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Sample records for approx constant applicable

  1. Nonlinear Schroedinger-Poisson definition of fine-structure-constant's value {approx}1/137

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinisch, G, E-mail: Gilbert.Reinisch@oca.e [Universite de Nice - Sophia Antipolis CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur BP 4229 06304 - Nice Cedex 4 (France)

    2010-06-01

    By numerically investigating the nonlinear Schroedinger-Poisson eigenstates of a condensed Bose gas of charged particles that is confined in a two-dimensional axisymmetric parabolic potential 1/2 m{sub e{omega}}{sup 2}r{sup 2} (e.g. quantum-dot helium), it is shown that the probability amplitude between two nonlinear-and hence non-orthogonal-eigenstates displays an interference pattern scaled (within 0.03 %) by graphic equation Since {alpha} = e{sup 2}/ h-bar c {approx} 1/137 is the fine structure constant, this stunning result-indeed velocity of light c does not enter the present non-relativistic model-is tentatively explained by the existence of a 'nonlinear' bound state of the trapped particle-particle interaction Coulomb field whose energy cal E = half pi hbar omega defines the induced emission or absorption equilibrium processes between two appropriate chemical potentials. Besides, a non-decoherence quantum-classical transition with increasing nonlinearity is pointed out. As a possible experimental test for the present theory, the 0s{sup 2} {yields}1s{sup 2} nonlinear transition in an {h_bar} {omega} = 1.66meV GaAs quantum-dot helium is emphasized.

  2. Rate Constant Calculation for Thermal Reactions Methods and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    DaCosta, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Providing an overview of the latest computational approaches to estimate rate constants for thermal reactions, this book addresses the theories behind various first-principle and approximation methods that have emerged in the last twenty years with validation examples. It presents in-depth applications of those theories to a wide range of basic and applied research areas. When doing modeling and simulation of chemical reactions (as in many other cases), one often has to compromise between higher-accuracy/higher-precision approaches (which are usually time-consuming) and approximate/lower-preci

  3. High temperature elastic constant measurements: application to plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an apparatus with which we have measured the Young's modulus and the Poisson's ratio of several compounds from the resonance frequency of cylinders in the temperature range 0 deg. C-700 deg. C. We especially studied the elastic constants of plutonium and measured for the first time to our knowledge the Young's modulus of Puδ and Puε. Eδ 360 deg. C = 1.6 1011 dy/cm2; Eε 490 deg. C = 1.1 1011 dy/cm2, σε = 0.25 ± 0.03 Using our results, we have calculated the compressibility, the Debye temperature, the Grueneisen constant and the electronic specific heat of Puε. (author)

  4. Measurements of Creep Internal Stress Based on Constant Strain Rate and Its Application to Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Wen-liang; WEI Tao

    2006-01-01

    This research is carried out on the basis of Constant Strain Rate(CSR) to measure creep internal stress. Measurements of creep internal stress are conducted on the material test machine by using the CSR method. A mathematical model of creep internal stress is also proposed and its application is presented in this paper.

  5. Equivalent Electromagnetic Constants for Microwave Application to Composite Materials for the Multi-Scale Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Fujisaki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To connect different scale models in the multi-scale problem of microwave use, equivalent material constants were researched numerically by a three-dimensional electromagnetic field, taking into account eddy current and displacement current. A volume averaged method and a standing wave method were used to introduce the equivalent material constants; water particles and aluminum particles are used as composite materials. Consumed electrical power is used for the evaluation. Water particles have the same equivalent material constants for both methods; the same electrical power is obtained for both the precise model (micro-model and the homogeneous model (macro-model. However, aluminum particles have dissimilar equivalent material constants for both methods; different electric power is obtained for both models. The varying electromagnetic phenomena are derived from the expression of eddy current. For small electrical conductivity such as water, the macro-current which flows in the macro-model and the micro-current which flows in the micro-model express the same electromagnetic phenomena. However, for large electrical conductivity such as aluminum, the macro-current and micro-current express different electromagnetic phenomena. The eddy current which is observed in the micro-model is not expressed by the macro-model. Therefore, the equivalent material constant derived from the volume averaged method and the standing wave method is applicable to water with a small electrical conductivity, although not applicable to aluminum with a large electrical conductivity.

  6. Quantum theory of the dielectric constant of a magnetized plasma and astrophysical applications. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, V.; Ventura, J.

    1972-01-01

    A quantum mechanical treatment of an electron plasma in a constant and homogeneous magnetic field is considered, with the aim of (1) defining the range of validity of the magnetoionic theory (2) studying the deviations from this theory, in applications involving high densities, and intense magnetic field. While treating the magnetic field exactly, a perturbation approach in the photon field is used to derive general expressions for the dielectric tensor. Numerical estimates on the range of applicability of the magnetoionic theory are given for the case of the 'one-dimensional' electron gas, where only the lowest Landau level is occupied.

  7. Applications of the constant-current variable-voltage dc accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variable beam energy at constant current is useful for industrial applications such as surface hardening and passivation or semiconductor processing. We discuss a dc accelerator, under development for the DOE magnetic fusion energy program, which uses electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) focusing to maintain constant current while the voltage is variable over a wide range. The use of ESQs also allows a conservative design that alleviates known causes of dc voltage breakdown. The beam is accelerated by a series of 100 kV ESQ modules, stackable to a megavolt or more. The energy is tunable to as low as 20 keV without reduction in current. Single-beam and multiple-beam systems have been designed, capable of accelerating typically 50 mA of N+ or O+ per beam. (orig.)

  8. Isospin Mixing In N $\\approx$ Z Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    Srnka, D; Versyck, S; Zakoucky, D

    2002-01-01

    Isospin mixing in N $\\approx$ Z nuclei region of the nuclear chart is an important phenomenon in nuclear physics which has recently gained theoretical and experimental interest. It also forms an important nuclear physics correction in the precise determination of the $ft$-values of superallowed 0$^+ \\rightarrow 0^+ \\beta$- transitions. The latter are used in precision tests of the weak interaction from nuclear $\\beta$- decay. We propose to experimentally measure isospin mixing into nuclear ground states in the N $\\approx$ Z region by determining the isospin forbidden Fermi-component in the Gamow-Teller dominated $J^{\\pi} \\rightarrow J^{\\pi} \\beta$- transitions through the observation of anisotropic positron emission from oriented nuclei. First measurements were carried out with $^{71}$As and are being analyzed now.

  9. Resonant converter topologies for constant-current power supplies and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power electronics, in general, and power supplies, in particular, is an important field of accelerator technology due to its widespread use, for instance in dc, ramp or pulse magnet power supplies, high voltage power supplies for electrostatic accelerators and RF amplifies, power supplies for vacuum pumps, vacuum gauges, beam diagnostic devices etc. It has been possible to meet stringent performance requirements with the continuing advancement in the field of power electronics. Resonant converters have been an active area of research in power electronics field due to variety of topologies, diverse, peculiar and useful characteristics. While the majority of the previous work on resonant converters has been directed towards developing methods of analysis and control techniques for the mentioned applications, very little has been done to explore their suitability for application as a constant-current power supply, which is either inherently required or can be advantageously applied in power supplies for various accelerator subsystems and other industrial applications such as electric arc welding, laser diode drivers, magnet illumination systems, battery charging, electrochemical processes etc.

  10. Application of equivalence methods on Monte Carlo method based homogenization multi-group constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multi-group constants generated via continuous energy Monte Carlo method do not satisfy the equivalence between reference calculation and diffusion calculation applied in reactor core analysis. To the satisfaction of the equivalence theory, general equivalence theory (GET) and super homogenization method (SPH) were applied to the Monte Carlo method based group constants, and a simplified reactor core and C5G7 benchmark were examined with the Monte Carlo constants. The results show that the calculating precision of group constants is improved, and GET and SPH are good candidates for the equivalence treatment of Monte Carlo homogenization. (authors)

  11. Evaluation and Application of the Constant Flow Technique in Testing Low-Permeability Geo-Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety assessment of facilities involved in geological disposal of hazardous waste, including radioactive nuclear waste, is generally performed through mass transport simulations combined with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. Transport of contaminants, such as radionuclides, through an engineered and/or natural barrier system is mainly controlled by advection, dispersion, sorption, and chain decay. Ideally, waste disposal facilities should be constructed in the geological environments where groundwater is not existent, or groundwater is static, or its flow is extremely slow. Potential fluid flow, however, may be induced by thermal convection and/or gas generation, and thus accurate evaluation of hydraulic properties, specifically the permeability and specific storage, along with diffusive transport properties of engineered and natural barrier materials, is of fundamental importance for safety assessment. The engineered and natural barrier materials for isolating hazardous wastes are hydraulically tight, and special techniques are generally required to obtain both rapid and accurate determination of their hydraulic properties. In this paper, the constant flow technique is introduced and evaluated. The capability of this technique in testing low-permeability geo-materials are illustrated through practical applications to a bentonite-sand mixture and rock samples having low permeabilities. (authors)

  12. Calibration of the k- ɛ model constants for use in CFD applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Nina; Guillias, Serge; Malki-Epshtein, Liora

    2011-11-01

    The k- ɛ turbulence model is a popular choice in CFD modelling due to its robust nature and the fact that it has been well validated. However it has been noted in previous research that the k- ɛ model has problems predicting flow separation as well as unconfined and transient flows. The model contains five empirical model constants whose values were found through data fitting for a wide range of flows (Launder 1972) but ad-hoc adjustments are often made to these values depending on the situation being modeled. Here we use the example of flow within a regular street canyon to perform a Bayesian calibration of the model constants against wind tunnel data. This allows us to assess the sensitivity of the CFD model to changes in these constants, find the most suitable values for the constants as well as quantifying the uncertainty related to the constants and the CFD model as a whole.

  13. Surfactant media for constant-current coulometry. Application for the determination of antioxidants in pharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziyatdinova, Guzel, E-mail: Ziyatdinovag@mail.ru [Analytical Chemistry Department, A.M. Butlerov Institute of Chemistry, Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kremlyevskaya, 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation); Ziganshina, Endzhe; Budnikov, Herman [Analytical Chemistry Department, A.M. Butlerov Institute of Chemistry, Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University, Kremlyevskaya, 18, Kazan 420008 (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Applicability of surfactants in constant-current coulometry is shown for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reactions of antioxidants with electrogenerated titrants in surfactant media are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Water insoluble antioxidants can be determined in water media with addition of surfactants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coulometric determination of antioxidants in pharmaceutical dosage forms using surfactants media is developed. - Abstract: Effect of surfactant presence on electrochemical generation of titrants has been evaluated and discussed for the first time. Cationic (1-dodecylpyridinium and cetylpyridinium bromide), anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate) and nonionic (Triton X100 and Brij{sup Registered-Sign} 35) surfactants as well as nonionic high molecular weight polymer (PEG 4000) do not react with the electrogenerated bromine, iodine and hexacyanoferrate(III) ions. The electrogenerated chlorine chemically interact with Triton X100 and Brij{sup Registered-Sign} 35. The allowable range of surfactants concentrations providing 100% current yield has been found. Chain-breaking low molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbic acid, rutin, {alpha}-tocopherol and retinol) were determined by reaction with the electrogenerated titrants in surfactant media. Nonionic and cationic surfactants can be used for the determination of antioxidants by reaction with the electrogenerated halogens. On contrary, cationic surfactants gives significantly overstated results of antioxidants determination with electrogenerated hexacyanoferrate(III) ions. The use of surfactants in coulometry of {alpha}-tocopherol and retinol provides their solubilization and allows to perform titration in water media. Simple, express and reliable coulometric approach for determination of {alpha}-tocopherol, rutin and ascorbic acid in pharmaceuticals using surfactant media has been developed. The relative standard deviation of the

  14. Optical measurement of Verdet constants of two electrooptic crystals and their applications to optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Changsheng

    2013-12-01

    Verdet constants of beta-barium borate (BBO) and lead molybdate (PMO) crystals are measured experimentally by the method of comparison with a block of terbium-doped glass with a known Verdet constant. Experimental setups mainly include two prism polarizers, a solenoid and ac current supply, and signal processing circuits. The influences of light intensity fluctuation, applied magnetic field and signal processing circuits on measurement result of Verdet constant can be removed by using the method of comparison. For light wavelength of 635nm, the measured Verdet constants respectively are 5.80+/-0.06 rad/(T.m) for the BBO crystal and 54.6+/-1.1 rad/(T.m) for the PMO crystal. A novel optical current sensor based on electrooptic compensation is designed in principle using the BBO crystal.

  15. Anharmonic force constants extracted from first-principles molecular dynamics: applications to heat transfer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic method to calculate anharmonic force constants of crystals is presented. The method employs the direct-method approach, where anharmonic force constants are extracted from the trajectory of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations at high temperature. The method is applied to Si where accurate cubic and quartic force constants are obtained. We observe that higher-order correction is crucial to obtain accurate force constants from the trajectory with large atomic displacements. The calculated harmonic and anharmonic force constants are, then, combined with the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) methods in calculating the thermal conductivity. The BTE approach successfully predicts the lattice thermal conductivity of bulk Si, whereas NEMD shows considerable underestimates. To evaluate the linear extrapolation method employed in NEMD to estimate bulk values, we analyze the size dependence in NEMD based on BTE calculations. We observe strong nonlinearity in the size dependence of NEMD in Si, which can be ascribed to acoustic phonons having long mean-free-paths and carrying considerable heat. Subsequently, we also apply the whole method to a thermoelectric material Mg2Si and demonstrate the reliability of the NEMD method for systems with low thermal conductivities. (paper)

  16. Model of constant probability event and its application in information fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓勇; 施文康

    2004-01-01

    A model of constant probability event is constructed rigorously in event space of PSCEA. It is showed that the numerical-based fusion and the algebraic-based fusion have a consistent result when the weight is regarded as a constant probability event. From the point of view of algebra, we present a novel similarity measure in product space. Based on the similarity degree, we use a similarity aggregation method to fusion experts' evaluation. We also give a numerical example to illustrate the method.

  17. Volatility dependence of Henry's law constants of condensable organics: Application to estimate depositional loss of secondary organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodzic, A.; Aumont, B.; Knote, C.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Tyndall, G.

    2014-07-01

    The water solubility of oxidation intermediates of volatile organic compounds that can condense to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is largely unconstrained in current chemistry-climate models. We apply the Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere to calculate Henry's law constants for these intermediate species. Results show a strong negative correlation between Henry's law constants and saturation vapor pressures. Details depend on precursor species, extent of photochemical processing, and NOx levels. Henry's law constants as a function of volatility are made available over a wide range of vapor pressures for use in 3-D models. In an application using the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) over the U.S. in summer, we find that dry (and wet) deposition of condensable organic vapors leads to major reductions in SOA, decreasing surface concentrations by ~50% (10%) for biogenic and ~40% (6%) for short chain anthropogenic precursors under the considered volatility conditions.

  18. Computing the Kirkwood g-Factor by Combining Constant Maxwell Electric Field and Electric Displacement Simulations: Application to the Dielectric Constant of Liquid Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Hutter, Jürg; Sprik, Michiel

    2016-07-21

    In his classic 1939 paper, Kirkwood linked the macroscopic dielectric constant of polar liquids to the local orientational order as measured by the g-factor (later named after him) and suggested that the corresponding dielectric constant at short-range is effectively equal to the macroscopic value just after "a distance of molecular magnitude" [ Kirkwood, J. Chem. Phys., 1939, 7, 911 ]. Here, we show a simple approach to extract the short-ranged Kirkwood g-factor from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation by superposing the outcomes of constant electric field E and constant electric displacement D simulations [ Zhang and Sprik, Phys. Rev. B: Condens. Matter Mater. Phys., 2016, 93, 144201 ]. Rather than from the notoriously slow fluctuations of the dipole moment of the full MD cell, the dielectric constant can now be estimated from dipole fluctuations at short-range, accelerating the convergence. Exploiting this feature, we computed the bulk dielectric constant of liquid water modeled in the generalized gradient approximation (PBE) to density functional theory and found it to be at least 40% larger than the experimental value. PMID:27352038

  19. Temperature and Pressure Derivatives of Elastic Constants With Application to the Mantle

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Don L.

    1988-01-01

    The temperature and pressure derivatives of the elastic moduli M of solids can be cast into the form of dimensionless logarithmic anharmonic {DLA} parameters, ∂ ln M/∂ In p = {M} at constant temperature, pressure, or entropy (T, P, S), where p is the density. These parameters show little variation from material to material and are expected to show little variation with temperature at high temperature. Most of the available derivative data for ionic solids has been renormalized and analyzed fo...

  20. DETERMINATION OF HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS OF ODOROUS CONTAMINANTS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO HUMAN PERCEPTION

    OpenAIRE

    Omur, Pinar

    2004-01-01

    Although utilities attempt to avoid offensive smelling compounds in consumer's drinking water, their efforts are often hampered by a lack of data or knowledge of the physical, chemical, and sensory properties of odorants. Many factors affect the ability of a consumer to detect odors, including: concentration, presence of chlorine/other odorants, temperature, and the individual's sensitivity. This research developed a simplified static-headspace technique to determine Henry's Law constants...

