WorldWideScience

Sample records for aptamer-tagged small rna

  1. Aptamer-tagged DNA origami for spatially addressable detection of aflatoxin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhisong; Wang, Ying; Xu, Dan; Pang, Lei

    2017-01-10

    A DNA origami-based platform for detecting aflatoxin B1 has been constructed with the assistance of aptamer probes and its complementary ssDNA-modified gold nanoparticles. This work may open new horizons for the application of DNA origami in the detection of a variety of small molecules.

  2. Small RNA in rice genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凯; 朱小蓬; 钟兰; 陈润生

    2002-01-01

    Rice has many characteristics of a model plant. The recent completion of the draft of the rice genome represents an important advance in our knowledge of plant biology and also has an important contribution to the understanding of general genomic evolution. Besides the rice genome finishing map, the next urgent step for rice researchers is to annotate the genes and noncoding functional sequences. The recent work shows that noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) play significant roles in biological systems. We have explored all the known small RNAs (a kind of ncRNA) within rice genome and other six species sequences, including Arabidopsis, maize, yeast, worm, mouse and pig. As a result we find 160 out of 552 small RNAs (sRNAs) in database have homologs in 108 rice scaffolds, and almost all of them (99.41%) locate in intron regions of rice by gene predication. 19 sRNAs only appear in rice. More importantly, we find two special U14 sRNAs: one is located in a set of sRNA ZMU14SNR9(s) which only appears in three plants, 86% sequences of them can be compared as the same sequence in rice, Arabidopsis and maize; the other conserved sRNA XLHS7CU14 has a segment which appears in almost all these species from plants to animals. All these results indicate that sRNA do not have evident borderline between plants and animals.

  3. Switching off small RNA regulation with trap-mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Johansen, Jesper; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Small non-coding regulatory RNAs in bacteria have been shown predominantly to be tightly regulated at the level of transcription initiation, and sRNAs that function by an antisense mechanism on trans-encoded target mRNAs have been shown or predicted to act stoichiometrically. Here we show that Mic......M, which silences the expression of an outer membrane protein, YbfM under most growth conditions, does not become destabilized by target mRNA overexpression, indicating that the small RNA regulator acts catalytically. Furthermore, our regulatory studies suggested that control of micM expression is unlikely...... to operate at the level of transcription initiation. By employing a highly sensitive genetic screen we uncovered a novel RNA-based regulatory principle in which induction of a trap-mRNA leads to selective degradation of a small regulatory RNA molecule, thereby abolishing the sRNA-based silencing of its...

  4. Small RNA biology is systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Daniel; Nowojewski, Andrzej; Levine, Erel

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade small regulatory RNA (srRNA) emerged as central players in the regulation of gene expression in all kingdoms of life. Multiple pathways for srRNA biogenesis and diverse mechanisms of gene regulation may indicate that srRNA regulation evolved independently multiple times. However, small RNA pathways share numerous properties, including the ability of a single srRNA to regulate multiple targets. Some of the mechanisms of gene regulation by srRNAs have significant effect on the abundance of free srRNAs that are ready to interact with new targets. This results in indirect interactions among seemingly unrelated genes, as well as in a crosstalk between different srRNA pathways. Here we briefly review and compare the major srRNA pathways, and argue that the impact of srRNA is always at the system level. We demonstrate how a simple mathematical model can ease the discussion of governing principles. To demonstrate these points we review a few examples from bacteria and animals.

  5. Small RNA combination therapy for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wen; Dahlman, James E.; Tammela, Tuomas; Khan, Omar F.; Sood, Sabina; Dave, Apeksha; Cai, Wenxin; Chirino, Leilani M.; Yang, Gillian R.; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G.; Sahay, Gaurav; Schroeder, Avi; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and siRNAs have enormous potential as cancer therapeutics, but their effective delivery to most solid tumors has been difficult. Here, we show that a new lung-targeting nanoparticle is capable of delivering miRNA mimics and siRNAs to lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and to tumors in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer based on activation of oncogenic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras) and loss of p53 function. Therapeutic delivery of miR-34a, a p53-regulated tumor suppressor miRNA, restored miR-34a levels in lung tumors, specifically down-regulated miR-34a target genes, and slowed tumor growth. The delivery of siRNAs targeting Kras reduced Kras gene expression and MAPK signaling, increased apoptosis, and inhibited tumor growth. The combination of miR-34a and siRNA targeting Kras improved therapeutic responses over those observed with either small RNA alone, leading to tumor regression. Furthermore, nanoparticle-mediated small RNA delivery plus conventional, cisplatin-based chemotherapy prolonged survival in this model compared with chemotherapy alone. These findings demonstrate that RNA combination therapy is possible in an autochthonous model of lung cancer and provide preclinical support for the use of small RNA therapies in patients who have cancer. PMID:25114235

  6. Minireview: The Roles of Small RNA Pathways in Reproductive Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of small noncoding RNA, including P-element-induced wimpy testis-interacting RNA, small interfering RNA, and microRNA, has energized research in reproductive medicine. In the two decades since the identification of small RNA, first in Caenorhabditis elegans and then in other animals, scientists in many disciplines have made significant progress in elucidating their biology. A powerful battery of tools, including knockout mice and small RNA mimics and antagonists, has facilitated...

  7. Minireview: The Roles of Small RNA Pathways in Reproductive Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchold, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of small noncoding RNA, including P-element-induced wimpy testis-interacting RNA, small interfering RNA, and microRNA, has energized research in reproductive medicine. In the two decades since the identification of small RNA, first in Caenorhabditis elegans and then in other animals, scientists in many disciplines have made significant progress in elucidating their biology. A powerful battery of tools, including knockout mice and small RNA mimics and antagonists, has facilitated investigation into the functional roles and therapeutic potential of these small RNA pathways. Current data indicate that small RNA play significant roles in normal development and physiology and pathological conditions of the reproductive tracts of females and males. Biologically plausible mRNA targets for these microRNA are aggressively being discovered. The next phase of research will focus on elucidating the clinical utility of small RNA-selective agonists and antagonists. PMID:21546411

  8. Physiological roles of small RNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaux, Charlotte; Verneuil, Nicolas; Hartke, Axel; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2014-06-01

    Unlike proteins, RNA molecules have emerged lately as key players in regulation in bacteria. Most reviews hitherto focused on the experimental and/or in silico methods used to identify genes encoding small RNAs (sRNAs) or on the diverse mechanisms of these RNA regulators to modulate expression of their targets. However, less is known about their biological functions and their implications in various physiological responses. This review aims to compile what is known presently about the diverse roles of sRNA transcripts in the regulation of metabolic processes, in different growth conditions, in adaptation to stress and in microbial pathogenesis. Several recent studies revealed that sRNA molecules are implicated in carbon metabolism and transport, amino acid metabolism or metal sensing. Moreover, regulatory RNAs participate in cellular adaptation to environmental changes, e.g. through quorum sensing systems or development of biofilms, and analyses of several sRNAs under various physiological stresses and culture conditions have already been performed. In addition, recent experiments performed with Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens showed that regulatory RNAs play important roles in microbial virulence and during infection. The combined results show the diversity of regulation mechanisms and physiological processes in which sRNA molecules are key actors.

  9. Small regulatory RNA and Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien P Faucher

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial species that is ubiquitous in almost any aqueous environment. It is the agent of Legionnaires’ disease, an acute and often under-reported form of pneumonia. In mammals, L. pneumophila replicates inside macrophages within a modified vacuole. Many protein regulators have been identified that control virulence-related properties, including RpoS, LetA/LetS and PmrA/PmrB. In the past few years, the importance of regulation of virulence factors by small regulatory RNA has been increasingly appreciated. This is also the case in L. pneumophila where three sRNAs (RsmY, RsmZ and 6S RNA were recently shown to be important determinants of virulence regulation and 79 actively transcribed sRNAs were identified. In this review we describe current knowledge about sRNAs and their regulatory properties and how this relates to the known regulatory systems of L. pneumophila. We also provide a model for sRNA-mediated control of gene expression that serves as a framework for understanding the regulation of virulence-related properties of L. pneumophila.

  10. Small Rna Regulatory Networks In Pseudomonas Putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojanovic, Klara; Long, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    chemicals and has a potential to be used as an efficient cell factory for various products. P. putida KT2240 is a genome-sequenced strain and a well characterized pseudomonad. Our major aim is to identify small RNA molecules (sRNAs) and their regulatory networks. A previous study has identified 37 sRNAs...... in this strain, while in other pseudomonads many more sRNAs have been found so far.P. putida KT2440 has been grown in different conditions which are likely to be encountered in industrial fermentations with the aim of using sRNAs for generation of improved cell factories. For that, cells have been grown in LB...... and harvested in different growth phases, as well as osmotic, membrane and oxidative stress conditions. RNA sequencing data has been analysed with the open source software system Rockhopper, and it has revealed over 180 putative sRNAs. Most of them (86%) seem to be novel and uncharacterized. The majority...

  11. SnoRNA derived small RNA%核仁小RNA源性小RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐玲; 胡娜

    2010-01-01

    最新研究结果表明,一些与RNA介导基因沉默相关的小RNA由核仁小RNA(small nucleolar RNA,snoRNA)加工产生,这种小RNA被称为核仁小RNA源性小RNA(snoRNA derived small RNA,sdRNA).sdRNA现象分布物种广;涉及的snoRNA种类全,数量多;产生的小RNA分子大小不一,数量、种类多.表明这种小RNA在生物中存任着广泛的普遍性.sdRNA的发现拓展了snoRNA的功能,揭示了snoRNA与RNA介导的基因沉默之间的紧密关系,增强了SnoRNA在RNA调控网络中的重要性,并为进一步研究RNA调控网络开启了一扇门.

  12. Endogenous Small RNA Clusters in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Xin Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In plants, small RNAs (sRNAs usually refer to non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs with lengths of 20–24 nucleotides. sRNAs are involved in the regulation of many essential processes related to plant development and environmental responses. sRNAs in plants are mainly grouped into microRNAs (miRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, and the latter can be further classified into trans-acting siRNAs (ta-siRNAs, repeat-associated siRNAs (ra-siRNAs, natural anti-sense siRNAs (nat-siRNAs, etc. Many sRNAs exhibit a clustered distribution pattern in the genome. Here, we summarize the features and functions of cluster-distributed sRNAs, aimed to not only provide a thorough picture of sRNA clusters (SRCs in plants, but also shed light on the identification of new classes of functional sRNAs.

  13. RNA interference and small interference RNA%RNA干涉和小干涉RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张芹; 王勇; 钱凯先

    2005-01-01

    RNA干涉(RNA interference.RNAi)可以抑制诸多真核基因的表达,小干涉RNA(small intmference RNA,siRNA)是RNA干涉的引发物,不同的siRNA可以引导不同水平的RNA干涉,不同种细胞中siRNA的寡核苷酸链的性质也有很大的不同.非编码RNA中的微小RNA(micnoRNA,miRNA)与siRNA在结构及作用方式等方面有很多区别和联系.RNAi的作用机制大致有两种:在Drosophila中的一般作用模式和在C.elegans中的扩大作用模式.利用RNA干涉技术可以通过抑制基因的表达来研究其功能;RNA干涉作为基因治疗的工具,在肝炎和AIDS的治疗过程中有一定的作用.RNAi的高特异性、高效性、放大效应和无细胞特异性等特点在科研中得到了广泛的应用.

  14. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus_minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  15. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  16. Regulation of small RNA stability: methylation and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijuan Ji; Xuemei Chen

    2012-01-01

    As central components of RNA silencing,small RNAs play diverse and important roles in many biological processes in eukaryotes.Aberrant reduction or elevation in the levels of small RNAs is associated with many developmental and physiological defects.The in vivo levels of small RNAs are precisely regulated through modulating the rates of their biogenesis and turnover.2'-O-methylation on the 3' terminal ribose is a major mechanism that increases the stability of small RNAs.The small RNA methyltransferase HUA ENHANCER1 (HEN1) and its homologs methylate microRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in plants,Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) in animals,and siRNAs in Drosophila.3' nucleotide addition,especially uridylation,and 3'-5' exonucleolytic degradation are major mechanisms that turnover small RNAs.Other mechanisms impacting small RNA stability include complementary RNAs,cis-elements in small RNA sequences and RNA-binding proteins.Investigations are ongoing to further understand how small RNA stability impacts their accumulation in vivo in order to improve the utilization of RNA silencing in biotechnology and therapeutic applications.

  17. Dissecting RNA-interference pathway with small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ya-Lin; Dinesh, Chimmanamada U; Chu, Chia-ying; Ali, Akbar; Brown, Kirk M; Cao, Hong; Rana, Tariq M

    2005-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process whereby short-interfering RNAs (siRNA) silence gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. We have screened a chemical library of substituted dihydropteridinones and identified a nontoxic, cell permeable, and reversible inhibitor of the RNAi pathway in human cells. Biochemical and fluorescence resonance-energy transfer experiments demonstrated that one of the compounds, named ATPA-18, inhibited siRNA unwinding that occurred within 6 hr of siRNA transfection. Extracts prepared from ATPA-18-treated cells also exhibited a decrease in target RNA cleavage by activated RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC*). Interestingly, when activated RISC*, which harbors unwound antisense siRNA, was treated with ATPA-18 in vitro, target RNA cleavage was not affected, indicating that this compound inhibited siRNA unwinding or steps upstream of unwinding in the RNAi pathway. Our results also establish the timing of siRNA unwinding and show that siRNA helicase activity is required for RNAi. ATPA-18 analogs will therefore provide a new class of small molecules for studying RNAi mechanisms in a variety of model organisms and deciphering in vivo genetic functions through reverse genetics.

  18. Small Interfering RNA Transfection Across a Phospholipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Van; Choubey, Amit; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2012-02-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. We have performed steered MD simulations to study the transfection of a bare siRNA and siRNA/Oleic Acid (OA) complex across the dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPC) bilayer at T = 323 K. Bare siRNA induces the formation of frustrated lipid gel domains, whereas in the presence of siRNA/OA complex the membrane is found to be in the liquid-ordered phase. In both cases the stress profiles across the membrane indicate that the membrane is under tension near the head groups and highly compressed at the water-hydrophobic interface. During transfection, the membrane is deformed and the lateral stress is significantly lowered for the bare siRNA and siRNA/OA complex. The bare siRNA transfects through a lipid-nanopore of hydrophilic head-groups and hydrophobic carbon chains, whereas the siRNA/OA complex transfects through a lipid-nanopore of hydrophilic head groups.

  19. A small RNA response at DNA ends in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, Katharina M; Böttcher, Romy; Förstemann, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Small RNAs have been implicated in numerous cellular processes, including effects on chromatin structure and the repression of transposons. We describe the generation of a small RNA response at DNA ends in Drosophila that is analogous to the recently reported double-strand break (DSB)-induced RNAs or Dicer- and Drosha-dependent small RNAs in Arabidopsis and vertebrates. Active transcription in the vicinity of the break amplifies this small RNA response, demonstrating that the normal messenger RNA contributes to the endogenous small interfering RNAs precursor. The double-stranded RNA precursor forms with an antisense transcript that initiates at the DNA break. Breaks are thus sites of transcription initiation, a novel aspect of the cellular DSB response. This response is specific to a double-strand break since nicked DNA structures do not trigger small RNA production. The small RNAs are generated independently of the exact end structure (blunt, 3'- or 5'-overhang), can repress homologous sequences in trans and may therefore--in addition to putative roles in repair--exert a quality control function by clearing potentially truncated messages from genes in the vicinity of the break.

  20. Functionalization of an Antisense Small RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Guillermo; Prakash, Satya; Cordero, Teresa; Kushwaha, Manish; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-02-27

    In order to explore the possibility of adding new functions to preexisting genes, we considered a framework of riboregulation. We created a new riboregulator consisting of the reverse complement of a known riboregulator. Using computational design, we engineered a cis-repressing 5' untranslated region that can be activated by this new riboregulator. As a result, both RNAs can orthogonally trans-activate translation of their cognate, independent targets. The two riboregulators can also repress each other by antisense interaction, although not symmetrically. Our work highlights that antisense small RNAs can work as regulatory agents beyond the antisense paradigm and that, hence, they could be interfaced with other circuits used in synthetic biology.

  1. Functional nanostructures for effective delivery of small interfering RNA therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Cheol Am; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has proved to be a powerful tool for target-specific gene silencing via RNA interference (RNAi). Its ability to control targeted gene expression gives new hope to gene therapy as a treatment for cancers and genetic diseases. However, siRNA shows poor pharmacological properties, such as low serum stability, off-targeting, and innate immune responses, which present a significant challenge for clinical applications. In addition, siRNA cannot cross the cell membrane for RNAi activity because of its anionic property and stiff structure. Therefore, the development of a safe, stable, and efficient system for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics into the cytoplasm of targeted cells is crucial. Several nanoparticle platforms for siRNA delivery have been developed to overcome the major hurdles facing the therapeutic uses of siRNA. This review covers a broad spectrum of non-viral siRNA delivery systems developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and discusses their characteristics and opportunities for clinical applications of therapeutic siRNA.

  2. RNA targeting by small molecules: Binding of protoberberine, benzophenanthridine and aristolochia alkaloids to various RNA structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopinatha Suresh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Studies on RNA targeting by small molecules to specifically control certain cellular functions is an area of remarkable current interest. For this purpose, a basic understanding of the molecular aspects of the interaction of small molecules with various RNA structures is essential. Alkaloids are a group of natural products with potential therapeutic utility, and very recently, their interaction with many RNA structures have been reported. Especially noteworthy are the protoberberines and aristolochia alkaloids distributed widely in many botanical families. Many of the alkaloids of these group exhibit excellent binding affinity to many RNA structures that may be exploited to develop RNA targeted therapeutics. This review attempts to present the current status on the understanding of the interaction of these alkaloids with various RNA structures, mainly highlighting the biophysical aspects.

  3. Design of a small molecule against an oncogenic noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Cameron, Michael D; Haga, Christopher L; Rosenberg, Laura H; Lafitte, Marie; Duckett, Derek R; Phinney, Donald G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-05-24

    The design of precision, preclinical therapeutics from sequence is difficult, but advances in this area, particularly those focused on rational design, could quickly transform the sequence of disease-causing gene products into lead modalities. Herein, we describe the use of Inforna, a computational approach that enables the rational design of small molecules targeting RNA to quickly provide a potent modulator of oncogenic microRNA-96 (miR-96). We mined the secondary structure of primary microRNA-96 (pri-miR-96) hairpin precursor against a database of RNA motif-small molecule interactions, which identified modules that bound RNA motifs nearby and in the Drosha processing site. Precise linking of these modules together provided Targaprimir-96 (3), which selectively modulates miR-96 production in cancer cells and triggers apoptosis. Importantly, the compound is ineffective on healthy breast cells, and exogenous overexpression of pri-miR-96 reduced compound potency in breast cancer cells. Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull-Down (Chem-CLIP), a small-molecule RNA target validation approach, shows that 3 directly engages pri-miR-96 in breast cancer cells. In vivo, 3 has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile and decreases tumor burden in a mouse model of triple-negative breast cancer. Thus, rational design can quickly produce precision, in vivo bioactive lead small molecules against hard-to-treat cancers by targeting oncogenic noncoding RNAs, advancing a disease-to-gene-to-drug paradigm.

  4. Unique small RNA signatures uncovered in the tammar wallaby genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay James

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small RNAs have proven to be essential regulatory molecules encoded within eukaryotic genomes. These short RNAs participate in a diverse array of cellular processes including gene regulation, chromatin dynamics and genome defense. The tammar wallaby, a marsupial mammal, is a powerful comparative model for studying the evolution of regulatory networks. As part of the genome sequencing initiative for the tammar, we have explored the evolution of each of the major classes of mammalian small RNAs in an Australian marsupial for the first time, including the first genome-scale analysis of the newest class of small RNAs, centromere repeat associated short interacting RNAs (crasiRNAs. Results Using next generation sequencing, we have characterized the major classes of small RNAs, micro (mi RNAs, piwi interacting (pi RNAs, and the centromere repeat associated short interacting (crasi RNAs in the tammar. We examined each of these small RNA classes with respect to the newly assembled tammar wallaby genome for gene and repeat features, salient features that define their canonical sequences, and the constitution of both highly conserved and species-specific members. Using a combination of miRNA hairpin predictions and co-mapping with miRBase entries, we identified a highly conserved cluster of miRNA genes on the X chromosome in the tammar and a total of 94 other predicted miRNA producing genes. Mapping all miRNAs to the tammar genome and comparing target genes among tammar, mouse and human, we identified 163 conserved target genes. An additional nine genes were identified in tammar that do not have an orthologous miRNA target in human and likely represent novel miRNA-regulated genes in the tammar. A survey of the tammar gonadal piRNAs shows that these small RNAs are enriched in retroelements and carry members from both marsupial and tammar-specific repeat classes. Lastly, this study includes the first in-depth analyses of the newly

  5. Small RNA Detection by in Situ Hybridization Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna O. Urbanek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding RNAs perform multiple regulatory functions in cells, and their exogenous mimics are widely used in research and experimental therapies to interfere with target gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are the most thoroughly investigated representatives of the small RNA family, which includes short interfering RNAs (siRNAs, PIWI-associated RNA (piRNAs, and others. Numerous methods have been adopted for the detection and characterization of small RNAs, which is challenging due to their short length and low level of expression. These include molecular biology methods such as real-time RT-PCR, northern blotting, hybridization to microarrays, cloning and sequencing, as well as single cell miRNA detection by microscopy with in situ hybridization (ISH. In this review, we focus on the ISH method, including its fluorescent version (FISH, and we present recent methodological advances that facilitated its successful adaptation for small RNA detection. We discuss relevant technical aspects as well as the advantages and limitations of ISH. We also refer to numerous applications of small RNA ISH in basic research and molecular diagnostics.

  6. Probing the MicroRNA and Small Interfering RNA Pathways with Virus-Encoded Suppressors of RNA SilencingW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunoyer, Patrice; Lecellier, Charles-Henri; Parizotto, Eneida Abreu; Himber, Christophe; Voinnet, Olivier

    2004-01-01

    In plants, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are effectors of RNA silencing, a process involved in defense through RNA interference (RNAi) and in development. Plant viruses are natural targets of RNA silencing, and as a counterdefensive strategy, they have evolved highly diverse silencing suppressor proteins. Although viral suppressors are usually thought to act at distinct steps of the silencing machinery, there had been no consensus system so far that allowed a strict side-by-side analysis of those factors. We have set up such a system in Arabidopsis thaliana and used it to compare the effects of five unrelated viral silencing suppressors on the siRNA and miRNA pathways. Although all the suppressors inhibited RNAi, only three of them induced developmental defects, indicating that the two pathways are only partially overlapping. These developmental defects were remarkably similar, and their penetrance correlated with inhibition of miRNA-guided cleavage of endogenous transcripts and not with altered miRNA accumulation per se. Among the suppressors investigated, the tombusviral P19 protein coimmunoprecipitated with siRNA duplexes and miRNA duplexes corresponding to the primary cleavage products of miRNA precursors. Thus, it is likely that P19 prevents RNA silencing by sequestering both classes of small RNAs. Moreover, the finding here that P19 binds siRNAs and suppresses RNAi in Hela cells also suggests that this factor may be useful to dissect the RNA silencing pathways in animals. Finally, the differential effects of the silencing suppressors tested here upon other types of Arabidopsis silencing-related small RNAs revealed a surprising variety of biosynthetic and, presumably, functional pathways for those molecules. Therefore, silencing suppressors are valuable probes of the complexity of RNA silencing. PMID:15084715

  7. The European database on small subunit ribosomal RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Wuyts, Jan; Van de Peer, Yves; Winkelmans, Tina; De Wachter, Rupert

    2002-01-01

    The European database on SSU rRNA can be consulted via the World WideWeb at http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ssu/ and compiles all complete or nearly complete small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences. Sequences are provided in aligned format. The alignment takes into account the secondary structure information derived by comparative sequence analysis of thousands of sequences. Additional information such as literature references, taxonomy, secondary structure models and nucleotide variability maps, is also...

  8. Mapping the small RNA content of simian immunodeficiency virions (SIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Brameier

    Full Text Available Recent evidence indicates that regulatory small non-coding RNAs are not only components of eukaryotic cells and vesicles, but also reside within a number of different viruses including retroviral particles. Using ultra-deep sequencing we have comprehensively analyzed the content of simian immunodeficiency virions (SIV, which were compared to mock-control preparations. Our analysis revealed that more than 428,000 sequence reads matched the SIV mac239 genome sequence. Among these we could identify 12 virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs that were highly abundant. Beside known retrovirus-enriched small RNAs, like 7SL-RNA, tRNA(Lys3 and tRNA(Lys isoacceptors, we also identified defined fragments derived from small ILF3/NF90-associated RNA snaR-A14, that were enriched more than 50 fold in SIV. We also found evidence that small nucleolar RNAs U2 and U12 were underrepresented in the SIV preparation, indicating that the relative number or the content of co-isolated exosomes was changed upon infection. Our comprehensive atlas of SIV-incorporated small RNAs provides a refined picture of the composition of retrovirions, which gives novel insights into viral packaging.

  9. Thermodynamic control of small RNA-mediated gene silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko eUi-Tei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs are crucial regulators of posttranscriptional gene silencing, which is referred to as RNA interference (RNAi or RNA silencing. In RNAi, siRNA loaded onto the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC downregulates target gene expression by cleaving mRNA whose sequence is perfectly complementary to the siRNA guide strand. We previously showed that highly functional siRNAs possessed the following characteristics: A or U residues at nucleotide position 1 measured from the 5’ terminal, four to seven A/Us in positions 1–7, and G or C residues at position 19. This finding indicated that an RNA strand with a thermodynamically unstable 5’ terminal is easily retained in the RISC and functions as a guide strand. In addition, it is clear that unintended genes with complementarities only in the seed region (positions 2–8 are also downregulated by off-target effects. siRNA efficiency is mainly determined by the Watson-Crick base-pairing stability formed between the siRNA seed region and target mRNA. siRNAs with a low seed-target duplex melting temperature (Tm have little or no seed-dependent off-target activity. Thus, important parts of the RNA silencing machinery may be regulated by nucleotide base-pairing thermodynamic stability. A mechanistic understanding of thermodynamic control may enable an efficient target gene-specific RNAi for functional genomics and safe therapeutic applications.

  10. Identification of Bacterial Small RNAs by RNA Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Lozano, María; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren;

    2014-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria are known to modulate gene expression and control a variety of processes including metabolic reactions, stress responses, and pathogenesis in response to environmental signals. A method to identify bacterial sRNAs on a genome-wide scale based on RNA seque...

  11. Transcriptome and small RNA deep sequencing reveals deregulation of miRNA biogenesis in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynette M; Kivinen, Virpi; Liu, Yuexin; Annala, Matti; Cogdell, David; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-Gong; Sawaya, Raymond; Yli-Harja, Olli; Shmulevich, Ilya; Fuller, Gregory N; Zhang, Wei; Nykter, Matti

    2013-02-01

    Altered expression of oncogenic and tumour-suppressing microRNAs (miRNAs) is widely associated with tumourigenesis. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying these alterations are poorly understood. We sought to shed light on the deregulation of miRNA biogenesis promoting the aberrant miRNA expression profiles identified in these tumours. Using sequencing technology to perform both whole-transcriptome and small RNA sequencing of glioma patient samples, we examined precursor and mature miRNAs to directly evaluate the miRNA maturation process, and examined expression profiles for genes involved in the major steps of miRNA biogenesis. We found that ratios of mature to precursor forms of a large number of miRNAs increased with the progression from normal brain to low-grade and then to high-grade gliomas. The expression levels of genes involved in each of the three major steps of miRNA biogenesis (nuclear processing, nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, and cytoplasmic processing) were systematically altered in glioma tissues. Survival analysis of an independent data set demonstrated that the alteration of genes involved in miRNA maturation correlates with survival in glioma patients. Direct quantification of miRNA maturation with deep sequencing demonstrated that deregulation of the miRNA biogenesis pathway is a hallmark for glioma genesis and progression.

  12. Small Luggage for a Long Journey: Transfer of Vesicle-Enclosed Small RNA in Interspecies Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Fabio A.; Lécuyer, Eric

    2017-01-01

    In the evolutionary arms race, symbionts have evolved means to modulate each other's physiology, oftentimes through the dissemination of biological signals. Beyond small molecules and proteins, recent evidence shows that small RNA molecules are transferred between organisms and transmit functional RNA interference signals across biological species. However, the mechanisms through which specific RNAs involved in cross-species communication are sorted for secretion and protected from degradation in the environment remain largely enigmatic. Over the last decade, extracellular vesicles have emerged as prominent vehicles of biological signals. They can stabilize specific RNA transcripts in biological fluids and selectively deliver them to recipient cells. Here, we review examples of small RNA transfers between plants and bacterial, fungal, and animal symbionts. We also discuss the transmission of RNA interference signals from intestinal cells to populations of the gut microbiota, along with its roles in intestinal homeostasis. We suggest that extracellular vesicles may contribute to inter-species crosstalk mediated by small RNA. We review the mechanisms of RNA sorting to extracellular vesicles and evaluate their relevance in cross-species communication by discussing conservation, stability, stoichiometry, and co-occurrence of vesicles with alternative communication vehicles. PMID:28360889

  13. Re-inspection of small RNA sequence datasets reveals several novel human miRNA genes.

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    Thomas Birkballe Hansen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: miRNAs are key players in gene expression regulation. To fully understand the complex nature of cellular differentiation or initiation and progression of disease, it is important to assess the expression patterns of as many miRNAs as possible. Thereby, identifying novel miRNAs is an essential prerequisite to make possible a comprehensive and coherent understanding of cellular biology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on two extensive, but previously published, small RNA sequence datasets from human embryonic stem cells and human embroid bodies, respectively [1], we identified 112 novel miRNA-like structures and were able to validate miRNA processing in 12 out of 17 investigated cases. Several miRNA candidates were furthermore substantiated by including additional available small RNA datasets, thereby demonstrating the power of combining datasets to identify miRNAs that otherwise may be assigned as experimental noise. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analysis highlights that existing datasets are not yet exhaustedly studied and continuous re-analysis of the available data is important to uncover all features of small RNA sequencing.

  14. Unzipping and binding of small interfering RNA with single walled Carbon Nanotube: a platform for small interfering RNA delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Sood, A K; Maiti, Prabal K; 10.1063/1.3682780

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to design efficient platform for siRNA delivery, we combine all atom classical and quantum simulations to study the binding of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by pristine single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT). Our results show that siRNA strongly binds to SWCNT surface via unzipping its base-pairs and the propensity of unzipping increases with the increase in the diameter of the SWCNTs. The unzipping and subsequent wrapping events are initiated and driven by van der Waals interactions between the aromatic rings of siRNA nucleobases and the SWCNT surface. However, MD simulations of double strand DNA (dsDNA) of the same sequence show that the dsDNA undergoes much less unzipping and wrapping on the SWCNT in the simulation time scale of 70 ns. This interesting difference is due to smaller interaction energy of thymidine of dsDNA with the SWCNT compared to that of uridine of siRNA, as calculated by dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT) methods. After the optimal binding of siRNA to SWCNT, t...

  15. Small interfering RNA delivery through positively charged polymer nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoni, Luca; Ferrari, Raffaele; Lupi, Monica; Cesana, Alberto; Falcetta, Francesca; Ubezio, Paolo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Morbidelli, Massimo; Moscatelli, Davide

    2016-03-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is receiving increasing attention with regard to the treatment of many genetic diseases, both acquired and hereditary, such as cancer and diabetes. Being a high molecular weight (MW) polyanion, siRNA is not able to cross a cell membrane, and in addition it is unstable in physiological conditions. Accordingly, a biocompatible nanocarrier able to deliver siRNA into cells is needed. In this work, we synthesized biocompatible positively charged nanoparticles (NPs) following a two-step process that involves ring opening polymerization (ROP) and emulsion free radical polymerization (EFRP). Firstly, we proved the possibility of fine tuning the NPs’ characteristics (e.g. size and surface charge) by changing the synthetic process parameters. Then the capability in loading and delivering undamaged siRNA into a cancer cell cytoplasm has been shown. This latter process occurs through the biodegradation of the polymer constituting the NPs, whose kinetics can be tuned by adjusting the polymer’s MW. Finally, the ability of NPs to carry siRNA inside the cells in order to inhibit their target gene has been demonstrated using green flourescent protein positive cells.

  16. Small RNA transcriptomes of mangroves evolve adaptively in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming; Lin, Xingqin; Xie, Munan; Wang, Yushuai; Shen, Xu; Liufu, Zhongqi; Wu, Chung-I; Shi, Suhua; Tang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are key players in plant stress responses. Here, we present the sRNA transcriptomes of mangroves Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and Kandelia candel. Comparative computational analyses and target predictions revealed that mangroves exhibit distinct sRNA regulatory networks that differ from those of glycophytes. A total of 32 known and three novel miRNA families were identified. Conserved and mangrove-specific miRNA targets were predicted; the latter were widely involved in stress responses. The known miRNAs showed differential expression between the mangroves and glycophytes, reminiscent of the adaptive stress-responsive changes in Arabidopsis. B. gymnorrhiza possessed highly abundant but less conserved TAS3 trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) in addition to tasiR-ARFs, with expanded potential targets. Our results indicate that the evolutionary alteration of sRNA expression levels and the rewiring of sRNA-regulatory networks are important mechanisms underlying stress adaptation. We also identified sRNAs that are involved in salt and/or drought tolerance and nutrient homeostasis as possible contributors to mangrove success in stressful environments.

  17. DSAP: deep-sequencing small RNA analysis pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Jung; Liu, Yi-Chung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Lin, Wei-Chen; Gan, Richie Ruei-Chi; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Tang, Petrus

    2010-07-01

    DSAP is an automated multiple-task web service designed to provide a total solution to analyzing deep-sequencing small RNA datasets generated by next-generation sequencing technology. DSAP uses a tab-delimited file as an input format, which holds the unique sequence reads (tags) and their corresponding number of copies generated by the Solexa sequencing platform. The input data will go through four analysis steps in DSAP: (i) cleanup: removal of adaptors and poly-A/T/C/G/N nucleotides; (ii) clustering: grouping of cleaned sequence tags into unique sequence clusters; (iii) non-coding RNA (ncRNA) matching: sequence homology mapping against a transcribed sequence library from the ncRNA database Rfam (http://rfam.sanger.ac.uk/); and (iv) known miRNA matching: detection of known miRNAs in miRBase (http://www.mirbase.org/) based on sequence homology. The expression levels corresponding to matched ncRNAs and miRNAs are summarized in multi-color clickable bar charts linked to external databases. DSAP is also capable of displaying miRNA expression levels from different jobs using a log(2)-scaled color matrix. Furthermore, a cross-species comparative function is also provided to show the distribution of identified miRNAs in different species as deposited in miRBase. DSAP is available at http://dsap.cgu.edu.tw.

  18. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans.

  19. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Ruan, Jishou; Chen, Rui; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chengjie; Kreuze, Jan F; Fei, ZhangJun; Zhu, Xiao; Gao, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq) can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans.

  20. Viral suppressors of RNA silencing hinder exogenous and endogenous small RNA pathways in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam Berry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In plants and insects, RNA interference (RNAi is the main responder against viruses and shapes the basis of antiviral immunity. Viruses counter this defense by expressing viral suppressors of RNAi (VSRs. While VSRs in Drosophila melanogaster were shown to inhibit RNAi through different modes of action, whether they act on other silencing pathways remained unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that expression of various plant and insect VSRs in transgenic flies does not perturb the Drosophila microRNA (miRNA pathway; but in contrast, inhibits antiviral RNAi and the RNA silencing response triggered by inverted repeat transcripts, and injection of dsRNA or siRNA. Strikingly, these VSRs also suppressed transposon silencing by endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings identify VSRs as tools to unravel small RNA pathways in insects and suggest a cosuppression of antiviral RNAi and endo-siRNA silencing by viruses during fly infections.

  1. Silent no more: Endogenous small RNA pathways promote gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedeles, Christopher J; Wu, Monica Z; Claycomb, Julie M

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous small RNA pathways related to RNA interference (RNAi) play a well-documented role in protecting host genomes from the invasion of foreign nucleic acids. In C. elegans, the PIWI type Argonaute, PRG-1, through an association with 21U-RNAs, mediates a genome surveillance process by constantly scanning the genome for potentially deleterious invading elements. Upon recognition of foreign nucleic acids, PRG-1 initiates a cascade of cytoplasmic and nuclear events that results in heritable epigenetic silencing of these transcripts and their coding genomic loci. If the PRG-1/21U-RNA genome surveillance pathway has the capacity to target most of the C. elegans transcriptome, what mechanisms exist to protect endogenous transcripts from being silenced by this pathway? In this commentary, we discuss three recent publications that implicate the CSR-1 small RNA pathway in the heritable activation of germline transcripts, propose a model as to why not all epialleles behave similarly, and touch on the practical implications of these findings.

  2. Chromosomally encoded small antisense RNA in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemanová, Martina; Kaderábková, Pavla; Pátek, Miroslav; Knoppová, Monika; Silar, Radoslav; Nesvera, Jan

    2008-02-01

    The first observation of chromosomally encoded small antisense RNA in Corynebacterium glutamicum is reported. Transcription oriented in the reverse direction to the transcription of the genes cg1934 and cg1935 was demonstrated within the chromosomal cg1934-cg1935 intergenic region. The transcription was found to be increased after heat shock. The transcriptional start point of this RNA designated ArnA was localized 21 bp upstream of the cg1935 translational start point by primer extension analysis, when the total RNA was isolated from cells grown at 30 degrees C. After heat shock, the transcriptional start point of an additional species of ArnA RNA was detected 19 bp upstream of the cg1935 translational start point. The stress-response sigma factor SigH was found to be involved in the synthesis of ArnA RNAs. The 3' end of the ArnA RNAs was identified using the 3'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique. The length of the two ArnA RNA species was thus determined to be 129 and 131 nt, respectively. The ArnA RNAs were found to overlap the 5'-untranslated region of the transcript of the cg1935 gene coding for a transcriptional regulator of the GntR family. These results suggest that the noncoding ArnA RNAs have a regulatory function.

  3. Small RNA expression and strain specificity in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bruijn Ewart

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Digital gene expression (DGE profiling has become an established tool to study RNA expression. Here, we provide an in-depth analysis of small RNA DGE profiles from two different rat strains (BN-Lx and SHR from six different rat tissues (spleen, liver, brain, testis, heart, kidney. We describe the expression patterns of known and novel micro (miRNAs and piwi-interacting (piRNAs. Results We confirmed the expression of 588 known miRNAs (54 in antisense orientation and identified 56 miRNAs homologous to known human or mouse miRNAs, as well as 45 new rat miRNAs. Furthermore, we confirmed specific A to I editing in brain for mir-376a/b/c and identified mir-377 as a novel editing target. In accordance with earlier findings, we observed a highly tissue-specific expression pattern for all tissues analyzed. The brain was found to express the highest number of tissue-specific miRNAs, followed by testis. Notably, our experiments also revealed robust strain-specific differential miRNA expression in the liver that is caused by genetic variation between the strains. Finally, we identified two types of germline-specific piRNAs in testis, mapping either to transposons or in strand-specific clusters. Conclusions Taken together, the small RNA compendium described here advances the annotation of small RNAs in the rat genome. Strain and tissue-specific expression patterns furthermore provide a strong basis for studying the role of small RNAs in regulatory networks as well as biological process like physiology and neurobiology that are extensively studied in this model system.

  4. Noncoding RNA small nucleolar RNA host gene 1 promote cell proliferation in nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J You

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the major cause of cancer death worldwide. Increasing evidence shows that noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs are widely involved in the development and progression of NSCLC. ncRNA small nucleolar RNA host gene 1 (SNHG1 has not been studied in cancer, especially its role in lung cancer remains unknown. Our studies were designed to investigate the expression and biological significance of SNHG1 in lung cancer. SNHG1 may be a novel ncRNA in early diagnosis in lung cancer. Methods: Noncoding RNA SNHG1 expression in 7 lung cancer cell lines was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. RNA interference approaches were used to find the biological functions of SNHG1. The effect of SNHG1 on proliferation was evaluated by cell count and crystal violet stains. Results: Noncoding RNA SNHG1 expression was significantly upregulated in lung cancer cells when compared with normal bronchial epithelial cells. In addition, in vitro assays our results indicated that knockdown of SNHG1 inhibited cell proliferation. Conclusions: Our data indicated that ncRNA SNHG1 is significantly upregulated in NSCLC cell lines and may represent a new biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC intervention.

  5. Repertoire of bovine miRNA and miRNA-like small regulatory RNAs expressed upon viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A Glazov

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA and other types of small regulatory RNAs play a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. Several distinct classes of small regulatory RNAs have been discovered in recent years. To extend the repertoire of small RNAs characterized in mammals and to examine relationship between host miRNA expression and viral infection we used Illumina's ultrahigh throughput sequencing approach. We sequenced three small RNA libraries prepared from cell line derived from the adult bovine kidney under normal conditions and upon infection of the cell line with Bovine herpesvirus 1. We used a bioinformatics approach to distinguish authentic mature miRNA sequences from other classes of small RNAs and short RNA fragments represented in the sequencing data. Using this approach we detected 219 out of 356 known bovine miRNAs and 115 respective miRNA* sequences. In addition we identified five new bovine orthologs of known mammalian miRNAs and discovered 268 new cow miRNAs many of which are not identifiable in other mammalian genomes and thus might be specific to the ruminant lineage. In addition we found seven new bovine mirtron candidates. We also discovered 10 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA loci that give rise to small RNA with possible miRNA-like function. Results presented in this study extend our knowledge of the biology and evolution of small regulatory RNAs in mammals and illuminate mechanisms of small RNA biogenesis and function. New miRNA sequences and the original sequencing data have been submitted to miRNA repository (miRBase and NCBI GEO archive respectively. We envisage that these resources will facilitate functional annotation of the bovine genome and promote further functional and comparative genomics studies of small regulatory RNA in mammals.

  6. Nicotiana small RNA sequences support a host genome origin of cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite RNAs (satRNAs are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat sequence (35S-GUS:Sat was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs.

  7. Nicotiana small RNA sequences support a host genome origin of cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Kiran; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Smith, Neil A; Schumann, Ulrike; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Zhang, Ren; Guo, Hui-Shan; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Satellite RNAs (satRNAs) are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS) transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat) sequence (35S-GUS:Sat) was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs.

  8. Small RNA-directed epigenetic natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixian Zhai

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress in epigenetics has revealed mechanisms that can heritably regulate gene function independent of genetic alterations. Nevertheless, little is known about the role of epigenetics in evolution. This is due in part to scant data on epigenetic variation among natural populations. In plants, small interfering RNA (siRNA is involved in both the initiation and maintenance of gene silencing by directing DNA methylation and/or histone methylation. Here, we report that, in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, a cluster of approximately 24 nt siRNAs found at high levels in the ecotype Landsberg erecta (Ler could direct DNA methylation and heterochromatinization at a hAT element adjacent to the promoter of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC, a major repressor of flowering, whereas the same hAT element in ecotype Columbia (Col with almost identical DNA sequence, generates a set of low abundance siRNAs that do not direct these activities. We have called this hAT element MPF for Methylated region near Promoter of FLC, although de novo methylation triggered by an inverted repeat transgene at this region in Col does not alter its FLC expression. DNA methylation of the Ler allele MPF is dependent on genes in known silencing pathways, and such methylation is transmissible to Col by genetic crosses, although with varying degrees of penetrance. A genome-wide comparison of Ler and Col small RNAs identified at least 68 loci matched by a significant level of approximately 24 nt siRNAs present specifically in Ler but not Col, where nearly half of the loci are related to repeat or TE sequences. Methylation analysis revealed that 88% of the examined loci (37 out of 42 were specifically methylated in Ler but not Col, suggesting that small RNA can direct epigenetic differences between two closely related Arabidopsis ecotypes.

  9. The long and short of antiviral defense: small RNA-based immunity in insects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronkhorst, A.W.; Rij, R.P. van

    2014-01-01

    The host RNA interference (RNAi) pathway of insects senses virus infection and induces an antiviral response to restrict virus replication. Dicer-2 detects viral double-stranded RNA, produced by RNA and DNA viruses, and generates viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs). Recent small RNA profiling stu

  10. Advances in targeted delivery of small interfering RNA using simple bioconjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer; Kjems, Jørgen; Sørensen, Kristine Rothaus;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Development of drugs based on RNA interference by small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been progressing slowly due to a number of challenges associated with the in vivo behavior of siRNA. A central problem is controlling siRNA delivery to specific cell types. Here, we review existing...

  11. Quantitative characteristics of gene regulation by small RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erel Levine

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of small RNAs (sRNAs have been shown to regulate critical pathways in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In bacteria, regulation by trans-encoded sRNAs is predominantly found in the coordination of intricate stress responses. The mechanisms by which sRNAs modulate expression of its targets are diverse. In common to most is the possibility that interference with the translation of mRNA targets may also alter the abundance of functional sRNAs. Aiming to understand the unique role played by sRNAs in gene regulation, we studied examples from two distinct classes of bacterial sRNAs in Escherichia coli using a quantitative approach combining experiment and theory. Our results demonstrate that sRNA provides a novel mode of gene regulation, with characteristics distinct from those of protein-mediated gene regulation. These include a threshold-linear response with a tunable threshold, a robust noise resistance characteristic, and a built-in capability for hierarchical cross-talk. Knowledge of these special features of sRNA-mediated regulation may be crucial toward understanding the subtle functions that sRNAs can play in coordinating various stress-relief pathways. Our results may also help guide the design of synthetic genetic circuits that have properties difficult to attain with protein regulators alone.

  12. Small RNA Transcriptome of the Oral Microbiome during Periodontitis Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Pinedo, Ana E; Yost, Susan; Frias-Lopez, Jorge

    2015-10-01

    The oral microbiome is one of the most complex microbial communities in the human body, and due to circumstances not completely understood, the healthy microbial community becomes dysbiotic, giving rise to periodontitis, a polymicrobial inflammatory disease. We previously reported the results of community-wide gene expression changes in the oral microbiome during periodontitis progression and identified signatures associated with increasing severity of the disease. Small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) are key players in posttranscriptional regulation, especially in fast-changing environments such as the oral cavity. Here, we expanded our analysis to the study of the sRNA metatranscriptome during periodontitis progression on the same samples for which mRNA expression changes were analyzed. We observed differential expression of 12,097 sRNAs, identifying a total of 20 Rfam sRNA families as being overrepresented in progression and 23 at baseline. Gene ontology activities regulated by the differentially expressed (DE) sRNAs included amino acid metabolism, ethanolamine catabolism, signal recognition particle-dependent cotranslational protein targeting to membrane, intron splicing, carbohydrate metabolism, control of plasmid copy number, and response to stress. In integrating patterns of expression of protein coding transcripts and sRNAs, we found that functional activities of genes that correlated positively with profiles of expression of DE sRNAs were involved in pathogenesis, proteolysis, ferrous iron transport, and oligopeptide transport. These findings represent the first integrated sequencing analysis of the community-wide sRNA transcriptome of the oral microbiome during periodontitis progression and show that sRNAs are key regulatory elements of the dysbiotic process leading to disease.

  13. Peptidomimetics with beta-peptoid resudies as carriers for intracellular delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla

    complexes with and transport small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the cell cytoplasm. These new compounds are peptidomimetic dodecamers based on alternating repeats of chiral N-alkylated ß-alanine residues (ß-peptoids) and a-amino acids with a net charge of +6. Complexes of siRNA and peptidomimetics were...

  14. Global Annotation of Small RNA and MicroRNA Mature Sequences from Developing Ovules of Gossypium hirsutum L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ABDURAKHMONOV Ibrokhim Y; DEVOR Eric J; HUANG Ling-yan; BURIEV Zabardast T; MAKAMOV Abdusalom; SHERMATOV Shukhrat E; ABDUKARIMOV Abdusattor

    2008-01-01

    @@ The involvement of small RNAs in cotton fiber development is under explored.The objective of this work was to directly clone,annotate,and analyze small RNAs of developing ovules to reveal the candidate small interfering RNA/microRNAs (siRNAs/miRNAs) involved in cotton ovule and fiber development.We cloned small RNA sequences from 0~10 days post anthesis (DPA) developing ovules of Gossypium hirsutum var.

  15. New therapeutic opportunities for Hepatitis C based on small RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-wei Pan; Scot D Henry; Bob J Scholte; Hugo W Tilanus; Harry LA Janssen; Luc JW van der Laan

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the major causes of chronic liver disease, including cirrhosis and liver cancer and is therefore, the most common indication for liver transplantation. Conventional antiviral drugs such as pegylated interferon-alpha, taken in combination with ribavirin, represent a milestone in the therapy of this disease. However, due to different viral and host factors, clinical success can be achieved only in approximately half of patients, making urgent the requirement of exploiting alternative approaches for HCV therapy. Fortunately, recent advances in the understanding of HCV viral replication and host cell interactions have opened new possibilities for therapeutic intervention. The most recent technologies, such as small interference RNA mediated gene-silencing, antisense oligonucleotides (ASO), or viral vector based gene delivery systems, have paved the way to develop novel therapeutic modalities for HCV. In this review, we outline the application of these technologies in the context of HCV therapy. Tn particular, we will focus on the newly defined role of cellular microRNA (miR-122) in viral replication and discuss its potential for HCV molecular therapy.

  16. Small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-based functional micro- and nanostructures for efficient and selective gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Hyeon; Chung, Bong Hyun; Park, Tae Gwan; Nam, Yoon Sung; Mok, Hyejung

    2012-07-17

    Because of RNA's ability to encode structure and functional information, researchers have fabricated diverse geometric structures from this polymer at the micro- and nanoscale. With their tunable structures, rigidity, and biocompatibility, novel two-dimensional and three-dimensional RNA structures can serve as a fundamental platform for biomedical applications, including engineered tissues, biosensors, and drug delivery vehicles. The discovery of the potential of small-interfering RNA (siRNA) has underscored the applications of RNA-based micro- and nanostructures in medicine. Small-interfering RNA (siRNA), synthetic double-stranded RNA consisting of approximately 21 base pairs, suppresses problematic target genes in a sequence-specific manner via inherent RNA interference (RNAi) processing. As a result, siRNA offers a potential strategy for treatment of many human diseases. However, due to inefficient delivery to cells and off-target effects, the clinical application of therapeutic siRNA has been very challenging. To address these issues, researchers have studied a variety of nanocarrier systems for siRNA delivery. In this Account, we describe several strategies for efficient siRNA delivery and selective gene silencing. We took advantage of facile chemical conjugation and complementary hybridization to design novel siRNA-based micro- and nanostructures. Using chemical crosslinkers and hydrophobic/hydrophilic polymers at the end of siRNA, we produced various RNA-based structures, including siRNA block copolymers, micelles, linear siRNA homopolymers, and microhydrogels. Because of their increased charge density and flexibility compared with conventional siRNA, these micro- and nanostructures can form polyelectrolyte complexes with poorly charged and biocompatible cationic carriers that are both more condensed and more homogenous than the complexes formed in other carrier systems. In addition, the fabricated siRNA-based structures are linked by cleavable disulfide

  17. Small RNA transcriptome investigation based on next-generation sequencing technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linglin Zhou; Xueying Li; Qi Liu; Fangqing Zhao; Jinyu Wu

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade,there has been a growing realization that studying the small RNA transcriptome is essential for understanding the complexity of transcriptional regulation.With an increased throughput and a reduced cost,next-generation sequencing technology has provided an unprecedented opportunity to measure the extent and complexity of small RNA transcriptome.Meanwhile,the large amount of obtained data and varied technology platforms have also posed multiple challenges for effective data analysis and mining.To provide some insight into the small RNA transcriptome investigation,this review describes the major small RNA classes,experimental methods to identify small RNAs,and available bioinformatics tools and databases.

  18. miRge - A Multiplexed Method of Processing Small RNA-Seq Data to Determine MicroRNA Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S Baras

    Full Text Available Small RNA RNA-seq for microRNAs (miRNAs is a rapidly developing field where opportunities still exist to create better bioinformatics tools to process these large datasets and generate new, useful analyses. We built miRge to be a fast, smart small RNA-seq solution to process samples in a highly multiplexed fashion. miRge employs a Bayesian alignment approach, whereby reads are sequentially aligned against customized mature miRNA, hairpin miRNA, noncoding RNA and mRNA sequence libraries. miRNAs are summarized at the level of raw reads in addition to reads per million (RPM. Reads for all other RNA species (tRNA, rRNA, snoRNA, mRNA are provided, which is useful for identifying potential contaminants and optimizing small RNA purification strategies. miRge was designed to optimally identify miRNA isomiRs and employs an entropy based statistical measurement to identify differential production of isomiRs. This allowed us to identify decreasing entropy in isomiRs as stem cells mature into retinal pigment epithelial cells. Conversely, we show that pancreatic tumor miRNAs have similar entropy to matched normal pancreatic tissues. In a head-to-head comparison with other miRNA analysis tools (miRExpress 2.0, sRNAbench, omiRAs, miRDeep2, Chimira, UEA small RNA Workbench, miRge was faster (4 to 32-fold and was among the top-two methods in maximally aligning miRNAs reads per sample. Moreover, miRge has no inherent limits to its multiplexing. miRge was capable of simultaneously analyzing 100 small RNA-Seq samples in 52 minutes, providing an integrated analysis of miRNA expression across all samples. As miRge was designed for analysis of single as well as multiple samples, miRge is an ideal tool for high and low-throughput users. miRge is freely available at http://atlas.pathology.jhu.edu/baras/miRge.html.

  19. High-Level Accumulation of Exogenous Small RNAs Not Affecting Endogenous Small RNA Biogenesis and Function in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wan-xia; Neil A Smith; ZHOU Chang-yong; WANG Ming-bo

    2014-01-01

    RNA silencing is a fundamental plant defence and gene control mechanism in plants that are directed by 20-24 nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). Infection of plants with viral pathogens or transformation of plants with RNA interference (RNAi) constructs is usually associated with high levels of exogenous siRNAs, but it is unclear if these siRNAs interfere with endogenous small RNA pathways and hence affect plant development. Here we provide evidence that viral satellite RNA (satRNA) infection does not affect siRNA and miRNA biogenesis or plant growth despite the extremely high level of satRNA-derived siRNAs. We generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that no longer develop the speciifc yellowing symptoms generally associated with infection by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y-satellite RNA (Y-Sat). We then used these plants to show that CMV Y-Sat infection did not cause any visible phenotypic changes in comparison to uninfected plants, despite the presence of high-level Y-Sat siRNAs. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of hairpin RNA (hpRNA)-derived siRNAs or miRNAs, and the level of siRNA-directed transgene silencing, are not signiifcantly affected by CMV Y-Sat infection. Taken together, our results suggest that the high levels of exogenous siRNAs associated with viral infection or RNAi-inducing transgenes do not saturate the endogenous RNA silencing machineries and have no signiifcant impact on normal plant development.

  20. Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Activity of Small Interfering RNA Targeting the Conserved RNA Termini of Lassa Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Stefanie; Günther, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs targeting the conserved RNA termini upstream of NP and L gene were found to reduce reporter gene expression from Lassa virus replicon and Lassa virus mRNA expression construct and to inhibit replication of different Lassa virus strains, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, and Mopeia virus in cell culture.

  1. Transcription of the major neurospora crassa microRNA-like small RNAs relies on RNA polymerase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuying Yang

    Full Text Available Most plant and animal microRNAs (miRNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. We previously discovered miRNA-like small RNAs (milRNAs in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa and uncovered at least four different pathways for milRNA production. To understand the evolutionary origin of milRNAs, we determined the roles of polymerases II and III (Pol II and Pol III in milRNA transcription. Our results show that Pol III is responsible for the transcription of the major milRNAs produced in this organism. The inhibition of Pol III activity by an inhibitor or by gene silencing abolishes the production of most abundant milRNAs and pri-milRNAs. In addition, Pol III associates with these milRNA producing loci. Even though silencing of Pol II does not affect the synthesis of the most abundant milRNAs, Pol II or both Pol II and Pol III are associated with some milRNA-producing loci, suggesting a regulatory interaction between the two polymerases for some milRNA transcription. Furthermore, we show that one of the Pol III-transcribed milRNAs is derived from a tRNA precursor, and its biogenesis requires RNase Z, which cleaves the tRNA moiety to generate pre-milRNA. Our study identifies the transcriptional machinery responsible for the synthesis of fungal milRNAs and sheds light on the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic small RNAs.

  2. Small RNA Library Cloning Procedure for Deep Sequencing of Specific Endogenous siRNA Classes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow, Maria C.; Lau, Nelson C.; Hall, Sarah E.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, distinct classes of small RNAs ranging in size from ~21 to 26 nucleotides have been discovered and shown to play important roles in a wide array of cellular functions. Because of the abundance of these small RNAs, library preparation from an RNA sample followed by deep sequencing provides the identity and quantity of a particular class of small RNAs. In this chapter we describe a detailed protocol for preparing small RNA libraries for deep sequencing on the Illumina platform from the nematode C. elegans. PMID:24920360

  3. Myelin basic protein synthesis is regulated by small non-coding RNA 715.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nina M; Moos, Christina; van Horssen, Jack; Witte, Maarten; van der Valk, Paul; Altenhein, Benjamin; Luhmann, Heiko J; White, Robin

    2012-09-01

    Oligodendroglial Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) synthesis is essential for myelin formation in the central nervous system. During oligodendrocyte differentiation, MBP mRNA is kept in a translationally silenced state while intracellularly transported, until neuron-derived signals initiate localized MBP translation. Here we identify the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715) as an inhibitor of MBP translation. SncRNA715 localizes to cytoplasmic granular structures and associates with MBP mRNA transport granule components. We also detect increased levels of sncRNA715 in demyelinated chronic human multiple sclerosis lesions, which contain MBP mRNA but lack MBP protein.

  4. Methods to enable the design of bioactive small molecules targeting RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disney, Matthew D.; Yildirim, Ilyas; Childs-Disney, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA is an immensely important target for small molecule therapeutics or chemical probes of function. However, methods that identify, annotate, and optimize RNA-small molecule interactions that could enable the design of compounds that modulate RNA function are in their infancies. This review describes recent approaches that have been developed to understand and optimize RNA motif-small molecule interactions, including Structure-Activity Relationships Through Sequencing (StARTS), quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR), chemical similarity searching, structure-based design and docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Case studies described include the design of small molecules targeting RNA expansions, the bacterial A-site, viral RNAs, and telomerase RNA. These approaches can be combined to afford a synergistic method to exploit the myriad of RNA targets in the transcriptome. PMID:24357181

  5. Targeting Th17 Cells with Small Molecules and Small Interference RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Song, Pingfang; Zhao, Yi; Xue, Li-Jia; Liu, Yi; Chu, Cong-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells play a central role in inflammatory and autoimmune diseases via the production of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin- (IL-) 17, IL-17F, and IL-22. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibodies show potent efficacy in psoriasis but poor effect in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and Crohn's disease. Alternative agents targeting Th17 cells may be a better way to inhibit the development and function of Th17 cells than antibodies of blocking a single effector cytokine. Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) which acts as the master transcription factor of Th17 differentiation has been an attractive pharmacologic target for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune disease. Recent progress in technology of chemical screen and engineering nucleic acid enable two new classes of therapeutics targeting RORγt. Chemical screen technology identified several small molecule specific inhibitors of RORγt from a small molecule library. Systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) technology enabled target specific aptamers to be isolated from a random sequence oligonucleotide library. In this review, we highlight the development and therapeutic potential of small molecules inhibiting Th17 cells by targeting RORγt and aptamer mediated CD4(+) T cell specific delivery of small interference RNA against RORγt gene expression to inhibit pathogenic effector functions of Th17 lineage.

  6. Global small RNA chaperone Hfq and regulatory small RNAs are important virulence regulators in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Quan; McNally, R Ryan; Sundin, George W

    2013-04-01

    Hfq is a global small RNA (sRNA) chaperone that interacts with Hfq-regulated sRNAs and functions in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. In this work, we identified Hfq to be a virulence regulator in the Gram-negative fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Deletion of hfq in E. amylovora Ea1189 significantly reduced bacterial virulence in both immature pear fruits and apple shoots. Analysis of virulence determinants in strain Ea1189Δhfq showed that Hfq exerts pleiotropic regulation of amylovoran exopolysaccharide production, biofilm formation, motility, and the type III secretion system (T3SS). Further characterization of biofilm regulation by Hfq demonstrated that Hfq limits bacterial attachment to solid surfaces while promoting biofilm maturation. Characterization of T3SS regulation by Hfq revealed that Hfq positively regulates the translocation and secretion of the major type III effector DspE and negatively controls the secretion of the putative translocator HrpK and the type III effector Eop1. Lastly, 10 Hfq-regulated sRNAs were identified using a computational method, and two of these sRNAs, RprA and RyhA, were found to be required for the full virulence of E. amylovora.

  7. Diverse evolutionary trajectories for small RNA biogenesis genes in the oomycete genus Phytophthora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene regulation by small RNA pathways is ubiquitous among eukaryotes, but little is known about small RNA pathways in the Stramenopile kingdom. Phytophthora, a genus of filamentous oomycetes, contains many devastating plant pathogens, causing multibillion-dollar damage to crops, ornamental plants, ...

  8. Cardiac Gene Expression Knockdown Using Small Inhibitory RNA-Loaded Microbubbles and Ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference has potential therapeutic value for cardiac disease, but targeted delivery of interfering RNA is a challenge. Custom designed microbubbles, in conjunction with ultrasound, can deliver small inhibitory RNA to target tissues in vivo. The efficacy of cardiac RNA interference using a microbubble-ultrasound theranostic platform has not been demonstrated in vivo. Therefore, our objective was to test the hypothesis that custom designed microbubbles and ultrasound can mediate effecti...

  9. Defining RNA–Small Molecule Affinity Landscapes Enables Design of a Small Molecule Inhibitor of an Oncogenic Noncoding RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    RNA drug targets are pervasive in cells, but methods to design small molecules that target them are sparse. Herein, we report a general approach to score the affinity and selectivity of RNA motif–small molecule interactions identified via selection. Named High Throughput Structure–Activity Relationships Through Sequencing (HiT-StARTS), HiT-StARTS is statistical in nature and compares input nucleic acid sequences to selected library members that bind a ligand via high throughput sequencing. The approach allowed facile definition of the fitness landscape of hundreds of thousands of RNA motif–small molecule binding partners. These results were mined against folded RNAs in the human transcriptome and identified an avid interaction between a small molecule and the Dicer nuclease-processing site in the oncogenic microRNA (miR)-18a hairpin precursor, which is a member of the miR-17-92 cluster. Application of the small molecule, Targapremir-18a, to prostate cancer cells inhibited production of miR-18a from the cluster, de-repressed serine/threonine protein kinase 4 protein (STK4), and triggered apoptosis. Profiling the cellular targets of Targapremir-18a via Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull Down (Chem-CLIP), a covalent small molecule–RNA cellular profiling approach, and other studies showed specific binding of the compound to the miR-18a precursor, revealing broadly applicable factors that govern small molecule drugging of noncoding RNAs.

  10. MicroRNA Expression Profile in Penile Cancer Revealed by Next-Generation Small RNA Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    Full Text Available Penile cancer (PeCa is a relatively rare tumor entity but possesses higher morbidity and mortality rates especially in developing countries. To date, the concrete pathogenic signaling pathways and core machineries involved in tumorigenesis and progression of PeCa remain to be elucidated. Several studies suggested miRNAs, which modulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level, were frequently mis-regulated and aberrantly expressed in human cancers. However, the miRNA profile in human PeCa has not been reported before. In this present study, the miRNA profile was obtained from 10 fresh penile cancerous tissues and matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues via next-generation sequencing. As a result, a total of 751 and 806 annotated miRNAs were identified in normal and cancerous penile tissues, respectively. Among which, 56 miRNAs with significantly different expression levels between paired tissues were identified. Subsequently, several annotated miRNAs were selected randomly and validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Compared with the previous publications regarding to the altered miRNAs expression in various cancers and especially genitourinary (prostate, bladder, kidney, testis cancers, the most majority of deregulated miRNAs showed the similar expression pattern in penile cancer. Moreover, the bioinformatics analyses suggested that the putative target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs between cancerous and matched normal penile tissues were tightly associated with cell junction, proliferation, growth as well as genomic instability and so on, by modulating Wnt, MAPK, p53, PI3K-Akt, Notch and TGF-β signaling pathways, which were all well-established to participate in cancer initiation and progression. Our work presents a global view of the differentially expressed miRNAs and potentially regulatory networks of their target genes for clarifying the pathogenic transformation of normal penis to PeCa, which research resource also

  11. Intersection of small RNA pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana sub-nuclear domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Pontes

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis thaliana, functionally diverse small RNA (smRNA pathways bring about decreased RNA accumulation of target genes via several different mechanisms. Cytological experiments have suggested that the processing of microRNAs (miRNAs and heterochromatic small interfering RNAs (hc-siRNAs occurs within a specific nuclear domain that can present Cajal Body (CB characteristics. It is unclear whether single or multiple smRNA-related domains are found within the same CB and how specialization of the smRNA pathways is determined within this specific sub-compartment. To ascertain whether nuclear smRNA centers are spatially related, we localized key proteins required for siRNA or miRNA biogenesis by immunofluorescence analysis. The intranuclear distribution of the proteins revealed that hc-siRNA, miRNA and trans-acting siRNA (ta-siRNA pathway proteins accumulate and colocalize within a sub-nuclear structure in the nucleolar periphery. Furthermore, colocalization of miRNA- and siRNA-pathway members with CB markers, and reduced wild-type localization patterns in CB mutants indicates that proper nuclear localization of these proteins requires CB integrity. We hypothesize that these nuclear domains could be important for RNA silencing and may partially explain the functional redundancies and interactions among components of the same protein family. The CB may be the place in the nucleus where Dicer-generated smRNA precursors are processed and assigned to a specific pathway, and where storage, recycling or assembly of RNA interference components takes place.

  12. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Valli

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  13. Extent, causes, and consequences of small RNA expression variation in human adipose tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopold Parts

    Full Text Available Small RNAs are functional molecules that modulate mRNA transcripts and have been implicated in the aetiology of several common diseases. However, little is known about the extent of their variability within the human population. Here, we characterise the extent, causes, and effects of naturally occurring variation in expression and sequence of small RNAs from adipose tissue in relation to genotype, gene expression, and metabolic traits in the MuTHER reference cohort. We profiled the expression of 15 to 30 base pair RNA molecules in subcutaneous adipose tissue from 131 individuals using high-throughput sequencing, and quantified levels of 591 microRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs. We identified three genetic variants and three RNA editing events. Highly expressed small RNAs are more conserved within mammals than average, as are those with highly variable expression. We identified 14 genetic loci significantly associated with nearby small RNA expression levels, seven of which also regulate an mRNA transcript level in the same region. In addition, these loci are enriched for variants significant in genome-wide association studies for body mass index. Contrary to expectation, we found no evidence for negative correlation between expression level of a microRNA and its target mRNAs. Trunk fat mass, body mass index, and fasting insulin were associated with more than twenty small RNA expression levels each, while fasting glucose had no significant associations. This study highlights the similar genetic complexity and shared genetic control of small RNA and mRNA transcripts, and gives a quantitative picture of small RNA expression variation in the human population.

  14. Extent, Causes, and Consequences of Small RNA Expression Variation in Human Adipose Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knights, Andrew J.; Abreu-Goodger, Cei; van de Bunt, Martijn; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Bartonicek, Nenad; van Dongen, Stijn; Mägi, Reedik; Nisbet, James; Barrett, Amy; Rantalainen, Mattias; Nica, Alexandra C.; Quail, Michael A.; Small, Kerrin S.; Glass, Daniel; Enright, Anton J.; Winn, John; Deloukas, Panos; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Spector, Timothy D.; Durbin, Richard; Lindgren, Cecilia M.

