by 20 percent resulted in maximum change in habitat units of 5.4 percent. Shallow-water habitat units were most sensitive to variation in drag coefficient with 42 percent change in unit area resulting from 20 percent change in the parameter value; however, no habitat unit value changed more than 10 percent for a 10 percent variation in drag coefficient. Sensitivity analysis provides guidance for selecting habitat metrics that maximize information content while minimizing model uncertainties. To assess model sensitivities arising from topographic variation from sediment transport on an annual time scale, we constructed separate models from two complete independent surveys in 2006 and 2007. The net topographic change was minimal at each site; the ratio of net topographic change to water volume in the reaches at 95 percent exceedance flow was less than 5 percent, indicating that on a reach

  8. Covariant approximation averaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shintani, Eigo; Blum, Thomas; Izubuchi, Taku; Jung, Chulwoo; Lehner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    We present a new class of statistical error reduction techniques for Monte-Carlo simulations. Using covariant symmetries, we show that correlation functions can be constructed from inexpensive approximations without introducing any systematic bias in the final result. We introduce a new class of covariant approximation averaging techniques, known as all-mode averaging (AMA), in which the approximation takes account of contributions of all eigenmodes through the inverse of the Dirac operator computed from the conjugate gradient method with a relaxed stopping condition. In this paper we compare the performance and computational cost of our new method with traditional methods using correlation functions and masses of the pion, nucleon, and vector meson in $N_f=2+1$ lattice QCD using domain-wall fermions. This comparison indicates that AMA significantly reduces statistical errors in Monte-Carlo calculations over conventional methods for the same cost.

  9. Arthropod Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Rusty Crayfish, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Arthropod Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009....

  10. Fish Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Rainbow Smelt, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Fish Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009. It...

  11. Mollusk Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Zebra mussels, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Mollusk Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009....

  12. Jellyfish Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Freshwater jellyfish, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Jellyfish Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009....

  13. Plant Distribution and Habitat, Other, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) plant distribution in Wisconsin - Reed Canary Grass (30 meter raster), Published in 2007, 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Plant Distribution and Habitat, Other dataset, published at 1:100000 (1in=8333ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Uncorrected Imagery information as of...

  14. Plant Distribution and Habitat, Other, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) plant distribution in Wisconsin - Curly Leaf Pondweed, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Plant Distribution and Habitat, Other dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of...

  15. Plant Distribution and Habitat, Other, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) plant distribution in Wisconsin - Milfoil hybrid, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Plant Distribution and Habitat, Other dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of...

  16. Plant Distribution and Habitat, Other, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) plant distribution in Wisconsin - Eurasian water milfoil, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Plant Distribution and Habitat, Other dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of...

  17. Arthropod Distribution and Habitat, Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) animal distribution in Wisconsin - Spiny/fishhook water flea, Published in 2009, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Wisconsin DNR Bureau of Watershed Management.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Arthropod Distribution and Habitat dataset, published at 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Observation information as of 2009....

  18. Earth Observing System Covariance Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Waqar H.; Hejduk, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of covariance realism is to properly size a primary object's covariance in order to add validity to the calculation of the probability of collision. The covariance realism technique in this paper consists of three parts: collection/calculation of definitive state estimates through orbit determination, calculation of covariance realism test statistics at each covariance propagation point, and proper assessment of those test statistics. An empirical cumulative distribution function (ECDF) Goodness-of-Fit (GOF) method is employed to determine if a covariance is properly sized by comparing the empirical distribution of Mahalanobis distance calculations to the hypothesized parent 3-DoF chi-squared distribution. To realistically size a covariance for collision probability calculations, this study uses a state noise compensation algorithm that adds process noise to the definitive epoch covariance to account for uncertainty in the force model. Process noise is added until the GOF tests pass a group significance level threshold. The results of this study indicate that when outliers attributed to persistently high or extreme levels of solar activity are removed, the aforementioned covariance realism compensation method produces a tuned covariance with up to 80 to 90% of the covariance propagation timespan passing (against a 60% minimum passing threshold) the GOF tests-a quite satisfactory and useful result.

  19. Aquatic impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the high reproduction rates of the plankton and good tidal mixing at existing plants, depletion of plankton populations has not occurred. Spawning occurs throughout the Bay for the species of fish present here, so local depletions are insufficient to decrease Bay populations. Impingement totals are small compared to mortality due to other sources. In addition, efforts to reduce these totals are now underway at all three existing plants, Calvert Cliffs, Morgantown, and Chalk Point. Habitat modification effects, usually more subtle in nature, have minor, localized impacts. Coupled together, the power plant monitoring studies show a low cumulative impact on the mesohaline environment. The major area of concern within this region is the impact of cooling water withdrawals upon the nursery and spawning areas of striped bass and other anadromous species. Possum Point and Vienna have the highest potential for impact. New facilities planned for this region (Douglas Point, Summit, and Vienna) would increase withdrawals. The overall impact upon striped bass due to entrainment drops from an estimated 6.6% entrainment (upper bound) of the eggs and larvae spawned in the Maryland portion of the Bay at present to an estimated 3.4% (upper bound) after 1987. The addition of Douglas Point and Summit is more than off-set by the retirements of the once-through cooling units at Vienna. No impingement data are available at any of the present plants; however, degraded water quality at the Baltimore and Washington plants appears to have severely restricted fish populations in these waters. The proposed plants are expected to have no major impacts in the areas of impingement or habitat modification due to the small amount of water withdrawn

  20. Covariant Magnetic Connection Hypersurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Pegoraro, F

    2016-01-01

    In the single fluid, nonrelativistic, ideal-Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma description magnetic field lines play a fundamental role by defining dynamically preserved "magnetic connections" between plasma elements. Here we show how the concept of magnetic connection needs to be generalized in the case of a relativistic MHD description where we require covariance under arbitrary Lorentz transformations. This is performed by defining 2-D {\\it magnetic connection hypersurfaces} in the 4-D Minkowski space. This generalization accounts for the loss of simultaneity between spatially separated events in different frames and is expected to provide a powerful insight into the 4-D geometry of electromagnetic fields when ${\\bf E} \\cdot {\\bf B} = 0$.

  1. Aquatic and Terrestrial Environment 2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. M.; Boutrup, S.; Bijl, L. van der;

    This report presents the 2004 results of the Danish National Monitoring and Assess-ment Programme for the Aquatic and Terrestrial Environments (NOVANA). 2004 was the first year in which terrestrial nature was included in the monitoring pro-gramme. The report reviews the state of the groundwater......, watercourses, lakes and marine waters and the pressures upon them and reviews the monitoring of terrestrial natural habitats and selected plants and animals. The report is based on the annual reports prepared for each subprogramme by the Topic Centres. The latter reports are mainly based on data collected and...

  2. Habitat stability, predation risk and ‘memory syndromes’

    OpenAIRE

    S. Dalesman; A. Rendle; S.R.X. Dall

    2015-01-01

    Habitat stability and predation pressure are thought to be major drivers in the evolutionary maintenance of behavioural syndromes, with trait covariance only occurring within specific habitats. However, animals also exhibit behavioural plasticity, often through memory formation. Memory formation across traits may be linked, with covariance in memory traits (memory syndromes) selected under particular environmental conditions. This study tests whether the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, demonst...

  3. Bayes linear covariance matrix adjustment

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkinson, Darren J

    1995-01-01

    In this thesis, a Bayes linear methodology for the adjustment of covariance matrices is presented and discussed. A geometric framework for quantifying uncertainties about covariance matrices is set up, and an inner-product for spaces of random matrices is motivated and constructed. The inner-product on this space captures aspects of our beliefs about the relationship between covariance matrices of interest to us, providing a structure rich enough for us to adjust beliefs about unknown matrices in the light of data such as sample covariance matrices, exploiting second-order exchangeability and related specifications to obtain representations allowing analysis. Adjustment is associated with orthogonal projection, and illustrated with examples of adjustments for some common problems. The problem of adjusting the covariance matrices underlying exchangeable random vectors is tackled and discussed. Learning about the covariance matrices associated with multivariate time series dynamic linear models is shown to be a...

  4. Modelling Realized Covariances and Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Jin; John M Maheu

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes new dynamic component models of realized covariance (RCOV) matrices based on recent work in time-varying Wishart distributions. The specifications are linked to returns for a joint multivariate model of returns and covariance dynamics that is both easy to estimate and forecast. Realized covariance matrices are constructed for 5 stocks using high-frequency intraday prices based on positive semi-definite realized kernel estimates. The models are compared based on a term-stru...

  5. Deriving covariant holographic entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Xi; Rangamani, Mukund

    2016-01-01

    We provide a gravitational argument in favour of the covariant holographic entanglement entropy proposal. In general time-dependent states, the proposal asserts that the entanglement entropy of a region in the boundary field theory is given by a quarter of the area of a bulk extremal surface in Planck units. The main element of our discussion is an implementation of an appropriate Schwinger-Keldysh contour to obtain the reduced density matrix (and its powers) of a given region, as is relevant for the replica construction. We map this contour into the bulk gravitational theory, and argue that the saddle point solutions of these replica geometries lead to a consistent prescription for computing the field theory Renyi entropies. In the limiting case where the replica index is taken to unity, a local analysis suffices to show that these saddles lead to the extremal surfaces of interest. We also comment on various properties of holographic entanglement that follow from this construction.

  6. Diversity of Aquatic Insects in Keniam River, National Park, Pahang, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Rasdi, Z.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The study on biodiversity of aquatic insects was carried out covering the area of Kuala Keniam to Kuala Perkai River, National Park, Pahang, Malaysia. The macro invertebrate community was found in the different types of micro-habitat and various flowing speed levels in good quality of water of Keniam Rivers consisted mainly of aquatic insects. There are large numbers and wide species of aquatic insects in aquatic habitats make them of great ecological importance. There are three divided strata with total of nine sampling location were carried out within several varieties of microhabitats such as sandy, cobble, gravel, leaf and the pool area. The aquatic insects were collected and sampled by using a D-framed aquatic kick net. There was a wide variety of aquatic insects belonging to at least 8 orders in the study area. The orders of insect were Odonata, Coleoptera, Diptera, Trichoptera, Thysanura, Orthopthera, Hemiptera and Ephemeroptera. Throughout the study period, there is range from total of 140 to 604 individuals of aquatic insect trapped monthly and collected in Keniam River from September 2009 to December 2010. Some group of aquatic insects were found significant (χ2<0.05 different abundance between strata and sampling dates as well as habitat on the diversity of aquatic insects in Keniam River. The abundance and distribution of aquatic insects‟ species were varied and not constant from one month to another during the study period due to biotic and abiotic factors. Species diversity of aquatic insects varied in different strata of the Keniam River. This indicates the richness and diverse groups of aquatic insects in the study area. It adds to the fact that the undisturbed habitat quality is most suitable for insects to breed and multiply under the natural ecosystem with abundant food supply. Moving upstream from Kuala Perkai to lower stream to Kuala Keniam, one can observe various types of habitats for aquatic insects to live.

  7. Habitat connectivity and ecosystem productivity: implications from a simple model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    The import of resources (food, nutrients) sustains biological production and food webs in resource-limited habitats. Resource export from donor habitats subsidizes production in recipient habitats, but the ecosystem-scale consequences of resource translocation are generally unknown. Here, I use a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton model to show how dispersive connectivity between a shallow autotrophic habitat and a deep heterotrophic pelagic habitat can amplify overall system production in metazoan food webs. This result derives from the finite capacity of suspension feeders to capture and assimilate food particles: excess primary production in closed autotrophic habitats cannot be assimilated by consumers; however, if excess phytoplankton production is exported to food-limited heterotrophic habitats, it can be assimilated by zooplankton to support additional secondary production. Transport of regenerated nutrients from heterotrophic to autotrophic habitats sustains higher system primary production. These simulation results imply that the ecosystem-scale efficiency of nutrient transformation into metazoan biomass can be constrained by the rate of resource exchange across habitats and that it is optimized when the transport rate matches the growth rate of primary producers. Slower transport (i.e., reduced connectivity) leads to nutrient limitation of primary production in autotrophic habitats and food limitation of secondary production in heterotrophic habitats. Habitat fragmentation can therefore impose energetic constraints on the carrying capacity of aquatic ecosystems. The outcomes of ecosystem restoration through habitat creation will be determined by both functions provided by newly created aquatic habitats and the rates of hydraulic connectivity between them.

  8. Long-term vegetation monitoring for different habitats in floodplains

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Petra; SCHWAB André; Stammel, Barbara; Ewald, Jörg; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2013-01-01

    A floodplain-restoration project along the Danube between Neuburg and Ingolstadt (Germany) aims to bring back water and sediment dynamic to the floodplain. The accompanied long-term monitoring has to document the changes in biodiversity related to this new dynamics. Considerations on and results of the vegetation monitoring concept are documented in this paper. In a habitat rich ecosystem like a floodplain different habitats (alluvial forest, semi-aquatic/aquatic sites) have different dema...

  9. Long-term vegetation monitoring for different habitats in floodplains

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Petra; SCHWAB André; Stammel, Barbara; Ewald, Jörg; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    A floodplain-restoration project along the Danube between Neuburg and Ingolstadt (Germany) aims to bring back water and sediment dynamic to the floodplain. The accompanied long-term monitoring has to document the changes in biodiversity related to this new dynamics. Considerations on and results of the vegetation monitoring concept are documented in this paper. In a habitat rich ecosystem like a floodplain different habitats (alluvial forest, semi-aquatic/aquatic sites) have different dema...

  10. Maryland ESI: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and rare plants in Maryland. Vector polygons in this data set...

  11. Evaluation and processing of covariance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings of a specialists'meeting on evaluation and processing of covariance data is divided into 4 parts bearing on: part 1- Needs for evaluated covariance data (2 Papers), part 2- generation of covariance data (15 Papers), part 3- Processing of covariance files (2 Papers), part 4-Experience in the use of evaluated covariance data (2 Papers)

  12. The incredible shrinking covariance estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, James

    2012-05-01

    Covariance estimation is a key step in many target detection algorithms. To distinguish target from background requires that the background be well-characterized. This applies to targets ranging from the precisely known chemical signatures of gaseous plumes to the wholly unspecified signals that are sought by anomaly detectors. When the background is modelled by a (global or local) Gaussian or other elliptically contoured distribution (such as Laplacian or multivariate-t), a covariance matrix must be estimated. The standard sample covariance overfits the data, and when the training sample size is small, the target detection performance suffers. Shrinkage addresses the problem of overfitting that inevitably arises when a high-dimensional model is fit from a small dataset. In place of the (overfit) sample covariance matrix, a linear combination of that covariance with a fixed matrix is employed. The fixed matrix might be the identity, the diagonal elements of the sample covariance, or some other underfit estimator. The idea is that the combination of an overfit with an underfit estimator can lead to a well-fit estimator. The coefficient that does this combining, called the shrinkage parameter, is generally estimated by some kind of cross-validation approach, but direct cross-validation can be computationally expensive. This paper extends an approach suggested by Hoffbeck and Landgrebe, and presents efficient approximations of the leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOC) estimate of the shrinkage parameter used in estimating the covariance matrix from a limited sample of data.

  13. Loss and modification of habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemckert, Francis; Hecnar, Stephen; Pilliod, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Amphibians live in a wide variety of habitats around the world, many of which have been modified or destroyed by human activities. Most species have unique life history characteristics adapted to specific climates, habitats (e.g., lentic, lotic, terrestrial, arboreal, fossorial, amphibious), and local conditions that provide suitable areas for reproduction, development and growth, shelter from environmental extremes, and predation, as well as connectivity to other populations or habitats. Although some species are entirely aquatic or terrestrial, most amphibians, as their name implies, lead a dual life and require a mosaic of habitats in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. With over 6 billion people on Earth, most species are now persisting in habitats that have been directly or indirectly influenced by human activities. Some species have disappeared where their habitats have been completely destroyed, reduced, or rendered unsuitable. Habitat loss and degradation are widely considered by most researchers as the most important causes of amphibian population decline globally (Barinaga 1990; Wake and Morowitz 1991; Alford and Richards 1999). In this chapter, a background on the diverse habitat requirements of amphibians is provided, followed by a discussion of the effects of urbanization, agriculture, livestock grazing, timber production and harvesting, fire and hazardous fuel management, and roads on amphibians and their habitats. Also briefly discussed is the influence on amphibian habitats of natural disturbances, such as extreme weather events and climate change, given the potential for human activities to impact climate in the longer term. For amphibians in general, microhabitats are of greater importance than for other vertebrates. As ectotherms with a skin that is permeable to water and with naked gelatinous eggs, amphibians are physiologically constrained to be active during environmental conditions that provide appropriate body temperatures and adequate

  14. Covariant Electrodynamics in Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1990-05-01

    The generalized Galilei covariant Maxwell equations and their EM field transformations are applied to the vacuum electrodynamics of a charged particle moving with an arbitrary velocity v in an inertial frame with EM carrier (ether) of velocity w. In accordance with the Galilean relativity principle, all velocities have absolute meaning (relative to the ether frame with isotropic light propagation), and the relative velocity of two bodies is defined by the linear relation uG = v1 - v2. It is shown that the electric equipotential surfaces of a charged particle are compressed in the direction parallel to its relative velocity v - w (mechanism for physical length contraction of bodies). The magnetic field H(r, t) excited in the ether by a charge e moving uniformly with velocity v is related to its electric field E(r, t) by the equation H=ɛ0(v - w)xE/[ 1 +w • (t>- w)/c20], which shows that (i) a magnetic field is excited only if the charge moves relative to the ether, and (ii) the magnetic field is weak if v - w is not comparable to the velocity of light c0 . It is remarkable that a charged particle can excite EM shock waves in the ether if |i> - w > c0. This condition is realizable for anti-parallel charge and ether velocities if |v-w| > c0- | w|, i.e., even if |v| is subluminal. The possibility of this Cerenkov effect in the ether is discussed for terrestrial and galactic situations

  15. Environmental variation and habitat separation among small mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habitat use and population density of five species of forest small mammals were monitored by annual spring snap-trap censuses at Pinawa, Manitoba, over 14 years. Population sizes were positively correlated among species and showed no evidence of density-dependent effects. Species were habitat selectors. Habitat use by species did not vary among years. Habitat separation between the dominant species was not correlated with environmental variables or with population size. We suggest that habitat selection and positive covariance among species abundances are the principal factors characterizing the dynamics of this community

  16. Covariant Stora-Zumino chain terms

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, C

    1999-01-01

    In a recent paper, Ekstrand proposed a simple expression from which covariant anomaly, covariant Schwinger term and higher covariant chain terms may be computed. We comment on the relation of his result to the earlier work of Tsutsui.

  17. Anthropogenic areas as incidental substitutes for original habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Abraín, Alejandro; Jiménez, Juan

    2016-06-01

    One speaks of ecological substitutes when an introduced species performs, to some extent, the ecosystem function of an extirpated native species. We suggest that a similar case exists for habitats. Species evolve within ecosystems, but habitats can be destroyed or modified by natural and human-made causes. Sometimes habitat alteration forces animals to move to or remain in a suboptimal habitat type. In that case, the habitat is considered a refuge, and the species is called a refugee. Typically refugee species have lower population growth rates than in their original habitats. Human action may lead to the unintended generation of artificial or semiartificial habitat types that functionally resemble the essential features of the original habitat and thus allow a population growth rate of the same magnitude or higher than in the original habitat. We call such areas substitution habitats and define them as human-made habitats within the focal species range that by chance are partial substitutes for the species' original habitat. We call species occupying a substitution habitat adopted species. These are 2 new terms in conservation biology. Examples of substitution habitats are dams for European otters, wheat and rice fields for many steppeland and aquatic birds, and urban areas for storks, falcons, and swifts. Although substitution habitats can bring about increased resilience against the agents of global change, the conservation of original habitat types remains a conservation priority. PMID:26483140

  18. Phase-covariant quantum cloning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum cloning machines for equatorial qubits are studied. For a 1 to 2 phase-covariant quantum cloning machine, using Hilbert-Schmidt norm and Bures fidelity, we show that our transformation can achieve the bound of the fidelity. (author)

  19. General covariance in computational electrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shyroki, Dzmitry; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole;

    2007-01-01

    We advocate the generally covariant formulation of Maxwell equations as underpinning some recent advances in computational electrodynamics—in the dimensionality reduction for separable structures; in mesh truncation for finite-difference computations; and in adaptive coordinate mapping as opposed...

  20. Symmetric Gini Covariance and Correlation

    OpenAIRE

    Sang, Yongli; Dang, Xin; Sang, Hailin

    2016-01-01

    Standard Gini covariance and Gini correlation play important roles in measuring the dependence of random variables with heavy tails. However, the asymmetry brings a substantial difficulty in interpretation. In this paper, we propose a symmetric Gini-type covariance and a symmetric Gini correlation ($\\rho_g$) based on the joint rank function. The proposed correlation $\\rho_g$ is more robust than the Pearson correlation but less robust than the Kendall's $\\tau$ correlation. We establish the rel...

  1. Influence of hydroperiod on aquatic primary productivity between short- and long-hydroperiod Florida Everglades marshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, J.; Olivas, P. C.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Malone, S. L.; Starr, G.

    2014-12-01

    Everglades National Park (ENP) represents one of the largest wetlands in the United States, where carbon cycling and primary productivity are closely linked to hydroperiod. Only recently has an integrative assessment of the CO2balance been undertaken in ENP. Previous periphyton and marcrophyte clipping experiments suggest that aquatic primary productivity (APP) is generally low in the Everglades freshwater marsh ecosystems. However, few studies have quantified aquatic metabolism in ENP, which may have significant influence on the entire ecosystem carbon dynamics. Eddy covariance towers were installed at a long- and short-hydroperiod marsh (Shark River Slough, SRS and Taylor Slough; TS, respectively) within ENP and have been running since 2008 . Net ecosystem exchange of CO2, H2O, and energy between the ecosystem and the atmosphere were measured along with meteorological data. To address how interannual and habitat variations in APP influences overall CO2 flux dynamics, we installed a D-Opto dissolved oxygen sensor (Zebra-Tech LTD) at each site in March of 2011, which allowed us to collect percent dissolved oxygen (DO%), dissolved oxygen concentration (DO ppm), and water temperature (oC) data at half hourly intervals from March of 2011 until present. We calculated gross and net aquatic primary productivity (ANPP), and night time aquatic respiration (AR), and compare interannual and inter site variation in APP between SRS and TS from October 2011 through December 2013. Our results reveal that across all three years (2011 - 2013) ANPP and AR were significantly higher at TS. ANPP was 15%, 16%, and 20% higher, and AR was 96%, 55%, and 7% higher at TS than at SRS. These results indicate that APP is contributing to the ecosystem carbon dynamics and differs with hydroperiod. Along with meteorological and data collected at the flux towers, we were also able to relate APP to changes in water level, photosynthetically active radiation and water temperature. This is the first

  2. Inter-annual variation (1991-1993) of the substratum-leaf colonization dynamics for aquatic fauna in different habitats of the lake of the hydroelectric of Balbina, Amazon Central, Brazil; Variacao interanual (1991-1993) da dinamica de colonizacao de substrato-folha por fauna aquatica, em diferentes habitats do lago da Hidreletrica de Balbina, Amazonia Central, Amazonas- Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela-Pena, Gladys

    1996-07-01

    Experiments on fauna colonization of submersed vegetal substrate in different depths of water column were done to evaluate the benthic community structure in three habitats of the Balbina hydroelectric dam in 1991, 1992 and 1993. In these experiments substrate exposition periods of up to 60 and 75 days were done. The fauna associated to the standard substrate (Mabea caudata) belonged to seven phyla: Arthropoda, Coelenterata, Nematoda, Bryozoa, Annelida, Mollusca an Chordata. The most abundant and frequent families, during the studied period, were Naididae (Tubificida), Chydoridae (Cladocera) and Cenestheridae (Conchostraca), suggesting the persistence of these groups. In general, the pattern of colonization indicates some tendency to increase gradually with time of exposition of the substrate in the environment. Probably, the discontinuity of the tendencies is associated with the insects mobility and emergence. The initial colonization always was higher and quicker in the margin habitat, which indicates that the source of organisms is this habitat. This is due to better conditions of the environment such as availability of food and protection, associated with the submerged vegetation and wood. The community mean density during this study was 7, 312 ind/m{sup 2}. The density, the species richness index, and the diversity were correlated with abiotic variables such as pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, habitat and depth. Also, the density was correlated with total carbon and ammonium. Species richness was correlated with total carbon, ammonium and water color. The density, diversity and species richness were proportionally inverse to depth of the habitats and total absence of organisms ago 10 meter of depth, different from what is found in bottom of natural environments. This fact was attributed to the high concentration of nutrients, such as ammonium and dissolved iron, to the existence of toxic gases such a sulphide, and to the conditions of hypoxia in the deep

  3. Predicting submerged aquatic vegetation cover and occurrence in a Lake Superior estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) provides the biophysical basis for multiple ecosystem services in Great Lakes estuaries. Understanding sources of variation in SAV is necessary for sustainable management of SAV habitat. From data collected in 2011 using hydroacoustic survey met...

  4. Shrinkage estimators for covariance matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, M J; Kass, R E

    2001-12-01

    Estimation of covariance matrices in small samples has been studied by many authors. Standard estimators, like the unstructured maximum likelihood estimator (ML) or restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimator, can be very unstable with the smallest estimated eigenvalues being too small and the largest too big. A standard approach to more stably estimating the matrix in small samples is to compute the ML or REML estimator under some simple structure that involves estimation of fewer parameters, such as compound symmetry or independence. However, these estimators will not be consistent unless the hypothesized structure is correct. If interest focuses on estimation of regression coefficients with correlated (or longitudinal) data, a sandwich estimator of the covariance matrix may be used to provide standard errors for the estimated coefficients that are robust in the sense that they remain consistent under misspecification of the covariance structure. With large matrices, however, the inefficiency of the sandwich estimator becomes worrisome. We consider here two general shrinkage approaches to estimating the covariance matrix and regression coefficients. The first involves shrinking the eigenvalues of the unstructured ML or REML estimator. The second involves shrinking an unstructured estimator toward a structured estimator. For both cases, the data determine the amount of shrinkage. These estimators are consistent and give consistent and asymptotically efficient estimates for regression coefficients. Simulations show the improved operating characteristics of the shrinkage estimators of the covariance matrix and the regression coefficients in finite samples. The final estimator chosen includes a combination of both shrinkage approaches, i.e., shrinking the eigenvalues and then shrinking toward structure. We illustrate our approach on a sleep EEG study that requires estimation of a 24 x 24 covariance matrix and for which inferences on mean parameters critically

  5. Lake Bathymetric Aquatic Vegetation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Aquatic vegetation represented as polygon features, coded with vegetation type (emergent, submergent, etc.) and field survey date. Polygons were digitized from...

  6. Covariant jump conditions in electromagnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A generally covariant four-dimensional representation of Maxwell’s electrodynamics in a generic material medium can be achieved straightforwardly in the metric-free formulation of electromagnetism. In this setup, the electromagnetic phenomena are described by two tensor fields, which satisfy Maxwell’s equations. A generic tensorial constitutive relation between these fields is an independent ingredient of the theory. By use of different constitutive relations (local and non-local, linear and non-linear, etc.), a wide area of applications can be covered. In the current paper, we present the jump conditions for the fields and for the energy–momentum tensor on an arbitrarily moving surface between two media. From the differential and integral Maxwell equations, we derive the covariant boundary conditions, which are independent of any metric and connection. These conditions include the covariantly defined surface current and are applicable to an arbitrarily moving smooth curved boundary surface. As an application of the presented jump formulas, we derive a Lorentzian type metric as a condition for existence of the wave front in isotropic media. This result holds for ordinary materials as well as for metamaterials with negative material constants. - Highlights: ► Covariant metric-free jump conditions for the electromagnetic field are derived. ► Covariantly defined surface current is considered. ► Lorentzian type metric from existence of the wave front in isotropic media. ► The result holds for ordinary materials as well as for metamaterials.

  7. Covariant jump conditions in electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Itin, Yakov

    2014-01-01

    A generally covariant four-dimensional representation of Maxwell's electrodynamics in a generic material medium can be achieved straightforwardly in the metric-free formulation of electromagnetism. In this setup, the electromagnetic phenomena described by two tensor fields, which satisfy Maxwell's equations. A generic tensorial constitutive relation between these fields is an independent ingredient of the theory. By use of different constitutive relations (local and non-local, linear and non-linear, etc.), a wide area of applications can be covered. In the current paper, we present the jump conditions for the fields and for the energy-momentum tensor on an arbitrarily moving surface between two media. From the differential and integral Maxwell equations, we derive the covariant boundary conditions, which are independent of any metric and connection. These conditions include the covariantly defined surface current and are applicable to an arbitrarily moving smooth curved boundary surface. As an application of ...

  8. GLq(N)-covariant quantum algebras and covariant differential calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GLq(N)-covariant quantum algebras with generators satisfying quadratic polynomial relations are considered. It is that, up to some innessential arbitrariness, there are only two kinds of such quantum algebras, namely, the algebras with q-deformed commutation and q-deformed anticommutation relations. 25 refs

  9. Cosmic censorship conjecture revisited: covariantly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we study the dynamics of the trapped region using a frame independent semi-tetrad covariant formalism for general locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) class II spacetimes. We covariantly prove some important geometrical results for the apparent horizon, and state the necessary and sufficient conditions for a singularity to be locally naked. These conditions bring out, for the first time in a quantitative and transparent manner, the importance of the Weyl curvature in deforming and delaying the trapped region during continual gravitational collapse, making the central singularity locally visible. (paper)

  10. Cosmic Censorship Conjecture revisited: Covariantly

    CERN Document Server

    Hamid, Aymen I M; Maharaj, Sunil D

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the dynamics of the trapped region using a frame independent semi-tetrad covariant formalism for general Locally Rotationally Symmetric (LRS) class II spacetimes. We covariantly prove some important geometrical results for the apparent horizon, and state the necessary and sufficient conditions for a singularity to be locally naked. These conditions bring out, for the first time in a quantitative and transparent manner, the importance of the Weyl curvature in deforming and delaying the trapped region during continual gravitational collapse, making the central singularity locally visible.

  11. Investigations of Altered Aquatic Ecosystems: Biomonitoring, Disease, and Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Lunde, Kevin Bryce

    2011-01-01

    Changes to hydrology, water chemistry, physical habitat, and the landscape surrounding aquatic ecosystems can have profound effects on their biological communities, potentially reducing important ecosystem services and functions provided to wildlife and humans. In this dissertation, I examine how environmental variables, human activities, and management practices have affected stream and wetland biota throughout Northern California. The parasitic trematode Ribeiroia ondatrae has been shown to...

  12. Covariation Neglect among Novice Investors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedesstrom, Ted Martin; Svedsater, Henrik; Garling, Tommy

    2006-01-01

    In 4 experiments, undergraduates made hypothetical investment choices. In Experiment 1, participants paid more attention to the volatility of individual assets than to the volatility of aggregated portfolios. The results of Experiment 2 show that most participants diversified even when this increased risk because of covariation between the returns…

  13. Relativistic covariance of Ohm's law

    CERN Document Server

    Starke, R

    2014-01-01

    The derivation of relativistic generalizations of Ohm's law has been a long-term issue in theoretical physics with deep implications for the study of relativistic plasmas in astrophysics and cosmology. Here we propose an alternative route to this problem by introducing the most general Lorentz covariant first order response law, which is written in terms of the fundamental response tensor $\\chi^\\mu_{~\

  14. Uncertainty covariances in robotics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of uncertainty covariance matrices in the analysis of robot trajectory errors is explored. First, relevant statistical concepts are reviewed briefly. Then, a simple, hypothetical robot model is considered to illustrate methods for error propagation and performance test data evaluation. The importance of including error correlations is emphasized

  15. CAM Photosynthesis in Submerged Aquatic Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a CO2-concentrating mechanism selected in response to aridity in terrestrial habitats, and, in aquatic environments, to ambient limitations of carbon. Evidence is reviewed for its presence in five genera of aquatic vascular plants, including Isoe??tes, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, Crassula, and Littorella. Initially, aquatic CAM was considered by some to be an oxymoron, but some aquatic species have been studied in sufficient detail to say definitively that they possess CAM photosynthesis. CO2-concentrating mechanisms in photosynthetic organs require a barrier to leakage; e.g., terrestrial C4 plants have suberized bundle sheath cells and terrestrial CAM plants high stomatal resistance. In aquatic CAM plants the primary barrier to CO2 leakage is the extremely high diffusional resistance of water. This, coupled with the sink provided by extensive intercellular gas space, generates daytime CO2(Pi) comparable to terrestrial CAM plants. CAM contributes to the carbon budget by both net carbon gain and carbon recycling, and the magnitude of each is environmentally influenced. Aquatic CAM plants inhabit sites where photosynthesis is potentially limited by carbon. Many occupy moderately fertile shallow temporary pools that experience extreme diel fluctuations in carbon availability. CAM plants are able to take advantage of elevated nighttime CO2 levels in these habitats. This gives them a competitive advantage over non-CAM species that are carbon starved during the day and an advantage over species that expend energy in membrane transport of bicarbonate. Some aquatic CAM plants are distributed in highly infertile lakes, where extreme carbon limitation and light are important selective factors. Compilation of reports on diel changes in titratable acidity and malate show 69 out of 180 species have significant overnight accumulation, although evidence is presented discounting CAM in some. It is concluded that similar proportions of the aquatic

  16. Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the Grand Calumet River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Laurel L.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2000-01-01

    The Grand Calumet River is potential habitat for a rich community of aquatic macroinvertebrates. Historical surveys of these organisms have been limited to post-industrialization of the Calumet Region; but because river habitats and conditions prior to industrialization have been described, past macroinvertebrate composition can be inferred. In the past 20 years, several surveys have been conducted in the Grand Calumet that have focused on a limited area, but when these studies are amassed the information available covers much of the river. In this paper, the aquatic macroinvertebrate communities in the river are described, and options for restoration are discussed. Many of the macroinvertebrates present are indicators of high levels of pollution, but a few pollution-sensitive species have been found. There is evidence, however, that the sediment quality has improved since the 1960's, likely due to pollution controls that have been put into place. Restoration opportunities should consider the macroinvertebrate community and the potential to improve sediment habitat without damaging the community structure.

  17. Impact of sampling efficiency on the performance of data-driven fish habitat models

    OpenAIRE

    Mouton, A.M.; Dillen, A.; Van den Neucker, T.; Buysse, D.; STEVENS, M.; Coeck, J.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, aquatic habitat modelling has gained more attention due to its relevance to river management, restoration and conservation biology. Although numerous habitat suitability models have been developed based on ecological data, data quality is often a key, but overlooked issue in the development of such models. This paper analysed the impact of sampling efficiency on the quality of data-driven habitat suitability models. Therefore, models were derived from fish habitat data ob...