  1. Impact of Chandra calibration uncertainties on galaxy cluster temperatures: application to the Hubble Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Reese, Erik D; Kitayama, Tetsu; Ota, Naomi; Sasaki, Shin; Suto, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    We perform a uniform, systematic analysis of a sample of 38 X-ray galaxy clusters with three different Chandra calibrations. The temperatures change systematically between calibrations. Cluster temperatures change on average by roughly ~6% for the smallest changes and roughly ~13% for the more extreme changes between calibrations. We explore the effects of the changing cluster spectral properties on Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) and X-ray determinations of the Hubble constant. The Hubble parameter changes by +10% and -13% between the current calibration and two previous Chandra calibrations, indicating that changes in the cluster temperature basically explain the entire change in H_0. Although this work focuses on the difference in spectral properties and resultant Hubble parameters between the calibrations, it is intriguing to note that the newer calibrations favor a lower value of the Hubble constant, H_0 ~ 60 km s-1 Mpc-1, typical of results from SZE/X-ray distances. Both galaxy clusters themselves and t...

  2. Constant and pulse power capabilities of lead-acid batteries made with thin metal film (TMF®) for different applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, R. C.

    Conventional power sources are able to deliver high energy, but high-power demands can be met only with advanced electrochemical or heavy battery devices. BOLDER Technologies has developed a high-power cell (86 g, 1.0 A h, 2 V) based on patented Thin Metal Film (TMF®) Technology which is capable of delivering very high constant or pulse power for several applications. Six cells in a 0.5-1 kg pack are capable of delivering 1 to 1000 A with a stiff voltage plateau of 12 V for periods ranging from 1 h to a few milliseconds, respectively, and constant power not provided by any other battery chemistry. The BOLDER TMF® cells are made of thin lead foil and PbO active material, which gives enormous cost advantages compared with existing lead-acid batteries or with competing battery systems. This paper presents the high constant-power and pulse-power delivery characteristics of batteries made with TMF technology. The new concept of developing hybrid power sources with proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) or other battery types for electronic communication and turbine-starting applications is also discussed.

  3. Solid-state fast voltage compensator for pulsed power applications requiring constant AC power consumption

    CERN Document Server

    Magallanes, Francisco Cabaleiro; Viarouge, Philippe; Cros, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel topological solution for pulsed power converters based on capacitor-discharge topologies, integrating a Fast Voltage Compensator which allows an operation at constant power consumption from the utility grid. This solution has been retained as a possible candidate for the CLIC project under study at CERN, which requires more than a thousand synchronously-operated klystron modulators producing a total pulsed power of almost 40 GW. The proposed Fast Voltage Compensator is integrated in the modulator such that it only has to treat the capacitor charger current and a fraction of the charging voltage, meaning that its dimensioning power and cost are minimized. This topology can be used to improve the AC power quality of any pulsed converters based on capacitor-discharge concept. A prototype has been built and exploited to validate the operating principle and demonstrate the benefits of the proposed solution.

  4. The 'Densitometric Image Analysis Software' and its application to determine stepwise equilibrium constants from electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth van Oeffelen

    Full Text Available Current software applications for densitometric analysis, such as ImageJ, QuantityOne (BioRad and the Intelligent or Advanced Quantifier (Bio Image do not allow to take the non-linearity of autoradiographic films into account during calibration. As a consequence, quantification of autoradiographs is often regarded as problematic, and phosphorimaging is the preferred alternative. However, the non-linear behaviour of autoradiographs can be described mathematically, so it can be accounted for. Therefore, the 'Densitometric Image Analysis Software' has been developed, which allows to quantify electrophoretic bands in autoradiographs, as well as in gels and phosphorimages, while providing optimized band selection support to the user. Moreover, the program can determine protein-DNA binding constants from Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSAs. For this purpose, the software calculates a chosen stepwise equilibrium constant for each migration lane within the EMSA, and estimates the errors due to non-uniformity of the background noise, smear caused by complex dissociation or denaturation of double-stranded DNA, and technical errors such as pipetting inaccuracies. Thereby, the program helps the user to optimize experimental parameters and to choose the best lanes for estimating an average equilibrium constant. This process can reduce the inaccuracy of equilibrium constants from the usual factor of 2 to about 20%, which is particularly useful when determining position weight matrices and cooperative binding constants to predict genomic binding sites. The MATLAB source code, platform-dependent software and installation instructions are available via the website http://micr.vub.ac.be.

  5. Mechanical First Law of Black Hole Spacetimes with Cosmological Constant and Its Application to Schwarzschild-de Sitter Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Urano, Miho; Saida, Hiromi

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical first law (MFL) of black hole spacetimes is a geometrical relation which relates variations of mass parameter and horizon area. While it is well known that the MFL of asymptotic flat black hole is equivalent to its thermodynamical first law, however we do not know the detail of MFL of black hole spacetimes with cosmological constant which possess black hole and cosmological event horizons. Then this paper aims to formulate an MFL of the two-horizon spacetimes. For this purpose, we try to include the effects of two horizons in the MFL. To do so, we make use of the Iyer-Wald formalism and extend it to regard the mass parameter and the cosmological constant as two independent variables which make it possible to treat the two horizons on the same footing. Our extended Iyer-Wald formalism preserves the existence of conserved Noether current and its associated Noether charge, and gives the abstract form of MFL of black hole spacetimes with cosmological constant. Then, as a representative application ...

  6. Study of formation constant of molybdophosphate and it's application in the product of xenotime sand, tooth and bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation constant of molybdophosphate complex and it's application in the product of xenotime sand, tooth and bone have been studied by spectrophotometric method. The molybdophosphate complex were formed from reaction between phosphate and molybdate on several of pH in the strong acid condition (pH = 0.45 - 0.71) and several of phosphate mole fraction (0.01 - 0.08). The several of complex formation reactions were determined by matrix disintegration technique. Molybdophosphate complex were founded three forms i.e. (P2Mo18O62)6- or 9 MPA, (PMo11O39)7- or 11 MPA and (PMo12O40)3- or 12 MPA. The formation constant of (PMo12O40)3- complex was found β = 1046.95 ± 103.7, while for (P2Mo18O62)6- and (PMo11O39)7- were not detected. The application in samples were found the concentration of P in product of xenotime sand : 5.37±0.08 μg/ml, in canine-tooth: 10.40 - 19.49 % in cutting-tooth : 11.08 - 18.05 % and in bone 10.94 - 14.29 %. (author)

  7. Spectral editing of weakly coupled spins using variable flip angles in PRESS constant echo time difference spectroscopy: Application to GABA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jeff; Hanstock, Chris C.; Wilman, Alan H.

    2009-10-01

    A general in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy editing technique is presented to detect weakly coupled spin systems through subtraction, while preserving singlets through addition, and is applied to the specific brain metabolite γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at 4.7 T. The new method uses double spin echo localization (PRESS) and is based on a constant echo time difference spectroscopy approach employing subtraction of two asymmetric echo timings, which is normally only applicable to strongly coupled spin systems. By utilizing flip angle reduction of one of the two refocusing pulses in the PRESS sequence, we demonstrate that this difference method may be extended to weakly coupled systems, thereby providing a very simple yet effective editing process. The difference method is first illustrated analytically using a simple two spin weakly coupled spin system. The technique was then demonstrated for the 3.01 ppm resonance of GABA, which is obscured by the strong singlet peak of creatine in vivo. Full numerical simulations, as well as phantom and in vivo experiments were performed. The difference method used two asymmetric PRESS timings with a constant total echo time of 131 ms and a reduced 120° final pulse, providing 25% GABA yield upon subtraction compared to two short echo standard PRESS experiments. Phantom and in vivo results from human brain demonstrate efficacy of this method in agreement with numerical simulations.

  8. Application of real, adjoint and bilinear weighting for collapsing group constants used in space neutron diffusion problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional collapsing for group cross sections used in multigroup nuclear reactor calculations is usually performed using normal (real; direct) flux weighting. The application of more advanced collapsing procedures using in an appropriate manner real, adjoint and bilinear weighting was in the past restricted in general to fundamental mode problems. Although the principles have been published for more than ten years, there seems to exist little recent experience on the merits and possible difficulties of these improved procedures for multidimensional diffusion problems for practical purposes, e.g. in the nuclear design and analysis of large Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs). The present work indicates the nature of the problems which could possibly be encountered in applying these procedures by tracing them back to the known close correspondence between group collapsing and synthesis methods. It tries to explain certain somewhat unusual features of the collapsed group constants obtained by adjoint and bilinear weighting and describes the experience gained in representative 1-dim. and 2-dim. test cases. It could be shown for criticality and perturbation calculations that in general it is advantageous to apply these improved collapsing methods if the necessary precautions are taken. Compared to the conventional collapsing procedures these improved procedures are especially useful for multidimensional problems because their application is well suited for that purpose. In the present study it could be proven that they are favorable with respect to computer time and storage needed due to the fact that the necessary number of coarse groups can be kept fairly small without deteriorating too much the accuracy and reliability of the coarse group results compared to reference results of corresponding fine group calculations with uncollapsed group constants. (orig.)

  9. Optical constants of materials in the EUV/soft x-ray region for multilayer mirror applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soufli, R [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The response of a given material to an incident electromagnetic wave is described by the energy dependent complex index of refraction n = 1 {minus} {delta} + i{beta}. In the extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/soft x-ray spectral region, the need for accurate determination of n is driven by activity in areas such as synchrotron based research, EUV/x-ray lithography, x-ray astronomy and plasma applications. Knowledge of the refractive index is essential for the design of the optical components of instruments used in experiments and applications. Moreover, measured values of n may be used to evaluate solid state models for the optical behavior of materials. The refractive index n of Si, Mo and Be is investigated in the EUV/soft x-ray region. In the case of Si, angle dependent reflectance measurements are performed in the energy range 50--180 eV. The optical constants {delta}, {beta} are both determined by fitting to the Fresnel equations. The results of this method are compared to the values in the 1993 atomic tables. Photoabsorption measurements for the optical constants of Mo are performed on C/Mo/C foils, in the energy range 60--930 eV. Photoabsorption measurements on Be thin films supported on silicon nitride membranes are performed, and the results are applied in the determination of the absorption coefficient of Be in the energy region 111.5--250 eV. The new results for Si and Mo are applied to the calculation of normal incidence reflectivities of Mo/Si and Mo/Be multilayer mirrors. These calculations show the importance of accurate knowledge of {delta} and {beta} in the prediction and modeling of the performance of multilayer optics.

  10. Varying Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D

    2005-01-01

    We review properties of theories for the variation of the gravitation and fine structure 'constants'. We highlight some general features of the cosmological models that exist in these theories with reference to recent quasar data that are consistent with time-variation in the fine structure 'constant' since a redshift of 3.5. The behaviour of a simple class of varying-alpha cosmologies is outlined in the light of all the observational constraints.

  11. A Virtual Mixture Approach to the Study of Multistate Equilibrium: Application to Constant pH Simulation in Explicit Water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongwu Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium of multiple states is a fundamental phenomenon in biology systems and has been the focus of many experimental and computational studies. This work presents a simulation method to directly study the equilibrium of multiple states. This method constructs a virtual mixture of multiple states (VMMS to sample the conformational space of all chemical states simultaneously. The VMMS system consists of multiple subsystems, one for each state. The subsystem contains a solute and a solvent environment. The solute molecules in all subsystems share the same conformation but have their own solvent environments. Transition between states is implicated by the change of their molar fractions. Simulation of a VMMS system allows efficient calculation of relative free energies of all states, which in turn determine their equilibrium molar fractions. For systems with a large number of state transition sites, an implicit site approximation is introduced to minimize the cost of simulation. A direct application of the VMMS method is for constant pH simulation to study protonation equilibrium. Applying the VMMS method to a heptapeptide of 3 ionizable residues, we calculated the pKas of those residues both with all explicit states and with implicit sites and obtained consistent results. For mouse epidermal growth factor of 9 ionizable groups, our VMMS simulations with implicit sites produced pKas of all 9 ionizable groups and the results agree qualitatively with NMR measurement. This example demonstrates the VMMS method can be applied to systems of a large number of ionizable groups and the computational cost scales linearly with the number of ionizable groups. For one of the most challenging systems in constant pH calculation, SNase Δ+PHS/V66K, our VMMS simulation shows that it is the state-dependent water penetration that causes the large deviation in lysine66's pKa.

  12. Application of accelerated evaluation method of alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation on bipolar linear regulator LM317

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With different irradiation methods including high dose rate irradiation, low dose rate irradiation, alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation, and US military standard constant high temperature and constant dose rate irradiation, the ionizing radiation responses of bipolar linear regulator LM317 from three different companies were investigated under the operating and zero biases. The results show that compared with constant high temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method, the alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method can not only very rapidly and accurately evaluate the dose rate effect of three bipolar linear regulators, but also well simulate the damage of low dose rate irradiation. Experiment results make the alteration temperature and constant dose rate irradiation method successfully apply to bipolar linear regulator. (authors)

  13. Astrophysics to z approx. 10 with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Robin; Hughes, Scott; Lang, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    The most useful characterization of a gravitational wave detector's performance is the accuracy with which astrophysical parameters of potential gravitational wave sources can be estimated. One of the most important source types for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is inspiraling binaries of black holes. LISA can measure mass and spin to better than 1% for a wide range of masses, even out to high redshifts. The most difficult parameter to estimate accurately is almost always luminosity distance. Nonetheless, LISA can measure luminosity distance of intermediate-mass black hole binary systems (total mass approx.10(exp 4) solar mass) out to z approx.10 with distance accuracies approaching 25% in many cases. With this performance, LISA will be able to follow the merger history of black holes from the earliest mergers of proto-galaxies to the present. LISA's performance as a function of mass from 1 to 10(exp 7) solar mass and of redshift out to z approx. 30 will be described. The re-formulation of LISA's science requirements based on an instrument sensitivity model and parameter estimation will be described.

  14. Hemaka's constant

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2012-01-01

    As proposed in a previous paper, the decorations of ancient objects can provide some information on the approximate evaluations of constant {\\pi}, the ratio of circumference to diameter. Here we discuss some disks found in the tomb of Hemaka, the chancellor of a king of the First Dynasty of Egypt, about 3000 BC. The discussion is based on measurements of the dimensionless ratio of lengths.

  15. MATHEMATICAL CONSTANTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, H.P.; Potter, Elinor

    1971-03-01

    This collection of mathematical data consists of two tables of decimal constants arranged according to size rather than function, a third table of integers from 1 to 1000, giving some of their properties, and a fourth table listing some infinite series arranged according to increasing size of the coefficients of the terms. The decimal values of Tables I and II are given to 20 D.

  16. HERSCHEL-ATLAS: TOWARD A SAMPLE OF {approx}1000 STRONGLY LENSED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Lapi, A.; Bressan, S.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Fan, L. [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Fleuren, S.; Sutherland, W. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Negrello, M. [Department of Physical Sciences, Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Baes, M. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Baker, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College, Blackett Lab, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Dannerbauer, H. [Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wien, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, 1180 Wien, Oesterreich (Austria); Dunne, L.; Dye, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Eales, S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Frayer, D. T. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Harris, A. I., E-mail: gnuevo@sissa.it [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); and others

    2012-04-10

    While the selection of strongly lensed galaxies (SLGs) with 500 {mu}m flux density S{sub 500} > 100 mJy has proven to be rather straightforward, for many applications it is important to analyze samples larger than the ones obtained when confining ourselves to such a bright limit. Moreover, only by probing to fainter flux densities is it possible to exploit strong lensing to investigate the bulk of the high-z star-forming galaxy population. We describe HALOS (the Herschel-ATLAS Lensed Objects Selection), a method for efficiently selecting fainter candidate SLGs, reaching a surface density of {approx_equal} 1.5-2 deg{sup -2}, i.e., a factor of about 4-6 higher than that at the 100 mJy flux limit. HALOS will allow the selection of up to {approx}1000 candidate SLGs (with amplifications {mu} {approx}> 2) over the full H-ATLAS survey area. Applying HALOS to the H-ATLAS Science Demonstration Phase field ({approx_equal} 14.4 deg{sup 2}) we find 31 candidate SLGs, whose candidate lenses are identified in the VIKING near-infrared catalog. Using the available information on candidate sources and candidate lenses we tentatively estimate a {approx_equal} 72% purity of the sample. As expected, the purity decreases with decreasing flux density of the sources and with increasing angular separation between candidate sources and lenses. The redshift distribution of the candidate lensed sources is close to that reported for most previous surveys for lensed galaxies, while that of candidate lenses extends to redshifts substantially higher than found in the other surveys. The counts of candidate SLGs are also in good agreement with model predictions. Even though a key ingredient of the method is the deep near-infrared VIKING photometry, we show that H-ATLAS data alone allow the selection of a similarly deep sample of candidate SLGs with an efficiency close to 50%; a slightly lower surface density ({approx_equal} 1.45 deg{sup -2}) can be reached with a {approx}70% efficiency.