    2012-01-01

    Small RNAs are functional molecules that modulate mRNA transcripts and have been implicated in the aetiology of several common diseases. However, little is known about the extent of their variability within the human population. Here, we characterise the extent, causes, and effects of naturally occurring variation in expression and sequence of small RNAs from adipose tissue in relation to genotype, gene expression, and metabolic traits in the MuTHER reference cohort. We profiled the expression of 15 to 30 base pair RNA molecules in subcutaneous adipose tissue from 131 individuals using high-throughput sequencing, and quantified levels of 591 microRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs. We identified three genetic variants and three RNA editing events. Highly expressed small RNAs are more conserved within mammals than average, as are those with highly variable expression. We identified 14 genetic loci significantly associated with nearby small RNA expression levels, seven of which also regulate an mRNA transcript level in the same region. In addition, these loci are enriched for variants significant in genome-wide association studies for body mass index. Contrary to expectation, we found no evidence for negative correlation between expression level of a microRNA and its target mRNAs. Trunk fat mass, body mass index, and fasting insulin were associated with more than twenty small RNA expression levels each, while fasting glucose had no significant associations. This study highlights the similar genetic complexity and shared genetic control of small RNA and mRNA transcripts, and gives a quantitative picture of small RNA expression variation in the human population. PMID:22589741

  15. Small interfering RNA delivery by polyethylenimine-functionalised porous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh Kafshgari, M; Alnakhli, M; Delalat, B; Apostolou, S; Harding, F J; Mäkilä, E; Salonen, J J; Kuss, B J; Voelcker, N H

    2015-12-01

    In this study, thermally hydrocarbonised porous silicon nanoparticles (THCpSiNPs) capped with polyethylenimine (PEI) were fabricated, and their potential for small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery was investigated in an in vitro glioblastoma model. PEI coating following siRNA loading enhanced the sustained release of siRNA, and suppressed burst release effects. The positively-charged surface improved the internalisation of the nanoparticles across the cell membrane. THCpSiNP-mediated siRNA delivery reduced mRNA expression of the MRP1 gene, linked to the resistence of glioblastoma to chemotherapy, by 63% and reduced MRP1-protein levels by 70%. MRP1 siRNA loaded nanoparticles did not induce cytotoxicity in glioblastoma cells, but markedly reduced cell proliferation. In summary, the results demonstrated that non-cytotoxic cationic THCpSiNPs are promising vehicles for therapeutic siRNA delivery.

  16. MicroRNAs and other small RNAs enriched in the Arabidopsis RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-2 mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng; Kulkarni, Karthik; Souret, Frédéric F.; MuthuValliappan, Ramesh; Tej, Shivakundan Singh; Poethig, R. Scott; Henderson, Ian R.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Wang, Wenzhong; Green, Pamela J.; Meyers, Blake C.

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains a highly complex and abundant population of small RNAs, and many of the endogenous siRNAs are dependent on RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase 2 (RDR2) for their biogenesis. By analyzing an rdr2 loss-of-function mutant using two different parallel sequencing technologies, MPSS and 454, we characterized the complement of miRNAs expressed in Arabidopsis inflorescence to considerable depth. Nearly all known miRNAs were enriched in this mutant and we identified 13 new miRNAs, all of which were relatively low abundance and constitute new families. Trans-acting siRNAs (ta-siRNAs) were even more highly enriched. Computational and gel blot analyses suggested that the minimal number of miRNAs in Arabidopsis is ∼155. The size profile of small RNAs in rdr2 reflected enrichment of 21-nt miRNAs and other classes of siRNAs like ta-siRNAs, and a significant reduction in 24-nt heterochromatic siRNAs. Other classes of small RNAs were found to be RDR2-independent, particularly those derived from long inverted repeats and a subset of tandem repeats. The small RNA populations in other Arabidopsis small RNA biogenesis mutants were also examined; a dcl2/3/4 triple mutant showed a similar pattern to rdr2, whereas dcl1–7 and rdr6 showed reductions in miRNAs and ta-siRNAs consistent with their activities in the biogenesis of these types of small RNAs. Deep sequencing of mutants provides a genetic approach for the dissection and characterization of diverse small RNA populations and the identification of low abundance miRNAs. PMID:16954541

  17. Modeling RNA topological structures using small angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Yuba R; Jiang, Wei; Stahlberg, Eric A; Stagno, Jason R; Wang, Yun-Xing

    2016-07-01

    Detailed understanding of the structure and function relationship of RNA requires knowledge about RNA three-dimensional (3D) topological folding. However, there are very few unique RNA entries in structure databases. This is due to challenges in determining 3D structures of RNA using conventional methods, such as X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy, despite significant advances in both of these technologies. Computational methods have come a long way in accurately predicting the 3D structures of small (topological structures, including a new method that combines secondary structural information and SAXS data to sample conformations generated through hierarchical moves of commonly observed RNA motifs.

  18. Initiation of RNA Polymerization and Polymerase Encapsidation by a Small dsRNA Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Collier

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During the replication cycle of double-stranded (ds RNA viruses, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP replicates and transcribes the viral genome from within the viral capsid. How the RdRP molecules are packaged within the virion and how they function within the confines of an intact capsid are intriguing questions with answers that most likely vary across the different dsRNA virus families. In this study, we have determined a 2.4 Å resolution structure of an RdRP from the human picobirnavirus (hPBV. In addition to the conserved polymerase fold, the hPBV RdRP possesses a highly flexible 24 amino acid loop structure located near the C-terminus of the protein that is inserted into its active site. In vitro RNA polymerization assays and site-directed mutagenesis showed that: (1 the hPBV RdRP is fully active using both ssRNA and dsRNA templates; (2 the insertion loop likely functions as an assembly platform for the priming nucleotide to allow de novo initiation; (3 RNA transcription by the hPBV RdRP proceeds in a semi-conservative manner; and (4 the preference of virus-specific RNA during transcription is dictated by the lower melting temperature associated with the terminal sequences. Co-expression of the hPBV RdRP and the capsid protein (CP indicated that, under the conditions used, the RdRP could not be incorporated into the recombinant capsids in the absence of the viral genome. Additionally, the hPBV RdRP exhibited higher affinity towards the conserved 5'-terminal sequence of the viral RNA, suggesting that the RdRP molecules may be encapsidated through their specific binding to the viral RNAs during assembly.

  19. Class II antigen-associated invariant chain mRNA in mouse small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, A J; Frederick, D; Hagen, S J; Katz, J D

    1991-09-30

    MHC class II antigen-associated invariant (Ii) chain mRNA appears in mouse small intestine during postnatal development. Ii chain cDNA hybridizes to RNA from epithelial sheets dissociated from the lamina propria with EDTA. Of several mouse organs tested, only bone marrow and spleen contain higher levels of Ii chain mRNA than small bowel. Ii chain mRNA is not detected in stomach, colon, duodenum, testis, liver, submandibular gland, or L-cell RNA; brain contains a cross-reactive but uncharacterized sequence. cDNA amplification using primers specific for both Ii31 and Ii41 chain mRNAs showed that both forms occur in small intestine. These results support the conclusion that regulation of the class II Ii chain gene is associated with the ontogeny of intestinal immunity.

  20. Small RNA sequencing reveals a comprehensive miRNA signature of BRCA1-associated high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Jan; Kluiver, Joost; de Almeida, Rodrigo C; Modderman, Rutger; Terpstra, Miente Martijn; Kok, Klaas; Withoff, Sebo; Hollema, Harry; Reitsma, Welmoed; de Bock, Geertruida H; Mourits, Marian J E; van den Berg, Anke

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: BRCA1 mutation carriers are at increased risk of developing high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC), a malignancy that originates from fallopian tube epithelium. We aimed to identify differentially expressed known and novel miRNAs in BRCA1-associated HGSOC. METHODS: Small RNA sequencing was p

  1. Small RNA sequencing reveals a comprehensive miRNA signature of BRCA1-associated high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Jan; Kluiver, Joost; de Almeida, Rodrigo C.; Modderman, Rutger; Terpstra, Miente Martijn; Kok, Klaas; Withoff, Sebo; Hollema, Harry; Reitsma, Welmoed; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Mourits, Marian J. E.; van den Berg, Anke

    2016-01-01

    AimsBRCA1 mutation carriers are at increased risk of developing high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC), a malignancy that originates from fallopian tube epithelium. We aimed to identify differentially expressed known and novel miRNAs in BRCA1-associated HGSOC. Methods Small RNA sequencing was perf

  2. Spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs of Tetrahymena thermophila and some possible snRNA-snRNA base-pairing interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, H; Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1991-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the full set of spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs; U1, U2, U4, U5 and U6) from the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. With the exception of U4 snRNA, the sizes of the T. thermophila snRNAs are closely similar to their metazoan homologues. The T...

  3. MicroRNA: a small molecule with a big biological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaofeng; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2012-01-01

    One of the most significant achievements in biological science in the last decade is the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi), a process within living cells that regulates gene expression at post-transcriptional levels. Historically, this process was described by other more generic names, such as co-suppression and post transcriptional gene silencing. Only after the molecular mechanism underlying these apparently unrelated processes was fully understood did it become apparent that they all described the RNAi phenomenon. In 2006, Dr. Andrew Fire and Dr. Craig C. Mello were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their work on RNAi interference. RNAi is an RNA-dependent gene silencing process that is controlled by the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) and is initiated by two types of small RNA molecules - microRNA (miRNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA). However, the function of microRNA appears to be far beyond RNAi alone, including direct interaction with the gene promoter and epigenetic regulation of the DNA methylation and histone modification. By regulating gene expression, miRNAs are likely to be involved in diverse biological activities, such as tumorigenesis, immune response, insulin secretion, neurotransmitter synthesis, and circadian rhythm, to name a few. MicroRNAs are 21-23 nucleotide single stranded RNA molecules found in eukaryotic cells. The first miRNA, lin-4, was characterized in C. elegans in the early 1990s [1]. In the early years, the progress on microRNA research was slow and experienced substantial growing pains. The short length and uniqueness of each microRNA rendered many conventional hybridization based methods ineffective; very small RNAs are difficult to reliably amplify or label without introducing bias. In addition, hybridization-based methods for microRNA profiling relied on probes designed to detect known microRNAs or known microRNA species previously identified by sequencing or homology search. Recent evidence of

  4. Sustained Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Inhibition in Primary Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can induce potent gene silencing by degradation of cognate mRNA. However, in dividing cells, the silencing lasts only 3 to 7 days, presumably because of siRNA dilution with cell division. Here, we investigated if sustained siRNA-mediated silencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is possible in terminally differentiated macrophages, which constitute an important reservoir of HIV in vivo. CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor...

  5. Fluorescent tag is not a reliable marker for small RNA transfection in the presence of serum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing Han; Qi-Wei Wang; Shi-Qiang Wang

    2013-09-01

    Chemically synthetic siRNA and miRNA have become powerful tools to study gene function in the past decade. Fluorescent dyes covalently attached to the 5′ or 3′ ends of synthetic small RNAs are widely used for fluorescently imaging and detection of these RNAs. However, the reliability of fluorescent tags as small RNA markers in different conditions has not attracted enough attention. We used Cy3-labelled small RNAs to explore the reliability of fluorescent tags as small RNA markers in cell cultures involving serum. A strong Cy3-fluorescence signal was observed in the cytoplasm of the cells transfected with Cy3-miR24 in the culture medium containing fetal bovine serum (FBS), but qRT-PCR results showed that little miR24 were detected in these cells. Further study demonstrated that small RNAs were degraded in the presence of FBS, suggesting that it was Cy3-RNA fragments, rather than the original Cy3-miR24, diffused into cells. These phenomena disappeared when FBS was replaced by boiled-FBS, further supporting that the Cy3-fluorescence we observed in cells in the presence of FBS could not represent the presence of intact small RNAs. These findings addressed that fluorescent tags are not reliable for small RNA transfection in the presence of serum in culture.

  6. YM500v3: a database for small RNA sequencing in human cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, I-Fang; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Chen, Chen-Yang; Liu, Shu-Hsuan; Li, Chia-Yang; Chan, Chia-Hao; Shih, Chuan-Chi; Cheng, Wei-Chung

    2017-01-01

    We previously presented the YM500 database, which contains >8000 small RNA sequencing (smRNA-seq) data sets and integrated analysis results for various cancer miRNome studies. In the updated YM500v3 database (http://ngs.ym.edu.tw/ym500/) presented herein, we not only focus on miRNAs but also on other functional small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs), such as PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), tRNA-derived fragments (tRFs), small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) and small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). There is growing knowledge of the role of sncRNAs in gene regulation and tumorigenesis. We have also incorporated >10 000 cancer-related RNA-seq and >3000 more smRNA-seq data sets into the YM500v3 database. Furthermore, there are two main new sections, ‘Survival' and ‘Cancer', in this updated version. The ‘Survival’ section provides the survival analysis results in all cancer types or in a user-defined group of samples for a specific sncRNA. The ‘Cancer’ section provides the results of differential expression analyses, miRNA–gene interactions and cancer miRNA-related pathways. In the ‘Expression’ section, sncRNA expression profiles across cancer and sample types are newly provided. Cancer-related sncRNAs hold potential for both biotech applications and basic research. PMID:27899625

  7. Nucleic acids encoding phloem small RNA-binding proteins and transgenic plants comprising them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, William J.; Yoo, Byung-Chun; Lough, Tony J.; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika

    2007-03-13

    The present invention provides a polynucleotide sequence encoding a component of the protein machinery involved in small RNA trafficking, Cucurbita maxima phloem small RNA-binding protein (CmPSRB 1), and the corresponding polypeptide sequence. The invention also provides genetic constructs and transgenic plants comprising the polynucleotide sequence encoding a phloem small RNA-binding protein to alter (e.g., prevent, reduce or elevate) non-cell autonomous signaling events in the plants involving small RNA metabolism. These signaling events are involved in a broad spectrum of plant physiological and biochemical processes, including, for example, systemic resistance to pathogens, responses to environmental stresses, e.g., heat, drought, salinity, and systemic gene silencing (e.g., viral infections).

  8. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Fahlgren

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  9. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R; Kasschau, Kristin D; Cuperus, Josh T; Press, Caroline M; Sullivan, Christopher M; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Hoyer, J Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Carrington, James C

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  10. PSRna: Prediction of small RNA secondary structures based on reverse complementary folding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Xu, Chengzhen; Wang, Lei; Liang, Hong; Feng, Weixing; Cai, Zhongxi; Wang, Ying; Cong, Wang; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structures is an important problem in computational biology and bioinformatics, since RNA secondary structures are fundamental for functional analysis of RNA molecules. However, small RNA secondary structures are scarce and few algorithms have been specifically designed for predicting the secondary structures of small RNAs. Here we propose an algorithm named "PSRna" for predicting small-RNA secondary structures using reverse complementary folding and characteristic hairpin loops of small RNAs. Unlike traditional algorithms that usually generate multi-branch loops and 5[Formula: see text] end self-folding, PSRna first estimated the maximum number of base pairs of RNA secondary structures based on the dynamic programming algorithm and a path matrix is constructed at the same time. Second, the backtracking paths are extracted from the path matrix based on backtracking algorithm, and each backtracking path represents a secondary structure. To improve accuracy, the predicted RNA secondary structures are filtered based on their free energy, where only the secondary structure with the minimum free energy was identified as the candidate secondary structure. Our experiments on real data show that the proposed algorithm is superior to two popular methods, RNAfold and RNAstructure, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC).

  11. Final report for ER65039, The Role of Small RNA in Biomass Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, Matthew E. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2015-03-12

    Our objective in this project was to discover the role of sRNA in regulating both biomass biosynthesis and perenniality in the Andropogoneae feedstock grasses. Our central hypothesis was that there is a time-and space specific sRNA network playing a crucial role in regulating processes associated with cell wall biosynthesis, flowering time control, overwintering/juvenility, and nutrient sequestration in the feedstock grasses. To address this, we performed a large scale biological project consisting of the growth of material, generation of Illumina libraries, sequencing and analysis for small RNA, mRNA and Degradome / cmRNA. Our subsidiary objectives included analysis of the biology of small RNAs and the cell wall composition of Miscanthus. These objectives have all been completed, one publication is in print, one is submitted and several more are in progress.

  12. Total Extracellular Small RNA Profiles from Plasma, Saliva, and Urine of Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeri, Ashish; Courtright, Amanda; Reiman, Rebecca; Carlson, Elizabeth; Beecroft, Taylor; Janss, Alex; Siniard, Ashley; Richholt, Ryan; Balak, Chris; Rozowsky, Joel; Kitchen, Robert; Hutchins, Elizabeth; Winarta, Joseph; McCoy, Roger; Anastasi, Matthew; Kim, Seungchan; Huentelman, Matthew; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Interest in circulating RNAs for monitoring and diagnosing human health has grown significantly. There are few datasets describing baseline expression levels for total cell-free circulating RNA from healthy control subjects. In this study, total extracellular RNA (exRNA) was isolated and sequenced from 183 plasma samples, 204 urine samples and 46 saliva samples from 55 male college athletes ages 18–25 years. Many participants provided more than one sample, allowing us to investigate variability in an individual’s exRNA expression levels over time. Here we provide a systematic analysis of small exRNAs present in each biofluid, as well as an analysis of exogenous RNAs. The small RNA profile of each biofluid is distinct. We find that a large number of RNA fragments in plasma (63%) and urine (54%) have sequences that are assigned to YRNA and tRNA fragments respectively. Surprisingly, while many miRNAs can be detected, there are few miRNAs that are consistently detected in all samples from a single biofluid, and profiles of miRNA are different for each biofluid. Not unexpectedly, saliva samples have high levels of exogenous sequence that can be traced to bacteria. These data significantly contribute to the current number of sequenced exRNA samples from normal healthy individuals. PMID:28303895

  13. Selection and characterization of small molecules that bind the HIV-1 frameshift site RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcheschi, Ryan J; Mouzakis, Kathryn D; Butcher, Samuel E

    2009-10-16

    HIV-1 requires a -1 translational frameshift to properly synthesize the viral enzymes required for replication. The frameshift mechanism is dependent upon two RNA elements, a seven-nucleotide slippery sequence (UUUUUUA) and a downstream RNA structure. Frameshifting occurs with a frequency of approximately 5%, and increasing or decreasing this frequency may result in a decrease in viral replication. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput screen designed to find small molecules that bind to the HIV-1 frameshift site RNA. Out of 34,500 compounds screened, 202 were identified as positive hits. We show that one of these compounds, doxorubicin, binds the HIV-1 RNA with low micromolar affinity (K(d) = 2.8 microM). This binding was confirmed and localized to the RNA using NMR. Further analysis revealed that this compound increased the RNA stability by approximately 5 degrees C and decreased translational frameshifting by 28% (+/-14%), as measured in vitro.

  14. Battle for the bulge: directing small molecules to DNA and RNA defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2002-08-01

    Small molecules were tailored to specifically bind bulged DNA by complementing the geometry and nucleotide size of the bulge site. The prospect of generating small molecules that influence the secondary structure of DNA and RNA holds great promise for clinical applications.

  15. Bias in ligation-based small RNA sequencing library construction is determined by adaptor and RNA structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan T Fuchs

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing (HTS has become a powerful tool for the detection of and sequence characterization of microRNAs (miRNA and other small RNAs (sRNA. Unfortunately, the use of HTS data to determine the relative quantity of different miRNAs in a sample has been shown to be inconsistent with quantitative PCR and Northern Blot results. Several recent studies have concluded that the major contributor to this inconsistency is bias introduced during the construction of sRNA libraries for HTS and that the bias is primarily derived from the adaptor ligation steps, specifically where single stranded adaptors are sequentially ligated to the 3' and 5'-end of sRNAs using T4 RNA ligases. In this study we investigated the effects of ligation bias by using a pool of randomized ligation substrates, defined mixtures of miRNA sequences and several combinations of adaptors in HTS library construction. We show that like the 3' adaptor ligation step, the 5' adaptor ligation is also biased, not because of primary sequence, but instead due to secondary structures of the two ligation substrates. We find that multiple secondary structural factors influence final representation in HTS results. Our results provide insight about the nature of ligation bias and allowed us to design adaptors that reduce ligation bias and produce HTS results that more accurately reflect the actual concentrations of miRNAs in the defined starting material.

  16. Silencing-associated and meiosis-specific small RNA pathways in Paramecium tetraurelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepère, Gersende; Nowacki, Mariusz; Serrano, Vincent; Gout, Jean-François; Guglielmi, Gérard; Duharcourt, Sandra; Meyer, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Distinct small RNA pathways are involved in the two types of homology-dependent effects described in Paramecium tetraurelia, as shown by a functional analysis of Dicer and Dicer-like genes and by the sequencing of small RNAs. The siRNAs that mediate post-transcriptional gene silencing when cells are fed with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) were found to comprise two subclasses. DCR1-dependent cleavage of the inducing dsRNA generates ∼23-nt primary siRNAs from both strands, while a different subclass of ∼24-nt RNAs, characterized by a short untemplated poly-A tail, is strictly antisense to the targeted mRNA, suggestive of secondary siRNAs that depend on an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. An entirely distinct pathway is responsible for homology-dependent regulation of developmental genome rearrangements after sexual reproduction. During early meiosis, the DCL2 and DCL3 genes are required for the production of a highly complex population of ∼25-nt scnRNAs from all types of germline sequences, including both strands of exons, introns, intergenic regions, transposons and Internal Eliminated Sequences. A prominent 5′-UNG signature, and a minor fraction showing the complementary signature at positions 21–23, indicate that scnRNAs are cleaved from dsRNA precursors as duplexes with 2-nt 3′ overhangs at both ends, followed by preferential stabilization of the 5′-UNG strand. PMID:19103667

  17. Development of pharmacophore models for small molecules targeting RNA: Application to the RNA repeat expansion in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelbello, Alicia J; González, Àlex L; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-12-01

    RNA is an important drug target, but current approaches to identify bioactive small molecules have been engineered primarily for protein targets. Moreover, the identification of small molecules that bind a specific RNA target with sufficient potency remains a challenge. Computer-aided drug design (CADD) and, in particular, ligand-based drug design provide a myriad of tools to identify rapidly new chemical entities for modulating a target based on previous knowledge of active compounds without relying on a ligand complex. Herein we describe pharmacophore virtual screening based on previously reported active molecules that target the toxic RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). DM1-associated defects are caused by sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1), an alternative splicing regulator, by expanded CUG repeats (r(CUG)(exp)). Several small molecules have been found to disrupt the MBNL1-r(CUG)(exp) complex, ameliorating DM1 defects. Our pharmacophore model identified a number of potential lead compounds from which we selected 11 compounds to evaluate. Of the 11 compounds, several improved DM1 defects both in vitro and in cells.

  18. RNA-Seq of the nucleolus reveals abundant SNORD44-derived small RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyan Bai

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs represent RNA species that are not translated to proteins, but which have diverse and broad functional activities in physiological and pathophysiological states. The knowledge of these small RNAs is rapidly expanding in part through the use of massive parallel (deep sequencing efforts. We present here the first deep sequencing of small RNomes in subcellular compartments with particular emphasis on small RNAs (sRNA associated with the nucleolus. The vast majority of the cellular, cytoplasmic and nuclear sRNAs were identified as miRNAs. In contrast, the nucleolar sRNAs had a unique size distribution consisting of 19-20 and 25 nt RNAs, which were predominantly composed of small snoRNA-derived box C/D RNAs (termed as sdRNA. Sequences from 47 sdRNAs were identified, which mapped to both 5' and 3' ends of the snoRNAs, and retained conserved box C or D motifs. SdRNA reads mapping to SNORD44 comprised 74% of all nucleolar sdRNAs, and were confirmed by Northern blotting as comprising both 20 and 25 nt RNAs. A novel 120 nt SNORD44 form was also identified. The expression of the SNORD44 sdRNA and 120 nt form was independent of Dicer/Drosha-mediated processing pathways but was dependent on the box C/D snoRNP proteins/sno-ribonucleoproteins fibrillarin and NOP58. The 120 nt SNORD44-derived RNA bound to fibrillarin suggesting that C/D sno-ribonucleoproteins are involved in regulating the stability or processing of SNORD44. This study reveals sRNA cell-compartment specific expression and the distinctive unique composition of the nucleolar sRNAs.

  19. RNA-Seq of the nucleolus reveals abundant SNORD44-derived small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Baoyan; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Wheelan, Sarah J; Laiho, Marikki

    2014-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs represent RNA species that are not translated to proteins, but which have diverse and broad functional activities in physiological and pathophysiological states. The knowledge of these small RNAs is rapidly expanding in part through the use of massive parallel (deep) sequencing efforts. We present here the first deep sequencing of small RNomes in subcellular compartments with particular emphasis on small RNAs (sRNA) associated with the nucleolus. The vast majority of the cellular, cytoplasmic and nuclear sRNAs were identified as miRNAs. In contrast, the nucleolar sRNAs had a unique size distribution consisting of 19-20 and 25 nt RNAs, which were predominantly composed of small snoRNA-derived box C/D RNAs (termed as sdRNA). Sequences from 47 sdRNAs were identified, which mapped to both 5' and 3' ends of the snoRNAs, and retained conserved box C or D motifs. SdRNA reads mapping to SNORD44 comprised 74% of all nucleolar sdRNAs, and were confirmed by Northern blotting as comprising both 20 and 25 nt RNAs. A novel 120 nt SNORD44 form was also identified. The expression of the SNORD44 sdRNA and 120 nt form was independent of Dicer/Drosha-mediated processing pathways but was dependent on the box C/D snoRNP proteins/sno-ribonucleoproteins fibrillarin and NOP58. The 120 nt SNORD44-derived RNA bound to fibrillarin suggesting that C/D sno-ribonucleoproteins are involved in regulating the stability or processing of SNORD44. This study reveals sRNA cell-compartment specific expression and the distinctive unique composition of the nucleolar sRNAs.

  20. Gene silencing in tick cell lines using small interfering or long double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Gerald; Alberdi, Pilar; Schnettler, Esther; Weisheit, Sabine; Kohl, Alain; Fazakerley, John K; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

    2013-03-01

    Gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is an important research tool in many areas of biology. To effectively harness the power of this technique in order to explore tick functional genomics and tick-microorganism interactions, optimised parameters for RNAi-mediated gene silencing in tick cells need to be established. Ten cell lines from four economically important ixodid tick genera (Amblyomma, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus including the sub-species Boophilus) were used to examine key parameters including small interfering RNA (siRNA), double stranded RNA (dsRNA), transfection reagent and incubation time for silencing virus reporter and endogenous tick genes. Transfection reagents were essential for the uptake of siRNA whereas long dsRNA alone was taken up by most tick cell lines. Significant virus reporter protein knockdown was achieved using either siRNA or dsRNA in all the cell lines tested. Optimum conditions varied according to the cell line. Consistency between replicates and duration of incubation with dsRNA were addressed for two Ixodes scapularis cell lines; IDE8 supported more consistent and effective silencing of the endogenous gene subolesin than ISE6, and highly significant knockdown of the endogenous gene 2I1F6 in IDE8 cells was achieved within 48 h incubation with dsRNA. In summary, this study shows that gene silencing by RNAi in tick cell lines is generally more efficient with dsRNA than with siRNA but results vary between cell lines and optimal parameters need to be determined for each experimental system.

  1. Potent host-directed small-molecule inhibitors of myxovirus RNA-dependent RNA-polymerases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie A Krumm

    Full Text Available Therapeutic targeting of host cell factors required for virus replication rather than of pathogen components opens new perspectives to counteract virus infections. Anticipated advantages of this approach include a heightened barrier against the development of viral resistance and a broadened pathogen target spectrum. Myxoviruses are predominantly associated with acute disease and thus are particularly attractive for this approach since treatment time can be kept limited. To identify inhibitor candidates, we have analyzed hit compounds that emerged from a large-scale high-throughput screen for their ability to block replication of members of both the orthomyxovirus and paramyxovirus families. This has returned a compound class with broad anti-viral activity including potent inhibition of different influenza virus and paramyxovirus strains. After hit-to-lead chemistry, inhibitory concentrations are in the nanomolar range in the context of immortalized cell lines and human PBMCs. The compound shows high metabolic stability when exposed to human S-9 hepatocyte subcellular fractions. Antiviral activity is host-cell species specific and most pronounced in cells of higher mammalian origin, supporting a host-cell target. While the compound induces a temporary cell cycle arrest, host mRNA and protein biosynthesis are largely unaffected and treated cells maintain full metabolic activity. Viral replication is blocked at a post-entry step and resembles the inhibition profile of a known inhibitor of viral RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp activity. Direct assessment of RdRp activity in the presence of the reagent reveals strong inhibition both in the context of viral infection and in reporter-based minireplicon assays. In toto, we have identified a compound class with broad viral target range that blocks host factors required for viral RdRp activity. Viral adaptation attempts did not induce resistance after prolonged exposure, in contrast to rapid

  2. Comparative analysis of the small RNA transcriptomes of Pinus contorta and Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Ryan D; Aksay, Gozde; Dolgosheina, Elena; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Magrini, Vincent; Mardis, Elaine R; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Unrau, Peter J

    2008-04-01

    The diversity of microRNAs and small-interfering RNAs has been extensively explored within angiosperms by focusing on a few key organisms such as Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana. A deeper division of the plants is defined by the radiation of the angiosperms and gymnosperms, with the latter comprising the commercially important conifers. The conifers are expected to provide important information regarding the evolution of highly conserved small regulatory RNAs. Deep sequencing provides the means to characterize and quantitatively profile small RNAs in understudied organisms such as these. Pyrosequencing of small RNAs from O. sativa revealed, as expected, approximately 21- and approximately 24-nt RNAs. The former contained known microRNAs, and the latter largely comprised intergenic-derived sequences likely representing heterochromatin siRNAs. In contrast, sequences from Pinus contorta were dominated by 21-nt small RNAs. Using a novel sequence-based clustering algorithm, we identified sequences belonging to 18 highly conserved microRNA families in P. contorta as well as numerous clusters of conserved small RNAs of unknown function. Using multiple methods, including expressed sequence folding and machine learning algorithms, we found a further 53 candidate novel microRNA families, 51 appearing specific to the P. contorta library. In addition, alignment of small RNA sequences to the O. sativa genome revealed six perfectly conserved classes of small RNA that included chloroplast transcripts and specific types of genomic repeats. The conservation of microRNAs and other small RNAs between the conifers and the angiosperms indicates that important RNA silencing processes were highly developed in the earliest spermatophytes. Genomic mapping of all sequences to the O. sativa genome can be viewed at http://microrna.bcgsc.ca/cgi-bin/gbrowse/rice_build_3/.

  3. The small 6C RNA of Corynebacterium glutamicum is involved in the SOS response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlke, Jennifer; Dostálová, Hana; Holátko, Jiří; Degner, Ursula; Bott, Michael; Pátek, Miroslav; Polen, Tino

    2016-09-01

    The 6C RNA family is a class of small RNAs highly conserved in Actinobacteria, including the genera Mycobacterium, Streptomyces and Corynebacterium whose physiological function has not yet been elucidated. We found that strong transcription of the cgb_03605 gene, which encodes 6C RNA in C. glutamicum, was driven by the SigA- and SigB-dependent promoter Pcgb_03605. 6C RNA was detected at high level during exponential growth phase (180 to 240 molcules per cell) which even increased at the entry of the stationary phase. 6C RNA level did not decrease within 240 min after transcription had been stopped with rifampicin, which suggests high 6C RNA stability. The expression of cgb_03605 further increased approximately twofold in the presence of DNA-damaging mitomycin C (MMC) and nearly threefold in the absence of LexA. Deletion of the 6C RNA gene cgb_03605 resulted in a higher sensitivity of C. glutamicum toward MMC and UV radiation. These results indicate that 6C RNA is involved in the DNA damage response. Both 6C RNA level-dependent pausing of cell growth and branched cell morphology in response to MMC suggest that 6C RNA may also be involved in a control of cell division.

  4. Application of biodegradable dendrigraft poly-l-lysine to a small interfering RNA delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yukinobu; Kuramoto, Haruka; Mieda, Yukari; Muro, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Hiroo; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Sakaguchi, Miako; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Kitahara, Takashi; Sasaki, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Dendrigraft poly-l-lysine (DGL), including its central core, consists entirely of lysine, hence it is completely biodegradable. We applied DGL in a small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery system. Binary complexes with siRNA and DGL had particle sizes of 23-73 nm and ζ-potentials of 34-42 mV. The siRNA-DGL complexes showed significant silencing effects in a mouse colon carcinoma cell line expressing luciferase (Colon26/Luc cells). The siRNA-DGL complexes induced slight cytotoxicity and hematological toxicity at a high charge ratio of DGL to siRNA, probably because of their cationic charges. Therefore, we recharged the siRNA-DGL complexes with γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA), a biodegradable anionic compound, which was reported to reduce the cytotoxicity of cationic complexes. The ternary complexes showed particle sizes of 35-47 nm at a charge ratio of greater than 14 to siRNA with negative charges. Strong silencing effects of the ternary complexes were observed in Colon26/Luc cells without cytotoxicity or hematological toxicity. The cellular uptake and degradation of the binary and ternary complexes were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The ternary complexes suppressed luciferase activity in the tumor after direct injection into the tumors of mice bearing Colon26/Luc cells. Thus, a potentially important siRNA delivery system was constructed using biodegradable DGL.

  5. Use of cryopreserved cell aliquots in the high-throughput screening of small interfering RNA libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Elissa A; Fajardo, Flordeliza; Wang, Xiangyun; Watson, J E Vivienne; Quon, Kim C; Kassner, Paul D

    2010-06-01

    Screening small interfering RNA (siRNA) libraries holds the potential to elucidate gene function as well as discover new targets for the therapeutic treatment of disease. Since the inception of siRNA as a discovery tool, there have been progressive improvements in siRNA design algorithms, the transfection reagents used to deliver them, and the assay formats used to monitor phenotypic changes. These changes have helped to improve the quality of the data emerging from siRNA screens. One variable that introduces inconsistency into high-throughput screening (HTS) of siRNA libraries is the state of the cells used in the assays. Multiple factors can contribute to differences in transfection efficiency as well as the basic cell biology, which can lead to differences in the genes identified in siRNA screens. The authors have developed a system using frozen cell aliquots to use in siRNA HTS, so that a major source of variability introduced into cell-based screens can be standardized. In addition, by transiently transfecting plasmids into cell lines and then freezing these cells down to use in siRNA transfection experiments, they have used this same technology to create new cell lines. This process of using aliquots of frozen cells is logistically advantageous in an HTS setting, as it reduces the time spent maintaining cell lines, as well as reducing possible downtime in screening due to lack of cells or poor cell health.

  6. Detailed characterization of the posttranscriptional gene-silencing-related small RNA in a GUS gene-silenced tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutvágner, G.; Mlynarova, L.; Nap, J.P.H.

    2000-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene-silencing phenomena such as cosuppression and RNA interference are associated with the occurrence of small, about 21-23 nt short RNA species homologous to the silenced gene. We here show that the small RNA present in silenced transgenic plants can easily be detected in total

  7. Interaction between cationic agents and small interfering RNA and DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unksov, I. N.; Slita, A. V.; Petrova, A. V.; Pereviazko, I.; Bakulev, V. M.; Rolich, V. I.; Bondarenko, A. B.; Kasyanenko, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Azobenzene containing surfactant AzoTAB was used for investigation of binding in cationic- agent + nucleic acid in NaCl salt aqueous solutions. Two nucleic acids, macromolecular DNA and small interfering RNA, were examined upon the interaction with the surfactant. For DNA the interaction was studied using spectral methods and the methods of viscometry and flow birefringence measurement. For siRNA the possibility of surfactant-based delivery was checked in vitro.

  8. Small RNA Regulators of Plant-Hemipteran Interactions: Micromanagers with Versatile Roles

    OpenAIRE

    Sampurna Sattar; Gary A Thompson

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) in plants have important roles in regulating biological processes, including development, reproduction, and stress responses. Recent research indicates significant roles for sRNA-mediated gene silencing during plant-hemipteran interactions that involve all three of these biological processes. Plant responses to hemipteran feeding are determined by changes in the host transcriptome that appear to be fine-tuned by sRNAs. The role of sRNA in plant defense responses ...

  9. A cost-effective method for Illumina small RNA-Seq library preparation using T4 RNA ligase 1 adenylated adapters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yun-Ru

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sequencing is a powerful tool for novel small RNA discovery. Illumina small RNA sequencing library preparation requires a pre-adenylated 3’ end adapter containing a 5’,5’-adenyl pyrophosphoryl moiety. In the absence of ATP, this adapter can be ligated to the 3’ hydroxyl group of small RNA, while RNA self-ligation and concatenation are repressed. Pre-adenylated adapters are one of the most essential and costly components required for library preparation, and few are commercially available. Results We demonstrate that DNA oligo with 5’ phosphate and 3’ amine groups can be enzymatically adenylated by T4 RNA ligase 1 to generate customized pre-adenylated adapters. We have constructed and sequenced a small RNA library for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum using the T4 RNA ligase 1 adenylated adapter. Conclusion We provide an efficient and low-cost method for small RNA sequencing library preparation, which takes two days to complete and costs around $20 per library. This protocol has been tested in several plant species for small RNA sequencing including sweet potato, pepper, watermelon, and cowpea, and could be readily applied to any RNA samples.

  10. Sustained small interfering RNA-mediated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 inhibition in primary macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Erwei; Lee, Sang-Kyung; Dykxhoorn, Derek M; Novina, Carl; Zhang, Dong; Crawford, Keith; Cerny, Jan; Sharp, Phillip A; Lieberman, Judy; Manjunath, N; Shankar, Premlata

    2003-07-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can induce potent gene silencing by degradation of cognate mRNA. However, in dividing cells, the silencing lasts only 3 to 7 days, presumably because of siRNA dilution with cell division. Here, we investigated if sustained siRNA-mediated silencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is possible in terminally differentiated macrophages, which constitute an important reservoir of HIV in vivo. CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor in macrophages, and the viral structural gene for p24 were targeted either singly or in combination. When transfected 2 days prior to infection, both CCR5 and p24 siRNAs effectively reduced HIV-1 infection for the entire 15-day period of observation, and combined targeting of both genes abolished infection. To investigate whether exogenously introduced siRNA is maintained stably in macrophages, we tested the kinetics of siRNA-mediated viral inhibition by initiating infections at various times (2 to 15 days) after transfection with CCR5 and p24 siRNAs. HIV suppression mediated by viral p24 siRNA progressively decreased and was lost by day 7 posttransfection. In contrast, viral inhibition by cellular CCR5 knockdown was sustained even when transfection preceded infection by 15 days, suggesting that the continued presence of target RNA may be needed for persistence of siRNA. The longer sustenance of CCR5 relative to p24 siRNA in uninfected macrophages was also confirmed by detection of internalized siRNA by modified Northern blot analysis. We also tested the potential of p24 siRNA to stably silence HIV in the setting of an established infection where the viral target gene is actively transcribed. Under these circumstances, long-term suppression of HIV replication could be achieved with p24 siRNA. Thus, siRNAs can induce potent and long-lasting HIV inhibition in nondividing cells such as macrophages.

  11. Precise small-molecule recognition of a toxic CUG RNA repeat expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Colgan, Lesley A; Nakai, Yoshio; Cameron, Michael D; Furling, Denis; Yasuda, Ryohei; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-02-01

    Excluding the ribosome and riboswitches, developing small molecules that selectively target RNA is a longstanding problem in chemical biology. A typical cellular RNA is difficult to target because it has little tertiary, but abundant secondary structure. We designed allele-selective compounds that target such an RNA, the toxic noncoding repeat expansion (r(CUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). We developed several strategies to generate allele-selective small molecules, including non-covalent binding, covalent binding, cleavage and on-site probe synthesis. Covalent binding and cleavage enabled target profiling in cells derived from individuals with DM1, showing precise recognition of r(CUG)(exp). In the on-site probe synthesis approach, small molecules bound adjacent sites in r(CUG)(exp) and reacted to afford picomolar inhibitors via a proximity-based click reaction only in DM1-affected cells. We expanded this approach to image r(CUG)(exp) in its natural context.

  12. Genome-scale mRNA and small RNA transcriptomic insights into initiation of citrus apomixis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jian-Mei; Liu, Zheng; Wu, Xiao-Meng; Fang, Yan-Ni; Jia, Hui-Hui; Xie, Zong-Zhou; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Guo, Wen-Wu

    2016-01-01

    Nucellar embryony (NE) is an adventitious form of apomixis common in citrus, wherein asexual embryos initiate directly from nucellar cells surrounding the embryo sac. NE enables the fixation of desirable agronomic traits and the production of clonal offspring of virus-free rootstock, but impedes progress in hybrid breeding. In spite of the great importance of NE in citrus breeding and commercial production, little is understood about the underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, the stages of nucellar embryo initiation (NEI) were determined for two polyembryonic citrus cultivars via histological observation. To explore the genes and regulatory pathways involved in NEI, we performed mRNA-seq and sRNA-seq analyses of ovules immediately prior to and at stages during NEI in the two pairs of cultivars. A total of 305 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between the poly- and monoembryonic ovules. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that several processes are significantly enriched based on DEGs. In particular, response to stress, and especially response to oxidative stress, was over-represented in polyembryonic ovules. Nearly 150 miRNAs, comprising ~90 conserved and ~60 novel miRNAs, were identified in the ovules of either cultivar pair. Only two differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs) were identified, of which the novel miRN23-5p was repressed whereas the targets accumulated in the polyembryonic ovules. This integrated study on the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory profiles between poly- and monoembryonic citrus ovules provides new insights into the mechanism of NE, which should contribute to revealing the regulatory mechanisms of plant apomixis. PMID:27619233

  13. Characterization of the small RNA component of leaves and fruits from four different cucurbit species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeeswaran Guru

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of non-coding small RNAs involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression critical for plant growth and development, stress responses and other diverse biological processes in plants. The Cucurbitaceae or cucurbit family represents some of economically important species, particularly those with edible and medicinal fruits. Genomic tools for the molecular analysis of members of this family are just emerging. Partial draft genome sequence became available recently for cucumber and watermelon facilitating investigation of the small RNA component of the transcriptomes in cucurbits. Results We generated four small RNA libraries from bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria, Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita pepo, and, watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus in order to identify conserved and novel lineage specific miRNAs in these cucurbits. Deep sequencing of small RNA libraries from these species resulted in 1,597,263, 532,948, 601,388, and 493,384 unique sRNA reads from bottle gourd, moschata, pepo and watermelon, respectively. Sequence analysis of these four libraries resulted in identification of 21 miRNA families that are highly conserved and 8 miRNA families that are moderately conserved in diverse dicots. We also identified 4 putative novel miRNAs in these plant species. Furthermore, the tasiRNAs were identified and their biogenesis was determined in these cucurbits. Small RNA blot analysis or q-PCR analyses of leaf and fruit tissues of these cucurbits showed differential expression of several conserved miRNAs. Interestingly, the abundance of several miRNAs in leaves and fruits of closely related C. moschata and C. pepo was also distinctly different. Target genes for the most conserved miRNAs are also predicted. Conclusion High-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries from four cucurbit species has provided a glimpse of small RNA component in their transcriptomes. The analysis also

  14. Comparison of small molecules and oligonucleotides that target a toxic, non-coding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costales, Matthew G; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Potential RNA targets for chemical probes and therapeutic modalities are pervasive in the transcriptome. Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are commonly used to target RNA sequence. Small molecules are emerging as a modality to target RNA structures selectively, but their development is still in its infancy. In this work, we compare the activity of oligonucleotides and several classes of small molecules that target the non-coding r(CCUG) repeat expansion (r(CCUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), an incurable disease that is the second-most common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy. Small molecule types investigated include monomers, dimers, and multivalent compounds synthesized on-site by using RNA-templated click chemistry. Oligonucleotides investigated include phosphorothioates that cleave their target and vivo-morpholinos that modulate target RNA activity via binding. We show that compounds assembled on-site that recognize structure have the highest potencies amongst small molecules and are similar in potency to a vivo-morpholino modified oligonucleotide that targets sequence. These studies are likely to impact the design of therapeutic modalities targeting other repeats expansions that cause fragile X syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for example.

  15. Coherence resonance in a noise-driven gene network regulated by small RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small RNA has recently drawn more and more attention. In this paper, we concentrate on the influence of noises on gene network regulated by small RNA using chemical Langevin equation. It shows that the noise can cause oscillation when the oscillate does not occur in the corresponding deterministic system. The coherence of the noise induced oscillation reaches a maximum for an optimal intensity of noise, and the coherence resonance appears accordingly. The findings imply probably omnipresent importance of noise in the functioning process of living organism.

  16. 7SK small nuclear RNA inhibits cancer cell proliferation through apoptosis induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramati, Farid; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Fallah, Parviz; Soleimani, Masoud; Ghanbarian, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    7SK small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is a 331-333-bp non-coding RNA, which recruits HEXIM 1/2 protein to inhibit positive elongation factor b (P-TEFb) activity. P-TEFb is an essential factor in alleviating promoter-proximal paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and initiating the productive elongation phase of gene transcription. Without this protein, Pol II will remain in its hypophosphorylated state, and no transcription occurs. In this study, we inhibited P-TEFb activity by over-expressing 7SK snRNA in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cancer cell line. This inhibition led to a significant decrease in cell viability, which can be due to the transcription inhibition. Moreover, 7SK snRNA over-expression promoted apoptosis in cancerous cells. Our results suggest 7SK snRNA as a potential endogenous anti-cancer agent, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that uses a long non-coding RNA's over-expression against cancer cell growth and proliferation.

  17. Alpha-synuclein suppression by targeted small interfering RNA in the primate substantia nigra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L McCormack

    Full Text Available The protein alpha-synuclein is involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Its toxic potential appears to be enhanced by increased protein expression, providing a compelling rationale for therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing neuronal alpha-synuclein burden. Here, feasibility and safety of alpha-synuclein suppression were evaluated by treating monkeys with small interfering RNA (siRNA directed against alpha-synuclein. The siRNA molecule was chemically modified to prevent degradation by exo- and endonucleases and directly infused into the left substantia nigra. Results compared levels of alpha-synuclein mRNA and protein in the infused (left vs. untreated (right hemisphere and revealed a significant 40-50% suppression of alpha-synuclein expression. These findings could not be attributable to non-specific effects of siRNA infusion since treatment of a separate set of animals with luciferase-targeting siRNA produced no changes in alpha-synuclein. Infusion with alpha-synuclein siRNA, while lowering alpha-synuclein expression, had no overt adverse consequences. In particular, it did not cause tissue inflammation and did not change (i the number and phenotype of nigral dopaminergic neurons, and (ii the concentrations of striatal dopamine and its metabolites. The data represent the first evidence of successful anti-alpha-synuclein intervention in the primate substantia nigra and support further development of RNA interference-based therapeutics.

  18. Optimization of transfection efficiency of small interfering RNA in purified human prolactinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-hu; SONG Yong-mei; ZHAO Jiang; YU Chun-jiang; ZHAN Qi-min

    2011-01-01

    Background Control of hypersecretion of certain hormones is one of the key targets in the treatment of pituitary adenomas. RNA interference has been shown to inhibit protein expression, and thus it may represent a promising method for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. In the present study, transfection efficiency of small interfering RNA (siRNA) was optimized in human prolactinoma cells.Methods First, a method was optimized to extract highly purified human prolactinoma cells in vitro. The extracted cells were verified to retain the physiological features of prolactin (PRL) secretion. Second, three conditions for siRNA transfection were tested by the evaluation of transfection efficiency and cell viability. The proper transfection condition was verified for human prolactinoma cells. Third, the siRNA for prolactin was transfected into the human prolactinoma cells, and the suppression of PRL mRNA was evaluated by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR.Conclusion It is possible to inhibit hormone hypersecretion by RNA interference, that may eventually enable therapeutic siRNA drugs developed.

  19. Exploration of small RNA-seq data for small non-coding RNAs in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Srinivas V; Tiwari, Amit K; Hazard, Sprague W; Mahajan, Milind; Ravnic, Dino J

    2017-01-01

    Background: Improved healthcare and recent breakthroughs in technology have substantially reduced cancer mortality rates worldwide. Recent advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) have allowed genomic analysis of the human transcriptome. Now, using NGS we can further look into small non-coding regions of RNAs (sncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs), Piwi-interacting-RNAs (piRNAs), long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs (sn/snoRNAs) among others. Recent studies looking at sncRNAs indicate their role in important biological processes such as cancer progression and predict their role as biomarkers for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. Results: In the present study, we data mined publically available small RNA sequencing data from colorectal tissue samples of eight matched patients (benign, tumor, and metastasis) and remapped the data for various small RNA annotations. We identified aberrant expression of 13 miRNAs in tumor and metastasis specimens [tumor vs benign group (19 miRNAs) and metastasis vs benign group (38 miRNAs)] of which five were upregulated, and eight were downregulated, during disease progression. Pathway analysis of aberrantly expressed miRNAs showed that the majority of miRNAs involved in colon cancer were also involved in other cancers. Analysis of piRNAs revealed six to be over-expressed in the tumor vs benign cohort and 24 in the metastasis vs benign group. Only two piRNAs were shared between the two cohorts. Examining other types of small RNAs [sn/snoRNAs, mt_rRNA, miscRNA, nonsense mediated decay (NMD), and rRNAs] identified 15 sncRNAs in the tumor vs benign group and 104 in the metastasis vs benign group, with only four others being commonly expressed. Conclusion: In summary, our comprehensive analysis on publicly available small RNA-seq data identified multiple differentially expressed sncRNAs during colorectal cancer progression at different stages compared to normal colon tissue. We speculate that

  20. A simple and efficient method to transfect small interference RNA into bovine SCNT embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, LiJun; Li, WenZhe; Mao, QingFu; Wang, YongSheng; Li, Qian; Hua, Song; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    RNA interference is an important tool to study the gene function. Microinjection and electroporation are usually used to transfer DNA, small interference RNA (siRNA), morpholinos, and protein into oocytes or embryos. This study used a simple and effective method to transfect siRNA into bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos. In this method, siRNA transfection and electrofusion of SCNT were combined. A pair of platinum microelectrodes was used during SCNT to complete electrofusion. A CY3-labeled siRNA-targeted DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1) was chosen to verify the siRNA transfection efficiency of this approach. First, a suitable concentration of siRNA was mixed with Zimmermann's fusion medium. Reconstructed embryos were then added into the microdrops of the mixed fusion medium to simultaneously transfect the siRNA and electrofuse the SCNT embryos. Our results showed that transfecting DNMT1 siRNA via the proposed method caused obvious CY3 fluorescence and significant downregulation of DNMT1 messenger RNA, DNMT1 protein, and global DNA methylation levels in the SCNT embryos. Meanwhile, the survival rate after electrofusion (90.4% vs. 89.4% vs. 89.1%, P > 0.05) and developmental rates of the SCNT embryos (72.8% vs. 74.9% vs. 72.4%, P > 0.05; 29.7% vs. 31.7% vs. 29.7%, P > 0.05) were not significantly affected. In summary, siRNAs were effectively transfected into the SCNT embryos via the proposed method and exert their functions, and the normal development of preimplantation SCNT embryos was not affected by the method used.

  1. Novel microRNA-like viral small regulatory RNAs arising during human hepatitis A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wang, Bin; Wu, Meini; Zhang, Jing; Duan, Zhiqing; Wang, Haixuan; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, Yunzhang

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), including host miRNAs and viral miRNAs, play vital roles in regulating host-virus interactions. DNA viruses encode miRNAs that regulate the viral life cycle. However, it is generally believed that cytoplasmic RNA viruses do not encode miRNAs, owing to inaccessible cellular miRNA processing machinery. Here, we provide a comprehensive genome-wide analysis and identification of miRNAs that were derived from hepatitis A virus (HAV; Hu/China/H2/1982), which is a typical cytoplasmic RNA virus. Using deep-sequencing and in silico approaches, we identified 2 novel virally encoded miRNAs, named hav-miR-1-5p and hav-miR-2-5p. Both of the novel virally encoded miRNAs were clearly detected in infected cells. Analysis of Dicer enzyme silencing demonstrated that HAV-derived miRNA biogenesis is Dicer dependent. Furthermore, we confirmed that HAV mature miRNAs were generated from viral miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) in host cells. Notably, naturally derived HAV miRNAs were biologically and functionally active and induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Genomic location analysis revealed novel miRNAs located in the coding region of the viral genome. Overall, our results show that HAV naturally generates functional miRNA-like small regulatory RNAs during infection. This is the first report of miRNAs derived from the coding region of genomic RNA of a cytoplasmic RNA virus. These observations demonstrate that a cytoplasmic RNA virus can naturally generate functional miRNAs, as DNA viruses do. These findings also contribute to improved understanding of host-RNA virus interactions mediated by RNA virus-derived miRNAs.

  2. A deep analysis of the small non-coding RNA population in Schistosoma japonicum eggs.

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    Pengfei Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosoma japonicum is a parasitic flatworm that causes zoonotic schistosomiasis. The typical outcome of schistosomiasis is hepatic granuloma and fibrosis, which is primarily induced by soluble egg-derived antigens. Although schistosomal eggs represent an important pathogenic stage to the host, the biology of this critical stage is largely unknown. We previously investigated the expression profiles of sncRNAs during different developmental stages of this parasite. However, using small RNA extracted from egg-deposited liver tissues generated limited information about sncRNAs in eggs. Here, we characterized the complete small RNAome in this stage of the parasite after optimization of RNA purification. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A library, SjE, was constructed with the small RNA extracted from S. japonicum eggs and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. The data were depicted by comprehensive bioinformatic analysis to explore the expression features of sncRNAs in the egg stage. MicroRNAs accounted for about one quarter of the total small RNA population in this stage, with a strongly biased expression pattern of certain miRNA family members. Sja-miR-71, sja-miR-71-5p, and sja-miR-36-3p were suggested to play important roles in embryo development. A panel of transfer RNA fragments (tRFs precisely processed from the 5' end of mature tRNAs was identified for the first time, which represented a strong egg stage-biased expression. The tRNA-Ala derived small RNAs were the most highly expressed Sj-tRFs in eggs. Further, the expression of siRNAs from 29 types of well-defined transposable elements (TEs was observed to be relatively stable among different developmental stages. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, we characterized the sncRNA profile in the egg stage of S. japonicum. Featured expression of sncRNAs, especially the tRNA-derived small RNAs, was identified, which was further compared with that of other developmental

  3. Rationally designed small molecules targeting the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 are potently bioactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Hoskins, Jason; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2012-05-18

    RNA is an important drug target, but it is difficult to design or discover small molecules that modulate RNA function. In the present study, we report that rationally designed, modularly assembled small molecules that bind the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) are potently bioactive in cell culture models. DM1 is caused when an expansion of r(CUG) repeats, or r(CUG)(exp), is present in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) mRNA. r(CUG)(exp) folds into a hairpin with regularly repeating 5'CUG/3'GUC motifs and sequesters muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1). A variety of defects are associated with DM1, including (i) formation of nuclear foci, (ii) decreased translation of DMPK mRNA due to its nuclear retention, and (iii) pre-mRNA splicing defects due to inactivation of MBNL1, which controls the alternative splicing of various pre-mRNAs. Previously, modularly assembled ligands targeting r(CUG)(exp) were designed using information in an RNA motif-ligand database. These studies showed that a bis-benzimidazole (H) binds the 5'CUG/3'GUC motif in r(CUG)(exp.) Therefore, we designed multivalent ligands to bind simultaneously multiple copies of this motif in r(CUG)(exp). Herein, we report that the designed compounds improve DM1-associated defects including improvement of translational and pre-mRNA splicing defects and the disruption of nuclear foci. These studies may establish a foundation to exploit other RNA targets in genomic sequence.

  4. 微孢子虫核糖体小亚单位RNA(ssUrRNA)基因%Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Genes of Microsporidia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王见杨; 黄可威; 毛西成; 赵 昀; 陆长德

    2001-01-01

    微孢子虫是广泛分布于自然界的细胞内原虫类寄生物。它们可寄生于整个生物界。微孢子虫是真核生物,但其核糖体及核糖体RNA(rRNA)为原核生物型。为探讨9种家蚕病原性微孢子虫的种属地位及亲缘关系,对已广泛用于生物进化分类的核糖体小亚单位RNA(asurRNA)基因进行了研究。由微孢子虫ssurRNA基因序列同源性分析所构建的系统进化发育树及Southam杂交分析表明,这9种微孢子虫同为Nosema属,为同属不同种。%Microsporidia are ubiquitous intracellular parasitic protozoa infecting all types of animals. Their ribosomes and rRNAs are of prokaryotic size. In order to better understand their phylogenetic relationship and identify the uncertain species, the sequences of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (ssurRNA, 16 S rRNA) genesof nine microsporidia infectious to the silkworm, Bombyx mori, were determined. The results of phylogenetic trees and Southern blotting suggest all the nine strains of icrosporidia are various species of the genus Nosema.

  5. Undesired small RNAs originate from an artificial microRNA precursor in transgenic petunia (Petunia hybrida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Guo

    Full Text Available Although artificial microRNA (amiRNA technology has been used frequently in gene silencing in plants, little research has been devoted to investigating the accuracy of amiRNA precursor processing. In this work, amiRNAchs1 (amiRchs1, based on the Arabidopsis miR319a precursor, was expressed in order to suppress the expression of CHS genes in petunia. The transgenic plants showed the CHS gene-silencing phenotype. A modified 5' RACE technique was used to map small-RNA-directed cleavage sites and to detect processing intermediates of the amiRchs1 precursor. The results showed that the target CHS mRNAs were cut at the expected sites and that the amiRchs1 precursor was processed from loop to base. The accumulation of small RNAs in amiRchs1 transgenic petunia petals was analyzed using the deep-sequencing technique. The results showed that, alongside the accumulation of the desired artificial microRNAs, additional small RNAs that originated from other regions of the amiRNA precursor were also accumulated at high frequency. Some of these had previously been found to be accumulated at low frequency in the products of ath-miR319a precursor processing and some of them were accompanied by 3'-tailing variant. Potential targets of the undesired small RNAs were discovered in petunia and other Solanaceae plants. The findings draw attention to the potential occurrence of undesired target silencing induced by such additional small RNAs when amiRNA technology is used. No appreciable production of secondary small RNAs occurred, despite the fact that amiRchs1 was designed to have perfect complementarity to its CHS-J target. This confirmed that perfect pairing between an amiRNA and its targets is not the trigger for secondary small RNA production. In conjunction with the observation that amiRNAs with perfect complementarity to their target genes show high efficiency and specificity in gene silencing, this finding has an important bearing on future applications of ami

  6. The Small Interfering RNA Pathway Is Not Essential for Wolbachia-Mediated Antiviral Protection in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Lauren M Hedges; Yamada, Ryuichi; O'Neill, Scott L; Karyn N. Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Wolbachia pipientis delays RNA virus-induced mortality in Drosophila spp. We investigated whether Wolbachia-mediated protection was dependent on the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway, a key antiviral defense. Compared to Wolbachia-free flies, virus-induced mortality was delayed in Wolbachia-infected flies with loss-of-function of siRNA pathway components, indicating that Wolbachia-mediated protection functions in the absence of the canonical siRNA pathway.

  7. Phytophthora effector targets a novel component of small RNA pathway in plants to promote infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yongli; Shi, Jinxia; Zhai, Yi; Hou, Yingnan; Ma, Wenbo

    2015-05-05

    A broad range of parasites rely on the functions of effector proteins to subvert host immune response and facilitate disease development. The notorious Phytophthora pathogens evolved effectors with RNA silencing suppression activity to promote infection in plant hosts. Here we report that the Phytophthora Suppressor of RNA Silencing 1 (PSR1) can bind to an evolutionarily conserved nuclear protein containing the aspartate-glutamate-alanine-histidine-box RNA helicase domain in plants. This protein, designated PSR1-Interacting Protein 1 (PINP1), regulates the accumulation of both microRNAs and endogenous small interfering RNAs in Arabidopsis. A null mutation of PINP1 causes embryonic lethality, and silencing of PINP1 leads to developmental defects and hypersusceptibility to Phytophthora infection. These phenotypes are reminiscent of transgenic plants expressing PSR1, supporting PINP1 as a direct virulence target of PSR1. We further demonstrate that the localization of the Dicer-like 1 protein complex is impaired in the nucleus of PINP1-silenced or PSR1-expressing cells, indicating that PINP1 may facilitate small RNA processing by affecting the assembly of dicing complexes. A similar function of PINP1 homologous genes in development and immunity was also observed in Nicotiana benthamiana. These findings highlight PINP1 as a previously unidentified component of RNA silencing that regulates distinct classes of small RNAs in plants. Importantly, Phytophthora has evolved effectors to target PINP1 in order to promote infection.

  8. Characterization of small RNA populations in non-transgenic and aflatoxin-reducing-transformed peanut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Imana L; Dang, Phat M; Sobolev, Victor S; Orner, Valerie A; Powell, Joseph L; Lamb, Marshall C; Arias, Renee S

    2017-04-01

    Aflatoxin contamination is a major constraint in food production worldwide. In peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), these toxic and carcinogenic aflatoxins are mainly produced by Aspergillus flavus Link and A. parasiticus Speare. The use of RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising method to reduce or prevent the accumulation of aflatoxin in peanut seed. In this study, we performed high-throughput sequencing of small RNA populations in a control line and in two transformed peanut lines that expressed an inverted repeat targeting five genes involved in the aflatoxin-biosynthesis pathway and that showed up to 100% less aflatoxin B1 than the controls. The objective was to determine the putative involvement of the small RNA populations in aflatoxin reduction. In total, 41 known microRNA (miRNA) families and many novel miRNAs were identified. Among those, 89 known and 10 novel miRNAs were differentially expressed in the transformed lines. We furthermore found two small interfering RNAs derived from the inverted repeat, and 39 sRNAs that mapped without mismatches to the genome of A. flavus and were present only in the transformed lines. This information will increase our understanding of the effectiveness of RNAi and enable the possible improvement of the RNAi technology for the control of aflatoxins.

  9. Extent, Causes, and Consequences of Small RNA Expression Variation in Human Adipose Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Leopold Parts; Hedman, Åsa K.; Sarah Keildson; Knights, Andrew J.; Cei Abreu-Goodger; Martijn van de Bunt; José Afonso Guerra-Assunção; Nenad Bartonicek; Stijn van Dongen; Reedik Mägi; James Nisbet; Amy Barrett; Mattias Rantalainen; Nica, Alexandra C.; Quail, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Small RNAs are functional molecules that modulate mRNA transcripts and have been implicated in the aetiology of several common diseases. However, little is known about the extent of their variability within the human population. Here, we characterise the extent, causes, and effects of naturally occurring variation in expression and sequence of small RNAs from adipose tissue in relation to genotype, gene expression, and metabolic traits in the MuTHER reference cohort. We profiled the expressio...

  10. Heat shock increases lifetime of a small RNA and induces its accumulation in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatosyan, Karina A; Kramerov, Dmitri A

    2016-08-01

    4.5SH and 4.5SI RNA are two abundant small non-coding RNAs specific for several related rodent families including Muridae. These RNAs have a number of common characteristics such as the short length (about 100nt), transcription by RNA polymerase III, and origin from Short Interspersed Elements (SINEs). However, their stabilities in cells substantially differ: the half-life of 4.5SH RNA is about 20min, while that of 4.5SI RNA is 22h. Here we studied the influence of cell stress such as heat shock or viral infection on these two RNAs. We found that the level of 4.5SI RNA did not change in stressed cells; whereas heat shock increased the abundance of 4.5SH RNA 3.2-10.5 times in different cell lines; and viral infection, 5 times. Due to the significant difference in the turnover rates of these two RNAs, a similar activation of their transcription by heat shock increases the level of the short-lived 4.5SH RNA and has minor effect on the level of the long-lived 4.5SI RNA. In addition, the accumulation of 4.5SH RNA results not only from the induction of its transcription but also from a substantial retardation of its decay. To our knowledge, it is the first example of a short-lived non-coding RNA whose elongated lifetime contributes significantly to its accumulation in stressed cells.

  11. Systematic coarse-grained modeling of complexation between small interfering RNA and polycations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Zonghui [Graduate Program in Applied Physics, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Luijten, Erik, E-mail: luijten@northwestern.edu [Graduate Program in Applied Physics, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Engineering Sciences and Applied Mathematics, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations can provide insight into the properties of polymeric gene-delivery carriers by elucidating their interactions and detailed binding patterns with nucleic acids. However, to explore nanoparticle formation through complexation of these polymers and nucleic acids and study their behavior at experimentally relevant time and length scales, a reliable coarse-grained model is needed. Here, we systematically develop such a model for the complexation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and grafted polyethyleneimine copolymers, a promising candidate for siRNA delivery. We compare the predictions of this model with all-atom simulations and demonstrate that it is capable of reproducing detailed binding patterns, charge characteristics, and water release kinetics. Since the coarse-grained model accelerates the simulations by one to two orders of magnitude, it will make it possible to quantitatively investigate nanoparticle formation involving multiple siRNA molecules and cationic copolymers.

  12. Targeted Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Using Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian M.K. Shahzad

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference holds tremendous potential as a therapeutic approach, especially in the treatment of malignant tumors. However, efficient and biocompatible delivery methods are needed for systemic delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA. To maintain a high level of growth, tumor cells scavenge high-density lipoprotein (HDL particles by overexpressing its receptor: scavenger receptor type B1 (SR-B1. In this study, we exploited this cellular characteristic to achieve efficient siRNA delivery and established a novel formulation of siRNA by incorporating it into reconstituted HDL (rHDL nanoparticles. Here, we demonstrate that rHDL nanoparticles facilitate highly efficient systemic delivery of siRNA in vivo, mediated by the SR-B1. Moreover, in therapeutic proof-of-concept studies, these nanoparticles were effective in silencing the expression of two proteins that are key to cancer growth and metastasis (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and focal adhesion kinase in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian and colorectal cancer. These data indicate that an rHDL nanoparticle is a novel and highly efficient siRNA carrier, and therefore, this novel technology could serve as the foundation for new cancer therapeutic approaches.

  13. Micro RNA: Small but full of mystery and use (review article

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    M.R. Noori Daloii

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs form a class of small non-coding RNA molecules. With only 21-23 nucleutide in length, they have an important role in gene expression. These molecules bind to their target mRNA molecules and repress the protein expression via mRNA degradation or blocking the translation machine of the cell. From the advent of molecular biology microRNA molecules were out of focus, however huge amount of studies in the past few years revealed a lot of facts about their nature. Nowadays around 1600 different microRNA are discovered in human, animals, plant and even viruses. In this review article the most recent data in the history, genes, expression and process of these molecules are introduced. Furthermore, the findings about diverse roles of these molecules in normal and abnormal conditions, cancer in particular, are shown. Finally, the differences to siRNA molecules and the prospect of microRNA have been explained.

  14. Small regulatory RNA-induced growth rate heterogeneity of Bacillus subtilis.

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    Ruben A T Mars

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Isogenic bacterial populations can consist of cells displaying heterogeneous physiological traits. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs could affect this heterogeneity since they act by fine-tuning mRNA or protein levels to coordinate the appropriate cellular behavior. Here we show that the sRNA RnaC/S1022 from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can suppress exponential growth by modulation of the transcriptional regulator AbrB. Specifically, the post-transcriptional abrB-RnaC/S1022 interaction allows B. subtilis to increase the cell-to-cell variation in AbrB protein levels, despite strong negative autoregulation of the abrB promoter. This behavior is consistent with existing mathematical models of sRNA action, thus suggesting that induction of protein expression noise could be a new general aspect of sRNA regulation. Importantly, we show that the sRNA-induced diversity in AbrB levels generates heterogeneity in growth rates during the exponential growth phase. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the resulting subpopulations of fast- and slow-growing B. subtilis cells reflect a bet-hedging strategy for enhanced survival of unfavorable conditions.