  18. Landscape determinants and remote sensing of anopheline mosquito larval habitats in the western Kenya highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beck Louisa

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past two decades the east African highlands have experienced several major malaria epidemics. Currently there is a renewed interest in exploring the possibility of anopheline larval control through environmental management or larvicide as an additional means of reducing malaria transmission in Africa. This study examined the landscape determinants of anopheline mosquito larval habitats and usefulness of remote sensing in identifying these habitats in western Kenya highlands. Methods Panchromatic aerial photos, Ikonos and Landsat Thematic Mapper 7 satellite images were acquired for a study area in Kakamega, western Kenya. Supervised classification of land-use and land-cover and visual identification of aquatic habitats were conducted. Ground survey of all aquatic habitats was conducted in the dry and rainy seasons in 2003. All habitats positive for anopheline larvae were identified. The retrieved data from the remote sensors were compared to the ground results on aquatic habitats and land-use. The probability of finding aquatic habitats and habitats with Anopheles larvae were modelled based on the digital elevation model and land-use types. Results The misclassification rate of land-cover types was 10.8% based on Ikonos imagery, 22.6% for panchromatic aerial photos and 39.2% for Landsat TM 7 imagery. The Ikonos image identified 40.6% of aquatic habitats, aerial photos identified 10.6%, and Landsate TM 7 image identified 0%. Computer models based on topographic features and land-cover information obtained from the Ikonos image yielded a misclassification rate of 20.3–22.7% for aquatic habitats, and 18.1–25.1% for anopheline-positive larval habitats. Conclusion One-metre spatial resolution Ikonos images combined with computer modelling based on topographic land-cover features are useful tools for identification of anopheline larval habitats, and they can be used to assist to malaria vector control in western Kenya

  19. Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the lower Missouri River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), has been conducting research on the aquatic macroinvertebrates of the lower Missouri River since the mid-1990s. This research was initiated in response to the need for comprehensive characterization of biological communities inhabiting aquatic habitats in large river systems that have historically been poorly studied. The USGS Status and Trends of Biological Resources Program provided partial funding for pilot studies that began in 1993 when the CERC was part of the USFWS. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide stakeholders, scientists, management, and the general public with a basic summary of results from studies conducted by the CERC since that time period.

  20. Nitrous Oxide Emission by Aquatic Macrofauna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, Peter; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Schramm, Andreas

    Many macrofauna species co-ingest large quantities of microorganisms some of which survive the gut passage. Denitrifying bacteria, in particular, become metabolically induced by anoxic conditions, nitrate, and labile organic compounds in the gut of invertebrates. A striking consequence of the short......, respectively. Aside from these case studies, we screened more than 20 macrofauna species in various aquatic habitats for nitrous oxide production. Filter- and deposit-feeders that ingest large quantities of microorganisms were the most important emitters of nitrous oxide. In contrast, predatory species that do...... not ingest large quantities of microorganisms produced insignificant amounts of nitrous oxide. With increasing eutrophication, filter- and deposit-feeders often become the dominant feeding guilds of benthic communities. Thus, with increasing nitrate pollution, aquatic macrofauna has the potential to...

  1. Aquatic Life Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Aquatic Life Benchmarks is an EPA-developed set of criteria for freshwater species. These benchmarks are based on toxicity values reviewed by EPA and used in...

  2. Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Columbia River and groundwater well water sources are delivered to the Aquatic Research Laboratory (ARL), where these resources are used to conduct research on fish...

  3. Shrinkage Estimators for Covariance Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, Michael J.; Kass, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    Estimation of covariance matrices in small samples has been studied by many authors. Standard estimators, like the unstructured maximum likelihood estimator (ML) or restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimator, can be very unstable with the smallest estimated eigenvalues being too small and the largest too big. A standard approach to more stably estimating the matrix in small samples is to compute the ML or REML estimator under some simple structure that involves estimation of fewer paramet...

  4. Quantum covariant c-map

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrov, Sergei

    2007-01-01

    We generalize the covariant c-map found in hep-th/0701214 including perturbative quantum corrections. We also perform explicitly the superconformal quotient from the hyperkahler cone obtained by the quantum c-map to the quaternion-Kahler space, which is the moduli space of hypermultiplets. As a result, the perturbatively corrected metric on the moduli space is found in a simplified form comparing to the expression known in the literature.

  5. Molecular ecology of aquatic microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Abstracts of reports are presented from a meeting on Molecular Ecology of Aquatic Microbes. Topics included: opportunities offered to aquatic ecology by molecular biology; the role of aquatic microbes in biogeochemical cycles; characterization of the microbial community; the effect of the environment on aquatic microbes; and the targeting of specific biological processes.

  6. The H-Covariant Strong Picard Groupoid

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, Stefan; Waldmann, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The notion of H-covariant strong Morita equivalence is introduced for *-algebras over C = R(i) with an ordered ring R which are equipped with a *-action of a Hopf *-algebra H. This defines a corresponding H-covariant strong Picard groupoid which encodes the entire Morita theory. Dropping the positivity conditions one obtains H-covariant *-Morita equivalence with its H-covariant *-Picard groupoid. We discuss various groupoid morphisms between the corresponding notions of the Picard groupoids. ...

  7. Covariant Perturbations of Schwarzschild Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Clarkson, Chris A.; Barrett, Richard K.

    2002-01-01

    We present a new covariant and gauge-invariant perturbation formalism for dealing with spacetimes having spherical symmetry (or some preferred spatial direction) in the background, and apply it to the case of gravitational wave propagation in a Schwarzschild black hole spacetime. The 1+3 covariant approach is extended to a `1+1+2 covariant sheet' formalism by introducing a radial unit vector in addition to the timelike congruence, and decomposing all covariant quantities with respect to this....

  8. Are Maxwell's equations Lorentz-covariant?

    CERN Document Server

    Redzic, D V

    2016-01-01

    The statement that Maxwell's electrodynamics in vacuum is already covariant under Lorentz transformations is commonplace in the literature. We analyse the actual meaning of that statement and demonstrate that Maxwell's equations are perfectly fit to be Lorentz-covariant; they become Lorentz-covariant if we construct to be so, by postulating certain transformation properties of field functions. In Aristotelian terms, the covariance is a plain potentiality, but not necessarily entelechy.

  9. Introducing Aquatic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Kinne, Otto; Browman, Howard I.; Seaman, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The Inter-Research Science Center (IR) journals Marine Ecology Progress Series (MEPS) and Aquatic Microbial Ecology (AME) have been receiving increasing numbers of high-quality manuscripts that are principally biological, rather than ecological. With regret, we have had to turn these submissions away. Also, leading limnologists have for many years suggested that IR should provide an outlet for top quality articles on freshwater biology and ecology. Aquatic Biology (...

  10. Restoring Damaged Aquatic Ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, John

    2006-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems must play a major role to ensure that water, which is both essential and scarce, is always available for both present and future generations. This has become even more urgent in light of the ongoing increase in total world population and predicted changes in the world climate. Since aquatic ecosystems have been damaged at a rate far in excess of both natural restoration and anthropogenic restoration, it is essential that both restorative processes be accelerated. However, e...

  11. Covariant jump conditions in electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itin, Yakov

    2012-02-01

    A generally covariant four-dimensional representation of Maxwell's electrodynamics in a generic material medium can be achieved straightforwardly in the metric-free formulation of electromagnetism. In this setup, the electromagnetic phenomena are described by two tensor fields, which satisfy Maxwell's equations. A generic tensorial constitutive relation between these fields is an independent ingredient of the theory. By use of different constitutive relations (local and non-local, linear and non-linear, etc.), a wide area of applications can be covered. In the current paper, we present the jump conditions for the fields and for the energy-momentum tensor on an arbitrarily moving surface between two media. From the differential and integral Maxwell equations, we derive the covariant boundary conditions, which are independent of any metric and connection. These conditions include the covariantly defined surface current and are applicable to an arbitrarily moving smooth curved boundary surface. As an application of the presented jump formulas, we derive a Lorentzian type metric as a condition for existence of the wave front in isotropic media. This result holds for ordinary materials as well as for metamaterials with negative material constants.

  12. Poor oxic conditions in a large estuary reduce connectivity from marine to freshwater habitats of a diadromous fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétard, Stéphane; Feunteun, Eric; Bultel, Elise; Gadais, Romain; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Trancart, Thomas; Lasne, Emilien

    2016-02-01

    Connectivity in aquatic systems is often related to abundance and permeability of physical barriers, such as dams, which delay or impede movements of biota with important consequences for aquatic biodiversity. Water quality may, however, also control connectivity between essential habitats. In macrotidal estuaries, Estuarine Turbidity Maxima (ETM) have a strong impact on water quality because of the low oxygen concentration occurring as a response to the related high bacterial and low photosynthetic activities. In this study, we assess Allis shad estuarine spawning migration in 2011 and 2012 in the Loire River (France) where the ETM occurs at spring and summer. Using an acoustic telemetry array, we show that trans-estuarine migration is inhibited during hypoxic episodes in the middle part of the estuary. Shad tends to stay in downstream areas, and even at sea, where oxygen conditions are more suitable. Trans-estuarine migration occurs hastily during neap tide when the ETM decreases, both in terms of spatial extent and intensity, inducing a shift in a set of covariates including dissolved oxygen, which increases, and suspended matter, which decreases. In the context of climate warming, ETM are expected to increase with probable adverse implications for shad migration success and doubtless other diadromous populations.

  13. Covariant Quantization of D-branes

    OpenAIRE

    Kallosh, Renata

    1997-01-01

    We have found that kappa-symmetry allows a covariant quantization provided the ground state of the theory is strictly massive. For D-p-branes a Hamiltonian analysis is performed to explain the existence of a manifestly supersymmetric and Lorentz covariant description of the BPS states of the theory. The covariant quantization of the D-0-brane is presented as an example.

  14. Physical habitat structure of the lake shoreline and littoral zone -- How important is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent National Lakes Assessment (NLA) included the first national assessment of littoral and lakeshore physical habitat. It quantified water depth, surface characteristics, bank morphology, lake level fluctuations, substrate, fish concealment features, aquatic macrophytes, l...

  15. Contaminant discharge in habitat springs of the Barton Springs Salamander during storm rainfall events

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aquatic habitat of the endangered Barton Springs salamander, Eurycea sosorum, in Travis County, Texas can potentially be impacted by contaminants in surface runoff...

  16. Colorado Plateau Rapid Ecoregion Assessment Management Question B7: What is the location/distribution of these aquatic biodiversity sites?

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior — This map shows water features where aquatic biodiversity is likely to be important. It shows buffered streams, wetlands, and deepwater habitats that fall within...

  17. WILDLIFE HABITAT INVENTORY

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNDOĞDU, Ebubekir

    2009-01-01

    This study focused on what does habitat mean in wildlife, which factors it contains, how to make inventory for these factors and how to analyses habitat according to chosen species. In spite of habitat inventory has various meanings for varying areas and species by examining literature on this issue the most preferred habitat inventory standards are presented in this article. Keywords: Habitat, Inventory, Mapping

  18. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  19. Hydrology and density feedbacks control the ecology of intermediate hosts of schistosomiasis across habitats in seasonal climates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Saez, Javier; Mande, Theophile; Ceperley, Natalie; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mari, Lorenzo; Gatto, Marino; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We report about field and theoretical studies on the ecology of the aquatic snails (Bulinus spp. and Biomphalaria pfeifferi) that serve as obligate intermediate hosts in the complex life cycle of the parasites causing human schistosomiasis. Snail abundance fosters disease transmission, and thus the dynamics of snail populations are critically important for schistosomiasis modeling and control. Here, we single out hydrological drivers and density dependence (or lack of it) of ecological growth rates of local snail populations by contrasting novel ecological and environmental data with various models of host demography. Specifically, we study various natural and man-made habitats across Burkina Faso's highly seasonal climatic zones. Demographic models are ranked through formal model comparison and structural risk minimization. The latter allows us to evaluate the suitability of population models while clarifying the relevant covariates that explain empirical observations of snail abundance under the actual climatic forcings experienced by the various field sites. Our results link quantitatively hydrological drivers to distinct population dynamics through specific density feedbacks, and show that statistical methods based on model averaging provide reliable snail abundance projections. The consistency of our ranking results suggests the use of ad hoc models of snail demography depending on habitat type (e.g., natural vs. man-made) and hydrological characteristics (e.g., ephemeral vs. permanent). Implications for risk mapping and space-time allocation of control measures in schistosomiasis-endemic contexts are discussed. PMID:27162339

  20. The Habitat Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Consists of activities which address the causes of habitat destruction and the effects of habitat loss on animals and plants. Identifies habitat loss as the major reason for the endangerment and extinction of plant and animal species. (ML)

  1. Louisiana ESI: HABITATS (Habitat and Plant Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for coastal habitats in Louisiana. Vector polygons represent various habitats, including marsh types,...

  2. EcologicHabitat_WLH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Wildlife Linkage Habitat Analysis uses landscape scale data to identify or predict the location of potentially significant wildlife linkage habitats (WLH)...

  3. The role of habitat filtering in the leaf economics spectrum and plant susceptibility to pathogen infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Miranda E; Cronin, James P.; Mitchell, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    1.The Leaf Economics Spectrum (LES) describes global covariation in the traits of plant leaves. The LES is thought to arise from biophysical constraints and habitat filtering (ecological selection against unfit trait combinations along environmental gradients). However, the role of habitat filtering in generating the LES has not been tested experimentally.

  4. Microbial biotechnology for remediation of aquatic habitats polluted with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorica Coşier

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromium may occur in nine different forms of oxidation ranging from ?II to +VI, with forms II, III and VI as the most commonly encountered. In Cluj county, chromium pollution dates well back in time and has caused important dysfunction to the mechanical-biological wastewater purification station of the city of Cluj (Coşier & Diţă 1996. The purpose of this study was to develop one microbial method able to reduce hexavalent chromium (mobile, permeable to cell membrane, carcinogenic and mutagenic (Ishikawa et al 1994 to the trivalent form (insoluble and an essential element for humans (Song et al 2006. Different sources of chromium-reducing bacteria and many sources of carbon and energy added to the Kvasnikov mineral basal medium (Komori et al 1990 with increasing amount of chromate (200- 1000 mg/l were tested. Two bacterial strains, able to reduce even 1000 mg chromate/l, were isolated in pure culture. For one of these bacterial strains, we determined the optimum conditions for the reduction of Cr (VI.

  5. Contaminated Aquatic Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglal, Kendrick

    2016-10-01

    A review of the literature published in 2015 relating to the assessment, evaluation and remediation of contaminated aquatic sediments is presented. The review is divided into the following main sections: policy and guidance, methodology, distribution, fate and transport, risk, toxicity and remediation. PMID:27620103

  6. Aquatic Environment 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, L. M.; Bijl, L. van der; Boutrup, S.; Iversen, T. M.; Ellermann, T.; Hovmand, M. F.; Bøgestrand, J.; Grant, R.; Hansen, J.; Jensen, J. P.; Stockmarr, J.; Laursen, K. D.

    The report summarizes the results of the Danish Aquatic Monitoring and Assessment Programme 1998-2003. Danish Environmental Protection Agency 2000: NOVA-2003. Programbeskrivelse for det nationale program for overvågning af vandmiljøet 1998-2003. 397 pp. - Redegørelse fra Miljøstyrelsen nr. 1 (in...

  7. Principle of general covariance and quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors emphasise the distinction between formal and operational notions of general covariance. Classical, formal covariance implies operational covariance. This is not true in quantum theory. Two observers may not agree on the results of measurement of a tensorial object like T/sub ik/ (stress tensor) in quantum theory. In particular, one observer might conclude that the measured value is zero while another might attribute non-zero value to it

  8. Balancing Covariates via Propensity Score Weighting

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Fan; Morgan, Kari Lock; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    Covariate balance is crucial for an unconfounded descriptive or causal comparison. However, lack of balance is common in observational studies. This article considers weighting strategies for balancing covariates. We define a general class of weights-the balancing weights-that balance the weighted distributions of the covariates between treatment groups. These weights incorporate the propensity score to weight each group to an analyst-selected target population. This class unifies existing we...

  9. Adaptive covariance estimation of locally stationary processes

    OpenAIRE

    Mallat, Stéphane; Papanicolaou, George; Zhang, Zhifeng

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that the covariance operator of a locally stationary process has approximate eigenvectors that are local cosine functions. We model locally stationary processes with pseudo-differential operators that are time-varying convolutions. An adaptive covariance estimation is calculated by searching first for a "best" local cosine basis which approximates the covariance by a band or a diagonal matrix. The estimation is obtained from regularized versions of the diagonal coefficients in the...

  10. Kalman Filtering with Unknown Noise Covariances

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Since it is often difficult to identify the noise covariances for a Kalman filter, they are commonly considered design variables. If so, we can as well try to choose them so that the corresponding Kalman filter has some nice form. In this paper, we introduce a one-parameter subfamily of Kalman filters with the property that the covariance parameters cancel in the expression for the Kalman gain. We provide a simple criterion which guarantees that the implicitly defined process covariance matri...

  11. Competing risks and time-dependent covariates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Andersen, Per K

    2010-01-01

    classified by Kalbfleisch and Prentice [The Statistical Analysis of Failure Time Data, Wiley, New York, 2002] with the intent of clarifying their role and emphasizing the limitations in standard survival models and in the competing risks setting. If random (internal) time-dependent covariates are to be......Time-dependent covariates are frequently encountered in regression analysis for event history data and competing risks. They are often essential predictors, which cannot be substituted by time-fixed covariates. This study briefly recalls the different types of time-dependent covariates, as...

  12. Synge's covariant conservation laws for general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following Synge, the covariant formulas for the total four-momentum and angular momentum of an isolated physical system in general relativity are derived. These formulas ar first obtained in the weak-field approximation, for which they are shown to be expressible in surface integral form, to be unique, and to represent covariantly conserved quantities. The covariant expressions for the general case are then shown to be identical to those for the weak-field case. The uniquely determined and covariantly conserved quantities so obtained are found to agree with the corresponding canonical, noncovariant surface integral expressions

  13. Conformal covariance and the split property

    CERN Document Server

    Morinelli, Vincenzo; Weiner, Mihály

    2016-01-01

    We show that for a conformal local net of observables on the circle, the split property is automatic. Both full conformal covariance (i.e. diffeomorphism covariance) and the circle-setting play essential roles in this fact, while by previously constructed examples it was already known that even on the circle, M\\"obius covariance does not imply the split property. On the other hand, here we also provide an example of a local conformal net living on the two-dimensional Minkowski space, which - although being diffeomorphism covariant - does not have the split property.

  14. Detailed seafloor habitat mapping to enhance marine-resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawada, David G.; Hart, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    Pictures of the seafloor capture important information about the sediments, exposed geologic features, submerged aquatic vegetation, and animals found in a given habitat. With the emergence of marine protected areas (MPAs) as a favored tactic for preserving coral reef resources, knowledge of essential habitat components is paramount to designing effective management strategies. Surprisingly, detailed information on seafloor habitat components is not available in many areas that are being considered for MPA designation or that are already designated as MPAs. A task of the U.S. Geological Survey Coral Reef Ecosystem STudies (USGS CREST) project is addressing this issue.

  15. Aquatic Pest Control. Manual 99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Agricultural Experiment Station.

    This training manual provides information needed to meet the minimum EPA standards for certification as a commercial applicator of pesticides in the aquatic pest control category. The text discusses various water use situations; aquatic weed identification; herbicide use and effects; and aquatic insects and their control. (CS)

  16. Introduced aquatic plants and algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-native aquatic plants such as waterhyacinth and hydrilla severely impair the uses of aquatic resources including recreational faculties (lakes, reservoirs, rivers) as well as timely delivery of irrigation water for agriculture. Costs associated with impacts and management of all types of aquatic...

  17. Invasive ornamental fish: a potential threat to aquatic biodiversity in peninsular India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.D.M. Knight

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alien fish find their way into newer habitats and ecosystems opportunistically. Once in a new habitat, these species try to occupy empty niches and compete with native species. An alien species becomes invasive wherever it has a competetive advantage over native species. Ecology of aquatic invasive alien species is rather poorly understood as most attention has been on invertebrates as that which spread through ballast water. Invasive alien species of fish that have taken advantage of the aquarium trade are emerging as the most important threats to fragile aquatic habitats. Regulations to this trade are rather weak and there is a general lack of data on the ecological impact of alien fish species despite the fact that a third of the world’s worst aquatic invasive species are aquarium or ornamental species.

  18. Intermittent pool beds are permanent cyclic habitats with distinct wet, moist and dry phases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony I Dell

    Full Text Available Recognition that intermittent pools are a single habitat phase of an intermittent pool bed that cycles between aquatic and terrestrial habitat greatly enhances their usefulness for addressing general questions in ecology. The aquatic phase has served as a model system in many ecological studies, because it has distinct habitat boundaries in space and time and is an excellent experimental system, but the aquatic to terrestrial transition and terrestrial phase remain largely unstudied. We conducted a field experiment within six replicate natural intermittent pool beds to explore macroinvertebrate community dynamics during the transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitat and during the terrestrial phase. We monitored and compared macroinvertebrate communities within leaf packs that i remained wet, ii underwent drying (i.e., started wet and then dried, and iii remained dry. Our results show that i a diverse macroinvertebrate community inhabits all phases of intermittent pool beds, ii pool drying involves colonization by an assemblage of macroinvertebrates not recorded in permanently terrestrial leaf packs, iii the community within dried leaf packs remains distinct from that of permanently terrestrial leaf packs for an extended period following drying (possibly until subsequent refilling, and iv there are likely to be strong spatial and temporal resource linkages between the aquatic and terrestrial communities. The unique environmental characteristics of intermittent pool beds, which repeatedly cycle from aquatic to terrestrial habitat, should continue to make them valuable study systems.

  19. Aquatic polymers can drive pathogen transmission in coastal ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, Karen; Krusor, Colin; Mazzillo, Fernanda F. M.; Conrad, Patricia A.; Largier, John L.; Jonna A K Mazet; Silver, Mary W.

    2014-01-01

    Gelatinous polymers including extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) are fundamental to biophysical processes in aquatic habitats, including mediating aggregation processes and functioning as the matrix of biofilms. Yet insight into the impact of these sticky molecules on the environmental transmission of pathogens in the ocean is limited. We used the zoonotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii as a model to evaluate polymer-mediated mechanisms that promote transmission of terrestrially derived pa...

  20. Freshwater Ecosystems and Resilience of Pacific Salmon: Habitat Management Based on Natural Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon H Reeves; Dunham, Jason B.; Bisson, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    In spite of numerous habitat restoration programs in fresh waters with an aggregate annual funding of millions of dollars, many populations of Pacific salmon remain significantly imperiled. Habitat restoration strategies that address limited environmental attributes and partial salmon life-history requirements or approaches that attempt to force aquatic habitat to conform to idealized but ecologically unsustainable conditions may partly explain this lack of response. Natural watershed process...

  1. Broad-Scale Comparison of Photosynthesis in Terrestrial and Aquatic Plant Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand-Jensen, Kaj; Krause-Jensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    Comparisons of photosynthesis in terrestrial and aquatic habitats have been impaired by differences in methods and time-scales of measurements. We compiled information on gross photosynthesis at high irradiance and photosynthetic efficiency at low irradiance from 109 published terrestrial studies...... of forests, grasslands and crops and 319 aquatic studies of phytoplankton, macrophyte and attached microalgal communities to test if specific differences existed between the communities. Maximum gross photosynthesis and photosynthetic efficiency were systematically higher in terrestrial than in...

  2. Improving aquatic warbler population assessments by accounting for imperfect detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Oppel

    Full Text Available Monitoring programs designed to assess changes in population size over time need to account for imperfect detection and provide estimates of precision around annual abundance estimates. Especially for species dependent on conservation management, robust monitoring is essential to evaluate the effectiveness of management. Many bird species of temperate grasslands depend on specific conservation management to maintain suitable breeding habitat. One such species is the Aquatic Warbler (Acrocephalus paludicola, which breeds in open fen mires in Central Europe. Aquatic Warbler populations have so far been assessed using a complete survey that aims to enumerate all singing males over a large area. Because this approach provides no estimate of precision and does not account for observation error, detecting moderate population changes is challenging. From 2011 to 2013 we trialled a new line transect sampling monitoring design in the Biebrza valley, Poland, to estimate abundance of singing male Aquatic Warblers. We surveyed Aquatic Warblers repeatedly along 50 randomly placed 1-km transects, and used binomial mixture models to estimate abundances per transect. The repeated line transect sampling required 150 observer days, and thus less effort than the traditional 'full count' approach (175 observer days. Aquatic Warbler abundance was highest at intermediate water levels, and detection probability varied between years and was influenced by vegetation height. A power analysis indicated that our line transect sampling design had a power of 68% to detect a 20% population change over 10 years, whereas raw count data had a 9% power to detect the same trend. Thus, by accounting for imperfect detection we increased the power to detect population changes. We recommend to adopt the repeated line transect sampling approach for monitoring Aquatic Warblers in Poland and in other important breeding areas to monitor changes in population size and the effects of

  3. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV), Eelgrass beds, estuarine and marine wetlands in Narragansett Bay delineated from 1999 true color aerial photography and coded according to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Classification of Wetlands and Deepwater Habitats of the United States (Cowardin, , Published in 2003, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Orthoimagery information as of 2003. It...

  4. Treatment Effects with Many Covariates and Heteroskedasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cattaneo, Matias D.; Jansson, Michael; Newey, Whitney K.

    propose a new heteroskedasticity consistent standard error formula that is fully automatic and robust to both (conditional) heteroskedasticity of unknown form and the inclusion of possibly many covariates. We apply our findings to three settings: (i) parametric linear models with many covariates, (ii...

  5. Aquatic Ecology Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Population studies were concerned with predicting long-term consequences of mortality imposed on animal populations by man's activities. These studies consisted of development of a generalized life cycle model and an empirical impingement model for use in impact analysis. Chemical effects studies were conducted on chlorine minimization; fouling by the Asiatic clam; identification of halogenated organics in cooling water; and effects of halogenated organics in cooling systems on aquatic organisms. Ecological transport studies were conducted on availability of sediment-bound 137Cs and 60Co to fish; 137Cs and 60Co in White Oak Lake fish; and chromium levels in fish from a lake chronically contaminated with chromates from cooling towers. Progress is also reported on the following: effects of irradiation on thermal tolerance of mosquito fish; toxicity of nickel to the developing eggs and larvae of carp; accumulation of selected heavy metals associated with fly ash; and environmental monitoring of aquatic ecosystems

  6. Columbia River ESI: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), rare plant species [Water howellia (Howelia aquatilis) and...

  7. Western Alaska ESI: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in Western Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  8. Effect modification by time-varying covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, James M; Hernán, Miguel A; Rotnitzky, Andrea

    2007-11-01

    Marginal structural models (MSMs) allow estimation of effect modification by baseline covariates, but they are less useful for estimating effect modification by evolving time-varying covariates. Rather, structural nested models (SNMs) were specifically designed to estimate effect modification by time-varying covariates. In their paper, Petersen et al. (Am J Epidemiol 2007;166:985-993) describe history-adjusted MSMs as a generalized form of MSM and argue that history-adjusted MSMs allow a researcher to easily estimate effect modification by time-varying covariates. However, history-adjusted MSMs can result in logically incompatible parameter estimates and hence in contradictory substantive conclusions. Here the authors propose a more restrictive definition of history-adjusted MSMs than the one provided by Petersen et al. and compare the advantages and disadvantages of using history-adjusted MSMs, as opposed to SNMs, to examine effect modification by time-dependent covariates. PMID:17875581

  9. Ecological limitations on aquatic mosquito predator colonization in the urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John; Keating, Joseph; Mbogo, Charles M; Kahindi, Samuel; Beier, John C

    2004-12-01

    Urban malaria cases are becoming common in Africa as more people move into cities and industrialization proceeds. While many species of Anopheles mosquitoes vector malaria in rural areas, only a few are found within cities. The success of anthropophilic species in cities, such as members of the An. gambiae complex, may be explained by limitations on colonization by predator species in urban environments. Habitats that are temporal or structurally simple have lower predator survivorship in a variety of ecosystems, but these have not been investigated previously in an urban area. Areas within and around the Kenyan coastal town of Malindi were previously sampled for the presence of standing water using a geographic sampling strategy with probability proportional to size sampling of planned well-drained, unplanned poorly-drained, planned poorly-drained, unplanned well-drained, and peri-urban locations. Standing aquatic habitats in these areas were reassessed. During monthly sampling, presence/absence of mosquitoes and predator taxa were noted, as were ecological habitat variables: structural complexity and presence of water. Lambda statistics were calculated to associate predator guilds, habitat types, location variables, and ecological variables. All predator guilds found in habitats were strongly associated with habitat type, as were the structural complexity and temporal nature of the habitats. Types of habitat were heterogeneously distributed throughout Malindi, with swimming pools as a common habitat type in planned urban areas and tire track pools a common habitat type in peri-urban areas of Malindi. Predator colonization of aquatic habitats in Malindi was strongly influenced by habitat type, and not associated with location characteristics. Ecological variables were affected by the type of habitats, which are co-associated with planning and drainage in Malindi. While habitat types are distributed heterogeneously within Malindi, habitats with low predation

  10. General covariance and quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extension of the principle of relativity to general coordinate systems is based on the hypothesis that an accelerated observer is locally equivalent to a hypothetical inertial observer with the same velocity as the noninertial observer. This hypothesis of locality is expected to be valid for classical particle phenomena as well as for classical wave phenomena but only in the short-wavelength approximation. The generally covariant theory is therefore expected to be in conflict with the quantum theory which is based on wave-particle duality. This is explicitly demonstrated for the frequency of electromagnetic radiation measured by a uniformly rotating observer. The standard Doppler formula is shown to be valid only in the geometric optics approximation. A new definition for the frequency is proposed, and the resulting formula for the frequency measured by the rotating observer is shown to be consistent with expectations based on the classical theory of electrons. A tentative quantum theory is developed on the basis of the generalization of the Bohr frequency condition to include accelerated observers. The description of the causal sequence of events is assumed to be independent of the motion of the observer. Furthermore, the quantum hypothesis is supposed to be valid for all observers. The implications of this theory are critically examined. The new formula for frequency, which is still based on the hypothesis of locality, leads to the observation of negative energy quanta by the rotating observer and is therefore in conflict with the quantum theory

  11. Tunneling times with covariant measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kiukas, J; Werner, R F; 10.1007/s10701-009-9275-z

    2009-01-01

    We consider the time delay of massive, non-relativistic, one-dimensional particles due to a tunneling potential. In this setting the well-known Hartman effect asserts that often the sub-ensemble of particles going through the tunnel seems to cross the tunnel region instantaneously. An obstacle to the utilization of this effect for getting faster signals is the exponential damping by the tunnel, so there seems to be a trade-off between speedup and intensity. In this paper we prove that this trade-off is never in favor of faster signals: the probability for a signal to reach its destination before some deadline is always reduced by the tunnel, for arbitrary incoming states, arbitrary positive and compactly supported tunnel potentials, and arbitrary detectors. More specifically, we show this for several different ways to define ``the same incoming state'' and ''the same detector'' when comparing the settings with and without tunnel potential. The arrival time measurements are expressed in the time-covariant appr...

  12. Contaminants in oil field produced waters discharged into the Loch Katrine Wetland Complex, Park County, Wyoming and their bioconcentration in the aquatic bird food chain

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 866-acre Loch Katrine wetland complex in Park County, Wyoming provides habitat for many species of aquatic birds. However, the complex is sustained primarily by...

  13. Late cretaceous aquatic plant world in Patagonia, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cúneo, N Rubén; Gandolfo, María A; Zamaloa, María C; Hermsen, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution, we describe latest Cretaceous aquatic plant communities from the La Colonia Formation, Patagonia, Argentina, based on their taxonomic components and paleoecological attributes. The La Colonia Formation is a geological unit deposited during a Maastrichtian-Danian transgressive episode of the South Atlantic Ocean. This event resulted in the deposition of a series of fine-grained sediments associated with lagoon systems occurring along irregular coastal plains in northern Patagonia. These deposits preserved a diverse biota, including aquatic and terrestrial plants and animals. The aquatic macrophytes can be broadly divided into two groups: free-floating and rooted, the latter with emergent or floating leaves. Free-floating macrophytes include ferns in Salviniaceae (Azolla and Paleoazolla) and a monocot (Araceae). Floating microphytes include green algae (Botryoccocus, Pediastrum and Zygnemataceae). Among the rooted components, marsileaceous water ferns (including Regnellidium and an extinct form) and the eudicot angiosperm Nelumbo (Nelumbonaceae) are the dominant groups. Terrestrial plants occurring in the vegetation surrounding the lagoons include monocots (palms and Typhaceae), ferns with affinities to Dicksoniaceae, conifers, and dicots. A reconstruction of the aquatic plant paleocommuniy is provided based on the distribution of the fossils along a freshwater horizon within the La Colonia Formation. This contribution constitutes the first reconstruction of a Cretaceous aquatic habitat for southern South America. PMID:25148081

  14. Late cretaceous aquatic plant world in Patagonia, Argentina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Rubén Cúneo

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we describe latest Cretaceous aquatic plant communities from the La Colonia Formation, Patagonia, Argentina, based on their taxonomic components and paleoecological attributes. The La Colonia Formation is a geological unit deposited during a Maastrichtian-Danian transgressive episode of the South Atlantic Ocean. This event resulted in the deposition of a series of fine-grained sediments associated with lagoon systems occurring along irregular coastal plains in northern Patagonia. These deposits preserved a diverse biota, including aquatic and terrestrial plants and animals. The aquatic macrophytes can be broadly divided into two groups: free-floating and rooted, the latter with emergent or floating leaves. Free-floating macrophytes include ferns in Salviniaceae (Azolla and Paleoazolla and a monocot (Araceae. Floating microphytes include green algae (Botryoccocus, Pediastrum and Zygnemataceae. Among the rooted components, marsileaceous water ferns (including Regnellidium and an extinct form and the eudicot angiosperm Nelumbo (Nelumbonaceae are the dominant groups. Terrestrial plants occurring in the vegetation surrounding the lagoons include monocots (palms and Typhaceae, ferns with affinities to Dicksoniaceae, conifers, and dicots. A reconstruction of the aquatic plant paleocommuniy is provided based on the distribution of the fossils along a freshwater horizon within the La Colonia Formation. This contribution constitutes the first reconstruction of a Cretaceous aquatic habitat for southern South America.

  15. Aquatic invertebrate communities in tank bromeliads: how well do classic ecological patterns apply?

    OpenAIRE

    Jocque, Merlijn; Field, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Tank bromeliads (Bromeliaceae) often occur in high densities in the Neotropics and represent a key freshwater habitat in montane forests, housing quite complex invertebrate communities. We tested the extent to which there are species richness–altitude, richness–environment, richness–size, richness–habitat complexity and richness–isolation relationships for the aquatic invertebrate communities from 157 bromeliads in Cusuco National Park, Honduras. We found that invertebrate species richness an...

  16. Efficacy of trap modifications for increasing capture rates of aquatic snakes in floating aquatic funnel traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing detection and capture probabilities of rare or elusive herpetofauna of conservation concern is important to inform the scientific basis for their management and recovery. The Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is an example of a secretive, wary, and generally difficult-to-sample species about which little is known regarding its patterns of occurrence and demography. We therefore evaluated modifications to existing traps to increase the detection and capture probabilities of the Giant Gartersnake to improve the precision with which occurrence, abundance, survival, and other demographic parameters are estimated. We found that adding a one-way valve constructed of cable ties to the small funnel opening of traps and adding hardware cloth extensions to the wide end of funnels increased capture rates of the Giant Gartersnake by 5.55 times (95% credible interval = 2.45–10.51) relative to unmodified traps. The effectiveness of these modifications was insensitive to the aquatic habitat type in which they were deployed. The snout-vent length of the smallest and largest captured snakes did not vary among trap modifications. These trap modifications are expected to increase detection and capture probabilities of the Giant Gartersnake, and show promise for increasing the precision with which demographic parameters can be estimated for this species. We anticipate that the trap modifications found effective in this study will be applicable to a variety of aquatic and semi-aquatic reptiles and amphibians and improve conservation efforts for these species.