  17. Application of the pM'-pCH diagrams in the determination of hydrolysis constants of the lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pM'-pCH diagrams allowed to determine the saturation and non-saturation zones of Lu(OH)3 in solid phase and those were applied for determining the hydrolysis and lutetium solubility constants, using the radioactive isotope Lu-177. The first constant of hydrolysis was also determined by the potentiometric method in absence of solid phase. (Author)

  18. Tailoring the optical constants in single-crystal silicon with embedded silver nanostructures for advanced silicon photonics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmonic effects associated with metal nanostructures are expected to hold the key to tailoring light emission/propagation and harvesting solar energy in materials including single crystal silicon which remains the backbone in the microelectronics and photovoltaics industries but unfortunately, lacks many functionalities needed for construction of advanced photonic and optoelectronics devices. Currently, silicon plasmonic structures are practically possible only in the configuration with metal nanoparticles or thin film arrays on a silicon surface. This does not enable one to exploit the full potential of plasmonics for optical engineering in silicon, because the plasmonic effects are dominant over a length of ∼50 nm, and the active device region typically lies below the surface much beyond this range. Here, we report on a novel method for the formation of silver nanoparticles embedded within a silicon crystal through metal gettering from a silver thin film deposited at the surface to nanocavities within the Si created by hydrogen ion implantation. The refractive index of the Ag-nanostructured layer is found to be 3–10% lower or higher than that of silicon for wavelengths below or beyond ∼815–900 nm, respectively. Around this wavelength range, the optical extinction values increase by a factor of 10–100 as opposed to the pure silicon case. Increasing the amount of gettered silver leads to an increased extinction as well as a redshift in wavelength position for the resonance. This resonance is attributed to the surface plasmon excitation of the resultant silver nanoparticles in silicon. Additionally, we show that the profiles for optical constants in silicon can be tailored by varying the position and number of nanocavity layers. Such silicon crystals with embedded metal nanostructures would offer novel functional base structures for applications in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and plasmonics

  19. Tailoring the optical constants in single-crystal silicon with embedded silver nanostructures for advanced silicon photonics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhter, Perveen [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States); Huang, Mengbing, E-mail: mhuang@albany.edu; Spratt, William; Kadakia, Nirag [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Amir, Faisal [Department of Physics, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, North Dakota 58203 (United States)

    2015-03-28

    Plasmonic effects associated with metal nanostructures are expected to hold the key to tailoring light emission/propagation and harvesting solar energy in materials including single crystal silicon which remains the backbone in the microelectronics and photovoltaics industries but unfortunately, lacks many functionalities needed for construction of advanced photonic and optoelectronics devices. Currently, silicon plasmonic structures are practically possible only in the configuration with metal nanoparticles or thin film arrays on a silicon surface. This does not enable one to exploit the full potential of plasmonics for optical engineering in silicon, because the plasmonic effects are dominant over a length of ∼50 nm, and the active device region typically lies below the surface much beyond this range. Here, we report on a novel method for the formation of silver nanoparticles embedded within a silicon crystal through metal gettering from a silver thin film deposited at the surface to nanocavities within the Si created by hydrogen ion implantation. The refractive index of the Ag-nanostructured layer is found to be 3–10% lower or higher than that of silicon for wavelengths below or beyond ∼815–900 nm, respectively. Around this wavelength range, the optical extinction values increase by a factor of 10–100 as opposed to the pure silicon case. Increasing the amount of gettered silver leads to an increased extinction as well as a redshift in wavelength position for the resonance. This resonance is attributed to the surface plasmon excitation of the resultant silver nanoparticles in silicon. Additionally, we show that the profiles for optical constants in silicon can be tailored by varying the position and number of nanocavity layers. Such silicon crystals with embedded metal nanostructures would offer novel functional base structures for applications in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and plasmonics.

  20. DISCOVERY OF A PROTOCLUSTER AT z {approx} 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshikawa, Jun; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ishizaki, Yoshifumi [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ota, Kazuaki; Nagao, Tohru [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Hayashi, Masao [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Jiang, Linhua; Egami, Eiichi [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Chery Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Malkan, Matthew A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro, E-mail: jun.toshikawa@nao.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-05-10

    We report the discovery of a protocluster at z {approx} 6 containing at least eight cluster member galaxies with spectroscopic confirmations in the wide-field image of the Subaru Deep Field (SDF). The overdensity of the protocluster is significant at the 6{sigma} level, based on the surface number density of i'-dropout galaxies. The overdense region covers {approx}6' Multiplication-Sign 6' (14 Mpc Multiplication-Sign 14 Mpc in comoving units at z = 6) and includes 30 i'-dropout galaxies. Follow-up spectroscopy revealed that 15 of these are real z {approx} 6 galaxies (5.7 < z < 6.3). Of these 15, 8 are clustering in a narrow redshift range ({Delta}z < 0.05 centered at z = 6.01), corresponding to a seven-fold increase in number density over the average in redshift space. We found no significant difference in the observed properties, such as Ly{alpha} luminosities and UV continuum magnitudes, between the eight protocluster members and the seven non-members. The velocity dispersion of the eight protocluster members is 647 {+-} 124 km s{sup -1}, which is about three times higher than that predicted by the standard cold dark matter model. This discrepancy could be attributed to the distinguishing three-dimensional distribution of the eight protocluster members. We discuss two possible explanations for this discrepancy: either the protocluster is already mature, with old galaxies at the center, or it is still immature and composed of three subgroups merging to become a larger cluster. In either case, this concentration of z = 6.01 galaxies in the SDF may be one of the first sites of formation of a galaxy cluster in the universe.

  1. Calibrating UV Emissivity And Dust Absorption At z \\approx 3

    OpenAIRE

    Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Calzetti, Daniela

    1998-01-01

    We detail a technique for estimating the UV extinction and luminosity of UV selected galaxies using UV quantities alone. The technique is based on a tight correlation between the ratios of far infrared (FIR) to UV flux ratios and UV color for a sample of local starbursts. A simple empirical fit to this correlation can be used to estimate UV extinction as a function of color. This method is applied to a sample of Lyman-break systems selected from the HDF and having $z \\approx 3$. The resultant...

  2. Application of quantitative structure-activity relationship to the determination of binding constant based on fluorescence quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Yingying [Department of Applied Chemistry, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Liu Huitao, E-mail: liuht-ytu@163.co [Department of Applied Chemistry, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Luan Feng; Gao Yuan [Department of Applied Chemistry, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was used to predict and explain binding constant (log K) determined by fluorescence quenching. This method allowed us to predict binding constants of a variety of compounds with human serum albumin (HSA) based on their structures alone. Stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) and nonlinear radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) were performed to build the models. The statistical parameters provided by the MLR model (R{sup 2}=0.8521, RMS=0.2678) indicated satisfactory stability and predictive ability while the RBFNN predictive ability is somewhat superior (R{sup 2}=0.9245, RMS=0.1736). The proposed models were used to predict the binding constants of two bioactive components in traditional Chinese medicines (isoimperatorin and chrysophanol) whose experimental results were obtained in our laboratory and the predicted results were in good agreement with the experimental results. This QSAR approach can contribute to a better understanding of structural factors of the compounds responsible for drug-protein interactions, and can be useful in predicting the binding constants of other compounds. - Research Highlights: QSAR models for binding constants of some compounds to HSA were developed. The models provide a simple and straightforward way to predict binding constant. QSAR can give some insight into structural features related to binding behavior.

  3. Second and third order elastic constants of double hexagonal close packed crystal: application of praseodymium and neodymium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of homogeneous deformation has been applied to obtain theoretical expressions for the second order elastic (SOE) and third order elastic (TOE) constants of an ideal dhcp lattice. Two body interactions alone have been considered between the origin atom and six other kinds of atoms. The expressions obtained for the TOE constants have been employed to calculate the TOE constants for the metals Pr and Nd whose c to a ratio is very nearly equal to the ideal value. The Anderson-Grueneisen parameter for the two metals is calculated using their respective TOE constants. Anderson's theory is used to calculate the temperature dependence of the bulk modulus Bsub(S) for these two metals and is compared with the experimental values. The agreement is good. The low temperature limit of the volume Grueneisen function has been obtained using the respective theoretical TOE constants of these two metals. The variation of a/a0 and v/v0 with hydrostatic pressure up to 100 kbar has been calculated using the theoretical TOE constants and Thurston's extrapolation formula for both Pr and Nd. (Auth.)

  4. Application of quantitative structure-activity relationship to the determination of binding constant based on fluorescence quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was used to predict and explain binding constant (log K) determined by fluorescence quenching. This method allowed us to predict binding constants of a variety of compounds with human serum albumin (HSA) based on their structures alone. Stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) and nonlinear radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) were performed to build the models. The statistical parameters provided by the MLR model (R2=0.8521, RMS=0.2678) indicated satisfactory stability and predictive ability while the RBFNN predictive ability is somewhat superior (R2=0.9245, RMS=0.1736). The proposed models were used to predict the binding constants of two bioactive components in traditional Chinese medicines (isoimperatorin and chrysophanol) whose experimental results were obtained in our laboratory and the predicted results were in good agreement with the experimental results. This QSAR approach can contribute to a better understanding of structural factors of the compounds responsible for drug-protein interactions, and can be useful in predicting the binding constants of other compounds. - Research Highlights: → QSAR models for binding constants of some compounds to HSA were developed. → The models provide a simple and straightforward way to predict binding constant. → QSAR can give some insight into structural features related to binding behavior.

  5. Dyes with high dielectric constants

    OpenAIRE

    Langhals, Heinz

    1988-01-01

    The dielectric constants of perylene dyes, perylene-3,4: 9,10-tetracarboxylic bisimides, are reported. With aromatic substituents, dielectric constants up to 110 are obtained. With polymeric dyes, the dielectric constants rise to 260. Mechanisms and applications are discussed.

  6. Impulse responses of piezoelectric discs: application to the measurement of their constants and to the calibration of receiving transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two devices based on the study of the response of a disc excited by current pulses are described. The piezoelectric constant, the permittivity and the coupling factor are measured with the first one; the receiving transducer sensitivity as a function of the ultrasonic wave frequency is obtained with the other one

  7. Two-sided bounds for eigenvalues of differential operators with applications to Friedrichs', Poincaré, trace, and similar constants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebestová, I.; Vejchodský, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2014), s. 308-329. ISSN 0036-1429 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : bounds on spectrum * a posteriori error estimate * optimal constant Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.788, year: 2014 http://epubs.siam.org/doi/abs/10.1137/13091467X

  8. Enhanced effects of variation of the fundamental constants in laser interferometers and application to dark matter detection

    CERN Document Server

    Stadnik, Y V

    2015-01-01

    We outline new laser interferometer measurements to search for variation of the electromagnetic fine-structure constant $\\alpha$ and particle masses (including a non-zero photon mass). We propose a strontium optical lattice clock -- silicon single-crystal cavity interferometer as a novel small-scale platform for these new measurements. Multiple passages of a light beam inside an interferometer enhance the effects due to variation of the fundamental constants by the mean number of passages ($N_{\\textrm{eff}} \\sim 10^2$ for a large-scale gravitational-wave detector, such as LIGO, Virgo, GEO600 or TAMA300, while $N_{\\textrm{eff}} \\sim 10^5$ for a strontium clock -- silicon cavity interferometer). Our proposed laser interferometer measurements may be implemented as an extremely precise tool in the direct detection of scalar dark matter that forms an oscillating classical field or topological defects.

  9. Application of the theory of dynamical systems to the Boltzmann equation for gas mixtures with constant collision frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis looks into some qualitative properties, of dynamical systems occurring as ordinary differential equations. Essential information about the structure of the solution can be obtained without explicitly solving a linear system of differential equations with constant coefficients. This can be achieved by decomposing the operator of such a system into a semisimple and a nilpotent part. Fundamental theorems, concerning the existence of the solutions are discussed as well as the problem of stability of equilibrium points in dynamical systems (Liapunov's theorem). Gradient systems, special forms of dynamical systems, have particular properties that simplify the analysis of their flow. Finally, by applying the theory of dynamical systems to the Boltzmann equation with constant collision frequencies an investigation of equilibrium points is carried out. A mixture of three gases consisting of particles that interact through different collision mechanisms serves as the physical model. (Suda)

  10. Time constant of hydraulic-head response in aquifers subjected to sudden recharge change: application to large basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Guy; Rousseau-Gueutin, Pauline; de Marsily, Ghislain

    2015-08-01

    Analytical formulae are proposed to describe the first-order temporal evolution of the head in large groundwater systems (such as those found in North Africa or eastern Australia) that are subjected to drastic modifications of their recharge conditions (such as those in Pleistocene and Holocene times). The mathematical model is based on the hydrodynamics of a mixed-aquifer system composed of a confined aquifer connected to an unconfined one with a large storage capacity. The transient behaviour of the head following a sudden change of recharge conditions is computed with Laplace transforms for linear one-dimensional and cylindrical geometries. This transient evolution closely follows an exponential trend exp(- t/ τ). The time constant τ is expressed analytically as a function of the various parameters characterizing the system. In many commonly occurring situations, τ depends on only four parameters: the width a c of the main confined aquifer, its transmissivity T c, the integrated storage situated upstream in the unconfined aquifer M = S u a u, and a curvature parameter accounting for convergence/divergence effects. This model is applied to the natural decay of large aquifer basins of the Sahara and Australia following the end of the mid-Holocene humid period. The observed persistence of the resource is discussed on the basis of the time constant estimated with the system parameters. This comparison confirms the role of the upstream water reserve, which is modelled as an unconfined aquifer, and highlights the significant increase of the time constant in case of converging flow.

  11. Entropy relations and the application of black holes with the cosmological constant and Gauss–Bonnet term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on entropy relations, we derive the thermodynamic bound for entropy and the area of horizons for a Schwarzschild–dS black hole, including the event horizon, Cauchy horizon, and negative horizon (i.e., the horizon with negative value, which are all geometrically bound and comprised by the cosmological radius. We consider the first derivative of the entropy relations to obtain the first law of thermodynamics for all horizons. We also obtain the Smarr relation for the horizons using the scaling discussion. For the thermodynamics of all horizons, the cosmological constant is treated as a thermodynamic variable. In particular, the thermodynamics of the negative horizon are defined well in the r<0 side of space–time. This formula appears to be valid for three-horizon black holes. We also generalize the discussion to thermodynamics for the event horizon and Cauchy horizon of Gauss–Bonnet charged flat black holes because the Gauss–Bonnet coupling constant is also considered to be thermodynamic variable. These results provide further insights into the crucial role played by the entropy relations of multi-horizons in black hole thermodynamics as well as improving our understanding of entropy at the microscopic level.

  12. Application of potentiometric stripping analysis with constant inverse current in the analytic step for determining lead in glassware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZVONIMIR J. SUTUROVIC

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The trace amounts of lead in extraction glassware products were determined by potentiometric stripping analysis with constant inverse current in the analytic step (PSA-iR, an electrochemical technique of high sensitivity and selectivity. This paper deals with an investigation which was directed to the effect of a great number of factors on the results of PSA-iR, of lead in glassware, such as the mercury time electrodeposition, the electrolysis potential, the solution stirring rate and the constant inverse current. Linearity of the lead analytical signal was achieved within the range of mass concentrations from 2.5 mg/dm3 to 4.5 mg/dm3. A detection limit of 0.64 mg/dm3 was obtained, with a reproducibility of 4.14 % expressed as the coefficient of variation. The analyses were carried out using a computerized stripping analyzer of domestic design and manufacture (Faculty of Technology, Novi Sad and “Elektrouniverzal”, Leskovac. The accuracy of the method was confirmed by parallel analyses using flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry as the reference method.

  13. Chemical vapor deposition and characterization of zirconium tin titanate as a high dielectric constant material for potential electronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Ebony Lynn

    Integrated circuit (IC) manufacturers increasingly need new high dielectric constant (epsilon) materials for gate stacks to maintain the pace of developing faster, higher capacity CMOS and DRAM devices. Identification of new high-epsilon materials that can be integrated into current manufacturing processes is critical to the continued development of IC devices. Using magnetron sputtering and a compositional spread approach, a key composition of amorphous zirconium tin titanate (a-ZTT) films was found to exhibit a dielectric constant from 50 to 70 and leakage currents from 10-9 to 10 -7 A/cm2 at 1 MV/cm. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) is an attractive technique for deposition of ZTT films because it offers several advantages over sputter deposition. Many processing parameters can be controlled and varied in the optimization of the film microstructure and composition. In addition, high-epsilon phases of the compounds might be achieved at low temperatures by using plasma enhancement of the CVD process. Alternatively, use of ozone or other oxidants may allow complete oxidation of metal precursors at lower processing temperatures. The following discussion details the construction and modification of a CVD reactor for the deposition of ZTT thin films. In addition, characterization of a precursor "cocktail"---a solution containing all the metal components of the film---for the deposition of ZTT thin films is discussed. Discussion includes experiments characterizing the dielectric and device properties (dielectric constant, dielectric loss, capacitance, and leakage current) of CVD-grown, a-ZTT thin films using the precursor "cocktail". The importance of the relationship of the cation ratio in the precursor that is translated to the film and its relationship to the dielectric properties are shown. The device properties of ZTT films were measured using Capacitance-Voltage (CV) and Current-Voltage (IV) analysis, while dielectric properties were explored using Impedance

  14. Application of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy to determine elastic constants of plasma-sprayed coatings with high internal friction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedmák, P.; Seiner, Hanuš; Sedlák, Petr; Landa, Michal; Mušálek, Radek; Matějíček, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 232, October (2013), s. 747-757. ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702; GA ČR GA13-13616S; GA ČR(CZ) GPP108/12/P552; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1872 Grant ostatní: Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR(CZ) M100761203 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma-sprayed coatings * elastic constants * resonant ultrasound spectroscopy * internal friction * anisotropy Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics; BI - Acoustics (UFP-V) Impact factor: 2.199, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0257897213006063

  15. Application of chemometrics methods with kinetic constraints for estimation of rate constants of second order consecutive reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen; Khoshkam, Maryam

    2008-05-01

    To determine the rate constants for the second order consecutive reactions of the form U + V -(k1)--> W -(k2)--> P, a number of chemometrics and hard modeling-based methods are described. The absorption spectroscopic data from the reaction were utilized for performing the analysis. Concentrations and extinctions of components were comparable, and all of them were absorbing species. The number of steps in the reaction was less than the number of absorbing species, which resulted in a rank-deficient response matrix. This can cause difficulties for some of the methods described in the literature. The standard MATLAB functions were used for determining the solutions of the differential equations as well as for finding the optimal rate constants to describe the kinetic profiles. The available knowledge about the system determines the approaches described in this paper. The knowledge includes the spectra of reactants and products, the initial concentrations, and the exact kinetics. Some of this information is sometimes not available or is hard to estimate. Multiple linear regression for fitting the kinetic parameters to the obtained concentration profiles, rank augmentation using multiple batch runs, a mixed spectral approach which treats the reaction using a pseudo species concept, and principal components regression are the four groups of methods discussed in this study. In one of the simulated datasets the spectra are quite different, and in the other one the spectra of one reactant and of the product share a high degree of overlap. Instrumental noise, sampling error are the sources of error considered. Our aim was the investigation of the relative merits of each method. PMID:18469471

  16. Application of PC-ANN to Acidity Constant Prediction of Various Phenols and Benzoic Acids in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HABIBI-YANGJEH Aziz; ESMAILIAN Mahdi

    2008-01-01

    Principal component regression(PCR)and principal component-artificial neural network(PC-ANN)models were applied to prediction of the acidity constant for various benzoic acids and phenols(242 compounds)in water at 25℃.A large number of theoretical descriptors were calculated for each molecule.The first fifty principal components(PC)were found to explain more than 95% of variances in the original data matrix.From the pool of these PC's.the eigenvalue ranking method was employed to select the best set of PC for PCR and PC-ANN models.The PC-ANN model with architecture 47-20-1 was generated using 47 principal components as inputs and its output is pKa.For evaluation of the predictive power of the PeR and PC-ANN models,pKa values of 37 compounds in the prediction set were calculated.Mean percentage deviation (MPD)for PCR and PC-ANN models are 18.45 and 0.6448,respectively.These improvements are due to the fact that the PKa of the compounds demonstrate non-linear correlations with the principal components.Comparison of the results obtained by the models reveals superiority of the PC-ANN model relative to the PCR model.