  15. Identification of a sigma B-dependent small noncoding RNA in Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Sejrup; Olsen, Anders Steno; Bonde, Mette

    2008-01-01

    In Listeria monocytogenes, the alternative sigma factor sigma(B) plays important roles in stress tolerance and virulence. Here, we present the identification of SbrA, a novel small noncoding RNA that is produced in a sigma(B)-dependent manner. This finding adds the sigma(B) regulon to the growing...

  16. Prolonged in vivo gene silencing by electroporation-mediated plasmid delivery of small interfering RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eefting, D.; Grimbergen, J.M.; Vries, M.R. de; Weel, V. van; Kaijzel, E.L.; Que, I.; Moon, R.T.; Löwik, C.W.; Bockel, J.H. van; Quax, P.H.A.

    2007-01-01

    For the successful application of RNA interference in vivo, it is desired to achieve (local) delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and long-term gene silencing. Nonviral electrodelivery is suitable to obtain local and prolonged expression of transgenes. By intramuscular electrodelivery of a pl

  17. Functional specialization of the small interfering RNA pathway in response to virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Trindade Marques

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, post-transcriptional gene silencing occurs when exogenous or endogenous double stranded RNA (dsRNA is processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs by Dicer-2 (Dcr-2 in association with a dsRNA-binding protein (dsRBP cofactor called Loquacious (Loqs-PD. siRNAs are then loaded onto Argonaute-2 (Ago2 by the action of Dcr-2 with another dsRBP cofactor called R2D2. Loaded Ago2 executes the destruction of target RNAs that have sequence complementarity to siRNAs. Although Dcr-2, R2D2, and Ago2 are essential for innate antiviral defense, the mechanism of virus-derived siRNA (vsiRNA biogenesis and viral target inhibition remains unclear. Here, we characterize the response mechanism mediated by siRNAs against two different RNA viruses that infect Drosophila. In both cases, we show that vsiRNAs are generated by Dcr-2 processing of dsRNA formed during viral genome replication and, to a lesser extent, viral transcription. These vsiRNAs seem to preferentially target viral polyadenylated RNA to inhibit viral replication. Loqs-PD is completely dispensable for silencing of the viruses, in contrast to its role in silencing endogenous targets. Biogenesis of vsiRNAs is independent of both Loqs-PD and R2D2. R2D2, however, is required for sorting and loading of vsiRNAs onto Ago2 and inhibition of viral RNA expression. Direct injection of viral RNA into Drosophila results in replication that is also independent of Loqs-PD. This suggests that triggering of the antiviral pathway is not related to viral mode of entry but recognition of intrinsic features of virus RNA. Our results indicate the existence of a vsiRNA pathway that is separate from the endogenous siRNA pathway and is specifically triggered by virus RNA. We speculate that this unique framework might be necessary for a prompt and efficient antiviral response.

  18. Metal ion binding and function in natural and artificial small RNA enzymes from a structural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, Joseph E

    2011-01-01

    Ribozymes are often perceived as part of an antiquated catalytic arsenal hearkening back to a pre-biotic RNA World that was eventually supplanted by proteins. However, recent genome-wide searches have revealed a plethora of new catalytic RNA motifs that appear to be variations on well-known themes. This suggests that ribozymes have continued to evolve in order to fulfill specific, RNA-essential biological niches. Although such ribozymes are small and catalyze one-step phosphodiester-bond scission reactions, ongoing structure and function analyses at the lab bench have demonstrated that RNA has the capacity for a diverse number of reactions such as carbon-carbon bond formation, and tRNA aminoacylation. Here we describe the fundamental structure and metal binding properties of four naturally occurring RNA enzymes: the hammerhead, hairpin, hepatitis delta virus, and glmS metabolite sensing ribozyme. In addition, we discuss the fold and ion coordination of three artificial ribozymes developed to probe the boundaries of RNA catalysis; these include the leadzyme, the flexizyme, and the Diels-Alder ribozyme. Our approach is to relate structure to function with the knowledge of ideal metal-ion coordination geometry that we have derived herein from surveys of high-resolution small molecule structures. An emergent theme is that natural and artificial ribozymes that catalyze single-step reactions often possess a pre-formed active site. Multivalent ions facilitate RNA active site formation, but can also provide Lewis acid functionality that is necessary for catalysis. When metal ion binding isn't possible, ribozymes make due by ionizing their bases, or by recruiting cofactors that augment their chemical functionality.

  19. Regulation of bacterial photosynthesis genes by the small noncoding RNA PcrZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mank, Nils N; Berghoff, Bork A; Hermanns, Yannick N; Klug, Gabriele

    2012-10-02

    The small RNA PcrZ (photosynthesis control RNA Z) of the facultative phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is induced upon a drop of oxygen tension with similar kinetics to those of genes for components of photosynthetic complexes. High expression of PcrZ depends on PrrA, the response regulator of the PrrB/PrrA two-component system with a central role in redox regulation in R. sphaeroides. In addition the FnrL protein, an activator of some photosynthesis genes at low oxygen tension, is involved in redox-dependent expression of this small (s)RNA. Overexpression of full-length PcrZ in R. sphaeroides affects expression of a small subset of genes, most of them with a function in photosynthesis. Some mRNAs from the photosynthetic gene cluster were predicted to be putative PcrZ targets and results from an in vivo reporter system support these predictions. Our data reveal a negative effect of PcrZ on expression of its target mRNAs. Thus, PcrZ counteracts the redox-dependent induction of photosynthesis genes, which is mediated by protein regulators. Because PrrA directly activates photosynthesis genes and at the same time PcrZ, which negatively affects photosynthesis gene expression, this is one of the rare cases of an incoherent feed-forward loop including an sRNA. Our data identified PcrZ as a trans acting sRNA with a direct regulatory function in formation of photosynthetic complexes and provide a model for the control of photosynthesis gene expression by a regulatory network consisting of proteins and a small noncoding RNA.

  20. Temporal small RNA transcriptome profiling unraveled partitioned miRNA expression in developing maize endosperms between reciprocal crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming eXin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In angiosperms, the endosperm nurtures embryo and provides nutrients for seed germination. We have performed high-throughput small RNA transcriptome sequencing of kernels at 0, 3, and 5 days after pollination (DAP and endosperms at 7, 10, and 15 DAP by using B73 and Mo17 reciprocal crosses in previous study. Here, we further explored these small RNA-seq data to investigate the potential roles of miRNAs in regulating gene expression process. In total, 57 conserved miRNAs and 18 novel miRNAs were observed highly expressed in maize endosperm. Temporal expression profiling indicates these miRNAs exhibited dynamic and partitioned expression patterns at different developmental stages between maize reciprocal crosses, and qRT-PCR results further confirmed our observation. In addition, we found a subset of distinct tandem miRNAs are generated from a single stem-loop structure in maize which might be conserved in monocots. Furthermore, a SNP variation of Zma-miR408-5p at 11th base position was characterized between B73 and Mo17 which leads to completely different functions in repressing targets. More interestingly, Zma-miR408-5p exhibited B73-biased expression pattern in the B73 and Mo17 reciprocal hybrid endosperms at 7, 10 and 15 DAP according to the reads abundance with SNPs and CAPS experiment.

  1. Silencing invariant chains of dendritic cells enhances anti-tumor immunity using small-interfering RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Shan; CHEN Xue-hua; ZHU Zheng-gang; LI Jian-fang; YU Bei-qin; GU Qin-long; LIU Bing-ya

    2010-01-01

    Background Genetic modification of dendritic cells (DCs) has been used as an effective approach to enhance anti-tumor immunity. RNA interference (RNAi), which can cause the degradation of any RNA in a sequence-specific manner, is a post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism. In this study, small-interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for the Ii gene was transfected into DCs, and the anti-tumor immunity of Ii-silenced DCs was assessed.Methods The silencing effect of siRNA was evaluated by Western blotting and real-time PCR analyses. In vitro cytotoxic activity of T cells was evaluated using a Cytotox 96(R) non-radioactive cytotoxicity assay kit. The time to tumor onset and the tumor volumes were used as reliable indices to assess the anti-tumor immunity in vivo. To further examine the mechanisms underlying the anti-tumor immunity, flow cytometry analysis was used.Results The Ii expression of DCs was significantly reduced after Ii siRNA transfection. Significant in vitro anti-tumor ability was exhibited when DCs were co-transfected with Ii siRNA plus endogenous tumor antigen (P <0.05). Furthermore,tumor growth was greatly inhibited when mice were immunized with DCs transfected with Ii siRNA plus tumor antigen prior to or subsequent to tumor implantation. Flow cytometry analysis in vitro and in vivo indicated that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were significantly activated in the Ii siRNA group (P <0.05).Conclusion Silencing of the Ii gene of DCs may offer a potential approach to enhance DC-based anti-tumor immunity.

  2. Small interference RNA targeting tissue factor inhibits human lung adenocarcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jianing

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human coagulation trigger tissue factor (TF is overexpressed in several types of cancer and involved in tumor growth, vascularization, and metastasis. To explore the role of TF in biological processes of lung adenocarcinoma, we used RNA interference (RNAi technology to silence TF in a lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 with high-level expression of TF and evaluate its antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Methods The specific small interfering RNA (siRNA designed for targeting human TF was transfected into A549 cells. The expression of TF was detected by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot. Cell proliferation was measured by MTT and clonogenic assays. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. The metastatic potential of A549 cells was determined by wound healing, the mobility and Matrigel invasion assays. Expressions of PI3K/Akt, Erk1/2, VEGF and MMP-2/-9 in transfected cells were detected by Western blot. In vivo, the effect of TF-siRNA on the growth of A549 lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in nude mice was investigated. Results TF -siRNA significantly reduced the expression of TF in the mRNA and protein levels. The down-regulation of TF in A549 cells resulted in the suppression of cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. Erk MAPK, PI3K/Akt pathways as well as VEGF and MMP-2/-9 expressions were inhibited in TF-siRNA transfected cells. Moreover, intratumoral injection of siRNA targeting TF suppressed the tumor growth of A549 cells in vivo model of lung adenocarcinoma. Conclusions Down-regulation of TF using siRNA could provide a potential approach for gene therapy against lung adenocarcinoma, and the antitumor effects may be associated with inhibition of Erk MAPK, PI3K/Akt pathways.

  3. Identification of Small Molecule Modulators of MicroRNA by Library Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhangang; Chen, Yangchao

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors and are dysregulated in cancer. miRNAs therefore represent promising therapeutic targets for cancer. Small molecules that could modulate the expression of miRNAs would thus have potential as anticancer agents. Library screening of small molecules targeting miRNAs is a useful technology platform for anticancer drug development. Here, we describe a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell-based luciferase reporter system which could be used to screen for small molecule modulators of tumor suppressor microRNA-34a.

  4. Effects of long DNA folding and small RNA stem-loop in thermophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yusuke T; Tlusty, Tsvi; Libchaber, Albert

    2012-10-30

    In thermophoresis, with the fluid at rest, suspensions move along a gradient of temperature. In an aqueous solution, a PEG polymer suspension is depleted from the hot region and builds a concentration gradient. In this gradient, DNA polymers of different sizes can be separated. In this work the effect of the polymer structure for genomic DNA and small RNA is studied. For genome-size DNA, individual single T4 DNA is visualized and tracked in a PEG solution under a temperature gradient built by infrared laser focusing. We find that T4 DNA follows steps of depletion, ring-like localization, and accumulation patterns as the PEG volume fraction is increased. Furthermore, a coil-globule transition for DNA is observed for a large enough PEG volume fraction. This drastically affects the localization position of T4 DNA. In a similar experiment, with small RNA such as ribozymes we find that the stem-loop folding of such polymers has important consequences. The RNA polymers having a long and rigid stem accumulate, whereas a polymer with stem length less than 4 base pairs shows depletion. Such measurements emphasize the crucial contribution of the double-stranded parts of RNA for thermal separation and selection under a temperature gradient. Because huge temperature gradients are present around hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean seafloor, this process might be relevant, at the origin of life, in an RNA world hypothesis. Ribozymes could be selected from a pool of random sequences depending on the length of their stems.

  5. A survey of small RNA population during FR-induced apical hook opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eLi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Photomorphogenesis is a mechanism employed by plants to regulate their architecture and developmental program in response to light conditions. As they emerge into light for the first time, dark-grown seedlings employ a rapid and finely-controlled photomorphogenic signaling network. Small RNAs have increasingly been revealed to play an important role in regulating multiple aspects of plant development, by modulating the stability of mRNAs. The rapid alteration of the mRNA transcriptome is a known hallmark of the de-etiolation response, thus we investigated the small RNA transcriptome during this process in specific seedling tissues. Here we describe a survey of the small RNA expression profile in four tissues of etiolated soybean seedlings, the cotyledons, hypocotyl and the convex and concave sides of the apical hook. We also investigate how this profile responds to a one-hour far-red light treatment. Our data suggests that miRNAs show a different global profile between these tissues and treatments, suggesting a possible role for tissue- and treatment-specific expression in the differential morphology of the seedling on de-etiolation. Further evidence for the role of miRNA in light-regulated development is given by the de-etiolation responses of a hypomorphic ago1 mutant, which displays reduced and delayed photomorphogenic responses in apical hook and cotyledon angle to far-red light.

  6. Soybean ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit: Mechanisms and determinants of RNA turnover. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, R.B. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Genetics

    1993-12-31

    An in vitro degradation system has been developed from petunia and soybean polysomes in order to investigate the mechanisms and determinants controlling RNA turnover in higher plants. This system faithfully degrades soybean ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase small subunit (rbcS) mRNA into the same products observed in total RNA preparations. In previous years it was shown that the most stable products represent a nested constellation of fragments, which are shortened from their 3{prime} ends, and have intact 5{prime} ends. Exogenous rbcS RNA tagged with novel 5{prime} sequence 15 or 56 bp long were synthesized in vitro as Sp6 and T7 runoff transcripts, respectively. When added to the system they were degraded faithfully into constellation of products which were 15 or 56 bp longer than the endogenous products, respectively. Detailed kinetics on the appearance of these exogenous products confirmed degradation proceeds in an overall 3{prime} to 5{prime} direction but suggested that there are multiple pathways through which the RNA may be degraded. To further demonstrate a precursor product relationships, in vitro synthesized transcripts truncated at their 3{prime} ends were shown to degrade into the expected smaller fragments previously mapped in the 5{prime} portion of the rbcS RNA.

  7. Small noncoding RNA GcvB is a novel regulator of acid resistance in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Ye

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The low pH environment of the human stomach is lethal for most microorganisms; but not Escherichia coli, which can tolerate extreme acid stress. Acid resistance in E. coli is hierarchically controlled by numerous regulators among which are small noncoding RNAs (sncRNA. Results In this study, we individually deleted seventy-nine sncRNA genes from the E. coli K12-MG1655 chromosome, and established a single-sncRNA gene knockout library. By systematically screening the sncRNA mutant library, we show that the sncRNA GcvB is a novel regulator of acid resistance in E. coli. We demonstrate that GcvB enhances the ability of E. coli to survive low pH by upregulating the levels of the alternate sigma factor RpoS. Conclusion GcvB positively regulates acid resistance by affecting RpoS expression. These data advance our understanding of the sncRNA regulatory network involved in modulating acid resistance in E. coli.

  8. RNA sequencing uncovers antisense RNAs and novel small RNAs in Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rhun, Anaïs; Beer, Yan Yan; Reimegård, Johan; Chylinski, Krzysztof; Charpentier, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human pathogen responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild to life-threatening infections. During the infectious process, the temporal and spatial expression of pathogenicity factors is tightly controlled by a complex network of protein and RNA regulators acting in response to various environmental signals. Here, we focus on the class of small RNA regulators (sRNAs) and present the first complete analysis of sRNA sequencing data in S. pyogenes. In the SF370 clinical isolate (M1 serotype), we identified 197 and 428 putative regulatory RNAs by visual inspection and bioinformatics screening of the sequencing data, respectively. Only 35 from the 197 candidates identified by visual screening were assigned a predicted function (T-boxes, ribosomal protein leaders, characterized riboswitches or sRNAs), indicating how little is known about sRNA regulation in S. pyogenes. By comparing our list of predicted sRNAs with previous S. pyogenes sRNA screens using bioinformatics or microarrays, 92 novel sRNAs were revealed, including antisense RNAs that are for the first time shown to be expressed in this pathogen. We experimentally validated the expression of 30 novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs. We show that the expression profile of 9 sRNAs including 2 predicted regulatory elements is affected by the endoribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y, highlighting the critical role of these enzymes in sRNA regulation.

  9. Diagnostic and prognostic signatures from the small non-coding RNA transcriptome in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens-Uzunova, E S; Jalava, S E; Dits, N F

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequent male malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer-related death in Western countries. Current clinical and pathological methods are limited in the prediction of postoperative outcome. It is becoming increasingly evident that small non-coding RNA...... RNAs (snoRNAs) and transfer RNAs (tRNAs). From microarray analysis, we derived a miRNA diagnostic classifier that accurately distinguishes normal from cancer samples. Furthermore, we were able to construct a PCa prognostic predictor that independently forecasts postoperative outcome. Importantly...

  10. A conserved small RNA promotes silencing of the outer membrane protein YbfM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anders Aamann; Johansen, Jesper; Nielsen, Jesper S;

    2009-01-01

    In the past few years an increasing number of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) in enterobacteria have been found to negatively regulate the expression of outer membrane proteins (OMPs) at the post-transcriptional level. These RNAs act under various growth and stress conditions, suggesting that one...... important physiological role of regulatory RNA molecules in Gram-negative bacteria is to modulate the cell surface and/or to prevent accumulation of OMPs in the envelope. Here, we extend the OMP-sRNA network by showing that the expression of the outer membrane protein YbfM is silenced by a conserved s...

  11. Genome-wide screening for components of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro-RNA (miRNA) pathways in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H-J; Chen, T; Ma, X-F; Xue, J; Pan, P-L; Zhang, X-C; Cheng, J-A; Zhang, C-X

    2013-12-01

    The brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, is a major rice pest in Asia, and accumulated evidence indicates that this species is susceptible to RNA interference (RNAi); however, the mechanism underlying RNAi and parental RNAi has not yet been determined. We comprehensively investigated the repertoire of core genes involved in small interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro-RNA (miRNA) pathways in the BPH by comparing its newly assembled transcriptome and genome with those of Drosophila melanogaster, Tribolium castaneum and Caenorhabditis elegans. Our analysis showed that the BPH possesses one drosha and two Dicer (dcr) genes, three dsRNA-binding motif protein genes, two Argonaute (ago) genes, two Eri-1-like genes (eri-1), and a Sid-1-like gene (sid-1). Additionally, we report for first time that parental RNAi might occur in this species, and siRNA pathway and Sid-1 were required for high efficiency of systemic RNAi triggered by exogenous dsRNA. Furthermore, our results also demonstrated that the miRNA pathway was involved in BPH metamorphosis as depletion of the ago1 or dcr1 gene severely impaired ecdysis. The BPH might be a good model system to study the molecular mechanism of systemic RNAi in hemimetabolous insects, and RNAi has potential to be developed to control this pest in agricultural settings.

  12. CCR5 small interfering RNA ameliorated joint inflammation in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongmei; Yang, Pingting; Fang, Fang; Ding, Shuang; Xiao, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is found in inflamed synovium of RA patients and is necessary for formation of RA. We aimed to check whether delivery of CCR5-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) via electroporation suppresses local inflammation in arthritis rats. Vectors encoding siRNA that target CCR5 or negative control siRNA were constructed for gene silencing and the silencing effects of suppressing CCR5 expression in synovium examined by western blot. The vector with strongest effect was delivered into the knee joint of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats by the in vivo electroporation method 7, 10, 13, and 16 days after immunization with Complete Freund's adjuvant. During an observation of 28 days, behavior, paw swelling, arthritis and histopathologic scoring were estimated. The expression level of CCR5 in synovium was evaluated by western blot and real-time PCR. Anti-CCR5 D1 siRNA was effectively inhibited CCR5 expression in vitro. Moreover, delivery of the siRNA into inflammatory joint also suppressed the expression of CCR5 in vivo and markedly suppressed paw swelling and inflammation. Local electroporation of anti-CCR5 siRNA into the left inflamed joints could achieve the silencing of CCR5 gene and alleviate local inflammation just in the knee joint injected with siRNA other than the opposite joint. Inhibition of CCR5 expression may provide a potential for treatment of RA.

  13. Small RNA profiling of Xenopus embryos reveals novel miRNAs and a new class of small RNAs derived from intronic transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Joanne L; Horswell, Stuart; Heliot, Claire; Armisen, Javier; Zimmerman, Lyle B; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Miska, Eric A; Hill, Caroline S

    2014-01-01

    Small RNA control of gene expression is critical for developmental processes in vertebrate embryos. To determine the dynamics of small RNA expression and to uncover novel small RNAs in the early vertebrate embryo, we performed high-throughput sequencing of all small RNAs in Xenopus tropicalis embryos at three developmental time points and in dissected halves of gastrula embryos. This analysis allowed us to identify novel microRNAs and we show that microRNA expression is highly dynamic and spatially localized in early embryos. In addition, we have developed a microRNA prediction pipeline and demonstrate that it has the power to predict new miRNAs that are experimentally detectable in frogs, mice, and humans. By combining the small RNA sequencing with mRNA profiling at the different developmental stages, we identify a new class of small noncoding RNAs that we name siteRNAs, which align in clusters to introns of protein-coding genes. We show that siteRNAs are derived from remnants of transposable elements present in the introns. We find that genes containing clusters of siteRNAs are transcriptionally repressed as compared with all genes. Furthermore, we show that this is true for individual genes containing siteRNA clusters, and that these genes are enriched in specific repressive histone modifications. Our data thus suggest a new mechanism of siteRNA-mediated gene silencing in vertebrates, and provide an example of how mobile elements can affect gene regulation.

  14. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Gene Silencing using Small Interferin RNA: DNA Hybrid Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, L

    2006-02-08

    The recent discovery that short hybrid RNA:DNA molecules (siHybrids) induce long-term silencing of gene expression in mammalian cells conflicts with the currently hypothesized mechanisms explaining the action of small, interfering RNA (siRNA). As a first step to elucidating the mechanism for this effect, we set out to quantify the delivery of siHybrids and determine their cellular localization in mammalian cells. We then tracked the segregation of the siHybrids into daughter cells after cell division. Markers for siHybrid delivery were shown to enter cells with and without the use of a transfection agent. Furthermore, delivery without transfection agent only occurred after a delay of 2-4 hours, suggesting a degradation process occurring in the cell culture media. Therefore, we studied the effects of nucleases and backbone modifications on the stability of siHybrids under cell culture conditions.

  15. Therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs/micro interfering RNA in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Grassi, Gabriele; Dapas, Barbara

    2015-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the predominant form of primary liver cancer and represents the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current available therapeutic approaches are poorly effective, especially for the advanced forms of the disease. In the last year, short double stranded RNA molecules termed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro interfering RNAs (miRNA), emerged as interesting molecules with potential therapeutic value for HCC. The practical use of these molecules is however limited by the identification of optimal molecular targets and especially by the lack of effective and targeted HCC delivery systems. Here we focus our discussion on the most recent advances in the identification of siRNAs/miRNAs molecular targets and on the development of suitable siRNA/miRNAs delivery systems.

  16. Nanoparticle-based delivery of small interfering RNA: challenges for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miele E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Evelina Miele,1,* Gian Paolo Spinelli,2,* Ermanno Miele,3 Enzo Di Fabrizio,3,6 Elisabetta Ferretti,4 Silverio Tomao,2 Alberto Gulino,1,5 1Department of Molecular Medicine, 2Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, 3Nanostructures, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, via Morego, 30, 16163 Genova, 4Department of Experimental Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, 5Center for Life Nanoscience, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Rome, Italy, 6BIONEM lab, University of Magna Graecia, Campus S. Venuta, Viale Europa 88100 Catanzaro, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: During recent decades there have been remarkable advances and profound changes in cancer therapy. Many therapeutic strategies learned at the bench, including monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors, have been used at the bedside, leading to important successes. One of the most important advances in biology has been the discovery that small interfering RNA (siRNA is able to regulate the expression of genes, by a phenomenon known as RNA interference (RNAi. RNAi is one of the most rapidly growing fields of research in biology and therapeutics. Much research effort has gone into the application of this new discovery in the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. However, even though these molecules may have potential and strong utility, some limitations make their clinical application difficult, including delivery problems, side effects due to off-target actions, disturbance of physiological functions of the cellular machinery involved in gene silencing, and induction of the innate immune response. Many researchers have attempted to overcome these limitations and to improve the safety of potential RNAi-based therapeutics. Nanoparticles, which are nanostructured entities with tunable size, shape, and surface, as well as biological behavior, provide an ideal opportunity to modify current

  17. Deep sequencing reveals small RNA characterization of invasive micropapillary carcinomas of the breast.

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    Li, Shuai; Yang, Cuicui; Zhai, Lili; Zhang, Wenwei; Yu, Jing; Gu, Feng; Lang, Ronggang; Fan, Yu; Gong, Meihua; Zhang, Xiuqing; Fu, Li

    2012-11-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) is an uncommon histological type of breast cancer. IMPC has a special growth pattern and a more aggressive behavior than invasive ductal carcinomas of no special types (IDC-NSTs). microRNAs are a large class of non-coding RNAs involved in the regulation of various biological processes. Here, we analyzed the small RNA transcriptomes of five formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) pure IMPC samples and five FFPE IDC-NSTs samples by means of next-generation sequencing, generating a total of >170,000,000 clean reads. In an unsupervised cluster analysis, differently expressed miRNAs generated a tree with clear distinction between IMPC and IDC-NSTs classes. Paired fresh-frozen and FFPE specimens showed very similar miRNA expression profiles. By means of RT-qPCR, we further investigated miRNA expression in more IMPC (n = 22) and IDC-NSTs (n = 24) FFPE samples and found let-7b, miR-30c, miR-148a, miR-181a, miR-181a*, and miR-181b were significantly differently expressed between the two groups. We also elucidated several features of miRNA in these breast cancer tissues including 5' variability, miRNA editing, and 3' untemplated addition. Our findings will lead to further understanding of the invasive potency of IMPC and gain an insight into the diversity and complexity of small RNA molecules in breast cancer tissues.

  18. tRF2Cancer: A web server to detect tRNA-derived small RNA fragments (tRFs) and their expression in multiple cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ling-Ling; Xu, Wei-Lin; Liu, Shun; Sun, Wen-Ju; Li, Jun-Hao; Wu, Jie; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2016-07-08

    tRNA-derived small RNA fragments (tRFs) are one class of small non-coding RNAs derived from transfer RNAs (tRNAs). tRFs play important roles in cellular processes and are involved in multiple cancers. High-throughput small RNA (sRNA) sequencing experiments can detect all the cellular expressed sRNAs, including tRFs. However, distinguishing genuine tRFs from RNA fragments generated by random degradation remains a major challenge. In this study, we developed an integrated web-based computing system, tRF2Cancer, to accurately identify tRFs from sRNA deep-sequencing data and evaluate their expression in multiple cancers. The binomial test was introduced to evaluate whether reads from a small RNA-seq data set represent tRFs or degraded fragments. A classification method was then used to annotate the types of tRFs based on their sites of origin in pre-tRNA or mature tRNA. We applied the pipeline to analyze 10 991 data sets from 32 types of cancers and identified thousands of expressed tRFs. A tool called 'tRFinCancer' was developed to facilitate the users to inspect the expression of tRFs across different types of cancers. Another tool called 'tRFBrowser' shows both the sites of origin and the distribution of chemical modification sites in tRFs on their source tRNA. The tRF2Cancer web server is available at http://rna.sysu.edu.cn/tRFfinder/.

  19. Progress of Targeting Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Small Interfering RNA in Liver Fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Zhou; Xue-feng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a common pathological consequence of a variety of chronic stimuli, including viral, autoimmune, drug-induced, cholestatic and metabolic diseases. Fibrosis is driven by a dynamic process involving increased synthesis of matrix components and a failure of physiological mechanisms of matrix turnover. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) remains a central event in fibrosis. HSCs are the main source of extracellular matrix (ECM). Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), which is the fibrogenic master cytokine, can induce the activation of HSCs to produce a large amount of ECM, and is capable of inducing apoptosis of liver cells. RNA interference (RNAi) is a novel gene disruption technology. Studies have shown that small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting TGF-β1 may inhibit the activation and proliferation of HSCs, suppress ECM synthesis and block liver fibrosis. TGF-β1 siRNA-mediated gene silencing therapy provides a new avenue for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes recent progresses in research on HSCs, TGF-β1 and TGF-β1 siRNA in liver fibrosis.

  20. Blockage of receptor-interacting protein 2 expression by small interfering RNA in murine macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to demonstrate that blocking the receptor-interacting protein2(Rip2)expression can decrease inflammatory cytokine production by macrophage and protect mice from endotoxin lethality.Murine Rip2 small interfering RNA(siRNA)plasmids were constructed and transfected into macrophage and Rip2 expression was detected with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)and western blot.Cell proliferation was assayed with MTT.TNF-α concentration was assayed with ELISA and high-mobility group box 1 protein(HMGB1)level with semi-quantitative western blot after lipopolysaccharide(LPS)stimulation.LPS challenge was given after the plasmids were injected into mice and the survival rate was calculated.Rip2 siRNA plasmid could block the mRNA and protein expression of Rip2 and promote cell proliferation.Blocking Rip2 could attenuate LPS-induced TNF-~ and HMGB1 production.The HMGB1 expression in the liver decreased to(40.21±11.03)pg/g,and serum TNF-α level decreased to(300.43±59.26)ng/L(P<0.05).The survival rate of mice from endotoxemia was also improved(P<0.05).The results demonstrate that Rip2 siRNA plasmid can block the expression of Rip2,decrease the production of TNF-α and HMGB1 and protect mice from fatal endotoxemia.

  1. A stress-induced small RNA modulates alpha-rhizobial cell cycle progression.

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    Marta Robledo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms adjusting replication initiation and cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions are crucial for microbial survival. Functional characterization of the trans-encoded small non-coding RNA (trans-sRNA EcpR1 in the plant-symbiotic alpha-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti revealed a role of this class of riboregulators in modulation of cell cycle regulation. EcpR1 is broadly conserved in at least five families of the Rhizobiales and is predicted to form a stable structure with two defined stem-loop domains. In S. meliloti, this trans-sRNA is encoded downstream of the divK-pleD operon. ecpR1 belongs to the stringent response regulon, and its expression was induced by various stress factors and in stationary phase. Induced EcpR1 overproduction led to cell elongation and increased DNA content, while deletion of ecpR1 resulted in reduced competitiveness. Computationally predicted EcpR1 targets were enriched with cell cycle-related mRNAs. Post-transcriptional repression of the cell cycle key regulatory genes gcrA and dnaA mediated by mRNA base-pairing with the strongly conserved loop 1 of EcpR1 was experimentally confirmed by two-plasmid differential gene expression assays and compensatory changes in sRNA and mRNA. Evidence is presented for EcpR1 promoting RNase E-dependent degradation of the dnaA mRNA. We propose that EcpR1 contributes to modulation of cell cycle regulation under detrimental conditions.

  2. Small interference RNA targeting vascular endothelial growth factor gene effectively attenuates retinal neovascularization in mice model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Yi-chun; SUN Bei; ZHAO Kan-xing; HAN Mei; WANG Yu-chuan

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanism of retinal neovascularization is not understood completely.Many growth factors are involved in the process of retinal neovascularization,such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and pigment epithelium-deprived factor (PEDF),which are the representatives of angiogenic and antiangiogenic molecules respectively.Oxygen induced retinopathy (OIR) is a useful model to investigate retinal neovascularization.The present study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of small interference RNA (siRNA) targeting VEGF gene in attenuating oxygen induced retinopathy (OIR) by regulating VEGF to PEDF ratio (VEGF/PEDF).Methods In vitro,cultured EOMA cells were transfected with VEGF-siRNA (psi-HITM/EGFPNEGF siRNA) and LipofectamineTM 2000 for 24,48,and 72 hours,respectively.Expression of VEGF mRNA was evaluated by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the level of VEGF protein was analyzed by Western blotting.In vivo,OIR model mice were established,the mice (C57BL/6J) received an intra-vitreal injection of 1 μl of mixture of psi-HITM/EGFPNEGF siRNA and Lipofectamine 2000.Expressions of retinal VEGF and PEDF protein were measured by Western blotting,retinal neovascularization was observed by fluorescein angiography,and quantified.Results In vitro psi-HITM/EGFP/VEGF siRNA treatment significantly reduced VEGF mRNA and protein expression.In vivo,with decreased VEGF and VEGF-PEDF ratio,significant attenuation of neovascular tufts,avascular regions,tortuous,and dilated blood vessels were observed in the interfered animals.Conclusions VEGF plays an important role in OIR,and the transfection of VEGF-siRNA can effectively downregulate VEGF expression in vivo,accompanied by the downregulation of VEGF-PEDF ratio,and simultaneous attenuation of retinal neovascularization was also observed.These findings suggest that VEGF/PEDF may serve as a potential target in the treatment of retinal neovascularization and RNA interference targeting VEGF expression

  3. Comparison of Small RNA Profiles of Glycine max and Glycine soja at Early Developmental Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuzhe; Mui, Zeta; Liu, Xuan; Yim, Aldrin Kay-Yuen; Qin, Hao; Wong, Fuk-Ling; Chan, Ting-Fung; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Lam, Hon-Ming; Lim, Boon Leong

    2016-12-06

    Small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and phased small interfering RNAs (phasiRNAs; from PHAS loci), play key roles in plant development. Cultivated soybean, Glycine max, contributes a great deal to food production, but, compared to its wild kin, Glycine soja, it may lose some genetic information during domestication. In this work, we analyzed the sRNA profiles of different tissues in both cultivated (C08) and wild soybeans (W05) at three stages of development. A total of 443 known miRNAs and 15 novel miRNAs showed varying abundances between different samples, but the miRNA profiles were generally similar in both accessions. Based on a sliding window analysis workflow that we developed, 50 PHAS loci generating 55 21-nucleotide phasiRNAs were identified in C08, and 46 phasiRNAs from 41 PHAS loci were identified in W05. In germinated seedlings, phasiRNAs were more abundant in C08 than in W05. Disease resistant TIR-NB-LRR genes constitute a very large family of PHAS loci. PhasiRNAs were also generated from several loci that encode for NAC transcription factors, Dicer-like 2 (DCL2), Pentatricopeptide Repeat (PPR), and Auxin Signaling F-box 3 (AFB3) proteins. To investigate the possible involvement of miRNAs in initiating the PHAS-phasiRNA pathway, miRNA target predictions were performed and 17 C08 miRNAs and 15 W05 miRNAs were predicted to trigger phasiRNAs biogenesis. In summary, we provide a comprehensive description of the sRNA profiles of wild versus cultivated soybeans, and discuss the possible roles of sRNAs during soybean germination.

  4. Genetic characterization of clinical acanthamoeba isolates from Japan using nuclear and mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Moshiur; Yagita, Kenji; Kobayashi, Akira; Oikawa, Yosaburo; Hussein, Amjad I A; Matsumura, Takahiro; Tokoro, Masaharu

    2013-08-01

    Because of an increased number of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) along with associated disease burdens, medical professionals have become more aware of this pathogen in recent years. In this study, by analyzing both the nuclear 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene loci, 27 clinical Acanthamoeba strains that caused AK in Japan were classified into 3 genotypes, T3 (3 strains), T4 (23 strains), and T5 (one strain). Most haplotypes were identical to the reference haplotypes reported from all over the world, and thus no specificity of the haplotype distribution in Japan was found. The T4 sub-genotype analysis using the 16S rRNA gene locus also revealed a clear sub-conformation within the T4 cluster, and lead to the recognition of a new sub-genotype T4i, in addition to the previously reported sub-genotypes T4a-T4h. Furthermore, 9 out of 23 strains in the T4 genotype were identified to a specific haplotype (AF479533), which seems to be a causal haplotype of AK. While heterozygous nuclear haplotypes were observed from 2 strains, the mitochondrial haplotypes were homozygous as T4 genotype in the both strains, and suggested a possibility of nuclear hybridization (mating reproduction) between different strains in Acanthamoeba. The nuclear 18S rRNA gene and mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene loci of Acanthamoeba spp. possess different unique characteristics usable for the genotyping analyses, and those specific features could contribute to the establishment of molecular taxonomy for the species complex of Acanthamoeba.

  5. Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 associates with small nucleolar RNA which contributes to ribosome biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsufumi eOzoe

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin receptor substrates (IRSs are well known to play crucial roles in mediating intracellular signals of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs/insulin. Previously we showed that IRS-1 forms high molecular mass complexes containing RNAs. To identify RNAs in IRS-1 complexes, we performed UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP analysis using HEK293 cells expressing FLAG-IRS-1 and FLAG-IRS-2. We detected the radioactive signals in the immunoprecipitates of FLAG-IRS-1 proportional to the UV irradiation, but not in the immunoprecipitates of FLAG-IRS-2, suggesting the direct contact of RNAs with IRS-1. RNAs cross-linked to IRS-1 were then amplified by RT-PCR, followed by sequence analysis. We isolated sequence tags attributed to 25 messenger RNAs and 8 non-coding RNAs, including small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs. We focused on the interaction of IRS-1 with U96A snoRNA (U96A and its host Rack1 (receptor for activated C kinase 1 pre-mRNA. We confirmed the interaction of IRS-1 with U96A, and with RACK1 pre-mRNA by immunoprecipitation with IRS-1 followed by Northern blotting or RT-PCR analyses. Mature U96A in IRS-1-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts was quantitatively less than WT. We also found that a part of nuclear IRS-1 is localized in the Cajal body, a nuclear subcompartment where snoRNA mature. The unanticipated function of IRS-1 in snoRNA biogenesis highlights the potential of RNA-associated IRS-1 complex to open a new line of investigation to dissect the novel mechanisms regulating IGFs/insulin-mediated biological events.

  6. MicroRNA-dependent regulation of transcription in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Molina-Pinelo

    Full Text Available Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC and adenocarcinoma are the most common histological subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, and have been traditionally managed in the clinic as a single entity. Increasing evidence, however, illustrates the biological diversity of these two histological subgroups of lung cancer, and supports the need to improve our understanding of the molecular basis beyond the different phenotypes if we aim to develop more specific and individualized targeted therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify microRNA (miRNA-dependent transcriptional regulation differences between SCC and adenocarcinoma histological lung cancer subtypes. In this work, paired miRNA (667 miRNAs by TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA and mRNA profiling (Whole Genome 44 K array G112A, Agilent was performed in tumor samples of 44 NSCLC patients. Nine miRNAs and 56 mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in SCC versus adenocarcinoma samples. Eleven of these 56 mRNA were predicted as targets of the miRNAs identified to be differently expressed in these two histological conditions. Of them, 6 miRNAs (miR-149, miR-205, miR-375, miR-378, miR-422a and miR-708 and 9 target genes (CEACAM6, CGN, CLDN3, ABCC3, MLPH, ACSL5, TMEM45B, MUC1 were validated by quantitative PCR in an independent cohort of 41 lung cancer patients. Furthermore, the inverse correlation between mRNAs and microRNAs expression was also validated. These results suggest miRNA-dependent transcriptional regulation differences play an important role in determining key hallmarks of NSCLC, and may provide new biomarkers for personalized treatment strategies.

  7. miRMOD: a tool for identification and analysis of 5′ and 3′ miRNA modifications in Next Generation Sequencing small RNA data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Kaushik

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, the microRNAs (miRNAs have emerged to be important regulators of gene expression across various species. Several studies have confirmed different types of post-transcriptional modifications at terminal ends of miRNAs. The reports indicate that miRNA modifications are conserved and functionally significant as it may affect miRNA stability and ability to bind mRNA targets, hence affecting target gene repression. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS of the small RNA (sRNA provides an efficient and reliable method to explore miRNA modifications. The need for dedicated software, especially for users with little knowledge of computers, to determine and analyze miRNA modifications in sRNA NGS data, motivated us to develop miRMOD. miRMOD is a user-friendly, Microsoft Windows and Graphical User Interface (GUI based tool for identification and analysis of 5′ and 3′ miRNA modifications (non-templated nucleotide additions and trimming in sRNA NGS data. In addition to identification of miRNA modifications, the tool also predicts and compares the targets of query and modified miRNAs. In order to compare binding affinities for the same target, miRMOD utilizes minimum free energies of the miRNA:target and modified-miRNA:target interactions. Comparisons of the binding energies may guide experimental exploration of miRNA post-transcriptional modifications. The tool is available as a stand-alone package to overcome large data transfer problems commonly faced in web-based high-throughput (HT sequencing data analysis tools. miRMOD package is freely available at http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/miRMOD.

  8. Combined small RNA and degradome sequencing reveals complex microRNA regulation of catechin biosynthesis in tea (Camellia sinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ping; Cheng, Chunzhen; Lin, Yuling; Zhu, Qiufang; Lin, Jinke

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous non-coding small RNAs playing crucial regulatory roles in plants. Tea, a globally popular non-alcoholic drink, is rich in health-enhancing catechins. In this study, 69 conserved and 47 novel miRNAs targeting 644 genes were identified by high-throughout sequencing. Predicted target genes of miRNAs were mainly involved in plant growth, signal transduction, morphogenesis and defense. To further identify targets of tea miRNAs, degradome sequencing and RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5’cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) were applied. Using degradome sequencing, 26 genes mainly involved in transcription factor, resistance protein and signal transduction protein synthesis were identified as potential miRNA targets, with 5 genes subsequently verified. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed that the expression patterns of novel-miR1, novel-miR2, csn-miR160a, csn-miR162a, csn-miR394 and csn-miR396a were negatively correlated with catechin content. The expression of six miRNAs (csn-miRNA167a, csn-miR2593e, csn-miR4380a, csn-miR3444b, csn-miR5251 and csn-miR7777-5p.1) and their target genes involved in catechin biosynthesis were also analyzed by qRT-PCR. Negative and positive correlations were found between these miRNAs and catechin contents, while positive correlations were found between their target genes and catechin content. This result suggests that these miRNAs may negatively regulate catechin biosynthesis by down-regulating their biosynthesis-related target genes. Taken together, our results indicate that miRNAs are crucial regulators in tea, with the results of 5’-RLM-RACE and expression analyses revealing the important role of miRNAs in catechin anabolism. Our findings should facilitate future research to elucidate the function of miRNAs in catechin biosynthesis. PMID:28225779

  9. Small RNA Control of Cell-to-Cell Communication in Vibrio Harveyi and Vibrio Cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-to-cell communication, by which bacteria coordinate gene expression and behavior on a population-wide scale. Quorum sensing is accomplished through production, secretion, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules termed autoinducers. The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae and the marine bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi incorporate information from multiple autoinducers, and also environmental signals and metabolic cues into their quorum-sensing pathways. At the core of these pathways lie several homologous small regulatory RNA molecules, the Quorum Regulatory RNAs. Small noncoding RNAs have emerged throughout the bacterial and eukaryotic kingdoms as key regulators of behavioral and developmental processes. Here, I review our present understanding of the role of the Qrr small RNAs in integrating quorum-sensing signals and in regulating the individual cells response to this information.

  10. Atu027, a liposomal small interfering RNA formulation targeting protein kinase N3, inhibits cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleku, Manuela; Schulz, Petra; Keil, Oliver; Santel, Ansgar; Schaeper, Ute; Dieckhoff, Britta; Janke, Oliver; Endruschat, Jens; Durieux, Birgit; Röder, Nadine; Löffler, Kathrin; Lange, Christian; Fechtner, Melanie; Möpert, Kristin; Fisch, Gerald; Dames, Sibylle; Arnold, Wolfgang; Jochims, Karin; Giese, Klaus; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Scholz, Arne; Kaufmann, Jörg

    2008-12-01

    We have previously described a small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery system (AtuPLEX) for RNA interference (RNAi) in the vasculature of mice. Here we report preclinical data for Atu027, a siRNA-lipoplex directed against protein kinase N3 (PKN3), currently under development for the treatment of advanced solid cancer. In vitro studies revealed that Atu027-mediated inhibition of PKN3 function in primary endothelial cells impaired tube formation on extracellular matrix and cell migration, but is not essential for proliferation. Systemic administration of Atu027 by repeated bolus injections or infusions in mice, rats, and nonhuman primates results in specific, RNAi-mediated silencing of PKN3 expression. We show the efficacy of Atu027 in orthotopic mouse models for prostate and pancreatic cancers with significant inhibition of tumor growth and lymph node metastasis formation. The tumor vasculature of Atu027-treated animals showed a specific reduction in lymph vessel density but no significant changes in microvascular density.

  11. Improving fold activation of small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) with rational RNA engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sarai; Chappell, James; Sankar, Sitara; Chew, Rebecca; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory RNAs have become integral components of the synthetic biology and bioengineering toolbox for controlling gene expression. We recently expanded this toolbox by creating small transcription activating RNAs (STARs) that act by disrupting the formation of a target transcriptional terminator hairpin placed upstream of a gene. While STARs are a promising addition to the repertoire of RNA regulators, much work remains to be done to optimize the fold activation of these systems. Here we apply rational RNA engineering strategies to improve the fold activation of two STAR regulators. We demonstrate that a combination of promoter strength tuning and multiple RNA engineering strategies can improve fold activation from 5.4-fold to 13.4-fold for a STAR regulator derived from the pbuE riboswitch terminator. We then validate the generality of our approach and show that these same strategies improve fold activation from 2.1-fold to 14.6-fold for an unrelated STAR regulator, opening the door to creating a range of additional STARs to use in a broad array of biotechnologies. We also establish that the optimizations preserve the orthogonality of these STARs between themselves and a set of RNA transcriptional repressors, enabling these optimized STARs to be used in sophisticated circuits.

  12. Small Molecule Inhibition of microRNA-210 Reprograms an Oncogenic Hypoxic Circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costales, Matthew G; Haga, Christopher L; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Phinney, Donald G; Disney, Matthew D

    2017-03-08

    A hypoxic state is critical to the metastatic and invasive characteristics of cancer. Numerous pathways play critical roles in cancer maintenance, many of which include noncoding RNAs such as microRNA (miR)-210 that regulates hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). Herein, we describe the identification of a small molecule named Targapremir-210 that binds to the Dicer site of the miR-210 hairpin precursor. This interaction inhibits production of the mature miRNA, derepresses glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like enzyme (GPD1L), a hypoxia-associated protein negatively regulated by miR-210, decreases HIF-1α, and triggers apoptosis of triple negative breast cancer cells only under hypoxic conditions. Further, Targapremir-210 inhibits tumorigenesis in a mouse xenograft model of hypoxic triple negative breast cancer. Many factors govern molecular recognition of biological targets by small molecules. For protein, chemoproteomics and activity-based protein profiling are invaluable tools to study small molecule target engagement and selectivity in cells. Such approaches are lacking for RNA, leaving a void in the understanding of its druggability. We applied Chemical Cross-Linking and Isolation by Pull Down (Chem-CLIP) to study the cellular selectivity and the on- and off-targets of Targapremir-210. Targapremir-210 selectively recognizes the miR-210 precursor and can differentially recognize RNAs in cells that have the same target motif but have different expression levels, revealing this important feature for selectively drugging RNAs for the first time. These studies show that small molecules can be rapidly designed to selectively target RNAs and affect cellular responses to environmental conditions, resulting in favorable benefits against cancer. Further, they help define rules for identifying druggable targets in the transcriptome.

  13. A method for in vivo identification of bacterial small RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Jonathan; Djapgne, Louise; Tran, Bao Quoc; Goo, Young Ah; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2014-12-01

    Small bacterial regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) have gained immense appreciation over the last decade for their roles in mediating posttranscriptional gene regulation of numerous physiological processes. Several proteins contribute to sRNA stability and regulation, most notably the Hfq RNA-binding protein. However, not all sRNAs rely on Hfq for their stability. It is therefore likely that other proteins contribute to the stability and function of certain bacterial sRNAs. Here, we describe a methodology for identifying in vivo-binding proteins of sRNAs, developed using the iron-responsive PrrF and PrrH sRNAs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. RNA was isolated from iron-depleted cultures, which were irradiated to cross-link nucleoprotein complexes. Subsequently, PrrF- and PrrH-protein complexes were enriched using cDNA "bait", and enriched RNA-protein complexes were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry to identify PrrF and PrrH associated proteins. This method identified Hfq as a potential PrrF- and PrrH-binding protein. Interestingly, Hfq was identified more often in samples probed with the PrrF cDNA "bait" as compared to the PrrH cDNA "bait", suggesting Hfq has a stronger binding affinity for the PrrF sRNAs in vivo. Hfq binding to the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs was validated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified Hfq protein from P. aeruginosa. As such, this study demonstrates that in vivo cross-linking coupled with sequence-specific affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (SSAC-MS/MS) is an effective methodology for unbiased identification of bacterial sRNA-binding proteins.

  14. Control of female gamete formation by a small RNA pathway in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo-Monfil, Vianey; Durán-Figueroa, Noé; Arteaga-Vandázquez, Mario; Demesa-Arévalo, Edgar; Autran, Daphné; Grimanelli, Daniel; Slotkin, Keith; Martienssen, Robert A.; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    In the ovules of most sexual flowering plants female gametogenesis is initiated from a single surviving gametic cell, the functional megaspore, formed after meiosis of the somatically derived megaspore mother cell (MMC)1,2. Because some mutants and certain sexual species exhibit more than one MMC2-4, and many others are able to form gametes without meiosis (by apomixis)5, it has been suggested that somatic cells in the ovule are competent to respond to a local signal likely to play an important function in determination6. Here we show that the Arabidopsis protein ARGONAUTE9 (AGO9) controls female gamete formation by restricting the specification of gametophyte precursors in a dosage-dependent, non-cell-autonomous manner. Mutations in AGO9 lead to the differentiation of multiple gametic cells that are able to initiate gametogenesis. The AGO9 protein is not expressed in the gamete lineage; instead, it is expressed in cytoplasmic foci of somatic companion cells. Mutations in SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3 and RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6 exhibit an identical defect to ago9 mutants, indicating that the movement of small RNA (sRNA) silencing out of somatic companion cells is necessary for controlling the specification of gametic cells. AGO9 preferentially interacts with 24 nucleotide (nt) sRNAs derived from transposable elements (TEs), and its activity is necessary to silence TEs in female gametes and their accessory cells. Our results show that AGO9-dependent sRNA silencing is crucial to specify cell fate in the Arabidopsis ovule, and that epigenetic reprogramming in companion cells is necessary for sRNA–dependent silencing in plant gametes. PMID:20208518

  15. Application of small RNA technology for improved control of parasitic helminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Collette; Winter, Alan D; Marks, Neil D; Gu, Henry; McNeilly, Tom N; Gillan, Victoria; Devaney, Eileen

    2015-08-15

    Over the last decade microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of post-transcriptional gene expression. miRNAs are short, non-coding RNAs that regulate a variety of processes including cancer, organ development and immune function. This class of small RNAs bind with partial complementarity to their target mRNA sequences, most often in the 3'UTR, to negatively regulate gene expression. In parasitic helminths, miRNAs are being increasingly studied for their potential roles in development and host-parasite interactions. The availability of genome data, combined with small RNA sequencing, has paved the way to profile miRNAs expressed at particular developmental stages for many parasitic helminths. While some miRNAs are conserved across species, others appear to be unique to specific parasites, suggesting important roles in adaptation and survival in the host environment. Some miRNAs are released from parasites, in exosomes or in protein complexes, and the potential effects of these on host immune function are being increasingly studied. In addition, release of miRNAs from schistosome and filarial parasites into host plasma can be exploited for the development of specific and sensitive diagnostic biomarkers of infection. Interfering with miRNA function, as well as silencing key components of the pathways they regulate, will progress our understanding of parasite development and provide a novel approach to therapeutic control. RNA interference (RNAi) by siRNAs has proven to be inconsistent in parasitic nematodes. However, the recent successes reported for schistosome and liver fluke RNAi, encourage further efforts to enhance delivery of RNA and improve in vitro culture systems and assays to monitor phenotypic effects in nematodes. These improvements are important for the establishment of reliable functional genomic platforms for novel drug and vaccine development. In this review we focus on the important roles of mi

  16. Translational control of small heat shock genes in mesophilic and thermophilic cyanobacteria by RNA thermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimdins, Annika; Klinkert, Birgit; Aschke-Sonnenborn, Ursula; Kaiser, Friederike M; Kortmann, Jens; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria constitute a heterogeneous phylum of oxygen-producing, photosynthetic prokaryotes. They are susceptible to various stress conditions like heat, salt, or light stress, all inducing the cyanobacterial heat shock response (HSR). Cyanobacterial small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are known to preserve thylakoid membrane integrity under stress conditions, thereby protecting the photosynthesis machinery. In Synechocystis sp PCC 6803, synthesis of the sHsp Hsp17 is regulated by an RNA thermometer (RNAT) in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the hsp17 mRNA. RNATs are direct temperature sensors that control expression of many bacterial heat shock and virulence genes. They hinder translation at low temperatures by base pairing, thus blocking ribosome access to the mRNA.   To explore the temperature range in which RNATs act, we studied various RNAT candidates upstream of sHsp genes from mesophilic and thermophilic cyanobacteria. The mesophilic cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis and Nostoc sp chromosomally encode two sHsps each. Reporter gene studies suggested RNAT-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of shsp expression in both organisms. Detailed structural analysis of the two A. variabilis candidates revealed two novel RNAT types. The first, avashort, regulates translation primarily by masking of the AUG translational start codon. The second, featuring an extended initial hairpin, thus named avalong, presumably makes use of complex tertiary interaction. The 5'-UTR of the small heat shock gene hspA in the thermophile Thermosynechococcus elongatus is predicted to adopt an extended secondary structure. Structure probing revealed that the ribosome binding site was blocked at temperatures below 55 °C. The results of this study demonstrate that cyanobacteria commonly use RNATs to control expression of their small heat shock genes.

  17. Structure of the Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2 RNA and Designed Small Molecules That Reduce Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L.; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Lohman, Jeremy R.; Guan, Lirui; Tran, Tuan; Sarkar, Partha; Schatz, George C.; Disney, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is an untreatable neuromuscular disorder caused by a r(CCUG) expansion (r(CCUG)exp) that folds into an extended hairpin with periodically repeating 2×2 nucleotide internal loops (5’CCUG/3’GUCC). We designed multivalent compounds that improve DM2-associated defects using information about RNA-small molecule interactions. We also report the first crystal structure of r(CCUG)exp refined to 2.35 Å. Structural analysis of the three 5’CCUG/3’GUCC repeat internal loop...

  18. Profiling of small RNA cargo of extracellular vesicles shed by Trypanosoma cruzi reveals a specific extracellular signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Calero, Tamara; Garcia-Silva, Rosa; Pena, Alvaro; Robello, Carlos; Persson, Helena; Rovira, Carlos; Naya, Hugo; Cayota, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Over the last years, an expanding family of small regulatory RNAs (e.g. microRNAs, siRNAs and piRNAs) was recognized as key players in novel forms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in most eukaryotes. However, the machinery associated with Ago/Dicer-dependent small RNA biogenesis was thought to be either entirely lost or extensively simplified in some unicellular organisms including Trypanosoma cruzi, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Leishmania major and Plasmodium falciparum. Although the biogenesis of small RNAs from non-coding RNAs represent a minor fraction of the normal small RNA transcriptome in eukaryotic cells, they represent the unique small RNA pathways in Trypanosoma cruzi which produce different populations of small RNAs derived from tRNAs, rRNAs, sn/snoRNAs and mRNAs. These small RNAs are secreted included in extracellular vesicles and transferred to other parasites and susceptible mammalian cells. This process represents a novel form of cross-kingdom transfer of genetic material suggesting that secreted vesicles could represent new relevant pieces in life cycle transitions, infectivity and cell-to-cell communication. Here, we provide for the first time a detailed analysis of the small RNA cargo of extracellular vesicles from T. cruzi epimastigotes under nutritional stress conditions compared to the respective intracellular compartment using deep sequencing. Compared with the intracellular compartment, shed extracellular vesicles showed a specific extracellular signature conformed by distinctive patterns of small RNAs derived from rRNA, tRNA, sno/snRNAs and protein coding sequences which evidenced specific secretory small RNA processing pathways.

  19. In human granulosa cells from small antral follicles, androgen receptor mRNA and androgen levels in follicular fluid correlate with FSH receptor mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. E.; Rasmussen, I. A.; Kristensen, Stine Gry;

    2011-01-01

    RNA analysis (24 women). Expression of Androgen Receptor (AR) mRNA levels in granulosa cells, and of androstenedione and testosterone in FF, were correlated to the expression of FSH receptor (FSHR), LH receptor (LHR), CYP19 and anti-Müllerian Hormone-receptor2 (AMHR2) mRNA in the granulosa cells and to the FF...... with the expression of AMHR2, but did not correlate with any of the hormones in the FF. These data demonstrate an intimate association between AR expression in immature granulosa cells, and the expression of FSHR in normal small human antral follicles and between the FF levels of androgen and FSHR expression...

  20. Small RNA-directed epigenetic programming of embryonic stem cell cardiac differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Hossein; Wagner, Nicole; Michiels, Jean-François; Cuzin, François; Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Rassoulzadegan, Minoo

    2017-01-01

    Microinjection of small noncoding RNAs in one-cell embryos was reported in several instances to result in transcriptional activation of target genes. To determine the molecular mechanisms involved and to explore whether such epigenetic regulations could play a role in early development, we used a cell culture system as close as possible to the embryonic state. We report efficient cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells induced by small non-coding RNAs with sequences of Cdk9, a key player in cardiomyocyte differentiation. Transfer of oligoribonucleotides representing parts of the Cdk9 mRNA into ES and mouse embryo fibroblast cultures resulted in upregulation of transcription. Dependency on Argonaute proteins and endogenous antisense transcripts indicated that the inducer oligoribonucleotides were processed by the RNAi machinery. Upregulation of Cdk9 expression resulted in increased efficiency of cardiac differentiation suggesting a potential tool for stem cell-based regenerative medicine. PMID:28165496

  1. The small RNA-based odyssey of epigenetic information in plants: from cells to species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirouze, Marie

    2012-12-01

    In the past years a plethora of roles for small RNAs (sRNAs) have been revealed in developmental biology, physiology, pathogen interactions, and more recently in genome stability and transposon control. sRNAs have a repressive impact on gene expression by directly interfering with endogenous mRNAs or virus RNA, or by maintaining heterochromatin. In plants, the most abundant sRNAs are by far the ones produced from heterochromatic loci and playing a role in epigenetic regulation. Here, I review some specific examples of the roles of these sRNAs belonging to the class of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in controlling the epigenetic regulation of the genome. I will highlight their role as mediators of epigenetic information at various organization levels: between two alleles within a single cell, two tissues within an organism, two individuals or two generations within a species, and even two species within a kingdom.

  2. Rationally designed small molecules that target both the DNA and RNA causing myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lien; Luu, Long M; Peng, Shaohong; Serrano, Julio F; Chan, H Y Edwin; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2015-11-11

    Single-agent, single-target therapeutic approaches are often limited by a complex disease pathobiology. We report rationally designed, multi-target agents for myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). DM1 originates in an abnormal expansion of CTG repeats (CTG(exp)) in the DMPK gene. The resultant expanded CUG transcript (CUG(exp)) identified as a toxic agent sequesters important proteins, such as muscleblind-like proteins (MBNL), undergoes repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation, and potentially causes microRNA dysregulation. We report rationally designed small molecules that target the DM1 pathobiology in vitro in three distinct ways by acting simultaneously as transcription inhibitors, by inhibiting aberrant protein binding to the toxic RNA, and by acting as RNase mimics to degrade the toxic RNA. In vitro, the agents are shown to (1) bind CTG(exp) and inhibit formation of the CUG(exp) transcript, (2) bind CUG(exp) and inhibit sequestration of MBNL1, and (3) cleave CUG(exp) in an RNase-like manner. The most potent compounds are capable of reducing the levels of CUG(exp) in DM1 model cells, and one reverses two separate CUG(exp)-induced phenotypes in a DM1 Drosophila model.

  3. Expression of cell cycle regulating factor mRNA in small cell lung cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, M; Poulsen, H S; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the expression of cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases (CDK), and CDK inhibitors (CKI) at the mRNA level in a panel of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines in vitro and in vivo as xenografts in nude mice. The results showed that the cell lines expressed varying amounts of most...... cyclin and CDK's but only a few of the cell lines expressed cyclin D1 and/or D2 and some lacked expression of CDK6. Most cell lines expressed mRNA for the CKI's but two cell lines lacked expression of P15INK4B and p16INK4A. The mRNA expression differed for a few of the cell lines regarding cyclin D2...... and CDK6 when in vitro and in vivo data were compared. Two of the cell lines that express the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein had no sign of a deregulated Rb pathway but further studies at the protein level are necessary to demonstrate whether these two cell lines should have a normal Rb pathway or whether...

  4. Structure of the myotonic dystrophy type 2 RNA and designed small molecules that reduce toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Lohman, Jeremy R; Guan, Lirui; Tran, Tuan; Sarkar, Partha; Schatz, George C; Disney, Matthew D

    2014-02-21

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is an incurable neuromuscular disorder caused by a r(CCUG) expansion (r(CCUG)(exp)) that folds into an extended hairpin with periodically repeating 2×2 nucleotide internal loops (5'CCUG/3'GUCC). We designed multivalent compounds that improve DM2-associated defects using information about RNA-small molecule interactions. We also report the first crystal structure of r(CCUG) repeats refined to 2.35 Å. Structural analysis of the three 5'CCUG/3'GUCC repeat internal loops (L) reveals that the CU pairs in L1 are each stabilized by one hydrogen bond and a water-mediated hydrogen bond, while CU pairs in L2 and L3 are stabilized by two hydrogen bonds. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal that the CU pairs are dynamic and stabilized by Na(+) and water molecules. MD simulations of the binding of the small molecule to r(CCUG) repeats reveal that the lowest free energy binding mode occurs via the major groove, in which one C residue is unstacked and the cross-strand nucleotides are displaced. Moreover, we modeled the binding of our dimeric compound to two 5'CCUG/3'GUCC motifs, which shows that the scaffold on which the RNA-binding modules are displayed provides an optimal distance to span two adjacent loops.

  5. Small RNA sequencing for profiling microRNAs in long-term preserved formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded non-small cell lung cancer tumor specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Buitrago

    Full Text Available The preservation of microRNAs in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue makes them particularly useful for biomarker studies. The utility of small RNA sequencing for microRNA expression profiling of FFPE samples has yet to be determined.Total RNA was extracted from de-paraffinized and proteinase K-treated FFPE specimens (15-20 years old of 8 human lung adenocarcinoma tumors by affinity chromatography on silica columns. MicroRNAs in the RNA preparations were quantified by the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing platform with sequencing libraries prepared with the TruSeq Small RNA Sample Preparation Kit (version 2.0 to obtain unpaired reads of 50 b for small RNA fragments. MicroRNAs were also quantified using Agilent Human miRNA (release 16.0 microarrays that can detect 1,205 mature microRNAs and by quantitative reverse transcription (RT-PCR assays.Between 9.1-16.9 million reads were obtained by small RNA sequencing of extracted RNA samples. Of these, only 0.6-2.3% (mean = 1.5% represented microRNAs. The sequencing method detected 454-625 microRNAs/sample (mean = 550 compared with 200-349 (mean = 286 microRNAs detected by microarray. In Spearman correlation analyses, the average correlation coefficient for the 126 microRNAs detected in all samples by both methods was 0.37, and >0.5 for 63 microRNAs. In correlation analyses of the sequencing- and RT-PCR-based measurements, the coefficients were 0.19-0.95 (mean = 0.73 and >0.7, respectively, for 7 of 9 examined microRNAs. The average inter-replicate Spearman correlation coefficient for the sequencing method was 0.81.Small RNA sequencing can be used to obtain microRNA profiles of FFPE tissue specimens with performance characteristics similar to those of microarrays, in spite of the fragmentation of ribosomal and messenger RNAs that reduces the method's informative capacity. The accuracy of the method can conceivably be improved by increasing sequencing depth and/or depleting FFPE tissue RNAs of

  6. Small-angle X-ray scattering: a bridge between RNA secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xianyang [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; Stagno, Jason R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Bhandari, Yuba R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Zuo, Xiaobing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Wang, Yun-Xing [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.

    2015-02-01

    Whereas the structures of small to medium-sized well folded RNA molecules often can be determined by either X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy, obtaining structural information for large RNAs using experimental, computational, or combined approaches remains a major interest and challenge. RNA is very sensitive to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) due to high electron density along phosphate-sugar backbones, whose scattering contribution dominates SAXS intensity. For this reason, SAXS is particularly useful in obtaining global RNA structural information that outlines backbone topologies and, therefore, molecular envelopes. Such information is extremely valuable in bridging the gap between the secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures of RNAmolecules, particularly those that have proven difficult to study using other structuredetermination methods. Here we review published results of RNA topological structures derived from SAXS data or in combination with other experimental data, as well as details on RNA sample preparation for SAXS experiments.

  7. The small RNA content of human sperm reveals pseudogene-derived piRNAs complementary to protein-coding genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantano, Lorena; Jodar, Meritxell; Bak, Mads

    2015-01-01

    At the end of mammalian sperm development, sperm cells expel most of their cytoplasm and dispose of the majority of their RNA. Yet, hundreds of RNA molecules remain in mature sperm. The biological significance of the vast majority of these molecules is unclear. To better understand the processes......-specific genes. The most abundant class of small noncoding RNAs in sperm are PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Surprisingly, we found that human sperm cells contain piRNAs processed from pseudogenes. Clusters of piRNAs from human testes contain pseudogenes transcribed in the antisense strand and processed...... that generate sperm small RNAs and what roles they may have, we sequenced and characterized the small RNA content of sperm samples from two human fertile individuals. We detected 182 microRNAs, some of which are highly abundant. The most abundant microRNA in sperm is miR-1246 with predicted targets among sperm...

  8. Synaptic vesicles contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) including transfer RNA fragments (trfRNA) and microRNAs (miRNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huinan; Wu, Cheng; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Sachs, Matthew S; Harlow, Mark L

    2015-10-08

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are neuronal presynaptic organelles that load and release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In addition to classic neurotransmitters, we have found that synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica, a model cholinergic synapse, contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs), primarily the 5' ends of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) termed tRNA fragments (trfRNAs). To test the evolutionary conservation of SV sRNAs we examined isolated SVs from the mouse central nervous system (CNS). We found abundant levels of sRNAs in mouse SVs, including trfRNAs and micro RNAs (miRNAs) known to be involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. This discovery suggests that, in addition to inducing changes in local dendritic excitability through the release of neurotransmitters, SVs may, through the release of specific trfRNAs and miRNAs, directly regulate local protein synthesis. We believe these findings have broad implications for the study of chemical synaptic transmission.

  9. Serum microRNA biomarkers for detection of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick T Hennessey

    Full Text Available Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality world-wide and the majority of cases are diagnosed at late stages of disease. There is currently no cost-effective screening test for NSCLC, and the development of such a test is a public health imperative. Recent studies have suggested that chest computed tomography screening of patients at high risk of lung cancer can increase survival from disease, however, the cost effectiveness of such screening has not been established. In this Phase I/II biomarker study we examined the feasibility of using serum miRNA as biomarkers of NSCLC using RT-qPCR to examine the expression of 180 miRNAs in sera from 30 treatment naive NSCLC patients and 20 healthy controls. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC and area under the curve were used to identify differentially expressed miRNA pairs that could distinguish NSCLC from healthy controls. Selected miRNA candidates were further validated in sera from an additional 55 NSCLC patients and 75 healthy controls. Examination of miRNA expression levels in serum from a multi-institutional cohort of 50 subjects (30 NSCLC patients and 20 healthy controls identified differentially expressed miRNAs. A combination of two differentially expressed miRNAs miR-15b and miR-27b, was able to discriminate NSCLC from healthy controls with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of 100% in the training set. Upon further testing on additional 130 subjects (55 NSCLC and 75 healthy controls, this miRNA pair predicted NSCLC with a specificity of 84% (95% CI 0.73-0.91, sensitivity of 100% (95% CI; 0.93-1.0, NPV of 100%, and PPV of 82%. These data provide evidence that serum miRNAs have the potential to be sensitive, cost-effective biomarkers for the early detection of NSCLC. Further testing in a Phase III biomarker study in is necessary for validation of these results.