  17. Habitat monitoring plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Management of habitat is required in order to achieve the refuge purpose and wildlife objectives. The Upland Habitat Management Plan (1993, Interim Plan) and the...

  18. California Condor Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These Data identify (in general) the areas where critical habitat for the California Condor occur. Critical habitat for the species consists of the following 10...

  19. Predictive Seagrass Habitat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restoration of ecosystem services provided by seagrass habitats in estuaries requires a firm understanding of the modes of action of multiple interacting stressors including nutrients, climate change, coastal land-use change, and habitat modification. We explored the application...

  20. EcologicHabitat_WCV

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — WCV describes the value of the Wildlife Habitat Suitability as it approaches the state highway system. This analysis was designed to use the Wildlife Habitat...

  1. Sustainable exploitation and management of aquatic resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Köster, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    surrounding environment.Freshwater fisheries and ecology is devoted to looking at the behaviour of particular speciesof fish and their interaction with the environment. Coastal ecology deals with the structure and function ofthe ecosystems as a habitat for fish and shellfish as well as with coastal area...... ecosystem approach whichutilizes synergies in natural and technical sciencedisciplines. DTU Aqua advises the Danish Ministry ofFood, Agriculture and Fisheries and other publicauthorities, the commercial fisheries, theaquaculture industry and international commissions.DTU Aqua deals with all types ofaquatic...... ocean and how these factors impact the living conditions formarine organisms. Population genetics aims at gaining knowledge on how to preserve and managebiodiversity sustainably. Individual biology deals with the biology of aquatic organisms and theirinteraction with other organisms and with the...

  2. The covariant quantum Green-Schwarz superstring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First we present the covariantly quantized space-time supersymmetric superstring. The main ingredients are additional auxiliary variables and their corresponding auxiliary gauge symmetries. They allow a Lorentz covariant gauge fixed lagrangian path integral which has the form of a free 2-dimensional conformal field theory with a finite number of 2-dimensional world-sheet fields and ghosts. Next we show that the path integral is anomaly free in 10 space-time dimensions. Then, by a canonical (operator) quantization we obtain in the point-particle limit the covariant equations of motion of the D=10 super Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. (authors)

  3. The Relationship between an Invasive Shrub and Soil Moisture: Seasonal Interactions and Spatially Covarying Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong He

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that positive relationships between invasive plants and soil can contribute to further plant invasions. However, it remains unclear whether these relations remain unchanged throughout the growing season. In this study, spatial sequences of field observations along a transect were used to reveal seasonal interactions and spatially covarying relations between one common invasive shrub (Tartarian Honeysuckle, Lonicera tatarica and soil moisture in a tall grassland habitat. Statistical analysis over the transect shows that the contrast between soil moisture in shrub and herbaceous patches vary with season and precipitation. Overall, a negatively covarying relationship between shrub and soil moisture (i.e., drier surface soils at shrub microsites exists during the very early growing period (e.g., May, while in summer a positively covarying phenomenon (i.e., wetter soils under shrubs is usually evident, but could be weakened or vanish during long precipitation-free periods. If there is sufficient rainfall, surface soil moisture and leaf area index (LAI often spatially covary with significant spatial oscillations at an invariant scale (which is governed by the shrub spatial pattern and is about 8 m, but their phase relation in space varies with season, consistent with the seasonal variability of the co-varying phenomena between shrub invasion and soil water content. The findings are important for establishing a more complete picture of how shrub invasion affects soil moisture.

  4. Comment on covariant Stora--Zumino chain terms

    OpenAIRE

    Adam, C.

    1999-01-01

    In a recent paper, Ekstrand proposed a simple expression from which covariant anomaly, covariant Schwinger term and higher covariant chain terms may be computed. We comment on the relation of his result to the earlier work of Tsutsui.

  5. Tool use by aquatic animals

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Janet; Patterson, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Tool-use research has focused primarily on land-based animals, with less consideration given to aquatic animals and the environmental challenges and conditions they face. Here, we review aquatic tool use and examine the contributing ecological, physiological, cognitive and social factors. Tool use among aquatic animals is rare but taxonomically diverse, occurring in fish, cephalopods, mammals, crabs, urchins and possibly gastropods. While additional research is required, the scarcity of tool ...

  6. Anopheline larval habitats seasonality and species distribution: a prerequisite for effective targeted larval habitats control programmes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliningaya J Kweka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Larval control is of paramount importance in the reduction of malaria vector abundance and subsequent disease transmission reduction. Understanding larval habitat succession and its ecology in different land use managements and cropping systems can give an insight for effective larval source management practices. This study investigated larval habitat succession and ecological parameters which influence larval abundance in malaria epidemic prone areas of western Kenya. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A total of 51 aquatic habitats positive for anopheline larvae were surveyed and visited once a week for a period of 85 weeks in succession. Habitats were selected and identified. Mosquito larval species, physico-chemical parameters, habitat size, grass cover, crop cycle and distance to nearest house were recorded. Polymerase chain reaction revealed that An. gambiae s.l was the most dominant vector species comprised of An.gambiae s.s (77.60% and An.arabiensis (18.34%, the remaining 4.06% had no amplification by polymerase chain reaction. Physico-chemical parameters and habitat size significantly influenced abundance of An. gambiae s.s (P = 0.024 and An. arabiensis (P = 0.002 larvae. Further, larval species abundance was influenced by crop cycle (P≤0.001, grass cover (P≤0.001, while distance to nearest houses significantly influenced the abundance of mosquito species larvae (r = 0.920;P≤0.001. The number of predator species influenced mosquito larval abundance in different habitat types. Crop weeding significantly influenced with the abundance of An.gambiae s.l (P≤0.001 when preceded with fertilizer application. Significantly higher anopheline larval abundance was recorded in habitats in pasture compared to farmland (P = 0.002. When habitat stability and habitat types were considered, hoof print were the most productive followed by disused goldmines. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that implementation of effective larval

  7. Ohio Aquatic Gap Analysis-An Assessment of the Biodiversity and Conservation Status of Native Aquatic Animal Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, S. Alex; Kula, Stephanie P.; Simonson, Laura A.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the GAP Analysis Program is to keep common species common by identifying those species and habitats that are not yet adequately represented in the existing matrix of conservation lands. The Gap Analysis Program (GAP) is sponsored by the Biological Resources Discipline of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The Ohio Aquatic GAP (OH-GAP) is a pilot project that is applying the GAP concept to aquatic-specifically, riverine-data. The mission of GAP is to provide regional assessments of the conservation status of native animal species and to facilitate the application of this information to land-management activities. OH-GAP accomplished this through * mapping aquatic habitat types, * mapping the predicted distributions of fish, crayfish, and bivalves, * documenting the presence of aquatic species in areas managed for conservation, * providing GAP results to the public, planners, managers, policy makers, and researchers, and * building cooperation with multiple organizations to apply GAP results to state and regional management activities. Gap analysis is a coarse-scale assessment of aquatic biodiversity and conservation; the goal is to identify gaps in the conservation of native aquatic species. It is not a substitute for biological field studies and monitoring programs. Gap analysis was conducted for the continuously flowing streams in Ohio. Lakes, reservoirs, wetlands, and the Lake Erie islands were not included in this analysis. The streams in Ohio are in the Lake Erie and Ohio River watersheds and pass through six of the level III ecoregions defined by Omernik: the Eastern Corn Belt Plains, Southern Michigan/Northern Indiana Drift Plains, Huron/Erie Lake Plain, Erie Drift Plains, Interior Plateau, and the Western Allegheny Plateau. To characterize the aquatic habitats available to Ohio fish, crayfish, and bivalves, a classification system needed to be developed and mapped. The process of classification includes delineation of areas of relative

  8. Modular covariance, PCT, spin and statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Guido, D

    1995-01-01

    The notion of modular covariance is reviewed and the reconstruction of the Poincar\\'e group extended to the low-dimensional case. The relations with the PCT symmetry and the Spin and Statistics theorem are described.

  9. The Covariant Picard Groupoid in Differential Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Waldmann, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    In this article we discuss some general results on the covariant Picard groupoid in the context of differential geometry and interpret the problem of lifting Lie algebra actions to line bundles in the Picard groupoid approach.

  10. Covariance data evaluation for experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some methods and codes have been developed and utilized for covariance data evaluation of experimental data, including parameter analysis, physical analysis, Spline fitting etc.. These methods and codes can be used in many different cases

  11. Forecasting Covariance Matrices: A Mixed Frequency Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halbleib, Roxana; Voev, Valeri

    This paper proposes a new method for forecasting covariance matrices of financial returns. The model mixes volatility forecasts from a dynamic model of daily realized volatilities estimated with high-frequency data with correlation forecasts based on daily data. This new approach allows for flexi......This paper proposes a new method for forecasting covariance matrices of financial returns. The model mixes volatility forecasts from a dynamic model of daily realized volatilities estimated with high-frequency data with correlation forecasts based on daily data. This new approach allows...... for flexible dependence patterns for volatilities and correlations, and can be applied to covariance matrices of large dimensions. The separate modeling of volatility and correlation forecasts considerably reduces the estimation and measurement error implied by the joint estimation and modeling of covariance...

  12. Characteristic Polynomials of Sample Covariance Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Kösters, Holger

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the second-order correlation function of the characteristic polynomial of a sample covariance matrix. Starting from an explicit formula for the generating function, we re-obtain several well-known kernels from random matrix theory.

  13. Covariance Spectroscopy for Fissile Material Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusty Trainham, Jim Tinsley, Paul Hurley, Ray Keegan

    2009-06-02

    Nuclear fission produces multiple prompt neutrons and gammas at each fission event. The resulting daughter nuclei continue to emit delayed radiation as neutrons boil off, beta decay occurs, etc. All of the radiations are causally connected, and therefore correlated. The correlations are generally positive, but when different decay channels compete, so that some radiations tend to exclude others, negative correlations could also be observed. A similar problem of reduced complexity is that of cascades radiation, whereby a simple radioactive decay produces two or more correlated gamma rays at each decay. Covariance is the usual means for measuring correlation, and techniques of covariance mapping may be useful to produce distinct signatures of special nuclear materials (SNM). A covariance measurement can also be used to filter data streams because uncorrelated signals are largely rejected. The technique is generally more effective than a coincidence measurement. In this poster, we concentrate on cascades and the covariance filtering problem.

  14. Evaluation of covariance for fission neutron spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Nakashima, Hideki [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Ohsawa, Takaaki; Shibata, Keiichi

    1999-02-01

    A covariance evaluation system for the evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-3.2 was established, and the covariance data for fission neutron spectra of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 239}Pu were evaluated. Two methods were employed to evaluate the covariance. One is based on the experimental data, and the other is based on a model calculation including some kinds of renormalizations. The latter technique was adopted for the covariance evaluation of the fission neutron spectra in JENDL-3.2. We performed an adjustment of the evaluated fission neutron spectrum of {sup 235}U using the spectrum averaged cross sections for the {sup 27}Al(n, p), {sup 46,47,48}Ti(n, p), {sup 54,56}Fe(n, p), {sup 58}Ni(n, p), {sup 90}Zr(n, 2n) reactions. The adjusted spectrum integrated over energy was found to be unity. (author)

  15. Covariance Eigenvector Sparsity for Compression and Denoising

    CERN Document Server

    Schizas, Ioannis D

    2012-01-01

    Sparsity in the eigenvectors of signal covariance matrices is exploited in this paper for compression and denoising. Dimensionality reduction (DR) and quantization modules present in many practical compression schemes such as transform codecs, are designed to capitalize on this form of sparsity and achieve improved reconstruction performance compared to existing sparsity-agnostic codecs. Using training data that may be noisy a novel sparsity-aware linear DR scheme is developed to fully exploit sparsity in the covariance eigenvectors and form noise-resilient estimates of the principal covariance eigenbasis. Sparsity is effected via norm-one regularization, and the associated minimization problems are solved using computationally efficient coordinate descent iterations. The resulting eigenspace estimator is shown capable of identifying a subset of the unknown support of the eigenspace basis vectors even when the observation noise covariance matrix is unknown, as long as the noise power is sufficiently low. It i...

  16. COMBINING CLIMATE MODEL PREDICTIONS, HYDROLOGICAL MODELING, AND ECOLOGICAL NICHE MODELING ALGORITHMS TO PREDICT THE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON AQUATIC BIODIVERSITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The results of this research will provide a broad taxonomic and regional assessment of the impacts of climate change on aquatic species in the United States by producing predictions of current and future habitat quality for aquatic taxa based on multiple climate change scen...

  17. Aquatic insect assemblages associated with subalpine stream segment types in relict glaciated headwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Joshua S.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Bolton, Susan M.; Weekes, Anne A.; Gara, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    1. Aquatic habitats and biotic assemblages in subalpine headwaters are sensitive to climate and human impacts. Understanding biotic responses to such perturbations and the contribution of high-elevation headwaters to riverine biodiversity requires the assessment of assemblage composition among habitat types. We compared aquatic insect assemblages among headwater stream segment types in relict glaciated subalpine basins in Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington, USA. 2. Aquatic insects were collected during summer and autumn in three headwater basins. In each basin, three different stream segment types were sampled: colluvial groundwater sources, alluvial lake inlets, and cascade-bedrock lake outlets. Ward's hierarchical cluster analysis revealed high β diversity in aquatic insect assemblages, and non-metric multidimensional scaling indicated that spatial and temporal patterns in assemblage composition differed among headwater stream segment types. Aquatic insect assemblages showed more fidelity to stream segment types than to individual basins, and the principal environmental variables associated with assemblage structure were temperature and substrate. 3. Indicator species analyses identified specific aquatic insects associated with each stream segment type. Several rare and potentially endemic aquatic insect taxa were present, including the recently described species, Lednia borealis (Baumann and Kondratieff). 4. Our results indicate that aquatic insect assemblages in relict glaciated subalpine headwaters were strongly differentiated among stream segment types. These results illustrate the contribution of headwaters to riverine biodiversity and emphasise the importance of these habitats for monitoring biotic responses to climate change. Monitoring biotic assemblages in high-elevation headwaters is needed to prevent the potential loss of unique and sensitive biota.

  18. Attenuation caused by infrequently updated covariates in survival analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Liestøl, Knut

    Attenuation; Cox regression model; Measurement errors; Survival analysis; Time-dependent covariates......Attenuation; Cox regression model; Measurement errors; Survival analysis; Time-dependent covariates...

  19. Open, Sharable, and Extensible Data Management for the Korea National Aquatic Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Program: A RESTful API-Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Meilan Jiang; Karpjoo Jeong; Jung-Hwan Park; Nan-Young Kim; Soon-Jin Hwang; Sang-Hun Kim

    2016-01-01

    Implemented by a national law, the National Aquatic Ecological Monitoring Program (NAEMP) has been assessing the ecological health status of surface waters, focusing on streams and rivers, in Korea since 2007. The program involves ecological monitoring of multiple aquatic biota such as benthic diatoms, macroinvertebrates, fish, and plants as well as water quality and habitat parameters. Taking advantage of the national scale of long-term aquatic ecological monitoring and the standardization o...

  20. On covariant Poisson brackets in field theory

    OpenAIRE

    Sharapov, Alexey A.

    2014-01-01

    A general approach is proposed to constructing covariant Poisson brackets in the space of histories of a classical field-theoretical model. The approach is based on the concept of Lagrange anchor, which was originally developed as a tool for path-integral quantization of Lagrangian and non-Lagrangian dynamics. The proposed covariant Poisson brackets generalize the Peierls' bracket construction known in the Lagrangian field theory.

  1. Time varying covariance structures in financial markets

    OpenAIRE

    Gerhard, Frank; Hess, Dieter E.

    1996-01-01

    Reliable estimates of variances and covariances are crucial for portfolio management and risk controlling. This paper investigates alternative methods to estimate time varying variance-covariance matrices: ordinary estimates and exponentially weighted moving averages in comparison to Markov switching models. Different criteria are used to assess the quality of estimators. Bootstrapped confidence intervals for variances and correlations allow to compare the reliability of these estimates. Most...

  2. Covariate analysis of bivariate survival data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, L.E.

    1992-01-01

    The methods developed are used to analyze the effects of covariates on bivariate survival data when censoring and ties are present. The proposed method provides models for bivariate survival data that include differential covariate effects and censored observations. The proposed models are based on an extension of the univariate Buckley-James estimators which replace censored data points by their expected values, conditional on the censoring time and the covariates. For the bivariate situation, it is necessary to determine the expectation of the failure times for one component conditional on the failure or censoring time of the other component. Two different methods have been developed to estimate these expectations. In the semiparametric approach these expectations are determined from a modification of Burke's estimate of the bivariate empirical survival function. In the parametric approach censored data points are also replaced by their conditional expected values where the expected values are determined from a specified parametric distribution. The model estimation will be based on the revised data set, comprised of uncensored components and expected values for the censored components. The variance-covariance matrix for the estimated covariate parameters has also been derived for both the semiparametric and parametric methods. Data from the Demographic and Health Survey was analyzed by these methods. The two outcome variables are post-partum amenorrhea and breastfeeding; education and parity were used as the covariates. Both the covariate parameter estimates and the variance-covariance estimates for the semiparametric and parametric models will be compared. In addition, a multivariate test statistic was used in the semiparametric model to examine contrasts. The significance of the statistic was determined from a bootstrap distribution of the test statistic.

  3. On the covariant relativistic separable kernel

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarenko, S G; Rogochaya, E P; Yanev, Y

    2008-01-01

    Two different methods of the covariant relativistic separable kernel construction in the Bethe-Salpeter approach are considered. One of them leads in the center-of-mass system of two particles to the quasipotential equation. The constructed 4-dimensional covariant functions are used to reproduce neutron-proton phase shifts for total angular momenta $J=0,1$. Obtained results are compared with other model calculations.

  4. Optimal Non-Universally Covariant Cloning

    OpenAIRE

    D'Ariano, G. M.; Presti, P. Lo

    2001-01-01

    We consider non-universal cloning maps, namely cloning transformations which are covariant under a proper subgroup G of the universal unitary group U(d), where d is the dimension of the Hilbert space H of the system to be cloned. We give a general method for optimizing cloning for any cost-function. Examples of applications are given for the phase-covariant cloning (cloning of equatorial qubits) and for the Weyl-Heisenberg group (cloning of "continuous variables").

  5. Functional CLT for sample covariance matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Zhidong; Zhou, Wang; 10.3150/10-BEJ250

    2010-01-01

    Using Bernstein polynomial approximations, we prove the central limit theorem for linear spectral statistics of sample covariance matrices, indexed by a set of functions with continuous fourth order derivatives on an open interval including $[(1-\\sqrt{y})^2,(1+\\sqrt{y})^2]$, the support of the Mar\\u{c}enko--Pastur law. We also derive the explicit expressions for asymptotic mean and covariance functions.

  6. Covariant action for type IIB supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ashoke

    2016-07-01

    Taking clues from the recent construction of the covariant action for type II and heterotic string field theories, we construct a manifestly Lorentz covariant action for type IIB supergravity, and discuss its gauge fixing maintaining manifest Lorentz invariance. The action contains a (non-gravitating) free 4-form field besides the usual fields of type IIB supergravity. This free field, being completely decoupled from the interacting sector, has no physical consequence.

  7. Sequential BART for imputation of missing covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dandan; Daniels, Michael J; Winterstein, Almut G

    2016-07-01

    To conduct comparative effectiveness research using electronic health records (EHR), many covariates are typically needed to adjust for selection and confounding biases. Unfortunately, it is typical to have missingness in these covariates. Just using cases with complete covariates will result in considerable efficiency losses and likely bias. Here, we consider the covariates missing at random with missing data mechanism either depending on the response or not. Standard methods for multiple imputation can either fail to capture nonlinear relationships or suffer from the incompatibility and uncongeniality issues. We explore a flexible Bayesian nonparametric approach to impute the missing covariates, which involves factoring the joint distribution of the covariates with missingness into a set of sequential conditionals and applying Bayesian additive regression trees to model each of these univariate conditionals. Using data augmentation, the posterior for each conditional can be sampled simultaneously. We provide details on the computational algorithm and make comparisons to other methods, including parametric sequential imputation and two versions of multiple imputation by chained equations. We illustrate the proposed approach on EHR data from an affiliated tertiary care institution to examine factors related to hyperglycemia. PMID:26980459

  8. North Slope, Alaska ESI: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for benthic marine habitats for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  9. Covariance Modifications to Subspace Bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, D B

    2008-11-19

    Adaptive signal processing algorithms that rely upon representations of signal and noise subspaces often require updates to those representations when new data become available. Subspace representations frequently are estimated from available data with singular value (SVD) decompositions. Subspace updates require modifications to these decompositions. Updates can be performed inexpensively provided they are low-rank. A substantial literature on SVD updates exists, frequently focusing on rank-1 updates (see e.g. [Karasalo, 1986; Comon and Golub, 1990, Badeau, 2004]). In these methods, data matrices are modified by addition or deletion of a row or column, or data covariance matrices are modified by addition of the outer product of a new vector. A recent paper by Brand [2006] provides a general and efficient method for arbitrary rank updates to an SVD. The purpose of this note is to describe a closely-related method for applications where right singular vectors are not required. This note also describes the SVD updates to a particular scenario of interest in seismic array signal processing. The particular application involve updating the wideband subspace representation used in seismic subspace detectors [Harris, 2006]. These subspace detectors generalize waveform correlation algorithms to detect signals that lie in a subspace of waveforms of dimension d {ge} 1. They potentially are of interest because they extend the range of waveform variation over which these sensitive detectors apply. Subspace detectors operate by projecting waveform data from a detection window into a subspace specified by a collection of orthonormal waveform basis vectors (referred to as the template). Subspace templates are constructed from a suite of normalized, aligned master event waveforms that may be acquired by a single sensor, a three-component sensor, an array of such sensors or a sensor network. The template design process entails constructing a data matrix whose columns contain the

  10. Providing Aquatic Organism Passage in Vertically Unstable Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JanineM Castro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic organism passage barriers have been identified as one of the key impediments to recovery of salmonids and other migratory aquatic organisms in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. As such, state and federal agencies invest millions of dollars annually to address passage barriers. Because many barriers function as ad hoc grade control structures, their removal and/or replacement can unwittingly set off a cascade of effects that can negatively impact the very habitat and passage that project proponents seek to improve. The resultant vertical instability can result in a suite of effects that range from floodplain disconnection and loss of backwater and side channel habitat, to increased levels of turbidity. Risk assessment, including an evaluation of both the stage of stream evolution and a longitudinal profile analysis, provides a framework for determining if grade control is warranted, and if so, what type of structure is most geomorphically appropriate. Potential structures include placement of large wood and roughness elements, and constructed riffles, step-pools, and cascades. The use of structure types that mimic natural reach scale geomorphic analogues should result in improved aquatic organism passage, increased structural resilience, and reduced maintenance.

  11. Aquatic biodiversity in forests: A weak link in ecosystem services resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaluna, Brooke E.; Olson, Deanna H.; Flitcroft, Rebecca L; Weber, Matthew A.; Bellmore, James R.; Wondzell, Steven M.; Dunham, Jason; Johnson, Sherri L.; Reeves, Gordon H.

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of aquatic ecosystems is being quickly reduced on many continents, warranting a closer examination of the consequences for ecological integrity and ecosystem services. Here we describe intermediate and final ecosystem services derived from aquatic biodiversity in forests. We include a summary of the factors framing the assembly of aquatic biodiversity in forests in natural systems and how they change with a variety of natural disturbances and human-derived stressors. We consider forested aquatic ecosystems as a multi-state portfolio, with diverse assemblages and life-history strategies occurring at local scales as a consequence of a mosaic of habitat conditions and past disturbances and stressors. Maintaining this multi-state portfolio of assemblages requires a broad perspective of ecosystem structure, various functions, services, and management implications relative to contemporary stressors. Because aquatic biodiversity provides multiple ecosystem services to forests, activities that compromise aquatic ecosystems and biodiversity could be an issue for maintaining forest ecosystem integrity. We illustrate these concepts with examples of aquatic biodiversity and ecosystem services in forests of northwestern North America, also known as Northeast Pacific Rim. Encouraging management planning at broad as well as local spatial scales to recognize multi-state ecosystem management goals has promise for maintaining valuable ecosystem services. Ultimately, integration of information from socio-ecological ecosystems will be needed to maintain ecosystem services derived directly and indirectly from forest aquatic biota.

  12. Exposures from aquatic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for estimation aquatic pathways contribution to the total population exposure are discussed. Aquatic pathways are the major factor for radionuclides spreading from the Chernobyl Exclusion zone. An annual outflow of 90Sr and 137Cs comprised 10-20 TBq and 2-4 TBq respectively and the population exposed by this effluence constitutes almost 30 million people. The dynamic of doses from 90Sr and 'Cs, which Dnieper water have to delivered, is calculated. The special software has been developed to simulate the process of dose formation in the of diverse Dnieper regions. Regional peculiarities of municipal tap, fishing and irrigation are considered. Seventy-year prediction of dose structure and function of dose forming is performed. The exposure is estimated for 12 regions of the Dnieper basin and the Crimea. The maximal individual annual committed effective doses due to the use of water by ordinary members of the population in Kiev region from 90Sr and 137Cs in 1986 are 1.7*10-5 Sv and 2.7*10-5 Sv respectively. A commercial fisherman on Kiev reservoir in 1986 received 4.7*10-4 Sv and 5*10-3 Sv from 90Sr and 137Cs, respectively. The contributions to the collective cumulative (over 70 years) committed effective dose (CCCED70) of irrigation, municipal tap water and fish consumption for members of the population respectively are 18%, 43%, 39% in Kiev region, 8%, 25%, 67% in Poltava region, and 50%, 50%, 0% (consumption of Dnieper fish is absent) in the Crimea. The predicted contribution of the Strontium-90 to CCCED70 resulting from the use of water is 80%. The CCCED70 to the population of the Dnieper regions (32.5 million people) is 3000 person-Sv due to the use the Dnieper water

  13. Nuclear data covariances in the Indian context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic of covariances is recognized as an important part of several ongoing nuclear data science activities, since 2007, in the Nuclear Data Physics Centre of India (NDPCI). A Phase-1 project in collaboration with the Statistics department in Manipal University, Karnataka (Prof. K.M. Prasad and Prof. S. Nair) on nuclear data covariances was executed successfully during 2007-2011 period. In Phase-I, the NDPCI has conducted three national Theme meetings sponsored by the DAE-BRNS in 2008, 2010 and 2013 on nuclear data covariances. In Phase-1, the emphasis was on a thorough basic understanding of the concept of covariances including assigning uncertainties to experimental data in terms of partial errors and micro correlations, through a study and a detailed discussion of open literature. Towards the end of Phase-1, measurements and a first time covariance analysis of cross-sections for 58Ni (n, p) 58Co reaction measured in Mumbai Pelletron accelerator using 7Li (p,n) reactions as neutron source in the MeV energy region were performed under a PhD programme on nuclear data covariances in which enrolled are two students, Shri B.S. Shivashankar and Ms. Shanti Sheela. India is also successfully evolving a team of young researchers to code nuclear data of uncertainties, with the perspectives on covariances, in the IAEA-EXFOR format. A Phase-II DAE-BRNS-NDPCI proposal of project at Manipal has been submitted and the proposal is undergoing a peer-review at this time. In Phase-2, modern nuclear data evaluation techniques that including covariances will be further studied as a research and development effort, as a first time effort. These efforts include the use of techniques such as that of the Kalman filter. Presently, a 48 hours lecture series on treatment of errors and their propagation is being formulated under auspices of the Homi Bhabha National Institute. The talk describes the progress achieved thus far in the learning curve of the above-mentioned and exciting

  14. Activities on covariance estimation in Japanese Nuclear Data Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Keiichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Described are activities on covariance estimation in the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. Covariances are obtained from measurements by using the least-squares methods. A simultaneous evaluation was performed to deduce covariances of fission cross sections of U and Pu isotopes. A code system, KALMAN, is used to estimate covariances of nuclear model calculations from uncertainties in model parameters. (author)

  15. Schroedinger covariance states in anisotropic waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper Squeezed and Covariance States based on Schroedinger inequality and their connection with other nonclassical states are considered for particular case of anisotropic waveguide in LiNiO3. Here, the problem of photon creation and generation of squeezed and Schroedinger covariance states in optical waveguides is solved in two steps: 1. Quantization of electromagnetic field is provided in the presence of dielectric waveguide using normal-mode expansion. The photon creation and annihilation operators are introduced, expanding the solution A-vector(r-vector,t) in a series in terms of the Sturm - Liouville mode-functions. 2. In terms of these operators the Hamiltonian of the field in a nonlinear waveguide is derived. For such Hamiltonian we construct the covariance states as stable (with nonzero covariance), which minimize the Schroedinger uncertainty relation. The evolutions of the three second momenta of q-circumflexj and p-circumflexj are calculated. For this Hamiltonian all three momenta are expressed in terms of one real parameters s only. It is found out how covariance, via this parameter s, depends on the waveguide profile n(x,y), on the mode-distributions u-vectorj(x,y), and on the waveguide phase mismatching Δβ. (author). 37 refs

  16. Cross-covariance functions for multivariate geostatistics

    KAUST Repository

    Genton, Marc G.

    2015-05-01

    Continuously indexed datasets with multiple variables have become ubiquitous in the geophysical, ecological, environmental and climate sciences, and pose substantial analysis challenges to scientists and statisticians. For many years, scientists developed models that aimed at capturing the spatial behavior for an individual process; only within the last few decades has it become commonplace to model multiple processes jointly. The key difficulty is in specifying the cross-covariance function, that is, the function responsible for the relationship between distinct variables. Indeed, these cross-covariance functions must be chosen to be consistent with marginal covariance functions in such a way that the second-order structure always yields a nonnegative definite covariance matrix. We review the main approaches to building cross-covariance models, including the linear model of coregionalization, convolution methods, the multivariate Matérn and nonstationary and space-time extensions of these among others. We additionally cover specialized constructions, including those designed for asymmetry, compact support and spherical domains, with a review of physics-constrained models. We illustrate select models on a bivariate regional climate model output example for temperature and pressure, along with a bivariate minimum and maximum temperature observational dataset; we compare models by likelihood value as well as via cross-validation co-kriging studies. The article closes with a discussion of unsolved problems. © Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2015.

  17. Trends on Habitat Management

    OpenAIRE

    Raluca Giuşcă

    2008-01-01

    According to traditional image, human habitat constitution is the result of natural inter-relations, the fundamental premise of the existence of natural resources, the climate, and the access to more developed proximities for commercial trading. Human habitat represents a complex system, with environmental values, having live and natural components that are inter-related. The dwelling is the fundamental component of the habitat and by relationship with the other components determines the leve...

  18. Accurate covariance estimation of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing: limitations of jackknife covariance

    CERN Document Server

    Shirasaki, Masato; Miyatake, Hironao; Takahashi, Ryuichi; Hamana, Takashi; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Murata, Ryoma

    2016-01-01

    We develop a method to simulate galaxy-galaxy weak lensing by utilizing all-sky, light-cone simulations. We populate a real catalog of source galaxies into a light-cone simulation realization, simulate the lensing effect on each galaxy, and then identify lensing halos that are considered to host galaxies or clusters of interest. We use the mock catalog to study the error covariance matrix of galaxy-galaxy weak lensing and find that the super-sample covariance (SSC), which arises from density fluctuations with length scales comparable with or greater than a size of survey area, gives a dominant source of the sample variance. We then compare the full covariance with the jackknife (JK) covariance, the method that estimates the covariance from the resamples of the data itself. We show that, although the JK method gives an unbiased estimator of the covariance in the shot noise or Gaussian regime, it always over-estimates the true covariance in the sample variance regime, because the JK covariance turns out to be a...

  19. Progress on Nuclear Data Covariances: AFCI-1.2 Covariance Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblozinsky,P.; Oblozinsky,P.; Mattoon,C.M.; Herman,M.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Pigni,M.T.; Talou,P.; Hale,G.M.; Kahler,A.C.; Kawano,T.; Little,R.C.; Young,P.G

    2009-09-28

    Improved neutron cross section covariances were produced for 110 materials including 12 light nuclei (coolants and moderators), 78 structural materials and fission products, and 20 actinides. Improved covariances were organized into AFCI-1.2 covariance library in 33-energy groups, from 10{sup -5} eV to 19.6 MeV. BNL contributed improved covariance data for the following materials: {sup 23}Na and {sup 55}Mn where more detailed evaluation was done; improvements in major structural materials {sup 52}Cr, {sup 56}Fe and {sup 58}Ni; improved estimates for remaining structural materials and fission products; improved covariances for 14 minor actinides, and estimates of mubar covariances for {sup 23}Na and {sup 56}Fe. LANL contributed improved covariance data for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu including prompt neutron fission spectra and completely new evaluation for {sup 240}Pu. New R-matrix evaluation for {sup 16}O including mubar covariances is under completion. BNL assembled the library and performed basic testing using improved procedures including inspection of uncertainty and correlation plots for each material. The AFCI-1.2 library was released to ANL and INL in August 2009.

  20. Shorebird Habitat Suitability Indicies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This dataset consists of predicted habitat suitability indices and species richness for eight shorebird species (Black-bellied Plover [Pluvialis squatarola],...

  1. Amazonian freshwater habitats experiencing environmental and socioeconomic threats affecting subsistence fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    Cleber J. R. Alho; Roberto E. Reis; Aquino, Pedro P. U.

    2015-01-01

    Matching the trend seen among the major large rivers of the globe, the Amazon River and its tributaries are facing aquatic ecosystem disruption that is affecting freshwater habitats and their associated biodiversity, including trends for decline in fishery resources. The Amazon’s aquatic ecosystems, linked natural resources, and human communities that depend on them are increasingly at risk from a number of identified threats, including expansion of agriculture; cattle pastures; infrastructur...

  2. NOAA Office for Coastal Management and Maine Department of Marine Resources Benthic Habitat Data, coastal Maine and York and Webhannet rivers, 1993-2001 (NODC Accession 0089462)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Maine's eelgrass (SAV) meadows form an important aquatic habitat for the state. These meadows provide shelter for juvenile fish, and invertebrates. In certain...

  3. Manifest Covariant Hamiltonian Theory of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cremaschini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The problem of formulating a manifest covariant Hamiltonian theory of General Relativity in the presence of source fields is addressed, by extending the so-called "DeDonder-Weyl" formalism to the treatment of classical fields in curved space-time. The theory is based on a synchronous variational principle for the Einstein equation, formulated in terms of superabundant variables. The technique permits one to determine the continuum covariant Hamiltonian structure associated with the Einstein equation. The corresponding continuum Poisson bracket representation is also determined. The theory relies on first-principles, in the sense that the conclusions are reached in the framework of a non-perturbative covariant approach, which allows one to preserve both the 4-scalar nature of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian densities as well as the gauge invariance property of the theory.