  17. The ‘Densitometric Image Analysis Software’ and Its Application to Determine Stepwise Equilibrium Constants from Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Liesbeth van Oeffelen; Eveline Peeters; Phu Nguyen Le Minh; Daniël Charlier

    2014-01-01

    Current software applications for densitometric analysis, such as ImageJ, QuantityOne (BioRad) and the Intelligent or Advanced Quantifier (Bio Image) do not allow to take the non-linearity of autoradiographic films into account during calibration. As a consequence, quantification of autoradiographs is often regarded as problematic, and phosphorimaging is the preferred alternative. However, the non-linear behaviour of autoradiographs can be described mathematically, so it can be accounted for....

  18. Application of Constant Rate of Supply model (CRS) in dating of Guanabara Bay sediments using 210Pb measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A geochronological study of the Guanabara Bay (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) based on 210Pb dating technique to determine sedimentation rates and using the Constant Rate of Supply model (CRS) is presented in this work. Sediment samples were collected from river-head of Estrela, Sao Joao de Meriti, Guapimirim, Guaxindiba e Imbuacu. A low energy gamma spectrometry (210Pb, samples taken from the Estrela and Sao Joao de Meriti rivers. Radiochemical method was applied to determine the amount of 210Pb in samples collected near Guapimirim, Guaxindiba and Imbuacu Rivers. Atomic absorption spectrometry with air-acetylene flame technique was used to determine the amount of copper in all these samples. Experimental data shown the following variation in the concentration levels of copper and 210Pb: (i) copper; from 2.5 μg/g to 37.1 μg/g (Imbuacu River); from 3.6 to 228.1 μg/g (Estrela River); from 11.6 to 73.4 μg/g (Guapimirim River); from 12.0 to 52.9 μg/g (Guaxindiba River) and from 90.8 to to 237.7 μg/g (Sao Joao de Meriti River), (ti) 210Pb; from 2.0 Bq/kg to 27.0 Bq/kg (Imbuacu River); from 25.2 to 136.6 Bq/kg (Estrela River); from 40.0 to 90.0 Bq/kg (Sao Joao de Meriti River); from 7.0 to 70.0 Bq/kg (Guapimirim River); from 10.0 to 48.0 Bq/kg (Guaxindiba River). The sedimentation rates ranged from 0.30 cm/y in the Imbuacu River for a depth below of 35 cm to 1.3 cm/y for 0-30 cm depth in Guaxindiba River. It was concluded that the experimental data found in this work are consistent with those published in the scientific literature and that they can be predicted by the CRS model. (author)

  19. Cosmological Constant, Fine Structure Constant and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Hao; Zou, Xiao-Bo; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the cosmological constant model $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the evidence of varying fine structure constant $\\alpha$ was found in 1998. If $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$ is right, it means that the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ should be also varying. In this work, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, in which we view...

  20. The Structure of Dark Molecular Gas in the Galaxy - I: A Pilot Survey for 18-cm OH Emission Towards $l \\approx 105^{\\deg}, b \\approx +1^{\\deg}$

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Ronald J; Engelke, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    We report the first results from a survey for 1665, 1667, and 1720 MHz OH emission over a small region of the Outer Galaxy centered at $l \\approx 105.0\\deg , b \\approx +1.0\\deg$ . This sparse, high-sensitivity survey ($\\Delta Ta \\approx \\Delta Tmb \\approx 3.0 - 3.5$ mK rms in 0.55 km/s channels), was carried out as a pilot project with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT, FWHM $\\approx 7.6'$) on a 3 X 9 grid at $0.5\\deg$ spacing. The pointings chosen correspond with those of the existing $^{12}$CO(1-0) CfA survey of the Galaxy (FWHM $\\approx 8.4'$). With 2-hr integrations, 1667 MHz OH emission was detected with the GBT at $\\gtrsim 21$ of the 27 survey positions ($\\geq 78\\%$ ), confirming the ubiquity of molecular gas in the ISM as traced by this spectral line. With few exceptions, the main OH lines at 1665 and 1667 MHz appear in the ratio of 5:9 characteristic of LTE at our sensitivity levels. No OH absorption features are recorded in the area of the present survey, in agreement with the low levels of continuum bac...

  1. J-convexity constants

    OpenAIRE

    Jincai Wang

    2007-01-01

    We introduce the \\(J\\)-convexity constants on Banach spaces and give some properties of the constants. We give the relations between the \\(J\\)-convexity constants and the \\(n\\)-th von Neumann-Jordan constants. Using the quantitative indices we estimate the value of \\(J\\)-convexity constants in Orlicz spaces.

  2. The near field/far field model with constant application of chemical mass and exponentially decreasing emission of the mass applied.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicas, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The near field/far field (NF/FF) model is a contaminant dispersion construct that permits making airborne contaminant exposure estimates for an individual located close to an emission source. In the present analysis, chemical emission involves a constant mass rate of chemical application to surfaces, denoted I (mg/min), and an exponentially decreasing rate of emission of the chemical from the surfaces with rate constant α (min(-1)). The time-dependent emission rate function is: G(t), mg/min = I - I exp(- αt), where time t is in minutes. The exact time-dependent equations for the contaminant concentration in the NF and the FF are presented. These equations are used to revise a previous analysis of a study in which a penetrant liquid containing benzene was applied to parts on a work table in a test room. The previous analysis assumed that the benzene was applied as a bolus at the start of a 15-min use period, whereas the present analysis assumes the same total benzene mass was applied at a uniform rate over the 15-min use period, but with the same evaporation rate constant α. The new G(t) function leads to a lower 15-min time weighted average NF benzene concentration that better matches the experimental data. It is also shown that the exact equation for the NF concentration is well approximated by combining two well-mixed single-zone equations. The approximation method is mathematically simpler and obviates the need to derive the exact NF equation. PMID:26861562

  3. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  4. THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS: BRIGHT, HIGHLY MAGNIFIED GALAXY CANDIDATES AT z {approx} 7 BEHIND A1703

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, L. D.; Coe, D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bouwens, R. J.; Smit, R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Postbus 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Zitrin, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Ford, H. C.; Zheng, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Illingworth, G. D. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Benitez, N. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), C/Camino Bajo de Huetor 24, Granada 18008 (Spain); Broadhurst, T. J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Leioa (Spain)

    2012-03-01

    We report the discovery of seven strongly lensed Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z {approx} 7 detected in Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of A1703. The brightest candidate, called A1703-zD1, has an observed (lensed) magnitude of 24.0 AB (26{sigma}) in the WFC3/IR F160W band, making it 0.2 mag brighter than the z{sub 850}-dropout candidate recently reported behind the Bullet Cluster and 0.7 mag brighter than the previously brightest known z {approx} 7.6 galaxy, A1689-zD1. With a cluster magnification of {approx}9, this source has an intrinsic magnitude of H{sub 160} = 26.4 AB, a strong z{sub 850} - J{sub 125} break of 1.7 mag, and a photometric redshift of z {approx} 6.7. Additionally, we find six other bright LBG candidates with H{sub 160}-band magnitudes of 24.9-26.4, photometric redshifts z {approx} 6.4 - 8.8, and magnifications {mu} {approx} 3-40. Stellar population fits to the Advanced Camera for Surveys, WFC3/IR, and Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera data for A1703-zD1 and A1703-zD4 yield stellar masses (0.7 - 3.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, stellar ages 5-180 Myr, and star formation rates {approx}7.8 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and low reddening with A{sub V} {<=} 0.7. The source-plane reconstruction of the exceptionally bright candidate A1703-zD1 exhibits an extended structure, spanning {approx}4 kpc in the z {approx} 6.7 source plane, and shows three resolved star-forming knots of radius r {approx} 0.4 kpc.

  5. Cosmological Hubble constant and nuclear Hubble constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the Universe after the Big Bang and the evolution of the dense and highly excited nuclear matter formed by relativistic nuclear collisions are investigated and compared. Values of the Hubble constants for cosmological and nuclear processes are obtained. For nucleus-nucleus collisions at high energies the nuclear Hubble constant is obtained in the frame of different models involving the hydrodynamic flow of the nuclear matter. Significant difference in the values of the two Hubble constant - cosmological and nuclear - is observed

  6. Constant Communities in Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Tanmoy; Ganguly, Niloy; Bhowmick, Sanjukta; Mukherjee, Animesh

    2013-01-01

    Identifying community structure is a fundamental problem in network analysis. Most community detection algorithms are based on optimizing a combinatorial parameter, for example modularity. This optimization is generally NP-hard, thus merely changing the vertex order can alter their assignments to the community. However, there has been very less study on how vertex ordering influences the results of the community detection algorithms. Here we identify and study the properties of invariant groups of vertices (constant communities) whose assignment to communities are, quite remarkably, not affected by vertex ordering. The percentage of constant communities can vary across different applications and based on empirical results we propose metrics to evaluate these communities. Using constant communities as a pre-processing step, one can significantly reduce the variation of the results. Finally, we present a case study on phoneme network and illustrate that constant communities, quite strikingly, form the core func...

  7. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  8. Electron transport and electron energy distributions within the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases of indium nitride: Response to the application of a constant and uniform electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqua, Poppy; Hadi, Walid A.; Salhotra, Amith K.; O' Leary, Stephen K., E-mail: stephen.oleary@ubc.ca [School of Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada); Shur, Michael S. [Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2015-03-28

    Within the framework of an ensemble semi-classical three-valley Monte Carlo electron transport simulation approach, we critically contrast the nature of the electron transport that occurs within the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases of indium nitride in response to the application of a constant and uniform electric field. We use the electron energy distribution and its relationship with the electron transport characteristics in order to pursue this analysis. For the case of zinc-blende indium nitride, only a peak corresponding to the electrons within the lowest energy conduction band valley is observed, this peak being seen to broaden and shift to higher energies in response to increases in the applied electric field strength, negligible amounts of upper energy conduction band valley occupancy being observed. In contrast, for the case of wurtzite indium nitride, in addition to the aforementioned lowest energy conduction band valley peak in the electron energy distribution, and its broadening and shifting to higher energies in response to increases in the applied electric field strength, beyond a certain critical electric field strength, 30 kV/cm for the case of this particular material, upper energy conduction band valley occupancy is observed, this occupancy being further enhanced in response to further increases in the applied electric field strength. Reasons for these results are provided. The potential for device consequences is then commented upon.

  9. Electron transport and electron energy distributions within the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases of indium nitride: Response to the application of a constant and uniform electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of an ensemble semi-classical three-valley Monte Carlo electron transport simulation approach, we critically contrast the nature of the electron transport that occurs within the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases of indium nitride in response to the application of a constant and uniform electric field. We use the electron energy distribution and its relationship with the electron transport characteristics in order to pursue this analysis. For the case of zinc-blende indium nitride, only a peak corresponding to the electrons within the lowest energy conduction band valley is observed, this peak being seen to broaden and shift to higher energies in response to increases in the applied electric field strength, negligible amounts of upper energy conduction band valley occupancy being observed. In contrast, for the case of wurtzite indium nitride, in addition to the aforementioned lowest energy conduction band valley peak in the electron energy distribution, and its broadening and shifting to higher energies in response to increases in the applied electric field strength, beyond a certain critical electric field strength, 30 kV/cm for the case of this particular material, upper energy conduction band valley occupancy is observed, this occupancy being further enhanced in response to further increases in the applied electric field strength. Reasons for these results are provided. The potential for device consequences is then commented upon

  10. Cosmological Constant, Fine Structure Constant and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Hao; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the cosmological constant model $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the evidence of varying fine structure constant $\\alpha$ was found in 1998. If $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$ is right, it means that the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ should be also varying. In this work, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant $\\Lambda\\propto\\alpha^{-6}$, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. We propose two types of models to describe the evolutions of $\\Lambda$ and $\\alpha$. Then, we consider the observational constraints on these models, by using the 293 $\\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha$ data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars, and the data of type Ia supernovae (SNIa), cosmic microwave background (CMB), baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO). We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the narrow ranges of ${\\cal O}(10^{-5})$ t...

  11. Physics without physical constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the general principles of both Newton's mechanics and Maxwell's electrodynamics, a new approach to basic equations of physics is presented. The new basic equations express fundamental laws of physics and are free from any physical constants. The necessary constants appear only through some kind of constitutive relations and by considering special solutions of the basic equations. The presented approach admits a new interpretation of fundamental physical constants, such as the Planck gravitational ones. 4 refs. (author)

  12. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, I.; Horáček, J.

    2013-06-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  13. Varying fine-structure and gravitational constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple relation between the time-dependent fine-structure and gravitational constants of alpha/alpha2 approx G/G is derived from the hypothesis that both of these fundamental constants are related to the more fundamental length scale of nature as in he unified pregauge and pregeometric theory of all fundamental forces. From the latest observation of alpha/alpha = (-1.91 ± 0.54) centre dot 10-15yr-1 by Webb et al., it leads to the prediction of G/G = (-0.154 ± 0.044) centre dot 10-12yr-1, which is not only consistent with the most precise limit of G/G = (-0.6 ± 2.0) centre dot 10-12yr-1 by Thorsett but also feasible for future experimental tests

  14. The Cosmological Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Sean M.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a review of the physics and cosmology of the cosmological constant. Focusing on recent developments, I present a pedagogical overview of cosmology in the presence of a cosmological constant, observational constraints on its magnitude, and the physics of a small (and potentially nonzero vacuum energy.

  15. Reconstructing the Gamma-Ray Photon Optical Depth of the Universe To Z Approx. 4 from Multiwavelength Galaxy Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgason, Kari; Kashlinsky, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Reconstructing the Gamma-Ray Photon Optical Depth of the Universe To Z Approx. 4fFrom Multiwavelength Galaxy Survey Data We reconstruct the gamma-ray opacity of the universe out to z approx. photons already at z approx. < 0.2 and reaching tau approx 10 at z = 1. Comparing with the currently available Fermi/LAT gamma-ray burst and blazar data shows that there is room for significant emissions originating in the first stars era.

  16. THE BIMODAL METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION OF THE COOL CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM AT z {approx}< 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, N.; Howk, J. C. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Tripp, T. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C.; Fox, A. J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J. K. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); O' Meara, J. M. [Department of Physics, Saint Michael' s College, Vermont, One Winooski Park, Colchester, VT 05439 (United States); Ribaudo, J. [Department of Physics, Utica College, 1600 Burrstone Road, Utica, New York 13502 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    We assess the metal content of the cool ({approx}10{sup 4} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) about galaxies at z {approx}< 1 using an H I-selected sample of 28 Lyman limit systems (LLS; defined here as absorbers with 16.2 {approx}< log N{sub H{sub I}} {approx}< 18.5) observed in absorption against background QSOs by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The N{sub H{sub I}} selection avoids metallicity biases inherent in many previous studies of the low-redshift CGM. We compare the column densities of weakly ionized metal species (e.g., O II, Si II, Mg II) to N{sub H{sub I}} in the strongest H I component of each absorber. We find that the metallicity distribution of the LLS (and hence the cool CGM) is bimodal with metal-poor and metal-rich branches peaking at [X/H] {approx_equal} -1.6 and -0.3 (or about 2.5% and 50% solar metallicities). The cool CGM probed by these LLS is predominantly ionized. The metal-rich branch of the population likely traces winds, recycled outflows, and tidally stripped gas; the metal-poor branch has properties consistent with cold accretion streams thought to be a major source of fresh gas for star forming galaxies. Both branches have a nearly equal number of absorbers. Our results thus demonstrate there is a significant mass of previously undiscovered cold metal-poor gas and confirm the presence of metal enriched gas in the CGM of z {approx}< 1 galaxies.