  10. Small RNA and transcriptome deep sequencing proffers insight into floral gene regulation in Rosa cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jungeun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Roses (Rosa sp., which belong to the family Rosaceae, are the most economically important ornamental plants—making up 30% of the floriculture market. However, given high demand for roses, rose breeding programs are limited in molecular resources which can greatly enhance and speed breeding efforts. A better understanding of important genes that contribute to important floral development and desired phenotypes will lead to improved rose cultivars. For this study, we analyzed rose miRNAs and the rose flower transcriptome in order to generate a database to expound upon current knowledge regarding regulation of important floral characteristics. A rose genetic database will enable comprehensive analysis of gene expression and regulation via miRNA among different Rosa cultivars. Results We produced more than 0.5 million reads from expressed sequences, totalling more than 110 million bp. From these, we generated 35,657, 31,434, 34,725, and 39,722 flower unigenes from Rosa hybrid: ‘Vital’, ‘Maroussia’, and ‘Sympathy’ and Rosa rugosa Thunb. , respectively. The unigenes were assigned functional annotations, domains, metabolic pathways, Gene Ontology (GO terms, Plant Ontology (PO terms, and MIPS Functional Catalogue (FunCat terms. Rose flower transcripts were compared with genes from whole genome sequences of Rosaceae members (apple, strawberry, and peach and grape. We also produced approximately 40 million small RNA reads from flower tissue for Rosa, representing 267 unique miRNA tags. Among identified miRNAs, 25 of them were novel and 242 of them were conserved miRNAs. Statistical analyses of miRNA profiles revealed both shared and species-specific miRNAs, which presumably effect flower development and phenotypes. Conclusions In this study, we constructed a Rose miRNA and transcriptome database, and we analyzed the miRNAs and transcriptome generated from the flower tissues of four Rosa cultivars. The database provides a

  11. A Prophage-Encoded Small RNA Controls Metabolism and Cell Division in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Divya; Ragunathan, Preethi T; Fei, Jingyi; Vanderpool, Carin K

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of small RNAs (sRNAs) have been identified in diverse bacterial species, and while the functions of most remain unknown, some regulate key processes, particularly stress responses. The sRNA DicF was identified over 25 years ago as an inhibitor of cell division but since then has remained uncharacterized. DicF consists of 53 nucleotides and is encoded by a gene carried on a prophage (Qin) in the genomes of many Escherichia coli strains. We demonstrated that DicF inhibits cell division via direct base pairing with ftsZ mRNA to repress translation and prevent new synthesis of the bacterial tubulin homolog FtsZ. Systems analysis using computational and experimental methods identified additional mRNA targets of DicF: xylR and pykA mRNAs, encoding the xylose uptake and catabolism regulator and pyruvate kinase, respectively. Genetic analyses showed that DicF directly base pairs with and represses translation of these targets. Phenotypes of cells expressing DicF variants demonstrated that DicF-associated growth inhibition is not solely due to repression of ftsZ, indicating that the physiological consequences of DicF-mediated regulation extend beyond effects on cell division caused by reduced FtsZ synthesis. IMPORTANCE sRNAs are ubiquitous and versatile regulators of bacterial gene expression. A number of well-characterized examples in E. coli are highly conserved and present in the E. coli core genome. In contrast, the sRNA DicF (identified over 20 years ago but remaining poorly characterized) is encoded by a gene carried on a defective prophage element in many E. coli genomes. Here, we characterize DicF in order to better understand how horizontally acquired sRNA regulators impact bacterial gene expression and physiology. Our data confirm the long-hypothesized DicF-mediated regulation of ftsZ, encoding the bacterial tubulin homolog required for cell division. We further uncover DicF-mediated posttranscriptional control of metabolic gene expression. Ectopic

  12. Caenorhabditis elegans pseudouridine synthase 1 activity in vivo: tRNA is a substrate, but not U2 small nuclear RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Jeffrey R; Padgett, Richard W

    2003-06-01

    The formation of pseudouridine (Psi) from uridine is post-transcriptional and catalysed by pseudouridine synthases, several of which have been characterized from eukaryotes. Pseudouridine synthase 1 (Pus1p) has been well characterized from yeast and mice. In yeast, Pus1p has been shown to have dual substrate specificity, modifying uridines in tRNAs and at position 44 in U2 small nuclear RNA (U2 snRNA). In order to study the in vivo activity of a metazoan Pus1p, a knockout of the gene coding for the homologue of Pus1p in Caenorhabditis elegans was obtained. The deletion encompasses the first two putative exons and includes the essential aspartate that is required for activity in truA pseudouridine synthases. The locations of most modified nucleotides on small RNAs in C. elegans are not known, and the positions of Psi were determined on four tRNAs and U2 snRNA. The uridine at position 27 of tRNA(Val) (AAC), a putative Pus1p-modification site, was converted into Psi in the wild-type worms, but the tRNA(Val) (AAC) from mutant worms lacked the modification. Psi formation at positions 13, 32, 38 and 39, all of which should be modified by other pseudouridine synthases, was not affected by the loss of Pus1p. The absence of Pus1p in C. elegans had no effect on the modification of U2 snRNA in vivo, even though worm U2 snRNA has a Psi at position 45 (the equivalent of yeast U2 snRNA position 44) and at four other positions. This result was unexpected, given the known dual specificity of yeast Pus1p.

  13. Identification and expression profiling of Vigna mungo microRNAs from leaf small RNA transcriptome by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sujay; Kundu, Anirban; Pal, Amita

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that play a crucial role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Several conserved and species-specific miRNAs have been characterized to date, predominantly from the plant species whose genome is well characterized. However, information on the variability of these regulatory RNAs in economically important but genetically less characterized crop species are limited. Vigna mungo is an important grain legume, which is grown primarily for its protein-rich edible seeds. miRNAs from this species have not been identified to date due to lack of genome sequence information. To identify miRNAs from V. mungo, a small RNA library was constructed from young leaves. High-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformatic analysis of the small RNA reads led to the identification of 66 miRNA loci represented by 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 19 families and eight non-conserved miRNAs belonging to seven families. Besides, 13 novel miRNA candidates in V. mungo were also identified. Expression patterns of selected conserved, non-conserved, and novel miRNA candidates have been demonstrated in leaf, stem, and root tissues by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and potential target genes were predicted for most of the conserved miRNAs. This information offers genomic resources for better understanding of miRNA mediated post-transcriptional gene regulation.

  14. Small Interference RNA Targeting TLR4 Gene Effectively Attenuates Pulmonary Inflammation in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixiang Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The present study was to investigate the feasibility of adenovirus-mediated small interference RNA (siRNA targeting Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 gene in ameliorating lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced acute lung injury (ALI. Methods. In vitro, alveolar macrophages (AMs were treated with Ad-siTLR4 and Ad-EFGP, respectively, for 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h, and then with LPS (100 ng/mL for 2 h, and the function and expression of TLR4 were evaluated. In vivo, rats received intratracheal injection of 300 μL of normal saline (control group, 300 μL of Ad-EGFP (Ad-EGFP group, or 300 μL of Ad-siTLR4 (Ad-siTLR4 group and then were intravenously treated with LPS (50 mg/kg to induce ALI. Results. Ad-siTLR4 treatment significantly reduced TLR4 expression and production of proinflammatory cytokines following LPS treatment both in vitro and in vivo. Significant alleviation of tissue edema, microvascular protein leakage, and neutrophil infiltration was observed in the AdsiTLR4-treated animals. Conclusion. TLR4 plays a critical role in LPS-induced ALI, and transfection of Ad-siTLR4 can effectively downregulate TLR4 expression in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by alleviation of LPS-induced lung injury. These findings suggest that TLR4 may serve as a potential target in the treatment of ALI and RNA interfering targeting TLR4 expression represents a therapeutic strategy.

  15. Small interfering RNA targeted to secretory clusterin blocks tumor growth, motility, and invasion in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohe Niu; Xinhui Li; Bin Hu; Rong Li; Ligang Wang; Lilin Wu; Xingang Wang

    2012-01-01

    Clusterin/apolipoprotein J (Clu) is a ubiquitously expressed secreted heterodimeric glycoprotein that is implicated in several physiological processes.It has been reported that the elevated level of secreted clusterin (sClu) protein is associated with poor survival in breast cancer patients and can induce metastasis in rodent models.In this study,we investigated the effects of sClu inhibition with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) on cell motility,invasion,and growth in vitro and in vivo.MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with pSuper-siRNA/sClu.Cell survival and proliferation were examined by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium and clonogenic survival assay.The results showed that sClu silencing significantly inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells.The invasion and migration ability were also dramatically decreased,which was detected by matrigel assays.TUNEL staining and caspase-3 activity assay demonstrated that sClu silencing also could increase the apoptosis rate of cells,resulting in the inhibition of cell growth.We also determined the effects of sClu silencing on tumor growth and metastatic progression in an orthotopic breast cancer model.The results showed that orthotopic primary tumors derived from MDA-MB-231/pSuper sClu siRNA cells grew significantly slower than tumors derived from parental MDA-MB-231 or MDA-MB-231/pSuper scramble siRNA cells,and metastasize less to the lungs.These data suggest that secretory clusterin plays a significant role in tumor growth and metastatic progression.Knocking-down sClu gene expression may provide a valuable method for breast cancer therapy.

  16. Detection of CEA mRNA on non-small lung cancer and it's significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guowen WANG

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective In recent years, many studies on micrometastasis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC have been reported, this study is to investigate the effect of operation on micrometastasis from NSCLC andevaluate the relation between micrometastasis and clincopathological parameters. Methods The blood samples were taken from 70 cases of NSCLC and 18 patients with benign diseases at 3 intervals during the operation from peripheral vein. The transcription of carcinoembryonic antigen messenger ribonucleic acid (CEA mRNA was assayed by means of nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and micro-fluid chip. Results The CEA mRNA positive rates of all 3 time spots were as follows: 50% at beginning of the operation (Time 1, 62.8% at ligating the pulmonary vein (Time 2 and 57.1% at 1 h after ligating pulmonary vein (Time 3. There is significant difference between Time 1 and Time 2 (χ2=7.114, P <0.05. The positive rates of well-differentiation and middle-differentiation, stage Ⅰ and state Ⅱ, Tis, T1 and T2, N0 were significant less than non-differentiation and low-differentiation, stage Ⅲ and state Ⅳ, T3 and T4, N1,N2 and N3, respectively. No negative control samples was found to be positive, and no positive control samples was found to be negative. The sensitivity of our test was 10 cells/mL. Conclusion The cancer cells dissemination during operation was demonstrated indirectly in our study, the time of pulmonary vein ligation (earlier or later may affect the quantity of tumor cells released into circulation; The patients with lower differentiation, advanced TNM stage, larger tumor size and metastasis of lymph node have higher rates of metastasis in peripheral, so the detection of CEA mRNA can guide the therapy of NSCLC to a certain extent.

  17. Inhibition of full length Hepatitis C Virus particles of 1a genotype through small interference RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehman Sidra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV, a member of the Flaviviridae family of viruses, is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Currently, the only treatment available consists of a combination of Pegylated interferon alpha (INF-α and ribavirin, but only half of the patients treated show a sufficient antiviral response. Thus there is a great need for the development of new treatments for HCV infections. RNA interference (RNAi represents a new promising approach to develop effective antiviral drugs and has been extremely effective against HCV infection. Results This study was design to assess or explore the silencing effect of small interference RNAs (siRNAs against full length HCV particles of genotype 1a. In the present study six 21-bp siRNAs were designed against different regions of HCV structural genes (Core, E1 and E2. Selected siRNAs were labeled as Csi 301, Csi 29, E1si 52, E1si 192, E2si 86 and E2si 493. Our results demonstrated that siRNAs directed against HCV core gene showed 70% reduction in viral titer in HCV infected liver cells. Moreover, siRNAs against E1 and E2 envelop genes showed a dramatic reduction in HCV viral RNA, E2si 86 exhibited 93% inhibition, while E1si 192, E2si 493 and E1si 52 showed 87%, 80%, and 66% inhibition respectively. No significant inhibition was detected in cells transfected with the negative control siRNA. Conclusion Our results suggested that siRNAs targeted against HCV structural genes efficiently silence full length HCV particles and provide an effective therapeutic option against HCV infection.

  18. Limitations of mRNA amplification from small-size cell samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myklebost Ola

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global mRNA amplification has become a widely used approach to obtain gene expression profiles from limited material. An important concern is the reliable reflection of the starting material in the results obtained. This is especially important with extremely low quantities of input RNA where stochastic effects due to template dilution may be present. This aspect remains under-documented in the literature, as quantitative measures of data reliability are most often lacking. To address this issue, we examined the sensitivity levels of each transcript in 3 different cell sample sizes. ANOVA analysis was used to estimate the overall effects of reduced input RNA in our experimental design. In order to estimate the validity of decreasing sample sizes, we examined the sensitivity levels of each transcript by applying a novel model-based method, TransCount. Results From expression data, TransCount provided estimates of absolute transcript concentrations in each examined sample. The results from TransCount were used to calculate the Pearson correlation coefficient between transcript concentrations for different sample sizes. The correlations were clearly transcript copy number dependent. A critical level was observed where stochastic fluctuations became significant. The analysis allowed us to pinpoint the gene specific number of transcript templates that defined the limit of reliability with respect to number of cells from that particular source. In the sample amplifying from 1000 cells, transcripts expressed with at least 121 transcripts/cell were statistically reliable and for 250 cells, the limit was 1806 transcripts/cell. Above these thresholds, correlation between our data sets was at acceptable values for reliable interpretation. Conclusion These results imply that the reliability of any amplification experiment must be validated empirically to justify that any gene exists in sufficient quantity in the input material. This

  19. An "in-depth" description of the small non-coding RNA population of Schistosoma japonicum schistosomulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangxun Wang

    Full Text Available Parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma are the causative agents of schistosomiasis, which afflicts more than 200 million people yearly in tropical regions of South America, Asia and Africa. A promising approach to the control of this and many other diseases involves the application of our understanding of small non-coding RNA function to the design of safe and effective means of treatment. In a previous study, we identified five conserved miRNAs from the adult stage of Schistosoma japonicum. Here, we applied Illumina Solexa high-throughput sequencing methods (deep sequencing to investigate the small RNAs expressed in S. japonicum schistosomulum (3 weeks post-infection. This has allowed us to examine over four million sequence reads including both frequently and infrequently represented members of the RNA population. Thus we have identified 20 conserved miRNA families that have orthologs in well-studied model organisms and 16 miRNA that appear to be specific to Schistosoma. We have also observed minor amounts of heterogeneity in both 3' and 5' terminal positions of some miRNA as well as RNA fragments resulting from the processing of miRNA precursor. An investigation of the genomic arrangement of the 36 identified miRNA revealed that seven were tightly linked in two clusters. We also identified members of the small RNA population whose structure indicates that they are part of an endogenously derived RNA silencing pathway, as evidenced by their extensive complementarities with retrotransposon and retrovirus-related Pol polyprotein from transposon.

  20. Bacterial clade with the ribosomal RNA operon on a small plasmid rather than the chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, Mizue; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Okubo, Takashi; Sugawara, Masayuki; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Mitsui, Hisayuki

    2015-11-17

    rRNA is essential for life because of its functional importance in protein synthesis. The rRNA (rrn) operon encoding 16S, 23S, and 5S rRNAs is located on the "main" chromosome in all bacteria documented to date and is frequently used as a marker of chromosomes. Here, our genome analysis of a plant-associated alphaproteobacterium, Aureimonas sp. AU20, indicates that this strain has its sole rrn operon on a small (9.4 kb), high-copy-number replicon. We designated this unusual replicon carrying the rrn operon on the background of an rrn-lacking chromosome (RLC) as the rrn-plasmid. Four of 12 strains close to AU20 also had this RLC/rrn-plasmid organization. Phylogenetic analysis showed that those strains having the RLC/rrn-plasmid organization represented one clade within the genus Aureimonas. Our finding introduces a previously unaddressed viewpoint into studies of genetics, genomics, and evolution in microbiology and biology in general.

  1. Genome-wide search reveals a novel GacA-regulated small RNA in Pseudomonas species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Elisabeth

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small RNAs (sRNAs are widespread among bacteria and have diverse regulatory roles. Most of these sRNAs have been discovered by a combination of computational and experimental methods. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium and opportunistic human pathogen, the GacS/GacA two-component system positively controls the transcription of two sRNAs (RsmY, RsmZ, which are crucial for the expression of genes involved in virulence. In the biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, three GacA-controlled sRNAs (RsmX, RsmY, RsmZ regulate the response to oxidative stress and the expression of extracellular products including biocontrol factors. RsmX, RsmY and RsmZ contain multiple unpaired GGA motifs and control the expression of target mRNAs at the translational level, by sequestration of translational repressor proteins of the RsmA family. Results A combined computational and experimental approach enabled us to identify 14 intergenic regions encoding sRNAs in P. aeruginosa. Eight of these regions encode newly identified sRNAs. The intergenic region 1698 was found to specify a novel GacA-controlled sRNA termed RgsA. GacA regulation appeared to be indirect. In P. fluorescens CHA0, an RgsA homolog was also expressed under positive GacA control. This 120-nt sRNA contained a single GGA motif and, unlike RsmX, RsmY and RsmZ, was unable to derepress translation of the hcnA gene (involved in the biosynthesis of the biocontrol factor hydrogen cyanide, but contributed to the bacterium's resistance to hydrogen peroxide. In both P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens the stress sigma factor RpoS was essential for RgsA expression. Conclusion The discovery of an additional sRNA expressed under GacA control in two Pseudomonas species highlights the complexity of this global regulatory system and suggests that the mode of action of GacA control may be more elaborate than previously suspected. Our results also confirm that

  2. Small RNA molecules and regulation of spermatogenesis%小RNA分子与精子发生调控

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟雅楠; 孟丽军; 宋亚娟; 刘美玲; 张秀军

    2011-01-01

    Small RNA molecules (small RNAs) have recently emerged as important regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional or translation level.Significant progtess has recently been made in utilizing small RNAs to elucidate the molecular mechanisms regulating spermatogenesis.There are three major small RNAs: small interfering RNAs (siRNAs),microRNAs (miRNAs).and piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs).Small-RNAs have diverse biological functions in meiosis and spermatogenesis, In vitro or in vivo, use of siRNA to knockdown genes is a way to study the function of genes of intrest in spermatogenesis.miRNA can be involved in the regulation of mitosis, meiosis, and postmeiosis in spermatogenesis.piRNAs are mainly involved in regulating the process of meiosis and postmeiosis, and repressing retrotransposon transposition in male germline cells.In this paper, we reviewed recent works on the synthesis, mechanism, function, and Outlook of smaIIRNAs.%近来研究发现小RNA(small RNAs)可作为转录后及翻译水平上基因表达调节的重要调节因子,利用小RNA来阐明调节精子发生的分子机制取得了显著进展.这些小RNA主要分为3类,即小干扰RNA(siRNA),微小RNA(miRNA)以及与piwi蛋白相互作用的RNA(piRNA).在减数分裂和精子发生过程中,小RNA具有多种生物学功能,如利用siRNA体外转染或体内注射来敲低特定基因从而研究该基因在精子发生过程中的作用;miRNA可能参与精子发生中有丝、减数及后减数分裂阶段的基因表达调节;piRNA主要参与调节雄性生殖细胞减数及后减数分裂的过程,在精子发生中起抑制反转录转座子(retrotransposons)的作用.文章对小RNAs合成、作用机制、功能及展望等最新进展进行了综述.

  3. Preparation of small amounts of sterile siRNA-liposomes with high entrapping efficiency by dual asymmetric centrifugation (DAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Markus; Ziroli, Vittorio; Helm, Mark; Massing, Ulrich

    2009-04-02

    Liposomal formulation of siRNA is an attractive approach for improving its delivery in vivo, shielding the RNA from nucleases and promoting tumor targeting. Here, the production of very small batch sizes of siRNA-liposomes by using the "dual asymmetric centrifugation (DAC)" technique was investigated. This new technique combines rapid and sterile liposome preparation with very high entrapping efficiencies. DAC is here presented in conjunction with a non-destructive microscale analysis based on double fluorescence labeling, which enables monitoring of siRNA integrity during the liposomal preparation. Integrity is reflected in spatial proximity of the dyes, which results in measurable fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The combination of DAC and the sensitive FRET analysis allows the handling of batch sizes down to 20 mg of conventional liposomes (CL) and sterically stabilized liposomes (SL). These were prepared in common 2 ml reaction tubes and loaded with calcein or labeled siRNA. Liposome sizes were 79+/-16 nm for CL and 109+/-9 nm for SL loaded with siRNA. Trapping efficiencies ranged from 43 to 81%, depending on batch size, enclosed compound, and liposome composition. FRET monitoring showed that the siRNA remained intact throughout DAC and that liposomal formulations protected the siRNA from nucleases. siRNA-liposomes remained stable for at least 3 months.

  4. Small RNA in situ hybridization in Caenorhabditis elegans, combined with RNA-seq, identifies germline-enriched microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Tamara J; Yao, Qiuming; Yun, Sijung; Lee, Chin-Yung; Bennett, Karen L

    2016-10-15

    Over four hundred different microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in the genome of the model organism the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. As the germline is dedicated to the preservation of each species, and almost half of all the cells in an adult nematode are germline, it is likely that regulatory miRNAs are important for germline development and maintenance. In C. elegans the miR35 family has strong maternal effects, contributing to normal embryogenesis and to adult fecundity. To determine whether any particular miRNAs are greatly enriched in the C. elegans germline we used RNA-seq to compare the miRNA populations in several germline-defective strains of adult C. elegans worms, including glp-4(germline proliferation-4), glh-1(germline helicase-1) and dcr-1(dicer-1). Statistical analyses of RNA-seq comparisons identified 13 miRNAs that are germline-enriched, including seven members of the well-studied miR35 family that were reduced as much as 1000-fold in TaqMan qRT PCR miRNA assays. Along with the miR35s, six others: miR-56 (a member of the miR51 family),-70, -244, -260 , -788 and -4813, none of which previously considered as such, were also identified by RNA-seq as germline-enriched candidates. We went on to develop a successful miRNA in situ hybridization protocol for C. elegans, revealing miR35s specifically concentrate during oogenesis in the pachytene region of the gonad, and persist throughout early embryogenesis, while in adult animals neither let-7 nor miR-228 has a germline-bias.

  5. The small RNA content of human sperm reveals pseudogene-derived piRNAs complementary to protein-coding genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantano, Lorena; Jodar, Meritxell; Bak, Mads; Ballescà, Josep Lluís; Tommerup, Niels; Oliva, Rafael; Vavouri, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    At the end of mammalian sperm development, sperm cells expel most of their cytoplasm and dispose of the majority of their RNA. Yet, hundreds of RNA molecules remain in mature sperm. The biological significance of the vast majority of these molecules is unclear. To better understand the processes that generate sperm small RNAs and what roles they may have, we sequenced and characterized the small RNA content of sperm samples from two human fertile individuals. We detected 182 microRNAs, some of which are highly abundant. The most abundant microRNA in sperm is miR-1246 with predicted targets among sperm-specific genes. The most abundant class of small noncoding RNAs in sperm are PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Surprisingly, we found that human sperm cells contain piRNAs processed from pseudogenes. Clusters of piRNAs from human testes contain pseudogenes transcribed in the antisense strand and processed into small RNAs. Several human protein-coding genes contain antisense predicted targets of pseudogene-derived piRNAs in the male germline and these piRNAs are still found in mature sperm. Our study provides the most extensive data set and annotation of human sperm small RNAs to date and is a resource for further functional studies on the roles of sperm small RNAs. In addition, we propose that some of the pseudogene-derived human piRNAs may regulate expression of their parent gene in the male germline. PMID:25904136

  6. Identification and expression profiling of Vigna mungo microRNAs from leaf small RNA transcriptome by deep sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sujay Paul; Anirban Kundu; Amita Pal

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that play a crucial role in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Several conserved and species-specific miRNAs have been characterized to date, predominantly from the plant species whose genome is well characterized. However, information on the variability of these regulatory RNAs in economically important but genetically less characterized crop species are limited. Vigna mungo is an important grain legume, which is grown primarily for its protein-rich edible seeds. miRNAs from this species have not been identified to date due to lack of genome sequence information. To identify miRNAs from V. mungo, a small RNA library was constructed from young leaves. High-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformat-ic analysis of the small RNA reads led to the identification of 66 miRNA loci represented by 45 conserved miRNAs belonging to 19 families and eight non-conserved miRNAs belonging to seven families. Besides, 13 novel miRNA candidates in V. mungo were also identified. Expression patterns of selected conserved, non-conserved, and novel miRNA candidates have been demonstrated in leaf, stem, and root tissues by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and potential target genes were predicted for most of the conserved miRNAs. This information offers genomic resour-ces for better understanding of miRNA mediated post-transcriptional gene regulation.

  7. Small RNA and A-to-I Editing in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eran, Alal

    One in every 88 children is diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs), a set of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by social impairments, communication deficits, and repetitive behavior. ASDs have a substantial genetic component, but the specific cause of most cases remains unknown. Understanding gene-environment interactions underlying ASD is essential for improving early diagnosis and identifying critical targets for intervention and prevention. Towards this goal, we surveyed adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing in autistic brains. A-to-I editing is an epigenetic mechanism that fine-tunes synaptic function in response to environmental stimuli, shown to modulate complex behavior in animals. We used ultradeep sequencing to quantify A-to-I receding of candidate synaptic genes in postmortem cerebella from individuals with ASD and neurotypical controls. We found unexpectedly wide distributions of human A-to-I editing levels, whose extremes were consistently populated by individuals with ASD. We correlated A-to-I editing with isoform usage, identified clusters of correlated sites, and examined differential editing patterns. Importantly, we found that individuals with ASD commonly use a dysfunctional form of the editing enzyme ADARB1. We next profiled small RNAs thought to regulate A-to-I editing, which originate from one of the most commonly altered loci in ASD, 15q11. Deep targeted sequencing of SNORD115 and SNORD116 transcripts enabled their high-resolution detection in human brains, and revealed a strong gender bias underlying their expression. The consistent 2-fold upregulation of 15q11 small RNAs in male vs. female cerebella could be important in delineating the role of this locus in ASD, a male dominant disorder. Overall, these studies provide an accurate population-level view of small RNA and A-to-I editing in human cerebella, and suggest that A-to-I editing of synaptic genes may be informative for assessing the epigenetic risk for autism

  8. Long non-coding RNA small nucleolar RNA host gene 12 (SNHG12) promotes cell proliferation and migration by upregulating angiomotin gene expression in human osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Wendong; Wang, Pei; Feng, Shiqing; Xue, Yuan; Li, Yulin

    2016-03-01

    The long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) small nucleolar RNA host gene 12 (SNHG12) has a role in cell proliferation and migration. Angiomotin, encoded by the AMOT gene, is a protein that regulates the migration and organization of endothelial cells. SNHG12 and AMOT have been shown to play a role in a variety of human cancers but have yet to be studied in detail in human osteosarcoma. Tissue samples from primary osteosarcoma (n = 20) and adjacent normal tissues (n = 20), the osteosarcoma cell lines, SAOS-2, MG-63, U-2 OS, and the human osteoblast cell line hFOB (OB3) were studied using Western blot for angiomotin, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for the expression of SNHG12 and AMOT. The expression of SNHG12 was knocked down using RNA interference. Cell migration assays were performed. Cell apoptosis was studied using flow cytometry. SNHG12 and AMOT messenger RNA (mRNA) expression was upregulated in osteosarcoma tissues and cell lines when compared with normal tissues and cells. Upregulation of AMOT mRNA was associated with upregulation of SNHG12. Knockdown of SNHG12 reduced the expression of angiomotin in osteosarcoma cells and suppressed cell proliferation and migration but did not affect cell apoptosis. This preliminary study has shown that the lncRNA SNHG12 promotes cell proliferation and migration by upregulating AMOT gene expression in osteosarcoma cells in vivo and in vitro. Further studies are recommended to investigate the role of SNHG12 and AMOT expression in tumor cell proliferation and migration and angiogenesis in osteosarcoma and a range of malignant mesenchymal tumors.

  9. Deep sequencing analysis of small noncoding RNA and mRNA targets of the global post-transcriptional regulator, Hfq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sittka, A; Lucchini, S; Papenfort, K;

    2008-01-01

    would be rescued by overexpression of HilD and FlhDC, and we proved this to be correct. The combination of epitope-tagging and HTPS of immunoprecipitated RNA detected the expression of many intergenic chromosomal regions of Salmonella. Our approach overcomes the limited availability of high...

  10. Differential RNA-seq of Vibrio cholerae identifies the VqmR small RNA as a regulator of biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenfort, Kai; Förstner, Konrad U; Cong, Jian-Ping; Sharma, Cynthia M; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-02-17

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of cell-to-cell communication that enables bacteria to transition between individual and collective lifestyles. QS controls virulence and biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera disease. Differential RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of wild-type V. cholerae and a locked low-cell-density QS-mutant strain identified 7,240 transcriptional start sites with ∼ 47% initiated in the antisense direction. A total of 107 of the transcripts do not appear to encode proteins, suggesting they specify regulatory RNAs. We focused on one such transcript that we name VqmR. vqmR is located upstream of the vqmA gene encoding a DNA-binding transcription factor. Mutagenesis and microarray analyses demonstrate that VqmA activates vqmR transcription, that vqmR encodes a regulatory RNA, and VqmR directly controls at least eight mRNA targets including the rtx (repeats in toxin) toxin genes and the vpsT transcriptional regulator of biofilm production. We show that VqmR inhibits biofilm formation through repression of vpsT. Together, these data provide to our knowledege the first global annotation of the transcriptional start sites in V. cholerae and highlight the importance of posttranscriptional regulation for collective behaviors in this human pathogen.

  11. 外泌体在小 RNA 基因治疗中的研究进展%Exosome-Mediated Small RNA Delivery For Gene Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙武; 曹风娟; 王楠; 周榆; 巴一; 张辰宇

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs,including small interfering RNAand microRNA,are emerging as promising ther-apeutic drugs against a wide array of diseases.Current techniques for small RNA transfer use viruses or synthetic agents as delivery vehicles,however,these kinds of vehicles have a high toxicity and low target-specific.Exosomes ,natural nanocarriers derived from endogenous cells ,have the intrinsic ability to trav-erse biological barriers and to naturally transport functional small RNAs between cells.Exosome-based de-livery of small RNAs may provide an untapped source of effective delivery strategy to overcome impedi-ments such as inefficiency,unspecificity and immunogenic reactions,and exosomes potentially represent a novel and exciting delivery vehicle.In this review,we provide an update and overview of the new find-ings that reveal the potential applications of exosome-based small RNA delivery as therapeutics in clinical settings.%小 RNA,包括小干扰 RNA 以及微小 RNA,已成为多种疾病的潜在治疗药物。目前,小 RNA的运输载体主要是病毒或者合成试剂。然而这类载体往往毒性高且特异性低。外泌体是由内源细胞分泌出来的天然纳米材料,本身能够穿越生物膜并在细胞间传递小 RNA。以外泌体为基础的小RNA 递送作为一种新的转运方式,能够克服低效率,低特异性以及免疫反应等缺陷,有望成为新型载体。本文简要论述了以外泌体为载体的小 RNA 递送系统在临床治疗研究中的前沿进展。

  12. Small RNA profiling and characterization of piRNA clusters in the adult testes of the common marmoset, a model primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Takamasa; Iwasaki, Yuka W; Lin, Zachary Yu-Ching; Imamura, Masanori; Seki, Naomi M; Sasaki, Erika; Saito, Kuniaki; Okano, Hideyuki; Siomi, Mikiko C; Siomi, Haruhiko

    2014-08-01

    Small RNAs mediate gene silencing by binding Argonaute/Piwi proteins to regulate target RNAs. Here, we describe small RNA profiling of the adult testes of Callithrix jacchus, the common marmoset. The most abundant class of small RNAs in the adult testis was piRNAs, although 353 novel miRNAs but few endo-siRNAs were also identified. MARWI, a marmoset homolog of mouse MIWI and a very abundant PIWI in adult testes, associates with piRNAs that show characteristics of mouse pachytene piRNAs. As in other mammals, most marmoset piRNAs are derived from conserved clustered regions in the genome, which are annotated as intergenic regions. However, unlike in mice, marmoset piRNA clusters are also found on the X chromosome, suggesting escape from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation by the X-linked clusters. Some of the piRNA clusters identified contain antisense-orientated pseudogenes, suggesting the possibility that pseudogene-derived piRNAs may regulate parental functional protein-coding genes. More piRNAs map to transposable element (TE) subfamilies when they have copies in piRNA clusters. In addition, the strand bias observed for piRNAs mapped to each TE subfamily correlates with the polarity of copies inserted in clusters. These findings suggest that pachytene piRNA clusters determine the abundance and strand-bias of TE-derived piRNAs, may regulate protein-coding genes via pseudogene-derived piRNAs, and may even play roles in meiosis in the adult marmoset testis.

  13. Small RNA Sequencing Reveals Differential miRNA Expression in the Early Development of Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) Pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Yu; Wu, Mei; Li, Lihong; Jin, Chuan; Zhang, Qingli; Chen, Chengbin; Song, Wenqin; Wang, Chunguo

    2017-01-01

    Pollen development is an important and complex biological process in the sexual reproduction of flowering plants. Although the cytological characteristics of pollen development are well defined, the regulation of its early stages remains largely unknown. In the present study, miRNAs were explored in the early development of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) pollen. A total of 333 known miRNAs that originated from 235 miRNA families were detected. Fifty-five novel miRNA candidates were identified. Sixty of the 333 known miRNAs and 49 of the 55 predicted novel miRNAs exhibited significantly differential expression profiling in the three distinct developmental stages of broccoli pollen. Among these differentially expressed miRNAs, miRNAs that would be involved in the developmental phase transition from uninucleate microspores to binucleate pollen grains or from binucleate to trinucleate pollen grains were identified. miRNAs that showed significantly enriched expression in a specific early stage of broccoli pollen development were also observed. In addition, 552 targets for 127 known miRNAs and 69 targets for 40 predicted novel miRNAs were bioinformatically identified. Functional annotation and GO (Gene Ontology) analysis indicated that the putative miRNA targets showed significant enrichment in GO terms that were related to plant organ formation and morphogenesis. Some of enriched GO terms were detected for the targets directly involved in plant male reproduction development. These findings provided new insights into the functions of miRNA-mediated regulatory networks in broccoli pollen development.

  14. Quantification of Small Non-Coding RNAs Allows an Accurate Comparison of miRNA Expression Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Masotti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are highly conserved ∼22-mer RNA molecules, encoded by plants and animals that regulate the expression of genes binding to the 3′-UTR of specific target mRNAs. The amount of miRNAs in a total RNA sample depends on the recovery efficiency that may be significantly affected by the different purification methods employed. Traditional approaches may be inefficient at recovering small RNAs, and common spectrophotometric determination is not adequate to quantify selectively these low molecular weight (LMW species from total RNA samples. Here, we describe the use of qualitative and quantitative lab-on-a-chip tools for the analysis of these LMW RNA species. Our data emphasize the close correlation of LMW RNAs with the expression levels of some miRNAs. We therefore applied our result to the comparison of some miRNA expression profiles in different tissues. Finally, the methods we used in this paper allowed us to analyze the efficiency of extraction protocols, to study the small (but significant differences among various preparations and to allow a proper comparison of some miRNA expression profiles in various tissues.

  15. MicroRNA-944 Affects Cell Growth by Targeting EPHA7 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minxia; Zhou, Kecheng; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have critical roles in lung tumorigenesis and development. To determine aberrantly expressed miRNAs involved in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigate pathophysiological functions and mechanisms, we firstly carried out small RNA deep sequencing in NSCLC cell lines (EPLC-32M1, A549 and 801D) and a human immortalized cell line 16HBE, we then studied miRNA function by cell proliferation and apoptosis. cDNA microarray, luciferase reporter assay and miRNA transfection were used to investigate interaction between the miRNA and target gene. miR-944 was significantly down-regulated in NSCLC and had many putative targets. Moreover, the forced expression of miR-944 significantly inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC cells in vitro. By integrating mRNA expression data and miR-944-target prediction, we disclosed that EPHA7 was a potential target of miR-944, which was further verified by luciferase reporter assay and microRNA transfection. Our data indicated that miR-944 targets EPHA7 in NSCLC and regulates NSCLC cell proliferation, which may offer a new mechanism underlying the development and progression of NSCLC. PMID:27681722

  16. Production of virus-derived ping-pong-dependent piRNA-like small RNAs in the mosquito soma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M Morazzani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural maintenance cycles of many mosquito-borne pathogens require establishment of persistent non-lethal infections in the invertebrate host. The mechanism by which this occurs is not well understood, but we have previously shown that an antiviral response directed by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs is important in modulating the pathogenesis of alphavirus infections in the mosquito. However, we report here that infection of mosquitoes with an alphavirus also triggers the production of another class of virus-derived small RNAs that exhibit many similarities to ping-pong-dependent piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs. However, unlike ping-pong-dependent piRNAs that have been described previously from repetitive elements or piRNA clusters, our work suggests production in the soma. We also present evidence that suggests virus-derived piRNA-like small RNAs are capable of modulating the pathogenesis of alphavirus infections in dicer-2 null mutant mosquito cell lines defective in viral siRNA production. Overall, our results suggest that a non-canonical piRNA pathway is present in the soma of vector mosquitoes and may be acting redundantly to the siRNA pathway to target alphavirus replication.

  17. Comparison of dengue virus type 2-specific small RNAs from RNA interference-competent and -incompetent mosquito cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn C Scott

    Full Text Available The exogenous RNA interference (RNAi pathway is an important antiviral defense against arboviruses in mosquitoes, and virus-specific small interfering (siRNAs are key components of this pathway. Understanding the biogenesis of siRNAs in mosquitoes could have important ramifications in using RNAi to control arbovirus transmission. Using deep sequencing technology, we characterized dengue virus type 2 (DENV2-specific small RNAs produced during infection of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and A. aegypti Aag2 cell cultures and compared them to those produced in the C6/36 Aedes albopictus cell line. We show that the size and mixed polarity of virus-specific small RNAs from DENV-infected A. aegypti cells indicate that they are products of Dicer-2 (Dcr2 cleavage of long dsRNA, whereas C6/36 cells generate DENV2-specific small RNAs that are longer and predominantly positive polarity, suggesting that they originate from a different small RNA pathway. Examination of virus-specific small RNAs after infection of the two mosquito cell lines with the insect-only flavivirus cell fusing agent virus (CFAV corroborated these findings. An in vitro assay also showed that Aag2 A. aegypti cells are capable of siRNA production, while C6/36 A. albopictus cells exhibit inefficient Dcr2 cleavage of long dsRNA. Defective expression or function of Dcr2, the key initiator of the RNAi pathway, might explain the comparatively robust growth of arthropod-borne viruses in the C6/36 cell line, which has been used frequently as a surrogate for studying molecular interactions between arboviruses and cells of their mosquito hosts.

  18. Small interfering RNA targeting the nonstructural gene 1 transcript inhibits influenza A virus replication in experimental mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Roopali; Khanna, Madhu; Kumar, Prashant; Kumar, Binod; Sharma, Sonal; Gupta, Neha; Saxena, Latika

    2012-12-01

    Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A viruses counteracts the host immune response against the influenza viruses by not only inhibiting the nuclear export and maturation of host cell messenger RNA (mRNA), but by also blocking the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-mediated inhibition of viral RNA translation. Reduction of NS1 gene product in the host cell may be a potent antiviral strategy to provide protection against the influenza virus infection. We used small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) synthesized against the viral mRNA to down regulate the NS1 gene and observed its effect on inhibition of virus replication. When NS1 gene-specific siRNA were transfected in Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells followed by influenza A virus infection, approximately 60% inhibition in intracellular levels of NS1 RNA was observed. When siRNA was administered in BALB/c mice, 92% reduction in the levels of NS1 gene expression in mice lungs was observed. A significant reduction in the lung virus titers and cytokine levels was also detected in the presence of siRNAs as compared with the untreated control. The study was validated by the use of selectively disabled mutants of each set of siRNA. Our findings suggest that siRNA targeted against NS1 gene of influenza A virus can provide considerable protection to the virus-infected host cells and may be used as potential candidates for nucleic acid-based antiviral therapy for prevention of influenza A virus infection.

  19. Comparative Small RNA Analysis of Pollen Development in Autotetraploid and Diploid Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs play key roles in plant reproduction. However, knowledge on microRNAome analysis in autotetraploid rice is rather limited. Here, high-throughput sequencing technology was employed to analyze miRNAomes during pollen development in diploid and polyploid rice. A total of 172 differentially expressed miRNAs (DEM were detected in autotetraploid rice compared to its diploid counterpart, and 57 miRNAs were specifically expressed in autotetraploid rice. Of the 172 DEM, 115 and 61 miRNAs exhibited up- and down-regulation, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis on the targets of up-regulated DEM showed that they were enriched in transport and membrane in pre-meiotic interphase, reproduction in meiosis, and nucleotide binding in single microspore stage. osa-miR5788 and osa-miR1432-5p_R+1 were up-regulated in meiosis and their targets revealed interaction with the meiosis-related genes, suggesting that they may involve in the genes regulation associated with the chromosome behavior. Abundant 24 nt siRNAs associated with transposable elements were found in autotetraploid rice during pollen development; however, they significantly declined in diploid rice, suggesting that 24 nt siRNAs may play a role in pollen development. These findings provide a foundation for understanding the effect of polyploidy on small RNA expression patterns during pollen development that cause pollen sterility in autotetraploid rice.

  20. Roadmap to cellular reprogramming--manipulating transcriptional networks with DNA, RNA, proteins and small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörsdörfer, P; Thier, M; Kadari, A; Edenhofer, F

    2013-06-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that the plasticity of mammalian somatic cells is much higher than previously assumed and that ectopic expression of transcription factors may have the potential to induce the conversion of any cell type into another. Fibroblast cells can be converted into embryonic stem cell-like cells, neural cells, cardiomyocytes, macrophage-like cells as well as blood progenitors. Additionally, the conversion of astrocytes into neurons or neural stem cells into monocytes has been demonstrated. Nowadays, in the era of systems biology, continuously growing holistic data sets are providing increasing insights into core transcriptional networks and cellular signaling pathways. This knowledge enables cell biologists to understand how cellular fate is determined and how it could be manipulated. As a consequence for biomedical applications, it might be soon possible to convert patient specific somatic cells directly into desired transplantable other cell types. The clinical value, however, of such reprogrammed cells is currently limited due to the invasiveness of methods applied to induce reprogramming factor activity. This review will focus on experimental strategies to ectopically induce cell fate modulators. We will emphasize those strategies that enable efficient and robust overexpression of transcription factors by minimal genetic alterations of the host genome. Furthermore, we will discuss procedures devoid of any genomic manipulation, such as the direct delivery of mRNA, proteins, or the use of small molecules. By this, we aim to give a comprehensive overview on state of the art techniques that harbor the potential to generate safe reprogrammed cells for clinical applications.

  1. Kinases required in hepatitis C virus entry and replication highlighted by small interference RNA screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotard, Maud; Lepère-Douard, Charlotte; Régeard, Morgane; Piquet-Pellorce, Claire; Lavillette, Dimitri; Cosset, François-Loic; Gripon, Philippe; Le Seyec, Jacques

    2009-11-01

    The entry pathway of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), a major human pathogen, into the cell is incompletely defined. To better characterize this viral life cycle stage, we screened a small interfering RNA library dedicated to the membrane trafficking and remodeling with the infection model of Huh-7.5.1 cells by HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp). Results showed that the down-regulation of different factors implied in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) inhibits HCVpp cell infection. In addition, knockdown of the phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase type III-alpha (PI4KIIIalpha) prevented infection by HCVpp or by cell-culture grown JFH-1-based HCV. Moreover, the replication activity of an HCV replicon was also affected by the PI4KIIIalpha knockdown. Additional investigations on the different members of the PI4K family revealed that the presence of PI4KIIIbeta in the host cells influenced their susceptibility to HCVpp infection and their capacity to sustain the HCV replication. The PI4KIII involvement during the HCV life cycle seemed to occur by other ways than the control of the CME or of the membranous expression of HCV receptors. Finally, our library screening completed data on the CME-dependant entry route of HCV and identified 2 kinases, PI4KIIIalpha and beta, as relevant potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Distribution and mRNA Expression of BAMBI in Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

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    Shen MIAO

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective BAMBI structure is similar with that of the receptor Ⅰof TGF-β, it broadly participates in the control of TGF-β signaling. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression and its significance of BAMBI in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and explore the relation between BAMBI and clinical and pathological factors of NSCLC. Methods Sixty-three cases with NSCLC and adjacent normal tissue specimens were used for immunohistochemical assay. Thirty-one fresh lung cancer tissue specimens and surrounding normal lung tissue specimens was preserved for RT-PCR in -70 ℃ after quick-frozen in liquid nitrogen immediately. Results The level of BAMBI mRNA in cancer tissues was higher than that in the corresponding adjacent tissues (0.358±0.135 vs 0.249±0.129, with the difference being statistically significant (P =0.003. BAMBI protein expressed mainly in the membrane and the cytoplasm close to the membrane, its expression in the cancer tissue was higher than that in the adjacent tissues, the difference was significant (P <0.01. Expression of BAMBI in the cancer tissue was higher than that in the adjacent tissues, and the expression of BAMBI in adenocarcinoma of lung is higher than that in squamous carcinoma. Conclusion The expressions of BAMBI significantly increase in NSCLC. It might be a common affair in carcinogenesis of NSCLC.

  3. Efficient production of superior dumbbell-shaped DNA minimal vectors for small hairpin RNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Han; Jiang, Xiaoou; Tan, Kar Tong; Hang, Liting; Patzel, Volker

    2015-10-15

    Genetic therapy holds great promise for the treatment of inherited or acquired genetic diseases; however, its breakthrough is hampered by the lack of suitable gene delivery systems. Dumbbell-shaped DNA minimal vectors represent an attractive, safe alternative to the commonly used viral vectors which are fraught with risk, but dumbbell generation appears to be costly and time-consuming. We developed a new PCR-based method for dumbbell production which comprises only two steps. First, PCR amplification of the therapeutic expression cassette using chemically modified primers to form a ready-to-ligate DNA structure; and second, a highly efficient intramolecular ligation reaction. Compared with conventional strategies, the new method produces dumbbell vectors more rapidly, with higher yields and purity, and at lower costs. In addition, such produced small hairpin RNA expressing dumbbells triggered superior target gene knockdown compared with conventionally produced dumbbells or plasmids. Our novel method is suitable for large-scale dumbbell production and can facilitate clinical applications of this vector system.

  4. Identification of Novel MicroRNAs in Primates by Using the Synteny Information and Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data

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    Xiao Sun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Current technologies that are used for genome-wide microRNA (miRNA prediction are mainly based on BLAST tool. They often produce a large number of false positives. Here, we describe an effective approach for identifying orthologous pre-miRNAs in several primates based on syntenic information. Some of them have been validated by small RNA high throughput sequencing data. This approach uses the synteny information and experimentally validated miRNAs of human, and incorporates currently available algorithms and tools to identify the pre-miRNAs in five other primates. First, we identified 929 potential pre-miRNAs in the marmoset in which miRNAs have not yet been reported. Then, we predicted the miRNAs in other primates, and we successfully re-identified most of the published miRNAs and found 721, 979, 650 and 639 new potential pre-miRNAs in chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan and rhesus macaque, respectively. Furthermore, the miRNA transcriptome in the four primates have been re-analyzed and some novel predicted miRNAs have been supported by the small RNA sequencing data. Finally, we analyzed the potential functions of those validated miRNAs and explored the regulatory elements and transcription factors of some validated miRNA genes of interest. The results show that our approach can effectively identify novel miRNAs and some miRNAs that supported by small RNA sequencing data maybe play roles in the nervous system.

  5. Inducing effect of PGRs on small regulatory si/miRNA in resistance to sugar beet cyst nematode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsygankova, V A; Stefanovska, T R; Galkin, A P; Ponomarenko, S P; Blume, Ya B

    2012-01-01

    Sugar beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii Schmidt is an economically important plant parasite of sugar beet in Ukraine. The pest control options are limited. Sugar beet cyst nematode resistant varieties are not available on the market. Carbamate and organophosphate pesticides have been banned due to the high toxicity. The problem is aggravated by continuously increasing of oilseed rape (which is suitable host for H. schachtii) growing area due to biofuel demands. Several studies' results indicate that PGRs have role in management of plant parasitic nematodes but for sugar beet it is not studied well. We had an objective- studying of the role of four compositional PGRs created based of avermectin in suppression of sugar beet cyst nematode population on sugar beet and oilseed rape caused by enhancing of endogenous si/miRNA complementary to H. schachtii mRNA. Laboratory study was conducted in 2011 with using method DOT-blot hybridization si/miRNA with mRNA and by testing inhibitory activity in cell free system protein biosynthesis. That was shown that application of the PGRs enhances sugar beet and oilseeds rape plant immune-protective properties and resistance against plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schochtii through enhancement of synthesis of small regulatory si/miRNA related (complementary) to an mRNA structure of the parasitic organisms. As a result, translation of mRNA of the nematode is blocked and causes the mortality of plant parasite juveniles.

  6. Assessing specific oligonucleotides and small molecule antibiotics for the ability to inhibit the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction.

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    Dustin T King

    Full Text Available Studies on Coding Region Determinant-Binding Protein (CRD-BP and its orthologs have confirmed their functional role in mRNA stability and localization. CRD-BP is present in extremely low levels in normal adult tissues, but it is over-expressed in many types of aggressive human cancers and in neonatal tissues. Although the exact role of CRD-BP in tumour progression is unclear, cumulative evidence suggests that its ability to physically associate with target mRNAs is an important criterion for its oncogenic role. CRD-BP has high affinity for the 3'UTR of the oncogenic CD44 mRNA and depletion of CRD-BP in cells led to destabilization of CD44 mRNA, decreased CD44 expression, reduced adhesion and disruption of invadopodia formation. Here, we further characterize the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction and assess specific antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule antibiotics for their ability to inhibit the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction. CRD-BP has a high affinity for binding to CD44 RNA nts 2862-3055 with a Kd of 645 nM. Out of ten antisense oligonucleotides spanning nts 2862-3055, only three antisense oligonucleotides (DD4, DD7 and DD10 were effective in competing with CRD-BP for binding to 32P-labeled CD44 RNA. The potency of DD4, DD7 and DD10 in inhibiting the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction in vitro correlated with their ability to specifically reduce the steady-state level of CD44 mRNA in cells. The aminoglycoside antibiotics neomycin, paramomycin, kanamycin and streptomycin effectively inhibited the CRD-BP-CD44 RNA interaction in vitro. Assessing the potential inhibitory effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics including neomycin on the CRD-BP-CD44 mRNA interaction in cells proved difficult, likely due to their propensity to non-specifically bind nucleic acids. Our results have important implications for future studies in finding small molecules and nucleic acid-based inhibitors that interfere with protein-RNA interactions.

  7. Efficient protection and transfection of small interfering RNA by cationic shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuefei; Fang, Huafeng; Zhang, Ke; Shrestha, Ritu; Wooley, Karen L; Taylor, John-Stephen A

    2013-04-01

    Despite the great potential of small interfering RNA (siRNA) as a therapeutic agent, progress in this area has been hampered by a lack of efficient biocompatible transfection agents. Recently, cationic shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (cSCKs) were found to possess lower cytotoxicity and better transfection ability for phosphorothioate ODNs and plasmid DNA than the commonly used cationic lipid-based agent Lipofectamine. To determine the usefulness of cSCKs for siRNA transfection, a small library of cSCKs with varying percentage of primary and tertiary amines was assessed for its ability to bind to siRNA, inhibit siRNA degradation in human serum, and to transfect HeLa and mouse macrophage cell lines. The silencing efficiency in HeLa cells was greatest with the cSCK with 100% primary amines (pa100) as determined by their viability following transfection with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic siRNAs. cSCK-pa100 showed greater silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 in the HeLa cells, as well in 293T and human bronchial epithelial (HEK) cells, but was comparable in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells and human mammary epithelial (MCF10a) cells. cSCK-pa100 also showed greater silencing of iNOS expression than Lipofectamine 2000 in a mouse macrophage cell line, and provided greater protection from serum degradation, demonstrating its potential usefulness as an siRNA transfection agent. The siRNA silencing of iNOS at lower concentrations of siRNA could be enhanced by complexation with the fusogenic GALA peptide, which was shown to enhance endosomal escape following uptake.

  8. Downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) utilizing adenovirus-mediated transfer of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in a novel spinal metastatic melanoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, Andrew J; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Chetty, Chandramu; Lakka, Sajani S; Gujrati, Meena; Spomar, Daniel G; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2008-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) comprise a class of secreted zinc-dependent endopeptidases implicated in the metastatic potential of tumor cells due to their ability to degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM) and basement membrane. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) has been detected in high levels and correlates with invasiveness in human melanoma. We have studied the effect of adenovirus-mediated transfer of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MMP-2 in the human melanoma cell line A2058. The delivery of these double-stranded RNA molecules represents an efficient technology in silencing disease-causing genes with known sequences at the post-transcriptional level. siRNA against MMP-2 mRNA (Ad-MMP-2) was found to decrease MMP-2 protein expression and activity in melanoma cells as demonstrated by western blotting and gelatin zymography. Furthermore, infection of cells with Ad-MMP-2 inhibited cellular migration and invasion as indicated by spheroid and matrigel assays. We also observed dose-dependent suppression of vascular network formation in an angiogenesis assay. Finally, we developed a nude mouse spinal metastatic model to investigate the local effects of tumor metastasis. Intravenous tail vein injection with Ad-MMP-2 on days 5, 9 and 11 after tumor implantation resulted in complete retention of neurological function as compared to control and scrambled vector (Ad-SV)-treated groups that showed complete paraplegia by day 14+/-2 days. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed decreased tumor size in the Ad-MMP-2-treated animals. This novel experimental model revealed that adenoviral-mediated transfer of RNA interference against MMP-2 results in the retention of neurological function and significantly inhibited tumor growth.

  9. RNA helicases

    OpenAIRE

    Owttrim, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Similar to proteins, RNA molecules must fold into the correct conformation and associate with protein complexes in order to be functional within a cell. RNA helicases rearrange RNA secondary structure and RNA-protein interactions in an ATP-dependent reaction, performing crucial functions in all aspects of RNA metabolism. In prokaryotes, RNA helicase activity is associated with roles in housekeeping functions including RNA turnover, ribosome biogenesis, translation and small RNA metabolism. In...

  10. Photoperiod-and thermo-sensitive genic male sterility in rice are caused by a point mutation in a novel noncoding RNA that produces a small RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Zhou; Zhenlan Liu; Letian Chen; Yao-Guang Liu; Chuxiong Zhuang; Qinjian Liu; Jing Li; Dagang Jiang; Lingyan Zhou; Ping Wu; Sen Lu; Feng Li; Liya Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Photoperiod- and thermo-sensitive genic male sterility (PGMS and TGMS) are the core components for hybrid breeding in crops.Hybrid rice based on the two-line system using PGMS and TGMS lines has been successfully developed and applied widely in agriculture.However,the molecular mechanism underlying the control of PGMS and TGMS remains obscure.In this study,we mapped and cloned a major locus,p/tms12-1 (photo- or thermo-sensitive genic male sterility locus on chromosome 12),which confers PGMS in the japonica rice line Nongken 58S (NK58S)and TGMS in the indica rice line Peiai 64S (PA64S,derived from NK58S).A 2.4-kb DNA fragment containing the wild-type allele P/TMS12-1 was able to restore the pollen fertility of NK58S and PA64S plants in genetic complementation.P/TMS12-1 encodes a unique noncoding RNA,which produces a 21-nucleotide small RNA that we named osa-smR5864w.A substitution of C-to-G in p/tms12-1,the only polymorphism relative to P/TMS12-1,is present in the mutant small RNA,namely osa-smR5864m.Furthermore,overexpression of a 375-bp sequence of P/TMS12-1 in transgenic NK58S and PA64S plants also produced osa-smR5864w and restored pollen fertility.The small RNA was expressed preferentially in young panicles,but its expression was not markedly affected by different day lengths or temperatures.Our results reveal that the point mutation in p/tms12-1,which probably leads to a loss-of-function for osa-smR5864m,constitutes a common cause for PGMS and TGMS in the japonica and indica lines,respectively.Our findings thus suggest that this noncoding small RNA gene is an important regulator of male development controlled by cross-talk between the genetic networks and environmental conditions.

  11. Small Molecule Binding, Docking, and Characterization of the Interaction between Pth1 and Peptidyl-tRNA

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    Mary C. Hames

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial Pth1 is essential for viability. Pth1 cleaves the ester bond between the peptide and nucleotide of peptidyl-tRNA generated from aborted translation, expression of mini-genes, and short ORFs. We have determined the shape of the Pth1:peptidyl-tRNA complex using small angle neutron scattering. Binding of piperonylpiperazine, a small molecule constituent of a combinatorial synthetic library common to most compounds with inhibitory activity, was mapped to Pth1 via NMR spectroscopy. We also report computational docking results, modeling piperonylpiperazine binding based on chemical shift perturbation mapping. Overall these studies promote Pth1 as a novel antibiotic target, contribute to understanding how Pth1 interacts with its substrate, advance the current model for cleavage, and demonstrate feasibility of small molecule inhibition.

  12. De novo transcriptome and small RNA analysis of two Chinese willow cultivars reveals stress response genes in Salix matsudana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Guodong; Sui, Jinkai; Zeng, Yanfei; He, Caiyun; Duan, Aiguo; Zhang, Jianguo

    2014-01-01

    Salix matsudana Koidz. is a deciduous, rapidly growing, and drought resistant tree and is one of the most widely distributed and commonly cultivated willow species in China. Currently little transcriptomic and small RNAomic data are available to reveal the genes involve in the stress resistant in S. matsudana. Here, we report the RNA-seq analysis results of both transcriptome and small RNAome data using Illumina deep sequencing of shoot tips from two willow variants(Salix. matsudana and Salix matsudana Koidz. cultivar 'Tortuosa'). De novo gene assembly was used to generate the consensus transcriptome and small RNAome, which contained 106,403 unique transcripts with an average length of 944 bp and a total length of 100.45 MB, and 166 known miRNAs representing 35 miRNA families. Comparison of transcriptomes and small RNAomes combined with quantitative real-time PCR from the two Salix libraries revealed a total of 292 different expressed genes(DEGs) and 36 different expressed miRNAs (DEMs). Among the DEGs and DEMs, 196 genes and 24 miRNAs were up regulated, 96 genes and 12 miRNA were down regulated in S. matsudana. Functional analysis of DEGs and miRNA targets showed that many genes were involved in stress resistance in S. matsudana. Our global gene expression profiling presents a comprehensive view of the transcriptome and small RNAome which provide valuable information and sequence resources for uncovering the stress response genes in S. matsudana. Moreover the transcriptome and small RNAome data provide a basis for future study of genetic resistance in Salix.

  13. De novo transcriptome and small RNA analysis of two Chinese willow cultivars reveals stress response genes in Salix matsudana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Rao

    Full Text Available Salix matsudana Koidz. is a deciduous, rapidly growing, and drought resistant tree and is one of the most widely distributed and commonly cultivated willow species in China. Currently little transcriptomic and small RNAomic data are available to reveal the genes involve in the stress resistant in S. matsudana. Here, we report the RNA-seq analysis results of both transcriptome and small RNAome data using Illumina deep sequencing of shoot tips from two willow variants(Salix. matsudana and Salix matsudana Koidz. cultivar 'Tortuosa'. De novo gene assembly was used to generate the consensus transcriptome and small RNAome, which contained 106,403 unique transcripts with an average length of 944 bp and a total length of 100.45 MB, and 166 known miRNAs representing 35 miRNA families. Comparison of transcriptomes and small RNAomes combined with quantitative real-time PCR from the two Salix libraries revealed a total of 292 different expressed genes(DEGs and 36 different expressed miRNAs (DEMs. Among the DEGs and DEMs, 196 genes and 24 miRNAs were up regulated, 96 genes and 12 miRNA were down regulated in S. matsudana. Functional analysis of DEGs and miRNA targets showed that many genes were involved in stress resistance in S. matsudana. Our global gene expression profiling presents a comprehensive view of the transcriptome and small RNAome which provide valuable information and sequence resources for uncovering the stress response genes in S. matsudana. Moreover the transcriptome and small RNAome data provide a basis for future study of genetic resistance in Salix.

  14. Small interfering RNA therapy against carbohydrate sulfotransferase 15 inhibits cardiac remodeling in rats with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Sreedhar, Remya; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakamura, Masahiko; Harima, Meilei; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    Carbohydrate sulfotransferase 15 (CHST15) is a sulfotransferase responsible for biosynthesis of chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E), which plays important roles in numerous biological events such as biosynthesis of proinflammatory cytokines. However, the effects of CHST15 siRNA in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) after experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) have not yet been investigated. CHF was elicited in Lewis rats by immunization with cardiac myosin, and after immunization, the rats were divided into two groups and treated with either CHST15 siRNA (2μg/week) or vehicle. Age matched normal rats without immunizations were also included in this study. After 7weeks of treatment, we investigated the effects of CHST15 siRNA on cardiac function, proinflammatory cytokines, and cardiac remodeling in EAM rats. Myocardial functional parameters measured by hemodynamic and echocardiographic studies were significantly improved by CHST15 siRNA treatment in rats with CHF compared with that of vehicle-treated CHF rats. CHST15 siRNA significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis, and hypertrophy and its marker molecules (left ventricular (LV) mRNA expressions of transforming growth factor beta1, collagens I and III, and atrial natriuretic peptide) compared with vehicle-treated CHF rats. CHF-induced increased myocardial mRNA expressions of proinflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β], monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and -9), and CHST15 were also suppressed by the treatment with CHST15 siRNA. Western blotting study has confirmed the results obtained from mRNA analysis as CHST15 siRNA treated rats expressed reduced levels of inflammatory and cardiac remodeling marker proteins. Our results demonstrate for the first time, that CHST15 siRNA treatment significantly improved LV function and ameliorated the progression of cardiac remodeling in rats with CHF after EAM.

  15. Small Interfering RNA Targeting MDR1 Inhibits Ovarian Cancer Growth and Increases Efficacy of Chemotherapy in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-jun Liu; Guo-lan Gao; Kai-jia Tu; Li-qun Yu; Jun Gao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To further validate a knockdown approach for circumventing the multidrug resistance gene (MDR1), we used small interfering RNA(siRNA) targeting MDR1 gene to inhibit the expression of MDR1 gene and P-glycoprotein(P-gp) in vivo.Methods: Ascite tumor xenografts were established by implanting human ovarian carcinoma cells SKOV3/AR intraperitoneally into the nude mice. The mice were randomized into the following three treatment groups with each group six mice respectively: Taxol, Taxol with lipofectamine and Taxol with siRNA/MDR1- lipofectamine intraperitoneal injection. The tumor growth rate and the ascite growth rate of mice were investigated. The expressions of MDR1 gene and P-gp in mice were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry respctively.Results: The growth of tumors and ascites in mice treated with Taxol and siRNA/MDR1- lipofectamine was significantly inhibited compared with those in mice of other groups. After 28 days' treatment, the average tumor weight and ascite volume decreased by 43.6% and 29.7% in the group treated with Taxol and siRNA/MDR1-lipofectamine compared with these treated with Taxol alone (P<0.001). The expressions of MDR1 gene and P-gp in the group treated with Taxol and siRNA/MDR1-lipofectamine were also decreased compared with those in the group treated with Taxol alone (P<0.001).Conclusion: Small interfering RNA targeting-MDR1 can effectively and specifically suppress the expression of MDR1(P-glycoprotein) and inhibit ovarian cancer growth in vivo.

  16. MicroRNA expression and clinical outcome of small cell lung cancer.

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    Jih-Hsiang Lee

    Full Text Available The role of microRNAs in small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC is largely unknown. miR-34a is known as a p53 regulated tumor suppressor microRNA in many cancer types. However, its therapeutic implication has never been studied in SCLC, a cancer type with frequent dysfunction of p53. We investigated the expression of a panel of 7 microRNAs (miR-21, miR-29b, miR-34a/b/c, miR-155, and let-7a in 31 SCLC tumors, 14 SCLC cell lines, and 26 NSCLC cell lines. We observed significantly lower miR-21, miR-29b, and miR-34a expression in SCLC cell lines than in NSCLC cell lines. The expression of the 7 microRNAs was unrelated to SCLC patients' clinical characteristics and was neither prognostic in term of overall survival or progression-free survival nor predictive of treatment response. Overexpression or downregulation of miR-34a did not influence SCLC cell viability. The expression of these 7 microRNAs also did not predict in vitro sensitivity to cisplatin or etoposide in SCLC cell lines. Overexpression or downregulation of miR-34a did not influence sensitivity to cisplatin or etoposide in SCLC cell lines. In contrast to downregulation of the miR-34a target genes cMET and Axl by overexpression of miR-34a in NSCLC cell lines, the intrinsic expression of cMET and Axl was low in SCLC cell lines and was not influenced by overexpression of miR-34a. Our results suggest that the expression of the 7 selected microRNAs are not prognostic in SCLC patients, and miR-34a is unrelated to the malignant behavior of SCLC cells and is unlikely to be a therapeutic target.

  17. Small RNA analysis in Sindbis virus infected human HEK293 cells.

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    Andras Donaszi-Ivanov

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In contrast to the defence mechanism of RNA interference (RNAi in plants and invertebrates, its role in the innate response to virus infection of mammals is a matter of debate. Since RNAi has a well-established role in controlling infection of the alphavirus Sindbis virus (SINV in insects, we have used this virus to investigate the role of RNAi in SINV infection of human cells. RESULTS: SINV AR339 and TR339-GFP were adapted to grow in HEK293 cells. Deep sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs early in SINV infection (4 and 6 hpi showed low abundance (0.8% of viral sRNAs (vsRNAs, with no size, sequence or location specific patterns characteristic of Dicer products nor did they possess any discernible pattern to ascribe to a specific RNAi biogenesis pathway. This was supported by multiple variants for each sequence, and lack of hot spots along the viral genome sequence. The abundance of the best defined vsRNAs was below the limit of Northern blot detection. The adaptation of the virus to HEK293 cells showed little sequence changes compared to the reference; however, a SNP in E1 gene with a preference from G to C was found. Deep sequencing results showed little variation of expression of cellular microRNAs (miRNAs at 4 and 6 hpi compared to uninfected cells. Twelve miRNAs exhibiting some minor differential expression by sequencing, showed no difference in expression by Northern blot analysis. CONCLUSIONS: We show that, unlike SINV infection of invertebrates, generation of Dicer-dependent svRNAs and change in expression of cellular miRNAs were not detected as part of the Human response to SINV.

  18. The Complexity of Posttranscriptional Small RNA Regulatory Networks Revealed by In Silico Analysis of Gossypium arboreum L. Leaf, Flower and Boll Small Regulatory RNAs.