  4. Developing a novel approach to analyse the regimes of temporary streams and their controls on aquatic biota

    OpenAIRE

    Gallart, F.; Prat, N.; Garcia-Roger, E.M.; Latron, J.; Rieradevall, M.; P. Llorens; Barbera, G.G.; J. Froebrich

    2011-01-01

    Temporary streams are those water courses that undergo the recurrent cessation of flow or the complete drying of their channel. The biological communities in temporary stream reaches are strongly dependent on the temporal changes of the aquatic habitats determined by the hydrological conditions. The use of the aquatic fauna structural and functional characteristics to assess the ecological quality of a temporary stream reach can not therefore be made without taking into account the controls i...

  5. Behavioural cues surpass habitat factors in explaining prebreeding resource selection by a migratory diving duck

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Shawn T.; Warren, Jeffrey M.; Takekawa, John Y.; De La Cruz, Susan E. W.; Cutting, Kyle A.; Parker, Michael W.; Yee, Julie L.

    2014-01-01

    Prebreeding habitat selection in birds can often be explained in part by habitat characteristics. However, females may also select habitats on the basis of fidelity to areas of previous reproductive success or use by conspecifics. The relative influences of sociobehavioural attributes versus habitat characteristics in habitat selection has been primarily investigated in songbirds, while less is known about how these factors affect habitat selection processes in migratory waterfowl. Animal resource selection models often exhibit much unexplained variation; spatial patterns driven by social and behavioural characteristics may account for some of this. We radiomarked female lesser scaup, Aythya affinis, in the southwestern extent of their breeding range to explore hypotheses regarding relative roles of habitat quality, site fidelity and conspecific density in prebreeding habitat selection. We used linear mixed-effects models to relate intensity of use within female home ranges to habitat features, distance to areas of reproductive success during the previous breeding season and conspecific density. Home range habitats included shallow water (≤118 cm), moderate to high densities of flooded emergent vegetation/open water edge and open water areas with submerged aquatic vegetation. Compared with habitat features, conspecific female density and proximity to successful nesting habitats from the previous breeding season had greater influences on habitat use within home ranges. Fidelity and conspecific attraction are behavioural characteristics in some waterfowl species that may exert a greater influence than habitat features in influencing prebreeding space use and habitat selection within home ranges, particularly where quality habitat is abundant. These processes may be of critical importance to a better understanding of habitat selection in breeding birds.

  6. Parametric number covariance in quantum chaotic spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayak; Kumar, Sandeep; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-03-01

    We study spectral parametric correlations in quantum chaotic systems and introduce the number covariance as a measure of such correlations. We derive analytic results for the classical random matrix ensembles using the binary correlation method and obtain compact expressions for the covariance. We illustrate the universality of this measure by presenting the spectral analysis of the quantum kicked rotors for the time-reversal invariant and time-reversal noninvariant cases. A local version of the parametric number variance introduced earlier is also investigated. PMID:27078354

  7. Notes on Cosmic Censorship Conjecture revisited: Covariantly

    CERN Document Server

    Hamid, Aymen I M; Maharaj, Sunil D

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the dynamics of the trapped region using a frame independent semi-tetrad covariant formalism for general Locally Rotationally Symmetric (LRS) class II spacetimes. We covariantly prove some important geometrical results for the apparent horizon, and state the necessary and sufficient conditions for a singularity to be locally naked. These conditions bring out, for the first time in a quantitative and transparent manner, the importance of the Weyl curvature in deforming and delaying the trapped region during continual gravitational collapse, making the central singularity locally visible.

  8. Canonical quantization of generally covariant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmann (1917) argued that general relativity does not satisfy any relativity principle and that it is actually a theory of absolute space-time. The issues raised by Kretschmann, that of Hamiltonian dynamics and of canonical quantization of generally covariant systems, are discussed. The questions raised are: what is the role of space-time diffeomorphisms in Hamiltonian dynamics of generally covariant systems, what is the role of isometries in Hamiltonian dynamics of such systems and what happens to both problems in canonical quantization. (author)

  9. Covariant Hamiltonian evolution in supersymmetric quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiber, U

    2003-01-01

    We develop a general formalism for covariant Hamiltonian evolution of supersymmetric (field) theories by making use of the fact that these can be represented on the exterior bundle over their bosonic configuration space as generalized Dirac-Kaehler systems of the form $(d \\pm d^\\dag)\\ket{\\psi} = 0$. By using suitable deformations of the supersymmetry generators we find covariant Hamiltonians for target spaces with general gravitational and Kalb-Ramond field backgrounds and discuss their perturbation theory. Our results will be applied in another paper to the study of curvature corrections to superstring spectra in nontrivial backgrounds, such as ${\\rm AdS}$ close to its pp-wave limit.

  10. Modular invariance and covariant loop calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The covariant loop calculus provides and efficient technique for computing explicit expressions for the density on moduli space corresponding to arbitrary (bosonic string) loop diagrams. Since modular invariance is not manifest, however, we carry out a detailed comparison with known explicit 2- and 3- loop results derived using analytic geometry (1 loop is known to be ok). We establish identity to 'high' order in some moduli and exactly in others. Agreement is found as a result of various non-trivial cancellations, in part related to number theory. We feel our results provide very strong support for the correctness of the covariant loop calculus approach. (orig.)

  11. On covariant quantization of massive superparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have obtained, by dimensional reduction of the Green-Schwarz superstring, the action of a D=9 massive superparticle. Because of the presence of a Wess-Zumino term the action has Siegel symmetry. Harmonic variables realizing the coset space (SO(1,8))/SO(8) have been introduced to separate covariantly the fermionic constraints into irreducible first and second class constraints. Lorentz covariant gauge fixing conditions are imposed and the resulting BRST charge is of rank one and very simple in structure. (author). 21 refs

  12. A violation of the covariant entropy bound?

    CERN Document Server

    Masoumi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Several arguments suggest that the entropy density at high energy density $\\rho$ should be given by the expression $s=K\\sqrt{\\rho/G}$, where $K$ is a constant of order unity. On the other hand the covariant entropy bound requires that the entropy on a light sheet be bounded by $A/4G$, where $A$ is the area of the boundary of the sheet. We find that in a suitably chosen cosmological geometry, the above expression for $s$ violates the covariant entropy bound. We consider different possible explanations for this fact; in particular the possibility that entropy bounds should be defined in terms of volumes of regions rather than areas of surfaces.

  13. Habitat stability and occurrences of malaria vector larvae in western Kenya highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atieli Harrysone

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the occurrence of malaria vector larvae in the valleys of western Kenya highlands is well documented, knowledge of larval habitats in the uphill sites is lacking. Given that most inhabitants of the highlands actually dwell in the uphill regions, it is important to develop understanding of mosquito breeding habitat stability in these sites in order to determine their potential for larval control. Methods A total of 128 potential larval habitats were identified in hilltops and along the seasonal streams in the Sigalagala area of Kakamega district, western Kenya. Water availability in the habitats was followed up daily from August 3, 2006 to February 23, 2007. A habitat is defined as stable when it remains aquatic continuously for at least 12 d. Mosquito larvae were observed weekly. Frequencies of aquatic, stable and larvae positive habitats were compared between the hilltop and seasonal stream area using χ2-test. Factors affecting the presence/absence of Anopheles gambiae larvae in the highlands were determined using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results Topography significantly affected habitat availability and stability. The occurrence of aquatic habitats in the hilltop was more sporadic than in the stream area. The percentage of habitat occurrences that were classified as stable during the rainy season is 48.76% and 80.79% respectively for the hilltop and stream area. Corresponding frequencies of larvae positive habitats were 0% in the hilltop and 5.91% in the stream area. After the rainy season, only 23.42% of habitat occurrences were stable and 0.01% larvae positive habitats were found in the hilltops, whereas 89.75% of occurrences remained stable in the stream area resulting in a frequency of 12.21% larvae positive habitats. The logistic regression analysis confirmed the association between habitat stability and larval occurrence and indicated that habitat surface area was negatively affecting the

  14. Habitats, activities, and signs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh; Brynskov, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Digital habitats is a framework for designing and modeling environments for activities that involve mobile and embedded computing systems. This paper 1) introduces the basic concepts of the framework, i.e. activity, thematic role, and the three ‘dimensions’ of a habitat: physical, informational, ...

  15. Advanced Plant Habitat (APH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Stephanie E. (Compiler); Levine, Howard G.; Reed, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) hardware will be a large growth volume plant habitat, capable of hosting multigenerational studies, in which environmental variables (e.g., temperature, relative humidity, carbon dioxide level light intensity and spectral quality) can be tracked and controlled in support of whole plant physiological testing and Bio-regenerative Life Support System investigations.

  16. Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Tunison Laboratory of Aquatic Science (TLAS), located in Cortland, New York, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). TLAS was established...

  17. Role Models in Aquatic Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mabel C.

    1982-01-01

    Provided for each of 12 minority group role models in aquatic occupations are job responsibilities, educational requirements, comments on a typical day at the job, salary range, and recommendations for students wishing to enter the field described. (JN)

  18. Act together - implications of symbioses in aquatic ciliates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziallas, Claudia; Allgaier, Martin; Monaghan, Michael T.;

    2012-01-01

    ecosystems, which are often highly variable, harsh, and nutrient-deficient habitats. It is therefore not surprising that symbioses are widespread in both marine and freshwater environments. Symbioses in aquatic ciliates are good model systems for exploring symbiont-host interactions. Many ciliate species are......Mutual interactions in the form of symbioses can increase the fitness of organisms and provide them with the capacity to occupy new ecological niches. The formation of obligate symbioses allows for rapid evolution of new lifeforms including multitrophic consortia. Microbes are important components...

  19. ENDF-6 File 30: Data covariances obtained from parameter covariances and sensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    File 30 is provided as a means of describing the covariances of tabulated cross sections, multiplicities, and energy-angle distributions that result from propagating the covariances of a set of underlying parameters (for example, the input parameters of a nuclear-model code), using an evaluator-supplied set of parameter covariances and sensitivities. Whenever nuclear data are evaluated primarily through the application of nuclear models, the covariances of the resulting data can be described very adequately, and compactly, by specifying the covariance matrix for the underlying nuclear parameters, along with a set of sensitivity coefficients giving the rate of change of each nuclear datum of interest with respect to each of the model parameters. Although motivated primarily by these applications of nuclear theory, use of File 30 is not restricted to any one particular evaluation methodology. It can be used to describe data covariances of any origin, so long as they can be formally separated into a set of parameters with specified covariances and a set of data sensitivities

  20. A habitat-use model to determine essential fish habitat for juvenile brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) in Galveston Bay, Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Randall D.; Christensen, John D.; Mark E Monaco; Caldwell, Philip A.; Matthews, Geoffrey A.; Minello , Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    A density prediction model for juvenile brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) was developed by using three bottom types, five salinity zones, and four seasons to quantify patterns of habitat use in Galveston Bay, Texas. Sixteen years of quantitative density data were used. Bottom types were vegetated marsh edge, submerged aquatic vegetation, and shallow nonvegetated bottom. Multiple regression was used to develop density estimates, and the resultant formula was then coupled with a geographic...

  1. Evaluation of seven aquatic sampling methods for amphibians and other aquatic fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzburger, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    To design effective and efficient research and monitoring programs researchers must have a thorough understanding of the capabilities and limitations of their sampling methods. Few direct comparative studies exist for aquatic sampling methods for amphibians. The objective of this study was to simultaneously employ seven aquatic sampling methods in 10 wetlands to compare amphibian species richness and number of individuals detected with each method. Four sampling methods allowed counts of individuals (metal dipnet, D-frame dipnet, box trap, crayfish trap), whereas the other three methods allowed detection of species (visual encounter, aural, and froglogger). Amphibian species richness was greatest with froglogger, box trap, and aural samples. For anuran species, the sampling methods by which each life stage was detected was related to relative length of larval and breeding periods and tadpole size. Detection probability of amphibians varied across sampling methods. Box trap sampling resulted in the most precise amphibian count, but the precision of all four count-based methods was low (coefficient of variation > 145 for all methods). The efficacy of the four count sampling methods at sampling fish and aquatic invertebrates was also analyzed because these predatory taxa are known to be important predictors of amphibian habitat distribution. Species richness and counts were similar for fish with the four methods, whereas invertebrate species richness and counts were greatest in box traps. An effective wetland amphibian monitoring program in the southeastern United States should include multiple sampling methods to obtain the most accurate assessment of species community composition at each site. The combined use of frogloggers, crayfish traps, and dipnets may be the most efficient and effective amphibian monitoring protocol. ?? 2007 Brill Academic Publishers.

  2. Satellite-Based Assessment of the spatial extent of Aquatic Vegetation in Lake Victoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, W.; Aligeti, N.; Jeyaprakash, T.; Martins, M.; Stodghill, J.; Winstanley, H.

    2011-12-01

    Lake Victoria in Africa is the second largest freshwater lake in the world and is known for its abundance of aquatic wildlife. In particular over 200 different fish species are caught and sold by local fisherman. The lake is a major contributor to the local economy as a corridor of transportation, source of drinking water, and source of hydropower. However, the invasion of aquatic vegetation such as water hyacinth in the lake has disrupted each of these markets. Aquatic vegetation now covers a substantial area of the coastline blocking waterways, disrupting hydropower, hindering the collection of drinking water and decreasing the profitability of fishing. The vegetation serves as a habitat for disease carrying mosquitoes as well as snakes and snails that spread the parasitic disease bilharzia. The current control measures of invasive aquatic vegetation rely on biological, chemical and mechanical control. The objective of this study was to utilize remote sensing to map aquatic vegetation within Lake Victoria from 2000 to 2011. MODIS, Landsat 4-5TM, and Landsat 7-ETM imagery was employed to perform change detections in vegetation and identify the extent of aquatic vegetation throughout the years. The efficiency of containment efforts were evaluated and ideal time for application of such efforts were suggested. A methodology for aquatic vegetation surveillance was created. The results of this project were presented as a workshop to the Lake Victoria Fisheries Organization, SERVIR, and other partner organizations. The workshop provided instruction into the use of NASA and other satellite derived products. Time series animations of the spatial extent of aquatic vegetation within the lake were created. By identifying seasons of decreased aquatic vegetation, ideal times to employ control efforts were identified. SERVIR will subsequently utilize the methodologies and mapping results of this study to develop operational aquatic vegetation surveillance for Lake Victoria.

  3. Covariant derivative expansion of the heat kernel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the technique of labeled operators, compact explicit expressions are given for all traced heat kernel coefficients containing zero, two, four and six covariant derivatives, and for diagonal coefficients with zero, two and four derivatives. The results apply to boundaryless flat space-times and arbitrary non-Abelian scalar and gauge background fields. (orig.)

  4. Covariates of Sesame Street Viewing by Preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaner, Steven D.

    A study was made of nine covariates as to their discriminating power between preschoolers who watch Sesame Street regularly and preschoolers who do not watch Sesame Street, Surveyed were 372 3-4 year old children on 9 variables. The nine variables were: race, socioeconomic status, number of siblings, child's birth order, maternal age, maternal…

  5. Optimal covariate designs theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Premadhis; Mandal, Nripes Kumar; Sinha, Bikas Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This book primarily addresses the optimality aspects of covariate designs. A covariate model is a combination of ANOVA and regression models. Optimal estimation of the parameters of the model using a suitable choice of designs is of great importance; as such choices allow experimenters to extract maximum information for the unknown model parameters. The main emphasis of this monograph is to start with an assumed covariate model in combination with some standard ANOVA set-ups such as CRD, RBD, BIBD, GDD, BTIBD, BPEBD, cross-over, multi-factor, split-plot and strip-plot designs, treatment control designs, etc. and discuss the nature and availability of optimal covariate designs. In some situations, optimal estimations of both ANOVA and the regression parameters are provided. Global optimality and D-optimality criteria are mainly used in selecting the design. The standard optimality results of both discrete and continuous set-ups have been adapted, and several novel combinatorial techniques have been applied for...

  6. Economical Phase-Covariant Cloning of Qudits

    OpenAIRE

    Buscemi, Francesco; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2004-01-01

    We derive the optimal N to M phase-covariant quantum cloning for equatorial states in dimension d with M=kd+N, k integer. The cloning maps are optimal for both global and single-qudit fidelity. The map is achieved by an ``economical'' cloning machine, which works without ancilla.

  7. Modern applications of covariant density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern applications of Covariant Density Functional Theory (CDFT) are discussed. First we show a systematic investigation of fission barriers in actinide nuclei within constraint relativistic mean field theory allowing for triaxial deformations. In the second part we discuss a microscopic theory of quantum phase transitions (QPT) based on the relativistic generator coordinate method. (author)

  8. Linear transformations of variance/covariance matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parois, P.J.A.; Lutz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Many applications in crystallography require the use of linear transformations on parameters and their standard uncertainties. While the transformation of the parameters is textbook knowledge, the transformation of the standard uncertainties is more complicated and needs the full variance/covariance

  9. Econometric analysis of realized covariation: high frequency based covariance, regression, and correlation in financial economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses multivariate high frequency financial data using realized covariation. We provide a new asymptotic distribution theory for standard methods such as regression, correlation analysis, and covariance. It will be based on a fixed interval of time (e.g., a day or week), allowing the...... number of high frequency returns during this period to go to infinity. Our analysis allows us to study how high frequency correlations, regressions, and covariances change through time. In particular we provide confidence intervals for each of these quantities....

  10. Freshwater habitats in Plovdiv town and its surroundings and their importance for the biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DILYAN GEORGIEV

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The current synopsis reviews the types of aquatic habitats, that are located in the city of Plovdiv and analyses their importance for the biodiversity. Studies of the biodiversity in urban landscapes are of particular importance because they are still scarce. Several plant and animal groups are studied in the city of Plovdiv – mosses, mollusks, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. Their distribution among habitats is presented, as well as specific threats and conservation problems.

  11. Terrestrial habitat use by western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) in the sierra foothills

    OpenAIRE

    Zaragoza, G; Rose, JP; Purcell, K; Todd, BD

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles. Western Pond Turtles (Actinemys marmorata) are endemic to western North America and are found in a diversity of aquatic habitats. To date, few studies have examined the ecology of populations in ephemeral or intermittent ponds. Here, we studied the terrestrial habitat requirements of Western Pond Turtles in an intermittent pond that dries in years with below-average rainfall. We tracked terrestrial movements of Western Pond Turtles in a...

  12. Unravelling Lorentz Covariance and the Spacetime Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We report the discovery of an exact mapping from Galilean time and space coordinates to Minkowski spacetime coordinates, showing that Lorentz covariance and the space- time construct are consistent with the existence of a dynamical 3-space, and “absolute motion”. We illustrate this mapping first with the standard theory of sound, as vibra- tions of a medium, which itself may be undergoing fluid motion, and which is covari- ant under Galilean coordinate transformations. By introducing a different non-physical class of space and time coordinates it may be cast into a form that is covariant under “Lorentz transformations” wherein the speed of sound is now the “invariant speed”. If this latter formalism were taken as fundamental and complete we would be lead to the introduction of a pseudo-Riemannian “spacetime” description of sound, with a metric characterised by an “invariant speed of sound”. This analysis is an allegory for the development of 20th century physics, but where the Lorentz covariant Maxwell equa- tions were constructed first, and the Galilean form was later constructed by Hertz, but ignored. It is shown that the Lorentz covariance of the Maxwell equations only occurs because of the use of non-physical space and time coordinates. The use of this class of coordinates has confounded 20th century physics, and resulted in the existence of a “flowing” dynamical 3-space being overlooked. The discovery of the dynamics of this 3-space has lead to the derivation of an extended gravity theory as a quantum effect, and confirmed by numerous experiments and observations

  13. Hydrologic and water-quality rehabilitation of environments for suitable fish habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C. S.; Yang, S. T.; Xiang, H.; Liu, C. M.; Zhang, H. T.; Yang, Z. L.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, Y.; Mitrovic, S. M.; Yu, Q.; Lim, R. P.

    2015-11-01

    Aquatic ecological rehabilitation is attracting increasing public and research attention, but without knowledge of the responses of aquatic species to their habitats the success of habitat restoration is uncertain. Thus efficient study of species response to habitat, through which to prioritize the habitat factors influencing aquatic ecosystems, is highly important. However many current models have too high requirement for assemblage information and have great bias in results due to consideration of only the species' attribute of presence/absence, abundance or biomass, thus hindering the wider utility of these models. This paper, using fish as a case, presents a framework for identification of high-priority habitat factors based on the responses of aquatic species to their habitats, using presence/absence, abundance and biomass data. This framework consists of four newly developed sub-models aiming to determine weightings for the evaluation of species' contributions to their communities, to quantitatively calculate an integrated habitat suitability index for multi-species based on habitat factors, to assess the suitable probability of habitat factors and to assess the rehabilitation priority of habitat factors. The framework closely links hydrologic, physical and chemical habitat factors to fish assemblage attributes drawn from monitoring datasets on hydrology, water quality and fish assemblages at a total of 144 sites, where 5084 fish were sampled and tested. Breakpoint identification techniques based on curvature in cumulated dominance along with a newly developed weighting calculation model based on theory of mass systems were used to help identify the dominant fish, based on which the presence and abundance of multiple fish were normalized to estimate the integrated habitat suitability index along gradients of various factors, based on their variation with principal habitat factors. Then, the appropriate probability of every principal habitat factor was

  14. Aquatic risk assessment of pesticides in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriquiriborde, Pedro; Mirabella, Paula; Waichman, Andrea; Solomon, Keith; Van den Brink, Paul J; Maund, Steve

    2014-10-01

    Latin America is anticipated to be a major growth market for agriculture and production is increasing with use of technologies such as pesticides. Reports of contamination of aquatic ecosystems by pesticides in Latin America have raised concerns about potential for adverse ecological effects. In the registration process of pesticides, all countries require significant data packages on aquatic toxicology and environmental fate. However, there are usually no specific requirements to conduct an aquatic risk assessment. To address this issue, the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry organized a workshop that brought together scientists from academia, government, and industry to review and elaborate on aquatic risk assessment frameworks that can be implemented into regulation of pesticides in Latin America. The workshop concluded that the international framework for risk assessments (protection goals, effects, and exposure assessments, risk characterization, and risk mitigation) is broadly applicable in Latin America but needs further refinement for the use in the region. Some of the challenges associated with these refinements are discussed in the article. It was recognized that there is potential for data sharing both within and outside of the region where conditions are similar. However, there is a need for research to compare local species and environmental conditions to those in other jurisdictions to be able to evaluate the applicability of data used in other countries. Development should also focus on human resources as there is a need to build local capacity and capability, and scientific collaboration and exchange between stakeholders in industry, government, and academia is also important. The meeting also emphasized that, although establishing a regionally relevant risk assessment framework is important, this also needs to be accompanied by enforcement of developed regulations and good management practices to help protect aquatic habitats

  15. Cone visual pigments of aquatic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Lucy A; Robinson, Phyllis R

    2005-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that the visual systems of animals are evolutionarily adapted to their visual environment. The entrance many millions of years ago of mammals into the sea gave these new aquatic mammals completely novel visual surroundings with respect to light availability and predominant wavelengths. This study examines the cone opsins of marine mammals, hypothesizing, based on previous studies [Fasick et al. (1998) and Levenson & Dizon (2003)], that the deep-dwelling marine mammals would not have color vision because the pressure to maintain color vision in the dark monochromatic ocean environment has been relaxed. Short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) and long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone opsin genes from two orders (Cetacea and Sirenia) and an additional suborder (Pinnipedia) of aquatic mammals were amplified from genomic DNA (for SWS) and cDNA (for LWS) by PCR, cloned, and sequenced. All animals studied from the order Cetacea have SWS pseudogenes, whereas a representative from the order Sirenia has an intact SWS gene, for which the corresponding mRNA was found in the retina. One of the pinnipeds studied (harp seal) has an SWS pseudogene, while another species (harbor seal) appeared to have an intact SWS gene. However, no SWS cone opsin mRNA was found in the harbor seal retina, suggesting a promoter or splice site mutation preventing transcription of the gene. The LWS opsins from the different species were expressed in mammalian cells and reconstituted with the 11-cis-retinal chromophore in order to determine maximal absorption wavelengths (lambda(max)) for each. The deeper dwelling Cetacean species had blue shifted lambda(max) values compared to shallower-dwelling aquatic species. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that in the monochromatic oceanic habitat, the pressure to maintain color vision has been relaxed and mutations are retained in the SWS genes, resulting in pseudogenes. Additionally, LWS opsins are retained in the

  16. Invaded habitats. Chapter 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lopez-Vaamonde

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available More than 65% (1040 species of arthropod species alien to Europe are associated with human-made habitats, especially parks and gardens, human settlements and agricultural lands, whereas woodlands are yet colonized by less than 20% of the alien fauna, which still has a negligible representation in the other natural and semi-natural habitats. Large differences in habitat affinity are observed between alien taxonomic groups. Phytophagous species are predominant among aliens, representing 47.2% of species alien to Europe.

  17. Stochastic Lipschitz continuity for high dimensional Lasso with multiple linear covariate structures or hidden linear covariates

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Zhiyi

    2010-01-01

    Two extensions of generalized linear models are considered. In the first one, response variables depend on multiple linear combinations of covariates. In the second one, only response variables are observed while the linear covariates are missing. We derive stochastic Lipschitz continuity results for the loss functions involved in the regression problems and apply them to get bounds on estimation error for Lasso. Multivariate comparison results on Rademacher complexity are obtained as tools t...

  18. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products

  19. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Frank, M.L.

    1986-02-01

    Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products.

  20. Tritium in the aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the tritium released from nuclear facilities into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered algae, aquatic plants, invertebrates, fish, and food chain studies, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near that of the external medium. Incorporation of tritium from triated water into the organic matter of cells is at a slower rate than incorporation into the tissue free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the 'carrier' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher tropic levels. Radiation doses to large populations of humans from tritium releases will most likely be from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products. (author)

  1. Designated Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Critical habitats include those areas documented as currently supporting self-sustaining populations of any threatened or endangered species of wildlife as well as...

  2. Right Whale Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for Right Whale as designated by Federal Register Vol. 59, No. 28805, May 19, 1993, Rules and Regulations.

  3. Johnsons Seagrass Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for Johnson's Seagrass as designated by Federal Register Vol. 65, No. 66, Wednesday, April 5, 2000, Rules and Regulations.

  4. Green Turtle Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for green turtle as designated by Federal Register Vol. 63, No. 46701, September 2, 1998, Rules and Regulations.

  5. Critical Habitat Designations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Endangered Species Act (ESA) requires the Federal government to designate 'critical habitat' for any species it lists under the ESA. This dataset combines both...

  6. Smalltooth Sawfish Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent the critical habitat for smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinatat) as designated by 74 FR 45353, September 2, 2009, Rules and Regulations.

  7. Symmetry and Covariance of Non-relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Omote, Minoru; Kamefuchi, Susumu

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of a 5-dimensional form of space-time transformations non-relativistic quantum mechanics is reformulated in a manifestly covariant manner. The resulting covariance resembles that of the conventional relativistic quantum mechanics.

  8. Performance evaluation of sensor allocation algorithm based on covariance control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The covariance control capability of sensor allocation algorithms based on covariance control strategy is an important index to evaluate the performance of these algorithms. Owing to lack of standard performance metric indices to evaluate covariance control capability, sensor allocation ratio, etc, there are no guides to follow in the design procedure of sensor allocation algorithm in practical applications. To meet these demands, three quantified performance metric indices are presented, which are average covariance misadjustment quantity (ACMQ), average sensor allocation ratio (ASAR) and matrix metric influence factor (MMIF), where ACMQ, ASAR and MMIF quantify the covariance control capability, the usage of sensor resources and the robustness of sensor allocation algorithm, respectively. Meanwhile, a covariance adaptive sensor allocation algorithm based on a new objective function is proposed to improve the covariance control capability of the algorithm based on information gain. The experiment results show that the proposed algorithm have the advantage over the preceding sensor allocation algorithm in covariance control capability and robustness.

  9. Aquatic Natural Areas Analysis and Evaluation: Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranski, Dr. Michael J. [Catawba College

    2011-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of the natural area value of eight Aquatic Natural Areas (ANAs) and seven Aquatic Reference Areas (ARAs) on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Anderson and Roane Counties in east Tennessee. It follows a previous study in 2009 that analyzed and evaluated terrestrial natural areas on the Reservation. The purpose of both studies was to evaluate and rank those specially designated areas on the Reservation that contain sensitive species, special habitats, and natural area value. Natural areas receive special protections through established statutes, regulations, and policies. The ORR contains 33,542 acres (13,574 ha) administered by the Department of Energy. The surface waters of the Reservation range from 1st-order to 5th-order streams, but the majority of the streams recognized as ANAs and ARAs are 1st- and 2nd-order streams. East Fork Poplar Creek is a 4th-order stream and the largest watershed that drains Reservation lands. All the waters of the Reservation eventually reach the Clinch River on the southern and western boundaries of the ORR. All available information was collected, synthesized, and evaluated. Field observations were made to support and supplement the available information. Geographic information system mapping techniques were used to develop several quantitative attributes about the study areas. Narrative descriptions of each ANA and ARA and tables of numerical data were prepared. Criteria for assessment and evaluation were developed, and eight categories of factors were devised to produce a ranking system. The evaluation factors used in the ranking system were: (A) size of area, (B) percentage of watershed protected, (C) taxa present with protected status, (D) overall biotic diversity, (E) stream features, (F) water quality and use support ratings, (G) disturbance regime, and (H) other factors. Each factor was evaluated on a 5-point ranking scale (0-4), and each area received a composite score, where 32 was the

  10. Covariant Gauge Fixing and Canonical Quantization

    CERN Document Server

    McKeon, D G C

    2011-01-01

    Theories that contain first class constraints possess gauge invariance which results in the necessity of altering the measure in the associated quantum mechanical path integral. If the path integral is derived from the canonical structure of the theory, then the choice of gauge conditions used in constructing Faddeev's measure cannot be covariant. This shortcoming is normally overcome either by using the "Faddeev-Popov" quantization procedure, or by the approach of Batalin-Fradkin-Fradkina-Vilkovisky, and then demonstrating that these approaches are equivalent to the path integral constructed from the canonical approach with Faddeev's measure. We propose in this paper an alternate way of defining the measure for the path integral when it is constructed using the canonical procedure for theories containing first class constraints and that this new approach can be used in conjunction with covariant gauges. This procedure follows the Faddeev-Popov approach, but rather than working with the form of the gauge tran...

  11. Separability in asymmetric phase-covariant cloning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, asymmetric phase-covariant quantum cloning machines are defined and trade-off between qualities of their outputs and its impact on entanglement properties of the outputs are studies. In addition, optimal families among these cloners are introduced and also their entanglement properties are investigated. An explicit proof of optimality is presented for the case of qubits, which is based on the no-signaling condition. Our optimality proof can also be used to derive an upper bound on trade-off relations for a more general class of optimal cloners which clone states on a specific orbit of the Bloch sphere. It is shown that the optimal cloners of the equatorial states, as in the case of symmetric phase-covariant cloning, give rise to two separable clones, and in this sense these states are unique. For these cloners it is shown that total output is of GHZ-type

  12. Braided Field Quantization from Quantum Poincare Covariance

    CERN Document Server

    Lukierski, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that the covariance of the algebra of quantum NC fields under quantum-deformed Poincare symmetries implies the appearence of braided algebra of fields and the notion of braided locality in NC QFT. We briefly recall the historical development of NC QFT which was firstly formulated in the framework using classical relativistic symmetries but further it was described as generated by the quantum-deformed symmetries. We argue that consistent covariant quantum-deformed formalism requires "braiding all the way", in particular braided commutator of deformed field oscillators as well as the braid between the field oscillators and noncommutative Fourier exponentials. As example of braided quantum-deformed NC QFT we describe the NC scalar free fields on noncommutative canonical (Moyal-Weyl) space-time with braided c-number field commutator which implies braided locality.

  13. Covariant holography of a tachyonic accelerating universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozas-Fernandez, Alberto [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Madrid (Spain); University of Portsmouth, Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    We apply the holographic principle to a flat dark energy dominated Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetime filled with a tachyon scalar field with constant equation of state w = p/ρ, both for w > -1 and w < -1. By using a geometrical covariant procedure, which allows the construction of holographic hypersurfaces, we have obtained for each case the position of the preferred screen and have then compared these with those obtained by using the holographic dark energy model with the future event horizon as the infrared cutoff. In the phantom scenario, one of the two obtained holographic screens is placed on the big rip hypersurface, both for the covariant holographic formalism and the holographic phantom model. It is also analyzed whether the existence of these preferred screens allows a mathematically consistent formulation of fundamental theories based on the existence of an S-matrix at infinite distances. (orig.)

  14. Aquatic polymers can drive pathogen transmission in coastal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Karen; Krusor, Colin; Mazzillo, Fernanda F M; Conrad, Patricia A; Largier, John L; Mazet, Jonna A K; Silver, Mary W

    2014-11-22

    Gelatinous polymers including extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) are fundamental to biophysical processes in aquatic habitats, including mediating aggregation processes and functioning as the matrix of biofilms. Yet insight into the impact of these sticky molecules on the environmental transmission of pathogens in the ocean is limited. We used the zoonotic parasite Toxoplasma gondii as a model to evaluate polymer-mediated mechanisms that promote transmission of terrestrially derived pathogens to marine fauna and humans. We show that transparent exopolymer particles, a particulate form of EPS, enhance T. gondii association with marine aggregates, material consumed by organisms otherwise unable to access micrometre-sized particles. Adhesion to EPS biofilms on macroalgae also captures T. gondii from the water, enabling uptake of pathogens by invertebrates that feed on kelp surfaces. We demonstrate the acquisition, concentration and retention of T. gondii by kelp-grazing snails, which can transmit T. gondii to threatened California sea otters. Results highlight novel mechanisms whereby aquatic polymers facilitate incorporation of pathogens into food webs via association with particle aggregates and biofilms. Identifying the critical role of invisible polymers in transmission of pathogens in the ocean represents a fundamental advance in understanding and mitigating the health impacts of coastal habitat pollution with contaminated runoff. PMID:25297861

  15. Twisted covariant noncommutative self-dual gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A twisted covariant formulation of noncommutative self-dual gravity is presented. The formulation for constructing twisted noncommutative Yang-Mills theories is used. It is shown that the noncommutative torsion is solved at any order of the θ expansion in terms of the tetrad and some extra fields of the theory. In the process the first order expansion in θ for the Plebanski action is explicitly obtained.

  16. Spectral Diagonal Covariance in Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasanický, Ivan; Eben, Kryštof; Mandel, Jan; Vejmelka, Martin

    Munich: Ludwig Maximilians University, 2014. s. 10-10. [ISDA 2014. International Conference on Intelligent Systems Design and Applications. 24.02.2014-28.02.2014, Munich] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant ostatní: NSF DMS -1216481 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data assimilation * ensemble Kalman filter * diagonal covariance Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://www.isda2014.physik.uni-muenchen.de/index.html

  17. Area spectrum in Lorentz covariant loop gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrov, S.; Vassilevich, D.