  17. Decay Constants of Beauty Mesons from QCD Sum Rules

    CERN Document Server

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Simula, Silvano

    2014-01-01

    Our recently completed analysis of the decay constants of both pseudoscalar and vector beauty mesons reveals that in the bottom-quark sector two specific features of the sum-rule predictions show up: (i) For the input value of the bottom-quark mass in the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ scheme $\\overline{m}_b(\\overline{m}_b)\\approx4.18\\;\\mbox{GeV},$ the sum-rule result $f_B\\approx210$-$220\\;\\mbox{MeV}$ for the $B$ meson decay constant is substantially larger than the recent lattice-QCD finding $f_B\\approx190\\;\\mbox{MeV}.$ Requiring QCD sum rules to reproduce the lattice-QCD value of $f_B$ yields a significantly larger $b$-quark mass: $\\overline{m}_b(\\overline{m}_b)=4.247\\;\\mbox{GeV}.$ (ii) Whereas QCD sum-rule predictions for the charmed-meson decay constants $f_D,$ $f_{D_s},$ $f_{D^*}$ and $f_{D_s^*}$ are practically independent of the choice of renormalization scale, in the beauty sector the results for the decay constants - and especially for the ratio $f_{B^*}/f_B$ - prove to be very sensitive to the specific scale s...

  18. The effect of PECVD plasma decomposition on the wettability and dielectric constant changes in silicon modified DLC films for potential MEMS and low stiction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out investigations aimed at understanding the mechanism responsible for a water contact angle increase of up to ten degrees and a decrease in dielectric constant in silicon modified hydrogenated amorphous carbon films compared to unmodified hydrogenated amorphous carbon films. Our investigations based on surface chemical constituent analysis using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), SIMS, FTIR, contact angle / surface energy measurements and spectroscopic ellipsometry suggests the presence of hydrophobic chemical entities on the surface of the films. This observation is consistent with earlier theoretical plasma chemistry predictions and observed Raman peak shifts in the films. These surface hydrophobic entities also have a lower polarizability than the bonds in the un-modified films thereby reducing the dielectric constant of the silicon modified films measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Ellipsometric dielectric constant measurement is directly related to the surface energy through Hamaker's constant. Our current finding is expected to be of benefit to understanding stiction, friction and lubrication in areas that range from nano-tribology to microfluidics.

  19. Smoluchowski Equations for Agglomeration in Conditions of Variable Temperature and Pressure and a New Scaling of Rate Constants: Application to Nozzle-Beam Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiken, J; Goodisman, J; Kornilov, O

    2015-07-01

    The Smoluchowski equations provide a rigorous and efficient means for including multiple kinetic pathways when modeling coalescence growth systems. Originally written for a constant temperature and volume system, the equations must be modified if temperature and pressure vary during the coalescence time. In this paper, the equations are generalized, and adaptations appropriate to the situation presented by supersonic nozzle beam expansions are described. Given rate constants for all the cluster-cluster reactions, solution of the Smoluchowski equations would yield the abundances of clusters of all sizes at all times. This is unlikely, but we show that if these rate constants scale with the sizes of the reacting partners, the asymptotic (large size and large time) form of the cluster size distribution can be predicted. Experimentally determined distributions for He fit the predicted asymptotic distribution very well. Deviations between predicted and observed distributions allow identification of special cluster sizes that is, magic numbers. Furthermore, fitting an observed distribution to the theoretical form yields the base agglomeration cross section, from which all cluster-cluster rate constants may be obtained by scaling. Comparing the base cross section to measures of size and reactivity gives information about the coalescence process. PMID:26067086

  20. INTERMEDIATE-MASS HOT CORES AT {approx}500 AU: DISKS OR OUTFLOWS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Fuente, Asuncion; Alonso-Albi, Tomas [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, P.O. Box 112, 28803 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Fontani, Francesco; Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, 50125 Firenze (Italy); Boissier, Jeremie [Istituto di Radioastronomia, INAF, Via Gobetti 101, Bologna (Italy); Pietu, Vincent; Neri, Roberto [IRAM, 300 Rue de la piscine, 38406 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Busquet, Gemma [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Area di Recerca di Tor Vergata, Via Fosso Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy); Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut Ciencies Cosmos, Universitat Barcelona, Marti Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Zapata, Luis A. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Zhang, Qizhou; Ho, Paul T. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Audard, Marc, E-mail: palau@ieec.uab.es [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, Ch. des Maillettes 51, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland)

    2011-12-20

    Observations with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the most extended configuration toward two intermediate-mass star-forming regions, IRAS 22198+6336 and AFGL 5142, reveal the presence of several complex organic molecules at {approx}500 AU scales, confirming the presence of hot cores in both regions. The hot cores are not rich in CN-bearing molecules, as often seen in massive hot cores, and are mainly traced by CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH, (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OH, with, additionally, CH{sub 3}CHO, CH{sub 3}OD, and HCOOD for IRAS 22198+6336, and C{sub 6}H and O{sup 13}CS for AFGL 5142. The emission of complex molecules is resolved down to sizes of {approx}300 and {approx}600 AU, for IRAS 22198+6336 and AFGL 5142, respectively, and most likely is tracing protostellar disks rather than flattened envelopes or toroids as is usually found. This is especially clear for the case of IRAS 22198+6336, where we detect a velocity gradient for all the mapped molecules perpendicular to the most chemically rich outflow of the region, yielding a dynamic mass {approx}> 4 M{sub Sun }. As for AFGL 5142, the hot core emission is resolved into two elongated cores separated {approx}1800 AU. A detailed comparison of the complex molecule peaks to the new CO (2-1) data and H{sub 2}O maser data from the literature suggests also that for AFGL 5142 the complex molecules are mainly associated with disks, except for a faint and extended molecular emission found to the west, which is possibly produced in the interface between one of the outflows and the dense surrounding gas.

  1. Constant-energetics physical-space forcing methods for improved convergence to homogeneous-isotropic turbulence with application to particle-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassenne, Maxime; Urzay, Javier; Park, George I.; Moin, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates control-based forcing methods for incompressible homogeneous-isotropic turbulence forced linearly in physical space which result in constant turbulent kinetic energy, constant turbulent dissipation (also constant enstrophy), or a combination of the two based on a least-squares error minimization. The methods consist of proportional controllers embedded in the forcing coefficients. During the transient, the controllers adjust the forcing coefficients such that the controlled quantity achieves very early a minimal relative error with respect to its target stationary value. Comparisons of these forcing methods are made with the non-controlled approaches of Rosales and Meneveau ["Linear forcing in numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence: Physical space implementations and convergence properties," Phys. Fluids 17, 095106 (2005)] and Carroll and Blanquart ["A proposed modification to Lundgren's physical space velocity forcing method for isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids 25, 105114 (2013)], using direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES). The results indicate that the proposed constant-energetics forcing methods shorten the transient period from a user-defined artificial flow field to Navier-Stokes turbulence while maintaining steadier statistics. Additionally, the proposed method of constant kinetic-energy forcing behaves more robustly in coarse LES when initial conditions are employed that favor the occurrence of subgrid-scale backscatter, whereas the other approaches fail to provide physical turbulent flow fields. For illustration, the proposed forcing methods are applied to dilute particle-laden homogeneous-isotropic turbulent flows; the results serve to highlight the influences of the forcing strategies on the disperse-phase statistics.

  2. Application of the operational model of agonism to establish conditions when functional antagonism may be used to estimate agonist dissociation constants.

    OpenAIRE

    Leff, P.; Martin, G R; Morse, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The operational model of agonism (Black & Leff, 1983) has been used to analyse comparatively functional antagonism and irreversible antagonism as methods for estimating agonist dissociation constants (KAs). A general condition is established in terms of the model parameters which defines the type of experimental interventions at the receptor and the post-receptor level that allow valid KA estimation. It is shown that functional antagonism and other post-receptor interventions may produce chan...

  3. The research of application with crystal transfer function of reconstruction in the value of neutron decay exponential constant on zero power assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of transfer function of unorganic-crystal, CeF3, is measured by the method of pluse of laser radiation. It is applied that the mathematics convolution of neutron-decay exponential constant on zero power assembly is processed. At the same time, the effect is assumed that the dual-exponential type transfer function deals with the value of neutron-decay on zero power assembly in the convolution of input function. (authors)

  4. Effective Dielectric Constants of Photonic Crystal of Aligned Anisotropic Cylinders: Application to the Optical Response of Periodic Array of Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, E.; Krokhin, A. A.; Roberts, J.

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the static dielectric tensor of a periodic system of aligned anisotropic dielectric cylinders. Exact analytical formulas for the effective dielectric constants for the E- and H- eigenmodes are obtained for arbitrary 2D Bravais lattice and arbitrary cross-section of anisotropic cylinders. It is shown that depending on the symmetry of the unit cell photonic crystal of anisotropic cylinders behaves in the low-frequency limit like uniaxial or biaxial natural crystal. The developed th...

  5. Benchmarking the multipole shielding polarizability/reaction field approach to solvation against QM/MM: Applications to the shielding constants of N-methylacetamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Hanna; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Kongsted, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    We present a benchmark study of a combined multipole shielding polarizability/reaction field (MSP/RF) approach to the calculation of both specific and bulk solvation effects on nuclear magnetic shielding constants of solvated molecules. The MSP/RF scheme is defined by an expansion of the shielding constants of the solvated molecule in terms of electric field and field gradient property derivatives derived from single molecule ab initio calculations. The solvent electric field and electric field gradient are calculated based on data derived from molecular dynamics simulations, thereby accounting for solute-solvent dynamical effects. The MSP/RF method is benchmarked against polarizable quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The best agreement between the MSP/RF and QM/MM approaches is found by truncating the electric field expansion in the MSP/RF approach at the linear electric field level which is due to the cancelation of errors. In addition, we investigate the sensitivity of the results due to the choice of one-electron basis set in the ab initio calculations of the property derivatives and find that these derivatives are affected by the basis set in a way similar to the shielding constants themselves.

  6. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  7. Optimization for Hue Constant RGB Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Finlayson, Graham D.; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2002-01-01

    We present an optimization technique to find hue constant RGB sensors. The hue representation is based on a log RGB opponent color space that is invariant to brightness and gamma. While modeling the visual response did not derive the opponent space, the hue definition is similar to the ones found in CIE Lab and IPT. Finding hue constant RGB sensors through this optimization might be applicable in color engineering applications such as finding RGB sensors for color image encodings.

  8. Quaternions as astrometric plate constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, William H.

    1987-01-01

    A new method for solving problems in relative astrometry is proposed. In it, the relationship between the measured quantities and the components of the position vector of a star is modeled using quaternions, in effect replacing the plate constants of a standard four-plate-constant solution with the four components of a quaternion. The method allows a direct solution for the position vectors of the stars, and hence for the equatorial coordinates. Distortions, magnitude, and color effects are readily incorporated into the formalism, and the method is directly applicable to overlapping-plate problems. The advantages of the method include the simplicity of the resulting equations, their freedom from singularities, and the fact that trigonometric functions and tangential point transformations are not needed to model the plate material. A global solution over the entire sky is possible.

  9. Algorithm for structure constants

    CERN Document Server

    Paiva, F M

    2011-01-01

    In a $n$-dimensional Lie algebra, random numerical values are assigned by computer to $n(n-1)$ especially selected structure constants. An algorithm is then created, which calculates without ambiguity the remaining constants, obeying the Jacobi conditions. Differently from others, this algorithm is suitable even for poor personal computer. ------------- En $n$-dimensia algebro de Lie, hazardaj numeraj valoroj estas asignitaj per komputilo al $n(n-1)$ speciale elektitaj konstantoj de strukturo. Tiam algoritmo estas kreita, kalkulante senambigue la ceterajn konstantojn, obeante kondicxojn de Jacobi. Malsimile al aliaj algoritmoj, tiu cxi tauxgas ecx por malpotenca komputilo.

  10. Structure of high-spin states in A {approx} 60 region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakada, Hitoshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan); Furutaka, K.; Hatsukawa, Y. [and others

    1998-03-01

    High-spin states in the proton-rich Cu-Zn nuclei are investigated by the experiments at JAERI. New levels and {gamma}-rays are identified by the particle-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence, and J{sup P} assignments are made via the DCO ratio analysis. Yrast sequences are observed up to J {approx} 18 for {sup 62}Zn, and {sup 64}Zn, J {approx} 27/2 for {sup 61}Cu and J {approx} 23/2 for {sup 63}Cu. Though we cannot settle new J{sup P} values for {sup 61,63}Zn, their yrast sequence is also extended. In {sup 64}Zn, a doublet of {gamma}-rays is discovered at 1315 keV, clarifying the similarity in the level scheme between {sup 62}Zn and {sup 64}Zn. We reproduce the yrast levels by a shell-model calculation, by which structure of the high-spin states is further studied. A parity change in the yrast sequence is established, in which the unique-parity orbit 0g{sub 9/2} plays an essential role; one nucleon excitation to g{sub 9/2} gains high angular momentum with low seniority, at the cost of the single-parity energy. Second parity-change is also suggested by the calculation. Such parity change seems characteristic to spherical or nearly spherical nuclei. In {sup 61}Cu, concentration of the {gamma}-ray intensity is observed. This happens because a stretched 3-quasiparticle configuration including 0g{sub 9/2} is relatively stable, similarly to some isomers. Thus, by studying the structure of the high-spin states of the A {approx} 60 nuclei, we have clarified the role of unique-parity orbit in high-spin states, which may be generic to spherical and nearly spherical nuclei. (J.P.N.)

  11. THE SINS/zC-SINF SURVEY of z {approx} 2 GALAXY KINEMATICS: OUTFLOW PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Foerster-Schreiber, Natascha M.; Buschkamp, Peter; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Kurk, Jaron; Lutz, Dieter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr.1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Griffin, Kristen Shapiro [Space Sciences Research Group, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dellOsservatorio 5, Padova, I-35122 (Italy); Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Peng, Yingjie [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 (Switzerland); Bouche, Nicolas [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie (IRAP), Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, 14, avenue Edouard Berlin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Burkert, Andreas [Department fuer Physik, Universitaets-Sternwarte Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (USM), Scheinerstr. 1, Muenchen, D-81679 (Germany); Cresci, Giovanni [Istituto Nazionale di AstrofisicaOsservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Genel, Shy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hicks, Erin K. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, U.W., Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Naab, Thorsten, E-mail: sfnewman@berkeley.edu [Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl Schwarzschildstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2012-12-10

    Using SINFONI H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] AO data of 27 z {approx} 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the SINS and zC-SINF surveys, we explore the dependence of outflow strength (via the broad flux fraction) on various galaxy parameters. For galaxies that have evidence for strong outflows, we find that the broad emission is spatially extended to at least the half-light radius ({approx}a few kpc). Decomposition of the [S II] doublet into broad and narrow components suggests that this outflowing gas probably has a density of {approx}10-100 cm{sup -3}, less than that of the star-forming gas (600 cm{sup -3}). There is a strong correlation of the H{alpha} broad flux fraction with the star formation surface density of the galaxy, with an apparent threshold for strong outflows occurring at 1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Above this threshold, we find that SFGs with log m{sub *} > 10 have similar or perhaps greater wind mass-loading factors ({eta} = M-dot{sub out}/SFR) and faster outflow velocities than lower mass SFGs, suggesting that the majority of outflowing gas at z {approx} 2 may derive from high-mass SFGs. The mass-loading factor is also correlated with the star formation rate (SFR), galaxy size, and inclination, such that smaller, more star-forming, and face-on galaxies launch more powerful outflows. We propose that the observed threshold for strong outflows and the observed mass loading of these winds can be explained by a simple model wherein break-out of winds is governed by pressure balance in the disk.

  12. EARLY STAGES OF CLUSTER FORMATION: FRAGMENTATION OF MASSIVE DENSE CORES DOWN TO {approx}< 1000 AU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Fuente, Asuncion [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, P.O. Box 112, E-28803 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti Franques, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Fontani, Francesco; Cesaroni, Riccardo [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Lago E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Busquet, Gemma [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Recerca di Tor Vergata, Via Fosso Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Commercon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, Ecole Normale Superieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Boissier, Jeremie [Istituto di Radioastronomia, INAF, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Zapata, Luis A., E-mail: palau@ieec.uab.es [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2013-01-10

    In order to study the fragmentation of massive dense cores, which constitute the cluster cradles, we observed the continuum at 1.3 mm and the CO (2-1) emission of four massive cores with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the most extended configuration. We detected dust condensations down to {approx}0.3 M {sub Sun} and separate millimeter sources down to 0.''4 or {approx}< 1000 AU, comparable to the sensitivities and separations reached in optical/infrared studies of clusters. The CO (2-1) high angular resolution images reveal high-velocity knots usually aligned with previously known outflow directions. This, in combination with additional cores from the literature observed at similar mass sensitivity and spatial resolution, allowed us to build a sample of 18 protoclusters with luminosities spanning three orders of magnitude. Among the 18 regions, {approx}30% show no signs of fragmentation, while 50% split up into {approx}> 4 millimeter sources. We compiled a list of properties for the 18 massive dense cores, such as bolometric luminosity, total mass, and mean density, and found no correlation of any of these parameters with the fragmentation level. In order to investigate the combined effects of the magnetic field, radiative feedback, and turbulence in the fragmentation process, we compared our observations to radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations and found that the low-fragmented regions are reproduced well in the magnetized core case, while the highly fragmented regions are consistent with cores where turbulence dominates over the magnetic field. Overall, our study suggests that the fragmentation in massive dense cores could be determined by the initial magnetic field/turbulence balance in each particular core.