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    Hongtao Hu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs and secondary small interfering RNAs (principally phased siRNAs or trans-acting siRNAs are two distinct subfamilies of small RNAs (sRNAs that are emerging as key regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression in plants. Both miRNAs and secondary-siRNAs (sec-siRNAs are processed from longer RNA precursors by DICER-LIKE proteins (DCLs. Gossypium arboreum L., also known as tree cotton or Asian cotton, is a diploid, possibly ancestral relative of tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L., the predominant type of commercially grown cotton worldwide known as upland cotton. To understand the biological significance of these gene regulators in G. arboreum, a bioinformatics analysis was performed on G. arboreum small RNAs produced from G. arboreum leaf, flower, and boll tissues. Consequently, 263 miRNAs derived from 353 precursors, including 155 conserved miRNAs (cs-miRNAs and 108 novel lineage-specific miRNAs (ls-miRNAs. Along with miRNAs, 2,033 miRNA variants (isomiRNAs were identified as well. Those isomiRNAs with variation at the 3'-miRNA end were expressed at the highest levels, compared to other types of variants. In addition, 755 pha-siRNAs derived 319 pha-siRNA gene transcripts (PGTs were identified, and the potential pha-siRNA initiators were predicted. Also, 2,251 non-phased siRNAs were found as well, of which 1,088 appeared to be produced by so-called cis- or trans-cleavage of the PGTs observed at positions differing from pha-siRNAs. Of those sRNAs, 148 miRNAs/isomiRNAs and 274 phased/non-phased siRNAs were differentially expressed in one or more pairs of tissues examined. Target analysis revealed that target genes for both miRNAs and pha-siRNAs are involved a broad range of metabolic and enzymatic activities. We demonstrate that secondary siRNA production could result from initial cleavage of precursors by both miRNAs or isomiRNAs, and that subsequently produced phased and unphased siRNAs could result that also serve as triggers

  19. Uptake and impact of natural diet-derived small RNA in invertebrates: Implications for ecology and agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephen Y; Snow, Jonathan W

    2016-10-20

    The putative transfer and gene regulatory activities of diet-derived small RNAs (sRNAs) in ingesting animals are still debated. The existence of natural uptake of diet-derived sRNA by invertebrate species could have significant implication for our understanding of ecological relationships and could synergize with efforts to use RNA interference (RNAi) technology in agriculture. Here, we synthesize information gathered from studies in invertebrates using natural or artificial dietary delivery of sRNA and from studies of sRNA in vertebrate animals and plants to review our current understanding of uptake and impact of natural diet-derived sRNA on invertebrates. Our understanding has been influenced and sometimes confounded by the diversity of invertebrates and ingested plants studied, our limited insights into how gene expression may be modulated by dietary sRNAs at the mechanistic level, and the paucity of studies focusing directly on natural uptake of sRNA. As such, we suggest 2 strategies to investigate this phenomenon more comprehensively and thus facilitate the realization of its potentially broad impact on ecology and agriculture in the future.

  20. Nucleotide sequence of a crustacean 18S ribosomal RNA gene and secondary structure of eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelles, L; Fang, B L; Volckaert, G; Vandenberghe, A; De Wachter, R

    1984-12-11

    The primary structure of the gene for 18 S rRNA of the crustacean Artemia salina was determined. The sequence has been aligned with 13 other small ribosomal subunit RNA sequences of eukaryotic, archaebacterial, eubacterial, chloroplastic and plant mitochondrial origin. Secondary structure models for these RNAs were derived on the basis of previously proposed models and additional comparative evidence found in the alignment. Although there is a general similarity in the secondary structure models for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, the evidence seems to indicate a different topology in a central area of the structures.

  1. Dual function of the McaS small RNA in controlling biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke; Thomason, Maureen K.; Havelund, Johannes;

    2013-01-01

    S activates synthesis of the exopolysaccharide beta-1,6 N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PGA) by binding the global RNA-binding protein CsrA, a negative regulator of pgaA translation. The McaS RNA bears at least two CsrA-binding sequences, and inactivation of these sites compromises CsrA binding, PGA regulation...

  2. The major transcripts of the kinetoplast Trypanosoma brucei are very small ribosomal RNA's.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.C. Eperon; J.W.G. Janssen; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Borst (Piet)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractThe nucleotide sequence has been determined of a 2.2 kb segment of kinetoplast DNA, which encodes the major mitochondrial transcripts (12S and 9S) of Trypanosoma brucei. The sequence shows that the 12S RNA is a large subunit rRNA, although sufficiently unusual for resistance to chloramph

  3. Cotranscriptional Chromatin Remodeling by Small RNA Species: An HTLV-1 Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishat Aliya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell type specificity of human T cell leukemia virus 1 has been proposed as a possible reason for differential viral outcome in primary target cells versus secondary. Through chromatin remodeling, the HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax interacts with cellular factors at the chromosomally integrated viral promoter to activate downstream genes and control viral transcription. RNA interference is the host innate defense mechanism mediated by short RNA species (siRNA or miRNA that regulate gene expression. There exists a close collaborative functioning of cellular transcription factors with miRNA in order to regulate the expression of a number of eukaryotic genes including those involved in suppression of cell growth, induction of apoptosis, as well as repressing viral replication and propagation. In addition, it has been suggested that retroviral latency is influenced by chromatin alterations brought about by miRNA. Since Tax requires the assembly of transcriptional cofactors to carry out viral gene expression, there might be a close association between miRNA influencing chromatin alterations and Tax-mediated LTR activation. Herein we explore the possible interplay between HTLV-1 infection and miRNA pathways resulting in chromatin reorganization as one of the mechanisms determining HTLV-1 cell specificity and viral fate in different cell types.

  4. Immunity to tomato yellow leaf curl virus in transgenic tomato is associated with accumulation of transgene small RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibman, Diana; Prakash, Shanmugam; Wolf, Dalia; Zelcer, Aaron; Anfoka, Ghandi; Haviv, Sabrina; Brumin, Marina; Gaba, Victor; Arazi, Tzahi; Lapidot, Moshe; Gal-On, Amit

    2015-11-01

    Gene silencing is a natural defense response of plants against invading RNA and DNA viruses. The RNA post-transcriptional silencing system has been commonly utilized to generate transgenic crop plants that are "immune" to plant virus infection. Here, we applied this approach against the devastating DNA virus tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) in its host tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). To generate broad resistance to a number of different TYLCV viruses, three conserved sequences (the intergenic region [NCR], V1-V2 and C1-C2 genes) from the genome of the severe virus (TYLCV) were synthesized as a single insert and cloned into a hairpin configuration in a binary vector, which was used to transform TYLCV-susceptible tomato plants. Eight of 28 independent transgenic tomato lines exhibited immunity to TYLCV-Is and to TYLCV-Mld, but not to tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus, which shares relatively low sequence homology with the transgene. In addition, a marker-free (nptII-deleted) transgenic tomato line was generated for the first time by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation without antibiotic selection, followed by screening of 1180 regenerated shoots by whitefly-mediated TYLCV inoculation. Resistant lines showed a high level of transgene-siRNA (t-siRNA) accumulation (22% of total small RNA) with dominant sizes of 21 nt (73%) and 22 nt (22%). The t-siRNA displayed hot-spot distribution ("peaks") along the transgene, with different distribution patterns than the viral-siRNA peaks observed in TYLCV-infected tomato. A grafting experiment demonstrated the mobility of 0.04% of the t-siRNA from transgenic rootstock to non-transformed scion, even though scion resistance against TYLCV was not achieved.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded small RNA is released from EBV-infected cells and activates signaling from toll-like receptor 3

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus–encoded small RNA (EBER) is nonpolyadenylated, noncoding RNA that forms stem-loop structure by intermolecular base-pairing, giving rise to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)–like molecules, and exists abundantly in EBV-infected cells. Here, we report that EBER induces signaling from the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), which is a sensor of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and induces type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. A substantial amount of EBER, which was sufficient to induc...

  6. Bridging small interfering RNA with giant therapeutic outcomes using nanometric liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yuvraj; Tomar, Sandeep; Khan, Shariq; Meher, Jaya Gopal; Pawar, Vivek K; Raval, Kavit; Sharma, Komal; Singh, Pankaj K; Chaurasia, Mohini; Surendar Reddy, B; Chourasia, Manish K

    2015-12-28

    The scope of RNAi based therapeutics is unquestionable. However, if we dissect the current trend of clinical trials for afore mentioned drug class, some stark trends appear: 1) naked siRNA only exerts influence in topical mode whilst systemic delivery requires a carrier and 2) even after two decades of extensive efforts, not even a single siRNA containing product is commercially available. It was therefore felt that a perspective simplifying the unique intricacies of working with a merger of siRNA and liposomes from a pharmaceutical viewpoint could draw the attention of a wider array of interested researchers. We begin from the beginning and attempt to conduit the gap between theoretical logic and experimental/actual constraints. This, in turn could stimulate the next generation of investigators, gearing them to tackle the conundrum, which is siRNA delivery.

  7. Suppression of Breast Cancer Cell Migration by Small Interfering RNA Delivered by Polyethylenimine-Functionalized Graphene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan-Pin; Hung, Chao-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Zhong, Cai-Yan; Wang, Wan-Rou; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

    2016-05-01

    The carbon-based nanomaterial graphene can be chemically modified to associate with various molecules such as chemicals and biomolecules and developed as novel carriers for drug and gene delivery. In this study, a nonviral gene transfection reagent was produced by functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with a polycationic polymer, polyethylenimine (PEI), to increase the biocompatibility of GO and to transfect small interfering RNA (siRNA) against C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), a biomarker associated with cancer metastasis, into invasive breast cancer cells. PEI-functionalized GO (PEI-GO) was a homogeneous aqueous solution that remained in suspension during storage at 4 °C for at least 6 months. The particle size of PEI-GO was 172 ± 4.58 and 188 ± 5.00 nm at 4 and 25 °C, respectively, and increased slightly to 262 ± 17.6 nm at 37 °C, but remained unaltered with time. Binding affinity of PEI-GO toward siRNA was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), in which PEI-GO and siRNA were completely associated at a PEI-GO:siRNA weight ratio of 2:1 and above. The invasive breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was transfected with PEI-GO in complex with siRNAs against CXCR4 (siCXCR4). Suppression of the mRNA and protein expression of CXCR4 by the PEI-GO/siCXCR4 complex was confirmed by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. In addition, the metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 cells was attenuated by the PEI-GO/siCXCR4 complex as demonstrated in wound healing assay. Our results suggest that PEI-GO is effective in the delivery of siRNA and may contribute to targeted gene therapy to suppress cancer metastasis.

  8. Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA, peptides, and receptors in a thoracopulmonary malignant small round cell tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, F C; Orskov, C; Haselbacher, G;

    1994-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-(IGF) II and IGF-I and IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptors were expressed in a thoracopulmonary malignant small round cell tumor (MSRCT) from a 14-year-old boy. Northern analysis showed that the MSRCT expresses multiple IGF-II mRNA of 6.0, 4.8, 4.2, and 2.2 kilobase from...

  9. Discovery and small RNA profile of Pecan mosaic-associated virus, a novel potyvirus of pecan trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiu; Fu, Shuai; Qian, Yajuan; Zhang, Liqin; Xu, Yi; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-05-26

    A novel potyvirus was discovered in pecan (Carya illinoensis) showing leaf mosaic symptom through the use of deep sequencing of small RNAs. The complete genome of this virus was determined to comprise of 9,310 nucleotides (nt), and shared 24.0% to 58.9% nucleotide similarities with that of other Potyviridae viruses. The genome was deduced to encode a single open reading frame (polyprotein) on the plus strand. Phylogenetic analysis based on the whole genome sequence and coat protein amino acid sequence showed that this virus is most closely related to Lettuce mosaic virus. Using electron microscopy, the typical Potyvirus filamentous particles were identified in infected pecan leaves with mosaic symptoms. Our results clearly show that this virus is a new member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae. The virus is tentatively named Pecan mosaic-associated virus (PMaV). Additionally, profiling of the PMaV-derived small RNA (PMaV-sRNA) showed that the most abundant PMaV-sRNAs were 21-nt in length. There are several hotspots for small RNA production along the PMaV genome; two 21-nt PMaV-sRNAs starting at 811 nt and 610 nt of the minus-strand genome were highly repeated.

  10. The stress-related, rhizobial small RNA RcsR1 destabilizes the autoinducer synthase encoding mRNA sinI in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardt, Kathrin; Šmídová, Klára; Rahn, Helen; Lochnit, Günter; Robledo, Marta; Evguenieva-Hackenberg, Elena

    2016-05-03

    Quorum sensing is a cell density-dependent communication system of bacteria relying on autoinducer molecules. During the analysis of the post-transcriptional regulation of quorum sensing in the nitrogen fixing plant symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, we predicted and verified a direct interaction between the 5'-UTR of sinI mRNA encoding the autoinducer synthase and a small RNA (sRNA), which we named RcsR1. In vitro, RcsR1 prevented cleavage in the 5'-UTR of sinI by RNase E and impaired sinI translation. In line with low ribosomal occupancy and transcript destabilization upon binding of RcsR1 to sinI, overproduction of RcsR1 in S. meliloti resulted in lower level and shorter half-life of sinI mRNA, and in decreased autoinducer amount. Although RcsR1 can influence quorum sensing via sinI, its level did not vary at different cell densities, but decreased under salt stress and increased at low temperature. We found that RcsR1 and its stress-related expression pattern, but not the interaction with sinI homologs, are conserved in Sinorhizobium, Rhizobium and Agrobacterium. Consistently, overproduction of RcsR1 in S. meliloti and Agrobacterium tumefaciens inhibited growth at high salinity. We identified conserved targets of RcsR1 and showed that most conserved interactions and the effect on growth under salt stress are mediated by the first stem-loop of RcsR1, while its central part is responsible for the species-specific interaction with sinI. We conclude that RcsR1 is an ancient, stress-related riboregulator in rhizobia and propose that it links stress responses to quorum sensing in S. meliloti.

  11. A Salmonella small non-coding RNA facilitates bacterial invasion and intracellular replication by modulating the expression of virulence factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Gong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs that act as regulators of gene expression have been identified in all kingdoms of life, including microRNA (miRNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA in eukaryotic cells. Numerous sRNAs identified in Salmonella are encoded by genes located at Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs that are commonly found in pathogenic strains. Whether these sRNAs are important for Salmonella pathogenesis and virulence in animals has not been reported. In this study, we provide the first direct evidence that a pathogenicity island-encoded sRNA, IsrM, is important for Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells, intracellular replication inside macrophages, and virulence and colonization in mice. IsrM RNA is expressed in vitro under conditions resembling those during infection in the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, IsrM is found to be differentially expressed in vivo, with higher expression in the ileum than in the spleen. IsrM targets the mRNAs coding for SopA, a SPI-1 effector, and HilE, a global regulator of the expression of SPI-1 proteins, which are major virulence factors essential for bacterial invasion. Mutations in IsrM result in disregulation of expression of HilE and SopA, as well as other SPI-1 genes whose expression is regulated by HilE. Salmonella with deletion of isrM is defective in bacteria invasion of epithelial cells and intracellular replication/survival in macrophages. Moreover, Salmonella with mutations in isrM is attenuated in killing animals and defective in growth in the ileum and spleen in mice. Our study has shown that IsrM sRNA functions as a pathogenicity island-encoded sRNA directly involved in Salmonella pathogenesis in animals. Our results also suggest that sRNAs may represent a distinct class of virulence factors that are important for bacterial infection in vivo.

  12. Small activating RNA induces myogenic differentiation of rat adipose-derived stem cells by upregulating MyoD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenghe Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:RNA activation (RNAa is a mechanism of gene activation triggered by promoter-targeted small double stranded RNAs (dsRNAs, also known as small activating RNAs (saRNAs. Myogenic regulatory factor MyoD is regarded as the master activator of myogenic differentiation cascade by binding to enhancer of muscle specific genes. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI is a condition primarily resulted from urethral sphincter deficiency. It is thus expected that by promoting differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs into myoblasts by activating MyoD gene through RNAa may offer benefits to SUI.Materials and Methods:Rats ADSCs were isolated, proliferated in vitro, and identified by flow cytometry. Purified ADSCs were then transfected with a MyoD saRNA or control transfected. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and western blotting were used to detect MyoD mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Immunocytochemical staining was applied to determine the expression of desmin protein in transfected cells. Cell viability was measured by using CellTiter 96® AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay kit.Results:Transfection of a MyoD saRNA (dsMyoD into ADSCs significantly induced the expression of MyoD at both the mRNA and protein levels, and inhibited cell proliferation. Desmin protein expression was detected in dsMyoD treated ADSCs 2 weeks later.Conclusion:Our findings show that RNAa mediated overexpression of MyoD can promote transdifferentiation of ADSCs into myoblasts and may help treat stress urinary incontinence (SUI–a condition primarily resulted from urethral sphincter deficiency.

  13. Inhibition of Proliferation of Human Hela Cells by Small Interference RNA against Pokemon Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Yi-jing; NI Bing; JIANG Man; YANG Di; LI Fan; WU Yu-zhang

    2008-01-01

    Objective:The transcriptional repressor Pokemon(encoded by the Zbtb7 gene)is a critical factor in oncogenesis.Pokemon overexpression leads to overt oncogenic transformation both in vitro and in vivo in transgenic mice. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of retrovirus expressing the siRNA targeting Pokemon in human cervical cancer cells. Methods:We constructed and identified the recombinant retrovirus particle expressing siRNA of Pokemon gene,and then testified the suppression of recombinant plasmid and evaluated the gene-silencing effect. Results:We got the positive evaluation from colony forming experiment we found that the retrovirus expressing siRNA targeting Pokemon had repressing effect. Conclusion:Our work provides basis for the study of suppression effect of retrovirus in vivo and the design of the target-complex.

  14. Constructionof the recombinant adenovirus vectors of CALB2 gene and small interfering RNA, and application in testicular Leydig cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Jian; Wang Jing; Liu Shan; Sun Xue-ping; Gao Chao; Gao Li; Yang Xiao-yu; Liu Jia-yin; Cui Yu-gui

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To construct the recombinant adenovirus vectors of calretinin (CALB2) gene and small interfering RNA (siRNA),for over-expression or knock-down of CALB2,as the basis of functional investigation of CALB2 in testicular Leydig cells.Methods:The cDNA sequence of CALB2 was cloned by the reverse transcriptive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).A CALB2 gene fragment was sub-cloned into adenovirus shuttle plasmid pAdTrack-CMV to construct the shuttle plasmid pAdTrack-CALB2.Then it was transformed into BJ5183 cells with the adenoviral backbone pAdEasy-1 to obtain the homologous recombinant AdCMV-CALB2.The recombinant AdCMV-CALB2 was further packaged and amplificated in AD293 cells.The expression of CALB2 protein in AD293 cells was detected by Western blotting.CALB2 protein was over-expressed in mouse Leydig cell line (MLTC-1 cells) by the constructed AdCMVCALB2.CALB2 gene siRNA recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-H1-siRNA/CALB2 was also constructed simultaneously.Its efficacy was detected in AD293 cells by Western blotting.Results:The CALB2 gene recombinant adenovirus vector AdCMV-CALB2 and the CALB2 gene siRNA recombinant adenovirus vector Ad-H1-siRNA/CALB2 were constructed successfully by endonulease digestion and sequencing.AD293 cells infected with AdCMV-CALB2 or Ad-H1-SiRNA/CALB2 significantly expressed GFP protein.The expression of CALB2 protein was significantly up-regulated in AD293 cells infected with AdCMV-CALB2 plasmids,while the expression of CALB2 protein was down-regulated by 60% in the CALB2 cells infected with Ad-H1SiRNA/CALB2.MLTC-1 cells did not markedly express CALLB2 protein,while MLTC-1 cells infected with AdCMV-CALB2 expressed CALB2 protein at a high level.Conclusions:The recombinant adenovirus vectors of AdCMV-CALB2 and Ad-H1-SiRNA/CALB2 were successfully constructed.Both vectors effectively expressed in AD293.CALB2 protein was over-expressed in the cultured MLTC-1 cells by AdCMV-CALB2.These vectors of CALB2 gene and Leydig cell line are

  15. Silencing of MGMT with small interference RNA reversed resistance in human BCUN-resistant glioma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Si-ming; FANG Mao; GUO Hui; ZHONG Xue-yun

    2011-01-01

    Background Our previous study had cloned two glioma cell lines SWOZ1 and SWOZ2 isolated from parental glioma cell line SWO38.The 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) resistance of SWOZ1 was higher than that of SWOZ2.Since O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was thought to be closely related to BCNU resistance in glioma,this study aimed to explore the function of MGMT in glioma resistant to BCNU.Methods A BCNU resistant glioma cell line SWOZ2-BCNU was established.The expression of MGMT was detected in SWOZ1,SWOZ2 and SWOZ2-BCNU.Small interferencing RNA targeting MGMT was used to silence the expression of MGMT in resistant cell lines SWOZ1 and SWOZ2-BCNU.The cytotoxicity of BCNU to these cells was measured using the cell counting kit-8 assay.Statistical analysis was carried out by one-way analysis of variance in statistical package SPSS 13.0.Results The resistance of SWOZ1 and SWOZ2-BCNU against BCNU was 4.9-fold and 5.3-fold higher than that of SWOZ2.The results of quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting confirmed that MGMT was both significantly increased in SWOZ1 and SWOZ2-BCNU compared to SOWZ2.After transfection with small interferencing RNA targeting MGMT,a decreased level of MGMT mRNA expression in SWOZ1 and SWOZ2-BCNU for more than 75% compared to negative control was found and confirmed by Western blotting.As a result,the resistance against BCNU was reversed for about 50% both in the BCNU-resistant cell lines SWOZ1 and SWOZ2-BCNU.Conclusions Silencing MGMT with specific small interferencing RNA can reverse the BCNU resistant phenotype in these glioma cell lines.MGMT may play an important role both in intrinsic and acquired BCNU-resistance in glioma.

  16. The tRNA-Derived Small RNAs Regulate Gene Expression through Triggering Sequence-Specific Degradation of Target Transcripts in the Oomycete Pathogen Phytophthora sojae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinhu; Li, Tingting; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolong; Quan, Junli; Jin, Weibo; Zhang, Meixiang; Fan, Guangjin; Wang, Ming-Bo; Shan, Weixing

    2016-01-01

    Along with the well-studied microRNA (miRNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a new class of transfer RNA-derived small RNA (tsRNA), which has recently been detected in multiple organisms and is implicated in gene regulation. However, while miRNAs and siRNAs are known to repress gene expression through sequence-specific RNA cleavage or translational repression, how tsRNAs regulate gene expression remains unclear. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of tsRNAs in the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae. We show that multiple tRNAs are processed into abundant tsRNAs, which accumulate in a similar developmental stage-specific manner and are negatively correlated with the expression of predicted target genes. Degradome sequencing and 5′ RLM RACE experiments indicate tsRNAs can trigger degradation of target transcripts. Transient expression assays using GUS sensor constructs confirmed the requirement of sequence complementarity in tsRNA-mediated RNA degradation in P. sojae. Our results show that the tsRNA are a class of functional endogenous sRNAs and suggest that tsRNA regulate gene expression through inducing sequence-specific degradation of target RNAs in oomycetes. PMID:28066490

  17. Small Interfering RNA Targeted to ASPP2 Promotes Progression of Experimental Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE is vital in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR development. Apoptosis-stimulating proteins of p53 (ASPP2 have recently been reported to participate in EMT. However, the role of ASPP2 in PVR pathogenesis has not been identified. Methods. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of ASPP2 in epiretinal membranes of PVR patients. ARPE-19 cells were transfected with ASPP2-siRNA, followed with measurement of cell cytotoxicity, proliferation, and migration ability. EMT markers and related inflammatory and fibrosis cytokines were measured by western blot or flow cytometry. Additionally, PVR rat models were induced by intravitreal injection of ARPE-19 cells transfected with ASPP2-siRNA and evaluated accordingly. Results. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed less intense expression of ASPP2 in PVR membranes. ASPP2 knockdown facilitated the proliferation and migration of RPE cells and enhanced the expression of mesenchymal markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and ZEB1. Meanwhile, ASPP2-siRNA increased EMT-related and inflammatory cytokines, including TGF-β, CTGF, VEGF, TNF-α, and interleukins. PVR severities were more pronounced in the rat models with ASPP2-siRNA treatment. Conclusions. ASPP2 knockdown promoted EMT of ARPE-19 cells in vitro and exacerbated the progression of experimental PVR in vivo, possibly via inflammatory and fibrosis cytokines.

  18. Gene suppression via U1 small nuclear RNA interference (U1i) machinery using oligonucleotides containing 2'-modified-4'-thionucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yusaku; Yamazaki, Naoshi; Tarashima, Noriko; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Yoshiharu; Itoh, Kohji; Minakawa, Noriaki

    2013-09-01

    Gene suppression via U1 small nuclear RNA interference (U1i) is considered to be one of the most attractive approaches, and takes the place of general antisense, RNA interference (RNAi), and anti-micro RNA machineries. Since the U1i can be induced by short oligonucleotides (ONs), namely U1 adaptors consisting of a 'target domain' and a 'U1 domain', we prepared adaptor ONs using 2'-modified-4'-thionucleosides developed by our group, and evaluated their U1i activity. As a result, the desired gene suppression via U1i was observed in ONs prepared as a combination of 2'-fluoro-4'-thionucleoside and 2'-fluoronucleoside units as well as only 2'-fluoronucleoside units, while those prepared as combination of 2'-OMe nucleoside/2'-OMe-4'-thionucleoside and 2'-fluoronucleoside units did not show significant activity. Measurement of Tm values indicated that a higher hybridization ability of adaptor ONs with complementary RNA is one of the important factors to show potent U1i activity.

  19. Regulation of the small regulatory RNA MicA by ribonuclease III: a target-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Sandra C; Silva, Inês J; Saramago, Margarida; Domingues, Susana; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2011-04-01

    MicA is a trans-encoded small non-coding RNA, which downregulates porin-expression in stationary-phase. In this work, we focus on the role of endoribonucleases III and E on Salmonella typhimurium sRNA MicA regulation. RNase III is shown to regulate MicA in a target-coupled way, while RNase E is responsible for the control of free MicA levels in the cell. We purified both Salmonella enzymes and demonstrated that in vitro RNase III is only active over MicA when in complex with its targets (whether ompA or lamB mRNAs). In vivo, MicA is demonstrated to be cleaved by RNase III in a coupled way with ompA mRNA. On the other hand, RNase E is able to cleave unpaired MicA and does not show a marked dependence on its 5' phosphorylation state. The main conclusion of this work is the existence of two independent pathways for MicA turnover. Each pathway involves a distinct endoribonuclease, having a different role in the context of the fine-tuned regulation of porin levels. Cleavage of MicA by RNase III in a target-dependent fashion, with the concomitant decay of the mRNA target, strongly resembles the eukaryotic RNAi system, where RNase III-like enzymes play a pivotal role.

  20. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kenji K; Jurka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Most non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons encoding a restriction-like endonuclease show target-specific integration into repetitive sequences such as ribosomal RNA genes and microsatellites. However, only a few target-specific lineages of non-LTR retrotransposons are distributed widely and no lineage is found across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Here we report the most widely distributed lineage of target sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons, designated Utopia. Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family. Utopia families from oomycetes and wasps show strong target specificity while only a small number of Utopia copies from reptiles are flanked with U2 snRNA genes. Oomycete Utopia families contain an "archaeal" RNase H domain upstream of reverse transcriptase (RT), which likely originated from a plant RNase H gene. Analysis of Utopia from oomycetes indicates that multiple lineages of Utopia have been maintained inside of U2 genes with few copy numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of RT suggests the monophyly of Utopia, and it likely dates back to the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  1. A particular set of small non-coding RNAs is bound to the distinctive Argonaute protein of Trypanosoma cruzi: insights from RNA-interference deficient organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Silva, Maria Rosa; Sanguinetti, Julia; Cabrera-Cabrera, Florencia; Franzén, Oscar; Cayota, Alfonso

    2014-04-01

    The study of small RNAs and Argonaute proteins in eukaryotes that are deficient in functional RNA interference could provide insights into novel functions of small RNAs. In this study we describe small non-coding RNAs bound to a distinctive Argonaute protein of Trypanosoma cruzi, TcPIWI-tryp. Co-immunoprecipitation of TcPIWI-tryp followed by deep sequencing of isolated RNA identified abundant small RNAs derived from rRNAs and tRNAs. The small RNA repertoire differed from that of the canonical Argonaute in organisms with functional RNA interference, which could indicate novel biological functions for TcPIWI-tryp in T. cruzi and other members of the trypanosomatid clade.

  2. Determination of low-energy structures of a small RNA hairpin using Monte Carlo–based techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudhanshu Shanker; Pradipta Bandyopadhyay

    2012-07-01

    The energy landscape of RNA is known to be extremely rugged, and hence finding low-energy structures starting from a random structure is a challenging task for any optimization algorithm. In the current work, we have investigated the ability of one Monte Carlo–based optimization algorithm, Temperature Basin Paving, to explore the energy landscape of a small RNA T-loop hairpin. In this method, the history of the simulation is used to increase the probability of states less visited in the simulation. It has been found that using both energy and end-to-end distance as the biasing parameters in the simulation, the partially folded structure of the hairpin starting from random structures could be obtained.

  3. Phylogenetic position of Dysteria derouxi (Ciliophora:Phyllopharyngea: Dysteriida) inferred from the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The complete small subunit rRNA (SSrRNA) gene sequence of a marine ciliate, Dysteria derouxi Gong and Song, 2004, was determined to be of 1 708 nucleotides. The phylogenetic position of this species within the class Phyllopharyngea was deduced using distance matrix, maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood methods. Dysteria derouxi, together with other available ciliates of the class Phyllopharyngea, forms a monophyletic clade with strong bootstrap support in the distance matrix, maximum parsimony and likelihood tree construction methods, while the dysterids are, as a monophyletic group, phylogenetically close to the clade of chlamydodontids [values of 100% LS(least-squares), 100% NJ(neighbor-joining)]. In addition, the trees indicate that dysteriids may be a higher or specialized group within the class, which corresponds well to the morphology and infraciliature.

  4. Phylogenetic position of three Condylostoma species(Protozoa,Ciliophora,Heterotricheal inferred from the small subunit rRNA gene sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenbo Guo; Shan Gao; Weibo Song; Khaled A.S.A1-Rasheid; Chen Shao; Miao Miao; Saleh A.A1-Farraj; Saleh A.A1-Qurishy; Zigui Chen; Zhenzhen Yi

    2008-01-01

    The systematically poorly known ciliate genus Conadylostoma was erected by Vincent in 1826.About 10 morphotypes have been reported,but any molecular investigations concerning this group SO far are lacking.In this work,the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SS rRNA)gene of three marine Conaylostoma species was sequenced,by which the phylogenetic trees were constructed by distance-matrix,maximum parsimony and Bayesian inference methods.The results show that(1)all the trees have similar topologies with high supports;(2)Condylostoma is mostly related to the genus Condylostentor;and(3)three Condylostoma species as well as Conadylostentor auriculatus cluster together and form a sister group with other heterotrichs.This is moderately consistent with the assessment of phylo-genetic relationships of Conaylostoma-related heterotrichs from the morphological information.The phylogenetic relationship of some other related heterotrichs,Peritromus,Fotlictllina,Stentor and Blepharisma,has been also discussed.

  5. TAXONOMIC STATUS OF CAR BACILLUS BASED ON THE SMALL SUBUNIT RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏强; TsujiM; TakahashiT; IshiharaC; ItohT

    1995-01-01

    In an attempt to identify the taxonomic relationship between CAR bacillus and other bacteria, the SSU rRNA gene sequences of two CAR bacillus strains, CBM and CBR isolated from mice and rats respectively were used in the present studies. The SSU rRNA gene sequences, approximately 1.5 kb in size amplified from genomic DNAs from both strains, were determined and 96. 8% homologies were found to exist be-tween them. Those sequences were aligned to most euhacteria with a computer search showing high homol-ogy with those of Flavobacter/Flexibacter species especially closed to Fx. sanai and Ft. ferrugineum. Phylogenetic analysts indicated that CAR bacillus belongs to a species close to Fx. sancti and Ft. ferrug-imum subdivision.

  6. Genome-wide Annotation, Identification, and Global Transcriptomic Analysis of Regulatory or Small RNA Gene Expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan K. Carroll

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In Staphylococcus aureus, hundreds of small regulatory or small RNAs (sRNAs have been identified, yet this class of molecule remains poorly understood and severely understudied. sRNA genes are typically absent from genome annotation files, and as a consequence, their existence is often overlooked, particularly in global transcriptomic studies. To facilitate improved detection and analysis of sRNAs in S. aureus, we generated updated GenBank files for three commonly used S. aureus strains (MRSA252, NCTC 8325, and USA300, in which we added annotations for >260 previously identified sRNAs. These files, the first to include genome-wide annotation of sRNAs in S. aureus, were then used as a foundation to identify novel sRNAs in the community-associated methicillin-resistant strain USA300. This analysis led to the discovery of 39 previously unidentified sRNAs. Investigating the genomic loci of the newly identified sRNAs revealed a surprising degree of inconsistency in genome annotation in S. aureus, which may be hindering the analysis and functional exploration of these elements. Finally, using our newly created annotation files as a reference, we perform a global analysis of sRNA gene expression in S. aureus and demonstrate that the newly identified tsr25 is the most highly upregulated sRNA in human serum. This study provides an invaluable resource to the S. aureus research community in the form of our newly generated annotation files, while at the same time presenting the first examination of differential sRNA expression in pathophysiologically relevant conditions.

  7. IGS Minisatellites Useful for Race Differentiation in Colletotrichum lentis and a Likely Site of Small RNA Synthesis Affecting Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Durkin

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum lentis is a fungal pathogen of lentil in Canada but rarely reported elsewhere. Two races, Ct0 and Ct1, have been identified using differential lines. Our objective was to develop a PCR-probe differentiating these races. Sequences of the translation elongation factor 1α (tef1α, RNA polymerase II subunit B2 (rpb2, ATP citrate lyase subunit A (acla, and internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions were monomorphic, while the intergenic spacer (IGS region showed length polymorphisms at two minisatellites of 23 and 39 nucleotides (nt. A PCR-probe (39F/R amplifying the 39 nt minisatellite was developed which subsequently revealed 1-5 minisatellites with 1-12 repeats in C. lentis. The probe differentiated race Ct1 isolates having 7, 9 or 7+9 repeats from race Ct0 having primarily 2 or 4 repeats, occasionally 5, 6, or 8, but never 7 or 9 repeats. These isolates were collected between 1991 and 1999. In a 2012 survey isolates with 2 and 4 repeats increased from 34% to 67%, while isolated with 7 or 9 repeats decreased from 40 to 4%, likely because Ct1 resistant lentil varieties had been grown. The 39 nt repeat was identified in C. gloeosporioides, C. trifolii, Ascochyta lentis, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and Botrytis cinerea. Thus, the 39F/R PCR probe is not species specific, but can differentiate isolates based on repeat number. The 23 nt minisatellite in C. lentis exists as three length variants with ten sequence variations differentiating race Ct0 having 14 or 19 repeats from race Ct1 having 17 repeats, except for one isolate. RNA-translation of 23 nt repeats forms hairpins and has the appropriate length to suggest that IGS could be a site of small RNA synthesis, a hypothesis that warrants further investigation. Small RNA from fungal plant pathogens able to silence genes either in the host or pathogen thereby aiding infection have been reported.

  8. Efficient delivery of small interfering RNA into injured spinal cords in rats by photomechanical waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Toyooka, Terushige; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2011-03-01

    In the central nervous system, lack of axonal regeneration leads to permanent functional disabilities. In spinal cord injury (SCI), the over-expressions of intermediate filament (IF) proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are mainly involved in glial scar formation; these proteins work as both physical and biochemical barriers to axonal regeneration. Thus, silencing of these IF proteins would be an attractive strategy to treat SCI. In this study, we first attempted to deliver fluorescent probe-labeled siRNAs into injured spinal cords in rats by applying photomechanical waves (PMWs) to examine the capability of PMWs as a tool for siRNA delivery. Intense fluorescence from siRNAs was observed in much broader regions in the spinal cords with PMW application when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. Based on this result, we delivered siRNAs for GFAP and vimentin into injured spinal tissues in rats by applying PMWs. The treatment resulted in efficient silencing of the proteins at five days after SCI and a decrease of the cavity area in the injured tissue at three weeks after SCI when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. These results demonstrate the capability of PMWs for efficient delivery of siRNAs into injured spinal cords and treatment of SCIs.

  9. Small RNA interference-mediated gene silencing of heparanase abolishes the invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Xiaohua

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heparanase facilitates the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells, and is over-expressed in many kinds of malignancies. Our studies indicated that heparanase was frequently expressed in advanced gastric cancers. The aim of this study is to determine whether silencing of heparanase expression can abolish the malignant characteristics of gastric cancer cells. Methods Three heparanase-specific small interfering RNA (siRNAs were designed, synthesized, and transfected into cultured gastric cancer cell line SGC-7901. Heparanase expression was measured by RT-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. Cell proliferation was detected by MTT colorimetry and colony formation assay. The in vitro invasion and metastasis of cancer cells were measured by cell adhesion assay, scratch assay and matrigel invasion assay. The angiogenesis capabilities of cancer cells were measured by tube formation of endothelial cells. Results Transfection of siRNA against 1496-1514 bp of encoding regions resulted in reduced expression of heparanase, which started at 24 hrs and lasted for 120 hrs post-transfection. The siRNA-mediated silencing of heparanase suppressed the cellular proliferation of SGC-7901 cells. In addition, the in vitro invasion and metastasis of cancer cells were attenuated after knock-down of heparanase. Moreover, transfection of heparanase-specific siRNA attenuated the in vitro angiogenesis of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions These results demonstrated that gene silencing of heparanase can efficiently abolish the proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of human gastric cancer cells in vitro, suggesting that heparanase-specific siRNA is of potential values as a novel therapeutic agent for human gastric cancer.

  10. viRome: an R package for the visualization and analysis of viral small RNA sequence datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Mick; Schnettler, Esther; Kohl, Alain

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY: RNA interference (RNAi) is known to play an important part in defense against viruses in a range of species. Second-generation sequencing technologies allow us to assay these systems and the small RNAs that play a key role with unprecedented depth. However, scientists need access to tools which can condense, analyse and display the resulting data. Here we present viRome, a package for R that takes aligned sequence data and produces a range of essential plots and reports.Availability ...

  11. Analysis of the small RNA P16/RgsA in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteria contain small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that are responsible for altering transcription, translation, or mRNA stability. ncRNAs are important because they regulate virulence factors and susceptibility to various stresses. Here, the regulation of a recently described ncRNA of P. syringae DC30...

  12. Small RNA populations for two unrelated viruses exhibit different biases in strand polarity and proximity to terminal sequences in the insect host Homalodisca vitripennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next generation sequencing was used to analyze virus-derived small RNA (vsRNA) profiles for two taxonomically unrelated viruses infecting Homalodisca vitripennis, the glassy winged sharpshooter. Homalodisca coagulata virus-1 (HoCV-1), family Dicistroviridae, and Homalodisca vitripennis virus (HoVRV)...

  13. Dynamics of small RNA profiles of virus and host origin in wheat cultivars synergistically infected by Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus: virus infection caused a drastic shift in the endogenous small RNA profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M; Graybosch, Robert A; French, Roy; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, a Tritimovirus) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, a Poacevirus) of the family Potyviridae causes synergistic interaction. In this study, the effects of the synergistic interaction between WSMV and TriMV on endogenous and virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were examined in susceptible ('Arapahoe') and temperature-sensitive resistant ('Mace') wheat cultivars at 18°C and 27°C. Single and double infections in wheat caused a shift in the profile of endogenous small RNAs from 24 nt being the most predominant in healthy plants to 21 nt in infected wheat. Massive amounts of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs accumulated in singly and doubly infected Arapahoe at both temperatures and in Mace at 27°C but not 18°C. The plus- and minus-sense vsiRNAs were distributed throughout the genomic RNAs in Arapahoe at both temperature regimens and in Mace at 27°C, although some regions served as hot-spots, spawning an excessive number of vsiRNAs. The vsiRNA peaks were conserved among cultivars, suggesting that the Dicer-like enzymes in susceptible and resistant cultivars similarly accessed the genomic RNAs of WSMV or TriMV. Accumulation of large amounts of vsiRNAs in doubly infected plants suggests that the silencing suppressor proteins encoded by TriMV and WSMV do not prevent the formation of vsiRNAs; thus, the synergistic effect observed is independent from RNA-silencing mediated vsiRNA biogenesis. The high-resolution map of endogenous and vsiRNAs from WSMV- and/or TriMV-infected wheat cultivars may form a foundation for understanding the virus-host interactions, the effect of synergistic interactions on host defense, and virus resistance mechanisms in wheat.

  14. Comprehensive Small RNA-Seq of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV)-Infected Human Cells Detects Patterns of Novel, Non-Coding AAV RNAs in the Absence of Cellular miRNA Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutika, Catrin; Mietzsch, Mario; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Weger, Stefan; Sohn, Madlen; Chen, Wei; Heilbronn, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Most DNA viruses express small regulatory RNAs, which interfere with viral or cellular gene expression. For adeno-associated virus (AAV), a small ssDNA virus with a complex biphasic life cycle miRNAs or other small regulatory RNAs have not yet been described. This is the first comprehensive Illumina-based RNA-Seq analysis of small RNAs expressed by AAV alone or upon co-infection with helper adenovirus or HSV. Several hotspots of AAV-specific small RNAs were detected mostly close to or within the AAV-ITR and apparently transcribed from the newly identified anti-p5 promoter. An additional small RNA hotspot was located downstream of the p40 promoter, from where transcription of non-coding RNAs associated with the inhibition of adenovirus replication were recently described. Parallel detection of known Ad and HSV miRNAs indirectly validated the newly identified small AAV RNA species. The predominant small RNAs were analyzed on Northern blots and by human argonaute protein-mediated co-immunoprecipitation. None of the small AAV RNAs showed characteristics of bona fide miRNAs, but characteristics of alternative RNA processing indicative of differentially regulated AAV promoter-associated small RNAs. Furthermore, the AAV-induced regulation of cellular miRNA levels was analyzed at different time points post infection. In contrast to other virus groups AAV infection had virtually no effect on the expression of cellular miRNA, which underscores the long-established concept that wild-type AAV infection is apathogenic. PMID:27611072

  15. Establishment of a continuous culture system for Entamoeba muris and analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi S.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We established a culture system for Entamoeba muris (MG-EM-01 strain isolated from a Mongolian gerbil using a modified Balamuth’s egg yolk infusion medium supplemented with 4% adult bovine serum and Bacteroides fragilis cocultured with Escherichia coli. Further, encystation was observed in the culture medium. The morphological characteristics of E. muris are similar to those of Entamoeba coli (E. coli; moreover, the malic isoenzyme electrophoretic band, which shows species-specific electrophoretic mobility, of E. muris had almost the same mobility as that observed with the malic isoenzyme electrophorectic band of E. coli (UZG-EC-01 strain isolated from a gorilla. We determined the small subunit rRNA (SSU-rRNA gene sequence of the MG-EM-01 strain, and this sequence was observed to show 82.7% homology with that of the UZG-EC-01 strain. Further, the resultant phylogenetic tree for molecular taxonomy based on the SSU-rRNA genes of the 21 strains of the intestinal parasitic amoeba species indicated that the MG-EM-01 strain was most closely related to E. coli.

  16. Phylogenetic relationships between Vorticella convallaria and other species inferred from small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itabashi, Takeshi; Mikami, Kazuyuki; Fang, Jie; Asai, Hiroshi

    2002-08-01

    Vorticellid ciliates generally dwell in freshwater. In nature, the species have up until now been identified by comparison with previous descriptions. It is difficult to identify between species of the genus Vorticella, because the morphological markers of vorticellid ciliates described in reports are limited and variable. Unfortunately, culturing them has only succeeded with certain species such as Vorticella convallaria, but many others have been impossible to culture. To find out whether the sequence of a small subunit rRNA gene was an appropriate marker to identify vorticellid ciliates, the gene was aligned and compared. Finding a new convenient method will contribute to research on vorticellid ciliates. In strains of V. convallaria, classified morphologically, some varieties of the SSrRNA gene sequences were recognized, but there were large variations within the same species. According to the phylogenetic tree, these strains are closely related. However, the difference was not as big as between Vorticella and Carchesium. In addition, Carchesium constructed a distinct clade from the genus Vorticella and Epistylis. These results show the possibility that the SSrRNA gene is one of the important markers to identify species of Vorticella. This study is first to approach and clarify the complicated taxa in the genus Vorticella.

  17. INHIBITION OF PROLIFERATION OF HUMAN BREAST CANCER MCF-7 CELLS BY SMALL INTERFERENCE RNA AGAINST LRP16 GENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩为东; 赵亚力; 李琦; 母义明; 李雪; 宋海静; 陆祖谦

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Our previous studies have firstly demonstrated that 17(-E2 up-regulates LRP16 gene expression in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and ectopic expression of the LRP16 gene promotes MCF-7 cells proliferation. Here, the effects of the LRP16 gene expression on growth of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and the mechanism were further studied by establishing two stably LRP16-inhibitory MCR-7 cell lines. Methods: Hairpin small interference RNA (siRNA) strategy, by which hairpin siRNA was released by U6 promoter and was mediated by pLPC-based retroviral vector, was adopted to knockdown endogenous LRP16 level in MCF-7 cells. And the hairpin siRNA against green fluorescence protein (GFP) was used as the negative control. The suppressant efficiency of the LRP16 gene expression was confirmed by Nothern blot. Cell proliferation assay and soft agar colony formation assay were used to determine the status of the cells proliferation. Cell cycle checkpoints including cyclin E and cyclin D1 were examined by Western blot. Results: The results from cell proliferation assays suggested that down-regulation of LRP16 gene expression is capable of inhibiting MCF-7 breast cancer cell growth and down-regulation of the LRP16 gene expression is able to inhibit anchorage-independent growth of breast cancer cells in soft agar. We also demonstrated that cyclin E and cyclin D1 proteins were much lower in the LRP16-inhibitory cells than in the control cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that LRP16 gene play an important role in MCF-7 cells proliferation by regulating the pathway of the G1/S transition and may function as an important modulator in regulating the process of tumorigenesis in human breast.

  18. Phytophthora infestans Argonaute 1 binds microRNA and small RNAs from effector genes and transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åsman, Anna K M; Fogelqvist, Johan; Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Dixelius, Christina

    2016-08-01

    Phytophthora spp. encode large sets of effector proteins and distinct populations of small RNAs (sRNAs). Recent evidence has suggested that pathogen-derived sRNAs can modulate the expression of plant defense genes. Here, we studied the sRNA classes and functions associated with Phytophthora infestans Argonaute (Ago) proteins. sRNAs were co-immunoprecipitated with three PiAgo proteins and deep sequenced. Twenty- to twenty-two-nucleotide (nt) sRNAs were identified as the main interaction partners of PiAgo1 and high enrichment of 24-26-nt sRNAs was seen in the PiAgo4-bound sample. The frequencies and sizes of transposable element (TE)-derived sRNAs in the different PiAgo libraries suggested diversified roles of the PiAgo proteins in the control of different TE classes. We further provide evidence for the involvement of PiAgo1 in the P. infestans microRNA (miRNA) pathway. Protein-coding genes are probably regulated by the shared action of PiAgo1 and PiAgo5, as demonstrated by analysis of differential expression. An abundance of sRNAs from genes encoding host cell death-inducing Crinkler (CRN) effectors was bound to PiAgo1, implicating this protein in the regulation of the expanded CRN gene family. The data suggest that PiAgo1 plays an essential role in gene regulation and that at least two RNA silencing pathways regulate TEs in the plant-pathogenic oomycete P. infestans.

  19. Diverse mechanisms of post-transcriptional repression by the small RNA regulator of glucose-phosphate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovskyy, Maksym; Vanderpool, Carin K

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli small RNA SgrS controls a metabolic stress response that occurs upon accumulation of certain glycolytic intermediates. SgrS base pairs with and represses translation of ptsG and manXYZ mRNAs, which encode sugar transporters, and activates translation of yigL mRNA, encoding a sugar phosphatase. This study defines four new genes as direct targets of E. coli SgrS. These new targets, asd, adiY, folE and purR, encode transcription factors or enzymes of diverse metabolic pathways, including aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase, arginine decarboxylase gene activator, GTP cyclohydrolase I and a repressor of purine biosynthesis, respectively. SgrS represses translation of each of the four target mRNAs via distinct mechanisms. SgrS binding sites overlapping the Shine-Dalgarno sequences of adiY and folE mRNAs suggest that SgrS pairing with these targets directly occludes ribosome binding and prevents translation initiation. SgrS binding within the purR coding sequence recruits the RNA chaperone Hfq to directly repress purR translation. Two separate SgrS binding sites were found on asd mRNA, and both are required for full translational repression. Ectopic overexpression of asd, adiY and folE is specifically detrimental to cells experiencing glucose-phosphate stress, suggesting that SgrS-dependent repression of the metabolic functions encoded by these targets promotes recovery from glucose-phosphate stress.

  20. Identification of MicroRNA-like small RNAs from fungus parasite Nosema ceranae

    Science.gov (United States)

    We previously found transcripts encoding Dicer and Argonaute in the honey bee parasite Nosema ceranae. Since these proteins are involved in the production of regulatory microRNAs we carried out controlled infections and genetic screens in order to identify microRNAs in Nosema . We sequenced small R...

  1. A small yeast RNA inhibits HCV IRES mediated translation and inhibits replication of poliovirus in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Song Liang; Jian-Qi Lian; Yong-Xing Zhou; Qing-He Nie; Chun-Qiu Hao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-virus infection activity of internal ribosome entry site (IRES) specific inhibitor RNA (IRNA).METHODS: IRNA eukaryotic vector pcRz-IRNA or mIRNA eukaryotic vector pcRz-mIRNA was tansfected into human hepatocarcinoma cells (HHCC), then selected with neomycin G418 for 4 to 8 weeks, and then infected with polio virus vaccinas line. The cytopethogenesis effect was investigated and the cell extract was collected. At last the polio virus titer of different cells was determined by plaque assay.RESULTS: Constitutive expression of IRNA was not detrimental to cell growth. HCV IRES-mediated capindependent translation was markedly inhibited in cells constitutively expressing IRNA compared to control hepatoma cells. However, cap-dependent translation was not significantly affected in these cell line. Additionally, HHCC cells constitutively expressing IRNA became refractory to infection of polio virus.CONCLUSION: IRES specific IRNA can inhibit HCV IRES mediated translation and poliovirus replication.

  2. 小RNA的研究现状%The Advance of Small RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪虹; 孙开来

    2006-01-01

    长期以来,人们认为RNA只是起到遗传信息"桥梁"的作用,从DNA获得遗传信息再转化成蛋白质.然而,近十几年的研究表明--小RNA在基因调控和生长发育等方面发挥着重要作用.小RNA主要包括两大类:siRNA和miRNA.它们的功能既有相似又有差异,siRNA主要参与RNA干涉,而miRNA形成核糖核蛋白复合体(miRNP)调控基因表达.本文从siRNA和miRNA的结构、功能以及与人类疾病关系等方面综述了小RNA的最新研究进展.

  3. Small RNA-dependent expression of secondary metabolism is controlled by Krebs cycle function in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Kiefer, Patrick; Reimmann, Cornelia; Keel, Christoph; Dubuis, Christophe; Rolli, Joëlle; Vorholt, Julia A; Haas, Dieter

    2009-12-11

    Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, an antagonist of phytopathogenic fungi in the rhizosphere of crop plants, elaborates and excretes several secondary metabolites with antibiotic properties. Their synthesis depends on three small RNAs (RsmX, RsmY, and RsmZ), whose expression is positively controlled by the GacS-GacA two-component system at high cell population densities. To find regulatory links between primary and secondary metabolism in P. fluorescens and in the related species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we searched for null mutations that affected central carbon metabolism as well as the expression of rsmY-gfp and rsmZ-gfp reporter constructs but without slowing down the growth rate in rich media. Mutation in the pycAB genes (for pyruvate carboxylase) led to down-regulation of rsmXYZ and secondary metabolism, whereas mutation in fumA (for a fumarase isoenzyme) resulted in up-regulation of the three small RNAs and secondary metabolism in the absence of detectable nutrient limitation. These effects required the GacS sensor kinase but not the accessory sensors RetS and LadS. An analysis of intracellular metabolites in P. fluorescens revealed a strong positive correlation between small RNA expression and the pools of 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, and fumarate. We conclude that Krebs cycle intermediates (already known to control GacA-dependent virulence factors in P. aeruginosa) exert a critical trigger function in secondary metabolism via the expression of GacA-dependent small RNAs.

  4. Small indels induced by CRISPR/Cas9 in the 5' region of microRNA lead to its depletion and Drosha processing retardance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qian; Meng, Xing; Meng, Lingwei; Chang, Nannan; Xiong, Jingwei; Cao, Huiqing; Liang, Zicai

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA knockout by genome editing technologies is promising. In order to extend the application of the technology and to investigate the function of a specific miRNA, we used CRISPR/Cas9 to deplete human miR-93 from a cluster by targeting its 5' region in HeLa cells. Various small indels were induced in the targeted region containing the Drosha processing site and seed sequences. Interestingly, we found that even a single nucleotide deletion led to complete knockout of the target miRNA with high specificity. Functional knockout was confirmed by phenotype analysis. Furthermore, de novo microRNAs were not found by RNA-seq. Nevertheless, expression of the pri-microRNAs was increased. When combined with structural analysis, the data indicated that biogenesis was impaired. Altogether, we showed that small indels in the 5' region of a microRNA result in sequence depletion as well as Drosha processing retard.

  5. Posttranscriptional down-regulation of small ribosomal subunit proteins correlates with reduction of 18S rRNA in RPS19 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhai, Jitendra; Fröjmark, Anne-Sophie; Razzaghian, Hamid Reza; Davey, Edward; Schuster, Jens; Dahl, Niklas

    2009-06-18

    Ribosomal protein S19 (RPS19) is mutated in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA). We hypothesized that decreased levels of RPS19 lead to a coordinated down-regulation of other ribosomal (r-)proteins at the subunit level. We show that small interfering RNA (siRNA) knock-down of RPS19 results in a relative decrease of small subunit (SSU) r-proteins (S20, S21 and S24) when compared to large subunit (LSU) r-proteins (L3, L9, L30 and L38). This correlates with a relative decrease in 18S rRNA with respect to 28S rRNA. The r-protein mRNA levels remain relatively unchanged indicating a post transcriptional regulation of r-proteins at the level of subunit formation.

  6. Polymorphisms in miRNA binding site: new insight into small cell lung cancer susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-yu LIU; Jun CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause in cancer-related deaths with less than 15% five-year survival worldwide.Small cell lung cancer (SCLC),which accounts for about 15%-18% of lung cancer,carries the worst prognosis within the lung cancer patients.SCLC differs from other lung cancers,so called non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs),in the specifically clinical and biologic characteristics.It exhibits aggressive behavior,with rapid growth,early spread to distant sites.Although exquisite sensitive to chemotherapy and radiation,SCLC recurs rapidly with only 5% of patients surviving five years and frequent association with distinct paraneoplastic syndromes[1].

  7. Regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in Sinorhizobium meliloti by the trans-encoded small RNA MmgR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Antonio; Ceizel Borella, Germán; Linne, Uwe; Becker, Anke; Valverde, Claudio

    2017-02-06

    Riboregulation has a major role in the fine-tuning of multiple bacterial processes. Among the RNA players, trans-encoded untranslated small RNAs (sRNAs) regulate complex metabolic networks by tuning expression from multiple target genes in response to numerous signals. In Sinorhizobium meliloti, over 400 sRNAs are expressed under different stimuli. The sRNA MmgR-standing for Makes more granules Regulator-has been of particular interest to us since its sequence and structure are highly conserved among the α-proteobacteria, and its expression is regulated by the amount and quality of the bacterium's available nitrogen source. In this work, we explored the biological role of MmgR in S. meliloti 2011 by characterizing the effect of a deletion of the internal conserved core of mmgR (mmgR(Δ33-51)). This mutation resulted in higher amounts of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) distributed into more intracellular granules than are found in the wild-type strain. This phenotype was expressed upon cessation of balanced growth owing to a nitrogen depletion in the presence of surplus carbon (i. e., at a carbon:nitrogen molar ratio greater than 10). The normal PHB accumulation was complemented with a wild-type mmgR copy, but not with unrelated sRNA genes. Furthermore, the expression of mmgR limited PHB accumulation in the wild-type, regardless of the magnitude of the C surplus. Quantitative proteomic profiling and qRT-PCR revealed that the absence of MmgR results in a posttranscriptional overexpression of both PHB-phasin proteins (PhaP1, PhaP2). All together, our results indicate that the widely conserved α-proteobacterial MmgR sRNA fine-tunes the regulation of PHB storage in S. meliloti IMPORTANCE: High-throughput RNA sequencing has recently uncovered an overwhelming number of trans-encoded small RNAs (sRNAs) in diverse prokaryotes. In the nitrogen-fixing α-proteobacterial symbiont of alfalfa root nodules Sinorhizobium meliloti, only four out of hundreds of identified sRNA genes

  8. Phylogenetic distribution and evolutionary pattern of an α-proteobacterial small RNA gene that controls polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagares, Antonio; Roux, Indra; Valverde, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    It has become clear that sRNAs play relevant regulatory functions in bacteria. However, a comprehensive understanding of their biological roles considering evolutionary aspects has not been achieved for most of them. Thus, we have characterized the evolutionary and phylogenetic aspects of the Sinorhizobium meliloti mmgR gene encoding the small RNA MmgR, which has been recently reported to be involved in the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in this bacterium. We constructed a covariance model from a multiple sequence and structure alignment of mmgR close homologs that allowed us to extend the search and to detect further remote homologs of the sRNA gene. From our results, mmgR seemed to evolve from a common ancestor of the α-proteobacteria that diverged from the order of Rickettsiales. We have found mmgR homologs in most current species of α-proteobacteria, with a few exceptions in which genomic reduction events or gene rearrangements seem to explain its absence. Furthermore, a strong microsyntenic relationship was found between a large set of mmgR homologs and homologs of a gene encoding a putative N-formyl glutamate amidohydrolase (NFGAH) that allowed us to trace back the evolutionary path of this group of mmgR orthologs. Among them, structure and sequence traits have been completely conserved throughout evolution, namely a Rho-independent terminator and a 10-mer (5'-UUUCCUCCCU-3') that is predicted to remain in a single-stranded region of the sRNA. We thus propose the definition of the new family of α-proteobacterial sRNAs αr8, as well as the subfamily αr8s1 which encompass S. meliloti mmgR orthologs physically linked with the downstream open reading frame encoding a putative NFGAH. So far, mmgR is the trans-encoded small RNA with the widest phylogenetic distribution of well recognized orthologs among α-proteobacteria. Expression of the expected MmgR transcript in rhizobiales other than S. meliloti (Sinorhizobium fredii, Rhizobium

  9. Customized Treatment in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on EGFR Mutations and BRCA1 mRNA Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Rafael; Perez-Roca, Laia; Sanchez, Jose Javier; Cobo, Manuel; Moran, Teresa; Chaib, Imane; Provencio, Mariano; Domine, Manuel; Sala, Maria Angeles; Jimenez, Ulpiano; Diz, Pilar; Barneto, Isidoro; Macias, Jose Antonio; de las Peñas, Ramon; Catot, Silvia; Isla, Dolores; Sanchez, Jose Miguel; Ibeas, Rafael; Lopez-Vivanco, Guillermo; Oramas, Juana; Mendez, Pedro; Reguart, Noemi; Blanco, Remei; Taron, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    Background Median survival is 10 months and 2-year survival is 20% in metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. A small fraction of non-squamous cell lung cancers harbor EGFR mutations, with improved outcome to gefitinib and erlotinib. Experimental evidence suggests that BRCA1 overexpression enhances sensitivity to docetaxel and resistance to cisplatin. RAP80 and Abraxas are interacting proteins that form complexes with BRCA1 and could modulate the effect of BRCA1. In order to further examine the effect of EGFR mutations and BRCA1 mRNA levels on outcome in advanced NSCLC, we performed a prospective non-randomized phase II clinical trial, testing the hypothesis that customized therapy would confer improved outcome over non-customized therapy. In an exploratory analysis, we also examined the effect of RAP80 and Abraxas mRNA levels. Methodology/Principal Findings We treated 123 metastatic non-squamous cell lung carcinoma patients using a customized approach. RNA and DNA were isolated from microdissected specimens from paraffin-embedded tumor tissue. Patients with EGFR mutations received erlotinib, and those without EGFR mutations received chemotherapy with or without cisplatin based on their BRCA1 mRNA levels: low, cisplatin plus gemcitabine; intermediate, cisplatin plus docetaxel; high, docetaxel alone. An exploratory analysis examined RAP80 and Abraxas expression. Median survival exceeded 28 months for 12 patients with EGFR mutations, and was 11 months for 38 patients with low BRCA1, 9 months for 40 patients with intermediate BRCA1, and 11 months for 33 patients with high BRCA1. Two-year survival was 73.3%, 41.2%, 15.6% and 0%, respectively. Median survival was influenced by RAP80 expression in the three BRCA1 groups. For example, for patients with both low BRCA1 and low RAP80, median survival exceeded 26 months. RAP80 was a significant factor for survival in patients treated according to BRCA1 levels (hazard ratio, 1

  10. Combined large and small subunit ribosomal RNA phylogenies support a basal position of the acoelomorph flatworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, Maximilian J; Lockyer, Anne E; Cartwright-Finch, Chloë; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2003-05-22

    The phylogenetic position of the phylum Platyhelminthes has been re-evaluated in the past decade by analysis of diverse molecular datasets. The consensus is that the Rhabditophora + Catenulida, which includes most of the flatworm taxa, are not primitively simple basal bilaterians but are related to coelomate phyla such as molluscs. The status of two other groups of acoelomate worms, Acoela and Nemertodermatida, is less clear. Although many characteristics unite these two groups, initial molecular phylogenetic studies placed the Nemertodermatida within the Rhabditophora, but placed the Acoela at the base of the Bilateria, distant from other flatworms. This contradiction resulted in scepticism about the basal position of acoels and led to calls for further data. We have sequenced large subunit ribosomal RNA genes from 13 rhabditophorans + catenulids, three acoels and one nemertodermatid, tripling the available data. Our analyses strongly support a basal position of both acoels and nemertodermatids. Alternative hypotheses are significantly less well supported by the data. We conclude that the Nemertodermatida and Acoela are basal bilaterians and, owing to their unique body plan and embryogenesis, should be recognized as a separate phylum, the Acoelomorpha.

  11. Small RNA profiling of influenza A virus-infected cells identifies miR-449b as a regulator of histone deacetylase 1 and interferon beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Buggele

    Full Text Available The mammalian antiviral response relies on the alteration of cellular gene expression, to induce the production of antiviral effectors and regulate their activities. Recent research has indicated that virus infections can induce the accumulation of cellular microRNA (miRNA species that influence the stability of host mRNAs and their protein products. To determine the potential for miRNA regulation of cellular responses to influenza A virus infection, small RNA profiling was carried out using next generation sequencing. Comparison of miRNA expression profiles in uninfected human A549 cells to cells infected with influenza A virus strains A/Udorn/72 and A/WSN/33, revealed virus-induced changes in miRNA abundance. Gene expression analysis identified mRNA targets for a cohort of highly inducible miRNAs linked to diverse cellular functions. Experiments demonstrate that the histone deacetylase, HDAC1, can be regulated by influenza-inducible miR-449b, resulting in altered mRNA and protein levels. Expression of miR-449b enhances virus and poly(I:C activation of the IFNβ promoter, a process known to be negatively regulated by HDAC1. These findings demonstrate miRNA induction by influenza A virus infection and elucidate an example of miRNA control of antiviral gene expression in human cells, defining a role for miR-449b in regulation of HDAC1 and antiviral cytokine signaling.

  12. The cell cycle- and insulin-signaling-inhibiting miRNA expression pattern of very small embryonic-like stem cells contributes to their quiescent state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Magdalena; Schneider, Gabriela; Ratajczak, Janina; Suszynska, Malwina; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2015-08-01

    Murine Oct4(+), very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), are a quiescent stem cell population that requires a supportive co-culture layer to proliferate and/or to differentiate in vitro. Gene expression studies have revealed that the quiescence of these cells is due to changes in expression of parentally imprinted genes, including genes involved in cell cycle regulation and insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS). To investigate the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in VSEL quiescence, we performed miRNA studies in highly purified VSELs and observed a unique miRNA expression pattern in these cells. Specifically, we observed significant differences in the expression of certain miRNA species (relative to a reference cell population), including (i) miRNA-25_1 and miRNA-19 b, whose downregulation has the effect of upregulating cell cycle checkpoint genes and (ii) miRNA-675-3 p and miRNA-675-5 p, miRNA-292-5 p, miRNA-184, and miRNA-125 b, whose upregulation attenuates IIS. These observations are important for understanding the biology of these cells and for developing efficient ex vivo expansion strategies for VSELs isolated from adult tissues.

  13. The cell cycle- and insulin-signaling-inhibiting miRNA expression pattern of very small embryonic-like stem cells contributes to their quiescent state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Magdalena; Schneider, Gabriela; Ratajczak, Janina; Suszynska, Malwina; Kucia, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Murine Oct4+, very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), are a quiescent stem cell population that requires a supportive co-culture layer to proliferate and/or to differentiate in vitro. Gene expression studies have revealed that the quiescence of these cells is due to changes in expression of parentally imprinted genes, including genes involved in cell cycle regulation and insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS). To investigate the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in VSEL quiescence, we performed miRNA studies in highly purified VSELs and observed a unique miRNA expression pattern in these cells. Specifically, we observed significant differences in the expression of certain miRNA species (relative to a reference cell population), including (i) miRNA-25_1 and miRNA-19 b, whose downregulation has the effect of upregulating cell cycle checkpoint genes and (ii) miRNA-675-3 p and miRNA-675-5 p, miRNA-292-5 p, miRNA-184, and miRNA-125 b, whose upregulation attenuates IIS. These observations are important for understanding the biology of these cells and for developing efficient ex vivo expansion strategies for VSELs isolated from adult tissues. PMID:25966979

  14. Footprints of a trypanosomatid RNA world: pre-small subunit rRNA processing by spliced leader addition trans-splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Gustavo Mayer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The addition of a capped mini-exon [spliced leader (SL] through trans-splicing is essential for the maturation of RNA polymerase (pol II-transcribed polycistronic pre-mRNAs in all members of the Trypanosomatidae family. This process is an inter-molecular splicing reaction that follows the same basic rules of cis-splicing reactions. In this study, we demonstrated that mini-exons were added to precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA are transcribed by RNA pol I, including the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS region. Additionally, we detected the SL-5'ETS molecule using three distinct methods and located the acceptor site between two known 5'ETS rRNA processing sites (A' and A1 in four different trypanosomatids. Moreover, we detected a polyadenylated 5'ETS upstream of the trans-splicing acceptor site, which also occurs in pre-mRNA trans-splicing. After treatment with an indirect trans-splicing inhibitor (sinefungin, we observed SL-5'ETS decay. However, treatment with 5-fluorouracil (a precursor of RNA synthesis that inhibits the degradation of pre-rRNA led to the accumulation of SL-5'ETS, suggesting that the molecule may play a role in rRNA degradation. The detection of trans-splicing in these molecules may indicate broad RNA-joining properties, regardless of the polymerase used for transcription.