    2001-01-01

    We use the manifestly Lorentz covariant canonical formalism to evaluate eigenvalues of the area operator acting on Wilson lines. To this end we modify the standard definition of the loop states to make it applicable to the present case of non-commutative connections. The area operator is diagonalized by using the usual shift ambiguity in definition of the connection. The eigenvalues are then expressed through quadratic Casimir operators. No dependence on the Immirzi parameter appears.

  18. Area spectrum in Lorentz covariant loop gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use the manifestly Lorentz covariant canonical formalism to evaluate eigenvalues of the area operator acting on Wilson lines. To this end we modify the standard definition of the loop states to make it applicable to the present case of noncommutative connections. The area operator is diagonalized by using the usual shift ambiguity in the definition of the connection. The eigenvalues are then expressed through quadratic Casimir operators. No dependence on the Immirzi parameter appears

  19. Covariates of Craving in Actively Drinking Alcoholics

    OpenAIRE

    Chakravorty, Subhajit; Samuel T Kuna; Zaharakis, Nikola; O’Brien, Charles P.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Oslin, David

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this cross-sectional study was to assess the relationship of alcohol craving with biopsychosocial and addiction factors that are clinically pertinent to alcoholism treatment. Alcohol craving was assessed in 315 treatment-seeking, alcohol dependent subjects using the PACS questionnaire. Standard validated questionnaires were used to evaluate a variety of biological, addiction, psychological, psychiatric, and social factors. Individual covariates of craving included age, race, probl...

  20. Covariant Functional Calculi from the Affine Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Yafang

    2009-01-01

    Invoking the Clifford-Hermite Wavelets from Clifford analysis, we use the covariances of affine groups to construct a kind of functional calculi for several non-commuting bounded operators. Functional calculi are the intertwining transforms between the representations of affine groups in the space $L^2(\\mathbb R^m)$ and in the space of bounded operators. It turns out that the Weyl calculus is the value of this new functional calculus at the identity of affine groups. Our app...

  1. Bayesian Semiparametric Modeling of Realized Covariance Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Xin; John M Maheu

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces several new Bayesian nonparametric models suitable for capturing the unknown conditional distribution of realized covariance (RCOV) matrices. Existing dynamic Wishart models are extended to countably infinite mixture models of Wishart and inverse-Wishart distributions. In addition to mixture models with constant weights we propose models with time-varying weights to capture time dependence in the unknown distribution. Each of our models can be combined with returns...

  2. Covariant formulation of multiple localized quantum measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have considered the dynamics of simple measuring devices coupled to quantized relativistic Heisenberg-fields. We have defined localized observables and derived covariant equations for the joint probability distribution of the measured outcomes. The proposed formalism is based on standard field-theoretical terms. We have shown that our formalism yields the expected anti-coincidence when two devices detect two wavepackets of a single electron. Applications in the measurement theory of vacuum fluctuations have been suggested. (author). 6 refs, 1 fig

  3. Spectral Diagonal Covariance in Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasanický, Ivan; Eben, Kryštof; Mandel, Jan; Vejmelka, Martin

    Munich : Ludwig Maximilians University, 2014. s. 10-10. [ISDA 2014. International Conference on Intelligent Systems Design and Applications. 24.02.2014-28.02.2014, Munich] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant ostatní: NSF DMS-1216481 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data assimilation * ensemble Kalman filter * diagonal covariance Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology http://www.isda2014.physik.uni-muenchen.de/index.html

  4. Covariant method for calculating helicity amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an alternative approach for calculating helicity amplitudes for processes involving both massless and massive fermions. With this method one can easily obtain covariant expressions for the helicity amplitudes. The final expressions involve only four-vector products and are independent of the basis for γ matrices or specific form of the spinors. We use the method to obtain the helicity amplitudes for several processes involving top quark production. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. Decline and repair, and covariate effects

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shaomin; Scarf, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The failure processes of repairable systems may be impacted by operational and environmental stress factors. To accommodate such factors, reliability can be modelled using a multiplicative intensity function. In the proportional intensity model, the failure intensity is the product of the failure intensity function of the baseline system that quantifies intrinsic factors and a function of covariates that quantify extrinsic factors. The existing literature has extensively studied the failure p...

  6. Nuclear fission in covariant density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status of the application of covariant density functional theory to microscopic description of nuclear fission with main emphasis on superheavy nuclei (SHN) is reviewed. The softness of SHN in the triaxial plane leads to an emergence of several competing fission paths in the region of the inner fission barrier in some of these nuclei. The outer fission barriers of SHN are considerably affected both by triaxiality and octupole deformation. (authors)

  7. Covariant density functional theory for nuclear matter

    OpenAIRE

    Badarch, Urnaa

    2007-01-01

    The EOS of nuclear matter is studied in the framework of relativistic density dependent hadron field theory (DDRH) and results are compared to the results of the phenomenological density dependent approach DD-ME1 which is devised to fit the properties of the symmetric nuclear matter around the normal nuclear matter density . Nuclear interactions were described by a covariant density functional theory using baryons and mesons. In this work medium dependent modifications of ...

  8. Nuclear fission in covariant density functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Afanasjev A.V.; Abusara H.; Ring P.

    2013-01-01

    The current status of the application of covariant density functional theory to microscopic description of nuclear fission with main emphasis on superheavy nuclei (SHN) is reviewed. The softness of SHN in the triaxial plane leads to an emergence of several competing fission pathes in the region of the inner fission barrier in some of these nuclei. The outer fission barriers of SHN are considerably affected both by triaxiality and octupole deformation.

  9. The Beta-MANOVA Ensemble with General Covariance

    OpenAIRE

    Dubbs, Alexander; Edelman, Alan

    2013-01-01

    We find the joint generalized singular value distribution and largest generalized singular value distributions of the $\\beta$-MANOVA ensemble with positive diagonal covariance, which is general. This has been done for the continuous $\\beta > 0$ case for identity covariance (in eigenvalue form), and by setting the covariance to $I$ in our model we get another version. For the diagonal covariance case, it has only been done for $\\beta = 1,2,4$ cases (real, complex, and quaternion matrix entries...

  10. High-dimensional covariance estimation with high-dimensional data

    CERN Document Server

    Pourahmadi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Methods for estimating sparse and large covariance matrices Covariance and correlation matrices play fundamental roles in every aspect of the analysis of multivariate data collected from a variety of fields including business and economics, health care, engineering, and environmental and physical sciences. High-Dimensional Covariance Estimation provides accessible and comprehensive coverage of the classical and modern approaches for estimating covariance matrices as well as their applications to the rapidly developing areas lying at the intersection of statistics and mac

  11. Sparse covariance thresholding for high-dimensional variable selection

    OpenAIRE

    Daye, X. Jessie Jeng And Z. John

    2010-01-01

    In high-dimensions, many variable selection methods, such as the lasso, are often limited by excessive variability and rank deficiency of the sample covariance matrix. Covariance sparsity is a natural phenomenon in high-dimensional applications, such as microarray analysis, image processing, etc., in which a large number of predictors are independent or weakly correlated. In this paper, we propose the covariance-thresholded lasso, a new class of regression methods that can utilize covariance ...

  12. Covariance tracking: architecture optimizations for embedded systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Andrés; Lacassagne, Lionel; Gouiffès, Michèle; Zahraee, Ali Hassan

    2014-12-01

    Covariance matching techniques have recently grown in interest due to their good performances for object retrieval, detection, and tracking. By mixing color and texture information in a compact representation, it can be applied to various kinds of objects (textured or not, rigid or not). Unfortunately, the original version requires heavy computations and is difficult to execute in real time on embedded systems. This article presents a review on different versions of the algorithm and its various applications; our aim is to describe the most crucial challenges and particularities that appeared when implementing and optimizing the covariance matching algorithm on a variety of desktop processors and on low-power processors suitable for embedded systems. An application of texture classification is used to compare different versions of the region descriptor. Then a comprehensive study is made to reach a higher level of performance on multi-core CPU architectures by comparing different ways to structure the information, using single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) instructions and advanced loop transformations. The execution time is reduced significantly on two dual-core CPU architectures for embedded computing: ARM Cortex-A9 and Cortex-A15 and Intel Penryn-M U9300 and Haswell-M 4650U. According to our experiments on covariance tracking, it is possible to reach a speedup greater than ×2 on both ARM and Intel architectures, when compared to the original algorithm, leading to real-time execution.

  13. ANALYSIS OF COVARIANCE WITH SPATIALLY CORRELATED SECONDARY VARIABLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data sets which contain measurements on a spatially referenced response and covariate are analyzed using either co-kriging or spatial analysis of covariance. While co-kriging accounts for the correlation structure of the covariate, it is purely a predictive tool. Alternatively, spatial analysis of c...

  14. On the covariance matrices in the evaluated nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implications of the uncertainties of nuclear data on reactor calculations are shown. The concept of variance, covariance and correlation are expressed first by intuitive definitions and then through statistical theory. The format of the covariance data for ENDF/B is explained and the formulas to obtain the multigroup covariances are given. (Author)

  15. Conformally covariant operators and effective action in external gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The n-dimensional expressions for the second order conformally covariant differentional operators acting on vector and tensor fields and for the fourth order conformally covariant operator acting on scalar fields are obtained. For the fourth order operator one-loop effective action is evaluated in four dimensions. The possibility of effective action evaluation for other conformally covariant operators is discussed

  16. Earth Observation System Flight Dynamics System Covariance Realism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Waqar H.; Tracewell, David

    2016-01-01

    This presentation applies a covariance realism technique to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observation System (EOS) Aqua and Aura spacecraft based on inferential statistics. The technique consists of three parts: collection calculation of definitive state estimates through orbit determination, calculation of covariance realism test statistics at each covariance propagation point, and proper assessment of those test statistics.

  17. Hidden Covariation Detection Produces Faster, Not Slower, Social Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Lynne A.; Andrade, Jackie

    2006-01-01

    In P. Lewicki's (1986b) demonstration of hidden covariation detection (HCD), responses of participants were slower to faces that corresponded with a covariation encountered previously than to faces with novel covariations. This slowing contrasts with the typical finding that priming leads to faster responding and suggests that HCD is a unique type…

  18. Lichens of neglected habitats in Eastern and East-Central European lowlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurga Motiejūnaitē

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Situation of lichens of aquatic and transient habitats in Eastern and East-Central European lowlands is discussed basing on example of several selected species: Leptogium biatorinum, Sarcosagium campestre, Steinia geophana, Verrucaria aquatilis, V. hydrela, V. praetermissa, V. xyloxena. Both habitat types are generally very much neglected in the region and all species show large spatial gaps in recording, which makes it difficult to judge both about their true distribution limits and spreading dynamics. On the other hand, targeted search through the suitable habitats and abundance of such indicate that many of these lichens are probably not uncommon in the region.

  19. 78 FR 47612 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for the Sharpnose...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... important in providing adequate filtration of surface water runoff to maintain a healthy aquatic ecosystem... Texas fall within the boundaries of the proposed critical habitat. If we finalize this rule as proposed... are available at http://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/ArlingtonTexas/ , at http://www.regulations.gov...

  20. Ecosystem Services of Coastal Habitats and Fisheries: Multi-Scale Ecological and Economic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical habitats for fish and wildlife often are small patches in landscapes, e.g., aquatic vegetation beds, reefs, isolated ponds and wetlands, remnant old growth forests, etc, yet the same animal populations that depend on these patches for reproduction or survival can be exte...

  1. Energetic extremes in aquatic locomotion by coral reef fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Fulton

    Full Text Available Underwater locomotion is challenging due to the high friction and resistance imposed on a body moving through water and energy lost in the wake during undulatory propulsion. While aquatic organisms have evolved streamlined shapes to overcome such resistance, underwater locomotion has long been considered a costly exercise. Recent evidence for a range of swimming vertebrates, however, has suggested that flapping paired appendages around a rigid body may be an extremely efficient means of aquatic locomotion. Using intermittent flow-through respirometry, we found exceptional energetic performance in the Bluelined wrasse Stethojulis bandanensis, which maintains tuna-like optimum cruising speeds (up to 1 metre s(-1 while using 40% less energy than expected for their body size. Displaying an exceptional aerobic scope (22-fold above resting, streamlined rigid-body posture, and wing-like fins that generate lift-based thrust, S. bandanensis literally flies underwater to efficiently maintain high optimum swimming speeds. Extreme energetic performance may be key to the colonization of highly variable environments, such as the wave-swept habitats where S. bandanensis and other wing-finned species tend to occur. Challenging preconceived notions of how best to power aquatic locomotion, biomimicry of such lift-based fin movements could yield dramatic reductions in the power needed to propel underwater vehicles at high speed.

  2. Energetic extremes in aquatic locomotion by coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Christopher J; Johansen, Jacob L; Steffensen, John F

    2013-01-01

    Underwater locomotion is challenging due to the high friction and resistance imposed on a body moving through water and energy lost in the wake during undulatory propulsion. While aquatic organisms have evolved streamlined shapes to overcome such resistance, underwater locomotion has long been considered a costly exercise. Recent evidence for a range of swimming vertebrates, however, has suggested that flapping paired appendages around a rigid body may be an extremely efficient means of aquatic locomotion. Using intermittent flow-through respirometry, we found exceptional energetic performance in the Bluelined wrasse Stethojulis bandanensis, which maintains tuna-like optimum cruising speeds (up to 1 metre s(-1)) while using 40% less energy than expected for their body size. Displaying an exceptional aerobic scope (22-fold above resting), streamlined rigid-body posture, and wing-like fins that generate lift-based thrust, S. bandanensis literally flies underwater to efficiently maintain high optimum swimming speeds. Extreme energetic performance may be key to the colonization of highly variable environments, such as the wave-swept habitats where S. bandanensis and other wing-finned species tend to occur. Challenging preconceived notions of how best to power aquatic locomotion, biomimicry of such lift-based fin movements could yield dramatic reductions in the power needed to propel underwater vehicles at high speed. PMID:23326566

  3. Prioritizing tiger conservation through landscape genetics and habitat linkages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibek Yumnam

    Full Text Available Even with global support for tiger (Panthera tigris conservation their survival is threatened by poaching, habitat loss and isolation. Currently about 3,000 wild tigers persist in small fragmented populations within seven percent of their historic range. Identifying and securing habitat linkages that connect source populations for maintaining landscape-level gene flow is an important long-term conservation strategy for endangered carnivores. However, habitat corridors that link regional tiger populations are often lost to development projects due to lack of objective evidence on their importance. Here, we use individual based genetic analysis in combination with landscape permeability models to identify and prioritize movement corridors across seven tiger populations within the Central Indian Landscape. By using a panel of 11 microsatellites we identified 169 individual tigers from 587 scat and 17 tissue samples. We detected four genetic clusters within Central India with limited gene flow among three of them. Bayesian and likelihood analyses identified 17 tigers as having recent immigrant ancestry. Spatially explicit tiger occupancy obtained from extensive landscape-scale surveys across 76,913 km(2 of forest habitat was found to be only 21,290 km(2. After accounting for detection bias, the covariates that best explained tiger occupancy were large, remote, dense forest patches; large ungulate abundance, and low human footprint. We used tiger occupancy probability to parameterize habitat permeability for modeling habitat linkages using least-cost and circuit theory pathway analyses. Pairwise genetic differences (FST between populations were better explained by modeled linkage costs (r>0.5, p<0.05 compared to Euclidean distances, which was in consonance with observed habitat fragmentation. The results of our study highlight that many corridors may still be functional as there is evidence of contemporary migration. Conservation efforts should

  4. Freshwater Ecosystems and Resilience of Pacific Salmon: Habitat Management Based on Natural Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon H. Reeves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In spite of numerous habitat restoration programs in fresh waters with an aggregate annual funding of millions of dollars, many populations of Pacific salmon remain significantly imperiled. Habitat restoration strategies that address limited environmental attributes and partial salmon life-history requirements or approaches that attempt to force aquatic habitat to conform to idealized but ecologically unsustainable conditions may partly explain this lack of response. Natural watershed processes generate highly variable environmental conditions and population responses, i.e., multiple life histories, that are often not considered in restoration. Examples from several locations underscore the importance of natural variability to the resilience of Pacific salmon. The implication is that habitat restoration efforts will be more likely to foster salmon resilience if they consider processes that generate and maintain natural variability in fresh water. We identify three specific criteria for management based on natural variability: the capacity of aquatic habitat to recover from disturbance, a range of habitats distributed across stream networks through time sufficient to fulfill the requirements of diverse salmon life histories, and ecological connectivity. In light of these considerations, we discuss current threats to habitat resilience and describe how regulatory and restoration approaches can be modified to better incorporate natural variability.

  5. Quantum energy inequalities and local covariance II: categorical formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewster, Christopher J.

    2007-11-01

    We formulate quantum energy inequalities (QEIs) in the framework of locally covariant quantum field theory developed by Brunetti, Fredenhagen and Verch, which is based on notions taken from category theory. This leads to a new viewpoint on the QEIs, and also to the identification of a new structural property of locally covariant quantum field theory, which we call local physical equivalence. Covariant formulations of the numerical range and spectrum of locally covariant fields are given and investigated, and a new algebra of fields is identified, in which fields are treated independently of their realisation on particular spacetimes and manifestly covariant versions of the functional calculus may be formulated.

  6. Determination of covariant Schwinger terms in anomalous gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A functional integral method is used to determine equal time commutators between the covariant currents and the covariant Gauss-law operators in theories which are affected by an anomaly. By using a differential geometrical setup we show how the derivation of consistent- and covariant Schwinger terms can be understood on an equal footing. We find a modified consistency condition for the covariant anomaly. As a by-product the Bardeen-Zumino functional, which relates consistent and covariant anomalies, can be interpreted as connection on a certain line bundle over all gauge potentials. Finally the commutator anomalies are calculated for the two- and four dimensional case. (Author) 13 refs

  7. Aquatic Plants and Lake Ecosystems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Jan; Květ, Jan

    Oxford : Blackwell Science Ltd, 2003 - (O´Sullivan, P.; Reynolds, C.), s. 309-340 ISBN 0-632-04797-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/01/1113 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : Aquatic macrophytes * green algae Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  8. Macrophytes: Ecology of aquatic plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bornette, G.; Puijalon, S.

    2009-01-01

    Aquatic plants contribute to maintaining key functions and related biodiversity in freshwater ecosystems, and to provide the needs of human societies. The way the ecological niches of macrophytes are determined by abiotic filters and biotic ones is considered. A simple, broadly applicable model of t

  9. Act together – implications of symbioses in aquatic ciliates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eDziallas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mutual interactions in form of symbioses can increase the fitness of organisms and provide them with the capacity to occupy new ecological niches. The formation of obligate symbioses allows for rapid evolution of new life forms including multitrophic consortia. Microbes are important components of many known endosymbioses and their short generation times and strong potential for genetic exchange may be important drivers of speciation. Hosts provide endo- and ectosymbionts with stable, nutrient-rich environments and protection from environmental stresses. This is of particular importance in aquatic ecosystems, which are often highly variable, harsh and nutrient-deficient habitats. Thus it is not surprising that symbioses are widespread in both marine and freshwater environments. Symbioses in aquatic ciliates are good model systems for exploring symbiont-host interactions. Many ciliate species are globally distributed and have been intensively studied in the context of plastid evolution. Their relatively large cell size offers an ideal habitat for numerous microorganisms with different functional traits including commensalism and parasitism. Phagocytosis facilitates the formation of symbiotic relationships, particularly since some ingested microorganisms can escape the digestion. For example, photoautotrophic algae and methanogens represent endosymbionts that greatly extend the biogeochemical functions of their hosts. Consequently, symbiotic relationships between protists and prokaryotes are widespread and often result in new ecological functions of symbiotic communities. This enables ciliates to thrive under a wide range of environmental conditions including ultraoligotrophic or anoxic habitats. We summarize the current understanding of this exciting research topic to identify the many areas in which knowledge is lacking and to stimulate future research by providing an overview on new methodologies and by formulating a number of emerging

  10. Ecological opportunities, habitat, and past climatic fluctuations influenced the diversification of modern turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João Fabrício Mota; Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre Felizola

    2016-08-01

    Habitat may be viewed as an important life history component potentially related to diversification patterns. However, differences in diversification rates between aquatic and terrestrial realms are still poorly explored. Testudines is a group distributed worldwide that lives in aquatic and terrestrial environments, but until now no-one has evaluated the diversification history of the group as a whole. We aim here to investigate the diversification history of turtles and to test if habitat influenced speciation rate in these animals. We reconstructed the phylogeny of the modern species of chelonians and estimated node divergence dates using molecular markers and a Bayesian approach. Then, we used Bayesian Analyses of Macroevolutionary Mixtures to evaluate the diversification history of turtles and evaluate the effect of habitat on this pattern. Our reconstructed phylogeny covered 300 species (87% of the total diversity of the group). We found that the emydid subfamily Deirochelyinae, which forms the turtle hotspot in south-eastern United States, had an increase in its speciation rate, and that Galapagos tortoises had similar increases. Current speciation rates are lower in terrestrial turtles, contradicting studies supporting the idea terrestrial animals diversify more than aquatic species. Our results suggest that habitat, ecological opportunities, island invasions, and climatic factors are important drivers of diversification in modern turtles and reinforce the importance of habitat as a diversification driver. PMID:27233435

  11. Model-Based Selection of Areas for the Restoration of Acrocephalus paludicola Habitats in NE Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Annett; Tanneberger, Franziska; Bellebaum, Jochen

    2014-04-01

    The global Aquatic Warbler ( Acrocephalus paludicola, Vieillot, 1817) population has suffered a major decline due to the large-scale destruction of its natural habitat (fen mires). The species is at risk of extinction, especially in NE Germany/NW Poland. In this study, we developed habitat suitability models based on satellite and environmental data to identify potential areas for habitat restoration on which further surveys and planning should be focused. To create a reliable model, we used all Aquatic Warbler presences in the study area since 1990 as well as additional potentially suitable habitats identified in the field. We combined the presence/absence regression tree algorithm Cubist with the presence-only algorithm Maxent since both commonly outperform other algorithms. To integrate the separate model results, we present a new way to create a metamodel using the initial model results as variables. Additionally, a histogram approach was applied to further reduce the final search area to the most promising sites. Accuracy increased when using both remote sensing and environmental data. It was highest for the integrated metamodel (Cohen's Kappa of 0.4, P sites for Aquatic Warbler habitat restoration.

  12. Carbonic anhydrase levels and internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations in aquatic macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C.I.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase levels were examined in a variety of aquatic macrophytes from different habitats. In general, carbonic anhydrase levels increased across the habitat gradient such that activities were low in submersed aquatic macrophytes and high in emergent macrophytes with floating-leaved and free-floating plants exhibiting intermediate activities. Internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations were analyzed in relation to carbonic anhydrase activities. There was no correlation between these two parameters. Internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations ranged from low to high in submersed macrophytes, but were low in floating-leaved and emergent macrophytes. The observed internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations are discussed in relation to the individual morphologies of the plants and the environments in which they occurred.

  13. Aquatic Macrophyte Risk Assessment for Pesticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maltby, L.; Arnold, D.; Arts, G.H.P.; Davies, J.; Heimbach, F.; Pickl, C.; Poulsen, V.

    2009-01-01

    Given the essential role that primary producers play in aquatic ecosystems, it is imperative that the potential risk of pesticides to the structure and functioning of aquatic plants is adequately assessed. This book discusses the assessment of the risk of pesticides with herbicidal activity to aquat

  14. MATXTST, Basic Operations for Covariance Matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: MATXTST and MATXTST1 perform the following operations for a covariance matrix: - test for singularity; - test for positive definiteness; - compute the inverse if the matrix is non-singular; - compute the determinant; - determine the number of positive, negative, and zero eigenvalues; - examine all possible 3 X 3 cross correlations within a sub-matrix corresponding to a leading principal minor which is non-positive definite. While the two programs utilize the same input, the calculational procedures employed are somewhat different and their functions are complementary. The available input options include: i) the full covariance matrix, ii) the basic variables plus the relative covariance matrix, or iii) uncertainties in the basic variables plus the correlation matrix. 2 - Method of solution: MATXTST employs LINPACK subroutines SPOFA and SPODI to test for positive definiteness and to perform further optional calculations. Subroutine SPOFA factors a symmetric matrix M using the Cholesky algorithm to determine the elements of a matrix R which satisfies the relation M=R'R, where R' is the transposed matrix of R. Each leading principal minor of M is tested until the first one is found which is not positive definite. MATXTST1 uses LINPACK subroutines SSICO, SSIFA, and SSIDI to estimate whether the matrix is near to singularity or not (SSICO), and to perform the matrix diagonalization process (SSIFA). The algorithm used in SSIFA is generalization of the Method of Lagrange Reduction. SSIDI is used to compute the determinant and inertia of the matrix. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Matrices of sizes up to 50 X 50 elements can be treated by present versions of the programs

  15. Spectral Diagonal Covariance in EnKF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mandel, J.; Kasanický, Ivan; Vejmelka, Martin

    Ostrava: Ústav geoniky AV ČR, 2014 - (Blaheta, R.; Starý, J.; Sysalová, D.). s. 64-64 ISBN 978-80-86407-47-0. [Modelling 2014. 02.06.2014-06.06.2014, Rožnov pod Radhoštěm] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant ostatní: NSF DMS -1216481 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : ensemble Kalman filter * high-dimensional covariance * spectral approximations Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  16. Linear Covariance Analysis and Epoch State Estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, F. Landis; Carpenter, J. Russell

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends in two directions the results of prior work on generalized linear covariance analysis of both batch least-squares and sequential estimators. The first is an improved treatment of process noise in the batch, or epoch state, estimator with an epoch time that may be later than some or all of the measurements in the batch. The second is to account for process noise in specifying the gains in the epoch state estimator. We establish the conditions under which the latter estimator is equivalent to the Kalman filter.

  17. On the Galilean covariance of classical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Galilean covariant approach to classical mechanics of a single interacting particle is described. In this scheme constitutive relations defining forces are rejected and acting forces are determined by some fundamental differential equations. It is shown that total energy of the interacting particle transforms under Galilean transformations differently from the kinetic energy. The statement is illustrated on the exactly solvable examples of the harmonic oscillator and the case of constant forces and also, in the suitable version of the perturbation theory, for the anharmonic oscillator. (author)

  18. Setting of Covariance for Kalman Filter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pecherková, Pavla

    Praha: ÚTIA AV ČR, 2006 - (Přikryl, J.; Šmídl, V.). s. 45-46 [International PhD Workshop on Interplay of Societal and Technical Decision-Making, Young Generation Viewpoint /7./. 25.09.2006-30.09.2006, Hrubá Skála] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : traffic * covariance * Kalman filter Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory

  19. Inferring Meta-covariates in Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Keith; McMillan, Lisa; Girolami, Mark

    This paper develops an alternative method for gene selection that combines model based clustering and binary classification. By averaging the covariates within the clusters obtained from model based clustering, we define “meta-covariates” and use them to build a probit regression model, thereby selecting clusters of similarly behaving genes, aiding interpretation. This simultaneous learning task is accomplished by an EM algorithm that optimises a single likelihood function which rewards good performance at both classification and clustering. We explore the performance of our methodology on a well known leukaemia dataset and use the Gene Ontology to interpret our results.

  20. Minimal covariant observables identifying all pure states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmeli, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.carmeli@gmail.com [D.I.M.E., Università di Genova, Via Cadorna 2, I-17100 Savona (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Genova (Italy); Heinosaari, Teiko, E-mail: teiko.heinosaari@utu.fi [Turku Centre for Quantum Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku (Finland); Toigo, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.toigo@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy); I.N.F.N., Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-09-02

    It has been recently shown by Heinosaari, Mazzarella and Wolf (2013) [1] that an observable that identifies all pure states of a d-dimensional quantum system has minimally 4d−4 outcomes or slightly less (the exact number depending on d). However, no simple construction of this type of minimal observable is known. We investigate covariant observables that identify all pure states and have minimal number of outcomes. It is shown that the existence of this kind of observables depends on the dimension of the Hilbert space.

  1. Covariant separable kernel of the deuteron

    CERN Document Server

    Bondarenko, S G; Hwang, W -Y Pauchy; Rogochaya, E P

    2010-01-01

    The six-rank separable kernel of the neutron-proton interaction for the triplet coupled $^3S_1^+$-$^3D_1^+$ partial state within the covariant Bethe-Salpeter approach is constructed. Two different methods of a relativistic generalization of initially nonrelativistic form factors parametrizing the kernel are considered. Parameters of the kernel are defined from the description of phase shifts and low-energy characteristics in the elastic neutron-proton scattering. At the same time the half-off-shell behavior of the kernel is controlled by the appropriate description of the Noyes-Kowalski function and the deuteron properties.

  2. Non-evaluation applications for covariance matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.

    1982-05-01

    The possibility for application of covariance matrix techniques to a variety of common research problems other than formal data evaluation are demonstrated by means of several examples. These examples deal with such matters as fitting spectral data, deriving uncertainty estimates for results calculated from experimental data, obtaining the best values for plurally-measured quantities, and methods for analysis of cross section errors based on properties of the experiment. The examples deal with realistic situations encountered in the laboratory, and they are treated in sufficient detail to enable a careful reader to extrapolate the methods to related problems.

  3. Spectral Diagonal Covariance in EnKF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mandel, J.; Kasanický, Ivan; Vejmelka, Martin

    Ostrava : Ústav geoniky AV ČR, 2014 - (Blaheta, R.; Starý, J.; Sysalová, D.). s. 64-64 ISBN 978-80-86407-47-0. [Modelling 2014. 02.06.2014-06.06.2014, Rožnov pod Radhoštěm] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant ostatní: NSF DMS-1216481 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : ensemble Kalman filter * high-dimensional covariance * spectral approximations Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  4. Non-evaluation applications for covariance matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility for application of covariance matrix techniques to a variety of common research problems other than formal data evaluation are demonstrated by means of several examples. These examples deal with such matters as fitting spectral data, deriving uncertainty estimates for results calculated from experimental data, obtaining the best values for plurally-measured quantities, and methods for analysis of cross section errors based on properties of the experiment. The examples deal with realistic situations encountered in the laboratory, and they are treated in sufficient detail to enable a careful reader to extrapolate the methods to related problems

  5. SO(2,1) Covariant IIB Superalgebra

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Mitsuko; Hatsuda, Machiko; Kamimura, Kiyoshi; Tokunaga, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    We propose a type IIB super-Poincare algebra with SO(2,1) covariant central extension. Together with SO(2,1) and SO(9,1) generators, a SO(2,1) triplet (momenta), a Majorana-spinor doublet (supercharges) and a Rarita-Schwinger central charge generate a group, G. We consider a coset G/H where H=(SO(2) x Lorentz), and the SL(2,R) 2-form doublet is obtained by the coset construction. It is shown that U(1) connections, whose strengths are associated with 2-forms, are recognized as coordinates of t...

  6. ISOLATION OF FILAMENTOUS FUNGI ASSOCIATED WITH TWO COMMON EDIBLE AQUATIC INSECTS, HYDROPHILUS PICEUS AND DYTISCUS MARGINALIS

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Gur; Ahmet Polat; Umit Incekara; Murat Ozdal; Esabi Basaran Kurbanoglu,Gani Erhan Tasar

    2012-01-01

    Insects are widely used for their potential source of protein, lipids, carbohydrates and certain vitamins in many parts of the world. As in terrestial ones, aquatic insects can also carry fungal structures. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated microfungal flora of internal and external surface of Hydrophilus piceus and Dytiscus marginalis collected from their natural habitats in Erzurum (Turkey). We isolated total 19 different species of fungi belonging to Penicillium, Alternaria, Be...

  7. Distribution of aquatic insects in phumdis (floating island) of Loktak Lake, Manipur, northeastern India

    OpenAIRE

    K. Takhelmayum; Gupta, S.

    2011-01-01

    A study was made on the temporal fluctuations of distribution of aquatic insects around Phumdi Live (PL), Phumdi Mixed (PM) and Phumdi Dry (PD) areas of Loktak Lake. Phumdis are a heterogeneous mass of soil, vegetation and organic matter. The study revealed the presence of predators, and the absence of herbivores and detritivores in both PL and PM, the PD area was totally devoid of insects. Although both the habitats supported the same predator groups hemiptera and odonata, diversity and ...

  8. Genome-Wide Scans for Candidate Genes Involved in the Aquatic Adaptation of Dolphins

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan-Bo; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Liu, He-Qun; Irwin, David M; Shen, Yong-Yi; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Since their divergence from the terrestrial artiodactyls, cetaceans have fully adapted to an aquatic lifestyle, which represents one of the most dramatic transformations in mammalian evolutionary history. Numerous morphological and physiological characters of cetaceans have been acquired in response to this drastic habitat transition, such as thickened blubber, echolocation, and ability to hold their breath for a long period of time. However, knowledge about the molecular basis underlying the...

  9. Phenotypic flexibility of gape anatomy fine-tunes the aquatic prey-capture system of newts

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wassenbergh, Sam; Heiss, Egon

    2016-07-01

    A unique example of phenotypic flexibility of the oral apparatus is present in newts (Salamandridae) that seasonally change between an aquatic and a terrestrial habitat. Newts grow flaps of skin between their upper and lower jaws, the labial lobes, to partly close the corners of the mouth when they adopt an aquatic lifestyle during their breeding season. Using hydrodynamic simulations based on μCT-scans and cranial kinematics during prey-capture in the smooth newt (Lissotriton vulgaris), we showed that this phenotypic flexibility is an adaptive solution to improve aquatic feeding performance: both suction distance and suction force increase by approximately 15% due to the labial lobes. As the subsequent freeing of the corners of the mouth by resorption of the labial lobes is assumed beneficial for the terrestrial capture of prey by the tongue, this flexibility of the mouth fine-tunes the process of capturing prey throughout the seasonal switching between water and land.

  10. Azospirillum genomes reveal transition of bacteria from aquatic to terrestrial environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Wisniewski-Dyé

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fossil records indicate that life appeared in marine environments ∼3.5 billion years ago (Gyr and transitioned to terrestrial ecosystems nearly 2.5 Gyr. Sequence analysis suggests that "hydrobacteria" and "terrabacteria" might have diverged as early as 3 Gyr. Bacteria of the genus Azospirillum are associated with roots of terrestrial plants; however, virtually all their close relatives are aquatic. We obtained genome sequences of two Azospirillum species and analyzed their gene origins. While most Azospirillum house-keeping genes have orthologs in its close aquatic relatives, this lineage has obtained nearly half of its genome from terrestrial organisms. The majority of genes encoding functions critical for association with plants are among horizontally transferred genes. Our results show that transition of some aquatic bacteria to terrestrial habitats occurred much later than the suggested initial divergence of hydro- and terrabacterial clades. The birth of the genus Azospirillum approximately coincided with the emergence of vascular plants on land.