  13. QUIET-TIME INTERPLANETARY {approx}2-20 keV SUPERHALO ELECTRONS AT SOLAR MINIMUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Linghua [Department of Geophysics, Peking University, 100871 Beijing (China); Lin, Robert P.; Salem, Chadi; Pulupa, Marc; Larson, Davin E.; Luhmann, Janet G. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Yoon, Peter H., E-mail: wanglhwang@gmail.com [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    We present a statistical survey of {approx}2-20 keV superhalo electrons in the solar wind measured by the SupraThermal Electron instrument on board the two STEREO spacecraft during quiet-time periods from 2007 March through 2009 March at solar minimum. The observed superhalo electrons have a nearly isotropic angular distribution and a power-law spectrum, f{proportional_to}v{sup -{gamma}}, with {gamma} ranging from 5 to 8.7, with nearly half between 6.5 and 7.5, and an average index of 6.69 {+-} 0.90. The observed power-law spectrum varies significantly on a spatial scale of {approx}>0.1 AU and a temporal scale of {approx}>several days. The integrated density of quiet-time superhalo electrons at 2-20 keV ranges from {approx}10{sup -8} cm{sup -3} to 10{sup -6} cm{sup -3}, about 10{sup -9}-10{sup -6} of the solar wind density, and, as well as the power-law spectrum, shows no correlation with solar wind proton density, velocity, or temperature. The density of superhalo electrons appears to show a solar-cycle variation at solar minimum, while the power-law spectral index {gamma} has no solar-cycle variation. These quiet-time superhalo electrons are present even in the absence of any solar activity-e.g., active regions, flares or microflares, type III radio bursts, etc.-suggesting that they may be accelerated by processes such as resonant wave-particle interactions in the interplanetary medium, or possibly by nonthermal processes related to the acceleration of the solar wind such as nanoflares, or by acceleration at the CIR forward shocks.

  14. GALEX-SELECTED LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2: COMPARISON WITH OTHER POPULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberzettl, L.; Williger, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Louisville, Louisville KY 20492 (United States); Lehnert, M. D. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, UMR 8111 du CNRS, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France); Nesvadba, N. [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS, Universite Paris-Sud, Bat. 120-121, 91405 Orsay (France); Davies, L. [Department of Physics, H H Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-20

    We present results of a search for bright Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at 1.5 {<=} z {<=} 2.5 in the GOODS-S field using an NUV-dropout technique in combination with color selection. We derived a sample of 73 LBG candidates. We compare our selection efficiencies to BM/BX and BzK methods (techniques solely based on ground-based data sets), and find the NUV data to provide greater efficiency for selecting star-forming galaxies. We estimate LBG candidate ages, masses, star formation rates, and extinction from fitting PEGASE synthesis evolution models. We find that about 20% of our LBG candidates are comparable to infrared-luminous LBGs or submillimeter galaxies which are thought to be precursors of massive elliptical galaxies today. Overall, we can show that although BM/BX and BzK methods do identify star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2, the sample they provide biases against those star-forming galaxies which are more massive and contain sizeable red stellar populations. A true Lyman break criterion at z {approx} 2 is therefore more directly comparable to the populations found at z {approx} 3, which does contain a red fraction.

  15. Microscopic group constants determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of microscopic group constants determination for nuclear reactor calculations is described in this paper. The principle of this method is group averaging of microscopic cross sections with respect to the standard spectrum. The group cross sections obtained are used for the calculation of fast critical assembly Jezebel. (author)

  16. Demonstration of the Serpent Monte-Carlo Code Applicability toFew-Group Constants Generation for Existing and Advanced Reactor Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpent is a continuous-energy Monte Carlo (MC) reactor physics code recently developed at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Serpent can be used for 2D fuel lattice calculations as well as for 3D full core simulations. Due to its built-in decay and burnup routine Serpent can perform depletion and decay analysis to provide time-dependent isotopic compositions and spent fuel characteristics including radioactivity and decay heat. Serpent uses matrix exponential method to solve the Bateman decay and depletion equations while the solution of the matrix exponential relies on the Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method (CRAM) Serpent runs significantly faster than other MC codes due to the two main reasons: 1) the use of the Woodcock delta-tracking in a combination with a typical surface-to-surface ray-tracing in a geometry routine, and 2) the use of the unionized energy grid for all point-wise reaction cross sections. The later, however, considerably increases the memory requirements and can be a bottleneck in simulations with a large number of involved nuclides. Serpent is especially designed to generate homogenized constants for deterministic 3D core analysis. For any region of interest the code automatically calculates homogenized few-group cross sections, group-to-group scattering matrices, diffusion coefficients, assembly discontinuity factors, kinetics parameters, etc. More details can be found in Serpent User's Manual. Recently some new calculation methods related to the production of homogenized few-group constants were implemented in the Serpent code including homogenization in leakage-corrected criticality spectrum, group constant generation in reflectors and other non-fissile regions, and improved treatment of neutron-multiplying scattering reactions. The capability to generate homogenized few-group constants can be considered as one of the most attractive features of Serpent. Being a MC code, Serpent is capable of handling complex geometries without

  17. Application of Bloch oscillations and atomic interferometry for the measurement of the h/m ratio and the determination of the fine structure constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is possible to determine the h/mRb ratio between the Planck constant and the mass of the atoms, and then to deduce a value of the fine structure constant alpha, from the accurate measurement of the recoil velocity of an atom absorbing a photon. To perform this measurement we combine the high efficiency of Bloch oscillations with the high sensitivity of a Ramsey-Borde interferometer. The Bloch oscillations technic allows us to transfer a large number of recoils to the atoms (up to 1600 recoil momenta). An interferometric Ramsey-Borde velocity sensor, based on velocity selective Raman transitions, allows us to measure the momentum transferred to the atoms. A measurement with a statistical uncertainty of 3 ppb (3*10-9), in conjunction with a careful study of systematic effects (3.4 ppb), lead us to a determination of alpha with a relative uncertainty of 4.8 ppb. The value of α-1 is 137.03599887(65). It is the best determination of alpha, independent from quantum electrodynamics

  18. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, P., E-mail: papp@fmph.uniba.sk [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Matejčík, Š. [Department of Experimental Physics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mach, P.; Urban, J. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Paidarová, I. [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Dolejškova 3, CZ-182 23 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Horáček, J., E-mail: horacek@mbox.troja.mff.cuni.cz [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-180 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2013-06-03

    Highlights: • The anions are stabilized by additional charges on the nuclei. • The energy dependence of anions and neutrals on nuclear charges are calculated by ab initio methods. • Resonance energies and widths are obtained from the energy data by analytical continuation with Padé approximation. • The resonance energies and widths of amino acids are compared with Nestmann–Peyerimhoff’s method and with experiment. • The resonance energies and (widths) of formic acid monomer and dimer are 2.09 (0.33) eV and 1.7 (0.13) eV, respectively. - Abstract: The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  19. Constant Speed Ramps

    CERN Document Server

    Perdomo, Oscar M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we show all possible ramps where an object can move with constant speed under the effect of gravity and friction. The planar ramp are very easy to describe, just rotate a curve with velocity vector (tanh(as),sech(as)). Recall that tanh(as)^2+sech^2(as) = 1. Therefore, the solution of the planar constant speed problem is connected with easy to describe examples of curves with arc-length parameter. For ramps in the space, we show that there are as many ramps as tangent unit vector fields in the south hemisphere. A video explaining these results can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBrvbb0efVk

  20. Variation of fundamental constants

    CERN Document Server

    Flambaum, V V

    2006-01-01

    We present a review of recent works devoted to the variation of the fine structure constant alpha, strong interaction and fundamental masses. There are some hints for the variation in quasar absorption spectra, Big Bang nucleosynthesis, and Oklo natural nuclear reactor data. A very promising method to search for the variation of the fundamental constants consists in comparison of different atomic clocks. Huge enhancement of the variation effects happens in transition between accidentally degenerate atomic and molecular energy levels. A new idea is to build a ``nuclear'' clock based on the ultraviolet transition between very low excited state and ground state in Thorium nucleus. This may allow to improve sensitivity to the variation up to 10 orders of magnitude! Huge enhancement of the variation effects is also possible in cold atomic and molecular collisions near Feschbach resonance.

  1. The cosmological constant puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Bass, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The accelerating expansion of the Universe points to a small positive vacuum energy density and negative vacuum pressure. A strong candidate is the cosmological constant in Einstein's equations of General Relativity. Possible contributions are zero-point energies and the condensates associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The vacuum energy density extracted from astrophysics is 10 56 times smaller than the value expected from quantum fields and Standard Model particle physi...

  2. Is the sun constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small fluctuations in the solar constant can occur on timescales much shorter than the Kelvin time. Changes in the ability of convection to transmit energy through the superadiabatic and transition regions of the convection zone cause structure adjustments which can occur on a time scale of days. The bulk of the convection zone reacts to maintain hydrostatic equilibrium (though not thermal equilibrium) and causes a luminosity change. While small radius variations will occur, most of the change will be seen in temperature

  3. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Structure constants for new infinite-dimensional Lie algebras of U(N+,N-) tensor operators and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, M.

    2000-03-01

    The structure constants for Moyal brackets of an infinite basis of functions on the algebraic manifolds M of pseudo-unitary groups U (N + ,N - ) are provided. They generalize the Virasoro and icons/Journals/Common/calW" ALT="calW" ALIGN="TOP"/> icons/Journals/Common/infty" ALT="infty" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> algebras to higher dimensions. The connection with volume-preserving diffeomorphisms on M , higher generalized-spin and tensor operator algebras of U (N + ,N - ) is discussed. These centrally extended, infinite-dimensional Lie algebras also provide the arena for nonlinear integrable field theories in higher dimensions, residual gauge symmetries of higher-extended objects in the light-cone gauge and C * -algebras for tractable non-commutative versions of symmetric curved spaces.

  4. Confirmation of Small Dynamical and Stellar Masses for Extreme Emission Line Galaxies at z Approx. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseda, Michael V.; van Der Wel, Arjen; da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Pacifici, Camilla; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Franx, Marijn; van Dokkum, Pieter; Bell, Eric F.; Fumagalli, Mattia; Grogin, Norman A.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lundgren, Britt F.; Marchesini, Danilo; Nelson, Eric J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Straughn, Amber N.; Trump. Jonathan R.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Wuyts, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations from the Large Binocular Telescope and the Very Large Telescope reveal kinematically narrow lines (approx. 50 km/s) for a sample of 14 extreme emission line galaxies at redshifts 1.4 1. The stellar mass formed in this vigorous starburst phase represents a large fraction of the total (dynamical) mass, without a significantly massive underlying population of older stars. The occurrence of such intense events in shallow potentials strongly suggests that supernova-driven winds must be of critical importance in the subsequent evolution of these systems.

  5. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Jackson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H_0 values of around 72–74 km s^–1 Mpc^–1, with typical errors of 2–3 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67–68 km s^–1 Mpc^–1 and typical errors of 1–2 km s^–1 Mpc^–1. The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  6. Approximations to Euler's constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a problem of finding good approximations to Euler's constant γ=lim→∞ Sn, where Sn = Σk=Ln (1)/k-log(n+1), by linear forms in logarithms and harmonic numbers. In 1995, C. Elsner showed that slow convergence of the sequence Sn can be significantly improved if Sn is replaced by linear combinations of Sn with integer coefficients. In this paper, considering more general linear transformations of the sequence Sn we establish new accelerating convergence formulae for γ. Our estimates sharpen and generalize recent Elsner's, Rivoal's and author's results. (author)

  7. Application of a Genetic Algorithm to the Optimization of Rate Constants in Chemical Kinetic Models for Combustion Simulation of HCCI Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Kyu; Ito, Kazuma; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Wakisaka, Tomoyuki

    For numerically predicting the combustion processes in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines, practical chemical kinetic models have been explored. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been applied to the optimization of the rate constants in detailed chemical kinetic models, and a detailed kinetic model (592 reactions) for gasoline reference fuels with arbitrary octane number between 60 and 100 has been obtained from the detailed reaction schemes for iso-octane and n-heptane proposed by Golovitchev. The ignition timing in a gasoline HCCI engine has been predicted reasonably well by zero-dimensional simulation using the CHEMKIN code with this detailed kinetic model. An original reduced reaction scheme (45 reactions) for dimethyl ether (DME) has been derived from Curran’s detailed scheme, and the combustion process in a DME HCCI engine has been predicted reasonably well in a practical computation time by three-dimensional simulation using the authors’ GTT code, which has been linked to the CHEMKIN subroutines with the proposed reaction scheme and also has adopted a modified eddy dissipation combustion model.

  8. A CMOS front-end for MPPC-based detectors aimed to TOF applications with fast discriminator, adjustable arming threshold and constant-fraction functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have designed and realized a Front-End chip for MPPC in standard CMOS 0.35μm technology. The channel presents a low input impedance in order to reduce as much as possible the recovery time of the sensor. This is achieved using the current domain for processing signals through the current conveyors (CCII) as building blocks of the channel. A current feed-back with low-pass filter has also been used to realize a sensitive improvement of the correction of the pile-up problem, in case of high repetition rate events. An independent arming threshold is available for each channel, providing the selection of the event through the peak level (proportional to the number of simultaneously hit pixels) reached by the signal. A constant-fraction functionality is present in order to reduce the well know time-walk problem. The delay in the correspondent branch is obtained by using an additional CCII block. The digital output of the discriminator channel has adjustable time width. The pilot chip is made up of five channels. All the values of the independent thresholds are stored in 10−bit registers as well as the values of the trigger output width and the main polarization current of the CCII blocks. All the registers are writable from a standard three-wire SPI. These features make the chip fully self-consistent. In this work we present and discuss the simulation results together with the preliminary test performed

  9. Neutron-proton pairing correlations in medium mass N approx =Z nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovici, A; Faessler, A

    1999-01-01

    The pair structure and the average pairing gaps of realistic wave functions obtained within the complex Excited Vampir variational approach are investigated in order to evaluate the neutron-proton pairing correlations at low and high spins in medium mass N approx =Z nuclei. The number of isovector J suppi=0 sup + pairs is calculated for the lowest few 0 sup + states in two chains of nuclei in the A approx =70 mass region. The results indicate the dominant role played by the isovector neutron-proton pairing correlations in the structure of odd-odd N=Z nuclei and the reduction of their importance with increasing neutron excess in even-even nuclei. The evolution of particular isovector and isoscalar pairs with increasing angular momentum is analyzed for the odd-odd N=Z nucleus sup 7 sup 4 Rb and the even-even N=Z nucleus sup 7 sup 2 Kr. It turns out that in the nucleus sup 7 sup 4 Rb the neutron-proton correlations play an essential role for the alignment of the yrast positive-parity even-spin band.

  10. MEASUREMENT OF 21 cm BRIGHTNESS FLUCTUATIONS AT z {approx} 0.8 IN CROSS-CORRELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masui, K. W.; Switzer, E. R.; Calin, L.-M.; Pen, U.-L.; Shaw, J. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H8 (Canada); Banavar, N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Bandura, K. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Blake, C. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Chang, T.-C.; Liao, Y.-W. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, X.; Li, Y.-C. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, 20A Datun Road, Beijing 100012 (China); Natarajan, A.; Peterson, J. B.; Voytek, T. C. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    In this Letter, 21 cm intensity maps acquired at the Green Bank Telescope are cross-correlated with large-scale structure traced by galaxies in the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. The data span the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1 over two fields totaling {approx}41 deg. sq. and 190 hr of radio integration time. The cross-correlation constrains {Omega}{sub HI} b{sub HI} r = [0.43 {+-} 0.07(stat.) {+-} 0.04(sys.)] Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, where {Omega}{sub HI} is the neutral hydrogen (H I) fraction, r is the galaxy-hydrogen correlation coefficient, and b{sub HI} is the H I bias parameter. This is the most precise constraint on neutral hydrogen density fluctuations in a challenging redshift range. Our measurement improves the previous 21 cm cross-correlation at z {approx} 0.8 both in its precision and in the range of scales probed.

  11. The gas mass of star-forming galaxies at $z \\approx 1.3$

    CERN Document Server

    Kanekar, Nissim; Dwarakanath, K S

    2016-01-01

    We report a Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) search for HI 21cm emission from a large sample of star-forming galaxies at $z \\approx 1.18 - 1.34$, lying in sub-fields of the DEEP2 Redshift Survey. The search was carried out by co-adding ("stacking") the HI 21cm emission spectra of 857 galaxies, after shifting each galaxy's HI 21cm spectrum to its rest frame. We obtain the $3\\sigma$ upper limit S$_{\\rm{HI}} 1$. The implied limit on the average atomic gas mass fraction (relative to stars) is ${\\rm M}_{\\rm GAS}/{\\rm M}_* < 0.5$, comparable to the cold molecular gas mass fraction in similar star-forming galaxies at these redshifts. We find that the cosmological mass density of neutral atomic gas in star-forming galaxies at $z \\approx 1.3$ is $\\Omega_{\\rm GAS} < 3.7 \\times 10^{-4}$, significantly lower than $\\Omega_{\\rm GAS}$ estimates in both galaxies in the local Universe and damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ absorbers at $z \\geq 2.2$. Blue star-forming galaxies thus do not appear to dominate the neutral atomic ...