  15. The 3′ Untranslated Region of the Andes Hantavirus Small mRNA Functionally Replaces the Poly(A) Tail and Stimulates Cap-Dependent Translation Initiation from the Viral mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Ohlmann, Théophile; Darlix, Jean-Luc; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    In the process of translation of eukaryotic mRNAs, the 5′ cap and the 3′ poly(A) tail interact synergistically to stimulate protein synthesis. Unlike its cellular counterparts, the small mRNA (SmRNA) of Andes hantavirus (ANDV), a member of the Bunyaviridae, lacks a 3′ poly(A) tail. Here we report that the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the ANDV SmRNA functionally replaces a poly(A) tail and synergistically stimulates cap-dependent translation initiation from the viral mRNA. Stimulation of translation by the 3′UTR of the ANDV SmRNA was found to be independent of viral proteins and of host poly(A)-binding protein. PMID:20660206

  16. Expression profiling reveals Spot 42 small RNA as a key regulator in the central metabolism of Aliivibrio salmonicida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Geir Å

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spot 42 was discovered in Escherichia coli nearly 40 years ago as an abundant, small and unstable RNA. Its biological role has remained obscure until recently, and is today implicated in having broader roles in the central and secondary metabolism. Spot 42 is encoded by the spf gene. The gene is ubiquitous in the Vibrionaceae family of gamma-proteobacteria. One member of this family, Aliivibrio salmonicida, causes cold-water vibriosis in farmed Atlantic salmon. Its genome encodes Spot 42 with 84% identity to E. coli Spot 42. Results We generated a A. salmonicida spf deletion mutant. We then used microarray and Northern blot analyses to monitor global effects on the transcriptome in order to provide insights into the biological roles of Spot 42 in this bacterium. In the presence of glucose, we found a surprisingly large number of ≥ 2X differentially expressed genes, and several major cellular processes were affected. A gene encoding a pirin-like protein showed an on/off expression pattern in the presence/absence of Spot 42, which suggests that Spot 42 plays a key regulatory role in the central metabolism by regulating the switch between fermentation and respiration. Interestingly, we discovered an sRNA named VSsrna24, which is encoded immediately downstream of spf. This new sRNA has an expression pattern opposite to that of Spot 42, and its expression is repressed by glucose. Conclusions We hypothesize that Spot 42 plays a key role in the central metabolism, in part by regulating the pyruvat dehydrogenase enzyme complex via pirin.

  17. Persistence of smoking-induced dysregulation of miRNA expression in the small airway epithelium despite smoking cessation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqing Wang

    Full Text Available Even after quitting smoking, the risk of the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer remains significantly higher compared to healthy nonsmokers. Based on the knowledge that COPD and most lung cancers start in the small airway epithelium (SAE, we hypothesized that smoking modulates miRNA expression in the SAE linked to the pathogenesis of smoking-induced airway disease, and that some of these changes persist after smoking cessation. SAE was collected from 10th to 12th order bronchi using fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Affymetrix miRNA 2.0 arrays were used to assess miRNA expression in the SAE from 9 healthy nonsmokers and 10 healthy smokers, before and after they quit smoking for 3 months. Smoking status was determined by urine nicotine and cotinine measurement. There were significant differences in the expression of 34 miRNAs between healthy smokers and healthy nonsmokers (p1.5, with functions associated with lung development, airway epithelium differentiation, inflammation and cancer. After quitting smoking for 3 months, 12 out of the 34 miRNAs did not return to normal levels, with Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway being the top identified enriched pathway of the target genes of the persistent dysregulated miRNAs. In the context that many of these persistent smoking-dependent miRNAs are associated with differentiation, inflammatory diseases or lung cancer, it is likely that persistent smoking-related changes in SAE miRNAs play a role in the subsequent development of these disorders.

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans RIG-I Homolog Mediates Antiviral RNA Interference Downstream of Dicer-Dependent Biogenesis of Viral Small Interfering RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Stephanie R.; Lu, Jinfeng; Guo, Xunyang; Zhong, Jing; Broitman-Maduro, Gina; Li, Wan-Xiang; Lu, Rui; Maduro, Morris

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dicer enzymes process virus-specific double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to initiate specific antiviral defense by related RNA interference (RNAi) pathways in plants, insects, nematodes, and mammals. Antiviral RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans requires Dicer-related helicase 1 (DRH-1), not found in plants and insects but highly homologous to mammalian retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), intracellular viral RNA sensors that trigger innate immunity against RNA virus infection. However, it remains unclear if DRH-1 acts analogously to initiate antiviral RNAi in C. elegans. Here, we performed a forward genetic screen to characterize antiviral RNAi in C. elegans. Using a mapping-by-sequencing strategy, we uncovered four loss-of-function alleles of drh-1, three of which caused mutations in the helicase and C-terminal domains conserved in RLRs. Deep sequencing of small RNAs revealed an abundant population of Dicer-dependent virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) in drh-1 single and double mutant animals after infection with Orsay virus, a positive-strand RNA virus. These findings provide further genetic evidence for the antiviral function of DRH-1 and illustrate that DRH-1 is not essential for the sensing and Dicer-mediated processing of the viral dsRNA replicative intermediates. Interestingly, vsiRNAs produced by drh-1 mutants were mapped overwhelmingly to the terminal regions of the viral genomic RNAs, in contrast to random distribution of vsiRNA hot spots when DRH-1 is functional. As RIG-I translocates on long dsRNA and DRH-1 exists in a complex with Dicer, we propose that DRH-1 facilitates the biogenesis of vsiRNAs in nematodes by catalyzing translocation of the Dicer complex on the viral long dsRNA precursors. PMID:28325765

  19. SeqBuster, a bioinformatic tool for the processing and analysis of small RNAs datasets, reveals ubiquitous miRNA modifications in human embryonic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantano, Lorena; Estivill, Xavier; Martí, Eulàlia

    2010-03-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies enable direct approaches to catalog and analyze snapshots of the total small RNA content of living cells. Characterization of high-throughput sequencing data requires bioinformatic tools offering a wide perspective of the small RNA transcriptome. Here we present SeqBuster, a highly versatile and reliable web-based toolkit to process and analyze large-scale small RNA datasets. The high flexibility of this tool is illustrated by the multiple choices offered in the pre-analysis for mapping purposes and in the different analysis modules for data manipulation. To overcome the storage capacity limitations of the web-based tool, SeqBuster offers a stand-alone version that permits the annotation against any custom database. SeqBuster integrates multiple analyses modules in a unique platform and constitutes the first bioinformatic tool offering a deep characterization of miRNA variants (isomiRs). The application of SeqBuster to small-RNA datasets of human embryonic stem cells revealed that most miRNAs present different types of isomiRs, some of them being associated to stem cell differentiation. The exhaustive description of the isomiRs provided by SeqBuster could help to identify miRNA-variants that are relevant in physiological and pathological processes. SeqBuster is available at http://estivill_lab.crg.es/seqbuster.

  20. Thyroid Hormone Regulates the mRNA Expression of Small Heterodimer Partner through Liver Receptor Homolog-1

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    Hwa Young Ahn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundExpression of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1 is negatively regulated by orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP. In this study, we aimed to find whether thyroid hormone regulates SHP expression by modulating the transcriptional activities of liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1.MethodsWe injected thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine, T3 to C57BL/6J wild type. RNA was isolated from mouse liver and used for microarray analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Human hepatoma cell and primary hepatocytes from mouse liver were used to confirm the effect of T3 in vitro. Promoter assay and electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA were also performed using human hepatoma cell lineResultsInitial microarray results indicated that SHP expression is markedly decreased in livers of T3 treated mice. We confirmed that T3 repressed SHP expression in the liver of mice as well as in mouse primary hepatocytes and human hepatoma cells by real-time PCR analysis. LRH-1 increased the promoter activity of SHP; however, this increased activity was markedly decreased after thyroid hormone receptor β/retinoid X receptor α/T3 administration. EMSA revealed that T3 inhibits specific LRH-1 DNA binding.ConclusionWe found that thyroid hormone regulates the expression of SHP mRNA through interference with the transcription factor, LRH-1.

  1. Identification and expression of small non-coding RNA, L10-Leader, in different growth phases of Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Li; Xia, Wei; Li, Shaohua; Li, Wuju; Liu, Jiaojiao; Ding, Hongmei; Li, Jie; Li, Hui; Chen, Ying; Su, Xueting; Wang, Wei; Sun, Li; Wang, Chenglong; Shao, Ningsheng; Chu, Bingfeng

    2012-06-01

    Streptococcus mutans is one of the major cariogenic bacteria in the oral environment. Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) play important roles in the regulation of bacterial growth, stress tolerance, and virulence. In this study, we experimentally verified the existence of sRNA, L10-Leader, in S. mutans for the first time. Our results show that the expression level of L10-Leader was growth-phase dependent in S. mutans and varied among different clinical strains of S. mutans. The level of L10-Leader in S. mutans UA159 was closely related to the pH value, but not to the concentrations of glucose and sucrose in culture medium. We predicted target mRNAs of L10-Leader bioinformatically and found that some of these mRNAs were related to growth and stress response. Five predicted mRNA targets were selected and detected by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and we found that the expression levels of these mRNAs were closely related to the level of L10-Leader at different growth phases of the bacteria. Our results indicate that L10-Leader may play an important role in the regulation of responses in S. mutans, especially during its growth phase and acid adaption response.

  2. Regulation of the chitin degradation and utilization system by the ChiX small RNA in Serratia marcescens 2170.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kazushi; Shimizu, Mari; Sasaki, Naomi; Ogawa, Chisana; Minami, Haruka; Sugimoto, Hayuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Serratia marcescens 2170 produces three different types of chitinases and chitin-binding protein CBP21. We found that transposon insertion into the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of chiPQ-ctb led to defective chitinase and CBP21 production. ChiX small RNA possessed the complementary sequence of the 5' UTRs of the chiPQ-ctb and chiR and repressed the expression of chiP and chiR. ChiX was detected in a medium containing glucose, glycerol, GlcNAc, and (GlcNAc)2, but the expression of both chiP and chiR was only observed in a medium containing (GlcNAc)2. ∆chiX mutant produced chitinases, CBP21, and chitobiase without induction. chiP transcripts were more abundant than those of chiR or chiX in a medium containing (GlcNAc)2. These results suggest that the constitutively expressed ChiX binds to the highly abundant chiP 5' UTR, thereby leading to the induction of chiR mRNA translation and the subsequent expression of chitinases and CBP21.

  3. A new small RNA virus persistently infecting an established cell line of Galleria mellonella, induced by a heterologous infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lery, X; Fediere, G; Taha, A; Salah, M; Giannotti, J

    1997-01-01

    A persistent infection in a Galleria mellonella cell line was revealed when infected with a maize stem borer picorna-like virus isolated on Sesamia cretica (MSBV). The new virus, completely different from the MSBV, is designated as G. mellonella cell line virus (GmclV), induces spectacular cytopathic effects, and is also considered efficient in vivo. The GmclV is a 29-nm-diameter isometric virus, with single-strand RNA of 2.9 x 10(6) Da molecular weight with a poly(A) tract. Its capsid is constituted of only two major polypeptides, of 34,500 and 32,500 Da, and no minor bands could be detected. The characteristics of the GmclV do not permit us to classify it with assurance. Even though it has not yet been identified as a picornavirus, it can be classified in the small RNA virus group of the Picornaviridae. G. mellonella represents a very interesting model, owing to the fact that two different persistent viruses belonging to the same family were isolated in vivo and in vitro, to further the understanding of the general phenomenon of persistency and induction.

  4. Nanoencapsulated anti-CK2 small molecule drug or siRNA specifically targets malignant cancer but not benign cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembley, Janeen H; Unger, Gretchen M; Korman, Vicci L; Tobolt, Diane K; Kazimierczuk, Zygmunt; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Kren, Betsy T; Ahmed, Khalil

    2012-02-01

    CK2, a pleiotropic Ser/Thr kinase, is an important target for cancer therapy. We tested our novel tenfibgen-based nanocapsule for delivery of the inhibitor 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT) and an siRNA directed against both CK2α and α' catalytic subunits to prostate cancer cells. We present data on the TBG nanocapsule itself and on CK2 inhibition or downregulation in treated cells, including effects on Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65. By direct comparison of two CK2-directed cargos, our data provide proof that the TBG encapsulation design for delivery of drugs specifically to cancer cells has strong potential for small molecule- and nucleic acid-based cancer therapy.

  5. Nuclear Ribosomal RNA Small Subunit (18S rRNA) Nucleotide Sequen Nuclear Ribosomal RNA Small Subunit (18S rRNA) Nucleotide Sequen cing and Characterization of Sailonggu(Whole Bone of Myospalax baileyi Thomas)cing%塞隆骨原动物高原鼢鼠核基因18S rRNA序列测定与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹晖; 刘玉萍; 张绍来; 周开亚

    2001-01-01

    目的:测定仓鼠科动物高原鼢鼠Myospalax b aileyi的核rDNA基因序列,为塞隆骨正品基原检定提供分子依据。方法:采用PCR直接测序技术测定高原鼢鼠18S rRNA基因核苷酸序列并作序列特征分析。[ HT5”H〗结果:高原鼢鼠的18S rRNA序列长度为1 851 bp。根据排序比较,高原鼢鼠与2种鼠科动物间的DNA序列同源性 为72.04%~72.18%。结论:通过基因序列分析,DNA测序技术可成为 塞隆骨正品基原检定的准确有效手段。%Objective: Sequencing the nuclear ribosomal RNA small subunit (18S r RNA) gene of Myospalax baileyi (Cricetidae) to develop an ultimate and defi nitive means for origin identification of genuine Sailonggu. Methods: The total DNA wa s prepared from dried tail tissues. The nuclear 18S rRNA gene region was amplifi ed by PCR using a consensus primer set and its nucleotide sequence was determine d by PCR direct sequencing. The characteristic analysis of 18S rRNA sequences wa s generated usin software program Genetyx-SV/R Version 10.1. Results: The entire 18S rRNA gene region of M. baileyi spanned 1851 bp in length. Althou gh m ultiple alignment of sequence indicates that there are only lower homology (72.0 4%~72.18%)comparing with its two alias Mus musculus (GenBank Accession numb er X 00686)and Rattus norvegicus (M11188)(Muridae), their highly conservative dom ain i s located in 1020~1509 nt. There are many variable sites from upstream of 5'-e nd , which coud provide a novel information for molecular recognition of Sailonggu. Conclusion:DNA sequencing could be a useful and reliable tool in the origin identification of genuine Sailonggu.

  6. Locked Nucleic Acid Flow Cytometry-fluorescence in situ Hybridization (LNA flow-FISH): A Method for Bacterial Small RNA Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    Friedrich, U. & Lenke, J. Improved Enumeration of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Mesophilic Dairy Starter Cultures by Using Multiplex Quantitative Real...messenger RNA using locked nucleic acid probes. Anal. Biochem. 390, 109-114 (2009). 13. Waters, L. & Storz, G. Regulatory RNAs in bacteria . Cell. 136, 615...Video Article Locked Nucleic Acid Flow Cytometry-fluorescence in situ Hybridization (LNA flow-FISH): a Method for Bacterial Small RNA Detection Kelly

  7. Small RNA profiling reveals phosphorus deficiency as a contributing factor in symptom expression for citrus huanglongbing disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongwei; Sun, Ruobai; Albrecht, Ute; Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Wang, Airong; Coffey, Michael D; Girke, Thomas; Wang, Zonghua; Close, Timothy J; Roose, Mikeal; Yokomi, Raymond K; Folimonova, Svetlana; Vidalakis, Georgios; Rouse, Robert; Bowman, Kim D; Jin, Hailing

    2013-03-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating citrus disease that is associated with bacteria of the genus 'Candidatus Liberibacter' (Ca. L.). Powerful diagnostic tools and management strategies are desired to control HLB. Host small RNAs (sRNA) play a vital role in regulating host responses to pathogen infection and are used as early diagnostic markers for many human diseases, including cancers. To determine whether citrus sRNAs regulate host responses to HLB, sRNAs were profiled from Citrus sinensis 10 and 14 weeks post grafting with Ca. L. asiaticus (Las)-positive or healthy tissue. Ten new microRNAs (miRNAs), 76 conserved miRNAs, and many small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were discovered. Several miRNAs and siRNAs were highly induced by Las infection, and can be potentially developed into early diagnosis markers of HLB. miR399, which is induced by phosphorus starvation in other plant species, was induced specifically by infection of Las but not Spiroplasma citri that causes citrus stubborn-a disease with symptoms similar to HLB. We found a 35% reduction of phosphorus in Las-positive citrus trees compared to healthy trees. Applying phosphorus oxyanion solutions to HLB-positive sweet orange trees reduced HLB symptom severity and significantly improved fruit production during a 3-year field trial in south-west Florida. Our molecular, physiological, and field data suggest that phosphorus deficiency is linked to HLB disease symptomology.

  8. AS1411 aptamer tagged PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles for tumor cell targeting and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Athulya; Jeyamohan, Prashanti; Nair, Remya; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2012-11-01

    Liposomes and polymers are widely used drug carriers for controlled release since they offer many advantages like increased treatment effectiveness, reduced toxicity and are of biodegradable nature. In this work, anticancer drug-loaded PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and were functionalized with AS1411 anti-nucleolin aptamers for site-specific targeting against tumor cells which over expresses nucleolin receptors. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The drug-loading efficiency, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release studies were conducted using UV spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity studies were carried out in two different cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and GI-1 cells and two different normal cells, L929 cells and HMEC cells. Confocal microscopy and flowcytometry confirmed the cellular uptake of particles and targeted drug delivery. The morphology analysis of the NPs proved that the particles were smooth and spherical in shape with a size ranging from 60 to 110 nm. Drug-loading studies indicated that under the same drug loading, the aptamer-targeted NPs show enhanced cancer killing effect compared to the corresponding non-targeted NPs. In addition, the PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs exhibited high encapsulation efficiency and superior sustained drug release than the drug loaded in plain PLGA NPs. The results confirmed that AS1411 aptamer-PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs are potential carrier candidates for differential targeted drug delivery.

  9. A posteriori design of crystal contacts to improve the X-ray diffraction properties of a small RNA enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacElrevey, Celeste [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Spitale, Robert C. [Department of Chemistry, Biological Chemistry Cluster, River Campus Box 270216, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627-0216 (United States); Krucinska, Jolanta [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Wedekind, Joseph E., E-mail: joseph.wedekind@rochester.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Biological Chemistry Cluster, River Campus Box 270216, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627-0216 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Insertion of a dangling 5′-uracil and incorporation of synthetic linkers at the domain interface of a minimal hairpin ribozyme have been investigated as means of favorably influencing crystal packing. These modifications lead to changes in the ribozyme’s structural elements that mimic packing within a natural four-way helical junction, thereby providing an example of how knowledge-based design can be used to enhance the diffraction properties of a tertiarily folded RNA. The hairpin ribozyme is a small catalytic RNA comprising two helix–loop–helix domains linked by a four-way helical junction (4WJ). In its most basic form, each domain can be formed independently and reconstituted without a 4WJ to yield an active enzyme. The production of such minimal junctionless hairpin ribozymes is achievable by chemical synthesis, which has allowed structures to be determined for numerous nucleotide variants. However, abasic and other destabilizing core modifications hinder crystallization. This investigation describes the use of a dangling 5′-U to form an intermolecular U·U mismatch, as well as the use of synthetic linkers to tether the loop A and B domains, including (i) a three-carbon propyl linker (C3L) and (ii) a nine-atom triethylene glycol linker (S9L). Both linker constructs demonstrated similar enzymatic activity, but S9L constructs yielded crystals that diffracted to 2.65 Å resolution or better. In contrast, C3L variants diffracted to 3.35 Å and exhibited a 15 Å expansion of the c axis. Crystal packing of the C3L construct showed a paucity of 6{sub 1} contacts, which comprise numerous backbone to 2′-OH hydrogen bonds in junctionless and S9L complexes. Significantly, the crystal packing in minimal structures mimics stabilizing features observed in the 4WJ hairpin ribozyme structure. The results demonstrate how knowledge-based design can be used to improve diffraction and overcome otherwise destabilizing defects.

  10. Breviscapine suppresses the growth of non-small cell lung cancer by enhancing microRNA-7 expression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JIAN ZENG; SHUNV CAI

    2017-03-01

    Breviscapine (BVP) has previously been shown to inhibit the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.However, little is known about the effects of BVP on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth. Here, we aimedto study the effects of BVP on human NSCLC growth. We employed A549, NCL-H460 and A549 cells transfectedwith microRNA-7 (miR-7) mimic and inhibitor to investigate the effect of BVP on cell proliferation, apoptosis andapoptosis-associated molecules. The results showed that BVP significantly reduced the growth of A549 and NCLH460cells in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent manner, accompanied by a significant elevation ofapoptosis. Additionally, the present study also confirmed that BVP-treated A549 cells showed increased levels of Baxand microRNA-7 (miR-7) and a decreased level of Bcl-2. The up-regulation of miR-7 enhanced the BVP sensitivity ofNSCLC cells by suppressing cell proliferation and promoting cell apoptosis, while the inhibition of miR-7 reversedthe anti-proliferative pro-apoptotic effects of BVP. Pre-treatment with miR-7 mimics enhanced the BVP-mediateddown-regulation of Bax/Bcl-2 in NSCLC cells, while pre-treatment with the miR-7 inhibitor blocked the BVPmediateddown-regulation of Bax/Bcl. Taken together, these results confirm that BVP effectively inhibits NSCLCproliferation and that miR-7, as a novel target, is likely involved in BVP-induced growth suppression and theapoptosis of NSCLC cells.

  11. Insights into the therapeutic potential of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α small interfering RNA in malignant melanoma delivered via folate-decorated cationic liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Z

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhongjian Chen,1,* Tianpeng Zhang,2,* Baojian Wu,2 Xingwang Zhang2 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Shanghai Dermatology Hospital, 2Division of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Gangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Malignant melanoma (MM represents the most dangerous form of skin cancer, and its incidence is expected to rise in the coming time. However, therapy for MM is limited by low topical drug concentration and multidrug resistance. This article aimed to develop folate-decorated cationic liposomes (fc-LPs for hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α small interfering (siRNA delivery, and to evaluate the potential of such siRNA/liposome complexes in MM therapy. HIF-1α siRNA-loaded fc-LPs (siRNA-fc-LPs were prepared by a film hydration method followed by siRNA incubation. Folate decoration of liposomes was achieved by incorporation of folate/oleic acid-diacylated oligochitosans. The resulting siRNA-fc-LPs were 95.3 nm in size with a ζ potential of 2.41 mV. The liposomal vectors exhibited excellent loading capacity and protective effect toward siRNA. The in vitro cell transfection efficiency was almost parallel to the commercially available Lipofectamine™ 2000. Moreover, the anti-melanoma activity of HIF-1α siRNA was significantly enhanced through fc-LPs. Western blot analysis and apoptosis test demonstrated that siRNA-fc-LPs substantially reduced the production of HIF-1α-associated protein and induced the apoptosis of hypoxia-tolerant melanoma cells. Our designed liposomal vectors might be applicable as siRNA delivery vehicle to systemically or topically treat MM. Keywords: malignant melanoma, HIF-1α siRNA, chitosan, cationic liposomes, gene therapy

  12. Dicer-Dependent Biogenesis of Small RNAs and Evidence for MicroRNA-Like RNAs in the Penicillin Producing Fungus Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlmann, Tim A; Kück, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) that regulate gene expression in a wide range of eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed regulatory sRNAs in Penicillium chrysogenum, the industrial producer of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin. To identify sRNAs and microRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs) on a global approach, two sRNA sequencing libraries were constructed. One library was created with pooled total RNA, obtained from twelve differently grown cultures (RNA Mix), and the other with total RNA from a single submerged cultivation (∆ku70FRT2). Illumina sequencing of both RNA libraries produced 84,322,825 mapped reads. To distinguish between Dicer-dependent and independent sRNA formation, we further constructed two single dicer gene mutants (∆dcl2 and ∆dcl1) and a dicer double mutant (∆dcl2∆dcl1) and analyzed an sRNA library from the Dicer-deficient double-mutant. We identified 661 Dicer-dependent loci and in silico prediction revealed 34 milRNAs. Northern blot hybridization of two milRNAs provided evidence for mature milRNAs that are processed either in a complete or partial Dicer-dependent manner from an RNA precursor. Identified milRNAs share typical characteristics of previously discovered fungal milRNAs, like a strong preference for a 5' uracil and the typical length distribution. The detection of potential milRNA target sites in the genome suggests that milRNAs might play a role in posttranscriptional gene regulation. Our data will further increase our knowledge of sRNA dependent gene regulation processes, which is an important prerequisite to develop more effective strategies for improving industrial fermentations with P. chrysogenum.

  13. Dicer-Dependent Biogenesis of Small RNAs and Evidence for MicroRNA-Like RNAs in the Penicillin Producing Fungus Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim A Dahlmann

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs that regulate gene expression in a wide range of eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed regulatory sRNAs in Penicillium chrysogenum, the industrial producer of the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin. To identify sRNAs and microRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs on a global approach, two sRNA sequencing libraries were constructed. One library was created with pooled total RNA, obtained from twelve differently grown cultures (RNA Mix, and the other with total RNA from a single submerged cultivation (∆ku70FRT2. Illumina sequencing of both RNA libraries produced 84,322,825 mapped reads. To distinguish between Dicer-dependent and independent sRNA formation, we further constructed two single dicer gene mutants (∆dcl2 and ∆dcl1 and a dicer double mutant (∆dcl2∆dcl1 and analyzed an sRNA library from the Dicer-deficient double-mutant. We identified 661 Dicer-dependent loci and in silico prediction revealed 34 milRNAs. Northern blot hybridization of two milRNAs provided evidence for mature milRNAs that are processed either in a complete or partial Dicer-dependent manner from an RNA precursor. Identified milRNAs share typical characteristics of previously discovered fungal milRNAs, like a strong preference for a 5' uracil and the typical length distribution. The detection of potential milRNA target sites in the genome suggests that milRNAs might play a role in posttranscriptional gene regulation. Our data will further increase our knowledge of sRNA dependent gene regulation processes, which is an important prerequisite to develop more effective strategies for improving industrial fermentations with P. chrysogenum.

  14. In silico genome wide mining of conserved and novel miRNAs in the brain and pineal gland of Danio rerio using small RNA sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Suyash; Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Srivastava, Prachi; Kushwaha, Basdeo; Kumar, Ravindra; Pandey, Manmohan; Srivastava, Shreya

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNA molecules that bind to the mRNA of the target genes and regulate the expression of the gene at the post-transcriptional level. Zebrafish is an economically important freshwater fish species globally considered as a good predictive model for studying human diseases and development. The present study focused on uncovering known as well as novel miRNAs, target prediction of the novel miRNAs and the differential expression of the known miRNA using the small RNA sequencing data of the brain and pineal gland (dark and light treatments) obtained from NCBI SRA. A total of 165, 151 and 145 known zebrafish miRNAs were found in the brain, pineal gland (dark treatment) and pineal gland (light treatment), respectively. Chromosomes 4 and 5 of zebrafish reference assembly GRCz10 were found to contain maximum number of miR genes. The miR-181a and miR-182 were found to be highly expressed in terms of number of reads in the brain and pineal gland, respectively. Other ncRNAs, such as tRNA, rRNA and snoRNA, were curated against Rfam. Using GRCz10 as reference, the subsequent bioinformatic analyses identified 25, 19 and 9 novel miRNAs from the brain, pineal gland (dark treatment) and pineal gland (light treatment), respectively. Targets of the novel miRNAs were identified, based on sequence complementarity between miRNAs and mRNA, by searching for antisense hits in the 3'-UTR of reference RNA sequences of the zebrafish. The discovery of novel miRNAs and their targets in the zebrafish genome can be a valuable scientific resource for further functional studies not only in zebrafish but also in other economically important fishes.

  15. Light-regulated mRNA condensation by a photosensitive surfactant works as a series photoswitch of translation activity in the presence of small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudiuk, Sergii; Saito, Hirohide; Hara, Tomoaki; Inoue, Tan; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Baigl, Damien

    2011-11-14

    AzoTAB, a photosensitive azobenzene cationic surfactant, which phototriggers translation activity through light-regulated condensation of mRNA, is added to a translation solution containing several mRNAs, which can be selectively silenced by specific small RNAs. We find that gene silencing by small RNAs remains functional regardless of AzoTAB concentration and UV illumination. In the absence of UV, the translation of all genes present in the medium is partially to fully inhibited depending on AzoTAB concentration. In contrast, the application of a short UV stimulus (365 nm for 1.5 min) results in the selective photoactivation of genes that are not silenced by small RNA. These results show that light-regulated condensation by AzoTAB works as a sequence-independent series photoswitch added to parallel sequence-specific regulation by small RNAs.

  16. Small RNA Profiling Reveals Phosphorus Deficiency as a Contributing Factor in Symptom Expression for Citrus Huanglongbing Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Zhao; Ruobai Sun; Ute Albrecht; Chellappan Padmanabhan; Airong Wang; Michael D.Coffey; Thomas Girke

    2013-01-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating citrus disease that is associated with bacteria of the genus "Candidatus Liberibacter' (Ca.L.).Powerful diagnostic tools and management strategies are desired to control HLB.Host small RNAs (sRNA) play a vital role in regulating host responses to pathogen infection and are used as early diagnostic markers for many human diseases,including cancers.To determine whether citrus sRNAs regulate host responses to HLB,sRNAs were profiled from Citrus sinensis 10 and 14 weeks post grafting with Ca.L.asiaticus (Las)-positive or healthy tissue.Ten new microRNAs (miRNAs),76 conserved miRNAs,and many small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were discovered.Several miRNAs and siRNAs were highly induced by Las infection,and can be potentially developed into early diagnosis markers of HLB.miR399,which is induced by phosphorus starvation in other plant species,was induced specifically by infection of Las but not Spiroplasma citri that causes citrus stubborn--a disease with symptoms similar to HLB.We found a 35% reduction of phosphorus in Las-positive citrus trees compared to healthy trees.Applying phosphorus oxyanion solutions to HLB-positive sweet orange trees reduced HLB symptom severity and significantly improved fruit production during a 3-year field trial in south-west Florida.Our molecular,physiological,and field data suggest that phosphorus deficiency is linked to HLB disease symptomology.

  17. MicroRNA-133a suppresses multiple oncogenic membrane receptors and cell invasion in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Kai Wang

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs cause high mortality worldwide, and the cancer progression can be activated by several genetic events causing receptor dysregulation, including mutation or amplification. MicroRNAs are a group of small non-coding RNA molecules that function in gene silencing and have emerged as the fine-tuning regulators during cancer progression. MiR-133a is known as a key regulator in skeletal and cardiac myogenesis, and it acts as a tumor suppressor in various cancers. This study demonstrates that miR-133a expression negatively correlates with cell invasiveness in both transformed normal bronchial epithelial cells and lung cancer cell lines. The oncogenic receptors in lung cancer cells, including insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R, TGF-beta receptor type-1 (TGFBR1, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, are direct targets of miR-133a. MiR-133a can inhibit cell invasiveness and cell growth through suppressing the expressions of IGF-1R, TGFBR1 and EGFR, which then influences the downstream signaling in lung cancer cell lines. The cell invasive ability is suppressed in IGF-1R- and TGFBR1-repressed cells and this phenomenon is mediated through AKT signaling in highly invasive cell lines. In addition, by using the in vivo animal model, we find that ectopically-expressing miR-133a dramatically suppresses the metastatic ability of lung cancer cells. Accordingly, patients with NSCLCs who have higher expression levels of miR-133a have longer survival rates compared with those who have lower miR-133a expression levels. In summary, we identified the tumor suppressor role of miR-133a in lung cancer outcome prognosis, and we demonstrated that it targets several membrane receptors, which generally produce an activating signaling network during the progression of lung cancer.

  18. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus in Mice by a Small Interfering RNA Targeting a Highly Conserved Sequence in Viral IRES Pseudoknot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Su Moon

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus (HCV internal ribosome entry site (IRES that directs cap-independent viral translation is a primary target for small interfering RNA (siRNA-based HCV antiviral therapy. However, identification of potent siRNAs against HCV IRES by bioinformatics-based siRNA design is a challenging task given the complexity of HCV IRES secondary and tertiary structures and association with multiple proteins, which can also dynamically change the structure of this cis-acting RNA element. In this work, we utilized siRNA tiling approach whereby siRNAs were tiled with overlapping sequences that were shifted by one or two nucleotides over the HCV IRES stem-loop structures III and IV spanning nucleotides (nts 277-343. Based on their antiviral activity, we mapped a druggable region (nts 313-343 where the targets of potent siRNAs were enriched. siIE22, which showed the greatest anti-HCV potency, targeted a highly conserved sequence across diverse HCV genotypes, locating within the IRES subdomain IIIf involved in pseudoknot formation. Stepwise target shifting toward the 5' or 3' direction by 1 or 2 nucleotides reduced the antiviral potency of siIE22, demonstrating the importance of siRNA accessibility to this highly structured and sequence-conserved region of HCV IRES for RNA interference. Nanoparticle-mediated systemic delivery of the stability-improved siIE22 derivative gs_PS1 siIE22, which contains a single phosphorothioate linkage on the guide strand, reduced the serum HCV genome titer by more than 4 log10 in a xenograft mouse model for HCV replication without generation of resistant variants. Our results provide a strategy for identifying potent siRNA species against a highly structured RNA target and offer a potential pan-HCV genotypic siRNA therapy that might be beneficial for patients resistant to current treatment regimens.

  19. A genome-wide identification analysis of small regulatory RNAs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by RNA-Seq and conservation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Pellin

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for smallRNAs (sRNAs identification. First we build an effective target genome (ETG by means of a strand-specific procedure. Then we propose a new bioinformatic pipeline based mainly on the combination of two types of information: the first provides an expression map based on RNA-seq data (Reads Map and the second applies principles of comparative genomics leading to a Conservation Map. By superimposing these two maps, a robust method for the search of sRNAs is obtained. We apply this methodology to investigate sRNAs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. This bioinformatic procedure leads to a total list of 1948 candidate sRNAs. The size of the candidate list is strictly related to the aim of the study and to the technology used during the verification process. We provide performance measures of the algorithm in identifying annotated sRNAs reported in three recent published studies.

  20. Evaluating hypotheses of basal animal phylogeny using complete sequences of large and small subunit rRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Allen G.; Silberman, Jeffrey; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2001-06-21

    We studied the evolutionary relationships among basal metazoan lineages by using complete large subunit (LSU) and small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA sequences for 23 taxa. After identifying competing hypotheses, we performed maximum likelihood searches for trees conforming to each hypothesis. Kishino-Hasegawa tests were used to determine whether the data (LSU, SSU, and combined) reject any of the competing hypotheses. We also conducted unconstrained tree searches, compared the resulting topologies, and calculated bootstrap indices. Shimodaira-Hasegawa tests were applied to determine whether the data reject any of the topologies resulting from the constrained and unconstrained tree searches. LSU, SSU, and the combined data strongly contradict two assertions pertaining to sponge phylogeny. Hexactinellid sponges are not likely to be the basal lineage of amonophyletic Porifera or the sister group to all other animals. Instead, Hexactinellida and Demospongia form a well-supported clade of siliceous sponges, Silicea. It remains unclear, on the basis of these data alone, whether the calcarean sponges are more closely related to Silicea or to nonsponge animals. The SSU and combined data reject the hypothesis that Bilateria is more closely related to Ctenophora than it is to Cnidaria, whereas LSU data alone do not refute either hypothesis. LSU and SSU data agree in supporting the monophyly of Bilateria, Cnidaria, Ctenophora, and Metazoa. LSU sequence data reveal phylogenetic structure in a data set with limited taxon sampling. Continued accumulation of LSU sequences should increase our understanding of animal phylogeny.

  1. Phylogenetics of the brachyuran crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda): the status of Podotremata based on small subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahyong, Shane T; Lai, Joelle C Y; Sharkey, Deirdre; Colgan, Donald J; Ng, Peter K L

    2007-11-01

    The true crabs, the Brachyura, are generally divided into two major groups: Eubrachyura or 'advanced' crabs, and Podotremata or 'primitive' crabs. The status of Podotremata is one of the most controversial issues in brachyuran systematics. The podotreme crabs, best recognised by the possession of gonopores on the coxae of the pereopods, have variously been regarded as mono-, para- or polyphyletic, or even as non-brachyuran. For the first time, the phylogenetic positions of the podotreme crabs were studied by cladistic analysis of small subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA sequences. Eight of 10 podotreme families were represented along with representatives of 17 eubrachyuran families. Under both maximum parsimony and Bayesian Inference, Podotremata was found to be significantly paraphyletic, comprising three major clades: Dromiacea, Raninoida, and Cyclodorippoida. The most 'basal' is Dromiacea, followed by Raninoida and Cylodorippoida. Notably, Cyclodorippoida was identified as the sister group of the Eubrachyura. Previous hypotheses that the dromiid crab, Hypoconcha, is an anomuran were unsupported, though Dromiidae as presently composed could be paraphyletic. Topologies constrained for podotreme monophyly were found to be significantly worse (P < 0.04) than unconstrained topologies under Templeton and S-H tests. The clear pattern of podotreme paraphyly and robustness of topologies recovered indicates that Podotremata as a formal concept is untenable. Relationships among the eubrachyurans were generally equivocal, though results indicate the majoids or dorippoids were the least derived of the Eubrachyura. A new high level classification of the Brachyura is proposed.

  2. Prevalent ciliate symbiosis on copepods: high genetic diversity and wide distribution detected using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiling; Liu, Sheng; Hu, Simin; Li, Tao; Huang, Yousong; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2012-01-01

    Toward understanding the genetic diversity and distribution of copepod-associated symbiotic ciliates and the evolutionary relationships with their hosts in the marine environment, we developed a small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA)-based molecular method and investigated the genetic diversity and genotype distribution of the symbiotic ciliates on copepods. Of the 10 copepod species representing six families collected from six locations of Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, 9 were found to harbor ciliate symbionts. Phylogenetic analysis of the 391 ciliate 18S rDNA sequences obtained revealed seven groups (ribogroups), six (containing 99% of all the sequences) belonging to subclass Apostomatida, the other clustered with peritrich ciliate Vorticella gracilis. Among the Apostomatida groups, Group III were essentially identical to Vampyrophrya pelagica, and the other five groups represented the undocumented ciliates that were close to Vampyrophrya/Gymnodinioides/Hyalophysa. Group VI ciliates were found in all copepod species but one (Calanus sinicus), and were most abundant among all ciliate sequences obtained, indicating that they are the dominant symbiotic ciliates universally associated with copepods. In contrast, some ciliate sequences were found only in some of the copepods examined, suggesting the host selectivity and geographic differentiation of ciliates, which requires further verification by more extensive sampling. Our results reveal the wide occurrence and high genetic diversity of symbiotic ciliates on marine copepods and highlight the need to systematically investigate the host- and geography-based genetic differentiation and ecological roles of these ciliates globally.

  3. Prevalent ciliate symbiosis on copepods: high genetic diversity and wide distribution detected using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiling Guo

    Full Text Available Toward understanding the genetic diversity and distribution of copepod-associated symbiotic ciliates and the evolutionary relationships with their hosts in the marine environment, we developed a small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA-based molecular method and investigated the genetic diversity and genotype distribution of the symbiotic ciliates on copepods. Of the 10 copepod species representing six families collected from six locations of Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, 9 were found to harbor ciliate symbionts. Phylogenetic analysis of the 391 ciliate 18S rDNA sequences obtained revealed seven groups (ribogroups, six (containing 99% of all the sequences belonging to subclass Apostomatida, the other clustered with peritrich ciliate Vorticella gracilis. Among the Apostomatida groups, Group III were essentially identical to Vampyrophrya pelagica, and the other five groups represented the undocumented ciliates that were close to Vampyrophrya/Gymnodinioides/Hyalophysa. Group VI ciliates were found in all copepod species but one (Calanus sinicus, and were most abundant among all ciliate sequences obtained, indicating that they are the dominant symbiotic ciliates universally associated with copepods. In contrast, some ciliate sequences were found only in some of the copepods examined, suggesting the host selectivity and geographic differentiation of ciliates, which requires further verification by more extensive sampling. Our results reveal the wide occurrence and high genetic diversity of symbiotic ciliates on marine copepods and highlight the need to systematically investigate the host- and geography-based genetic differentiation and ecological roles of these ciliates globally.

  4. RNA targeting by small molecule alkaloids: Studies on the binding of berberine and palmatine to polyribonucleotides and comparison to ethidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Maidul; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2008-03-01

    The binding affinity, energetics and conformational aspects of the interaction of isoquinoline alkaloids berberine and palmatine to four single stranded polyribonucleotides polyguanylic acid [poly(G)], polyinosinic acid [poly(I)], polycytidylic acid [poly(C)] and polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] were studied by absorption, fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy and compared with ethidium. Berberine, palmatine and ethidium binds strongly with poly(G) and poly(I) with affinity in the order 10 5 M -1 while their binding to poly(C) and poly(U) were very weak or practically nil. The same conclusions have also emerged from isothermal titration calorimetric studies. The binding of all the three compounds to poly(C) and poly(I) was exothermic and favored by both negative enthalpy change and positive entropy change. Conformational change in the polymer associated with the binding was observed in poly(I) with all the three molecules and poly(U) with ethidium but not in poly(G) and poly(C) revealing differences in the orientation of the bound molecules in the hitherto different helical organization of these polymers. These fundamental results may be useful and serve as database for the development of futuristic RNA based small molecule therapeutics.

  5. Highly expressed long non-coding RNA FOXD2-AS1 promotes non-small cell lung cancer progression via Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Lin; Zhao, Ruixing; Lu, Jinxiu

    2017-03-11

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common and aggressive tumors around the world. Long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently shown to play important roles in regulating numerous biological processes including tumor progression. However, the role of lncRNA FOXD2-AS1 in NSCLC remains unclear. In this study, we found that lncRNA FOXD2-AS1 is significantly up-regulated in NSCLC tissues. Loss- and gain-function assays revealed that FOXD2-AS1 promotes NSCLC cell growth and NSCLC tumor progression. Furthermore, we also revealed that FOXD2-AS1 modulates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in NSCLC cells. Taken together, we conclude that lncRNA FOXD2-AS1 promotes NSCLC progression though Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These results suggest that lncRNA FOXD2-AS1 might act as a novel therapeutic target for NSCLC treatment.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded small RNA is released from EBV-infected cells and activates signaling from Toll-like receptor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Dai; Zhou, Li; Samanta, Mrinal; Matsumoto, Misako; Ebihara, Takashi; Seya, Tsukasa; Imai, Shosuke; Fujieda, Mikiya; Kawa, Keisei; Takada, Kenzo

    2009-09-28

    Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA (EBER) is nonpolyadenylated, noncoding RNA that forms stem-loop structure by intermolecular base-pairing, giving rise to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-like molecules, and exists abundantly in EBV-infected cells. Here, we report that EBER induces signaling from the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), which is a sensor of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and induces type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. A substantial amount of EBER, which was sufficient to induce signaling from TLR3, was released from EBV-infected cells, and the majority of the released EBER existed as a complex with a cellular EBER-binding protein La, suggesting that EBER was released from the cells by active secretion of La. Sera from patients with infectious mononucleosis (IM), chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV), and EBV-associated hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (EBV-HLH), whose general symptoms are caused by proinflammatory cytokines contained EBER, and addition of RNA purified from the sera into culture medium induced signaling from TLR3 in EBV-transformed lymphocytes and peripheral mononuclear cells. Furthermore, DCs treated with EBER showed mature phenotype and antigen presentation capacity. These findings suggest that EBER, which is released from EBV-infected cells, is responsible for immune activation by EBV, inducing type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokines. EBER-induced activation of innate immunity would account for immunopathologic diseases caused by active EBV infection.

  7. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of small RNAs in human endothelial cells and exosomes provides insights into localized RNA processing, degradation and sorting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Balkom, Bas W M; Eisele, Almut S; Pegtel, D Michiel; Bervoets, Sander; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles that mediate cell-cell communication. They contain proteins, lipids and RNA, and evidence is accumulating that these molecules are specifically sorted for release via exosomes. We recently showed that endothelial-cell-produced exosomes promote angiogenesis in vivo in a sm

  8. Small RNAs derived from natural antisense transcripts%天然反义转录物(NAT)来源的小分子RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢兆辉

    2009-01-01

    天然反义转录物(natural antisense transcript,NAT)通常指自然情况下生物体内生成的内源RNA,它们可以与其他RNA部分或完全互补.NAT在生物中非常普遍,并且可以产生多种具有调节作用的小RNA,如天然反义转录干扰小RNA、天然反义微RNA、长的十扰短RNA、扫描RNA和与Piwi相互作用的RNA等.这些小RNA或许是NAT调节基因表达的重要物质分子之一.本文就NAT来源的小RNA及其功能作一慨述.%Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are endogenous RNA molecules that exhibit partial or complete complementarity to other RNAs. They are common in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and can produce some small regulatory RNAs. Such as nat-small interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs), nat-microRNAs (nat-miRNAs), long short interfering RNAs (lsiRNAs), scan RNA (scnRNAs) and PIWl-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These small RNAs may be involved in the gene regulation by NATs, In this paper, small RNAs derived from NATs and their mechanisms are discussed.

  9. The sRNAome mining revealed existence of unique signature small RNAs derived from 5.8SrRNA from Piper nigrum and other plant lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Srinivasan; Soniya, E V

    2017-02-01

    Small RNAs derived from ribosomal RNAs (srRNAs) are rarely explored in the high-throughput data of plant systems. Here, we analyzed srRNAs from the deep-sequenced small RNA libraries of Piper nigrum, a unique magnoliid plant. The 5' end of the putative long form of 5.8S rRNA (5.8SLrRNA) was identified as the site for biogenesis of highly abundant srRNAs that are unique among the Piperaceae family of plants. A subsequent comparative analysis of the ninety-seven sRNAomes of diverse plants successfully uncovered the abundant existence and precise cleavage of unique rRF signature small RNAs upstream of a novel 5' consensus sequence of the 5.8S rRNA. The major cleavage process mapped identically among the different tissues of the same plant. The differential expression and cleavage of 5'5.8S srRNAs in Phytophthora capsici infected P. nigrum tissues indicated the critical biological functions of these srRNAs during stress response. The non-canonical short hairpin precursor structure, the association with Argonaute proteins, and the potential targets of 5'5.8S srRNAs reinforced their regulatory role in the RNAi pathway in plants. In addition, this novel lineage specific small RNAs may have tremendous biological potential in the taxonomic profiling of plants.

  10. Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA) regulate gene silencing and modify homeostatic status in animals faced with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    It has been established that reduced susceptibility to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has a genetic component. This genetic component may take the form of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNA), which are molecules that function as regulators of gene expression. Various sncRNAs ...

  11. TRANSLATION START SITE MULTIPLICITY OF THE CCAAT ENHANCER-BINDING PROTEIN-ALPHA MESSENGER-RNA IS DICTATED BY A SMALL 5' OPEN READING FRAME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CALKHOVEN, CF; BOUWMAN, PRJ; SNIPPE, L; AB, G

    1994-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP) alpha and beta of the bZIP family of transcription factors each occur as multiple forms due to translation initiation at different in-frame AUG codons from the same messenger RNA. The C/EBP alpha mRNAs of chicken, rat and Xenopus all contain a small 5' ope

  12. A Unique cis-Encoded Small Noncoding RNA Is Regulating Legionella pneumophila Hfq Expression in a Life Cycle-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Oliva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium that parasitizes protozoa, but it may also infect humans, thereby causing a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. To cycle between the environment and a eukaryotic host, L. pneumophila is regulating the expression of virulence factors in a life cycle-dependent manner: replicating bacteria do not express virulence factors, whereas transmissive bacteria are highly motile and infective. Here we show that Hfq is an important regulator in this network. Hfq is highly expressed in transmissive bacteria but is expressed at very low levels in replicating bacteria. A L. pneumophila hfq deletion mutant exhibits reduced abilities to infect and multiply in Acanthamoeba castellanii at environmental temperatures. The life cycle-dependent regulation of Hfq expression depends on a unique cis-encoded small RNA named Anti-hfq that is transcribed antisense of the hfq transcript and overlaps its 5′ untranslated region. The Anti-hfq sRNA is highly expressed only in replicating L. pneumophila where it regulates hfq expression through binding to the complementary regions of the hfq transcripts. This results in reduced Hfq protein levels in exponentially growing cells. Both the small noncoding RNA (sRNA and hfq mRNA are bound and stabilized by the Hfq protein, likely leading to the cleavage of the RNA duplex by the endoribonuclease RNase III. In contrast, after the switch to transmissive bacteria, the sRNA is not expressed, allowing now an efficient expression of the hfq gene and consequently Hfq. Our results place Hfq and its newly identified sRNA anti-hfq in the center of the regulatory network governing L. pneumophila differentiation from nonvirulent to virulent bacteria.

  13. A Unique cis-Encoded Small Noncoding RNA Is Regulating Legionella pneumophila Hfq Expression in a Life Cycle-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Giulia; Sahr, Tobias; Rolando, Monica; Knoth, Maike

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium that parasitizes protozoa, but it may also infect humans, thereby causing a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires’ disease. To cycle between the environment and a eukaryotic host, L. pneumophila is regulating the expression of virulence factors in a life cycle-dependent manner: replicating bacteria do not express virulence factors, whereas transmissive bacteria are highly motile and infective. Here we show that Hfq is an important regulator in this network. Hfq is highly expressed in transmissive bacteria but is expressed at very low levels in replicating bacteria. A L. pneumophila hfq deletion mutant exhibits reduced abilities to infect and multiply in Acanthamoeba castellanii at environmental temperatures. The life cycle-dependent regulation of Hfq expression depends on a unique cis-encoded small RNA named Anti-hfq that is transcribed antisense of the hfq transcript and overlaps its 5′ untranslated region. The Anti-hfq sRNA is highly expressed only in replicating L. pneumophila where it regulates hfq expression through binding to the complementary regions of the hfq transcripts. This results in reduced Hfq protein levels in exponentially growing cells. Both the small noncoding RNA (sRNA) and hfq mRNA are bound and stabilized by the Hfq protein, likely leading to the cleavage of the RNA duplex by the endoribonuclease RNase III. In contrast, after the switch to transmissive bacteria, the sRNA is not expressed, allowing now an efficient expression of the hfq gene and consequently Hfq. Our results place Hfq and its newly identified sRNA anti-hfq in the center of the regulatory network governing L. pneumophila differentiation from nonvirulent to virulent bacteria. PMID:28074027

  14. Mono-arginine Cholesterol-based Small Lipid Nanoparticles as a Systemic siRNA Delivery Platform for Effective Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinju; Saw, Phei Er; Gujrati, Vipul; Lee, Yonghyun; Kim, Hyungjun; Kang, Sukmo; Choi, Minsuk; Kim, Jae-Il; Jon, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    Although efforts have been made to develop a platform carrier for the delivery of RNAi therapeutics, systemic delivery of siRNA has shown only limited success in cancer therapy. Cationic lipid-based nanoparticles have been widely used for this purpose, but their toxicity and undesired liver uptake after systemic injection owing to their cationic surfaces have hampered further clinical translation. This study describes the development of neutral, small lipid nanoparticles (SLNPs) made of a nontoxic cationic cholesterol derivative, as a suitable carrier of systemic siRNA to treat cancers. The cationic cholesterol derivative, mono arginine-cholesterol (MA-Chol), was synthesized by directly attaching an arginine moiety to cholesterol via a cleavable ester bond. siRNA-loaded SLNPs (siRNA@SLNPs) were prepared using MA-Chol and a neutral helper lipid, dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), as major components and a small amount of PEGylated phospholipid mixed with siRNA. The resulting nanoparticles were less than ~50 nm in diameter with neutral zeta potential and much lower toxicity than typical cationic cholesterol (DC-Chol)-based lipid nanoparticles. SLNPs loaded with siRNA against kinesin spindle protein (siKSP@SLNPs) exhibited a high level of target gene knockdown in various cancer cell lines, as shown by measurement of KSP mRNA and cell death assays. Furthermore, systemic injection of siKSP@SLNPs into prostate tumor-bearing mice resulted in preferential accumulation of the delivered siRNA at the tumor site and significant inhibition of tumor growth, with little apparent toxicity, as shown by body weight measurements. These results suggest that these SLNPs may provide a systemic delivery platform for RNAi-based cancer therapy.

  15. Downregulation of microRNA-196a enhances the sensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer cells to cisplatin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Yang, Zailiang; Chen, Mingyan; Liu, Ying

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are a class of small, non-coding RNA molecules that play an important role in the pathogenesis of human diseases through the regulation of gene expression. Although miRNA-196a has been implicated in the progression of human lung cancer, its role in enhancing the sensitivity of non‑small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to cisplatin has not yet been confirmed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of miRNA‑196a on the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo. RT-qPCR was used to detect miRNA-196a expression. Synthesized locked nucleic acid (LNA)-anti‑miRNA-196a oligonucleotide was transiently transfected into the SPC‑A‑1 and A549 lung cancer cells to examine the effects of miRNA‑196a on the growth of and colony formation inthe cisplatin‑treated cells. The effects of miRNA-196a on the sensitivity of SPC‑A-1 cells to cisplatin in vivo were determined using BALB/c nude mice. The expression of miRNA‑196a was significantly higher in both the lung cancer tissues and cell lines. The LNA-based knockdown of miRNA-196a significantly inhibited SPC‑A‑1 and A549 cell growth and induced apoptosis. Moreover, the downregulation of miRNA-196a sensitized the SPC‑A‑1 and A549 NSCLC cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo, by inducing apoptosis. The findings of this study demonstrate that the administration of cisplatin in combination with miRNA-196a-targeted therapy may be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NSCLC.

  16. Small RNA deep sequencing identifies novel and salt-stress-regulated microRNAs from roots of Medicago sativa and Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Rui-Cai; Li, Ming-Na; Kang, Jun-Mei; Zhang, Tie-Jun; Sun, Yan; Yang, Qing-Chuan

    2015-05-01

    Small 21- to 24-nucleotide (nt) ribonucleic acids (RNAs), notably the microRNA (miRNA), are emerging as a posttranscriptional regulation mechanism. Salt stress is one of the primary abiotic stresses that cause the crop losses worldwide. In saline lands, root growth and function of plant are determined by the action of environmental salt stress through specific genes that adapt root development to the restrictive condition. To elucidate the role of miRNAs in salt stress regulation in Medicago, we used a high-throughput sequencing approach to analyze four small RNA libraries from roots of Zhongmu-1 (Medicago sativa) and Jemalong A17 (Medicago truncatula), which were treated with 300 mM NaCl for 0 and 8 h. Each library generated about 20 million short sequences and contained predominantly small RNAs of 24-nt length, followed by 21-nt and 22-nt small RNAs. Using sequence analysis, we identified 385 conserved miRNAs from 96 families, along with 68 novel candidate miRNAs. Of all the 68 predicted novel miRNAs, 15 miRNAs were identified to have miRNA*. Statistical analysis on abundance of sequencing read revealed specific miRNA showing contrasting expression patterns between M. sativa and M. truncatula roots, as well as between roots treated for 0 and 8 h. The expression of 10 conserved and novel miRNAs was also quantified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The miRNA precursor and target genes were predicted by bioinformatics analysis. We concluded that the salt stress related conserved and novel miRNAs may have a large variety of target mRNAs, some of which might play key roles in salt stress regulation of Medicago.

  17. A mathematical model and quantitative comparison of the small RNA circuit in the Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae quorum sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, G. A. M.; Guevara Vasquez, F.; Keener, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Quorum sensing is the process by which bacteria regulate their gene expression based on the local cell-population density. The quorum sensing systems of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio cholerae are comprised of a phosphorelay cascade coupled to a small RNA (sRNA) circuit. The sRNA circuit contains multiple quorum regulated small RNA (Qrr) that regulate expression of the homologous master transcriptional regulators LuxR (in V. harveyi) and HapR (in V. cholerae). Their quorum sensing systems are topologically similar and homologous thereby making it difficult to understand why repression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr. In this work we formulate and parameterize a novel mathematical model of the V. harveyi and V. cholerae sRNA circuit. We parameterize the model by fitting it to a variety of empirical data from both species. We show that we can distinguish all of the parameters and that the parameterizations (one for each species) are robust to errors in the data. We then use our model to propose some experiments to identify and explain kinetic differences between the species. We find that V. cholerae Qrr are more abundant and more sensitive to changes in LuxO than V. harveyi Qrr and argue that this is why expression of HapR is more robust than LuxR to changes in Qrr.

  18. Study on FSHR and LHR mRNA Levels of Different BMPRIB Genotypes of Small Tail Han Sheep During the Oestrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Cun-ling; LI Ning; WEI Ze-hui; ZHU Xiao-ping; LIU Hai-ying; JIA Zhi-hai

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between different BMPRIB genotypes of Small Tail Han sheep and FSHR and LHR mRNA levels during the oestrum was studied using semiquantitative PCR. The results indicated that FSHR mRNA extracted from the right ovary of BB (1.14 ± 0.11) ewes showed higher levels compared with AA (0.44 ± 0.11) and AB (0.36±0.08) ewes (P < 0.01), and LHR mRNA extracted from the right ovary of BB (0.42±0.02) ewes showed significantly higher levels compared with AA (0.23 ±0.02) and AB (0.25 ±0.04) ewes (P<0.01); however, the mRNA extracted from the left ovary showed no significant difference in levels among the genotypes during the oestrum. It indicated that the fecundity induced by a mutation of BMPRIB in Small Tail Han sheep may be related to the changes of the mRNA expression of LHR and FSHR in ovary.

  19. Small RNA-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA lesions by the DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 2 and ARGONAUTE 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Catherine; Cognat, Valérie; Graindorge, Stéfanie; Vincent, Timothée; Voinnet, Olivier; Molinier, Jean

    2017-04-04

    As photosynthetic organisms, plants need to prevent irreversible UV-induced DNA lesions. Through an unbiased, genome-wide approach, we have uncovered a previously unrecognized interplay between Global Genome Repair and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in the recognition of DNA photoproducts, prevalently in intergenic regions. Genetic and biochemical approaches indicate that, upon UV irradiation, the DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 2 (DDB2) and ARGONAUTE 1 (AGO1) of Arabidopsis thaliana form a chromatin-bound complex together with 21-nt siRNAs, which likely facilitates recognition of DNA damages in an RNA/DNA complementary strand-specific manner. The biogenesis of photoproduct-associated siRNAs involves the noncanonical, concerted action of RNA POLYMERASE IV, RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE-2, and DICER-LIKE-4. Furthermore, the chromatin association/dissociation of the DDB2-AGO1 complex is under the control of siRNA abundance and DNA damage signaling. These findings reveal unexpected nuclear functions for DCL4 and AGO1, and shed light on the interplay between small RNAs and DNA repair recognition factors at damaged sites.

  20. Analysis of U3 snoRNA and small subunit processome components in the parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ankita; Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ray, Ashwini Kumar; Kaur, Devinder; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2014-02-01

    In the early branching parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica, pre-rRNA synthesis continues when cells are subjected to growth stress, but processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates. To gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms leading to accumulation, it is necessary to define the pre-rRNA processing machinery in E. histolytica. We searched the E. histolytica genome sequence for homologs of the SSU processome, which contains the U3snoRNA, and 72 proteins in yeast. We could identify 57 of the proteins with high confidence. Of the rest, 6 were absent in human, and 4 were non-essential in yeast. The remaining 5 were absent in other parasite genomes as well. Analysis of U3snoRNA showed that the E. histolytica U3snoRNA adopted the same conserved secondary structure as seen in yeast and human. The predicted structure was verified by chemical modification followed by primer extension (SHAPE). Further we showed that the predicted interactions of Eh_U3snoRNA boxes A and A' with pre-18S rRNA were highly conserved both in position and sequence. The predicted interactions of 5'-hinge and 3'-hinge sequences of Eh_U3 snoRNA with the 5'-ETS sequences were conserved in position but not in sequence. Transcription of selected genes of SSU processome was tested by northern analysis, and transcripts of predicted sizes were obtained. During serum starvation, when unprocessed pre-RNA accumulated, the transcript levels of some of these genes declined. This is the first report on pre-rRNA processing machinery in E. histolytica, and shows that the components are well conserved with respect to yeast and human.

  1. Characterization of a small auxin-up RNA (SAUR-like gene involved in Arabidopsis thaliana development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Nektarios Markakis

    Full Text Available The root of Arabidopsis thaliana is used as a model system to unravel the molecular nature of cell elongation and its arrest. From a micro-array performed on roots that were treated with aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC, the precursor of ethylene, a Small auxin-up RNA (SAUR-like gene was found to be up regulated. As it appeared as the 76th gene in the family, it was named SAUR76. Root and leaf growth of overexpression lines ectopically expressing SAUR76 indicated the possible involvement of the gene in the division process. Using promoter::GUS and GFP lines strong expression was seen in endodermal and pericycle cells at the end of the elongation zone and during several stages of lateral root primordia development. ACC and IAA/NAA were able to induce a strong up regulation of the gene and changed the expression towards cortical and even epidermal cells at the beginning of the elongation zone. Confirmation of this up regulation of expression was delivered using qPCR, which also indicated that the expression quickly returned to normal levels when the inducing IAA-stimulus was removed, a behaviour also seen in other SAUR genes. Furthermore, confocal analysis of protein-GFP fusions localized the protein in the nucleus, cytoplasm and plasma membrane. SAUR76 expression was quantified in several mutants in ethylene and auxin-related pathways, which led to the conclusion that the expression of SAUR76 is mainly regulated by the increase in auxin that results from the addition of ACC, rather than by ACC itself.

  2. The role of microRNA-21 in predicting brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Zhang, Zhi; Gu, Tao; Xu, Shu-Feng; Dong, Li-Xin; Li, Xin; Fu, Bao-Hong; Fu, Zhan-Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at exploring the role of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in predicting brain metastases (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods A total of 132 NSCLC patients, including 68 patients with BM and 64 patients without BM, were included in the study. NSCLC cells were collected and assigned to the inhibitor (IN) group, the mock group, and the negative control (NC) group. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay was used to detect the miR-21 expression. Cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and apoptosis were detected by colony-forming assay, MTT assay, transwell assay, and flow cytometry, respectively. Angiogenesis was measured by endothelial cell tube formation assay. Results The miR-21 expression was higher in NSCLC patients with BM than in those without BM. The miR-21 expression in the IN group was lower than that in the NC and mock groups. Compared with the NC and mock groups, the values of optical density (OD) and the colony-forming number decreased in the IN group. Compared with the NC and mock groups, cell invasion and migration abilities significantly reduced in the IN group. The IN group had higher apoptosis rate than the NC and mock groups. The tube length was shorter and the number of junction points was less in the IN group in comparison to the NC and mock groups. Conclusion miR-21 might be a potential biomarker for the development of BM in NSCLC patients and could promote the proliferation, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis of NSCLC cells.

  3. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  4. Derivation of an endogenous small RNA from double-stranded Sox4 sense and natural antisense transcripts in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, King-Hwa; Brautigan, Peter J; Moore, Sarah; Fraser, Rachel; Cheah, Pike-See; Raison, Joy M; Babic, Milena; Lee, Young Kyung; Daish, Tasman; Mattiske, Deidre M; Mann, Jeffrey R; Adelson, David L; Thomas, Paul Q; Hahn, Christopher N; Scott, Hamish S

    2016-03-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are involved in cellular development and regulatory processes. Multiple NATs at the Sox4 gene locus are spatiotemporally regulated throughout murine cerebral corticogenesis. In the study, we evaluated the potential functional role of Sox4 NATs at Sox4 gene locus. We demonstrated Sox4 sense and NATs formed dsRNA aggregates in the cytoplasm of brain cells. Over expression of Sox4 NATs in NIH/3T3 cells generally did not alter the level of Sox4 mRNA expression or protein translation. Upregulation of a Sox4 NAT known as Sox4ot1 led to the production of a novel small RNA, Sox4_sir3. Its biogenesis is Dicer1-dependent and has characteristics resemble piRNA. Expression of Sox4_sir3 was observed in the marginal and germinative zones of the developing and postnatal brains suggesting a potential role in regulating neurogenesis. We proposed that Sox4 sense-NATs serve as Dicer1-dependent templates to produce a novel endo-siRNA- or piRNA-like Sox4_sir3.

  5. Impact of CHK2-small interfering RNA on CpG ODN7909-enhanced radiosensitivity in lung cancer A549 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen W; Liu XQ; Qiao TK; Yuan SJ

    2012-01-01

    Wei Chen,* Xiaoqun Liu,* Tiankui Qiao, Sujuan Yuan Department of Oncology, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To investigate the impact of checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2)-small interfering RNA (CHK2-siRNA) on the enhancement of radiosensitivity by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) 7909 in lung cancer A549 cells.Methods: The A549 cells were randomly divided into five groups: control, CpG, X-ray, CpG ...

  6. Phylogenetic positions of two marine ciliates, Metanophrys similis and Pseudocohnilembus hargisi (Protozoa, Ciliophora, Scuticociliatia), inferred from complete small subunit rRNA gene sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The small subunit rRNA (SSrRNA) gene was sequenced for two marine scuticociliates Metanophrys similis and Pseudocohnilembus hargisi. The results show that this gene comprises 1763 and 1753 nucleotides in the two marine ciliates respectively.Metanophrys similis is phylogenetically closely related to the clade containing Mesanophrys carcini and Anophyroides haemophila, which branches basally to other species within the order Philasterida. Pseudocohnilembus hargisi groups with its congener, P. marinus, with strong bootstrap support. Paranophrys magna groups with the clade including Cohnilembus and Uronema, representing a sister clade to that containing the two Pseudocohnilembus species.

  7. AB094. High-throughput sequencing of small RNA component of penile in a post-radical prostatectomy model of erectile dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yajun; Luan, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Hao; Li, Rui; Cui, Kai; Jiang, Hongyang; Li, Mingchao; Wang, Tao; Liu, Jihong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The introduction of nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy represents a milestone in the treatment of prostate cancer. However, a certain percentage of cancer survivors still suffer from erectile dysfunction. Recent research has stated that using PDE 5-inhibitors after radical prostatectomy may lead to biochemical recurrence. This study was performed to identify the expression profile of small RNA in rats with neurogenic erectile dysfunction, and to investigate possible genes and signaling pathways involving in the disease. Methods Neurogenic erectile dysfunction (ED) was induced in male rats by bilateral cavernous nerve crushing injury (BCNI). After 28 days, erectile function was evaluated by cavernous nerve electrostimulation. Masson’s trichrome staining was performed to assess histologic changes. RNA was isolated from the corpus cavernosum (CC) of both control rats and neurogenic ED rats. Small RNA sequencing was conducted using an Illumina Hiseq 2,500/2,000 platform. Candidate small RNAs were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Intracavernous pressure (ICP) was significantly decreased in BCNI group compared with SHAM group. Corporal tissue in the neurogenic ED rats showed a significantly lower smooth muscle/collagen ratio compared with tissue in the SHAM controls. Real time PCR validated that miR-9a-5p, miR-203a-5p, miR-378a-3p and miR-3557-5p were upregulated, and meanwhile miR-3084a-3p was downregulated. Conclusions Small RNA, including microRNA, may play an important role in the regulation of genes in CC and some certain miRs may participate in post-prostatectomy ED. Further studies will be designed to investigate the specific mechanisms of these changes.

  8. Research resources: comparative microRNA profiles in human corona radiata cells and cumulus oophorus cells detected by next-generation small RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Hong Tong

    Full Text Available During folliculogenesis, cumulus cells surrounding the oocyte differentiate into corona radiata cells (CRCs and cumulus oophorus cells (COCs, which are involved in gonadal steroidogenesis and the development of germ cells. Several studies suggested that microRNAs (miRNAs play an important regulatory role at the post-transcriptional level in cumulus cells. However, comparative miRNA profiles and associated processes in human CRCs and COCs have not been reported before. In this study, miRNA profiles were obtained from CRCs and COCs using next generation sequencing in women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF. A total of 785 and 799 annotated miRNAs were identified in CRCs and COCs, while high expression levels of six novel miRNAs were detected both in CRCs and in COCs. In addition, different expression patterns in CRCs and COCs were detected in 72 annotated miRNAs. To confirm the miRNA profile in COCs and CRCs, quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate the expression of annotated miRNAs, differentially expressed miRNAs, and novel miRNAs. The miRNAs in the let-7 family were found to be involved in the regulation of a broad range of biological processes in both cumulus cell populations, which was accompanied by a large amount of miRNA editing. Bioinformatics analysis showed that amino acid and energy metabolism were targeted significantly by miRNAs that were differentially expressed between CRCs and COCs. Our work extends the current knowledge of the regulatory role of miRNAs and their targeted pathways in folliculogenesis, and provides novel candidates for molecular biomarkers in the research of female infertility.