  11. Evaluation of Macroinvertebrate Communities and Habitat for Selected Stream Reaches at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.J. Henne; K.J. Buckley

    2005-08-12

    This is the second aquatic biological monitoring report generated by Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) Water Quality and Hydrology Group. The study has been conducted to generate impact-based assessments of habitat and water quality for LANL waterways. The monitoring program was designed to allow for the detection of spatial and temporal trends in water and habitat quality through ongoing, biannual monitoring of habitat characteristics and benthic aquatic macroinvertebrate communities at six key sites in Los Alamos, Sandia, Water, Pajarito, and Starmer's Gulch Canyons. Data were collected on aquatic habitat characteristics, channel substrate, and macroinvertebrate communities during 2001 and 2002. Aquatic habitat scores were stable between 2001 and 2002 at all locations except Starmer's Gulch and Pajarito Canyon, which had lower scores in 2002 due to low flow conditions. Channel substrate changes were most evident at the upper Los Alamos and Pajarito study reaches. The macroinvertebrate Stream Condition Index (SCI) indicated moderate to severe impairment at upper Los Alamos Canyon, slight to moderate impairment at upper Sandia Canyon, and little or no impairment at lower Sandia Canyon, Starmer's Gulch, and Pajarito Canyon. Habitat, substrate, and macroinvertebrate data from the site in upper Los Alamos Canyon indicated severe impacts from the Cerro Grande Fire of 2000. Impairment in the macroinvertebrate community at upper Sandia Canyon was probably due to effluent-dominated flow at that site. The minimal impairment SCI scores for the lower Sandia site indicated that water quality improved with distance downstream from the outfall at upper Sandia Canyon.

  12. Assessment of potential aquatic herbicide impacts to California aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemering, Geoffrey S; Hayworth, Jennifer D; Greenfield, Ben K

    2008-10-01

    A series of legal decisions culminated in 2002 with the California State Water Resources Control Board funding the San Francisco Estuary Institute to develop and implement a 3-year monitoring program to determine the potential environmental impacts of aquatic herbicide applications. The monitoring program was intended to investigate the behavior of all aquatic pesticides in use in California, to determine potential impacts in a wide range of water-body types receiving applications, and to help regulators determine where to direct future resources. A tiered monitoring approach was developed to achieve a balance between program goals and what was practically achievable within the project time and budget constraints. Water, sediment, and biota were collected under "worst-case" scenarios in close association with herbicide applications. Applications of acrolein, copper sulfate, chelated copper, diquat dibromide, glyphosate, fluridone, triclopyr, and 2,4-D were monitored. A range of chemical analyses, toxicity tests, and bioassessments were conducted. At each site, risk quotients were calculated to determine potential impacts. For sediment-partitioning herbicides, sediment quality triad analysis was performed. Worst-case scenario monitoring and special studies showed limited short-term and no long-term toxicity directly attributable to aquatic herbicide applications. Risk quotient calculations called for additional risk characterizations; these included limited assessments for glyphosate and fluridone and more extensive risk assessments for diquat dibromide, chelated copper products, and copper sulfate. Use of surfactants in conjunction with aquatic herbicides was positively associated with greater ecosystem impacts. Results therefore warrant full risk characterization for all adjuvant compounds. PMID:18293029

  13. Proposed Release Guides to Protect Aquatic Biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marter, W.L.

    2001-03-28

    At the request of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) and the Department of Energy (DOE), the Savannah River Laboratory was assigned the task of developing the release guides to protect aquatic biota. A review of aquatic radioecology literature by two leading experts in the field of radioecology concludes that exposure of aquatic biota at one rad per day or less will not produce detectable deleterious effects on aquatic organisms. On the basis of this report, DOE recommends the use of one rad per day as an interim dose standard to protect aquatic biota.

  14. Amphibious auditory evoked potentials in four North American Testudines genera spanning the aquatic-terrestrial spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyl, Jeffrey N; Johnston, Carol E

    2015-10-01

    Animals exhibit unique hearing adaptations in relation to the habitat media in which they reside. This study was a comparative analysis of auditory specialization in relation to habitat medium in Testudines, a taxon that includes both highly aquatic and fully terrestrial members. Evoked potential audiograms were collected in four species groups representing diversity along the aquatic-terrestrial spectrum: terrestrial and fossorial Gopherus polyphemus, terrestrial Terrapene carolina carolina, and aquatic Trachemys scripta and Sternotherus (S. odoratus and S. minor). Additionally, underwater sensitivity was tested in T. c. carolina, T. scripta, and Sternotherus with tympana submerged just below the water surface. In aerial audiograms, T. c. carolina were most sensitive, with thresholds 18 dB lower than Sternotherus. At 100-300 Hz, thresholds in T. c. carolina, G. polyphemus, and T. scripta were similar to each other. At 400-800 Hz, G. polyphemus thresholds were elevated to 11 dB above T. c. carolina. The underwater audiograms of T. c. carolina, T. scripta, and Sternotherus were similar. The results suggest aerial hearing adaptations in emydids and high-frequency hearing loss associated with seismic vibration detection in G. polyphemus. The underwater audiogram of T. c. carolina could reflect retention of ancestral aquatic auditory function. PMID:26194768

  15. Power Spectrum Super-Sample Covariance

    CERN Document Server

    Takada, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    We provide a simple, unified approach to describing the impact of super-sample covariance on power spectrum estimation in a finite-volume survey. For a wide range of survey volumes, the sample variance that arises from modes that are larger than the survey dominates the covariance of power spectrum estimators for modes much smaller than the survey. The perturbative and deeply nonlinear versions of this effect are known as beat coupling and halo sample variance respectively. We show that they are unified by the matter trispectrum of squeezed configurations and that such configurations obey a consistency relation which relates them to the response of the power spectrum to a change in the background density. Our method also applies to statistics that are based on radial projections of the density field such as weak lensing shear. While we use the halo model for an analytic description to expose the nature of the effect, the consistency description enables an accurate calibration of the full effect directly from ...

  16. Piecewise linear regression splines with hyperbolic covariates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consider the problem of fitting a curve to data that exhibit a multiphase linear response with smooth transitions between phases. We propose substituting hyperbolas as covariates in piecewise linear regression splines to obtain curves that are smoothly joined. The method provides an intuitive and easy way to extend the two-phase linear hyperbolic response model of Griffiths and Miller and Watts and Bacon to accommodate more than two linear segments. The resulting regression spline with hyperbolic covariates may be fit by nonlinear regression methods to estimate the degree of curvature between adjoining linear segments. The added complexity of fitting nonlinear, as opposed to linear, regression models is not great. The extra effort is particularly worthwhile when investigators are unwilling to assume that the slope of the response changes abruptly at the join points. We can also estimate the join points (the values of the abscissas where the linear segments would intersect if extrapolated) if their number and approximate locations may be presumed known. An example using data on changing age at menarche in a cohort of Japanese women illustrates the use of the method for exploratory data analysis. (author)

  17. Target Detection Using Nonsingular Approximations for a Singular Covariance Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nir Gorelik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate covariance matrix estimation for high-dimensional data can be a difficult problem. A good approximation of the covariance matrix needs in most cases a prohibitively large number of pixels, that is, pixels from a stationary section of the image whose number is greater than several times the number of bands. Estimating the covariance matrix with a number of pixels that is on the order of the number of bands or less will cause not only a bad estimation of the covariance matrix but also a singular covariance matrix which cannot be inverted. In this paper we will investigate two methods to give a sufficient approximation for the covariance matrix while only using a small number of neighboring pixels. The first is the quasilocal covariance matrix (QLRX that uses the variance of the global covariance instead of the variances that are too small and cause a singular covariance. The second method is sparse matrix transform (SMT that performs a set of K-givens rotations to estimate the covariance matrix. We will compare results from target acquisition that are based on both of these methods. An improvement for the SMT algorithm is suggested.

  18. Spatial covariation of local abundance among different parasite species: the effect of shared hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrue, C; Poulin, R

    2015-10-01

    Within any parasite species, abundance varies spatially, reaching higher values in certain localities than in others, presumably reflecting the local availability of host resources or the local suitability of habitat characteristics for free-living stages. In the absence of strong interactions between two species of helminths with complex life cycles, we might predict that the degree to which their abundances covary spatially is determined by their common resource requirements, i.e. how many host species they share throughout their life cycles. We test this prediction using five trematode species, all with a typical three-host cycle, from multiple lake sampling sites in New Zealand's South Island: Stegodexamene anguillae, Telogaster opisthorchis, Coitocaecum parvum, Maritrema poulini, and an Apatemon sp. Pairs of species from this set of five share the same host species at either one, two, or all three life cycle stages. Our results show that when two trematode species share the same host species at all three life stages, they show positive spatial covariation in abundance (of metacercarial and adult stages) across localities. When they share hosts at two life stages, they show positive spatial covariation in abundance in some cases but not others. Finally, if two trematode species share only one host species, at a single life stage, their abundances do not covary spatially. These findings indicate that the extent of resource sharing between parasite species can drive the spatial match-mismatch between their abundances, and thus influence their coevolutionary dynamics and the degree to which host populations suffer from additive or synergistic effects of multiple infections. PMID:26113509

  19. A Class of Population Covariance Matrices in the Bootstrap Approach to Covariance Structure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Hayashi, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Hirokazu

    2007-01-01

    Model evaluation in covariance structure analysis is critical before the results can be trusted. Due to finite sample sizes and unknown distributions of real data, existing conclusions regarding a particular statistic may not be applicable in practice. The bootstrap procedure automatically takes care of the unknown distribution and, for a given…

  20. Integrating terrestrial laser scanning and repeat field measurements to quantify habitat changes during baseflow recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelfle-Erskine, C. A.; Thompson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding stream habitat heterogeneity is essential for evaluating stream habitat quality for salmonids, but the variability in pool sizes, groundwater sources, and the associated water quality makes characterization of habitat challenging. Habitat volume and stream connectivity are key drivers of ecosystem processes in spatially-intermittent streams, and strongly influence survival of juvenile salmonids in coastal California. Stream disconnection creates heterogeneous habitats, as disconnected pools are fed by distinct groundwater and hyporheic sources of water containing different concentrations of carbon, oxygen and nutrients. These distinct biogeochemical regimes drive production of benthic macroinvertebrates (salmonids' primary food source) and dissolved oxygen levels, which in turn govern salmonid metabolism. In this study, we use terrestrial laser scans of the streambed, topographic surveys of wetted pools, and repeat field measurements of pool depth to develop a timeseries of finely resolved pool volumes and dry riffle lengths. We overlay repeat water quality measurements onto this surface to visualize how cessation of flow creates heterogeneous habitats influenced by groundwater flux and geomorphic setting. By coupling terrestrial laser scans with traditional surveys, we create high-resolution facies surfaces that can be integrated with timeseries measurements of other biogeochemical data to characterize changes in habitat conditions during baseflow recession. Compared with traditional survey methods, this method yields improved qualitative descriptions of habitat fragmentation via visualizations and spatially and temporally explicit quantification of aquatic and riparian habitat characteristics that drive salmonid over-summer survival.

  1. Field evaluation of a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model near boulders for habitat calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddle, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic models are now widely used in aquatic habitat studies. To test the sensitivity of calculated habitat outcomes to limitations of such a model and of typical field data, bathmetry, depth and velocity data were collected for three discharges in the vicinity of two large boulders in the South Platte River (Colorado) and used in the River2D model. Simulated depth and velocity were compared with observed values at 204 locations and the differences in habitat numbers produced by observed and simulated conditions were calculated. The bulk of the differences between simulated and observed depth and velocity values were found to lie within the likely error of measurement. However, the effect of flow simulation outliers on potential habitat outcomes must be considered when using 2D models for habitat simulation. Furthermore, the shape of the habitat suitability relation can influence the effects of simulation errors. Habitat relations with steep slopes in the velocity ranges found in similar study areas are expected to be sensitive to the magnitude of error found here. Comparison of habitat values derived from simulated and observed depth and velocity revealed a small tendency to under-predict habitat values.

  2. Field evaluation of a two-dimensinal hydrodynamic model near boulders for habitat calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddle, Terry

    2010-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic models are now widely used in aquatic habitat studies. To test the sensitivity of calculated habitat outcomes to limitations of such a model and of typical field data, bathymetry, depth and velocity data were collected for three discharges in the vicinity of two large boulders in the South Platte River (Colorado) and used in the River2D model. Simulated depth and velocity were compared with observed values at 204 locations and the differences in habitat numbers produced by observed and simulated conditions were calculated. The bulk of the differences between simulated and observed depth and velocity values were found to lie within the likely error of measurement. However, the effect of flow simulation outliers on potential habitat outcomes must be considered when using 2D models for habitat simulation. Furthermore, the shape of the habitat suitability relation can influence the effects of simulation errors. Habitat relations with steep slopes in the velocity ranges found in similar study areas are expected to be sensitive to the magnitude of error found here. Comparison of habitat values derived from simulated and observed depth and velocity revealed a small tendency to under-predict habitat values.

  3. NEPR Benthic Habitat Map 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This benthic habitat map was created from a semi-automated habitat mapping process, using a combination of bathymetry, satellite imagery, aerial imagery and...

  4. Pre-natal Aquatic Preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Frias, Ana; Serra, Célia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Water, a source of well-being, peace, fullness, freedom and harmony. For quite some time now, water is sought after for its renowned benefits in terms of relieving the physical and emotional changes which commonly occur during pregnancy. Objectives: 1) Describe the process of intervention, arising from the use of the aquatic environment in prenatal preparation 2) Relate the gains in health from prenatal preparation aquatica Method: Descriptive creating and applying a prep...

  5. Carcinogenic hazards in aquatic ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical characterization of contaminants in bottom sediments from the Great Lakes in western New York (Lake Erie) was carried out by applying reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) to fractions derived by routine organic extraction and separation methods. A comparison of the chromatograms from the sediments with those from analogous fractions isolated from tissue samples of aquatic biota showed correlations in the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) composition. In the HPLC analysis of fractions isolated from sediment, Tubifex worms, aquatic snails, and fish tissue samples clearly indicated a characteristic PAH ''fingerprint' in all segments of the aquatic food chain. The patterns of horizontal distribution of the relative PAH levels indicated a point source of the pollution in the Buffalo River. Feral fish population samples showed several kinds of lesions that appear to be neoplasms. The histology of these lesions is described, and the significance of the data in terms of a possible human health hazard is discussed.

  6. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of

  7. Evolutionary Hessian Learning: Forced Optimal Covariance Adaptive Learning (FOCAL)

    CERN Document Server

    Shir, Ofer M; Whitley, Darrell; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-01-01

    The Covariance Matrix Adaptation Evolution Strategy (CMA-ES) has been the most successful Evolution Strategy at exploiting covariance information; it uses a form of Principle Component Analysis which, under certain conditions, is suggested to converge to the correct covariance matrix, formulated as the inverse of the mathematically well-defined Hessian matrix. However, in practice, there exist conditions where CMA-ES converges to the global optimum (accomplishing its primary goal) while it does not learn the true covariance matrix (missing an auxiliary objective), likely due to step-size deficiency. These circumstances can involve high-dimensional landscapes with large condition numbers. This paper introduces a novel technique entitled Forced Optimal Covariance Adaptive Learning (FOCAL), with the explicit goal of determining the Hessian at the global basin of attraction. It begins by introducing theoretical foundations to the inverse relationship between the learned covariance and the Hessian matrices. FOCAL ...

  8. Lorentz Covariant Lagrangians of Self-dual Gauge Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Wung-Hong

    2013-01-01

    We study the Lorentz covariant Lagrangians of self-dual gauge fields. Along the method in the original PST formulation we find a simple way to covariantize the non-covariant Lagrangian. We derive in detail the basic formulas and then use them to prove the existence of extra gauge symmetries which allow us to gauge fix the auxiliary fields therein and previous non-covariant formulations are reproduced. We find the covariant Lagrangian for the case of decomposition of 6D spacetime into $D=D_1+D_2$. Our prescription can be easily extended to other non-covariant Lagrangian with more complex decomposition of spacetime. As an example, we also present the covariant Lagrangian in the case of another decomposition of spacetime.

  9. Shrinkage Estimation of the Power Spectrum Covariance Matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Pope, Adrian C

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a novel statistical technique, shrinkage estimation, to estimate the power spectrum covariance matrix from a limited number of simulations. We optimally combine an empirical estimate of the covariance with a model (the target) to minimize the total mean squared error compared to the true underlying covariance. We test our technique on N-body simulations and evaluate its performance by estimating cosmological parameters. Using a simple diagonal target, we show that the shrinkage estimator significantly outperforms both the empirical covariance and the target individually when using a small number of simulations. We find that reducing noise in the covariance estimate is essential for properly estimating the values of cosmological parameters as well as their confidence intervals. We extend our method to the jackknife covariance estimator and again find significant improvement, though simulations give better results. Even for thousands of simulations we still find evidence that our method improves es...

  10. COMAC. Nuclear data covariance matrices library for reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncertainty quantification for new reactor concepts such as the ASTRID project (sodium-cooled FBR studies at CEA) requires a precise evaluation of nuclear data covariances. Since 2005, the SPRC at CEA-Cadarache has developed a covariance matrices library, called COMAC (COvariance MAtrices from Cadarache, version 0.1), for the most important nuclear data: cross sections, multiplicities (prompt and delayed neutrons), prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS), fission yields. This paper presents the methodology used to produce those covariance matrices, illustrated with representative cases (23Na, 238U, 239Pu, 240Pu). We have used the CONRAD evaluation code to analyse simultaneously differential and specific integral experiments and to generate a coherent and realistic set of covariances. The quality of those covariances are illustrated with uncertainty propagation calculations on key parameters for ASTRID. (author)

  11. AFCI-2.0 Library of Neutron Cross Section Covariances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, M.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.; Mattoon,C.; Pigni,M.; Hoblit,S.; Mughabghab,S.F.; Sonzogni,A.; Talou,P.; Chadwick,M.B.; Hale.G.M.; Kahler,A.C.; Kawano,T.; Little,R.C.; Young,P.G.

    2011-06-26

    Neutron cross section covariance library has been under development by BNL-LANL collaborative effort over the last three years. The primary purpose of the library is to provide covariances for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) data adjustment project, which is focusing on the needs of fast advanced burner reactors. The covariances refer to central values given in the 2006 release of the U.S. neutron evaluated library ENDF/B-VII. The preliminary version (AFCI-2.0beta) has been completed in October 2010 and made available to the users for comments. In the final 2.0 release, covariances for a few materials were updated, in particular new LANL evaluations for {sup 238,240}Pu and {sup 241}Am were adopted. BNL was responsible for covariances for structural materials and fission products, management of the library and coordination of the work, while LANL was in charge of covariances for light nuclei and for actinides.

  12. Flux Partitioning by Isotopic Eddy Covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, R.; Munger, J. W.; Nelson, D. D.; McManus, J. B.; Zahniser, M. S.; Wofsy, S. C.; Saleska, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Net ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CO2 is routinely measured by eddy covariance at sites around the world, but studies of ecosystem processes are more interested in the gross photosynthetic and respiratory fluxes that comprise the net flux. The standard method of partitioning the net flux into these components has been to extrapolate nighttime respiration into daytime based on a relationship between nighttime respiration, temperature, and sometimes moisture. However, such relationships generally account for only a small portion of the variation in nighttime respiration, and the assumption that they can predict respiration throughout the day is dubious. A promising alternate method, known as isotopic flux partitioning, works by identifying the stable isotopic signatures of photosynthesis and respiration in the CO2 flux. We have used this method to partition the net flux at Harvard Forest, MA, based on eddy covariance measurements of the net 12CO2 and 13CO2 fluxes (as well as measurements of the sensible and latent heat fluxes and other meteorological variables). The CO2 isotopologues were measured at 4 Hz by an Aerodyne quantum cascade laser spectrometer with a δ13C precision of 0.4 % in 0.25 sec and 0.02 % in 100 sec. In the absence of such high-frequency, high-precision isotopic measurements, past attempts at isotopic flux partitioning have combined isotopic flask measurements with high-frequency (total) CO2 measurements to estimate the isoflux (the EC/flask approach). Others have used a conditional flask sampling approach called hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA). We 'sampled' our data according to each of these approaches, for comparison, and found disagreement in the calculated fluxes of ~10% for the EC/flask approach, and ~30% for HREA, at midday. To our knowledge, this is the first example of flux partitioning by isotopic eddy covariance. Wider use of this method, enabled by a new generation of laser spectrometers, promises to open a new window

  13. Orthogonal versus covariant Lyapunov vectors for rough hard disk systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bosetti, Hadrien; Posch, Harald A.

    2011-01-01

    The Oseledec splitting of the tangent space into covariant subspaces for a hyperbolic dynamical system is numerically accessible by computing the full set of covariant Lyapunov vectors. In this paper, the covariant Lyapunov vectors, the orthogonal Gram-Schmidt vectors, and the corresponding local (time-dependent) Lyapunov exponents, are analyzed for a planar system of rough hard disks (RHDS). These results are compared to respective results for a smooth-hard-disk system (SHDS). We find that t...

  14. Economical realization of phase covariant devices in arbitrary dimensions

    OpenAIRE

    Buscemi, Francesco; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2006-01-01

    We describe a unified framework of phase covariant multi user quantum transformations for d-dimensional quantum systems. We derive the optimal phase covariant cloning and transposition tranformations for multi phase states. We show that for some particular relations between the input and output number of copies they correspond to economical tranformations, which can be achieved without the need of auxiliary systems. We prove a relation between the optimal phase covariant cloning and transposi...

  15. Generally Covariant Actions for Multiple D-branes

    OpenAIRE

    Brecher, Dominic; Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Ling, Henry; Raamsdonk, Mark

    2004-01-01

    We develop a formalism that allows us to write actions for multiple D-branes with manifest general covariance. While the matrix coordinates of the D-branes have a complicated transformation law under coordinate transformations, we find that these may be promoted to (redundant) matrix fields on the transverse space with a simple covariant transformation law. Using these fields, we define a covariant distribution function (a matrix generalization of the delta function which describes the locati...

  16. Analysis of Longitudinal Data with Semiparametric Estimation of Covariance Function

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Jianqing; Huang, Tao; LI, Runze

    2007-01-01

    Improving efficiency for regression coefficients and predicting trajectories of individuals are two important aspects in analysis of longitudinal data. Both involve estimation of the covariance function. Yet, challenges arise in estimating the covariance function of longitudinal data collected at irregular time points. A class of semiparametric models for the covariance function is proposed by imposing a parametric correlation structure while allowing a nonparametric variance function. A kern...

  17. Ghost of habitat past: historic habitat affects the contemporary distribution of giant garter snakes in a modified landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Historic habitat conditions can affect contemporary communities and populations, but most studies of historic habitat are based on the reduction in habitat extent or connectivity. Little is known about the effects of historic habitat on contemporary species distributions when historic habitat has been nearly completely removed, but species persist in a highly altered landscape. More than 93% of the historic wetlands in the Central Valley of California, USA, have been drained and converted to agricultural and other uses, but agricultural wetlands, such as rice and its supporting infrastructure of canals, allow some species to persist. Little is known about the distribution of giant garter snakes Thamnophis gigas, a rare aquatic snake species inhabiting this predominantly agricultural landscape, or the variables that affect where this species occurs. We used occupancy modeling to examine the distribution of giant garter snakes at the landscape scale in the Sacramento Valley (northern portion of the Central Valley) of California, with an emphasis on the relative strength of historic and contemporary variables (landscape-scale habitat, local microhabitat, vegetation composition and relative prey counts) for predicting giant garter snake occurrence. Proximity to historic marsh best explained variation in the probability of occurrence of giant garter snakes at the landscape scale, with greater probability of occurrence near historic marsh. We suspect that the importance of distance to historic marsh represents dispersal limitations of giant garter snakes. These results suggest that preserving and restoring areas near historic marsh, and minimizing activities that reduce the extent of marsh or marsh-like (e.g. rice agriculture, canal) habitats near historic marsh may be advantageous to giant garter snakes.

  18. Habitat Use Database - Groundfish Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) Habitat Use Database (HUD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Habitat Use Database (HUD) was specifically designed to address the need for habitat-use analyses in support of groundfish EFH, HAPCs, and fishing and...

  19. Impact scores of invasive plants are biased by disregard of environmental co-variation and non-linearity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Thiele

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Prioritisation of high-impact species is becoming increasingly important for management of introduced species (‘neobiota’ because of their growing number of which, however, only a small fraction has substantial impacts. Impact scores for prioritising species may be affected by the type of effect model used. Recent studies have shown that environmental co-variation and non-linearity may be significant for effect models of biological invasions. Here, we test for differences in impact scores between simple and complex effect models of three invasive plant species (Heracleum mantegazzianum, Lupinus polyphyllus, Rosa rugosa.We investigated the effects of cover percentages of the invasive plants on species richness of invaded communities using both simple linear effect models (‘basic models’ and more complex linear or non-linear models including environmental co-factors (‘full models’. Then, we calculated impact scores for each invasive species as the average reduction of species richness predicted by basic and full effect models.All three non-native species had negative effects on species richness, but the full effect models also indicated significant influence of habitat types. Heracleum mantegazzianum had uniform linear effects in all habitats, while effects of L. polyphyllus interacted strongly with habitat type, and R. rugosa showed a marked non-linear relationship. Impact scores were overestimated by basic effect models for H. mantegazzianum and R. rugosa due to disregard of habitat effects and non-linearity, respectively. In contrast, impact of L. polyphyllus was underestimated by the basic model that did not account for the strong interaction of invader cover and habitat type.We conclude that simple linear models will often yield inaccurate impact scores of non-native species. Hence, effect models should consider environmental co-variation and, if necessary, non-linearity of the effects of biological invasions on native ecosystems.

  20. Covariant non-commutative space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, Jonathan J.; Verlinde, Herman

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a covariant non-commutative deformation of 3 + 1-dimensional conformal field theory. The deformation introduces a short-distance scale ℓp, and thus breaks scale invariance, but preserves all space-time isometries. The non-commutative algebra is defined on space-times with non-zero constant curvature, i.e. dS4 or AdS4. The construction makes essential use of the representation of CFT tensor operators as polynomials in an auxiliary polarization tensor. The polarization tensor takes active part in the non-commutative algebra, which for dS4 takes the form of so (5, 1), while for AdS4 it assembles into so (4, 2). The structure of the non-commutative correlation functions hints that the deformed theory contains gravitational interactions and a Regge-like trajectory of higher spin excitations.

  1. Covariant non-commutative space–time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J. Heckman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a covariant non-commutative deformation of 3+1-dimensional conformal field theory. The deformation introduces a short-distance scale ℓp, and thus breaks scale invariance, but preserves all space–time isometries. The non-commutative algebra is defined on space–times with non-zero constant curvature, i.e. dS4 or AdS4. The construction makes essential use of the representation of CFT tensor operators as polynomials in an auxiliary polarization tensor. The polarization tensor takes active part in the non-commutative algebra, which for dS4 takes the form of so(5,1, while for AdS4 it assembles into so(4,2. The structure of the non-commutative correlation functions hints that the deformed theory contains gravitational interactions and a Regge-like trajectory of higher spin excitations.

  2. General covariance and supersymmetry without supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An unusual four-dimensional generally covariant and supersymmetric SU(2) gauge theory is described. The theory has local degrees of freedom, and is invariant under a local (left-handed) chiral supersymmetry, which is half the supersymmetry of supergravity. The Hamiltonian 3+1 decomposition of the theory reveals the remarkable feature that the local supersymmetry is a consequence of Yang-Mills symmetry, in a manner reminiscent of how general coordinate invariance in Chern-Simons theory is a consequence of Yang-Mills symmetry. It is possible to write down an infinite number of conserved currents, which strongly suggests that the theory is classically integrable. A possible scheme for nonperturbative quantization is outlined. This utilizes ideas that have been developed and applied recently to the problem of quantizing gravity. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  3. Super-Sample Covariance in Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yin; Takada, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Using separate universe simulations, we accurately quantify super-sample covariance (SSC), the typically dominant sampling error for matter power spectrum estimators in a finite volume, which arises from the presence of super survey modes. By quantifying the power spectrum response to a background mode, this approach automatically captures the separate effects of beat coupling in the quasilinear regime, halo sample variance in the nonlinear regime and a new dilation effect which changes scales in the power spectrum coherently across the survey volume, including the baryon acoustic oscillation scale. It models these effects at typically the few percent level or better with a handful of small volume simulations for any survey geometry compared with directly using many thousands of survey volumes in a suite of large volume simulations. The stochasticity of the response is sufficiently small that in the quasilinear regime, SSC can be alternately included by fitting the mean density in the volume with these fixed ...

  4. Holographic bound in covariant loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Tamaki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate puncture statistics based on the covariant area spectrum in loop quantum gravity. First, we consider Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics with a Gibbs factor for punctures. We establish formulae which relate physical quantities such as horizon area to the parameter characterizing holographic degrees of freedom. We also perform numerical calculations and obtain consistency with these formulae. These results tell us that the holographic bound is satisfied in the large area limit and correction term of the entropy-area law can be proportional to the logarithm of the horizon area. Second, we also consider Bose-Einstein statistics and show that the above formulae are also useful in this case. By applying the formulae, we can understand intrinsic features of Bose-Einstein condensate which corresponds to the case when the horizon area almost consists of punctures in the ground state. When this phenomena occurs, the area is approximately constant against the parameter characterizing the temperature. When this ...

  5. A covariance analysis algorithm for interconnected systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Victor H. L.; Curley, Robert D.; Lin, Ching-An

    1987-01-01

    A covariance analysis algorithm for propagation of signal statistics in arbitrarily interconnected nonlinear systems is presented which is applied to six-degree-of-freedom systems. The algorithm uses statistical linearization theory to linearize the nonlinear subsystems, and the resulting linearized subsystems are considered in the original interconnection framework for propagation of the signal statistics. Some nonlinearities commonly encountered in six-degree-of-freedom space-vehicle models are referred to in order to illustrate the limitations of this method, along with problems not encountered in standard deterministic simulation analysis. Moreover, the performance of the algorithm shall be numerically exhibited by comparing results using such techniques to Monte Carlo analysis results, both applied to a simple two-dimensional space-intercept problem.

  6. Covariant derivation of tunneling across horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Vanzo, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    The tunneling method for stationary black holes in the Hamilton-Jacobi variant is reconsidered in the light of various critiques that have been moved against. It is shown that once the tunneling trajectories have been correctly identified the method is totally free from internal inconsistencies, it is manifestly covariant, it allows for the extension to spinning particles and it can even be used without solving the Hamilton-Jacobi equation. These conclusions borrow support on a simplified proof of the Hartle and Hawking analytic continuation of the propagator, made possible by the unique assumption that the classical action be analytic in complexified Schwarzschild spacetime. A more general version of the Parikh-Wilczek method will also be proposed along these lines.

  7. Cohomological operators and covariant quantum superalgebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtain an interesting realization of the de Rham cohomological operators of differential geometry in terms of the noncommutative q-superoscillators for the supersymmetric quantum group GLqp(1|1). In particular, we show that a unique quantum superalgebra, obeyed by the bilinears of fermionic and bosonic noncommutative q-(super)oscillators of GLqp(1|1), is exactly identical to that obeyed by the de Rham cohomological operators. A set of discrete symmetry transformations for a set of GLqp(1|1) covariant quantum superalgebras turns out to be the analogue of the Hodge duality * operation of differential geometry. A connection with an extended Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) algebra obeyed by the conserved and nilpotent (anti-)BRST and (anti-)co-BRST charges, the conserved ghost charge and a conserved bosonic charge (which is equal to the anticommutator of (anti-)BRST and (anti-)co-BRST charges) is also established

  8. Histories and observables in covariant field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Paugam, Frederic

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by DeWitt's viewpoint of covariant field theory, we define a general notion of non-local classical observable that applies to many physical lagrangian systems (with bosonic and fermionic variables), by using methods that are now standard in algebraic geometry. We review the (standard) methods of local functional calculus, as they are presented by Beilinson and Drinfeld, and relate them to our construction. We partially explain the relation of these with the Vinogradov's secondary calculus. The methods present here are all necessary to understand mathematically properly and with simple notions the full renormalization of the standard model, based on functional integral methods. This article can be seen as an introduction to well grounded classical physical mathematics, and as a good starting point to study quantum physical mathematics, that make frequent use of non-local functionals, like for example in the computation of Wilson's effective action. We finish by describing briefly a coordinate free ap...

  9. Nuclear landscape in covariant density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron and proton drip lines represent the limits of the nuclear landscape. While the proton drip line is measured experimentally up to rather high Z values, the location of the neutron drip line for absolute majority of elements is based on theoretical predictions which involve extreme extrapolations. The first ever systematic investigation of the location of the proton and neutron drip lines in the covariant density functional theory has been performed by employing a set of the state-of-the-art parametrizations. Calculated theoretical uncertainties in the position of two-neutron drip line are compared with those obtained in non-relativistic DFT calculations. Shell effects drastically affect the shape of two-neutron drip line. In particular, model uncertainties in the definition of two-neutron drip line at Z∼54, N=126 and Z∼82, N=184 are very small due to the impact of spherical shell closures at N=126 and 184

  10. Covariant Hyperbolization of Force-free Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Force-Free Flectrodynamics (FFE) is a non-linear system of equations modeling the evolution of the electromagnetic field, in the presence of a magnetically dominated relativistic plasma. This configuration arises on several astrophysical scenarios, which represent exciting laboratories to understand physics in extreme regimes. We show that this system, when restricted to the correct constraint submanifold, is symmetric hyperbolic. In numerical applications is not feasible to keep the system in that submanifold, and so, it is necessary to analyze its structure first in the tangent space of that submanifold and then in a whole neighborhood of it. As already shown by Pfeiffer, a direct (or naive) formulation of this system (in the whole tangent space) results in a weakly hyperbolic system of evolution equations for which well-possednes for the initial value formulation does not follows. Using the generalized symmetric hyperbolic formalism due to Geroch, we introduce here a covariant hyperbolization for the FFE s...

  11. Universal Gravitation as Lorentz-covariant Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Steven Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Einstein's equivalence principle implies that the acceleration of a particle in a "specified" gravitational field is independent of its mass. While this is certainly true to great accuracy for bodies we observe in the Earth's gravitational field, a hypothetical body of mass comparable to the Earth's would perceptibly cause the Earth to fall toward it, which would feed back into the strength as a function of time of the Earth's gravitational field affecting that body. In short, Einstein's equivalence principle isn't exact, but is an approximation that ignores recoil of the "specified" gravitational field, which sheds light on why general relativity has no clearly delineated native embodiment of conserved four-momentum. Einstein's 1905 relativity of course doesn't have the inexactitudes he unwittingly built into GR, so it is natural to explore a Lorentz-covariant gravitational theory patterned directly on electromagnetism, wherein a system's zero-divergence overall stress-energy, including all gravitational fee...

  12. Supergeometry in locally covariant quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hack, Thomas-Paul; Schenkel, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze supergeometric locally covariant quantum field theories. We develop suitable categories SLoc of super-Cartan supermanifolds, which generalize Lorentz manifolds in ordinary quantum field theory, and show that, starting from a few representation theoretic and geometric data, one can construct a functor A : SLoc --> S*Alg to the category of super-*-algebras which can be interpreted as a non-interacting super-quantum field theory. This construction turns out to disregard supersymmetry transformations as the morphism sets in the above categories are too small. We then solve this problem by using techniques from enriched category theory, which allows us to replace the morphism sets by suitable morphism supersets that contain supersymmetry transformations as their higher superpoints. We construct super-quantum field theories in terms of enriched functors eA : eSLoc --> eS*Alg between the enriched categories and show that supersymmetry transformations are appropriately described within the en...