  12. THE ASSEMBLY OF MILKY-WAY-LIKE GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 2.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Nelson, Erica June; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Momcheva, Ivelina [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Patel, Shannon; Fumagalli, Mattia; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands); Brammer, Gabriel [European Southern Observatory, Alonson de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Whitaker, Katherine E. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Lundgren, Britt [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Conroy, Charlie [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Foerster Schreiber, Natascha; Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kriek, Mariska [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marchesini, Danilo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Rix, Hans-Walter; Van der Wel, Arjen [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-10

    Galaxies with the mass of the Milky Way dominate the stellar mass density of the universe but it is uncertain how and when they were assembled. Here we study progenitors of these galaxies out to z = 2.5, using data from the 3D-HST and CANDELS Treasury surveys. We find that galaxies with present-day stellar masses of log (M) Almost-Equal-To 10.7 built {approx}90% of their stellar mass since z = 2.5, with most of the star formation occurring before z = 1. In marked contrast to the assembly history of massive elliptical galaxies, mass growth is not limited to large radii: the mass in the central 2 kpc of the galaxies increased by a factor of 3.2{sup +0.8}{sub -0.7} between z = 2.5 and z = 1. We therefore rule out simple models in which bulges were fully assembled at high redshift and disks gradually formed around them. Instead, bulges (and black holes) likely formed in lockstep with disks, through bar instabilities, migration, or other processes. We find that after z = 1 the growth in the central regions gradually stopped and the disk continued to be built up, consistent with recent studies of the gas distributions in z {approx} 1 galaxies and the properties of many spiral galaxies today.

  13. Reactor group constants and benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluated nuclear data files such as JENDL, ENDF/B-VI and JEF-2 are validated by analyzing critical mock-up experiments for various type reactors and assessing applicability for nuclear characteristics such as criticality, reaction rates, reactivities, etc. This is called Benchmark Testing. In the nuclear calculations, the diffusion and transport codes use the group constant library which is generated by processing the nuclear data files. In this paper, the calculation methods of the reactor group constants and benchmark test are described. Finally, a new group constants scheme is proposed. (author)

  14. Solution of TiO$_{2}$ memristor-capacitor series circuit excited by a constant voltage source and its application to calculate operation frequency of a programmable TiO$_{2}$ memristor-capacitor relaxation oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    MUTLU, Reşat

    2015-01-01

    The memristor is a new-found circuit element and its applications in programmable circuits are also under study. Analysis of most of its combinations with other circuit elements such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors does not exist. In this work, a TiO$_{2}$ memristor model with linear dopant drift speed is used and the solution of a TiO$_{2}$ memristor and capacitor series circuit driven by a constant voltage source is given. It is then used to analyze a novel M-C oscillator circuit. I...

  15. Constant Proportion Portfolio Insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Cathrine

    2014-01-01

    Portfolio insurance, as practiced in 1987, consisted of trading between an underlying stock portfolio and cash, using option theory to place a floor on the value of the position, as if it included a protective put. Constant Proportion Portfolio Insurance (CPPI) is an option-free variation on the...... theme, originally proposed by Fischer Black. In CPPI, a financial institution guarantees a floor value for the “insured” portfolio and adjusts the stock/bond mix to produce a leveraged exposure to the risky assets, which depends on how far the portfolio value is above the floor. Plain-vanilla portfolio...... insurance largely died with the crash of 1987, but CPPI is still going strong. In the frictionless markets of finance theory, the issuer’s strategy to hedge its liability under the contract is clear, but in the real world with transactions costs and stochastic jump risk, the optimal strategy is less obvious...

  16. When constants are important

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss several complexity aspects pertaining to neural networks, commonly known as the curse of dimensionality. The focus will be on: (1) size complexity and depth-size tradeoffs; (2) complexity of learning; and (3) precision and limited interconnectivity. Results have been obtained for each of these problems when dealt with separately, but few things are known as to the links among them. They start by presenting known results and try to establish connections between them. These show that they are facing very difficult problems--exponential growth in either space (i.e. precision and size) and/or time (i.e., learning and depth)--when resorting to neural networks for solving general problems. The paper will present a solution for lowering some constants, by playing on the depth-size tradeoff.

  17. Decay constants in geochronology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IgorM.Villa; PaulR.Renne

    2005-01-01

    Geologic time is fundamental to the Earth Sciences, and progress in many disciplines depends critically on our ability to measure time with increasing accuracy and precision. Isotopic geochronology makes use of the decay of radioactive nuclides as a help to quantify the histories of rock, minerals, and other materials. Both accuracy and precision of radioisotopic ages are, at present, limited by those of radioactive decay constants. Modem mass spectrometers can measure isotope ratios with a precision of 10-4 or better. On the other hand, the uncertainties associated with direct half-life determinations are, in most cases, still at the percent level. The present short note briefly summarizes progress and problems that have been encountered during the Working Group's activity.

  18. The Hubble Constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Neal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. In the last 20 years, much progress has been made and estimates now range between 60 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, with most now between 70 and 75 km s^-1 Mpc^-1, a huge improvement over the factor-of-2 uncertainty which used to prevail. Further improvements which gave a generally agreed margin of error of a few percent rather than the current 10% would be vital input to much other interesting cosmology. There are several programmes which are likely to lead us to this point in the next 10 years.

  19. Hadron spectrum, quark masses and decay constants from light overlap fermions on large lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galletly, D.; Horsley, R. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics; Guertler, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Rakow, P.E.L. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Theoretical Physics Division, Dept. of Mathematical Sciences; Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC]|[Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Streuer, T. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC]|[Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2006-07-15

    We present results from a simulation of quenched overlap fermions with Luescher-Weisz gauge field action on lattices up to 24{sup 3} 48 and for pion masses down to {approx}250 MeV. Among the quantities we study are the pion, rho and nucleon masses, the light and strange quark masses, and the pion decay constant. The renormalization of the scalar and axial vector currents is done nonperturbatively in the RI-MOM scheme. The simulations are performed at two different lattice spacings, a {approx}0.1 fm and {approx}0.15 fm, and on two different physical volumes, to test the scaling properties of our action and to study finite volume effects. We compare our results with the predictions of chiral perturbation theory and compute several of its low-energy constants. The pion mass is computed in sectors of fixed topology as well. (orig.)

  20. An investigation on linear and non-linear optical constants of nano-spherical CuPc thin films for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahia, I. S.; Ganesh, V.; Shkir, M.; AlFaify, S.; Zahran, H. Y.; Algarni, H.; Abutalib, M. M.; Al-Ghamdi, Attieh A.; El-Naggar, A. M.; AlBassam, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    In the current work, the authors present the systematic study on linear and nonlinear optical properties of Copper-phathalocyanine thin film deposited by thermal evaporation system for the first time. The thickness of the prepared thin film was measured and found to be ~300 nm. X-ray diffraction and AFM study confirms that the prepared thin film possess good quality. The orientation of the grown thin film is found to be along (100). UV-vis-NIR study shows that the deposited thin film is highly transparent (>80%) in the wavelength range of 700-2500 nm. Further, the recorded optical data was used to determine the various linear and nonlinear optical parameters. The calculated value of refractive index is found to be in the range of 0.4-1.0. The direct and indirect band gap value is found to be 2.9 and 3.25 eV, respectively. The value of linear and nonlinear susceptibilities is found to be in order of 10-12. The higher value of linear and nonlinear parameters makes it suitable for optoelectronic applications.

  1. Analysis of the chemical equilibrium of combustion at constant volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius BREBENEL

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Determining the composition of a mixture of combustion gases at a given temperature is based on chemical equilibrium, when the equilibrium constants are calculated on the assumption of constant pressure and temperature. In this paper, an analysis of changes occurring when combustion takes place at constant volume is presented, deriving a specific formula of the equilibrium constant. The simple reaction of carbon combustion in pure oxygen in both cases (constant pressure and constant volume is next considered as example of application, observing the changes occurring in the composition of the combustion gases depending on temperature.

  2. Improving performance of charge sensitive preamplifier in liquid scintillation counter using constant current technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are various charge constant current technologies for liquid scintillation circuit. The constant current technology, charge technology and their application to liquid scintillation counter are emphasized

  3. The interacting and non-constant cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a time-varying cosmological constant with a fixed equation of state, which evolves mainly through its interaction with the background during most of the long history of the universe. However, such interaction does not exist in the very early and the late-time universe and produces the acceleration during these eras when it becomes very nearly a constant. It is found that after the initial inflationary phase, the cosmological constant, which we call as lambda parameter, rolls down from a large constant value to another but very small constant value and further dominates the present epoch showing up in the form of the dark energy driving the acceleration. (author)

  4. Adelic Universe and Cosmological Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Makhaldiani, Nugzar

    2003-01-01

    In the quantum adelic field (string) theory models, vacuum energy -- cosmological constant vanish. The other (alternative ?) mechanism is given by supersymmetric theories. Some observations on prime numbers, zeta -- function and fine structure constant are also considered.

  5. Beyond the Hubble Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    about the distances to galaxies and thereby about the expansion rate of the Universe. A simple way to determine the distance to a remote galaxy is by measuring its redshift, calculate its velocity from the redshift and divide this by the Hubble constant, H0. For instance, the measured redshift of the parent galaxy of SN 1995K (0.478) yields a velocity of 116,000 km/sec, somewhat more than one-third of the speed of light (300,000 km/sec). From the universal expansion rate, described by the Hubble constant (H0 = 20 km/sec per million lightyears as found by some studies), this velocity would indicate a distance to the supernova and its parent galaxy of about 5,800 million lightyears. The explosion of the supernova would thus have taken place 5,800 million years ago, i.e. about 1,000 million years before the solar system was formed. However, such a simple calculation works only for relatively ``nearby'' objects, perhaps out to some hundred million lightyears. When we look much further into space, we also look far back in time and it is not excluded that the universal expansion rate, i.e. the Hubble constant, may have been different at earlier epochs. This means that unless we know the change of the Hubble constant with time, we cannot determine reliable distances of distant galaxies from their measured redshifts and velocities. At the same time, knowledge about such change or lack of the same will provide unique information about the time elapsed since the Universe began to expand (the ``Big Bang''), that is, the age of the Universe and also its ultimate fate. The Deceleration Parameter q0 Cosmologists are therefore eager to determine not only the current expansion rate (i.e., the Hubble constant, H0) but also its possible change with time (known as the deceleration parameter, q0). Although a highly accurate value of H0 has still not become available, increasing attention is now given to the observational determination of the second parameter, cf. also the Appendix at the

  6. THE FORMATION OF THE FIRST COSMIC STRUCTURES AND THE PHYSICS OF THE z {approx} 20 UNIVERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, Ryan M.; McQuinn, Matthew [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    We perform a suite of cosmological simulations in the {Lambda}CDM paradigm of the formation of the first structures in the universe prior to astrophysical reheating and reionization (15 {approx}< z < 200). These are the first simulations initialized in a manner that self-consistently accounts for the impact of pressure on the rate of growth of modes, temperature fluctuations in the gas, and the dark matter-baryon supersonic velocity difference. Even with these improvements, these are still difficult times to simulate accurately as the Jeans length of the cold intergalactic gas must be resolved while also capturing a representative sample of the universe. We explore the box size and resolution requirements to meet these competing objectives. Our simulations support the finding of recent studies that the dark matter-baryon velocity difference has a surprisingly large impact on the accretion of gas onto the first star-forming minihalos (which have masses of {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }). In fact, the halo gas is often significantly downwind of such halos and with lower densities in the simulations in which the baryons have a bulk flow with respect to the dark matter, modulating the formation of the first stars by the local value of this velocity difference. We also show that dynamical friction plays an important role in the nonlinear evolution of the dark matter-baryon differential velocity, acting to erase this velocity difference quickly in overdense gas, as well as sourcing visually apparent bow shocks and Mach cones throughout the universe. We use simulations with both the GADGET and Enzo cosmological codes to test the robustness of these conclusions. The comparison of these codes' simulations also provides a relatively controlled test of these codes themselves, allowing us to quantify some of the tradeoffs between the algorithms. For example, we find that particle coupling in GADGET between the gas and dark matter particles results in spurious growth that

  7. B-meson decay constants with domain-wall light quarks and nonperturbatively tuned relativistic b-quarks

    OpenAIRE

    Witzel, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    We report on our progress to obtain the decay constants f_B and f_Bs from lattice-QCD simulations on the RBC-UKQCD Collaborations 2+1 flavor domain-wall Iwasaki lattices. Using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks we analyze data with several partially quenched light-quark masses at two lattice spacings of a approx 0.11 fm and a approx 0.08 fm.

  8. Hemisphere differences in the morphology of the high latitude ionosphere measured at approx. 500 km

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambient electron density measurements made by the radio frequency capacitance probe on Ariel 4 have been analyzed in order to study the structures present at approx. 500 km altitude at latitudes poleward of + - 500A during the 1971 Northern Hemisphere winter (December solstice) and the 1972 Southern Hemisphere winter (June solstice); data obtained on 94 days centered on each solstice have been used. The general morphology of and the extreme densities within the mid-latitude electron density trough, the polar cap depletions and the electron density enhancements associated with the cusp-auroral zone were determined statistically. Analyses of data acquired during quiet magnetic conditions (Ksub(p) < = 2 +) show that the Northern and Southern Hemisphere winter ionospheres were significantly different; in particular, the Southern Hemisphere densities were lower than those in the Northern Hemisphere. The maximum electron densities observed in the Northern Hemisphere occurred in a magnetic-local-time range symmetrical about the 02 14 M.L.T. meridian, whereas in the Southern Hemisphere the maxima were symmetrical with respect to the midnight noon magnetic meridian. (author)

  9. Substructure within the SSA22 protocluster at $z\\approx3.09$

    CERN Document Server

    Topping, Michael W; Steidel, Charles C

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a densely sampled spectroscopic survey of the SSA22 protocluster at $z\\approx 3.09$. Our sample with Keck/LRIS spectroscopy includes 106 Ly$\\alpha$ Emitters (LAEs) and 40 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at $z=3.05-3.12$. These galaxies are contained within the $9'\\times9'$ region in which the protocluster was discovered, which also hosts the maximum galaxy overdensity in the SSA22 region. The redshift histogram of our spectroscopic sample reveals two distinct peaks, at $z=3.069$ (blue, 43 galaxies) and $z=3.095$ (red, 103 galaxies). Furthermore, objects in the blue and red peaks are segregated on the sky, with galaxies in the blue peak concentrating towards the western half of the field. These results suggest that the blue and red redshift peaks represent two distinct structures in physical space. Although the double-peaked redshift histogram is traced in the same manner by LBGs and LAEs, and brighter and fainter galaxies, we find that nine out of 10 X-ray AGNs in SSA22, and all seven sp...

  10. Coulomb Excitation of Neutron-Rich $A\\approx$140 Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    Van duppen, P L E

    2002-01-01

    Investigating the isospin dependence of the product between the B( E2; 0$_{1}^{+} \\rightarrow 2_{1}^{+}$)-value and the 2$_{1}^{+}$-excitation energy E$_{2^{+}}$ in even-even nuclei around $A\\!\\approx$140 one observes a rather smooth trend close to the valley of stability but clear indication for a reduction from the extrapolated B(E2)-values by one order of magnitude for some very neutron-rich nuclei. While close to the valley of stability the strong neutron-proton interaction results in an equilibration of the neutron and proton deformations with a predominate isoscalar character of the collective 2$^{+}$ excitation, it is conceivable that more loosely bound neutrons cannot polarize a close-to-magic proton core that well any more. This might result in a decoupling of the shape of the outer neutrons from the core and in a strong isovector admixture to the lowest lying 2$^{+}$ level. In this way the 2$^{+}$ -energies could be further lowered in neutron-rich nuclei, while the quadrupole moments of the proton c...

  11. Isomers in neutron-rich A{approx}190 nuclides from {sup 208}Pb fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caamano, M.; Podolyak, Z.; Garces Narro, J. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom); Walker, M. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom)]|[TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada); Regan, P.H. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, Guildford (United Kingdom)]|[Yale University, Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven (United States); Pfuetzner, M. [Warsaw University, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Gerl, J.; Cortina Gil, D.; Doering, J.; Geissel, H. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Hellstroem, M. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Lund University, Div. of Nuclear Physics (Sweden); Mayet, P. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[KU Leuven, IKS, Leuven (Belgium); Mineva, M.N. [Lund University, Division of Nuclear Physics (Sweden); Aprahamian, A. [University of Notre Dame, Department of Physics, South Bend (United States); Benlliure, J. [University of Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bruce, A.M. [University of Brighton, School of Engineering, Brighton (United Kingdom); Butler, P.A. [University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Cullen, D.M. [University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom)]|[University of Manchester, Schuster Lab., Manchester (United Kingdom); Enqvist, T. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany)]|[Univ. of Jyvaeskylae, Dept. of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Fox, C. [Univ. of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Lab., Liverpool (United Kingdom)]|[Duke Univ., TUNL, Durham (United States); Gelletly, M.; Giovinazzo, J.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Grzywacz, R.; Kleinboehl, A.H.; Korten, A.; Lewitowicz, M.; Lucas, R.; Mach, H.; O' Leary, C.D.; De Oliveira, F.; Pearson, C.J.; Rejmund, F.; Rejmund, M.; Sawicka, M.; Schaffner, H.; Schlegel, C.; Schmidt, K.; Schmidt, K.H.; Stevenson, P.D.; Theisen, C.; Vives, F.; Warner, D.D.; Wheldon, C.; Wollersheim, S.; Wooding, S.; Xu, F.; Yordanov, O.

    2005-02-01

    Relativistic projectile fragmentation of {sup 208}Pb has been used to produce isomers in neutron-rich, A{approx}190 nuclides. A forward-focusing spectrometer provided ion-by-ion mass and charge identification. The detection of {gamma}-rays emitted by stopped ions has led to the assignment of isomers in {sup 188}Ta, {sup 190}W, {sup 192}Re, {sup 193}Re, {sup 195}Os, {sup 197}Ir, {sup 198}Ir, {sup 200}Pt, {sup 201}Pt, {sup 202}Pt and {sup 203}Au, with half-lives ranging from approximately 10 ns to 1 ms. Tentative isomer information has been found also for {sup 174}Er, {sup 175}Er, {sup 185}Hf, {sup 191}Re, {sup 194}Re and {sup 199}Ir. In most cases, time-correlated, singles {gamma}-ray events provided the first spectroscopic data on excited states for each nuclide. In {sup 200}Pt and {sup 201}Pt, the assignments are supported by {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences. Isomeric ratios provide additional information, such as half-life and transition energy constraints in particular cases. The level structures of the platinum isotopes are discussed, and comparisons are made with isomer systematics. (orig.)