  9. Research Resources: Comparative MicroRNA Profiles in Human Corona Radiata Cells and Cumulus Oophorus Cells Detected by Next-Generation Small RNA Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Liu, Yu-Sheng; Ma, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    During folliculogenesis, cumulus cells surrounding the oocyte differentiate into corona radiata cells (CRCs) and cumulus oophorus cells (COCs), which are involved in gonadal steroidogenesis and the development of germ cells. Several studies suggested that microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important regulatory role at the post-transcriptional level in cumulus cells. However, comparative miRNA profiles and associated processes in human CRCs and COCs have not been reported before. In this study, miRNA profiles were obtained from CRCs and COCs using next generation sequencing in women undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation for IVF. A total of 785 and 799 annotated miRNAs were identified in CRCs and COCs, while high expression levels of six novel miRNAs were detected both in CRCs and in COCs. In addition, different expression patterns in CRCs and COCs were detected in 72 annotated miRNAs. To confirm the miRNA profile in COCs and CRCs, quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate the expression of annotated miRNAs, differentially expressed miRNAs, and novel miRNAs. The miRNAs in the let-7 family were found to be involved in the regulation of a broad range of biological processes in both cumulus cell populations, which was accompanied by a large amount of miRNA editing. Bioinformatics analysis showed that amino acid and energy metabolism were targeted significantly by miRNAs that were differentially expressed between CRCs and COCs. Our work extends the current knowledge of the regulatory role of miRNAs and their targeted pathways in folliculogenesis, and provides novel candidates for molecular biomarkers in the research of female infertility. PMID:25188034

  10. Transfer RNA Derived Small RNAs Targeting Defense Responsive Genes Are Induced during Phytophthora capsici Infection in Black Pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Srinivasan; Soniya, Eppurath V

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs derived from transfer RNAs were recently assigned as potential gene regulatory candidates for various stress responses in eukaryotes. In this study, we report on the cloning and identification of tRNA derived small RNAs from black pepper plants in response to the infection of the quick wilt pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. 5'tRFs cloned from black pepper were validated as highly expressed during P. capsici infection. A high-throughput systematic analysis of the small RNAome (sRNAome) revealed the predominance of 5'tRFs in the infected leaf and root. The abundance of 5'tRFs in the sRNAome and the defense responsive genes as their potential targets indicated their regulatory role during stress response in black pepper. The 5'Ala(CGC) tRF mediated cleavage was experimentally mapped at the tRF binding sites on the mRNA targets of Non-expresser of pathogenesis related protein (NPR1), which was down-regulated during pathogen infection. Comparative sRNAome further demonstrated sequence conservation of 5'Ala tRFs across the angiosperm plant groups, and many important genes in the defense response were identified in silico as their potential targets. Our findings uncovered the diversity, differential expression and stress responsive functional role of tRNA-derived small RNAs during Phytophthora infection in black pepper.

  11. Small interfering RNA technology and its applications in pulmonary fibrosis%小干扰RNA技术及其在肺纤维化中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡科迪; 赵静; 马小兵; 王献华

    2011-01-01

    @@ 近年来随着RNA干扰(RNA interference,RNAi)技术研究的进一步深入,利用该技术可以产生相关基因功能沉默,因此被广泛应用到基因调控的研究中.RNAi技术不仅为疾病发病机制的基础研究提供新的发展道路,而且为在基因水平上对疾病的治疗提供了可能.自从1998年美国科学家Fire和Mello第一次对RNAi进行了明确的描述,它就成为最热门的课题之一.RNAi可以使几乎所有生物体中一个特定的基因开启、关闭、更活跃或更不活跃,从而影响生物的体型和发育等,而且重要的是它提供了潜在的治疗及开关某些疾病的致病基因[1].简单地说,RNAi划分为二个主要分支,即小干扰RNA (small interfering RNA ,siRNA)和微小RNA(micro-RNA ,miRNA),其中关键的RNAi途径是siRNA,其需要双链RNA裂解,在3′端产生20-30bp的寡核苷酸,所产生的siRNA片段是由双链RNA的 Dicer酶前体构成的.siRNA 与蛋白结合形成无活性的RNA诱导沉默复合物,复合物中的解旋酶将siRNA 双链解开,形成活化的形式,然后由反义siRNA 介导该活化复合物识别并靶向切割同源靶RNA而发挥作用[2].

  12. Small interfering RNAs targeting peste des petits ruminants virus M mRNA increase virus-mediated fusogenicity and inhibit viral replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Zou, Yanli; Li, Lin; Liu, Shan; Chi, Tianying; Wang, Zhiliang

    2015-11-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), caused by peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), is an acute or subacute, highly contagious and economically important disease of small ruminants. The PPRV is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The PPRV matrix (M) protein possesses an intrinsic ability to bind to lipid membranes, and plays a crucial role in viral assembly and further budding. In this study, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNA) were designed on the basis of translated region for PPRV Nigeria 75/1M mRNA, and were subsequently synthesized for their transfection into Vero-SLAM cells, followed by infection with PPRVs. The results showed that two out of three siRNAs robustly induced cell-to-cell fusion as early as 36h post-infection with PPRVs, effectively suppressed expression of the M protein by interference for the M mRNA, and eventually inhibited viral replication in vitro. These findings led us to speculate that siRNA-mediated knockdown of the M protein would alter its interaction with viral glycoproteins, thus exacerbating intercellular fusion but hampering virus release.

  13. Establishment of a rapid, inexpensive protocol for extraction of high quality RNA from small amounts of strawberry plant tissues and other recalcitrant fruit crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Anastasis; Georgiadou, Egli C; Filippou, Panagiota; Manganaris, George A; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2014-03-01

    Strawberry plant tissues and particularly fruit material are rich in polysaccharides and polyphenolic compounds, thus rendering the isolation of nucleic acids a difficult task. This work describes the successful modification of a total RNA extraction protocol, which enables the isolation of high quantity and quality of total RNA from small amounts of strawberry leaf, root and fruit tissues. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of GAPDH housekeeping gene from isolated RNA further supports the proposed protocol efficiency and its use for downstream molecular applications. This novel procedure was also successfully followed using other fruit tissues, such as olive and kiwifruit. In addition, optional treatment with RNase A following initial nucleic acid extraction can provide sufficient quality and quality of genomic DNA for subsequent PCR analyses, as evidenced from PCR amplification of housekeeping genes using extracted genomic DNA as template. Overall, this optimized protocol allows easy, rapid and economic isolation of high quality RNA from small amounts of an important fruit crop, such as strawberry, with extended applicability to other recalcitrant fruit crops.

  14. A motif-based search in bacterial genomes identifies the ortholog of the small RNA Yfr1 in all lineages of cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axmann Ilka M

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-coding RNAs (ncRNA are regulators of gene expression in all domains of life. They control growth and differentiation, virulence, motility and various stress responses. The identification of ncRNAs can be a tedious process due to the heterogeneous nature of this molecule class and the missing sequence similarity of orthologs, even among closely related species. The small ncRNA Yfr1 has previously been found in the Prochlorococcus/Synechococcus group of marine cyanobacteria. Results Here we show that screening available genome sequences based on an RNA motif and followed by experimental analysis works successfully in detecting this RNA in all lineages of cyanobacteria. Yfr1 is an abundant ncRNA between 54 and 69 nt in size that is ubiquitous for cyanobacteria except for two low light-adapted strains of Prochlorococcus, MIT 9211 and SS120, in which it must have been lost secondarily. Yfr1 consists of two predicted stem-loop elements separated by an unpaired sequence of 16–20 nucleotides containing the ultraconserved undecanucleotide 5'-ACUCCUCACAC-3'. Conclusion Starting with an ncRNA previously found in a narrow group of cyanobacteria only, we show here the highly specific and sensitive identification of its homologs within all lineages of cyanobacteria, whereas it was not detected within the genome sequences of E. coli and of 7 other eubacteria belonging to the alpha-proteobacteria, chlorobiaceae and spirochaete. The integration of RNA motif prediction into computational pipelines for the detection of ncRNAs in bacteria appears as a promising step to improve the quality of such predictions.

  15. Both endo-siRNAs and tRNA-derived small RNAs are involved in the differentiation of primitive eukaryote Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jian-You; Guo, Yan-Hua; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Li, Yan; Xu, Wen-Li; Zhang, Yu-Chan; Zhou, Hui; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Ayala, Francisco J; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2014-09-30

    Small RNAs (sRNAs), including microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs), regulate most important biologic processes in eukaryotes, such as cell division and differentiation. Although sRNAs have been extensively studied in various eukaryotes, the role of sRNAs in the early emergence of eukaryotes is unclear. To address these questions, we deep sequenced the sRNA transcriptome of four different stages in the differentiation of Giardia lamblia, one of the most primitive eukaryotes. We identified a large number of endo-siRNAs in this fascinating parasitic protozoan and found that they were produced from live telomeric retrotransposons and three genomic regions (i.e., endo-siRNA generating regions [eSGRs]). eSGR-derived endo-siRNAs were proven to target mRNAs in trans. Gradual up-regulation of endo-siRNAs in the differentiation of Giardia suggested that they might be involved in the regulation of this process. This hypothesis was supported by the impairment of the differentiation ability of Giardia when GLDICER, essential for the biogenesis of endo-siRNAs, was knocked down. Endo-siRNAs are not the only sRNA regulators in Giardia differentiation, because a great number of tRNAs-derived sRNAs showed more dramatic expression changes than endo-siRNAs in this process. We totally identified five novel kinds of tRNAs-derived sRNAs and found that the biogenesis in four of them might be correlated with that of stress-induced tRNA-derived RNA (sitRNA), which was discovered in our previous studies. Our studies reveal an unexpected complex panorama of sRNA in G. lamblia and shed light on the origin and functional evolution of eukaryotic sRNAs.

  16. Novel small RNA expression libraries uncover hsa-miR-30b and hsa-miR-30c as important factors in anoikis resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Mateos, Miguel A; Barragán, Verónica; Torres, Belén; Rodríguez-Mateo, Cristina; Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; Berezikov, Eugene; Mudduluru, Giridhar; Allgayer, Heike; Pintor-Toro, José A

    2013-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely studied in order to elucidate their biological functions. MicroRNA microarrays or miRNA overexpression libraries generated by synthesis and cloning of individual miRNAs have been used to study their different roles. In this work, we have developed a novel methodology to express mature miRNAs and other small RNAs from a double convergent RNA polymerase III promoter. We show that the generated miRNAs function similarly to those processed from primary transcripts or pri-miRNAs. This system allowed us to produce a lentiviral library expressing the whole population of small RNAs present in a metastatic cell line. A functional screening using this library led to the identification of hsa-miR-30b and hsa-miR-30c as negative regulators of cell death induced by loss of attachment (anoikis). Importantly, we demonstrated that the acquisition of anoikis resistance via these miRNAs is achieved through down-regulation of caspase 3 expression. Moreover, overexpression of these miRNAs resulted in a decrease of other types of caspase 3-dependent cell death and enhanced the survival of MCF10A acinar cells in morphogenesis assays, suggesting a putative role as oncomirs. In summary, this novel methodology provides a powerful and effective way for identifying novel small RNAs involved in a particular biological process.

  17. Wolbachia Blocks Viral Genome Replication Early in Infection without a Transcriptional Response by the Endosymbiont or Host Small RNA Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Rainey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia can protect insects against viral infection, and is being introduced into mosquito populations in the wild to block the transmission of arboviruses that infect humans and are a major public health concern. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this antiviral protection, we have developed a new model system combining Wolbachia-infected Drosophila melanogaster cell culture with the model mosquito-borne Semliki Forest virus (SFV; Togaviridae, Alphavirus. Wolbachia provides strong antiviral protection rapidly after infection, suggesting that an early stage post-infection is being blocked. Wolbachia does appear to have major effects on events distinct from entry, assembly or exit as it inhibits the replication of an SFV replicon transfected into the cells. Furthermore, it causes a far greater reduction in the expression of proteins from the 3' open reading frame than the 5' non-structural protein open reading frame, indicating that it is blocking the replication of viral RNA. Further to this separation of the replicase proteins and viral RNA in transreplication assays shows that uncoupling of viral RNA and replicase proteins does not overcome Wolbachia's antiviral activity. This further suggests that replicative processes are disrupted, such as translation or replication, by Wolbachia infection. This may occur by Wolbachia mounting an active antiviral response, but the virus did not cause any transcriptional response by the bacterium, suggesting that this is not the case. Host microRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in protection, but again we found that host cell miRNA expression was unaffected by the bacterium and neither do our findings suggest any involvement of the antiviral siRNA pathway. We conclude that Wolbachia may directly interfere with early events in virus replication such as translation of incoming viral RNA or RNA transcription, and this likely involves an intrinsic (as opposed to

  18. Wolbachia Blocks Viral Genome Replication Early in Infection without a Transcriptional Response by the Endosymbiont or Host Small RNA Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, Stephanie M; Martinez, Julien; McFarlane, Melanie; Juneja, Punita; Sarkies, Peter; Lulla, Aleksei; Schnettler, Esther; Varjak, Margus; Merits, Andres; Miska, Eric A; Jiggins, Francis M; Kohl, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The intracellular endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia can protect insects against viral infection, and is being introduced into mosquito populations in the wild to block the transmission of arboviruses that infect humans and are a major public health concern. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this antiviral protection, we have developed a new model system combining Wolbachia-infected Drosophila melanogaster cell culture with the model mosquito-borne Semliki Forest virus (SFV; Togaviridae, Alphavirus). Wolbachia provides strong antiviral protection rapidly after infection, suggesting that an early stage post-infection is being blocked. Wolbachia does appear to have major effects on events distinct from entry, assembly or exit as it inhibits the replication of an SFV replicon transfected into the cells. Furthermore, it causes a far greater reduction in the expression of proteins from the 3' open reading frame than the 5' non-structural protein open reading frame, indicating that it is blocking the replication of viral RNA. Further to this separation of the replicase proteins and viral RNA in transreplication assays shows that uncoupling of viral RNA and replicase proteins does not overcome Wolbachia's antiviral activity. This further suggests that replicative processes are disrupted, such as translation or replication, by Wolbachia infection. This may occur by Wolbachia mounting an active antiviral response, but the virus did not cause any transcriptional response by the bacterium, suggesting that this is not the case. Host microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in protection, but again we found that host cell miRNA expression was unaffected by the bacterium and neither do our findings suggest any involvement of the antiviral siRNA pathway. We conclude that Wolbachia may directly interfere with early events in virus replication such as translation of incoming viral RNA or RNA transcription, and this likely involves an intrinsic (as opposed to an induced

  19. Small-RNA deep sequencing reveals Arctium tomentosum as a natural host of Alstroemeria virus X and a new putative Emaravirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqi Bi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arctium species (Asteraceae are distributed worldwide and are used as food and rich sources of secondary metabolites for the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., against avian influenza virus. RNA silencing is an antiviral defense mechanism that detects and destroys virus-derived double-stranded RNA, resulting in accumulation of virus-derived small RNAs (21-24 nucleotides that can be used for generic detection of viruses by small-RNA deep sequencing (SRDS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SRDS was used to detect viruses in the biennial wild plant species Arctium tomentosum (woolly burdock; family Asteraceae displaying virus-like symptoms of vein yellowing and leaf mosaic in southern Finland. Assembly of the small-RNA reads resulted in contigs homologous to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX, a positive/single-stranded RNA virus of genus Potexvirus (family Alphaflexiviridae, or related to negative/single-stranded RNA viruses of the genus Emaravirus. The coat protein gene of AlsVX was 81% and 89% identical to the two AlsVX isolates from Japan and Norway, respectively. The deduced, partial nucleocapsid protein amino acid sequence of the emara-like virus was only 78% or less identical to reported emaraviruses and showed no variability among the virus isolates characterized. This virus--tentatively named as Woolly burdock yellow vein virus--was exclusively associated with yellow vein and leaf mosaic symptoms in woolly burdock, whereas AlsVX was detected in only one of the 52 plants tested. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide novel information about natural virus infections in Acrtium species and reveal woolly burdock as the first natural host of AlsVX besides Alstroemeria (family Alstroemeriaceae. Results also revealed a new virus related to the recently emerged Emaravirus genus and demonstrated applicability of SRDS to detect negative-strand RNA viruses. SRDS potentiates virus surveys of wild plants, a research area underrepresented in

  20. 血浆循环microRNA-126在非小细胞肺癌诊断中的应用%Application of plasma circulation microRNA - 126 to diagnosis of non - small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘沙; 杨季云

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨血浆循环microRNA - 126浓度与非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)的相关性及其诊断价值.方法 采用实时荧光定量PCR方法检测130例NSCLC患者和作为对照的170例健康人的血浆循环microRNA - 126浓度.结果 对照组血浆循环microRNA - 126浓度显著高于NSCLC组(P<0.01).血浆循环microRNA - 126浓度ROC曲线下面积(area under the ROC curve,AUC)为0.758,95%CI为0.704~0.811(P<0.01).当血浆microRNA - 126浓度为1051 fmol/L时,血浆microRNA - 126对NSCLC诊断的特异度为90.0%,灵敏度为46.4%.其浓度与患者的年龄、性别、吸烟,病理分型和分期均无显著的相关性(P>0.05).结论 血浆循环microRNA - 126浓度对NSCLC有一定的临床诊断意义,联合其他血浆microRNA或肿瘤标志物,如神经元特异性烯醇化酶、癌胚抗原和细胞角蛋白片段21 - 1,可以弥补单一检测的局限性,以提高肺癌的阳性检出率,为临床提供可靠的依据.%Objective To discuss the correlation between the concentration of plasma circulation microRNA - 126 and the non - small cell lung cancer( NSCLC ), and to study its diagnostic value. Methods The concentration of plasma circulation micro RNA - 126 in 130 patients with NSCLC( NSCLC group )and 170 healthy people( control group )was detected through the method of real time fluorescent quantitation PCR. Results The concentration of microRNA - 126 in the control group was significantly higher than that in the NSCLC group( P < 0. 01 ). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the concentration was 0. 758, and the 95% CI was 0. 704 - 0. 81l( P < 0. 01 ). When the concentration of plasma microRNA - 126 was 1051 fmol/L, its specificity in the diagnosis of NSCLC was 90% ,and its sensitivity was 46. 4%. There were not obvious correlations between the concentration and age, gender, smoking, pathological typing and staging of the 130 patients. Conclusion The concentration of plasma circulation microRNA -126 has

  1. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic relationships based on 18S rRNA and ITS1 region of small form of canine Babesia spp. from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, M; Banerjee, P S; Garg, Rajat; Ram, Hira; Kundu, K; Kumar, Saroj; Kumar, G V P P S Ravi

    2014-10-01

    Canine babesiosis is a vector borne disease caused by intra-erythrocytic apicomplexan parasites Babesia canis (large form) and Babesia gibsoni (small form), throughout the globe. Apart from few sporadic reports on the occurrence of B. gibsoni infection in dogs, no attempt has been made to characterize Babesia spp. of dogs in India. Fifteen canine blood samples, positive for small form of Babesia, collected from northern to eastern parts of India, were used for amplification of 18S rRNA gene (∼1665bp) of Babesia sp. and partial ITS1 region (∼254bp) of B. gibsoni Asian genotype. Cloning and sequencing of the amplified products of each sample was performed separately. Based on sequences and phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA and ITS1 sequences, 13 were considered to be B. gibsoni. These thirteen isolates shared high sequence identity with each other and with B. gibsoni Asian genotype. The other two isolates could not be assigned to any particular species because of the difference(s) in 18S rRNA sequence with B. gibsoni and closer identity with Babesiaoccultans and Babesiaorientalis. In the phylogenetic tree, all the isolates of B. gibsoni Asian genotype formed a separate major clade named as Babesia spp. sensu stricto clade with high bootstrap support. The two unnamed Babesia sp. (Malbazar and Ludhiana isolates) clustered close together with B. orientalis, Babesia sp. (Kashi 1 isolate) and B. occultans of bovines. It can be inferred from this study that 18S rRNA gene and ITS1 region are highly conserved among 13 B. gibsoni isolates from India. It is the maiden attempt of genetic characterization by sequencing of 18S rRNA gene and ITS1 region of B. gibsoni from India and is also the first record on the occurrence of an unknown Babesia sp. of dogs from south and south-east Asia.

  2. Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling Pathway Constitutively Activated in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines and Inhibition of Growth of Cells by Small Interfering RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang TIAN; Wei-Dong ZANG; Wei-Hong HOU; Hong-Tao LIU; Le-Xun XUE

    2006-01-01

    Although constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation has been reported in many human tumors, the role of the NF-κB pathway in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not been known.In this study, NF-κB pathway in two ESCC cell lines was investigated using immunocytochemistry, Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The activation of NF-κB DNA binding was determined by electrophoretic mobility-shift assay. RNA interference was used to specifically inhibit the expression of p65. Growth of cells was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay.The results showed that p50, p65, Iκ Bα, p-Iκ Bα and Iκ B kinase β were expressed and mainly localized in the cytoplasm. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results showed the constitutive expressions of p50, p65 and Iκ Bα mRNA in the two ESCC cell lines. Furthermore, the nuclear extracts revealed that p50 and p65 translocated to the nucleus had DNA-binding activity. Finally, small interfering RNA of p65 decreased the expression of p65, and the viability of cells transfected with p65 small interfering RNA was significantly suppressed at the same concentration of 5-fluorouracil (P<0.05) compared to untransfected cells. The results of this study showed that there was the constitutively activated NF-κB signaling pathway in the ESCC cell lines. RNA interference targeting at p65 increased the sensitivity of the ESCC cell lines to 5-fluorouracil,suggesting that NF-κB might be a good target for cancer treatment.

  3. Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor in non-small cell lung cancer cells: the effect of combining RNA interference with tyrosine kinase inhibitors or cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Gang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a validated therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, current single agent receptor targeting does not achieve a maximal therapeutic effect, and some mutations confer resistance to current available agents. In the current study we have examined, in different NSCLC cell lines, the combined effect of RNA interference targeting the EGFR mRNA, and inactivation of EGFR signaling using different receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs or a monoclonal antibody cetuximab. Methods NSCLC cells (cell lines HCC827, H292, H358, H1650, and H1975 were transfected with EGFR siRNA and/or treated with the TKIs gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib, and/or with the monoclonal antibody cetuximab. The reduction of EGFR mRNA expression was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. The down-regulation of EGFR protein expression was measured by western blot, and the proliferation, viability, caspase3/7 activity, and apoptotic morphology were monitored by spectrophotometry, fluorimetry, and fluorescence microscopy. The combined effect of EGFR siRNA and different drugs was evaluated using a combination index. Results EGFR-specific siRNA strongly inhibited EGFR protein expression almost equally in all cell lines and inhibited cell growth and induced cell apoptosis in all NSCLC cell lines studied, albeit with a different magnitude. The effects on growth obtained with siRNA was strikingly different from the effects obtained with TKIs. The effects of siRNA probably correlate with the overall oncogenic significance of the receptor, which is only partly inhibited by the TKIs. The cells which showed weak response to TKIs, such as the H1975 cell line containing the T790M resistance mutation, were found to be responsive to siRNA knockdown of EGFR, as were cell lines with downstream TKI resistance mutations. The cell line HCC827, harboring an exon 19 deletion mutation, was more than 10-fold

  4. Small interfering RNA targeting ILK inhibits metastasis in human tongue cancer cells through repression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Yu [College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Laboratory of Forensic Medicine and Biomedical Information, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Qi, Jin [The Affiliated Hospital of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University (China); Deng, Shixiong [College of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Laboratory of Forensic Medicine and Biomedical Information, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wang, Cheng [Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Zhang, Luyu [Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Chen, Junxia, E-mail: chjunxia@126.com [Molecular Medicine and Cancer Research Center, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2013-08-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase. Accumulating evidences suggest that ILK are involved in cell–matrix interactions, cell proliferation, invasion, migration, angiogenesis and Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. EMT has been postulated as a prerequisite for metastasis. The reports have demonstrated that EMT was implicated in metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, here we further postulate that ILK might participate in EMT of tongue cancer. We showed that ILK siRNA inhibited EMT with low N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as high E-cadherin expression in vivo and in vitro. We found that knockdown of ILK inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion as well as changed cell morphology. We also demonstrated that ILK siRNA inhibited phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets Akt and GSK3β as well as reduced expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Furthermore, we found that the tongue tumor with high metastasis capability showed higher ILK, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as lower E-cadherin expression in clinical specimens. Finally, ILK siRNA led to the suppression for tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. Our findings suggest that ILK could be a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for tongue cancer. Highlights: • ILK siRNA influences cell morphology, cell cycle, migration and invasion. • ILK siRNA affects the expression of proteins associated with EMT. • ILK expression is related to EMT in clinical human tongue tumors. • ILK siRNA inhibits metastasis of the tongue cancer cells through suppressing EMT.

  5. Tumor invasion and metastasis regulated by microRNA-184 and microRNA-574-5p in small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Rui; Zhou, Xiaoshu; Yin, Zhongyuan; GUO, Jing; Hu, Ting; Jiang, Shun; Liu, Li; DONG, XIAORONG; Zhang, Sheng; Wu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive neuroendocrine tumor that has an extremely poor clinical prognosis. Metastasis is the key event in SCLC progression, but its mechanism has not been fully elucidated. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been proven to participate in cancer processes, but their function in SCLC has not been thoroughly studied either. Here, we performed microarray and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysesto identify the miRNAsassociated with metastasis and prognos...

  6. A versatile method to design stem-loop primer-based quantitative PCR assays for detecting small regulatory RNA molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Czimmerer

    Full Text Available Short regulatory RNA-s have been identified as key regulators of gene expression in eukaryotes. They have been involved in the regulation of both physiological and pathological processes such as embryonal development, immunoregulation and cancer. One of their relevant characteristics is their high stability, which makes them excellent candidates for use as biomarkers. Their number is constantly increasing as next generation sequencing methods reveal more and more details of their synthesis. These novel findings aim for new detection methods for the individual short regulatory RNA-s in order to be able to confirm the primary data and characterize newly identified subtypes in different biological conditions. We have developed a flexible method to design RT-qPCR assays that are very sensitive and robust. The newly designed assays were tested extensively in samples from plant, mouse and even human formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues. Moreover, we have shown that these assays are able to quantify endogenously generated shRNA molecules. The assay design method is freely available for anyone who wishes to use a robust and flexible system for the quantitative analysis of matured regulatory RNA-s.

  7. Suppression of non-small cell lung tumor development by the let-7 microRNA family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.S. Kumar (Madhu); S.J. Erkeland (Stefan); R.E. Pester (Ryan); C.Y. Chen (Cindy); M.S. Ebert (Margaret); P.A. Sharp (Phillip); T. Jacks (Tyler)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractMany microRNAs (miRNAs) target mRNAs involved in processes aberrant in tumorigenesis, such as proliferation, survival, and differentiation. In particular, the let-7 miRNA family has been proposed to function in tumor suppression, because reduced expression of let-7 family members is comm

  8. A Small Indel Mutant Mouse Model of Epidermolytic Palmoplantar Keratoderma and Its Application to Mutant-specific shRNA Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Ya-Su; Shi, Pei-Liang; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Tang, Yue-Xiao; Wang, Yan-Fang; Liu, Rong-Rong; Luan, Xiao-Rui; Fang, Yu; Mei, Ru-Huan; Du, Zhen-Fang; Ke, Hai-Ping; Matro, Erik; Li, Ling-En; Lin, Zhao-Yu; Zhao, Jing; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Ning

    2016-03-22

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is a relatively common autosomal-dominant skin disorder caused by mutations in the keratin 9 gene (KRT9), with few therapeutic options for the affected so far. Here, we report a knock-in transgenic mouse model that carried a small insertion-deletion (indel) mutant of Krt9, c.434delAinsGGCT (p.Tyr144delinsTrpLeu), corresponding to the human mutation KRT9/c.500delAinsGGCT (p.Tyr167delinsTrpLeu), which resulted in a human EPPK-like phenotype in the weight-stress areas of the fore- and hind-paws of both Krt9(+/mut) and Krt9(mut/mut) mice. The phenotype confirmed that EPPK is a dominant-negative condition, such that mice heterozygotic for the K9-mutant allele (Krt9(+/mut)) showed a clear EPPK-like phenotype. Then, we developed a mutant-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) therapy for EPPK mice. Mutant-specific shRNAs were systematically identified in vitro using a luciferase reporter gene assay and delivered into Krt9(+/mut) mice. shRNA-mediated knockdown of mutant protein resulted in almost normal morphology and functions of the skin, whereas the same shRNA had a negligible effect in wild-type K9 mice. Our results suggest that EPPK can be treated by gene therapy, and this has significant implications for future clinical application.

  9. Identification of a long non-coding RNA gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor opposite strand, which stimulates cell migration in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Eliza J; Seim, Inge; Pauli, Jana P; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Thomas, Patrick B; Carter, Shea L; Walpole, Carina M; Fung, Jenny N T; Josh, Peter; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2013-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in non‑small cell lung cancer tumourigenesis are largely unknown; however, recent studies have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are likely to play a role. In this study, we used public databases to identify an mRNA-like, candidate long non-coding RNA, GHSROS (GHSR opposite strand), transcribed from the antisense strand of the ghrelin receptor gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed higher expression of GHSROS in lung cancer tissue compared to adjacent, non-tumour lung tissue. In common with many long non-coding RNAs, GHSROS is 5' capped and 3' polyadenylated (mRNA-like), lacks an extensive open reading frame and harbours a transposable element. Engineered overexpression of GHSROS stimulated cell migration in the A549 and NCI-H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, but suppressed cell migration in the Beas-2B normal lung-derived bronchoepithelial cell line. This suggests that GHSROS function may be dependent on the oncogenic context. The identification of GHSROS, which is expressed in lung cancer and stimulates cell migration in lung cancer cell lines, contributes to the growing number of non-coding RNAs that play a role in the regulation of tumourigenesis and metastatic cancer progression.

  10. Highly Efficient Transfection of Small Interfering RNA into Murine Primary Chondrocytes via Optimized Electroporation%电穿孔法介导 siRNA 高效转染小鼠原代软骨细胞

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘安军; 麻献华; 杨瑞; 高琳; 陈李斌佶; 章卫平; 谢志芳

    2015-01-01

    目的:建立小鼠原代软骨细胞高效电转siRNA的方法。方法常规分离得到的小鼠原代软骨细胞继续用链丝菌蛋白酶消化3h,然后应用高效电转缓冲液和优化的电转参数转染pCMV-EGFP表达质粒或siRNA,用台盼蓝检测细胞存活率;转染后48h分析转染效率和siRNA靶分子的mRNA和蛋白表达水平。结果电穿孔后原代软骨细胞的存活率>80%,质粒的转染效率达到37.3%±5.2%;siRNA靶分子的mRNA和蛋白表达水平分别下调了75%和66%。结论成功建立了通过电穿孔介导siRNA转染小鼠原代软骨细胞的方法,达到了很好的基因沉默效果且保持了较高的细胞存活率。%Objective To develop an efficient and reliable method to transfect murine primary chondrocytes with small interfering RNA ( siRNA) by electroporation.Methods Murine primary chondrocytes were isolated and treated with pronase for 3 hours.The cells were then electroporated with either pCMV-EGFP plasmid or siRNA using a high performance electroporation buffer and optimized condi-tions.Cell viability was determined by trypan blue.The transfection efficiency and expression levels of siRNA-targeted gene were evalua-ted 48 hours post-electroporation.Results By using proper electroporation condition, 37.3%±5.2%of cells were transfected by the plasmid with high cellular viability (>80%) .Transfection of siRNA using the same electroporation resulted in effective down-regulation of its targeted gene expression at both mRNA and protein levels (75% and 66% decrease, respectively).Conclusion Transfection of murine primary chondrocytes with siRNA in this optimized electroporation condition was successful and resulted in effective gene silencing and high cellular viability.

  11. Discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor of human DDX3 specifically designed to target the RNA binding site: towards the next generation HIV-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marco; Falchi, Federico; Garbelli, Anna; Samuele, Alberta; Bernardo, Vincenzo; Paolucci, Stefania; Baldanti, Fausto; Schenone, Silvia; Manetti, Fabrizio; Maga, Giovanni; Botta, Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Efficacy of currently approved anti-HIV drugs is hampered by mutations of the viral enzymes, leading invariably to drug resistance and chemotherapy failure. Recent data suggest that cellular co-factors also represent useful targets for anti-HIV therapy. Here we describe the identification of the first small molecules specifically designed to inhibit the HIV-1 replication by targeting the RNA binding site of the human DEAD-Box RNA helicase DDX3. Optimization of a easily synthetically accessible hit (1) identified by application of a high-throughput docking approach afforded the promising compounds 6 and 8 which proved to inhibit both the helicase and ATPase activity of DDX3 and to reduce the viral load of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) infected with HIV-1.

  12. Resistance mechanisms to erlotinib in the non-small cell lung cancer cell line, HCC827 examined by RNA-seq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine; Alcaraz, Nicolas; Ditzel, Henrik

    Background: Erlotinib, an EGFR selective reversible inhibitor, has dramatically changed the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as approximately 70% of patients show significant tumor regression upon treatment. However, all patients eventually relapse due to development of acquired...... resistance, which in 43-50% of cases is caused by a secondary mutation (T790M) in EGFR, and in 5-15% of cases is caused by MET amplification. However, a majority of resistance cases are still unexplained. Consequently, our aim was to identify novel resistance mechanisms – and potentially new drug targets...... - in erlotinib-resistant subclones of the NSCLC cell line HCC827. Materials & Methods: We established 3 erlotinib-resistant subclones (resistant to 10, 20, 30 µM erlotinib, respectively), and prepared cDNA libraries of purified RNA from biological duplicates using TruSeq® Stranded Total RNA Ribo-Zero™ Gold...

  13. 微小RNA与卵巢癌的发病机制研究进展%Small RNA research progress and the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪春年; 王红卫; 李征

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA (miRNAs) as a short chain, non-coding RNA transcription is the important regulatory factors in the regulation of network. Studies have shown that miRNAs play important roles in the formation and progress of ovarian cancer, may become the new target for ovarian cancer treatment. This paper summarize the miRNAs in its role in the development of ovarian cancer.%微小RNA(miRNAs)作为一种短链非编码RNA,是转录后调控网络中重要的调控因子。研究表明miRNAs在卵巢癌形成与进展中发挥着重要作用,可能成为卵巢癌治疗的新靶点。本文就近年来miRNAs在卵巢癌发生发展中的作用做一综述。

  14. Establishing a Markerless Genetic Exchange System for Methanosarcina mazei Strain Gö1 for Constructing Chromosomal Mutants of Small RNA Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ehlers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A markerless genetic exchange system was successfully established in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 using the hpt gene coding for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. First, a chromosomal deletion mutant of the hpt gene was generated conferring resistance to the purine analog 8-aza-2,6-diaminopurine (8-ADP. The nonreplicating allelic exchange vector (pRS345 carrying the pac-resistance cassette for direct selection of chromosomal integration, and the hpt gene for counterselection was introduced into this strain. By a pop-in and ultimately pop-out event of the plasmid from the chromosome, allelic exchange is enabled. Using this system, we successfully generated a M. mazei deletion mutant of the gene encoding the regulatory non-coding RNA sRNA154. Characterizing M. mazei Δ154 under nitrogen limiting conditions demonstrated differential expression of at least three cytoplasmic proteins and reduced growth strongly arguing for a prominent role of sRNA154 in regulation of nitrogen fixation by posttranscriptional regulation.

  15. Silencing of focal adhesion kinase by tumor direct injection of small interfering RNA decreases in vivo tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Kae; Yamaura, Takeshi; Nakajima, Motowo; Honda, Toshiyuki; Kasaoka, Tatsuhiko

    2009-07-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is shown to be frequently correlated with malignancy of the tumor and poor prognosis of the diseases.Because FAK resides immediately downstream of the interaction of cell surface adhesion molecules and extracellular matricies, it is considered to be critical to regulate several cellular processes including growth, differentiation, adhesion, motility and apoptosis. However, the studies on the role of FAK related to cell proliferation have been limited even in vitro. Here, in order to validate the role of FAK in in vivo tumor formation and proliferation, we employed direct intratumoral injection of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting FAK with cationic liposome. Using shRNAs targeting FAK selected from the constructed shRNA library for FAK and by optimization of in vivo delivery conditions, we demonstrated different patterns of the association of FAK inhibition with in vivo tumor formation/proliferation inhibition in two models, PC3M heterotopic xenograft and 4T1 orthotopic syngraft models. These observations indicated that the roles of FAK in tumorigenesis are different among the tumor species. In addition, we showed that ERK is the critical MAP kinase in the signaling pathway down stream of FAK in in vivo proliferation of 4T1 tumor cells.

  16. MicroRNA-429 induces tumorigenesis of human non-small cell lung cancer cells and targets multiple tumor suppressor genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Yaoguo; Xu, Shidong; Ma, Jianqun; Wu, Jun [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Jin, Shi; Cao, Shoubo [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Yu, Yan, E-mail: yuyan@hrbmu.edu.cn [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • MiR-429 expression is upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). • MiR-429 inhibits PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression. • MiR-429 promotes metastasis and proliferation. • We report important regulatory mechanisms involved in NSCLC progression. • MiR-429 is a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker. - Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer death globally. MicroRNAs are evolutionally conserved small noncoding RNAs that are critical for the regulation of gene expression. Aberrant expression of microRNA (miRNA) has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of miR-429 are often upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with normal lung tissues, and its expression level is also increased in NSCLC cell lines compared with normal lung cells. Overexpression of miR-429 in A549 NSCLC cells significantly promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas inhibition of miR-429 inhibits these effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-429 down-regulates PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression by directly targeting the 3′-untranslated region of these target genes. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-429 plays an important role in promoting the proliferation and metastasis of NSCLC cells and is a potential target for NSCLC therapy.

  17. Combining NMR and small angle X-ray and neutron scattering in the structural analysis of a ternary protein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, Janosch; Wang, Iren; Sonntag, Miriam [Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany); Gabel, Frank [Extremophiles and Large Molecular Assemblies Group (ELMA), Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) CEA-CNRS-UJF (France); Sattler, Michael, E-mail: sattler@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Institute of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Many processes in the regulation of gene expression and signaling involve the formation of protein complexes involving multi-domain proteins. Individual domains that mediate protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions are typically connected by flexible linkers, which contribute to conformational dynamics and enable the formation of complexes with distinct binding partners. Solution techniques are therefore required for structural analysis and to characterize potential conformational dynamics. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) provides such information but often only sparse data are obtained with increasing molecular weight of the complexes. It is therefore beneficial to combine NMR data with additional structural restraints from complementary solution techniques. Small angle X-ray/neutron scattering (SAXS/SANS) data can be efficiently combined with NMR-derived information, either for validation or by providing additional restraints for structural analysis. Here, we show that the combination of SAXS and SANS data can help to refine structural models obtained from data-driven docking using HADDOCK based on sparse NMR data. The approach is demonstrated with the ternary protein-protein-RNA complex involving two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of Sex-lethal, the N-terminal cold shock domain of Upstream-to-N-Ras, and msl-2 mRNA. Based on chemical shift perturbations we have mapped protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces and complemented this NMR-derived information with SAXS data, as well as SANS measurements on subunit-selectively deuterated samples of the ternary complex. Our results show that, while the use of SAXS data is beneficial, the additional combination with contrast variation in SANS data resolves remaining ambiguities and improves the docking based on chemical shift perturbations of the ternary protein-RNA complex.

  18. Small RNA sequencing-microarray analyses in Parkinson leukocytes reveal deep brain stimulation-induced and splicing changes that classify brain region transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilach eSoreq

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are key post transcriptional regulators of their multiple target genes. However, the detailed profile of miRNA expression in Parkinson's disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide and the first motor disorder has not been charted yet. Here, we report comprehensive miRNA profiling by next-generation small-RNA sequencing, combined with targets inspection by splice-junction and exon arrays interrogating leukocyte RNA in Parkinson’s disease patients before and after deep brain stimulation (DBS treatment and of matched healthy control volunteers (HC. RNA-Seq analysis identified 254 miRNAs and 79 passenger strand forms as expressed in blood leukocytes, 16 of which were modified in patients pre treatment as compared to HC. 11 miRNAs were modified following brain stimulation, 5 of which were changed inversely to the disease induced changes. Stimulation cessation further induced changes in 11 miRNAs. Transcript isoform abundance analysis yielded 332 changed isoforms in patients compared to HC, which classified brain transcriptomes of 47 PD and control independent microarrays. Functional enrichment analysis highlighted mitochondrion organization. DBS induced 155 splice changes, enriched in ubiquitin homeostasis. Cellular composition analysis revealed immune cell activity pre and post treatment. Overall, 217 disease and 74 treatment alternative isoforms were predictably targeted by modified miRNAs within both 3’ and 5’ untranslated ends and coding sequence sites. The stimulation-induced network sustained 4 miRNAs and 7 transcripts of the disease network. We believe that the presented dynamic networks provide a novel avenue for identifying disease and treatment-related therapeutic targets. Furthermore, the identification of these networks is a major step forward in the road for understanding the molecular basis for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases and assessment of the impact of brain stimulation

  19. Small RNA Sequencing Uncovers New miRNAs and moRNAs Differentially Expressed in Normal and Primary Myelofibrosis CD34+ Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Guglielmelli

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN are chronic myeloid cancers thought to arise at the level of CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. They include essential thrombocythemia (ET, polycythemia vera (PV and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. All can progress to acute leukemia, but PMF carries the worst prognosis. Increasing evidences indicate that deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs might plays an important role in hematologic malignancies, including MPN. To attain deeper knowledge of short RNAs (sRNAs expression pattern in CD34+ cells and of their possible role in mediating post-transcriptional regulation in PMF, we sequenced with Illumina HiSeq2000 technology CD34+ cells from healthy subjects and PMF patients. We detected the expression of 784 known miRNAs, with a prevalence of miRNA up-regulation in PMF samples, and discovered 34 new miRNAs and 99 new miRNA-offset RNAs (moRNAs, in CD34+ cells. Thirty-seven small RNAs were differentially expressed in PMF patients compared with healthy subjects, according to microRNA sequencing data. Five miRNAs (miR-10b-5p, miR-19b-3p, miR-29a-3p, miR-379-5p, and miR-543 were deregulated also in PMF granulocytes. Moreover, 3'-moR-128-2 resulted consistently downregulated in PMF according to RNA-seq and qRT-PCR data both in CD34+ cells and granulocytes. Target predictions of these validated small RNAs de-regulated in PMF and functional enrichment analyses highlighted many interesting pathways involved in tumor development and progression, such as signaling by FGFR and DAP12 and Oncogene Induced Senescence. As a whole, data obtained in this study deepened the knowledge of miRNAs and moRNAs altered expression in PMF CD34+ cells and allowed to identify and validate a specific small RNA profile that distinguishes PMF granulocytes from those of normal subjects. We thus provided new information regarding the possible role of miRNAs and, specifically, of new moRNAs in this disease.

  20. Effects of duration of phenytoin administration on mRNA expression of cytochrome P450 and P-glycoprotein in the liver and small intestine of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kawase

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Phenytoin (5,5-diphenylhydantoin; DPH induces expression of cytochromes P450 (CYPs. Interactions between DPH and tacrolimus suggested that the persistence of CYP induction after discontinuation of DPH is dependent on the history of administration and dosing period of DPH. However, the relationship between the duration of DPH administration and expression of CYPs in the liver and small intestine of rats is not known. Alterations in levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1; ABCB1 as well as CYPs cause drug interactions in the small intestine. We examined the effects of the duration of DPH administration on expression of CYPs and P-gp in the liver and small intestine of rats. Rats were treated with DPH (100 mg/kg, peroral (p.o. twice a day (b.d. for 2, 4, 8, and 16 d. mRNA levels of CYPs and P-gp were examined using the total RNA extracted from the liver and duodenum 2 h and 24 h after the final administration of DPH. CYP3A activities were determined using microsomes. DPH administration for 2 d and 4 d markedly increased mRNA levels of CYPs such as CYP3A1, CYP3A2, CYP2B1, and CYP2B2 in the liver. A relatively long duration of DPH administration (8 d and 16 d resulted in abolition of the induction of hepatic CYP but increased CYP3A activities were maintained. These results suggest that the duration of DPH administration could be an important determinant of hepatic CYP induction.

  1. Specific responses in rat small intestinal epithelial mRNA expression and protein levels during chemotherapeutic damage and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Verburg (Melissa); I.B. Renes (Ingrid); D.J. van Nispen; S. Ferdinandusse; M. Jorritsma; H.A. Büller (Hans); A.W.C. Einerhand (Sandra); J. Dekker (Jan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe rapidly dividing small intestinal epithelium is very sensitive to the cytostatic drug methotrexate. We investigated the regulation of epithelial gene expression in rat jejunum during methotrexate-induced damage and regeneration. Ten differentiation markers were loca

  2. Impact of CHK2-small interfering RNA on CpG ODN7909-enhanced radiosensitivity in lung cancer A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen W

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Wei Chen,* Xiaoqun Liu,* Tiankui Qiao, Sujuan Yuan Department of Oncology, Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To investigate the impact of checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2-small interfering RNA (CHK2-siRNA on the enhancement of radiosensitivity by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN 7909 in lung cancer A549 cells.Methods: The A549 cells were randomly divided into five groups: control, CpG, X-ray, CpG + X-ray, and CHK2-siRNA + CpG + X-ray. Cell colonization was observed using inverted microscopy. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. CHK2 expression was detected by Western blot. CHK2-siRNA was adopted to silence the expression of CHK2.Results: The level of CHK2 phosphorylation was higher in the CpG + X-ray group than in the X-ray group. Increases in G2/mitotic (M phase arrest and apoptosis and a decrease of cell survival rate in the CpG + X-ray group were statistically significant (P < 0.05 when compared with the CHK2-siRNA + CpG + X-ray group in which the expression of CHK2 was obviously inhibited. The combination of CpG ODN7909 and X-ray irradiation was found to enhance the mitotic death of A549 cells. The sensitization enhancement ratio of mean death dose (D0 was 1.42 in the CpG + X-ray group, which was higher than that of the CHK2-siRNA + CpG + X-ray group, in which D0 was 1.05.Conclusion: To a certain extent, the impact of a combination of CpG ODN7909 and X-ray on G2/M phase arrest, apoptosis, and rate of cell survival was attenuated by CHK2-siRNA in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, indicating that increased phosphorylation of CHK2 might be a radiosensitive pathway.Keywords: oligodeoxynucleotide, checkpoint kinase 2, mitotic death, apoptosis, X-ray

  3. Effects of Methylation of FHIT Gene on it’s Protein and mRNA Expression in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wentong; Yin, Chonggao; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Hongli

    2009-01-01

    Background and objective Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) is a new tumor suppressor gene, whose promoter methylation plays an important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study is to explore the effects of CpG island methylation on protein and mRNA expression of FHIT in non-small cell lung cancer, and the roles of FHIT gene in pathogenesis of NSCLC. Methods Methylation and protein expression and transcriptional level of FHIT gene were detected by methylationspecific PCR, Western Blot and R...

  4. Insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 mRNA expression as a prognostic marker in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Cillas, Jesus Garcia-Fon

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) has yet to be established as a biomarker in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but could prove useful in customized chemotherapy. We explored its prognostic value using both quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain.......039 and 10.9 vs. 14.3 months, p=0.038, respectively). IGF1R protein expression showed a similar, although non-significant tendency. CONCLUSION: IGF1R mRNA expression may be a prognostic biomarker in advanced NSCLC and should be investigated in a larger population....

  5. Exploring the potential of small RNA subunit and ITS sequences for resolving phylogenetic relationships within the phylum Ctenophora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simion, Paul; Bekkouche, Nicolas; Jager, Muriel; Quéinnec, Eric; Manuel, Michaël

    2015-04-01

    Ctenophores are a phylum of non-bilaterian marine (mostly planktonic) animals, characterised by several unique synapomorphies (e.g., comb rows, apical organ). Relationships between and within the nine recognised ctenophore orders are far from understood, notably due to a paucity of phylogenetically informative anatomical characters. Previous attempts to address ctenophore phylogeny using molecular data (18S rRNA) led to poorly resolved trees but demonstrated the paraphyly of the order Cydippida. Here we compiled an updated 18S rRNA data set, notably including a few newly sequenced species representing previously unsampled families (Lampeidae, Euryhamphaeidae), and we constructed an additional more rapidly evolving ITS1 + 5.8S rRNA + ITS2 alignment. These data sets were analysed separately and in combination under a probabilistic framework, using different methods (maximum likelihood, Bayesian inference) and models (e.g., doublet model to accommodate secondary structure; data partitioning). An important lesson from our exploration of these datasets is that the fast-evolving internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions are useful markers for reconstructing high-level relationships within ctenophores. Our results confirm the paraphyly of the order Cydippida (and thus a "cydippid-like" ctenophore common ancestor) and suggest that the family Mertensiidae could be the sister group of all other ctenophores. The family Lampeidae (also part of the former "Cydippida") is probably the sister group of the order Platyctenida (benthic ctenophores). The order Beroida might not be monophyletic, due to the position of Beroe abyssicola outside of a clade grouping the other Beroe species and members of the "Cydippida" family Haeckeliidae. Many relationships (e.g. between Pleurobrachiidae, Beroida, Cestida, Lobata, Thalassocalycida) remain unresolved. Future progress in understanding ctenophore phylogeny will come from the use of additional rapidly evolving markers and improvement of

  6. Complete modification maps for the cytosolic small and large subunit rRNAs of Euglena gracilis: functional and evolutionary implications of contrasting patterns between the two rRNA components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnare, Murray N; Gray, Michael W

    2011-10-14

    In the protist Euglena gracilis, the cytosolic small subunit (SSU) rRNA is a single, covalently continuous species typical of most eukaryotes; in contrast, the large subunit (LSU) rRNA is naturally fragmented, comprising 14 separate RNA molecules instead of the bipartite (28S+5.8S) eukaryotic LSU rRNA typically seen. We present extensively revised secondary structure models of the E. gracilis SSU and LSU rRNAs and have mapped the positions of all of the modified nucleosides in these rRNAs (88 in SSU rRNA and 262 in LSU rRNA, with only 3 LSU rRNA modifications incompletely characterized). The relative proportions of ribose-methylated nucleosides and pseudouridine (∼60% and ∼35%, respectively) are closely similar in the two rRNAs; however, whereas the Euglena SSU rRNA has about the same absolute number of modifications as its human counterpart, the Euglena LSU rRNA has twice as many modifications as the corresponding human LSU rRNA. The increased levels of rRNA fragmentation and modification in E. gracilis LSU rRNA are correlated with a 3-fold increase in the level of mispairing in helical regions compared to the human LSU rRNA. In contrast, no comparable increase in mispairing is seen in helical regions of the SSU rRNA compared to its homologs in other eukaryotes. In view of the reported effects of both ribose-methylated nucleoside and pseudouridine residues on RNA structure, these correlations lead us to suggest that increased modification in the LSU rRNA may play a role in stabilizing a 'looser' structure promoted by elevated helical mispairing and a high degree of fragmentation.

  7. A small RNA mediated regulation of a stress-activated retrotransposon and the tissue specific transposition during the reproductive period in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eMatsunaga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs are key elements that facilitate genome evolution of the host organism. A number of studies have assessed the functions of TEs, which change gene expression in the host genome. Activation of TEs is controlled by epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation and histone modifications. Several recent studies have reported that TEs can also be activated by biotic or abiotic stress in some plants. We focused on a Ty1/copia retrotransposon, ONSEN, that is activated by heat stress in Arabidopsis. We found that transcriptional activation of ONSEN was regulated by an siRNA-related pathway, and the activation could also be induced by oxidative stress. Mutants deficient in small interfering RNA (siRNA biogenesis that were exposed to heat stress at the initial stages of vegetative growth showed transgenerational transposition. The transposition was also detected in the progeny, which originated from tissue that had differentiated after exposure to the heat stress. The results indicated that in some undifferentiated cells, transpositional activity could be maintained quite long after exposure to the heat stress.

  8. Development and application of small-subunit rRNA probes for assessment of selected Thiobacillus species and members of the genus Acidiphilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccia, J; Marchand, E A; Silverstein, J; Hernandez, M

    2000-07-01

    Culture-dependent studies have implicated sulfur-oxidizing bacteria as the causative agents of acid mine drainage and concrete corrosion in sewers. Thiobacillus species are considered the major representatives of the acid-producing bacteria in these environments. Small-subunit rRNA genes from all of the Thiobacillus and Acidiphilium species catalogued by the Ribosomal Database Project were identified and used to design oligonucleotide DNA probes. Two oligonucleotide probes were synthesized to complement variable regions of 16S rRNA in the following acidophilic bacteria: Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and T. thiooxidans (probe Thio820) and members of the genus Acidiphilium (probe Acdp821). Using (32)P radiolabels, probe specificity was characterized by hybridization dissociation temperature (T(d)) with membrane-immobilized RNA extracted from a suite of 21 strains representing three groups of bacteria. Fluorochrome-conjugated probes were evaluated for use with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at the experimentally determined T(d)s. FISH was used to identify and enumerate bacteria in laboratory reactors and environmental samples. Probing of laboratory reactors inoculated with a mixed culture of acidophilic bacteria validated the ability of the oligonucleotide probes to track specific cell numbers with time. Additionally, probing of sediments from an active acid mine drainage site in Colorado demonstrated the ability to identify numbers of active bacteria in natural environments that contain high concentrations of metals, associated precipitates, and other mineral debris.

  9. Cross-talk between a regulatory small RNA, cyclic-di-GMP signalling and flagellar regulator FlhDC for virulence and bacterial behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaochen; Khokhani, Devanshi; Wu, Xiaogang; Yang, Fenghuan; Biener, Gabriel; Koestler, Benjamin J; Raicu, Valerica; He, Chenyang; Waters, Christopher M; Sundin, George W; Tian, Fang; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Dickeya dadantii is a globally dispersed phytopathogen which causes diseases on a wide range of host plants. This pathogen utilizes the type III secretion system (T3SS) to suppress host defense responses, and secretes pectate lyase (Pel) to degrade the plant cell wall. Although the regulatory small RNA (sRNA) RsmB, cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) and flagellar regulator have been reported to affect the regulation of these two virulence factors or multiple cell behaviours such as motility and biofilm formation, the linkage between these regulatory components that coordinate the cell behaviours remain unclear. Here, we revealed a sophisticated regulatory network that connects the sRNA, c-di-GMP signalling and flagellar master regulator FlhDC. We propose multi-tiered regulatory mechanisms that link the FlhDC to the T3SS through three distinct pathways including the FlhDC-FliA-YcgR3937 pathway; the FlhDC-EcpC-RpoN-HrpL pathway; and the FlhDC-rsmB-RsmA-HrpL pathway. Among these, EcpC is the most dominant factor for FlhDC to positively regulate T3SS expression.

  10. Genetic variation in a microRNA-502 minding site in SET8 gene confers clinical outcome of non-small cell lung cancer in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic variants may influence microRNA-target interaction through modulate their binding affinity, creating or destroying miRNA-binding sites. SET8, a member of the SET domain-containing methyltransferase, has been implicated in a variety array of biological processes. METHODS: Using Taqman assay, we genotyped a polymorphism rs16917496 T>C within the miR-502 binding site in the 3'-untranslated region of the SET8 gene in 576 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Functions of rs16917496 were investigated using luciferase activity assay and validated by immunostaining. RESULTS: Log-rank test and cox regression indicated that the CC genotype was associated with a longer survival and a reduced risk of death for NSCLC [58.0 vs. 41.0 months, P = 0.031; hazard ratio = 0.44, 95% confidential interval: 0.26-0.74]. Further stepwise regression analysis suggested rs16917496 was an independently favorable factor for prognosis and the protective effect more prominent in never smokers, patients without diabetes and patients who received chemotherapy. A significant interaction was observed between rs16917496 and smoking status in relation to NSCLC survival (PC located at miR-502 binding site contributes to NSCLC survival by altering SET8 expression through modulating miRNA-target interaction.

  11. Down-regulation of STAT3 expression by vector-based small interfering RNA inhibits pancreatic cancer growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Huang; Guang Yang; Tao Jiang; Jun Cao; Ke-Jian Huang; Zheng-Jun Qiu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of RNA interference (RNAi) mediated silence of signal transduction and activation of transcription (STAT)3 on the growth of human pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo . METHODS: STAT3 specific shRNA was used to silence the expression of STAT3 in pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. The anti-growth effects of RNAi against STAT3 were studied in vitro and in experimental cancer xenografts in nude mice. The potential pathways involved in STAT3 signaling were detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. RESULTS: The expression of the STAT3 was inhibited using RNAi in SW1990 cells. RNAi against STAT3 inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis and significantly reduced the levels of CyclinD1 and Bcl-xL when compared with parental and control vector-transfected cells. In vivo experiments showed that RNAi against STAT3 inhibited the tumorigenicity of SW1990 cells and significantly suppressed tumor growth when it was directly injected into tumors. CONCLUSION: STAT3 signaling pathway plays an important role in the progression of pancreatic cancer, and silence of STAT3 gene using RNAi technique may be a novel therapeutic option for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  12. In vivo effects of the Epstein-Barr virus small RNA EBER-1 on protein synthesis and cell growth regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Kenneth G; Elia, Androulla; Jeffrey, Ian; Matys, Volker; Tilleray, Vivienne J; Souberbielle, Bernard; Clemens, Michael J

    2002-06-05

    Recent studies have suggested a role for the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA EBER-1 in malignant transformation. EBER-1 inhibits the activity of the protein kinase PKR, an inhibitor of protein synthesis with tumour suppressor properties. In human 293 cells and murine embryonic fibroblasts, transient expression of EBER-1 promoted total protein synthesis and enhanced the expression of cotransfected reporter genes. However reporter gene expression was stimulated equally well in cells from control and PKR knockout mice. NIH 3T3 cells stably expressing EBER-1 exhibited a greatly increased frequency of colony formation in soft agar, and protein synthesis in these cells was relatively resistant to inhibition by the calcium ionophore A23187. Nevertheless clones containing a high concentration of EBER-1 were not invariably tumourigenic. We conclude that EBER-1 can enhance protein synthesis by a PKR-independent mechanism and that, although this RNA may contribute to the oncogenic potential of Epstein-Barr virus, its expression is not always sufficient for malignant transformation.

  13. Identification and characterization of small molecules that inhibit nonsense-mediated RNA decay and suppress nonsense p53 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Leenus; Grigoryan, Arsen; Wang, Ding; Wang, Jinhua; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Cardozo, Timothy; Gardner, Lawrence B

    2014-06-01

    Many of the gene mutations found in genetic disorders, including cancer, result in premature termination codons (PTC) and the rapid degradation of their mRNAs by nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD). We used virtual library screening, targeting a pocket in the SMG7 protein, a key component of the NMD mechanism, to identify compounds that disrupt the SMG7-UPF1 complex and inhibit NMD. Several of these compounds upregulated NMD-targeted mRNAs at nanomolar concentrations, with minimal toxicity in cell-based assays. As expected, pharmacologic NMD inhibition disrupted SMG7-UPF1 interactions. When used in cells with PTC-mutated p53, pharmacologic NMD inhibition combined with a PTC "read-through" drug led to restoration of full-length p53 protein, upregulation of p53 downstream transcripts, and cell death. These studies serve as proof-of-concept that pharmacologic NMD inhibitors can restore mRNA integrity in the presence of PTC and can be used as part of a strategy to restore full-length protein in a variety of genetic diseases.

  14. Identification and characterization of small molecules that inhibit nonsense mediated RNA decay and suppress nonsense p53 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Leenus; Grigoryan, Arsen; Wang, Ding; Wang, Jinhua; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Cardozo, Timothy; Gardner, Lawrence B.

    2014-01-01

    Many of the gene mutations found in genetic disorders, including cancer, result in premature termination codons (PTCs) and the rapid degradation of their mRNAs by nonsense mediated RNA decay (NMD). We used virtual library screening (VLS) targeting a pocket in the SMG7 protein, a key component of the NMD mechanism, to identify compounds that disrupt the SMG7-UPF1 complex and inhibit NMD. Several of these compounds upregulated NMD targeted mRNAs at nanomolar concentrations with minimal toxicity in cell based assays. As expected, pharmacological NMD inhibition disrupted SMG7-UPF1 interactions. When used in cells with PTC mutated p53, pharmacological NMD inhibition combined with a PTC “read-through” drug led to restoration of full-length p53 protein, upregulation of p53 downstream transcripts, and cell death. These studies serve as proof-of-concept that pharmacological NMD inhibitors can restore mRNA integrity in the presence of PTC and be used as part of a strategy to restore full length protein in a variety of genetic diseases. PMID:24662918

  15. Small interfering RNA against transcription factor STAT6 leads to increased cholesterol synthesis in lung cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richa Dubey

    Full Text Available STAT6 transcription factor has become a potential molecule for therapeutic intervention because it regulates broad range of cellular processes in a large variety of cell types. Although some target genes and interacting partners of STAT6 have been identified, its exact mechanism of action needs to be elucidated. In this study, we sought to further characterize the molecular interactions, networks, and functions of STAT6 by profiling the mRNA expression of STAT6 silenced human lung cells (NCI-H460 using microarrays. Our analysis revealed 273 differentially expressed genes after STAT6 silencing. Analysis of the gene expression data with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA software revealed Gene expression, Cell death, Lipid metabolism as the functions associated with highest rated network. Cholesterol biosynthesis was among the most enriched pathways in IPA as well as in PANTHER analysis. These results have been validated by real-time PCR and cholesterol assay using scrambled siRNA as a negative control. Similar findings were also observed with human type II pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells, A549. In the present study we have, for the first time, shown the inverse relationship of STAT6 with the cholesterol biosynthesis in lung cancer cells. The present findings are potentially significant to advance the understanding and design of therapeutics for the pathological conditions where both STAT6 and cholesterol biosynthesis are implicated viz. asthma, atherosclerosis etc.

  16. Identification of Small Molecule Inhibitors of microRNA Involved in Chemoresistance and Cancer Stem Cells for Ovarian Cancer Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    EB, Cheng JQ. IKBKE is induced by STAT3 and tobacco carcinogen and determines chemosensitivity in non-small cell lung cancer. Oncogene, 32:151-9...study. AACR 103 Annual Meeting, 2012. 11 4. Guo JP, Kim D, Kurtyka C, Chen H, Wu D, Mittal A, Cheng JQ. IKBKE is induced by STAT3 and tobacco ... carcinogen and determines chemosensitivity in non-small cell lung cancer. AACR 103 Annual Meeting, 2012. 5. Kim D, Guo JP, Gao J, Yu C, Park J, Coppola D

  17. High Throughput Sequencing of Entamoeba 27nt Small RNA Population Reveals Role in Permanent Gene Silencing But No Effect on Regulating Gene Expression Changes during Stage Conversion, Oxidative, or Heat Shock Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanbang; Ehrenkaufer, Gretchen M; Manna, Dipak; Hall, Neil; Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    The human parasite Entamoeba histolytica has an active RNA interference (RNAi) pathway with an extensive repertoire of 27nt small RNAs that silence genes. However the role of this pathway in regulating amebic biology remains unknown. In this study, we address whether silencing via 27nt small RNAs may be a mechanism for controlling gene expression changes during conversion between the trophozoite and cyst stages of the parasite. We sequenced small RNA libraries generated from trophozoites, early cysts, mature cysts, and excysting cells and mapped them to the E. invadens genome. Our results show that, as in E. histolytica, small RNAs in E. invadens are largely ~27nt in length, have an unusual 5'-polyphosphate structure and mediate gene silencing. However, when comparing the libraries from each developmental time-point we found few changes in the composition of the small RNA populations. Furthermore, genes targeted by small RNAs were permanently silenced with no changes in transcript abundance during development. Thus, the E. invadens 27nt small RNA population does not mediate gene expression changes during development. In order to assess the generalizability of our observations, we examined whether small RNAs may be regulating gene expression changes during stress response in E. histolytica. Comparison of the 27nt small RNA populations from E. histolytica trophozoites from basal conditions, or after heat shock or exposure to oxidative stress showed few differences. Similar to data in E. invadens development, genes targeted by small RNAs were consistently silenced and did not change expression under tested stress conditions. Thus, the biological roles of the 27nt small RNA population in Entamoeba remain elusive. However, as the first characterization of the RNAi pathway in E. invadens these data serve as a useful resource for the study of Entamoeba development and open the door to the development of RNAi-based gene silencing tools in E. invadens.

  18. Small molecules that interact with RNA: riboswitch-based gene control and its involvement in metabolic regulation in plants and algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocobza, Samuel E; Aharoni, Asaph

    2014-08-01

    Riboswitches are RNA elements that bind small molecules and in turn regulate gene expression. This mechanism allows the cell to sense the intracellular concentration of these small molecules. A particular riboswitch typically regulates its adjacent gene by altering the transcription, the translation or the splicing of this gene. Recently, a riboswitch that binds thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) was characterized and found to regulate thiamin biosynthesis in plants and algae. Furthermore, it appears that this element is an essential regulator of primary metabolism in plants. Manipulation of endogenous riboswitch activity resulted in metabolic phenotypes that underlined the role of these elements and their ligands in preserving metabolic homeostasis. This situation supports the hypothesis that riboswitches could be remnants of the most ancient metabolic regulators. Here, we review the mode of action of the plant and algal TPP riboswitch and its relevance to the metabolic network. We also discuss the potential engineering of riboswitches as metabolite sensors in plants and platforms for gene control. Whether additional such RNA-based mechanisms exist in plants and in algae is still an open question, yet, the importance of these elements to metabolic regulation is beyond doubt.

  19. Silencing tumor necrosis factor-alpha in vitro from small interfering RNA-decorated titanium nanotube array can facilitate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenlin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Dawei; Zhuo, Mengchuan; Cheng, Jiwei; Xu, Xingping; Xing, Yongming; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are known for their bone bonding ability. However, the osseointegration may be severely disturbed in the inflammation environment. In order to enhance osseointegration of the implant in an inflamed environment, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was used to functionalize titanium surface for gene silencing. The chitosan-tripolyphosphate-hyaluronate complexes were used to formulate nanoparticles (NPs) with siRNA, which were adsorbed directly by the anodized titanium surface. The surface characterization was analyzed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy, as well as contact angle measurement. The fluorescence microscope was used to monitor the degradation of the layer. The coculture system was established with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown directly on functionalized titanium surface and RAW264.7 cells (preactivated by lipopolysaccharide) grown upside in a transwell chamber. The transfection and knockdown efficiency of TNF-α in RAW264.7 cells were determined by fluorescence microscope, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cytoskeleton and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were also analyzed. Regular vertical aligned nanotubes (~100 nm diameter and ~300 nm length) were generated after anodization of polished titanium. After loading with NPs, the nanotubes were filled and covered by a layer of amorphous particles. The surface topography changed and wettability decreased after covering with NPs. As expected, a burst degradation of the film was observed, which could provide sufficient NPs in the released supernatant and result in transfection and knockdown effects in RAW264.7 cells. The cytoskeleton arrangement of MSCs was elongated and the osteogenic differentiation was also significantly improved on NPs loading surface. In conclusion, the siRNA decorated titanium implant could simultaneously suppress inflammation and improve

  20. Comparison of PCR-based detection of chromogranin A mRNA with traditional histological lymph node staging of small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Ben

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate neuroendocrine neoplasia (NEN staging is vital for determining prognosis and therapeutic strategy. The great majority of NENs express chromogranin A (CgA which can be detected at a protein or transcript level. The current standards for lymph node metastasis detection are histological examination after Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E and CgA immunohistochemical (IHC staining. We hypothesized that detection of CgA mRNA transcripts would be a more sensitive method of detecting these metastases. Findings We compared these traditional methods with PCR for CgA mRNA extracted from formalin fixed paraffin embedded slides of lymph nodes (n = 196 from small intestinal NENs, other gastrointestinal cancers and benign gastrointestinal disease. CgA PCR detected significantly more NEN lymph nodes (75% than H&E (53% or CgA IHC (57% (p = 0.02. PCR detected CgA mRNA in 50% (14 of the 28 of SI-NEN lymph nodes previously considered negative. The false positive rate for detection of CgA mRNA was 19% in non-neuroendocrine cancers, and appeared to be due to occult neuroendocrine differentiation or contamination by normal epithelium during histological processing. Conclusions Molecular pathological analysis demonstrates the limitations of observer-dependent histopathology. CgA PCR analysis detected the presence of CgA transcripts in lymph nodes without histological evidence of tumor metastasis. Molecular node positivity (stage molN1 of SI-NEN lymph nodes could confer greater staging accuracy and facilitate early and accurate therapeutic intervention. This technique warrants investigation using clinically annotated tumor samples with follow-up data.