  13. A covariant treatment of cosmic parallax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gaia satellite will soon probe parallax on cosmological distances. Using the covariant formalism and considering the angle between a pair of sources, we find parallax for both spacelike and timelike separation between observation points. Our analysis includes both intrinsic parallax and parallax due to observer motion. We propose a consistency condition that tests the FRW metric using the parallax distance and the angular diameter distance. This test is purely kinematic and relies only on geometrical optics, it is independent of matter content and its relation to the spacetime geometry. We study perturbations around the FRW model, and find that they should be taken into account when analysing observations to determine the parallax distance

  14. Covariant Lyapunov analysis of chaotic Kolmogorov flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inubushi, Masanobu; Kobayashi, Miki U; Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Yamada, Michio

    2012-01-01

    Hyperbolicity is an important concept in dynamical system theory; however, we know little about the hyperbolicity of concrete physical systems including fluid motions governed by the Navier-Stokes equations. Here, we study numerically the hyperbolicity of the Navier-Stokes equation on a two-dimensional torus (Kolmogorov flows) using the method of covariant Lyapunov vectors developed by Ginelli et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 130601 (2007)]. We calculate the angle between the local stable and unstable manifolds along an orbit of chaotic solution to evaluate the hyperbolicity. We find that the attractor of chaotic Kolmogorov flows is hyperbolic at small Reynolds numbers, but that smaller angles between the local stable and unstable manifolds are observed at larger Reynolds numbers, and the attractor appears to be nonhyperbolic at a certain Reynolds numbers. Also, we observed some relations between these hyperbolic properties and physical properties such as time correlation of the vorticity and the energy dissipation rate. PMID:22400681

  15. Conformal killing tensors and covariant Hamiltonian dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A covariant algorithm for deriving the conserved quantities for natural Hamiltonian systems is combined with the non-relativistic framework of Eisenhart, and of Duval, in which the classical trajectories arise as geodesics in a higher dimensional space-time, realized by Brinkmann manifolds. Conserved quantities which are polynomial in the momenta can be built using time-dependent conformal Killing tensors with flux. The latter are associated with terms proportional to the Hamiltonian in the lower dimensional theory and with spectrum generating algebras for higher dimensional quantities of order 1 and 2 in the momenta. Illustrations of the general theory include the Runge-Lenz vector for planetary motion with a time-dependent gravitational constant G(t), motion in a time-dependent electromagnetic field of a certain form, quantum dots, the Hénon-Heiles and Holt systems, respectively, providing us with Killing tensors of rank that ranges from one to six

  16. Kriging approach for the experimental cross-section covariances estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the classical use of a generalized χ2 to determine the evaluated cross section uncertainty, we need the covariance matrix of the experimental cross sections. The usual propagation error method to estimate the covariances is hardly usable and the lack of data prevents from using the direct empirical estimator. We propose in this paper to apply the kriging method which allows to estimate the covariances via the distances between the points and with some assumptions on the covariance matrix structure. All the results are illustrated with the 2555Mn nucleus measurements. (authors)

  17. Summary report of technical meeting on neutron cross section covariances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary is given of the Technical Meeting on Neutron Cross Section Covariances. The meeting goal was to assess covariance data needs and recommend appropriate methodologies to address those needs. Discussions on covariance data focused on three general topics: 1) Resonance and unresolved resonance regions; 2) Fast neutron region; and 3) Users' perspective: benchmarks' uncertainty and reactor dosimetry. A number of recommendations for further work were generated and the important work that remains to be done in the field of covariances was identified. (author)

  18. From terrestrial to aquatic fluxes: Integrating stream dynamics within a dynamic global vegetation modeling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Jerad; Poulter, Benjamin; Emmett, Kristen; Cross, Molly; Al-Chokhachy, Robert; Maneta, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Integrated terrestrial ecosystem models simulate the dynamics and feedbacks between climate, vegetation, disturbance, and hydrology and are used to better understand biogeography and biogeochemical cycles. Extending dynamic vegetation models to the aquatic interface requires coupling surface and sub-surface runoff to catchment routing schemes and has the potential to enhance how researchers and managers investigate how changes in the environment might impact the availability of water resources for human and natural systems. In an effort towards creating such a coupled model, we developed catchment-based hydrologic routing and stream temperature model to pair with LPJ-GUESS, a dynamic global vegetation model. LPJ-GUESS simulates detailed stand-level vegetation dynamics such as growth, carbon allocation, and mortality, as well as various physical and hydrologic processes such as canopy interception and through-fall, and can be applied at small spatial scales, i.e., 1 km. We demonstrate how the coupled model can be used to investigate the effects of transient vegetation dynamics and CO2 on seasonal and annual stream discharge and temperature regimes. As a direct management application, we extend the modeling framework to predict habitat suitability for fish habitat within the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, a 200,000 km2 region that provides critical habitat for a range of aquatic species. The model is used to evaluate, quantitatively, the effects of management practices aimed to enhance hydrologic resilience to climate change, and benefits for water storage and fish habitat in the coming century.

  19. The canonical formalism in covariant theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of quantizing General Relativity (GR) is a formidable one and may require for its solution a complete understanding of string theory and its relationship with the gravitational field. Here the author discusses a more conservative and localized approach based on a covariant canonical formalism developed in a number of papers in the last few years. The idea is to consider theories which can be expressed entirely in terms of differential forms and then to exploit the analogy between time derivative and exterior derivative of forms. In the case of supergravity the field variables have then a double grading, the conventional form grading and the Fermi grading. There is no preferred time direction and, in space-time dimension D + 1, the conjugate momenta of a field form of degree rho is a form of degree D - rho. This form contains the usual components of the momentum besides other components needed in order to preserve covariance. The theory leads naturally to a hamiltonian form H of degree D + 1 which can be used within formalism in order to compute canonically the exterior derivative of a field-form. Its role is therefore quite different to that of the ordinary Hamiltonian which leads instead to Lie derivatives of a field. It is however possible to relate these quantities, and it turns out that the conventional Hamiltonian is the time component of a Poincare multiplet of 3-forms which can be used in order to compute Lie derivatives in any direction. Also the authors approach is well suit for applications within the group manifold approach

  20. Predicting the resilience and recovery of aquatic systems: a framework for model evolution within environmental observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipsey, Matthew R.; Hamilton, David P.; Hanson, Paul C.; Carey, Cayelan C; Coletti, Janaine Z; Read, Jordan S.; Ibelings, Bas W; Valensini, Fiona J; Brookes, Justin D

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining the health of aquatic systems is an essential component of sustainable catchmentmanagement, however, degradation of water quality and aquatic habitat continues to challenge scientistsand policy-makers. To support management and restoration efforts aquatic system models are requiredthat are able to capture the often complex trajectories that these systems display in response to multiplestressors. This paper explores the abilities and limitations of current model approaches in meeting this chal-lenge, and outlines a strategy based on integration of flexible model libraries and data from observationnetworks, within a learning framework, as a means to improve the accuracy and scope of model predictions.The framework is comprised of a data assimilation component that utilizes diverse data streams from sensornetworks, and a second component whereby model structural evolution can occur once the model isassessed against theoretically relevant metrics of system function. Given the scale and transdisciplinarynature of the prediction challenge, network science initiatives are identified as a means to develop and inte-grate diverse model libraries and workflows, and to obtain consensus on diagnostic approaches to modelassessment that can guide model adaptation. We outline how such a framework can help us explore thetheory of how aquatic systems respond to change by bridging bottom-up and top-down lines of enquiry,and, in doing so, also advance the role of prediction in aquatic ecosystem management.

  1. Predicting the resilience and recovery of aquatic systems: A framework for model evolution within environmental observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipsey, Matthew R.; Hamilton, David P.; Hanson, Paul C.; Carey, Cayelan C.; Coletti, Janaine Z.; Read, Jordan S.; Ibelings, Bas W.; Valesini, Fiona J.; Brookes, Justin D.

    2015-09-01

    Maintaining the health of aquatic systems is an essential component of sustainable catchment management, however, degradation of water quality and aquatic habitat continues to challenge scientists and policy-makers. To support management and restoration efforts aquatic system models are required that are able to capture the often complex trajectories that these systems display in response to multiple stressors. This paper explores the abilities and limitations of current model approaches in meeting this challenge, and outlines a strategy based on integration of flexible model libraries and data from observation networks, within a learning framework, as a means to improve the accuracy and scope of model predictions. The framework is comprised of a data assimilation component that utilizes diverse data streams from sensor networks, and a second component whereby model structural evolution can occur once the model is assessed against theoretically relevant metrics of system function. Given the scale and transdisciplinary nature of the prediction challenge, network science initiatives are identified as a means to develop and integrate diverse model libraries and workflows, and to obtain consensus on diagnostic approaches to model assessment that can guide model adaptation. We outline how such a framework can help us explore the theory of how aquatic systems respond to change by bridging bottom-up and top-down lines of enquiry, and, in doing so, also advance the role of prediction in aquatic ecosystem management.

  2. Role of Marsh-Mangrove Interface Habitats as Aquatic Refuges for Wetland Fishes and Other Aquatic Animals

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — We examined spatial and temporal dynamics in the fish community of ecotonal mangrove creeks along the Shark River Slough transect, particularly between SRS3 &...

  3. Understanding Aquatic Rhizosphere Processes Through Metabolomics and Metagenomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jian; Mynampati, Kalyan; Drautz, Daniela; Arumugam, Krithika; Williams, Rohan; Schuster, Stephan; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Swarup, Sanjay

    2013-04-01

    The aquatic rhizosphere is a region around the roots of aquatic plants. Many studies focusing on terrestrial rhizosphere have led to a good understanding of the interactions between the roots, its exudates and its associated rhizobacteria. The rhizosphere of free-floating roots, however, is a different habitat that poses several additional challenges, including rapid diffusion rates of signals and nutrient molecules, which are further influenced by the hydrodynamic forces. These can lead to rapid diffusion and complicates the studying of diffusible factors from both plant and/or rhizobacterial origins. These plant systems are being increasingly used for self purification of water bodies to provide sustainable solution. A better understanding of these processes will help in improving their performance for ecological engineering of freshwater systems. The same principles can also be used to improve the yield of hydroponic cultures. Novel toolsets and approaches are needed to investigate the processes occurring in the aquatic rhizosphere. We are interested in understanding the interaction between root exudates and the complex microbial communities that are associated with the roots, using a systems biology approach involving metabolomics and metagenomics. With this aim, we have developed a RhizoFlowCell (RFC) system that provides a controlled study of aquatic plants, observed the root biofilms, collect root exudates and subject the rhizosphere system to changes in various chemical or physical perturbations. As proof of concept, we have used RFC to test the response of root exudation patterns of Pandanus amaryllifolius after exposure to the pollutant naphthalene. Complexity of root exudates in the aquatic rhizosphere was captured using this device and analysed using LC-qTOF-MS. The highly complex metabolomic profile allowed us to study the dynamics of the response of roots to varying levels of naphthalene. The metabolic profile changed within 5mins after spiking with

  4. An ecohydraulic model to identify and monitor Moapa dace habitat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Hatten

    Full Text Available Moapa dace (Moapa coriacea is a critically endangered thermophilic minnow native to the Muddy River ecosystem in southeastern Nevada, USA. Restricted to temperatures between 26.0 and 32.0 °C, these fish are constrained to the upper two km of the Muddy River and several small tributaries fed by warm springs. Habitat alterations, nonnative species invasion, and water withdrawals during the 20th century resulted in a drastic decline in the dace population and in 1979 the Moapa Valley National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge was created to protect them. The goal of our study was to determine the potential effects of reduced surface flows that might result from groundwater pumping or water diversions on Moapa dace habitat inside the Refuge. We accomplished our goal in several steps. First, we conducted snorkel surveys to determine the locations of Moapa dace on three warm-spring tributaries of the Muddy River. Second, we conducted hydraulic simulations over a range of flows with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Third, we developed a set of Moapa dace habitat models with logistic regression and a geographic information system. Fourth, we estimated Moapa dace habitat over a range of flows (plus or minus 30% of base flow. Our spatially explicit habitat models achieved classification accuracies between 85% and 91%, depending on the snorkel survey and creek. Water depth was the most significant covariate in our models, followed by substrate, Froude number, velocity, and water temperature. Hydraulic simulations showed 2-11% gains in dace habitat when flows were increased by 30%, and 8-32% losses when flows were reduced by 30%. To ensure the health and survival of Moapa dace and the Muddy River ecosystem, groundwater and surface-water withdrawals and diversions need to be carefully monitored, while fully implementing a proactive conservation strategy.

  5. Fish habitat degradation in U.S. reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, L.E.; Spickard, M.; Dunn, T.; Webb, K.M.; Aycock, J.N.; Hunt, K.

    2010-01-01

    As the median age of the thousands of large reservoirs (> 200 ha) in the United States tops 50, many are showing various signs of fish habitat degradation. Our goal was to identify major factors degrading fish habitat in reservoirs across the country, and to explore regional degradation patterns. An online survey including 14 metrics was scored on a 0 (no degradation) to 5 (high degradation) point scale by 221 fisheries scientists (92% response rate) to describe degradation in 482 reservoirs randomly distributed throughout the continental United States. The highest scored sources of degradation were lack of aquatic macrophytes (41% of the reservoirs scored as 4-5), lack or loss of woody debris (35% scored 4-5), mistimed water level fluctuations (34% scored 4-5), and sedimentation (31% scored 4-5). Factor analysis identified five primary degradation factors that accounted for most of the variability in the 14 degradation metrics. The factors reflected siltation, structural habitat, eutrophication, water regime, and aquatic plants. Three degradation factors were driven principally by in-reservoir processes, whereas the other two were driven by inputs from the watershed. A comparison across U.S. regions indicated significant geographical differences in degradation relative to the factors emphasized by each region. Reservoirs sometimes have been dismissed as unnatural and disruptive, but they are a product of public policy, a critical feature of landscapes, and they cannot be overlooked if managers are to effectively conserve river systems. Protection and restoration of reservoir habitats may be enhanced with a broader perspective that includes watershed management, in addition to in reservoir activities.

  6. Phytoremediation Potential of Aquatic Macrophyte, Azolla

    OpenAIRE

    Sood, Anjuli; Uniyal, Perm L.; Prasanna, Radha; Ahluwalia, Amrik S.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic macrophytes play an important role in the structural and functional aspects of aquatic ecosystems by altering water movement regimes, providing shelter to fish and aquatic invertebrates, serving as a food source, and altering water quality by regulating oxygen balance, nutrient cycles, and accumulating heavy metals. The ability to hyperaccumulate heavy metals makes them interesting research candidates, especially for the treatment of industrial effluents and sewage waste water. The us...

  7. Aquatic plants clean wastewater lagoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    Water weeds that grow profusely in warm tropical and subtropical regions have always been considered a nuisance; current research is focusing on methods to cull benefits from such aquatic proliferations. Weeds, especially the water hyacinth, are proving to be useful in the purification of wastewater lagoons. The plants extract inorganic and organic toxicants from the effluent. Hyacinths employed in experiments conducted in Puerto Rico are removed from the lagoons to prevent overcrowding. This harvest is sent through a digester to produce methane. (2 diagrams, 3 photos)

  8. EPA Region 7 Aquatic Focus Areas (ECO_RES.R7_AQUATIC_FOCUS_AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This shapefile consists of 347 individual Aquatic Ecological System (AES) polygons that are the Aquatic Conservation Focus Areas for EPA Region 7. The focus areas...

  9. Community photosynthesis of aquatic macrophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binzer, T.; Sand-Jensen, K.; Middelboe, A. L.

    2006-01-01

    We compared 190 photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) experiments with single- and multispecies communities of macroalgae and vascular plants from freshwater and marine habitats. We found a typical hyperbolic P-E relation in all communities and no sign of photosaturation or photoinhibition of photosynt......We compared 190 photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E) experiments with single- and multispecies communities of macroalgae and vascular plants from freshwater and marine habitats. We found a typical hyperbolic P-E relation in all communities and no sign of photosaturation or photoinhibition of...... photosynthesis at the highest irradiances of about 2,000 mmol m22 s21. Macrophyte communities displayed much higher maximum gross production (GPmax), respiration, and light compensation point than separate phytoelements because of the multilayered structure and extensive self-shading in the communities, whereas...

  10. Radioactivity in the Canadian aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sources of radionuclides arising from natural anthropogenic processes as well as technologically enhanced natural radiation are discussed. Transport, distribution and behaviour of these radionuclides in aquatic systems are influenced by physical, chemical, biological and geological processes and conditions in freshwater and marine environments. Dosimetry of aquatic organisms, as well as various methods of measuring dose rate are presented. Effects of ionizing radiation (acute and chronic exposure) on aquatic organisms, populations and ecosystems are reviewed. This review covers the entire spectrum of the aquatic environment. Results of many studies are summarized. 300+ refs

  11. Covariant equations for the NN-πNN system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explain the deficiencies of the current NN-πNN equations, sketch the derivation of a set of covariant NN-πNN equations and describe the ways in which these equations differ from previous sets of covariant equations. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  12. Gauge independence as a consequence of gauge covariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauge independence of a physical S-matrix is proved without perturbation in a satisfactory gauge-field theory with gauge covariance. The proof goes through both for Abelian and non-Abelian cases, and the independence is a consequence of gauge covariance and asymptotic completeness. (auth.)

  13. Reality conditions for Ashtekar gravity from Lorentz-covariant formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrov, Sergei

    2005-01-01

    We show the equivalence of the Lorentz-covariant canonical formulation considered for the Immirzi parameter $\\beta=i$ to the selfdual Ashtekar gravity. We also propose to deal with the reality conditions in terms of Dirac brackets derived from the covariant formulation and defined on an extended phase space which involves, besides the selfdual variables, also their anti-selfdual counterparts.

  14. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1996-01-01

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalized...

  15. Theory of Covariance Equivalent ARMAV Models of Civil Engineering Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    In this paper the theoretical background for using covariance equivalent ARMAV models in modal analysis is discussed. It is shown how to obtain a covariance equivalent ARMA model for a univariate linear second order continuous-time system excited by Gaussian white noise. This result is generalize...

  16. Validity of covariance models for the analysis of geographical variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillot, Gilles; Schilling, Rene L.; Porcu, Emilio;

    2014-01-01

    1. Due to the availability of large molecular data-sets, covariance models are increasingly used to describe the structure of genetic variation as an alternative to more heavily parametrised biological models. 2. We focus here on a class of parametric covariance models that received sustained...

  17. On the bilinear covariants associated to mass dimension one spinors

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, J M Hoff; Rogerio, R J Bueno; Scatena, E

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we approach the issue of Clifford algebra basis deformation, allowing for bilinear covariants associated to Elko spinors which satisfy the Fierz-Pauli-Kofink identities. We present a complete analysis of covariance, taking into account the involved dual structure associated to Elko. Moreover, the possible generalizations to the recently presented new dual structure are performed.

  18. Habitat change influences mate search behaviour in three-spined sticklebacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuschele, Jan; Salminen, Tiina; Candolin, Ulrika

    2012-01-01

    is a global problem that alters habitat structure and visibility in aquatic ecosystems. We investigated whether changes in habitat complexity and male cue modality, visual or olfactory, influence mate search behaviour of female three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus. We allowed gravid females...... to search for mates in experimental pools that contained two nesting males and one social female, under low and high structural complexity (created from green Plexiglas sheets), with access to either visual or olfactory cues of the individuals. We found increased habitat complexity reduced the number...... evaluation in the absence of visual stimulation. This reduced the rate of mate encounters and probably also the opportunity for choice. Our results show that changes in habitat structure and visibility can alter female mate searching, with potential consequences for the opportunity for sexual selection....

  19. Mining of unexplored habitats for novel chitinases - chiA as a helper gene proxy in metagenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Kielak, Anna Maria; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed;

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the abundance and diversity of chitin-degrading microbial communities in ten terrestrial and aquatic habitats in order to provide guidance to the subsequent exploration of such environments for novel chitinolytic enzymes. A combined protocol which...

  20. Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, S.; Nottelman, H.

    1997-01-01

    The Biology Team of ESH-20 (the Ecology Group) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies measure water quality parameters and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from sampling sites within the upper canyon stream. Reports by Bennett and Cross discuss previous aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands the previous findings. The Biology Team collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates monthly at three sampling stations within Sandia Canyon in 1995. The two upstream stations occur near a cattail (Typha latifolia) dominated marsh downstream from outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. The third station is approximately 1.5 miles downstream from the outfalls within a mixed conifer forest. All water chemistry parameters measured in Sandia Canyon during 1995 fell within acceptable State limits and scored in the {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} ranges when compared to an Environmental Quality Index. However, aquatic macroinvertebrates habitats have been degraded by widespread erosion, channelization, loss of wetlands due to deposition and stream lowering, scour, limited acceptable substrates, LANL releases and spills, and other stressors. Macroinvertebrate communities at all the stations had low diversities, low densities, and erratic numbers of individuals. These results indicate that although the stream possesses acceptable water chemistry, it has reduced biotic potential. The best developed aquatic community occurs at the sampling station with the best habitat and whose downstream location partially mitigates the effects of upstream impairments.

  1. The covariant perturbative approach to cosmic microwave background anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Challinor, A D

    2000-01-01

    The Ehlers-Ellis 1+3 formulation of covariant hydrodynamics, when supplemented with covariant radiative transport theory, gives an exact, physically transparent description of the physics of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). Linearisation around a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe provides a very direct and seamless route through to the linear, gauge-invariant perturbation equations for scalar, vector and tensor modes in an almost-FRW model. In this contribution we review covariant radiative transport theory and its application to the perturbative method for calculating and understanding the anisotropy of the CMB. Particular emphasis is placed on the inclusion of polarization in a fully covariant manner. With this inclusion, the covariant perturbative approach offers a complete description of linearised CMB physics in an almost-FRW universe.

  2. Modular covariance and the algebraic PCT/spin-statistics theorem

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, D R

    1995-01-01

    In the theory of nets of observable algebras, the modular operators associated with wedge regions are expected to have a natural geometric action, a generalization of the Bisognano-Wichmann condition for nets associated with Poincare-covariant fields. Here many possible such modular covariance conditions are discussed (in spacetime of at least three dimensions), including several conditions previously proposed and known to imply versions of the PCT and spin-statistics theorems. The logical relations between these conditions are explored: for example, it is shown that most of them are equivalent, and that all of them follow from appropriate commutation relations for the modular automorphisms alone. These results allow us to reduce the study of modular covariance to the case of systems describing non-interacting particles. Given finitely many Poincare-covariant non-interacting particles of any given mass, it is shown that modular covariance and wedge duality must hold, and the modular operators for wedge region...

  3. Newton law in covariant unimodular $F(R)$ gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nojiri, S; Oikonomou, V K

    2016-01-01

    We propose a covariant ghost-free unimodular $F(R)$ gravity theory, which contains a three-form field and study its structure using the analogy of the proposed theory with a quantum system which describes a charged particle in uniform magnetic field. Newton's law in non-covariant unimodular $F(R)$ gravity as well as in unimodular Einstein gravity is derived and it is shown to be just the same as in General Relativity. The derivation of Newton's law in covariant unimodular $F(R)$ gravity shows that it is modified precisely in the same way as in the ordinary $F(R)$ theory. We also demonstrate that the cosmology of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background, is equivalent in the non-covariant and covariant formulations of unimodular $F(R)$ theory.

  4. UDU/T/ covariance factorization for Kalman filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, C. L.; Bierman, G. J.

    1980-01-01

    There has been strong motivation to produce numerically stable formulations of the Kalman filter algorithms because it has long been known that the original discrete-time Kalman formulas are numerically unreliable. Numerical instability can be avoided by propagating certain factors of the estimate error covariance matrix rather than the covariance matrix itself. This paper documents filter algorithms that correspond to the covariance factorization P = UDU(T), where U is a unit upper triangular matrix and D is diagonal. Emphasis is on computational efficiency and numerical stability, since these properties are of key importance in real-time filter applications. The history of square-root and U-D covariance filters is reviewed. Simple examples are given to illustrate the numerical inadequacy of the Kalman covariance filter algorithms; these examples show how factorization techniques can give improved computational reliability.

  5. Gaussian covariance matrices for anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Vecchia, Claudio dalla

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the redshift-space galaxy clustering have been a prolific source of cosmological information in recent years. In the era of precision cosmology, accurate covariance estimates are an essential step for the validation of galaxy clustering models of the redshift-space two-point statistics. For cases where only a limited set of simulations is available, assessing the data covariance is not possible or only leads to a noisy estimate. Also, relying on simulated realisations of the survey data means that tests of the cosmology dependence of the covariance are expensive. With these two points in mind, this work aims at presenting a simple theoretical model for the linear covariance of anisotropic galaxy clustering observations with synthetic catalogues. Considering the Legendre moments (`multipoles') of the two-point statistics and projections into wide bins of the line-of-sight parameter (`clustering wedges'), we describe the modelling of the covariance for these anisotropic clustering measurements f...

  6. High-dimensional covariance matrix estimation in approximate factor models

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Jianqing; Mincheva, Martina; 10.1214/11-AOS944

    2012-01-01

    The variance--covariance matrix plays a central role in the inferential theories of high-dimensional factor models in finance and economics. Popular regularization methods of directly exploiting sparsity are not directly applicable to many financial problems. Classical methods of estimating the covariance matrices are based on the strict factor models, assuming independent idiosyncratic components. This assumption, however, is restrictive in practical applications. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix, we allow the presence of the cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common factors, and it enables us to combine the merits of both methods. We estimate the sparse covariance using the adaptive thresholding technique as in Cai and Liu [J. Amer. Statist. Assoc. 106 (2011) 672--684], taking into account the fact that direct observations of the idiosyncratic components are unavailable. The impact of high dimensionality on the covariance matrix estimation based on the factor structure is then studi...

  7. Covariances in the Generalized Nuclear Data (GND) Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Generalized Nuclear Data structure (GND) is being designed as a new standard for storing evaluated nuclear data. It is intended as an eventual replacement for the ENDF-6 format, and as such must be capable of handling at a minimum all the types of data supported by ENDF-6, including central values and covariances. Containers for storing covariances in GND are being developed, with the goal of representing covariance data in a simple and concise manner, that is easy to read, understand and use. This paper presents an overview of the status of covariances in GND, and on the tools for generating and using covariance data that are being implemented in LLNL's nuclear data toolkit ‘Fudge’

  8. Local covariant quantum field theory over spectral geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Paschke, M; Paschke, Mario; Verch, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    A framework which combines ideas from Connes' noncommutative geometry, or spectral geometry, with recent ideas on generally covariant quantum field theory, is proposed in the present work. A certain type of spectral geometries modelling (possibly noncommutative) globally hyperbolic spacetimes is introduced in terms of so-called globally hyperbolic spectral triples. The concept is further generalized to a category of globally hyperbolic spectral geometries whose morphisms describe the generalization of isometric embeddings. Then a local generally covariant quantum field theory is introduced as a covariant functor between such a category of globally hyperbolic spectral geometries and the category of involutive algebras (or *-algebras). Thus, a local covariant quantum field theory over spectral geometries assigns quantum fields not just to a single noncommutative geometry (or noncommutative spacetime), but simultaneously to ``all'' spectral geometries, while respecting the covariance principle demanding that qua...

  9. Passive electroreception in aquatic mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech-Damal, Nicole U; Dehnhardt, Guido; Manger, Paul; Hanke, Wolf

    2013-06-01

    Passive electroreception is a sensory modality in many aquatic vertebrates, predominantly fishes. Using passive electroreception, the animal can detect and analyze electric fields in its environment. Most electric fields in the environment are of biogenic origin, often produced by prey items. These electric fields can be relatively strong and can be a highly valuable source of information for a predator, as underlined by the fact that electroreception has evolved multiple times independently. The only mammals that possess electroreception are the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the echidnas (Tachyglossidae) from the monotreme order, and, recently discovered, the Guiana dolphin (Sotalia guianensis) from the cetacean order. Here we review the morphology, function and origin of the electroreceptors in the two aquatic species, the platypus and the Guiana dolphin. The morphology shows certain similarities, also similar to ampullary electroreceptors in fishes, that provide cues for the search for electroreceptors in more vertebrate and invertebrate species. The function of these organs appears to be very similar. Both species search for prey animals in low-visibility conditions or while digging in the substrate, and sensory thresholds are within one order of magnitude. The electroreceptors in both species are innervated by the trigeminal nerve. The origin of the accessory structures, however, is completely different; electroreceptors in the platypus have developed from skin glands, in the Guiana dolphin, from the vibrissal system. PMID:23187861

  10. Inflation in general covariant theory of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Yongqing; Wu, Qiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study inflation in the framework of the nonrelativistic general covariant theory of the Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity with the projectability condition and an arbitrary coupling constant $\\lambda$. We find that the Friedmann-Robterson-Walker (FRW) universe is necessarily flat in such a setup. We work out explicitly the linear perturbations of the flat FRW universe without specifying to a particular gauge, and find that the perturbations are different from those obtained in general relativity, because of the presence of the high-order spatial derivative terms. Applied the general formulas to a single scalar field, we show that in the sub-horizon regions, the metric and scalar field are tightly coupled and have the same oscillating frequencies. In the super-horizon regions, the perturbations become adiabatic, and the comoving curvature perturbation is constant. We also calculate the power spectra and indices of both the scalar and tensor perturbations, and express them explicitly in terms of the...

  11. Generalized Covariant Gyrokinetic Dynamics of Magnetoplasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A basic prerequisite for the investigation of relativistic astrophysical magnetoplasmas, occurring typically in the vicinity of massive stellar objects (black holes, neutron stars, active galactic nuclei, etc.), is the accurate description of single-particle covariant dynamics, based on gyrokinetic theory (Beklemishev et al., 1999-2005). Provided radiation-reaction effects are negligible, this is usually based on the assumption that both the space-time metric and the EM fields (in particular the magnetic field) are suitably prescribed and are considered independent of single-particle dynamics, while allowing for the possible presence of gravitational/EM perturbations driven by plasma collective interactions which may naturally arise in such systems. The purpose of this work is the formulation of a generalized gyrokinetic theory based on the synchronous variational principle recently pointed out (Tessarotto et al., 2007) which permits to satisfy exactly the physical realizability condition for the four-velocity. The theory here developed includes the treatment of nonlinear perturbations (gravitational and/or EM) characterized locally, i.e., in the rest frame of a test particle, by short wavelength and high frequency. Basic feature of the approach is to ensure the validity of the theory both for large and vanishing parallel electric field. It is shown that the correct treatment of EM perturbations occurring in the presence of an intense background magnetic field generally implies the appearance of appropriate four-velocity corrections, which are essential for the description of single-particle gyrokinetic dynamics.

  12. Historical Hamiltonian Dynamics: symplectic and covariant

    CERN Document Server

    Lachieze-Rey, M

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a "historical" formalism for dynamical systems, in its Hamiltonian version (Lagrangian version was presented in a previous paper). It is universal, in the sense that it applies equally well to time dynamics and to field theories on space-time. It is based on the notion of (Hamiltonian) histories, which are sections of the (extended) phase space bundle. It is developed in the space of sections, in contradistinction with the usual formalism which works in the bundle manifold. In field theories, the formalism remains covariant and does not require a spitting of space-time. It considers space-time exactly in the same manner than time in usual dynamics, both being particular cases of the evolution domain. It applies without modification when the histories (the fields) are forms rather than scalar functions, like in electromagnetism or in tetrad general relativity. We develop a differential calculus in the infinite dimensional space of histories. It admits a (generalized) symplectic form which d...

  13. The covariance of GPS coordinates and frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore, in the general relativistic context, the properties of the recently introduced global positioning system (GPS) coordinates, as well as those of the associated frames and coframes that they define. We show that they are covariant and completely independent of any observer. We show that standard spectroscopic and astrometric observations allow any observer to measure (i) the values of the GPS coordinates at his position (ii) the components of his 4-velocity and (iii) the components of the metric in the GPS frame. This provides this system with a unique value both for conceptual discussion (no frame dependence) and for practical use (involved quantities are directly measurable): localization, motion monitoring, astrometry, cosmography and tests of gravitation theories. We show explicitly, in the general relativistic context, how an observer may estimate his position and motion, and reconstruct the components of the metric. This arises from two main results: the extension of the velocity fields of the probes to the whole (curved) spacetime, and the identification of the components of the observer's velocity in the GPS frame with the (inversed) observed redshifts of the probes. Specific cases (non-relativistic velocities, Minkowski and Friedmann-Lemaitre spacetimes, geodesic motions) are studied in detail

  14. Processing of resonance parameter covariance files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prudent use of resonance parameter covariance information requires the availability of a means of error propagation from the resonance parameters to the cross sections. This work presents an approach to obtaining these so-called resonance parameter sensitivities. The resonance parameter sensitivity methodology developed herein generally provides accurate results when compared to direct recalculations using existing and wellknown cross-section processing codes. However, it has been shown in several cases that self-shielded cross sections can be very nonlinear functions of the basic parameters. For this reason, caution must be used in any study which assumes that a linear relationship exists between a given self-shielded group cross section and its corresponding basic data parameters. The study also has pointed out the need for more approximate techniques which will allow the required sensitivity information to be obtained in a more cost-effective manner. This paper is a synopsis of major work that was completed nearly ten years ago. However, due to the lack of additional development in the field, it remains essentially the current state-of-the-art

  15. Plant Habitat (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  16. Habitat modeling and genetic signatures of postglacial recolonization for tidal estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolby, G. A.; Jacobs, D. K.

    2014-12-01

    Pleistocene glacial cycles are a foremost influence on the genetic diversity and species distribution patterns observed today. Though much work has centered on biotic response to such climatic forcing, little of it has regarded estuarine or other aquatic coastal taxa whose habitat formation is a function of sea level, hydrography, and coastal geomorphology. These physical parameters required for habitat formation suggest that glacial cycles impart a significant effect on such taxa through glacially driven eustatic changes. Additionally, the steepened coastline and rainfall-limited Mediterranean climate suggest limited glacial habitat for estuarine species in southern and Baja California. Here we present GIS modeled habitat for tidal estuaries for three co-distributed estuarine fishes (Gillichthys mirabilis, Quietula y-cauda, Fundulus parvipinnis) since the last glacial maximum. Parameterization of sea level and slope enables biologically relevant temporal resolution of near-millennial scale. At lowstand our approach reveals two refuges along the coast at 1000km distance from each other, with habitat rapidly increasing 15 - 12 ka during meltwater pulse 1A. Habitat area peaked in the early Holocene and began decreasing with the current stillstand roughly 7 ka, probably as a result of coastal maturation towards less tidal systems. To target the postglacial recolonization process we applied discriminant function analysis to highly polymorphic microsatellite data to partition out the alleles associated with refuges identified a priori by habitat modeling. The frequencies of these alleles were calculated for all individuals at intervening populations and regressed against geographic distance. This analysis revealed nonlinear mixing curves, suggesting uneven allelic mixing efficiency along the coastline, perhaps as a result of differential habitat origination times as indicated by the habitat models. These results highlight the dynamism of estuarine habitat in recent

  17. A longitudinal assessment of the aquatic macroinvertebrate community in the channelized lower Missouri River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Barry C; Wildhaber, Mark L; Charbonneau, Collette S; Fairchild, James F; Mueller, Brad G; Schmitt, Christopher J

    2003-06-01

    We conducted an aquatic macroinvertebrate assessment in the channelized reach of the lower Missouri River, and used statistical analysis of individual metrics and multimetric scores to identify community response patterns and evaluate relative biological condition. We examined longitudinal site differences that are potentially associated with water quality related factors originating from the Kansas City metropolitan area, using data from coarse rock substrate in flowing water habitats (outside river bends), and depositional mud substrate in slack water habitats (dike fields). Three sites above river mile (RM) 369 in Kansas City (Nebraska City, RM = 560; St. Joseph, RM = 530; Parkville, RM = 377) and three below (Lexington, RM = 319; Glasgow, RM = 228; Hermann, RM = 94) were sampled with rock basket artificial substrates, a qualitative kicknet method, and the Petite Ponar. We also compared the performance of the methods used. A total of 132 aquatic macroinvertebrate taxa were collected from the lower Missouri River; one third of these taxa belonged to the sensitive EPOT insect orders (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Odonata, and Trichoptera). Rock baskets had the highest mean efficiency (34.1%) of the methods, and the largest number of taxa was collected by Ponar (n = 69) and kicknet (n = 69) methods. Seven of the 15 metrics calculated from rock basket data, and five of the nine metrics calculated from Ponar data showed highly significant differences (ANOVA, P rock habitats below Kansas City (Lexington), an increase in relative dominance of Oligochaeta in depositional habitats at the next site downstream (Glasgow), and lower relative condition scores in rock habitat at Lexington and depositional habitat at Glasgow. Collectively, these data indicate that some urban-related impacts on the aquatic macroinvertebrate community are occurring. Our results suggest that the methods and assessment framework we used in this study could be successfully applied on a larger scale

  18. Coastal Resources Atlas: Long Island: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for sensitive/rare coastal plants and submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) for Long Island, New York. Vector...