  1. Streptococcus suis small RNA rss04 contributes to the induction of meningitis by regulating capsule synthesis and by inducing biofilm formation in a mouse infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Genhui; Tang, Huanyu; Zhang, Shouming; Ren, Haiyan; Dai, Jiao; Lai, Liying; Lu, Chengping; Yao, Huochun; Fan, Hongjie; Wu, Zongfu

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is an important pathogen for pigs, and it is also considered as a zoonotic agent for humans. Meningitis is one of the most common features of the infection caused by SS, but little is known about the mechanisms of SS meningitis. Recent studies have revealed that small RNAs (sRNAs) have emerged as key regulators of the virulence in several bacteria. In the previous study, we reported that SS sRNA rss04 was up-regulated in pig cerebrospinal fluid and contributes to SS virulence in a zebrafish infection model. Here, we show that rss04 facilitates SS invasion of mouse brain and lung in vivo. Label-free quantitation mass spectrometry analysis revealed that rss04 regulates transcriptional regulator CcpA and several virulence factors including LuxS. Transmission electron microscope and Dot-blot analyses indicated that rss04 represses capsular polysaccharide (CPS) production, which in turn facilitates SS adherence and invasion of mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells bEnd.3 in vitro and activates the mRNA expression of TLR2, CCL2, IL-6 and TNF-α in mouse brain in vivo at 12h post-infection. In addition, rss04 positively regulates SS biofilm formation. Survival analysis of infected mice showed that biofilm state in brain contributes to SS virulence by intracranial subarachnoidal route of infection. Together, our data reveal that SS sRNA rss04 contributes to the induction of meningitis by regulating the CPS synthesis and by inducing biofilm formation, thereby increasing the virulence in a mouse infection model. To our knowledge, rss04 represents the first bacterial sRNA that plays definitive roles in bacterial meningitis.

  2. Small regulatory RNAs of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway as a prophylactic treatment against fish pathogenic viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Hajiabadi, Seyed Amir Hossein Jalali; Kristensen, Lasse Bøgelund Juel;

    2011-01-01

    . The mechanism can be programmed with several types of small double stranded RNAs - the type of which defines the destiny of the target. One such class of regulatory RNAs called microRNAs are upregulated due to various physiological responses of the cell and they suppress many genes simultaneously believed...

  3. Small interfering RNA targeting mcl-1 enhances proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis in various solid malignant tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Wei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeting the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a promising approach for anticancer strategies. Recently, we found Bik accumulation in cancer cell lines after they were treated with bortezomib. However, recent evidence indicates that proteasome inhibitors may also induce the accumulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. The current study was designed to analyze the levels of several anti-apoptotic members of Bcl-2 family in different human cancer cell lines after they were treated with proteasome inhibitors. Methods Different human cancer cell lines were treated with proteasome inhibitors. Western blot were used to investigate the expression of Mcl-1 and activation of mitochondrial apoptotic signaling. Cell viability was investigated using SRB assay, and induction of apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry. Results We found elevated Mcl-1 level in human colon cancer cell lines DLD1, LOVO, SW620, and HCT116; human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3; and human lung cancer cell line H1299, but not in human breast cancer cell line MCF7 after they were treated with bortezomib. This dramatic Mcl-1 accumulation was also observed when cells were treated with other two proteasome inhibitors, MG132 and calpain inhibitor I (ALLN. Moreover, our results showed Mcl-1 accumulation was caused by stabilization of the protein against degradation. Reducing Mcl-1 accumulation by Mcl-1 siRNA reduced Mcl-1 accumulation and enhanced proteasome inhibitor-induced cell death and apoptosis, as evidenced by the increased cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3, and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase. Conclusions Our results showed that it was not only Bik but also Mcl-1 accumulation during the treatment of proteasome inhibitors, and combining proteasome inhibitors with Mcl-1 siRNA would enhance the ultimate anticancer effect suggesting this combination might be a more effective strategy for cancer therapy.

  4. A genome-wide siRNA screen for regulators of tumor suppressor p53 activity in human non-small lung cancer cells identifies components of the RNA splicing machinery as targets for anticancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebring-van Olst, Ellen; Blijlevens, Maxime; de Menezes, Renee X; van der Meulen-Muileman, Ida H; Smit, Egbert F; van Beusechem, Victor W

    2017-03-13

    Reinstating wild-type tumor suppressor p53 activity could be a valuable option for the treatment of cancer. To contribute to development of new treatment options for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we performed genome-wide siRNA screens for determinants of p53 activity in NSCLC cells. We identified many genes not previously known to be involved in regulating p53 activity. Silencing p53 pathway inhibitor genes was associated with loss of cell viability. The largest functional gene cluster influencing p53 activity was mRNA splicing. Prominent p53 activation was observed upon silencing of specific spliceosome components, rather than by general inhibition of the spliceosome. Ten genes were validated as inhibitors of p53 activity in multiple NSCLC cell lines: genes encoding the Ras-pathway activator SOS1, the zinc finger protein TSHZ3, the mitochondrial membrane protein COX16 and the spliceosome components SNRPD3, SF3A3, SF3B1, SF3B6, XAB2, CWC22 and HNRNPL. Silencing these genes generally increased p53 levels, with distinct effects on CDKN1A expression, induction of cell cycle arrest and cell death. Silencing spliceosome components was associated with alternative splicing of MDM4 mRNA, which could contribute to activation of p53. In addition, silencing splice factors was particularly effective in killing NSCLC cells, albeit in a p53-independent manner. Interestingly, silencing SNRPD3 and SF3A3 exerted much stronger cytotoxicity to NSCLC cells than to lung fibroblasts, suggesting that these genes could represent useful therapeutic targets. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Laser-Triggered Small Interfering RNA Releasing Gold Nanoshells against Heat Shock Protein for Sensitized Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Siwen; Zhang, Min; Ma, Yi; Liu, Yuxi; Gao, Weidong; Zhang, Jiaqi; Gu, Yueqing

    2017-02-01

    The resistance of cancer cells to photothermal therapy is closely related to the overexpression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are abnormally upregulated when cells are under lethal stresses. Common strategies that use small molecule inhibitors against HSPs to enhance hyperthermia effect lack spatial and temporal control of drug release, leading to unavoidable systemic toxicity. Herein, a versatile photothermal platform is developed which is composed of a hollow gold nanoshell core densely packed with small interfering RNAs against heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). Upon near infrared light irradiation, the small interfering RNAs can detach from gold surface specifically and escape from endosomes for Hsp70 silencing. Meanwhile, the temperature increases for hyperthermia therapy due to the high photothermal efficiency of the nanoshells. Efficient downregulation of Hsp70 after light activation is achieved in vitro and in vivo. Ultimately, the light-controlled dual functional nanosystem, with the effects of Hsp70 silencing and temperature elevation, results in sensitized photothermal therapy in nude mice model under mild temperature. This strategy smartly combines the localized photothermal therapy with controlled Hsp70 silencing, and has great potential for clinical translation with a simple and easily controlled structure.

  6. Effect of Small Interfering RNA on Nerve Growth Factor of Rats with Intervertebral Disc Inflammation%小干扰 RNA 对椎间盘炎症大鼠神经生长因子的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王刚

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the inhibition effect of small interfering RNA(siRNA)on nerve growth factor (NGF)induced by inflammatory factor IL - 6,IL - 1β,to provide novel targets for clinical treatment of discogenic low back pain(DLBP), Methods Nucleus pulposus and annulus fibrosus cells isolated from 60 SPF SD rates were divided into groups control(n = 12),study(n = 48), IL - 6 and IL - 1β were added into group study,cultured 48 h,and divided into subgroups A(10 nmol/ L),B(20 nmol/ L),C(50 nmol/ L),D(100 nmol/ L),12 in each, NGF - siRNA was introduced into cul-tured cells,cell conversion rate was determined and NGF - siRNA conversion rate calculated by flow cytometer,NGF mRNA ex-pression by real - time Q - PCR,NGF mRNA relative expression calculated,NGF concentration detected by enzyme - linked im-munosorbent assay(ELISA)before and after the introduction, Results By the results of flow cytometry,the conversion rate of NGF - siRNA cells was 99, 8% , NGF mRNA relative expressions of subgroups A,B,C,D were higher by times 3, 4,3, 7, 4, 7,8, 0 than that of control group before NGF - siRNA introduction(P < 0, 05),and lower by 39, 5% ,45, 5% ,45, 3% , 39, 9% ,47, 8% after introduction than before(P < 0, 05), NGF concentration of subgroups A,B,C,D were higher by times 2, 9,3, 3,4, 5,7, 4 than that of control group before NGF - siRNA introduction(P < 0, 05),and lower by 47, 2% ,33, 8% , 35, 4% ,43, 0% ,54, 9% after introduction than before(P < 0, 05), Conclusion Inflammatory cytokines IL - 6 and IL - 1βcan induce the NGF expression of rats intervertebral disc cells cultured in vitro,and the inductive effect has dose - dependence, NGF - siRNA interference,which can inhibit the inductive effects of inflammatory cytokines on NGF,provides a new target for DLBP treatment.%目的:探讨小干扰 RNA(siRNA)对炎性因子 IL -6、IL -1β诱导椎间盘大鼠神经生长因子( NGF)的抑制效应,为椎间盘源性腰痛(DLBP)的治疗

  7. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Amit

    performing a 15 mus all-atom MD simulation of a DPPC-CHOL bilayer. We find that the CHOL flip-flop rates are on the sub microsecond timescale. These results are verified by performing various independent parallel replica (PR) simulations. Our PR simulations provide significant boost in sampling of the flip-flop events. We observe that the CHOL flip-flop can induce membrane order, regulate membrane-bending energy, and facilitate membrane relaxation. The rapid flip-flop rates reported here have important implications for the role of CHOL in mechanical properties of cell membranes, formation of domains, and maintaining CHOL concentration asymmetry in plasma membrane. Our PR approach can reach submillisecond time scales and bridge the gap between MD simulations and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments on CHOL flip-flop dynamics in membranes. The last project deals with transfection barriers encountered by a bare small interfering RNA (siRNA) in a phospholipid bilayer. SiRNA molecules play a pivotal role in therapeutic applications. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA-based therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. We have examined structural and mechanical barriers to siRNA passage across a phospholipid bilayer using all-atom MD simulations. We find that the electrostatic interaction between the anionic siRNA and head groups of phospholipid molecules induces a phase transformation from the liquid crystalline to ripple phase. Steered MD simulations reveal that the siRNA transfection through the ripple phase requires a force of ˜ 1.5 nN.

  8. From Waddington's epigenetic landscape to small noncoding RNA: some important milestones in the history of epigenetics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Supratim

    2011-05-01

    The term epigenetics was coined in 1942 by C.H. Waddington in the context of studies on development. Since then, the meaning of epigenetics changed over time. In the beginning, epigenetics was viewed as a phenomenon above and beyond genetics. Epigenetic explanations were invoked when genetics could not explain a phenomenon. From the mid-seventies, the state of understanding started changing. Epigenetics has now morphed from a phenomenon to a branch of science whose molecular underpinnings are well understood. The current state of knowledge of epigenetics has evolved as our understanding of DNA methylation, chromatin modifications, and noncoding RNA, and their effects on gene expression increased. At this time in the annals of epigentics research, it is appropriate to revisit some of the important discoveries that have helped advance the field to its current state. This is a very brief review of some early discoveries, and by no means is a complete account of the history of epigenetics. In this review, the early history has also been emphasized in order to underscore the transformation of the science of epigenetics from a phenomenon to a modern field of intense research.

  9. Small-molecule inhibition of HIV pre-mRNA splicing as a novel antiretroviral therapy to overcome drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Bakkour

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises antiretroviral therapy efficacy and limits therapeutic options. Therefore, it is an ongoing task to identify new targets for antiretroviral therapy and to develop new drugs. Here, we show that an indole derivative (IDC16 that interferes with exonic splicing enhancer activity of the SR protein splicing factor SF2/ASF suppresses the production of key viral proteins, thereby compromising subsequent synthesis of full-length HIV-1 pre-mRNA and assembly of infectious particles. IDC16 inhibits replication of macrophage- and T cell-tropic laboratory strains, clinical isolates, and strains with high-level resistance to inhibitors of viral protease and reverse transcriptase. Importantly, drug treatment of primary blood cells did not alter splicing profiles of endogenous genes involved in cell cycle transition and apoptosis. Thus, human splicing factors represent novel and promising drug targets for the development of antiretroviral therapies, particularly for the inhibition of multidrug-resistant viruses.

  10. Silencing tumor necrosis factor-alpha in vitro from small interfering RNA-decorated titanium nanotube array can facilitate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Z

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhenlin Wang,1,* Zhiqiang Hu,2,* Dawei Zhang,3 Mengchuan Zhuo,1 Jiwei Cheng,1 Xingping Xu,1 Yongming Xing,1 Jie Fan2 1Department of Orthopaedics, 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, No 113 Hospital of PLA, Ningbo, 3Department of Orthopaedics, Xijing Hospital of PLA, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Titanium implants are known for their bone bonding ability. However, the osseointegration may be severely disturbed in the inflammation environment. In order to enhance osseointegration of the implant in an inflamed environment, the small interfering RNA (siRNA targeting tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α was used to functionalize titanium surface for gene silencing. The chitosan–tripolyphosphate–hyaluronate complexes were used to formulate nanoparticles (NPs with siRNA, which were adsorbed directly by the anodized titanium surface. The surface characterization was analyzed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force micro­scopy, as well as contact angle measurement. The fluorescence microscope was used to monitor the degradation of the layer. The coculture system was established with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs grown directly on functionalized titanium surface and RAW264.7 cells (preactivated by lipopolysaccharide grown upside in a transwell chamber. The transfection and knockdown efficiency of TNF-α in RAW264.7 cells were determined by fluorescence microscope, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cytoskeleton and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were also analyzed. Regular vertical aligned nanotubes (~100 nm diameter and ~300 nm length were generated after anodization of polished titanium. After loading with NPs, the nanotubes were filled and covered by a layer of amorphous particles. The surface topography changed and wettability decreased after covering with NPs. As expected, a burst degradation of the film was observed, which

  11. Comparative MiRNA Expressional Profiles and Molecular Networks in Human Small Bowel Tissues of Necrotizing Enterocolitis and Spontaneous Intestinal Perforation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Cheung Ng

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC and spontaneous intestinal perforation (SIP are acute intestinal conditions which could result in mortality and severe morbidity in preterm infants. Our objective was to identify dysregulated micro-RNAs (miRNAs in small bowel tissues of NEC and SIP, and their possible roles in disease pathophysiology.We performed differential miRNA arrays on tissues of NEC (n = 4, SIP (n = 4 and surgical-control (Surg-CTL; n = 4, and validated target miRNAs by qPCR (n = 10 each group. The association of target miRNAs with 52 dysregulated mRNAs was investigated by bioinformatics on functional and base-pair sequence algorithms, and correlation in same tissue samples.We presented the first miRNA profiles of NEC, SIP and Surg-CTL intestinal tissues in preterm infants. Of 28 validated miRNAs, 21 were significantly different between NEC or SIP and Surg-CTL. Limited overlapping in the aberrant expression of miRNAs between NEC and SIP indicated their distinct molecular mechanisms. A proposed network of dysregulated miRNA/mRNA pairs in NEC suggested interaction at bacterial receptor TLR4 (miR-31, miR-451, miR-203, miR-4793-3p, mediated via key transcription factors NFKB2 (miR-203, AP-1/FOSL1 (miR-194-3p, FOXA1 (miR-21-3p, miR-431 and miR-1290 and HIF1A (miR-31, and extended downstream to pathways of angiogenesis, arginine metabolism, cell adhesion and chemotaxis, extracellular matrix remodeling, hypoxia/oxidative stress, inflammation and muscle contraction. In contrast, upregulation of miR-451 and miR-223 in SIP suggested modulation of G-protein-mediated muscle contraction.The robust response of miRNA dysregulation in NEC and SIP, and concerted involvement of specific miRNAs in the molecular networks indicated their crucial roles in mucosa integrity and disease pathophysiology.

  12. A novel fur- and iron-regulated small RNA, NrrF, is required for indirect fur-mediated regulation of the sdhA and sdhC genes in Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellin, J R; Goswami, Sulip; Grogan, Susan; Tjaden, Brian; Genco, Caroline A

    2007-05-01

    Iron is both essential for bacterial growth and toxic at higher concentrations; thus, iron homeostasis is tightly regulated. In Neisseria meningitidis the majority of iron-responsive gene regulation is mediated by the ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur), a protein classically defined as a transcriptional repressor. Recently, however, microarray studies have identified a number of genes in N. meningitidis that are iron and Fur activated, demonstrating a new role for Fur as a transcriptional activator. Since Fur has been shown to indirectly activate gene transcription through the repression of small regulatory RNA molecules in other organisms, we hypothesized that a similar mechanism could account for Fur-dependent, iron-activated gene transcription in N. meningitidis. In this study, we used a bioinformatics approach to screen for the presence of Fur-regulated small RNA molecules in N. meningitidis MC58. This screen identified one small RNA, herein named NrrF (for neisserial regulatory RNA responsive to iron [Fe]), which was demonstrated to be both iron responsive and Fur regulated and which has a well-conserved orthologue in N. gonorrhoeae. In addition, this screen identified a number of other likely, novel small RNA transcripts. Lastly, we utilized a new bioinformatics approach to predict regulatory targets of the NrrF small RNA. This analysis led to the identification of the sdhA and sdhC genes, which were subsequently demonstrated to be under NrrF regulation in an nrrF mutant. This study is the first report of small RNAs in N. meningitidis and the first to use a bioinformatics approach to identify, a priori, regulatory targets of a small RNA.

  13. Study of genetic diversity of eukaryotic picoplankton in different oceanic regions by small-subunit rRNA gene cloning and sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, B; Pedrós-Alió, C; Massana, R

    2001-07-01

    Very small eukaryotic organisms (picoeukaryotes) are fundamental components of marine planktonic systems, often accounting for a significant fraction of the biomass and activity in a system. Their identity, however, has remained elusive, since the small cells lack morphological features for identification. We determined the diversity of marine picoeukaryotes by sequencing cloned 18S rRNA genes in five genetic libraries from North Atlantic, Southern Ocean, and Mediterranean Sea surface waters. Picoplankton were obtained by filter size fractionation, a step that excluded most large eukaryotes and recovered most picoeukaryotes. Genetic libraries of eukaryotic ribosomal DNA were screened by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and at least one clone of each operational taxonomic unit (OTU) was partially sequenced. In general, the phylogenetic diversity in each library was rather great, and each library included many different OTUs and members of very distantly related phylogenetic groups. Of 225 eukaryotic clones, 126 were affiliated with algal classes, especially the Prasinophyceae, the Prymnesiophyceae, the Bacillariophyceae, and the Dinophyceae. A minor fraction (27 clones) was affiliated with clearly heterotrophic organisms, such as ciliates, the chrysomonad Paraphysomonas, cercomonads, and fungi. There were two relatively abundant novel lineages, novel stramenopiles (53 clones) and novel alveolates (19 clones). These lineages are very different from any organism that has been isolated, suggesting that there are previously unknown picoeukaryotes. Prasinophytes and novel stramenopile clones were very abundant in all of the libraries analyzed. These findings underscore the importance of attempts to grow the small eukaryotic plankton in pure culture.

  14. Identification of microRNA profiles in docetaxel-resistant human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (SPC-A1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Wang; Bing, Feng; Hai-Zhu, Song; Wei, De; Long-Bang, Chen

    2010-01-01

    Docetaxel has been used as first-line chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), but further extensive and effective application is prevented by drug resistance. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been identified as important posttranscriptional regulators, which are involved in various biological processes. The aim of this study was to identify microRNA expression profiles involved in the development of docetaxel resistance in NSCLC. Here, microarray chip technology was employed to identify miRNA expression profiles in docetaxel-resistant human NSCLC cell line (SPC-A1/docetaxel). Then, the changes of miRNAs expression (>2-fold compared with control SPC-A1 cell line) were testified by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) assay. Furthermore, the potential target genes regulated by selected miRNAs were analysed by various target prediction tools. The expression of a total of 52 miRNAs showed significant difference between SPC-A1/docetaxel cells and control SPC-A1 cells (P SPC-A1/docetaxel cells, while the expression of other three miRNAs (miR-192, 424 and 98) was significantly up-regulated in SPC-A1/docetaxel cells (P SPC-A1/docetaxel and SPC-A1 cells were further confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Taken together, the identification of microRNA expression profiles in docetaxel-resistant NSCLC cells could provide a better understanding of mechanisms involved in drug sensitivity or resistance, which would be helpful to develop novel strategies for targeted therapies in chemorefractive NSCLC patients.

  15. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungsuwadee Paiboon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In addition, decreased levels of mRNA associated with T-cell signaling were found in the jejunum and ileum. Several members of the Solute Carrier (SLC and Adenosine Triphosphate Binding Cassette (ABC superfamilies of membrane transporters were found to be differentially expressed; these genes may play a role in differences in nutrient and xenobiotic absorption and disposition. mRNA expression of SLC39a4_predicted, a zinc transporter, was increased in all tissues, suggesting that it is involved in increased zinc uptake during lactation. Microarray data are available through GEO under GSE19175. Conclusions We detected differential expression of mRNA from several pathways in lactating dams, including upregulation of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway in liver and intestine, consistent with Srebp activation. Differential T-Cell signaling in the two most distal regions of the small intestine (ileum and

  16. Small ncRNA Expression-Profiling of Blood from Hemophilia A Patients Identifies miR-1246 as a Potential Regulator of Factor 8 Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tewarit Sarachana

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A (HA is a bleeding disorder caused by deficiency of functional plasma clotting factor VIII (FVIII. Genetic mutations in the gene encoding FVIII (F8 have been extensively studied. Over a thousand different mutations have been reported in the F8 gene. These span a diverse range of mutation types, namely, missense, splice-site, deletions of single and multiple exons, inversions, etc. There is nonetheless evidence that other molecular mechanisms, in addition to mutations in the gene encoding the FVIII protein, may be involved in the pathobiology of HA. In this study, global small ncRNA expression profiling analysis of whole blood from HA patients, and controls, was performed using high-throughput ncRNA microarrays. Patients were further sub-divided into those that developed neutralizing-anti-FVIII antibodies (inhibitors and those that did not. Selected differentially expressed ncRNAs were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis. We identified several ncRNAs, and among them hsa-miR-1246 was significantly up-regulated in HA patients. In addition, miR-1246 showed a six-fold higher expression in HA patients without inhibitors. We have identified an miR-1246 target site in the noncoding region of F8 mRNA and were able to confirm the suppressory role of hsa-miR-1246 on F8 expression in a stable lymphoblastoid cell line expressing FVIII. These findings suggest several testable hypotheses vis-à-vis the role of nc-RNAs in the regulation of F8 expression. These hypotheses have not been exhaustively tested in this study as they require carefully curated clinical samples.

  17. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  18. Prevalence, Genetic Characterization, and 18S Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Diversity of Trypanosoma rangeli in Triatomine and Mammal Hosts in Endemic Areas for Chagas Disease in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofia; Aguirre-Villacis, Fernanda; Pinto, C Miguel; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Grijalva, Mario J

    2015-12-01

    Trypanosoma rangeli is a nonpathogenic parasite for humans; however, its medical importance relies in its similarity and overlapping distribution with Trypanosoma cruzi, causal agent of Chagas disease in the Americas. The genetic diversity of T. rangeli and its association with host species (triatomines and mammals) has been identified along Central and the South America; however, it has not included data of isolates from Ecuador. This study reports infection with T. rangeli in 18 genera of mammal hosts and five species of triatomines in three environments (domestic, peridomestic, and sylvatic). Higher infection rates were found in the sylvatic environment, in close association with Rhodnius ecuadoriensis. The results of this study extend the range of hosts infected with this parasite and the geographic range of the T. rangeli genotype KP1(-)/lineage C in South America. It was not possible to detect variation on T. rangeli from the central coastal region and southern Ecuador with the analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene, even though these areas are ecologically different and a phenotypic subdivision of R. ecuadoriensis has been found. R. ecuadoriensis is considered one of the most important vectors for Chagas disease transmission in Ecuador due to its wide distribution and adaptability to diverse environments. An extensive knowledge of the trypanosomes circulating in this species of triatomine, and associated mammal hosts, is important for delineating transmission dynamics and preventive measures in the endemic areas of Ecuador and Northern Peru.

  19. Genome-wide mRNA-seq profiling reveals predominant down-regulation of lipid metabolic processes in adipose tissues of Small Tail Han than Dorset sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiangyang; Luo, Qingmiao; Qin, Xiaoyu; Guo, Yuntao; Zhao, Huijing

    2015-11-13

    Small Tail Han and Dorset sheep are two different sheep with distinguished morphologies in fat depositions. In order to characterize their gene expression profiles, our present study took the advantages of RNA sequencing technology with the aims to identify important genes regulating the metabolisms in adipose tissues of two different sheep. In obtained high quality sequencing reads, 85.9 (Han) and 86.1% (Dorset) were uniquely aligned to Oar v3.1 sheep reference genome, and over 76% of bases in mapped reads corresponded to mRNA. Using R package EBSeq, we identified 602 differentially expressed genes. Using the 602 genes, GO analysis showed that 30 out of 56 significantly enriched biological processes were metabolism related, of which the most significant one was triglyceride biosynthetic process. The KEGG pathway analysis indicated the down-regulation of several fat metabolic pathways. The predominant down-regulation of massive metabolic processes, particularly the lipid metabolism, in adipose tissues of Han sheep could explain, at least in part, the distinguished fat deposition between two different sheep, and our data constitute a basic picture of transcriptomes in these sheep for better understanding of underline biological mechanism in their lipid metabolisms.

  20. Identification of small auxin-up RNA (SAUR) genes in Urticales plants: mulberry (Morus notabilis), hemp (Cannabis sativa) and ramie (Boehmeria nivea)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xing Huang; Yaning Bao; Bo Wang; Lijun Liu; Jie Chen; Lunjin Dai; Sana Ullah Baloch; Dingxiang Peng

    2016-03-01

    Small auxin-up RNA (SAUR) genes are important gene families in auxin signalling transduction and are commonly used asearly auxin responsive markers. Till date, no SAUR gene is identified in Urticales plants despite of the published bioinformationof mulberry, hemp and ramie. In this study, we used Arabidopsis sequences as query to search against mulberry, hempgenomes and ramie transcriptome database. In total, we obtained 62, 56 and 71 SAUR genes in mulberry, hemp and ramie,respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the Urticales specific expansion of SAUR genes. Expression analysis showed 15 randomly selected ramie SAUR genes that were diversely functioned in ramie tissues and revealed a series of IAA-responsive,drought-responsive and high temperature-responsive genes. Moreover, comparison of qRT-PCR data and previous RNA-Seqdata suggested the reliability of our work. In this study, we first report the identification of SAUR genes in Urticales plants.These results will provide a foundation for their function validation in Urticales plant growth and development.

  1. LncRNA-UCA1 exerts oncogenic functions in non-small cell lung cancer by targeting miR-193a-3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wei; Ge, Hui-juan; Yang, Xiao-qun; Sun, Xiangjie; Huang, Hai; Tao, Xia; Chen, Wan-sheng; Li, Bing

    2016-02-01

    Recently, the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) urothelial carcinoma-associated 1 (UCA1) has been identified as an oncogenic gene in multiple human tumor entitles, and dysregulation of UCA1 was tightly linked to carcinogenesis and cancer progression. However, whether the aberrant expression of UCA1 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with malignancy, metastasis or prognosis has not been characterized. In this study, we found that UCA1 was upregulated in NSCLC tissues. Higher expression of UCA1 led to a significantly poorer survival time, and multivariate analysis revealed that UCA1 was an independent risk factor of prognosis. UCA1 overexpression enhanced, whereas UCA1 silencing impaired the proliferation and colony formation of NSCLC cells. Moreover, mechanistic investigations showed that UCA1 upregulated the expression of miR-193a-3p target gene ERBB4 through competitively 'spongeing' miR-193a-3p. Overall, we concluded that UCA1 functions as an oncogene in NSCLC, acting mechanistically by upregulating ERBB4 in part through 'spongeing' miR-193a-3p.

  2. Identification of small auxin-up RNA (SAUR) genes in Urticales plants: mulberry (Morus notabilis), hemp (Cannabis sativa) and ramie (Boehmeria nivea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xing; Bao, Yaning; Wang, B O; Liu, Lijun; Chen, Jie; Dai, Lunjin; Baloch, Sana Ullah; Peng, Dingxiang

    2016-03-01

    Small auxin-up RNA (SAUR) genes are important gene families in auxin signalling transduction and are commonly used as early auxin responsive markers. Till date, no SAUR gene is identified in Urticales plants despite of the published bioinformation of mulberry, hemp and ramie. In this study, we used Arabidopsis sequences as query to search against mulberry, hemp genomes and ramie transcriptome database. In total, we obtained 62, 56 and 71 SAUR genes in mulberry, hemp and ramie, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the Urticales specific expansion of SAUR genes. Expression analysis showed 15 randomly selected ramie SAUR genes that were diversely functioned in ramie tissues and revealed a series of IAA-responsive, drought-responsive and high temperature-responsive genes. Moreover, comparison of qRT-PCR data and previous RNA-Seq data suggested the reliability of our work. In this study, we first report the identification of SAUR genes in Urticales plants. These results will provide a foundation for their function validation in Urticales plant growth and development.

  3. Reconsideration of the phylogenetic positions of five peritrich genera, Vorticella, Pseudovorticella, Zoothamnopsis, Zoothamnium, and Epicarchesium (Ciliophora, Peritrichia, Sessilida), based on small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lifang; Song, Weibo; Warren, Alan; Shin, Mann Kyoon; Chen, Zigui; Ji, Daode; Sun, Ping

    2008-01-01

    In order to re-evaluate the systematics of sessilid peritrich ciliates, small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences were determined for 12 species belonging to five genera: Vorticella, Pseudovorticella, Epicarchesium, Zoothamnium, and Zoothamnopsis. Phylogenetic trees were deduced using Bayesian inference, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood methods. The phylogenetic analyses suggest that (1) sessilids which have stalks with continuous myonemes that contract in a zig-zag fashion form a separate clade from those which have stalks that contract independently and in a spiral fashion, supporting the separation of the family Zoothamniidae from the family Vorticellidae and (2) Epicarchesium and Pseudovorticella, both of which have reticulate silverline systems, are more closely related to each other than to other vorticellids, suggesting that differences in the silverline system (i.e. transverse vs. reticulate) may be the result of genuine evolutionary divergence among sessilid peritrichs. However, the newly sequenced Zoothamnopsis sinica, which has a reticulate silverline pattern, nests within the unresolved Zoothamnium species that have transverse silverline patterns. Thus, there were at least two evolutions of the reticulate silverline pattern character state from a plesiomorphic transverse state in the peritrichid ciliates. The molecular work demonstrates the genus Zoothamnium to be paraphyletic in relation to morphological studies, and suggests that Astylozoon, Opisthonecta, and Vorticella microstoma possibly share a SSU rRNA secondary structure in the helix E10-1 region.

  4. Determination of SGK1 mRNA in non-small cell lung cancer samples underlines high expression in squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbruzzese Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer represents the most frequent cause of death for cancer. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, which accounts for the vast majority of this disease, only early detection and treatment, when possible, may significantly affect patient's prognosis. An important role in NSCLC malignancy is attributed to the signal transduction pathways involving PI3Kinase, with consequent activation of the AKT family factors. The serum and glucocorticoid kinase (SGK factors, which share high structural and functional homologies with the AKT factors, are a family of ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine kinases under the control of cellular stress and hormones. SGK1 is the most represented SGK member. Methods By means of immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time PCR, we determined SGK1 protein and mRNA expression in a cohort of 66 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded NSCLC surgical samples. All samples belonged to patients with a well-documented clinical history. Results mRNA expression was significantly higher in squamous cell carcinomas, and correlated with several clinical prognostic indicators, being elevated in high-grade tumors and in tumors with bigger size and worse clinical stage. No correlation was found between SGK1 protein expression and these clinical parameters. Conclusions This explorative analysis of SGK1 expression in NSCLC samples highlights the potential role of this factor in NSCLC patients' prognosis. Moreover, the higher expression in the squamous cell carcinoma subtype opens new therapeutic possibilities in this NSCLC subtype by designing specific kinase inhibitors.

  5. The rnc Gene Promotes Exopolysaccharide Synthesis and Represses the vicRKX Gene Expressions via MicroRNA-Size Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng-Ying; Yang, Ying-Ming; Li, Ke-Zeng; Lei, Lei; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Tao, Xiang; Yin, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Ru; Ma, Xin-Rong; Hu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-dependent disease that largely relies on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to synthesize exopolysaccharides. Although the rnc gene is suggested to be involved in virulence mechanisms in many other bacteria, the information regarding it in S. mutans is very limited. Here, using deletion or overexpression mutant assay, we demonstrated that rnc in S. mutans significantly positively regulated exopolysaccharide synthesis and further altered biofilm formation. Meanwhile, the cariogenecity of S. mutans was decreased by deletion of rnc in a specific pathogen-free (SPF) rat model. Interestingly, analyzing the expression at mRNA level, we found the downstream vic locus was repressed by rnc in S. mutans. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, for the first time, three putative microRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) targeting vicRKX were predicted in S. mutans. The expression levels of these msRNAs were negatively correlated with vicRKX but positively correlated with rnc, indicating rnc probably repressed vicRKX expression through msRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. In all, the results present that rnc has a potential role in the regulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis and can affect vicRKX expressions via post-transcriptional repression in S. mutans. This study provides an alternative avenue for further research aimed at preventing caries.

  6. Identification of Circulating miRNAs in a Mouse Model of Nerve Allograft Transplantation under FK506 Immunosuppression by Illumina Small RNA Deep Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Chun Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study aimed to establish the expression profile of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs during nerve allotransplantation in the presence and absence of FK506 immunosuppression. Methods. A 1 cm BALB/c donor sciatic nerve graft was transplanted into the sciatic nerve gaps created in recipient C57BL/6 mice with or without daily FK506 immunosuppression [1 mg/(kg·d]. At 3, 7, and 14 d after nerve allotransplantation, serum samples were collected for miRNA expression analysis by Illumina small RNA deep sequencing. Results. Sequence analysis showed that the dominant size of circulating small RNAs after nerve allotransplantation was 22 nucleotides, followed by 23-nucleotide sequences. Nine upregulated circulating miRNAs (let-7e-5p, miR-101a-3p, miR-151-5p, miR-181a-5p, miR-204-5p, miR-340-5p, miR-381-3p, miR-411-5p, miR-9-5p, and miR-219-2-3p were identified at 3 d, but none was identified at 7 or 14 d. Among them, miR-9-5p had the highest fold-change of >50-fold, followed by miR-340-5p with 38.8-fold. The presence of these nine miRNAs was not significant at 7 and 14 d after nerve allotransplantation with or without immunosuppression, showing that these miRNAs are not ideal biomarkers for monitoring rejection of deep-buried nerve allografts, a response usually observed later. Conclusions. We identified nine upregulated circulating miRNAs, which may have a biological function, particularly during the early stages after nerve allotransplantation under FK506 immunosuppression.

  7. Identification of the base-pairing requirements for repression of hctA translation by the small RNA IhtA leads to the discovery of a new mRNA target in Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Grieshaber

    Full Text Available The non-coding small RNA, IhtA expressed by the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis modulates the translation of HctA, a key protein involved in replicative to infectious cell type differentiation. Using a combination of bioinformatics and mutagenesis we sought to identify the base pairing requirement for functional repression of HctA protein expression, with an eye to applying our findings towards the identification of additional targets. IhtA is predicted to fold into a three stem:loop structure. We found that loop 1 occludes the initiation codon of hctA, while loop 2 and 3 are not required for function. This 7 nucleotide region forms G/C rich interactions surrounding the AUG of hctA. Two additional genes in the chlamydial genome, CTL0322 and CTL0097, contained some elements of the hctA:IhtA recognition sequence. The mRNA of both CTL0322and CTL0097 interacted with IhtA in vitro as measured by biolayer interferometry. However, using a CheZ reporter expression system, IhtA only inhibited the translation of CTL0322. The proposed IhtA recognition site in the CTL0322 message contains significant G/C base pairing on either side of the initiation codon while CTL0097 only contains G/C base pairing 3' to the AUG initiation codon. These data suggest that as the functional interacting region is only 6-7nt in length that full translation repression is dependent on the degree of G/C base pairing. Additionally our results indicate that IhtA may regulate multiple mRNAs involved in the chlamydial infectious cycle.

  8. Identification of the Base-Pairing Requirements for Repression of hctA Translation by the Small RNA IhtA Leads to the Discovery of a New mRNA Target in Chlamydia trachomatis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieshaber, Nicole A.; Tattersall, Jeremiah S.; Liguori, Johella; Lipat, Joseph N.; Runac, Justin; Grieshaber, Scott S.

    2015-01-01

    The non-coding small RNA, IhtA expressed by the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis modulates the translation of HctA, a key protein involved in replicative to infectious cell type differentiation. Using a combination of bioinformatics and mutagenesis we sought to identify the base pairing requirement for functional repression of HctA protein expression, with an eye to applying our findings towards the identification of additional targets. IhtA is predicted to fold into a three stem:loop structure. We found that loop 1 occludes the initiation codon of hctA, while loop 2 and 3 are not required for function. This 7 nucleotide region forms G/C rich interactions surrounding the AUG of hctA. Two additional genes in the chlamydial genome, CTL0322 and CTL0097, contained some elements of the hctA:IhtA recognition sequence. The mRNA of both CTL0322and CTL0097 interacted with IhtA in vitro as measured by biolayer interferometry. However, using a CheZ reporter expression system, IhtA only inhibited the translation of CTL0322. The proposed IhtA recognition site in the CTL0322 message contains significant G/C base pairing on either side of the initiation codon while CTL0097 only contains G/C base pairing 3’ to the AUG initiation codon. These data suggest that as the functional interacting region is only 6-7nt in length that full translation repression is dependent on the degree of G/C base pairing. Additionally our results indicate that IhtA may regulate multiple mRNAs involved in the chlamydial infectious cycle. PMID:25756658

  9. Antitumor effect of RNA interference on non-small-cell lung cancer in vivo%RNA干扰技术抗非小细胞肺癌作用的体内实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhang; Chunxue Bai; Xin Zhang; Ling Mao; Yuehong Wang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Lung cancer has emerged as a leading cause of cancer death in the world. Current therapies are ineffective, thus new approaches are needed to improve the therapeutic ratio. RNA interference (RNAi) has shown promise in gene silencing in vitro, the potential of which in developing new methods for the therapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) needs to be further tested in vivo. In this study, chemically synthesized double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was transfected into NSCLC cell line SPC-A1 cells and established the tumor bur-dened athymic nude mice model to investigate whether dsRNA could induce gene silencing in NSCLC cells in vivo. Methods:SPC-A1 was transfected with EGFR sequence-specific dsRNA formulated with Lipofectamine 2000. SPC-A1 cells (1 x 107>/mL) in 200 μL were injected s.c. Into the left flank area of the mice to establish the tumor burdened athymic nude mice model.Calculate the tumor growth inhibition rate by measuring the diameter and the weight of the tumor. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to monitor the reduction in the production of the EGFR protein. Realtime RT-PCR was used to detect the silencing of the EGFR mRNA level. Results: It displayed that EGFR sequence specific dsRNA (dsRNA-EGFR)significantly inhibited the tumor growth in vivo. The tumor growth inhibition rate was 75.03%. The dsRNA-EGFR sequence specifically silenced EGFR with 53.6% of down-regulation of EGFR protein production and 32.3% of silencing of EGFR mRNA level. Conclusion: DsRNA-EGFR showed a blockbuster effect in downregulation of EGFR mRNA level and protein produc-tion, and inhibition of tumor growth in vivo.

  10. Molecular dynamics re-refinement of two different small RNA loop structures using the original NMR data suggest a common structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Niel M; Davis, Darrell R; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2012-08-01

    Restrained molecular dynamics simulations are a robust, though perhaps underused, tool for the end-stage refinement of biomolecular structures. We demonstrate their utility-using modern simulation protocols, optimized force fields, and inclusion of explicit solvent and mobile counterions-by re-investigating the solution structures of two RNA hairpins that had previously been refined using conventional techniques. The structures, both domain 5 group II intron ribozymes from yeast ai5γ and Pylaiella littoralis, share a nearly identical primary sequence yet the published 3D structures appear quite different. Relatively long restrained MD simulations using the original NMR restraint data identified the presence of a small set of violated distance restraints in one structure and a possibly incorrect trapped bulge nucleotide conformation in the other structure. The removal of problematic distance restraints and the addition of a heating step yielded representative ensembles with very similar 3D structures and much lower pairwise RMSD values. Analysis of ion density during the restrained simulations helped to explain chemical shift perturbation data published previously. These results suggest that restrained MD simulations, with proper caution, can be used to "update" older structures or aid in the refinement of new structures that lack sufficient experimental data to produce a high quality result. Notable cautions include the need for sufficient sampling, awareness of potential force field bias (such as small angle deviations with the current AMBER force fields), and a proper balance between the various restraint weights.

  11. Enrichment of Phosphatidylethanolamine in Viral Replication Compartments via Co-opting the Endosomal Rab5 Small GTPase by a Positive-Strand RNA Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses build extensive membranous replication compartments to support replication and protect the virus from antiviral responses by the host. These viruses require host factors and various lipids to form viral replication complexes (VRCs). The VRCs built by Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) are enriched with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) through a previously unknown pathway. To unravel the mechanism of PE enrichment within the TBSV replication compartment, in this paper, the authors demonstrate that TBSV co-opts the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound active form of the endosomal Rab5 small GTPase via direct interaction with the viral replication protein. Deletion of Rab5 orthologs in a yeast model host or expression of dominant negative mutants of plant Rab5 greatly decreases TBSV replication and prevents the redistribution of PE to the sites of viral replication. We also show that enrichment of PE in the viral replication compartment is assisted by actin filaments. Interestingly, the closely related Carnation Italian ringspot virus, which replicates on the boundary membrane of mitochondria, uses a similar strategy to the peroxisomal TBSV to hijack the Rab5-positive endosomes into the viral replication compartments. Altogether, usurping the GTP-Rab5–positive endosomes allows TBSV to build a PE-enriched viral replication compartment, which is needed to support peak-level replication. Thus, the Rab family of small GTPases includes critical host factors assisting VRC assembly and genesis of the viral replication compartment. PMID:27760128

  12. A complex small RNA repertoire is generated by a plant/fungal-like machinery and effected by a metazoan-like Argonaute in the single-cell human parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Laurence; Cannella, Dominique; Ortet, Philippe; Barakat, Mohamed; Sautel, Céline F; Kieffer, Sylvie; Garin, Jérôme; Bastien, Olivier; Voinnet, Olivier; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2010-05-27

    In RNA silencing, small RNAs produced by the RNase-III Dicer guide Argonaute-like proteins as part of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC) to regulate gene expression transcriptionally or post-transcriptionally. Here, we have characterized the RNA silencing machinery and exhaustive small RNAome of Toxoplasma gondii, member of the Apicomplexa, a phylum of animal- and human-infecting parasites that cause extensive health and economic damages to human populations worldwide. Remarkably, the small RNA-generating machinery of Toxoplasma is phylogenetically and functionally related to that of plants and fungi, and accounts for an exceptionally diverse array of small RNAs. This array includes conspicuous populations of repeat-associated small interfering RNA (siRNA), which, as in plants, likely generate and maintain heterochromatin at DNA repeats and satellites. Toxoplasma small RNAs also include many microRNAs with clear metazoan-like features whose accumulation is sometimes extremely high and dynamic, an unexpected finding given that Toxoplasma is a unicellular protist. Both plant-like heterochromatic small RNAs and metazoan-like microRNAs bind to a single Argonaute protein, Tg-AGO. Toxoplasma miRNAs co-sediment with polyribosomes, and thus, are likely to act as translational regulators, consistent with the lack of catalytic residues in Tg-AGO. Mass spectrometric analyses of the Tg-AGO protein complex revealed a common set of virtually all known RISC components so far characterized in human and Drosophila, as well as novel proteins involved in RNA metabolism. In agreement with its loading with heterochromatic small RNAs, Tg-AGO also associates substoichiometrically with components of known chromatin-repressing complexes. Thus, a puzzling patchwork of silencing processor and effector proteins from plant, fungal and metazoan origin accounts for the production and action of an unsuspected variety of small RNAs in the single-cell parasite Toxoplasma and possibly in other

  13. Small interference RNA profiling reveals the essential role of human membrane trafficking genes in mediating the infectious entry of dengue virus

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    Chu Justin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue virus (DENV is the causative agent of Dengue fever and the life-threatening Dengue Haemorrhagic fever or Dengue shock syndrome. In the absence of anti-viral agents or vaccine, there is an urgent need to develop an effective anti-viral strategy against this medically important viral pathogen. The initial interplay between DENV and the host cells may represent one of the potential anti-viral targeting sites. Currently the involvements of human membrane trafficking host genes or factors that mediate the infectious cellular entry of dengue virus are not well defined. Results In this study, we have used a targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA library to identify and profile key cellular genes involved in processes of endocytosis, cytoskeletal dynamics and endosome trafficking that are important and essential for DENV infection. The infectious entry of DENV into Huh7 cells was shown to be potently inhibited by siRNAs targeting genes associated with clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The important role of clathrin-mediated endocytosis was confirmed by the expression of well-characterized dominant-negative mutants of genes in this pathway and by using the clathrin endocytosis inhibitor chlorpromazine. Furthermore, DENV infection was shown to be sensitive to the disruption of human genes in regulating the early to late endosomal trafficking as well as the endosomal acidic pH. The importance and involvement of both actin and microtubule dynamics in mediating the infectious entry of DENV was also revealed in this study. Conclusions Together, the findings from this study have provided a detail profiling of the human membrane trafficking cellular genes and the mechanistic insight into the interplay of these host genes with DENV to initiate an infection, hence broadening our understanding on the entry pathway of this medically important viral pathogen. These data may also provide a new potential avenue for development of anti

  14. Effect of MicroRNA-335 on the Metastasis, Invasion and Proliferation of Cells in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang He; Liu Zhili; Wang Zhaoxia

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of microRNA-335 on the metastasis, invasion and proliferation of cells in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods:Real-time PCR was performed to detect the expression differences of microRNA-335 between 12 pairs of NSCLC and normal cancerous peripheral tissues, and between SPCA-1 cells of NSCLC and 16HBE of normal pulmonary epithelial cells, while miR-335 expression in SPCA-1 cells were down-regulated and proved by Lipofectamine 2000 transient transfection and real-time PCR, respectively. Scratch test, Transwell invasion assay as well as MTT and clone formation assays were applied to respectively determine the effect of miR-335 on the metastasis, invasion and proliferation of SPCA-1 cells. Results:Compared with para-carcinoma tissues and 16HBE cells, miR-335 expression was evidently higher in NSCLC and SPCA-1 cells. However, it decreased remarkably after transient transfection of anti-miR-335 by SPCA-1 cells with Lipofectamine 2000 for 24 h. Metastasis and invasion of SPCA-1 cells could be inhibited by suppressing miR-335 expression with suppression rates being (42.8±2.7)%and (73.25±4.4)%, respectively. However, the inhibition of miR-335 expression had no effect on the proliferation of SPCA-1 cells. Conclusion:miR-335 expresses highly in NSCLC and its low expression can obviously inhibit the metastasis and invasion of SPCA-1 cells, but has no effect on the proliferation.

  15. Selective cognitive deficits and reduced hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in small-conductance calcium-activated K+ channel deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, J P R; Redrobe, J P; Hansen, H H; Petersen, S; Bond, C T; Adelman, J P; Mikkelsen, J D; Mirza, N R

    2009-09-29

    Small-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels 1-3 (SK1-3) are important for neuronal firing regulation and are considered putative CNS drug targets. For instance non-selective SK blockers improve performance in animal models of cognition. The SK subtype(s) involved herein awaits identification and the question is difficult to address pharmacologically due to the lack of subtype-selective SK-channel modulators. In this study, we used doxycycline-induced conditional SK3-deficient (T/T) mice to address the cognitive consequences of selective SK3 deficiency. In T/T mice SK3 protein is near-eliminated from the brain following doxycycline treatment. We tested T/T and wild type (WT) littermate mice in five distinct learning and memory paradigms. In Y-maze spontaneous alternations and five-trial inhibitory avoidance the performance of T/T mice was markedly inferior to WT mice. In contrast, T/T and WT mice performed equally well in passive avoidance, object recognition and the Morris water maze. Thus, some aspects of working/short-term memory are disrupted in T/T mice. Using in situ hybridization, we further found the cognitive deficits in T/T mice to be paralleled by reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression in the dentate gyrus and CA3 of the hippocampus. BDNF mRNA levels in the frontal cortex were not affected. BDNF has been crucially implicated in many cognitive processes. Hence, the biological substrate for the cognitive impairments in T/T mice could conceivably entail reduced trophic support of the hippocampus.

  16. Expanding the RpoS/σS-network by RNA sequencing and identification of σS-controlled small RNAs in Salmonella.

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    Corinne Lévi-Meyrueis

    Full Text Available The RpoS/σS sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP controls a global adaptive response that allows many Gram-negative bacteria to survive starvation and various stresses. σS also contributes to biofilm formation and virulence of the food-borne pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium. In this study, we used directional RNA-sequencing and complementary assays to explore the σS-dependent transcriptome of S. Typhimurium during late stationary phase in rich medium. This study confirms the large regulatory scope of σS and provides insights into the physiological functions of σS in Salmonella. Extensive regulation by σS of genes involved in metabolism and membrane composition, and down-regulation of the respiratory chain functions, were important features of the σS effects on gene transcription that might confer fitness advantages to bacterial cells and/or populations under starving conditions. As an example, we show that arginine catabolism confers a competitive fitness advantage in stationary phase. This study also provides a firm basis for future studies to address molecular mechanisms of indirect regulation of gene expression by σS. Importantly, the σS-controlled downstream network includes small RNAs that might endow σS with post-transcriptional regulatory functions. Of these, four (RyhB-1/RyhB-2, SdsR, SraL were known to be controlled by σS and deletion of the sdsR locus had a competitive fitness cost in stationary phase. The σS-dependent control of seven additional sRNAs was confirmed in Northern experiments. These findings will inspire future studies to investigate molecular mechanisms and the physiological impact of post-transcriptional regulation by σS.

  17. Characterization of 12S rRNA gene for meat identification of common wild and domestic small herbivores as an aid to wildlife forensic

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    E. Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Chital and sambar are the common wild small herbivores, which are vulnerable to poaching for their meat. Many times poachers claim the wild meat to be that of goat or sheep. Hence, authentic evidences are required to stop such wildlife crime. The present investigation was carried out to study the species specific PCR-RFLP patterns for meat identification of chital and sambar and then differentiation from the meat of goat and sheep. Materials and Methods: Extracted DNA from meat samples were subjected to PCR using the universal primers of 12S rRNA gene. The PCR products were subjected to RFLP and sequencing. Results: The size of amplified PCR products was similar (440 bp in each species and sequence alignment showed more than 89 % similarities among these species. However, phylogenetic analysis revealed that Chital and Sambar are in one cluster while Goat and sheep are in other cluster. To differentiate between species, restriction digestion of the PCR products was carried out to produce characteristic PCR-RFLP patterns for each species. Restriction digestion with RsaI and AluI enzymes produced distinct PCR-RFLP patterns that differentiated the meat of wild species (chital-sambar from that of domestic species (goat-sheep. BsrI restriction digestion revealed unique PCR-RFLP pattern in chital differentiating it from the meat of other three species. Restriction digestion with DdeI enzyme led to the production of distinct PCR-RFLP patterns for chital and sambar to identify their meat individually. Conclusion: This study showed the effectiveness of 12S rRNA gene polymorphism in meat identification. The data can be used as evidence against the poachers to convict the wildlife crime in the court of law [Vet World 2013; 6(5.000: 254-259

  18. Integrating Small RNA Sequencing with QTL Mapping for Identification of miRNAs and Their Target Genes Associated with Heat Tolerance at the Flowering Stage in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Yang, Tifeng; Yu, Ting; Zhang, Shaohong; Mao, Xingxue; Zhao, Junliang; Wang, Xiaofei; Dong, Jingfang; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Although, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to be associated with heat tolerance at the seedling stage in rice, their involvement in heat tolerance at the flowering stage is still unknown. In this study, small RNA profiling was conducted in a heat-tolerant variety Gan-Xiang-Nuo (GXN) and a heat-sensitive variety Hua-Jing-Xian-74 (HJX), respectively. Totally, 102 miRNAs were differentially expressed (DE) under heat stress. Compared to HJX, GXN had more DE miRNAs and its DE miRNAs changed earlier under heat stress. Plant Ontology (PO) analysis of the target genes revealed that many DE miRNAs were involved in flower development. As a parallel experiment, QTL mapping was also conducted and four QTLs for heat tolerance at the flowering stage were identified using chromosome single-segment substitution lines derived from GXN and HJX. Further, through integrating analysis of DE miRNAs with QTLs, we identified 8 target genes corresponding to 26 miRNAs within the four QTL regions. Some meaningful target genes such as LOC_Os12g42400, SGT1, and pectinesterase were within the QTL regions. The negative correlation between miR169r-5p and its target gene LOC_Os12g42400 was confirmed under heat stress, and overexpression of miR169r-5p enhanced heat tolerance at flowering stage in rice. Our results demonstrate that the integrated analysis of genome-wide miRNA profiling with QTL mapping can facilitate identification of miRNAs and their target genes associated with the target traits and the limited candidates identified in this study offer an important source for further functional analysis and molecular breeding for heat tolerance in rice. PMID:28174587

  19. Translation inhibition of the developmental cycle protein HctA by the small RNA IhtA is conserved across Chlamydia.

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    Jeremiah Tattersall

    Full Text Available The developmental cycle of the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 is controlled in part by the small non-coding RNA (sRNA, IhtA. All Chlamydia alternate in a regulated fashion between the infectious elementary body (EB and the replicative reticulate body (RB which asynchronously re-differentiates back to the terminal EB form at the end of the cycle. The histone like protein HctA is central to RB:EB differentiation late in the cycle as it binds to and occludes the genome, thereby repressing transcription and translation. The sRNA IhtA is a critical component of this regulatory loop as it represses translation of hctA until late in infection at which point IhtA transcription decreases, allowing HctA expression to occur and RB to EB differentiation to proceed. It has been reported that IhtA is expressed during infection by the human pathogens C. trachomatis serovars L2, D and L2b and C. pneumoniae. We show in this work that IhtA is also expressed by the animal pathogens C. caviae and C. muridarum. Expression of HctA in E. coli is lethal and co-expression of IhtA relieves this phenotype. To determine if regulation of HctA by IhtA is a conserved mechanism across pathogenic chlamydial species, we cloned hctA and ihtA from C. trachomatis serovar D, C. muridarum, C. caviae and C. pneumoniae and assayed for rescue of growth repression in E. coli co-expression studies. In each case, co-expression of ihtA with the cognate hctA resulted in relief of growth repression. In addition, expression of each chlamydial species IhtA rescued the lethal phenotype of C. trachomatis serovar L2 HctA expression. As biolayer interferometry studies indicate that IhtA interacts directly with hctA message for all species tested, we predict that conserved sequences of IhtA are necessary for function and/or binding.

  20. Translation inhibition of the developmental cycle protein HctA by the small RNA IhtA is conserved across Chlamydia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Jeremiah; Rao, Geeta Vittal; Runac, Justin; Hackstadt, Ted; Grieshaber, Scott S; Grieshaber, Nicole A

    2012-01-01

    The developmental cycle of the obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2 is controlled in part by the small non-coding RNA (sRNA), IhtA. All Chlamydia alternate in a regulated fashion between the infectious elementary body (EB) and the replicative reticulate body (RB) which asynchronously re-differentiates back to the terminal EB form at the end of the cycle. The histone like protein HctA is central to RB:EB differentiation late in the cycle as it binds to and occludes the genome, thereby repressing transcription and translation. The sRNA IhtA is a critical component of this regulatory loop as it represses translation of hctA until late in infection at which point IhtA transcription decreases, allowing HctA expression to occur and RB to EB differentiation to proceed. It has been reported that IhtA is expressed during infection by the human pathogens C. trachomatis serovars L2, D and L2b and C. pneumoniae. We show in this work that IhtA is also expressed by the animal pathogens C. caviae and C. muridarum. Expression of HctA in E. coli is lethal and co-expression of IhtA relieves this phenotype. To determine if regulation of HctA by IhtA is a conserved mechanism across pathogenic chlamydial species, we cloned hctA and ihtA from C. trachomatis serovar D, C. muridarum, C. caviae and C. pneumoniae and assayed for rescue of growth repression in E. coli co-expression studies. In each case, co-expression of ihtA with the cognate hctA resulted in relief of growth repression. In addition, expression of each chlamydial species IhtA rescued the lethal phenotype of C. trachomatis serovar L2 HctA expression. As biolayer interferometry studies indicate that IhtA interacts directly with hctA message for all species tested, we predict that conserved sequences of IhtA are necessary for function and/or binding.

  1. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has provided exciting insights into a novel class of central (small) RNA molecules intimately involved in gene regulation. Only a small percentage of our DNA is translated into proteins by mRNA, yet 80% or more of the DNA is transcribed into RNA, and this RNA has been found...... to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...

  2. Cloning of the rhesus lymphocryptovirus viral capsid antigen and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA homologues and use in diagnosis of acute and persistent infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P; Jiang, H; Wang, F

    2000-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the most common cause of infectious mononucleosis and is associated with the development of several human malignancies. A closely related herpesvirus in the same lymphocryptovirus (LCV) genera as EBV naturally infects rhesus monkeys and provides an important animal model for studying EBV pathogenesis. We cloned the small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) homologue from the rhesus LCV and developed a peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine whether epitopes in the rhesus LCV sVCA are a reliable indicator of rhesus LCV infection. In order to define a "gold standard" for rhesus LCV infection, we also cloned the EBV-encoded small RNA 1 (EBER1) and EBER2 homologues from rhesus LCV and developed a reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay to detect persistent LCV infection in rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes. Animals from a conventional and a hand-reared colony were studied to compare the prevalence of rhesus LCV infection in the two groups. There was a 100% correlation between the peptide ELISA and EBER RT-PCR results for rhesus LCV infection. In addition, specificity for LCV infection and exclusion of potential cross-reactivity to the rhesus rhadinovirus sVCA homologue could be demonstrated using sera from experimentally infected animals. These studies establish two novel assays for reliable diagnosis of acute and persistent rhesus LCV infections. The rhesus LCV sVCA peptide ELISA provides a sensitive and reliable assay for routine screening, and these studies of the hand-reared colony confirm the feasibility of raising rhesus LCV-naive animals.

  3. MicroRNA-449a is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer and inhibits migration and invasion by targeting c-Met.

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    Wenting Luo

    Full Text Available MicroRNA-449a is expressed at a low level in several tumors and cancer cell lines, and induces G1 arrest, apoptosis, and senescence. To identify the function of miR-449a in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, we discussed the potential relevance of miR-449a to clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis in NSCLC. We also investigated the impact of miR-449a on migration and invasion in NSCLC cells. The expression of miR-449a in NSCLC tissues and cell lines was detected using RT-qPCR. In vitro, gain-of-function, loss-of-function experiments, and fluorescence assays were performed to identify the potential target of miR-449a and the function of miR-449a in NSCLC cells. MiR-449a was downregulated in both NSCLC tissues and cell lines. Moreover, a low expression level of miR-449a appeared to be correlated with lymph node metastasis and poor survival. In vitro, miR-449 regulated cell migration and invasion in NSCLC cells as a potential tumor suppressor, at least in part by targeting c-Met. Furthermore, reciprocal expression of miR-449a and c-Met was shown in NSCLC tissue samples. This study indicates that miR-449a might be associated with NSCLC progression, and suggests a crucial role for miR-449a in NSCLC.

  4. Effects of Methylation of FHIT Gene on it’s Protein and mRNA Expression in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Wentong LI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Fragile histidine triad (FHIT is a new tumor suppressor gene, whose promoter methylation plays an important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study is to explore the effects of CpG island methylation on protein and mRNA expression of FHIT in non-small cell lung cancer, and the roles of FHIT gene in pathogenesis of NSCLC. Methods Methylation and protein expression and transcriptional level of FHIT gene were detected by methylationspecific PCR, Western Blot and RT-PCR in 52 tumor tissues and normal tissues of NSCLC. Results Methylation in the tumor samples was detected at 38.46%, whereas it occurred at lower frequencies (7.69% in the corresponding normal lung tissues. Protein expression frequencies was 28.8% in the tumor samples, whereas it was 88.5% in the corresponding normal lung tissues. MRNA expression frequencies was 51.9% in the tumor samples and 100% in the corresponding normal lung tissues. Conclusion In NSCLC, FHIT gene promoter methylation frequency was significantly increased with decreased expression, suggesting that FHIT promoter methylation plays a role in lung cancer carcinogenesis.

  5. Downregulation of Cyclophilin A by siRNA diminishes non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and metastasis via the regulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9

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    Qian Zhe

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclophilin A (CypA is a cytosolic protein possessing peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity that was recently reported to be overexpressed in several cancers. Here, we explored the biology and molecular mechanism of CypA in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods The expression of CypA in human NSCLC cell lines was detected by real-time reverse transcription PCR. The RNA interference-mediated knockdown of CypA was established in two NSCLC cell lines (95C and A549. 239836 CypA inhibitor was also used to suppress CypA activity. Tumorigenesis was assessed based on cellular proliferation, colony formation assays, and anchorage-independent growth assays; metastasis was assessed based on wound healing and transwell assays. Results Suppression of CypA expression inhibited the cell growth and colony formation of A549 and 95C cells. CypA knockdown resulted in the inhibition of cell motility and invasion. Significantly, we show for the first time that CypA increased NSCLC cell invasion by regulating the activity of secreted matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9. Likewise, suppression of CypA with 239836 CypA inhibitor decreased cell proliferation and MMP9 activity. Conclusions The suppression of CypA expression was correlated with decreased NSCLC cell tumorigenesis and metastasis.

  6. In Situ Dynamics of F-Specific RNA Bacteriophages in a Small River: New Way to Assess Viral Propagation in Water Quality Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvel, Blandine; Gantzer, Christophe; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Ogorzaly, Leslie

    2017-03-01

    The occurrence and propagation of enteric viruses in rivers constitute a major public health issue. However, little information is available on the in situ transport and spread of viruses in surface water. In this study, an original in situ experimental approach using the residence time of the river water mass was developed to accurately follow the propagation of F-specific RNA bacteriophages (FRNAPHs) along a 3-km studied river. Surface water and sediment of 9 sampling campaigns were collected and analyzed using both infectivity and RT-qPCR assays. In parallel, some physico-chemical variables such as flow rate, water temperature, conductivity and total suspended solids were measured to investigate the impact of environmental conditions on phage propagation. For campaigns with low flow rate and high temperature, the results highlight a decrease of infectious phage concentration along the river, which was successfully modelled according to a first-order negative exponential decay. The monitoring of infectious FRNAPHs belonging mainly to the genogroup II was confirmed with direct phage genotyping and total phage particle quantification. Reported k decay coefficients according to exponential models allowed for the determination of the actual in situ distance and time necessary for removing 90 % of infectious phage particles. This present work provides a new way to assess the true in situ viral propagation along a small river. These findings can be highly useful in water quality and risk assessment studies to determine the viral contamination spread from a point contamination source to the nearest recreational areas.

  7. Phase I clinical trial of SYL040012, a small interfering RNA targeting β-adrenergic receptor 2, for lowering intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Montañés, Javier; Sádaba, Belén; Ruz, Verónica; Gómez-Guiu, Almudena; Zarranz, Javier; González, María Victoria; Pañeda, Covadonga; Jimenez, Ana Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate ocular tolerance, safety, and effect on intraocular pressure (IOP) of a topically administered small interfering RNA; SYL040012, on healthy volunteers. The study was an open-label, controlled, single-center study comprised of two intervals that enrolled 30 healthy subjects having IOP below 21 mmHg. SYL040012 was administered to one eye as a single dose to six subjects during interval 1. During interval 2 two different doses of SYL040012 were administered to one eye on a daily basis to two separate groups of 12 subjects each, over a period of 7 days. The contralateral eye was evaluated but not administered and served as control for the tolerance study. SYL040012 was well tolerated locally. No local or systemic adverse events related to the product developed in response to any of the doses studied. SYL040012 was not detected in plasma at any time point. Administration of SYL040012 over a period of 7 days reduced IOP values in 15 out of 24 healthy subjects regardless of the dose used. IOP decrease was statistically significant in response to one of the doses tested and responsiveness to SYL040012 seemed to be greater in individuals with higher baseline IOP.

  8. Small kinetochore associated protein (SKAP promotes UV-induced cell apoptosis through negatively regulating pre-mRNA processing factor 19 (Prp19.

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    Shan Lu

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a regulated cellular suicide program that is critical for the development and maintenance of healthy tissues. Previous studies have shown that small kinetochore associated protein (SKAP cooperates with kinetochore and mitotic spindle proteins to regulate mitosis. However, the role of SKAP in apoptosis has not been investigated. We have identified a new interaction involving SKAP, and we propose a mechanism through which SKAP regulates cell apoptosis. Our experiments demonstrate that both overexpression and knockdown of SKAP sensitize cells to UV-induced apoptosis. Further study has revealed that SKAP interacts with Pre-mRNA processing Factor 19 (Prp19. We find that UV-induced apoptosis can be inhibited by ectopic expression of Prp19, whereas silencing Prp19 has the opposite effect. Additionally, SKAP negatively regulates the protein levels of Prp19, whereas Prp19 does not alter SKAP expression. Finally, rescue experiments demonstrate that the pro-apoptotic role of SKAP is executed through Prp19. Taken together, these findings suggest that SKAP promotes UV-induced cell apoptosis by negatively regulating the anti-apoptotic protein Prp19.

  9. MicroRNA-181b is downregulated in non-small cell lung cancer and inhibits cell motility by directly targeting HMGB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Hu, Xu; Xia, Daokui; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-11-01

    The expression of microRNA-181b (miR-181b) has been investigated in various human cancers. However, the expression and functions of miR-181b in non-