  19. A taping method for external transmitter attachment on aquatic snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, G.D.; Smith, J.J.; Amarello, M.; Casazza, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Radio telemetry is extremely useful for studying habitat use and movements of free ranging snakes. Surgically implanting radio transmitters into the body cavity of snakes is standard practice in most studies (e.g., Reinert and Cundall 1982; Weatherhead and Blouin-Demers 2004), but this implanting method has its drawbacks. Surgery itself is risky for individual snakes because of the potential for infection or incomplete healing of the incision site. Also, transmitters that are small enough to be carried by small or slender snakes have a relatively short battery life and need to be removed or replaced often, thus requiring frequent surgeries. In rare or endangered snake species, the risk of using invasive implantation surgery may not be merited. External attachment methods are relatively non-invasive and allow removal and replacement of radio transmitters on smaller snakes. The Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is a semi-aquatic snake endemic to wetlands of the Central Valley of California, USA, and is federally and state listed as threatened (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1999). Telemetry studies of the habitat use and movements of this species typically used surgically implanted radio transmitters, but this method is limited to larger snakes, primarily females, because of size requirements for surgery (> 250 g). To overcome difficulties and biases associated with radio telemetry of T. gigas, we developed and evaluated several alternative techniques to attach external radio transmitters using tape.

  20. Habitat specialization through germination cueing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ten Brink, Dirk-Jan; Hendriksma, Harmen; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the adaptive association between seed germination ecology and specialization to either forest or open habitats across a range of evolutionary lineages of seed plants, in order to test the hypotheses that (1) species' specialization to open vs. shaded habitats is consistently...... accompanied by specialization in their regeneration niche; and (2) species are thereby adapted to utilize different windows of opportunity in time (season) and space (habitat)....

  1. Spatial Pattern Dynamics in Aquatic Ecosystem Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong Li

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, several modelling approaches are explored to represent spatial pattern dynamics of aquatic populations in aquatic ecosystems by the combination of models, knowledge and data in different scales. It is shown that including spatially distributed inputs retrieved from Remote Sensing i

  2. Control of Fish and Aquatic Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, R. B.; And Others

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University is a handbook for the water body manager. The bulk of the contents deals with aquatic plant control. The different types of aquatic plants, their reproduction and growth, and their role in the ecology of the water body are introduced in this main section. Also, the…

  3. Estimating Aquatic Insect Populations. Introduction to Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihuahuan Desert Research Inst., Alpine, TX.

    This booklet introduces high school and junior high school students to the major groups of aquatic insects and to population sampling techniques. Chapter 1 consists of a short field guide which can be used to identify five separate orders of aquatic insects: odonata (dragonflies and damselflies); ephemeroptera (mayflies); diptera (true flies);…

  4. Quantification of Covariance in Tropical Cyclone Activity across Teleconnected Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolwinski-Ward, S. E.; Wang, D.

    2015-12-01

    Rigorous statistical quantification of natural hazard covariance across regions has important implications for risk management, and is also of fundamental scientific interest. We present a multivariate Bayesian Poisson regression model for inferring the covariance in tropical cyclone (TC) counts across multiple ocean basins and across Saffir-Simpson intensity categories. Such covariability results from the influence of large-scale modes of climate variability on local environments that can alternately suppress or enhance TC genesis and intensification, and our model also simultaneously quantifies the covariance of TC counts with various climatic modes in order to deduce the source of inter-basin TC covariability. The model explicitly treats the time-dependent uncertainty in observed maximum sustained wind data, and hence the nominal intensity category of each TC. Differences in annual TC counts as measured by different agencies are also formally addressed. The probabilistic output of the model can be probed for probabilistic answers to such questions as: - Does the relationship between different categories of TCs differ statistically by basin? - Which climatic predictors have significant relationships with TC activity in each basin? - Are the relationships between counts in different basins conditionally independent given the climatic predictors, or are there other factors at play affecting inter-basin covariability? - How can a portfolio of insured property be optimized across space to minimize risk? Although we present results of our model applied to TCs, the framework is generalizable to covariance estimation between multivariate counts of natural hazards across regions and/or across peril types.

  5. Action recognition from video using feature covariance matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Ishwar, Prakash; Konrad, Janusz

    2013-06-01

    We propose a general framework for fast and accurate recognition of actions in video using empirical covariance matrices of features. A dense set of spatio-temporal feature vectors are computed from video to provide a localized description of the action, and subsequently aggregated in an empirical covariance matrix to compactly represent the action. Two supervised learning methods for action recognition are developed using feature covariance matrices. Common to both methods is the transformation of the classification problem in the closed convex cone of covariance matrices into an equivalent problem in the vector space of symmetric matrices via the matrix logarithm. The first method applies nearest-neighbor classification using a suitable Riemannian metric for covariance matrices. The second method approximates the logarithm of a query covariance matrix by a sparse linear combination of the logarithms of training covariance matrices. The action label is then determined from the sparse coefficients. Both methods achieve state-of-the-art classification performance on several datasets, and are robust to action variability, viewpoint changes, and low object resolution. The proposed framework is conceptually simple and has low storage and computational requirements making it attractive for real-time implementation. PMID:23508265

  6. Phytoremediation potential of aquatic macrophyte, Azolla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Anjuli; Uniyal, Perm L; Prasanna, Radha; Ahluwalia, Amrik S

    2012-03-01

    Aquatic macrophytes play an important role in the structural and functional aspects of aquatic ecosystems by altering water movement regimes, providing shelter to fish and aquatic invertebrates, serving as a food source, and altering water quality by regulating oxygen balance, nutrient cycles, and accumulating heavy metals. The ability to hyperaccumulate heavy metals makes them interesting research candidates, especially for the treatment of industrial effluents and sewage waste water. The use of aquatic macrophytes, such as Azolla with hyper accumulating ability is known to be an environmentally friendly option to restore polluted aquatic resources. The present review highlights the phytoaccumulation potential of macrophytes with emphasis on utilization of Azolla as a promising candidate for phytoremediation. The impact of uptake of heavy metals on morphology and metabolic processes of Azolla has also been discussed for a better understanding and utilization of this symbiotic association in the field of phytoremediation. PMID:22396093

  7. Evaluating extinction in rare habitats: an essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camacho, A. I.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Inference and estimation are the Achilles heel of many biological disciplines. The validation of results is the first step before taking any further decision. In Biodiversity studies the technical problems in validation are similar to those faced in other disciplines. The main difference with areas like medicine is that a validation error in the latter can easily take you to court, but very few responsibilities apart from moral or ethical ones generally derive from a faulty estimation or validation in Biodiversity. However, many political decisions concerning conservation issues, which in many cases affect powerful economic interests depend on the reliability of those biodiversity studies. Getting good, reliable information is not always easy, and this explains in part, the success of critical voices like Simon (1998 and Lomborg (2001. New methodologies like Population Viability Analysis has been developed to take advantage of the potential information contained in periodical sampling. We apply it to a peculiar and difficult to study fauna: the fauna of the aquatic subterranean environment. Lack of regular information and scarcity of the fauna due to difficulty to reach their proper habitat are the main problems that confront this analysis. However, despite its limitations, the analysis points towards a need to better understand the structure of the subterranean habitat from “an animal point of view” and the need of more regular sampling at the same time that the other environmental parameters are taken.

    La inferencia y la estima son el talón de Aquiles de muchas disciplinas biológicas. La validación de resultados es el primer paso antes de tomar decisiones ulteriores. En estudios de Biodiversidad los problemas técnicos de validación son semejantes a los que se enfrentan otras disciplinas. La principal diferencia con áreas como Medicina es que un error en validación en ésta última puede terminar fácilmente en el juzgado

  8. Covariant hyperbolization of force-free electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, F. L.; Reula, O. A.

    2016-04-01

    Force-free electrodynamics (FFE) is a nonlinear system of equations modeling the evolution of the electromagnetic field, in the presence of a magnetically dominated relativistic plasma. This configuration arises on several astrophysical scenarios which represent exciting laboratories to understand physics in extreme regimes. We show that this system, when restricted to the correct constraint submanifold, is symmetric hyperbolic. In numerical applications, it is not feasible to keep the system in that submanifold, and so it is necessary to analyze its structure first in the tangent space of that submanifold and then in a whole neighborhood of it. As has been shown [1], a direct (or naive) formulation of this system (in the whole tangent space) results in a weakly hyperbolic system of evolution equations for which well-posedness for the initial value formulation does not follow. Using the generalized symmetric hyperbolic formalism of Geroch [2], we introduce here a covariant hyperbolization for the FFE system. In fact, in analogy to the usual Maxwell case, a complete family of hyperbolizers is found, both for the restricted system on the constraint submanifold as well as for a suitably extended system defined in a whole neighborhood of it. A particular symmetrizer among the family is then used to write down the pertaining evolution equations, in a generic (3 +1 ) decomposition on a background spacetime. Interestingly, it turns out that for a particular choice of the lapse and shift functions of the foliation, our symmetrized system reduces to the one found in [1]. Finally, we analyze the characteristic structure of the resulting evolution system.

  9. Covariance evaluation for actinide nuclear data in JENDL-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The JENDL-4.0 was released in March 2010. It provides neutron nuclear data for 79 actinides from Ac to Fm. All of the actinides include covariance data. The covariance data were evaluated for reaction cross sections, resonance parameters, angular distributions of elastic scattering, average number of neutrons per fission, and prompt fission neutron spectra. They were deduced basically based on the consistent methodologies with the nuclear data evaluations. Statistical processing of experimental data sometimes gives unacceptably small uncertainty compared with experimental data. They may arise from ignoring unknown errors and correlation of experimental data and also from the modeling errors. The covariance data obtained from statistical estimation using the least-squares method were sometimes modified to be reasonable taking account of consistency with dispersion of experimental data, which may reflect the uncertainties of the data. For the fast neutron fission cross sections of 6 major actinides of 233,235,238U and 239,240,241Pu were evaluated simultaneously using both cross section and their ratio data with the least- squares fitting code SOK. It gave the covariance matrices that have cross correlations between different nuclei included in the analyses. For the minor actinide, the least-squares fitting code GMA was used for fission cross section evaluation for fast neutrons. The covariance data were obtained from the calculations at the same time. For other reaction cross sections, covariance matrices were evaluated using CCONE-KALMAN code system. Sensitivities to model parameters were calculated by CCONE code and used to estimate covariance matrices of the parameters with KALMAN code. Covariance matrices for other data such as resonance parameters and average numbers of fission neutrons were also evaluated based on experimental data. The evaluated covariance data were compiled to the ENDF-6 format files and included in JENDL-4.

  10. Covariate-adjusted measures of discrimination for survival data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Ian R; Rapsomaniki, Eleni; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    statistics in censored survival data. OBJECTIVE: To develop extensions of the C-index and D-index that describe the prognostic ability of a model adjusted for one or more covariate(s). METHOD: We define a covariate-adjusted C-index and D-index for censored survival data, propose several estimators......, and investigate their performance in simulation studies and in data from a large individual participant data meta-analysis, the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration. RESULTS: The proposed methods perform well in simulations. In the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration data, the age-adjusted C-index and D-index were...

  11. Bayes linear covariance matrix adjustment for multivariate dynamic linear models

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkinson, Darren J

    2008-01-01

    A methodology is developed for the adjustment of the covariance matrices underlying a multivariate constant time series dynamic linear model. The covariance matrices are embedded in a distribution-free inner-product space of matrix objects which facilitates such adjustment. This approach helps to make the analysis simple, tractable and robust. To illustrate the methods, a simple model is developed for a time series representing sales of certain brands of a product from a cash-and-carry depot. The covariance structure underlying the model is revised, and the benefits of this revision on first order inferences are then examined.

  12. Covariance matrices and applications to the field of nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A student's introduction to covariance error analysis and least-squares evaluation of data is provided. It is shown that the basic formulas used in error propagation can be derived from a consideration of the geometry of curvilinear coordinates. Procedures for deriving covariances for scaler and vector functions of several variables are presented. Proper methods for reporting experimental errors and for deriving covariance matrices from these errors are indicated. The generalized least-squares method for evaluating experimental data is described. Finally, the use of least-squares techniques in data fitting applications is discussed. Specific examples of the various procedures are presented to clarify the concepts

  13. Condensed matter many-body theory in relativistic covariant form

    OpenAIRE

    Olevano, Valerio; Ladisa, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    We present a relativistic covariant form of many-body theory. The many-body covariant Lagrangian is derived from QED by integrating out the internal non-quantized electromagnetic field. The ordinary many-body Hamiltonian is recovered as an approximation to the exact covariant theory that contains many-body terms beyond the solely electrostatic interaction, e.g. the Lorentz force among electrons, spin-spin etc. Spin and relativistic terms, e.g. spin-orbit, are also automatically accounted. Mor...

  14. Covariance analysis for Energy Density Functionals and instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Roca-Maza, X; Colò, G

    2014-01-01

    We present the covariance analysis of two successful nuclear energy density functionals, (i) a non-relativistic Skyrme functional built from a zero-range effective interaction, and (ii) a relativistic nuclear energy density functional based on density dependent meson-nucleon couplings. Such a study is crucial for assessing the information content of an observable when predicted by a given model. The covariance analysis is a useful tool for understanding the limitations of a model, the correlations between observables and the statistical errors. We also provide a brief review, partly connected with the covariance analysis, of some instabilities displayed by several energy density functionals of current use in nuclear physics.

  15. Newton law in covariant unimodular $F(R)$ gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Nojiri, S.; Odintsov, S.D.(Institut de Ciencies de lEspai (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Carrer de Can Magrans, s/n, Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona, 08193, Spain); Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a covariant ghost-free unimodular $F(R)$ gravity theory, which contains a three-form field and study its structure using the analogy of the proposed theory with a quantum system which describes a charged particle in uniform magnetic field. Newton's law in non-covariant unimodular $F(R)$ gravity as well as in unimodular Einstein gravity is derived and it is shown to be just the same as in General Relativity. The derivation of Newton's law in covariant unimodular $F(R)$ gravity shows...

  16. Covariance matrices and applications to the field of nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.

    1981-11-01

    A student's introduction to covariance error analysis and least-squares evaluation of data is provided. It is shown that the basic formulas used in error propagation can be derived from a consideration of the geometry of curvilinear coordinates. Procedures for deriving covariances for scaler and vector functions of several variables are presented. Proper methods for reporting experimental errors and for deriving covariance matrices from these errors are indicated. The generalized least-squares method for evaluating experimental data is described. Finally, the use of least-squares techniques in data fitting applications is discussed. Specific examples of the various procedures are presented to clarify the concepts.

  17. Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, Annual Report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.; Dawley, Earl M.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2010-08-01

    This report describes the 2009 research conducted under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE or Corps) project EST-09-P-01, titled “Evaluation of Life History Diversity, Habitat Connectivity, and Survival Benefits Associated with Habitat Restoration Actions in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary.” The research was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Marine Science Laboratory and Hydrology Group, in partnership with the University of Washington, School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, Columbia Basin Research, and Earl Dawley (NOAA Fisheries, retired). This Columbia River Fish Mitigation Program project, referred to as “Salmonid Benefits,” was started in FY 2009 to evaluate the state-of-the science regarding the ability to quantify the benefits to listed salmonids1 of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  18. Predation efficiency of Anopheles gambiae larvae by aquatic predators in western Kenya highlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyindo Mramba

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The current status of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and the effects of insecticides on non-target insect species have raised the need for alternative control methods for malaria vectors. Predation has been suggested as one of the important regulation mechanisms for malaria vectors in long-lasting aquatic habitats, but the predation efficiency of the potential predators is largely unknown in the highlands of western Kenya. In the current study, we examined the predation efficiency of five predators on Anopheles gambiae s.s larvae in 24 hour and semi- field evaluations. Methods Predators were collected from natural habitats and starved for 12 hours prior to starting experiments. Preliminary experiments were conducted to ascertain the larval stage most predated by each predator species. When each larval instar was subjected to predation, third instar larvae were predated at the highest rate. Third instar larvae of An. gambiae were introduced into artificial habitats with and without refugia at various larval densities. The numbers of surviving larvae were counted after 24 hours in 24. In semi-field experiments, the larvae were counted daily until they were all either consumed or had developed to the pupal stage. Polymerase chain reaction was used to confirm the presence of An. gambiae DNA in predator guts. Results Experiments found that habitat type (P P P P An. gambiae DNA was found in at least three out of ten midguts for all predator species. Gambusia affins was the most efficient, being three times more efficient than tadpoles. Conclusion These experiments provide insight into the efficiency of specific natural predators against mosquito larvae. These naturally occurring predators may be useful in biocontrol strategies for aquatic stage An. gambiae mosquitoes. Further investigations should be done in complex natural habitats for these predators.

  19. Summer Home Range Size and Habitat Use by River Otters in Ohio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Helon

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Reintroduced river otters (Lontra canadensis are an important component of Ohio’s biological diversity, and are a key indicator of wetland and watershed health and quality. However, few data are available on their home range sizes and habitat use. We monitored river otters using radio-telemetry in the Killbuck Watershed, in northeastern Ohio, during 2002 and 2003 to determine home range and habitat use. Overall, mean home range size was 802.4 ha (range = 84.5–3,376.3, SE = 448.2 for female river otters and 1,101.7 ha (range = 713.8–1,502.6, SE = 102.2 for male river otters. Home range size of female and male river otters did not differ in 2002 (P = 0.763, but males had larger home range size than females during 2003 (P = 0.001. Based on compositional analysis, habitat use differed in proportion to availability of the 5 habitat types available in the study area (marsh, wet meadow, riparian/floodplain, open water, and flooded upland (P < 0.0001. Overall, river otters used marsh habitat with a diverse association of floating aquatics and emergent vegetation in greater proportion than was available. Knowledge and understanding of river otter habitat use and home range size in Ohio will help managers identify habitats suitable for river otters in the Midwestern United States.

  20. Microbial Biofilm Community Variation in Flowing Habitats: Potential Utility as Bioindicators of Postmortem Submersion Intervals

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer M. Lang; Racheal Erb; Jennifer L. Pechal; Wallace, John R.; Ryan W. McEwan; Mark Eric Benbow

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous formation of microbial communities found on surfaces in aqueous environments. These structures have been investigated as biomonitoring indicators for stream heath, and here were used for the potential use in forensic sciences. Biofilm successional development has been proposed as a method to determine the postmortem submersion interval (PMSI) of remains because there are no standard methods for estimating the PMSI and biofilms are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats. We s...

  1. Distribution of aquatic insects in phumdis (floating island of Loktak Lake, Manipur, northeastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Takhelmayum

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was made on the temporal fluctuations of distribution of aquatic insects around Phumdi Live (PL, Phumdi Mixed (PM and Phumdi Dry (PD areas of Loktak Lake. Phumdis are a heterogeneous mass of soil, vegetation and organic matter. The study revealed the presence of predators, and the absence of herbivores and detritivores in both PL and PM, the PD area was totally devoid of insects. Although both the habitats supported the same predator groups hemiptera and odonata, diversity and density in terms of family and species were higher in PL than in PM. Temporal fluctuations revealed that the Shannon-Weiner’s Diversity Index values were highest in June for both PL (0.726 and PM (0.47. In both the sites the highest density was recorded in February. The relative abundance of hemiptera was higher than that of odonata in most of the months in PL. Phumdi Mixed was represented by one species of hemiptera only, in the month of February and dominated by odonates otherwise. Community composition of odonata larvae did not show any difference between the two habitats. Although the study revealed low diversity and density of insects in both sites, the PL community provided a better habitat to aquatic insects than that of PM. These are of value as fish food and in turn for fish production.

  2. Amazonian freshwater habitats experiencing environmental and socioeconomic threats affecting subsistence fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alho, Cleber J R; Reis, Roberto E; Aquino, Pedro P U

    2015-09-01

    Matching the trend seen among the major large rivers of the globe, the Amazon River and its tributaries are facing aquatic ecosystem disruption that is affecting freshwater habitats and their associated biodiversity, including trends for decline in fishery resources. The Amazon's aquatic ecosystems, linked natural resources, and human communities that depend on them are increasingly at risk from a number of identified threats, including expansion of agriculture; cattle pastures; infrastructure such as hydroelectric dams, logging, mining; and overfishing. The forest, which regulates the hydrological pulse, guaranteeing the distribution of rainfall and stabilizing seasonal flooding, has been affected by deforestation. Flooding dynamics of the Amazon Rivers are a major factor in regulating the intensity and timing of aquatic organisms. This study's objective was to identify threats to the integrity of freshwater ecosystems, and to seek instruments for conservation and sustainable use, taking principally fish diversity and fisheries as factors for analysis. PMID:25572836

  3. Anatomy of the root of eight species of emergent aquatic macrophytes from the upper Paraná river, Paraná State, Brazil floodplain - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i3.5509 Anatomy of the root of eight species of emergent aquatic macrophytes from the upper Paraná river, Paraná State, Brazil floodplain - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v32i3.5509

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Maria Marques Sanches Marques

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The upper Paraná River floodplain is characterized by the existence of several aquatic and transitional habitats between the aquatic and terrestrial environment, influencing the presence and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. Samples were taken from different places and permanent slides were prepared for analysis and capture of images with the objective of comparing the anatomy of the roots of eight species of emergent aquatic macrophytes. The species feature uniseriate epidermis with narrow and long cells, cortex composed of uniseriate or biseriate exodermis, with or without thickening, aerenchyma with great gaps, uniseriate endodermis, with or without thickening, continuous or interrupted pericycle, and central cylinder with variable number of xylem poles.The upper Paraná River floodplain is characterized by the existence of several aquatic and transitional habitats between the aquatic and terrestrial environment, influencing the presence and distribution of aquatic macrophytes. Samples were taken from different places and permanent slides were prepared for analysis and capture of images with the objective of comparing the anatomy of the roots of eight species of emergent aquatic macrophytes. The species feature uniseriate epidermis with narrow and long cells, cortex composed of uniseriate or biseriate exodermis, with or without thickening, aerenchyma with great gaps, uniseriate endodermis, with or without thickening, continuous or interrupted pericycle, and central cylinder with variable number of xylem poles.

  4. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  5. Genetic, ecological and geographic covariables explaining host range and specificity of a microsporidian parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Benjamin; Kaufmann, Andrea Patricia; Ebert, Dieter

    2015-11-01

    Parasites often have a smaller geographic distribution than their hosts. Common garden infection trials can untangle the role that historical contingencies, ecological conditions and the genetic constitution of local host populations play in limiting parasite geographic range; however, infection trials usually overestimate the range of hosts in which a parasite could naturally persist. This study overcomes that problem by using multigeneration, long-term persistence experiments. We study the microsporidian parasite Hamiltosporidium tvaerminnensis in monoclonal populations of Daphnia magna from 43 widely spread sites. The parasite persisted well in hosts collected from its natural geographic range, but demonstrated long-term persistence in only a few host genotypes outside this range. Genetic distance between hosts from the parasite's origin site and newly tested host populations correlated negatively with parasite persistence. Furthermore, the parasite persisted only in host populations from habitats with a high likelihood of drying up in summer, although we excluded environmental variation in our experiments. Together, our results suggest that host genetic factors play the dominant role in explaining the limited geographic range of parasites and that these genetic differences covary with geographic distance and the habitat type the host is adapted to. PMID:26147623

  6. Use of Aeromonas spp. as general indicators of antimicrobial susceptibility among bacteria in aquatic environments in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Masaru eUsui; Chie eTagaki; Akira eFukuda; Torahiko eOkubo; Chanchai eBoonla; Satoru eSuzuki; Kanako eSeki; Hideshige eTakada; Yutaka eTamura

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobials are widely used, not only for treating human infections, but also for treatment of livestock and in fish farms. Human habitats in Southeastern Asian countries are located in close proximity to aquatic environments. As such, the human populations within these regions are at risk of exposure to antimicrobial resistant bacteria (ARB), and thereby disseminating antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs). In this study, we collected water samples from 15 sites (5 sites in Chao Phraya Riv...

  7. Effects of co-habitation between Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Culex quinquefasciatus aquatic stages on life history traits

    OpenAIRE

    Kweka Eliningaya J; Zhou Goufa; Beilhe Leila B; Dixit Amruta; Afrane Yaw; Gilbreath Thomas M; Munga Stephen; Nyindo Mramba; Githeko Andrew K; Yan Guiyun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The effective measures for the control of malaria and filariasis vectors can be achieved by targeting immature stages of anopheline and culicine mosquitoes in productive habitat. To design this strategy, the mechanisms (like biotic interactions with conspecifc and heterospecific larvae) regulating mosquito aquatic stages survivorship, development time and the size of emerging adults should be understood. This study explored the effect of co-habitation between An. gambiae s...

  8. Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, November 1993--October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, S.

    1995-08-01

    The Ecological Studies Team (EST) of ESH-20 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. Reports by Bennett (1994) and Cross (1994) discuss previous EST aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands those findings. EST collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon from November 1993 through October 1994. The two upstream stations are located below outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. Some water quality parameters are different at the first three stations from those expected of natural streams in the area, indicating degraded water quality due to effluent discharges. The aquatic habitat at the upper stations has also been degraded by sedimentation and channelization. The macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and unstable communities. In contrast, the two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. The two lower stations have increased macroinvertebrate diversity and stable communities, further indications of downstream water quality improvement.

  9. Nonlinear wave equations, covariant exterior derivative, Painleve test, and integrability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A class of nonlinear wave equations is derived which can be written as the vanishing of a covariant exterior derivative. The Painleve test is performed and the connection with integrability is discussed

  10. The critical dimensions of parastrings from the covariant formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The critical dimensions of first-quantized parastrings by the covariant method is presented. An apparent disagreement with previous light-cone results of Mansouri and coworkers was found. A possible interpretation of the discrepancy is offered. 11 refs

  11. Empirical State Error Covariance Matrix for Batch Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisbee, Joe

    2015-01-01

    State estimation techniques effectively provide mean state estimates. However, the theoretical state error covariance matrices provided as part of these techniques often suffer from a lack of confidence in their ability to describe the uncertainty in the estimated states. By a reinterpretation of the equations involved in the weighted batch least squares algorithm, it is possible to directly arrive at an empirical state error covariance matrix. The proposed empirical state error covariance matrix will contain the effect of all error sources, known or not. This empirical error covariance matrix may be calculated as a side computation for each unique batch solution. Results based on the proposed technique will be presented for a simple, two observer and measurement error only problem.

  12. Covariance fitting of highly correlated $B_K$ data

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Boram; Jung, Chulwoo; Lee, Weonjong

    2011-01-01

    We present the reason why we use the diagonal approximation (uncorrelated fitting) when we perform the data analysis of highly correlated $B_K$ data on the basis of the SU(2) staggered chiral perturbation theory. Basically, the essence of the problem is that we do not have enough statistics to determine the small eigenvalues of the covariance matrix with a high precision. As a result, we have the smallest eigenvalue, which is smaller than the statistical error of the covariance matrix, corresponding to an unphysical eigenmode. We have applied a number of prescriptions available in the market such as the cutoff method and modified covariance matrix method. It turns out that the cutoff method is not a good prescription and the modified covariance matrix method is an even worse one. The diagonal approximation turns out to be a good prescription if the data points are somehow correlated and the statistics are relatively poor.

  13. Trouble shooting for covariance fitting in highly correlated data

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Boram; Lee, Weonjong; Jung, Chulwoo

    2011-01-01

    We report a possible solution to the trouble that the covariance fitting fails when the data is highly correlated and the covariance matrix has small eigenvalues. As an example, we choose the data analysis of highly correlated $B_K$ data on the basis of the SU(2) staggered chiral perturbation theory. Basically, the essence of the problem is that we do not have an accurate fitting function so that we cannot fit the highly correlated and precise data. When some eigenvalues of the covariance matrix are small, even a tiny error of fitting function can produce large chi-square and spoil the fitting procedure. We have applied a number of prescriptions available in the market such as diagonal approximation and cutoff method. In addition, we present a new method, the eigenmode shift method which fine-tunes the fitting function while keeping the covariance matrix untouched.

  14. Coherent states and covariant semi-spectral measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The close connection between Mackey's theory of imprimitivity systems and the so called generalized coherent states introduced by Perelomov is established. Coherent states give a covariant description of the ''localization'' of a quantum system in the phase space in a similar way as the imprimitivity systems give a covariant description of the localization of a quantum system in the configuration space. The observation that for any system of coherent states one can define a covariant semi-spectral measure made possible a rigurous formulation of this idea. A generalization of the notion of coherent states is given. Covariant semi-spectral measures associated with systems of coherent states are defined and characterized. Necessary and sufficient conditions for a unitary representation of a Lie group to be i) a subrepresentation of an induced one and ii) a representation with coherent states are given (author)

  15. Covariance Matrix Evaluations for Independent Mass Fission Yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terranova, N., E-mail: nicholas.terranova@unibo.it [Industrial Engineering Department (DIN), University of Bologna (Italy); Serot, O.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C. [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Sumini, M. [Industrial Engineering Department (DIN), University of Bologna (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Recent needs for more accurate fission product yields include covariance information to allow improved uncertainty estimations of the parameters used by design codes. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility to generate more reliable and complete uncertainty information on independent mass fission yields. Mass yields covariances are estimated through a convolution between the multi-Gaussian empirical model based on Brosa's fission modes, which describe the pre-neutron mass yields, and the average prompt neutron multiplicity curve. The covariance generation task has been approached using the Bayesian generalized least squared method through the CONRAD code. Preliminary results on mass yields variance-covariance matrix will be presented and discussed from physical grounds in the case of {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f) reactions.

  16. Electron localization functions and local measures of the covariance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paul W Ayers

    2005-09-01

    The electron localization measure proposed by Becke and Edgecombe is shown to be related to the covariance of the electron pair distribution. Just as with the electron localization function, the local covariance does not seem to be, in and of itself, a useful quantity for elucidating shell structure. A function of the local covariance, however, is useful for this purpose. A different function, based on the hyperbolic tangent, is proposed to elucidate the shell structure encapsulated by the local covariance; this function also seems to work better for the electron localization measure of Becke and Edgecombe. In addition, we propose a different measure for the electron localization that incorporates both the electron localization measure of Becke and Edgecombe and the Laplacian of the electron density; preliminary indications are that this measure is especially good at elucidating the shell structure in valence regions. Methods for evaluating electron localization functions directly from the electron density, without recourse to the Kohn-Sham orbitals, are discussed.

  17. Progress of Covariance Evaluation at the China Nuclear Data Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covariance evaluations at the China Nuclear Data Center focus on the cross sections of structural materials and actinides in the fast neutron energy range. In addition to the well-known Least-squares approach, a method based on the analysis of the sources of experimental uncertainties is especially introduced to generate a covariance matrix for a particular reaction for which multiple measurements are available. The scheme of the covariance evaluation flow is presented, and an example of n+90Zr is given to illuminate the whole procedure. It is proven that the accuracy of measurements can be properly incorporated into the covariance and the long-standing small uncertainty problem can be avoided

  18. Covariances from light-element r-martix analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We review the method for obtaining covariance information for light-element reactions using R-matrix theory. The general LANL R-matrix analysis code EDA provides accurate covariances for the resonance parameters at a solution due to the search algorithm it uses to find a local minimum of the chi-square surface. This information is used, together with analytically calculated sensitivity derivatives, in the first-order error propagation equation to obtain cross-section covariances for all reactions included in the analysis. Examples are given of the covariances obtained from the EDA analyses for n-p scattering and for the n+{sup 6}Li reactions used in the latest light-element standard cross section evaluation. Also discussed is a method of defining 'pure theory' correlations that could be useful for extensions to higher energies and heavier systems.

  19. Field assessments in western Kenya link malaria vectors to environmentally disturbed habitats during the dry season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omlin Francois X

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous malaria epidemics have occurred in western Kenya, with increasing frequency over the past 20 years. A variety of hypotheses on the etiology of these epidemics have been put forth, with different implications for surveillance and control. We investigated the ecological and socioeconomic factors promoting highland malaria vectors in the dry season after the 2002 epidemic. Methods Investigations were conducted in Kisii District during the dry season. Aquatic habitats in were surveyed for presence of malaria vectors. Brick-making pits were further investigated for co-associations of larval densities with emergent vegetation, habitat age, and predator diversity. Indoor spray catches were completed in houses near aquatic habitats. Participatory rural appraisals (PRAs were conducted with 147 community members. Results The most abundant habitat type containing Anopheles larvae was brick-making pits. Vegetation and habitat age were positively associated with predator diversity, and negatively associated with mosquito density. Indoor spray catches found that houses close to brick-making sites had malaria vectors, whereas those next to swamps did not. PRAs revealed that brick-making has grown rapidly in highland swamps due to a variety of socioeconomic pressures in the region. Conclusion Brick-making, an important economic activity, also generates dry season habitats for malaria vectors in western Kenya. Specifically, functional brick making pits contain less that 50% as many predator taxa and greater than 50% more mosquito larvae when compared with nearby abandoned brick making pits. Further evaluations of these disturbed, man-made habitats in the wet season may provide information important for malaria surveillance and control.

  20. Improving Covariate Balance in 2^K Factorial Designs via Rerandomization

    OpenAIRE

    Branson, Zach; Dasgupta, Tirthankar; Donald B. Rubin

    2015-01-01

    Factorial designs are widely used in agriculture, engineering, and the social sciences to study the causal effects of several factors simultaneously on a response. The objective of such a design is to estimate all factorial effects of interest, which typically include main effects and interactions among factors. To estimate factorial effects with high precision when a large number of pre-treatment covariates are present, balance among covariates across treatment groups should be ensured. We p...