  12. A constraint on the distance dependence of the gravitational constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extended supergravity theories predict the existence of vector and scalar bosons, besides the gravitation, which in the static limit couple to the mass. An example is the gravitation, leading to antigravity. If these bosons have a small mass (approx. -4 eV), an observable Yukawa term would be present in the gravitational potential in the newtonian limit. This can be parametrized by a distance dependent effective gravitational constant G(γ). Defining G0 = G (10 cm) and Gsub(e) = G (103 km), the comparison between theory and observations of the white dwarf Sirius B results in Gsub(c)/G0 = 0.98 +- 0.08. (orig.)

  13. A construction method for discrete constant negative Gaussian curvature surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Shimpei

    2016-01-01

    This article is an application of the author's paper about a construction method for discrete constant negative Gaussian curvature surfaces, the nonlinear d'Alembert formula. The heart of this formula is the Birkhoff decomposition, and we give a simple algorithm for the Birkhoff decomposition. As an application, we draw figures of discrete constant negative Gaussian curvature surfaces given by this method.

  14. THE FIRST Hi-GAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE OUTER GALAXY: A LOOK AT STAR FORMATION IN THE THIRD GALACTIC QUADRANT IN THE LONGITUDE RANGE 216. Degree-Sign 5 {approx}< l {approx}< 225. Degree-Sign 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Schisano, E.; Pestalozzi, M.; Benedettini, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J. [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Fukui, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Yamamoto, H. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Olmi, L. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri-INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Veneziani, M. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schneider, N.; Piazzo, L. [IRFU/SAp CEA/DSM, Laboratoire AIM CNRS, Universit Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ikhenaode, D. [DIET-Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Universita di Roma La Sapienza, via Eudossina 18, I-00184 Roma (Italy); Mizuno, A. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Onishi, T. [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Polychroni, D. [Department of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Maruccia, Y., E-mail: davide.elia@iaps.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universita del Salento, CP 193, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2013-07-20

    We present the first Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations in a portion of the outer Galaxy (216. Degree-Sign 5 {approx}< l {approx}< 225. Degree-Sign 5 and -2 Degree-Sign {approx}< b {approx}< 0 Degree-Sign ) as a part of the Hi-GAL survey. The maps between 70 and 500 {mu}m, the derived column density and temperature maps, and the compact source catalog are presented. NANTEN CO(1-0) line observations are used to derive cloud kinematics and distances so that we can estimate distance-dependent physical parameters of the compact sources (cores and clumps) having a reliable spectral energy distribution that we separate into 255 proto-stellar and 688 starless sources. Both typologies are found in association with all the distance components observed in the field, up to {approx}5.8 kpc, testifying to the presence of star formation beyond the Perseus arm at these longitudes. Selecting the starless gravitationally bound sources, we identify 590 pre-stellar candidates. Several sources of both proto- and pre-stellar nature are found to exceed the minimum requirement for being compatible with massive star formation based on the mass-radius relation. For the pre-stellar sources belonging to the Local arm (d {approx}< 1.5 kpc) we study the mass function whose high-mass end shows a power law N(log M){proportional_to}M {sup -1.0{+-}0.2}. Finally, we use a luminosity versus mass diagram to infer the evolutionary status of the sources, finding that most of the proto-stellar sources are in the early accretion phase (with some cases compatible with a Class I stage), while for pre-stellar sources, in general, accretion has not yet started.

  15. Incomplete vs. Complete Fusion at E/A {approx} 4-7 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pushpendra P [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, 1-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Yadav, Abhishek; Sharma, Vijay R; Singh, Devendra P; Gupta, Unnati; Singh, B P; Prasad, R [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, A. M. University, Aligarh-202 002 (India); Sharma, Manoj K [Physics Department, S. V. College, Aligarh-202 001 (India); Kumar, R; Golda, K S; Singh, R P; Muralithar, S; Bhowmik, R K, E-mail: pushpendrapsingh@gmail.com [NP-Group, Inter-University Accelerator Center, New Delhi-110 067 (India)

    2011-02-01

    With a view to study onset and strength of incomplete fusion at low projectile energies (i.e., {approx} 4-7 MeV/nucleon) three sets of experiments have been performed in {sup 12}C,{sup 16}O+{sup 169}Tm systems. In first set of experiments, spin-distributions and feeding intensity profiles for xn,{alpha}xn/2{alpha}xn-channels have been measured to figure out associated l-values. The spin-distributions for direct-{alpha}-emitting channels (associated with incomplete fusion) have been found to be distinctly different than that observed for fusion-evaporation (complete fusion) channels. The mean value of driving input angular momenta associated with direct-{alpha}-emitting-channels have been found to be higher than that observed for fusion-evaporation xn/{alpha}-emitting-channels, and increases with direct-{alpha}-multiplicity in forward cone. The second set of experiments has been performed to understand influence of incomplete fusion on complete fusion at these energies. Incomplete fusion strength function has been deduced from the analysis of experimental excitation functions. The third set of experiments deals with the validation of data reduction procedure used to deduce incomplete fusion fraction, and to confirm the fusion incompleteness at slightly above barrier energies. Forward-recoil-ranges of heavy reaction products have been measured and analysed on the basis of break-up fusion model. More than one linear-momentum-transfer components associated with full- and/or partial-fusion of projectile with target nucleus have been observed. Experimental ranges of forward-recoils are found to be in good agreement with that estimated using range-energy formulation. The relative strengths of complete and incomplete fusion components deduced from the analysis of forward-recoil-ranges and excitation functions complement each other. Result presented in this paper conclusively demonstrate substantial incomplete fusion contribution at energy as low as 7% above the barrier.

  16. EVIDENCE FOR COLD ACCRETION: PRIMITIVE GAS FLOWING ONTO A GALAXY AT z {approx} 0.274

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribaudo, Joseph; Lehner, Nicolas; Christopher Howk, J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Werk, Jessica K.; Xavier Prochaska, J. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Tripp, Todd M.; Meiring, Joseph D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Tumlinson, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    We present UV and optical observations from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope and Keck of a z = 0.27395 Lyman limit system (LLS) seen in absorption against the QSO PG1630+377. We detect H I absorption with log N(H I) = 17.06 {+-} 0.05 as well as Mg II, C III, Si III, and O VI in this system. The column densities are readily explained if this is a multi-phase system, with the intermediate and low ions arising in a very low metallicity ([Mg/H] = -1.71 {+-} 0.06) photoionized gas. We identify via Keck spectroscopy and Large Binocular Telescope imaging a 0.3 L{sub *} star-forming galaxy projected 37 kpc from the QSO at nearly identical redshift (z = 0.27406 and {Delta}v = -26 km s{sup -1}) with near solar metallicity ([O/H] = -0.20 {+-} 0.15). The presence of very low metallicity gas in the proximity of a near-solar metallicity, sub-L{sub *} galaxy strongly suggests that the LLS probes gas infalling onto the galaxy. A search of the literature reveals that such low-metallicity LLSs are not uncommon. We found that 50% (4/8) of the well-studied z {approx}< 1 LLSs have metallicities similar to the present system and show sub-L{sub *} galaxies with {rho} < 100 kpc in those fields where redshifts have been surveyed. We argue that the properties of these primitive LLSs and their host galaxies are consistent with those of cold mode accretion streams seen in galaxy simulations.

  17. Forward recursions and normalizing constant

    OpenAIRE

    Guyon, Xavier; Hardouin, Cécile

    2009-01-01

    Maximum likelihood parameter estimation is frequently replaced by various techniques because of its intractable normalizing constant. In the same way, the literature displays various alternatives for distributions involving such unreachable constants. In this paper, we consider a Gibbs distribution $\\pi $ and present a recurrence formula allowing a recursive calculus of the marginals of $\\pi $ and in the same time its normalizing constant$.$ The numerical performance of this algorithm is eval...

  18. Basic constant of matter world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was analysed how to gain constant 46 hidden among elementary units of matter world, which is divided into, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1. Here it shows the unity of opposites on philosophy and simple symmetric beauty of mathphysics. The constant specifically shows that scope constant 44 in nuclides layer of matter world and chromosome number of mankind is 23 pairs, which is the highest form of matter motion, the basic cause of existing constant 46 is that matter exists in space-time with 4-dimensions, and it obeys the principle of the most lower energy

  19. Inelastic neutron scattering study on Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2}(x{approx}0.3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohira-Kawamura, Seiko, E-mail: seiko.kawamura@j-parc.j [Academic and Information Board, Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Nagata, Takashi [Department of Physics, Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Takeda, Keiko [Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Yoshizawa, Hideki [Neutron Science Laboratory, I.S.S.P., University of Tokyo, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Kawano-Furukawa, Hazuki [Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Ochanomizu University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments were performed on single crystals of Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2}(x{approx}0.3). The results reveal that an inelastic scattering signal appears at {Delta}E{approx}5.5meV and q {approx} (0 1 0) in the orthorhombic notation. Intensity of the signal decreases with increasing temperature, and disappears above 100 K. The origin of this signal is of magnetic. However, we also found the signal is absent in samples from a different batch at the same T and Q conditions. This indicates that the signal is very sensitive to condition in sample preparation. It might be attributed to Na ion ordering (disordering).

  20. SPITZER EVIDENCE FOR A LATE-HEAVY BOMBARDMENT AND THE FORMATION OF UREILITES IN {eta} CORVI At {approx}1 Gyr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisse, C. M. [JHU-APL, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Wyatt, M. C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Chen, C. H. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Morlok, A. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, The Open University, Milton-Keynes (United Kingdom); Watson, D. M.; Manoj, P.; Sheehan, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Currie, T. M. [NASA-GSFC, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Thebault, P. [Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Sitko, M. L., E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: wyatt@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu, E-mail: a.morlok@open.ac.uk, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: manoj@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: psheeha2@mail.rochester.edu, E-mail: thayne.m.currie@nasa.gov, E-mail: philippe.thebault@obspm.fr, E-mail: sitko@spacescience.org [Space Science Institute, 475 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2-35 {mu}m spectra of the warm, {approx}350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star {eta} Corvi (F2V, 1.4 {+-} 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at {approx}3 AU from the central star, in the system's terrestrial habitability zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high-temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} kg of 0.1-100 {mu}m warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da {approx} a{sup -3.5}, the equivalent of a 130 km radius Kuiper Belt object (KBO) of 1.0 g cm{sup 3} density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6-0.8 Gyr during the late-heavy bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first megayears of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at {approx}150 AU. At {approx}1.4 Gyr they were prompted by dynamical stirring of their parent Kuiper Belt into spiraling into the inner system, eventually colliding at 5-10 km s{sup -1} with a rocky planetary body of mass {<=}M{sub Earth} at {approx}3 AU, delivering large amounts of water (>0.1% of M{sub Earth'sOceans}) and carbon-rich material. The Spitzer spectrum also closely matches spectra reported for the Ureilite meteorites of the Sudan Almahata Sitta fall in 2008, suggesting that one of the Ureilite parent bodies was a KBO.

  1. Design and Application on the Constant Pressure Cluster Device Type of Tobacco Pneumatic Conveying%恒压集束管式风力送丝装置的设计与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢海; 郑小珍; 彭小勇

    2012-01-01

    新型恒压集束管式风力送丝装置是一种采用集束管代替通用树状型分支式、风量自动补偿的风力送丝装置.经过某大型卷烟厂实际应用表明:该装置结构原理简单、风速控制 稳定、运行可靠、节能效果明显.%The new constant pressure cluster device type of tobacco pneumatic conveying equipment, it is a kind of the pipe bundle together instead of the universal tree branch type, air volume to be automatic compensation of tobacco pneumatic conveying equipment. After the practical application of a large cigarette factories ,it showed that has a significant advantage; simple structure, work principle, reliable wind speed control flexible, remarkable energy saving. In order to improve the energy efficiency of important energy production technology level, it is worth in the modern cigarette factories of tobacco pneumatic conveying system of popularization and application.

  2. Europium (III) and americium (III) stability constants with humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability constants for tracer concentrations of Eu(III) and Am(III) complexes with a humic acid extracted from a lake-bottom sediment were measured using a solvent extraction system. The organic extractant was di(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphoric acid in toluene while the humate aqueous phase had a constant ionic strength of 0.1 M (NaClO4). Aqueous humic acid concentrations were monitored by measuring uv-visible absorbances at approx.= 380 nm. The total carboxylate capacity of the humic acid was determined by direct potentiometric titration to be 3.86 +- 0.03 meq/g. The humic acid displayed typical characteristics of a polyelectrolyte - the apparent pKsub(a), as well as the calculated metal ion stability constants increased as the degree of ionization (α) increased. The binding data required a fit of two stability constants, β1 and β2, such that for Eu, log β1 = 8.86 α + 4.39, log β2 = 3.55 α + 11.06 while for Am, log β1 = 10.58 α + 3.84, log β2 = 5.32 α + 10.42. With hydroxide, carbonate, and humate as competing ligands, the humate complex associated with the β1 constant is calculated to be the dominant species for the trivalent actinides and lanthanides under conditions present in natural waters. (orig.)

  3. JF151型定速摩擦试验机的研制与应用%Application and design for the JF151 friction tester with constant speed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王振玉; 王铁山; 宋黎

    2012-01-01

    Based on the JF150 friction tester with constant speed,a JF151 friction tester with constant speed was designed and developed.The accurate calibration value could be obtained using the weights way,and the draught fan could be mounted underneath for improving service life.By adding water tank and relieving lever, the labor intensity of the operator could be reduced.By using the computer to control and test,the tester was in high accuracy even and the test data was accurate.The new tester was Compact in structure and operated easily.The working principle, composing parts,structure parameter,control system and means of the machine are expounded. With the application of the friction material,the structure design of the machine is reasonable with the performance satisfying the testing standard.%在JF150型定速摩擦试验机的基础上,设计并研制JF151型定速摩擦试验机.采用重力砝码式标定,使标定值更准确.风机下置,提高风机的使用寿命.增加水箱和卸载手柄,减轻了操作者的劳动强度.采用计算机进行控制和检测,控制精度更高,试验数据更准确,整体结构紧凑,操作方便.详细阐述了JF151型定速摩擦试验机的工作原理、结构组成及其技术参数,简述了其控制系统组成及其控制方式.该机结构设计合理的,性能优良,完全符合测试标准要求.

  4. Leptonic B- and D-meson decay constants with 2+1 flavors of asqtad fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Kronfeld, Andreas S; Simone, James N; Van de Water, Ruth S

    2015-01-01

    We present the status of our updated D- and B-meson decay-constant analysis, based on the MILC $N_f = 2+1$ asqtad gauge ensembles. Heavy quarks are incorporated using the Wilson clover action with the Fermilab interpretation. This analysis includes ensembles at five lattice spacings from a $\\approx$ 0.045 to 0.15 fm, and light sea-quark masses down to 1/20th of the strange-quark mass. Projected error budgets for ratios of decay constants, in particular between bottom- and charm-meson decay constants, are presented.

  5. Spectrophotometric determination of association constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Least-squares 'Systematic Trial-and-Error Procedure' (STEP) for spectrophotometric evaluation of association constant (equilibrium constant) K and molar absorption coefficient E for a 1:1 molecular complex, A + B = C, with error analysis according to Conrow et al. (1964). An analysis of the Charg...

  6. Formulas for determining rotational constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelachvili, G.

    This document is part of Subvolume B `Linear Triatomic Molecules', Part 9, of Volume 20 `Molecular Constants mostly from Infrared Spectroscopy' of Landolt-Börnstein Group II `Molecules and Radicals'. Part of the introduction, it states formulas for determining rotational constants, band center, band origin, and quadrupole coupling. Specific comments relate to BHO (HBO) and COS (OCS).

  7. The stability of fundamental constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tests of the constancy of fundamental constants are tests of the local position invariance and thus of the equivalence principle, at the heart of general relativity. After summarising the links between fundamental constants, gravity, cosmology and metrology, a brief overview of the observational and experimental constraints on their variation is proposed. (authors)

  8. Application of the pM{sup '}-pC{sub H} diagrams in the determination of hydrolysis constants of the lanthanides; Aplicacion de los diagramas pM{sup '}-pC{sub H} en la determinacion de las constantes de hidrolisis de los lantanidos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez G, H.; Jimenez R, M.; Solache R, M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Quimica, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rojas H, A. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Departamento de Quimica, Area de Quimica Analitica (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The pM{sup '}-pC{sub H} diagrams allowed to determine the saturation and non-saturation zones of Lu(OH){sub 3} in solid phase and those were applied for determining the hydrolysis and lutetium solubility constants, using the radioactive isotope Lu-177. The first constant of hydrolysis was also determined by the potentiometric method in absence of solid phase. (Author)

  9. THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1 FROM THE 3D-HST SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Erica June; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Leja, Joel [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel [European Southern Observatory, Alonson de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Lundgren, Britt [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Whitaker, Katherine E. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Van der Wel, Arjen [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Foerster Schreiber, Natascha; Wuyts, Stijn [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbe, Ivo; Patel, Shannon [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Leiden (Netherlands); Kriek, Mariska [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schmidt, Kasper B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time. Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond the local Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of H{alpha} emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the H{alpha} emission, we find that star formation occurred in approximately exponential distributions at z {approx} 1, with a median Sersic index of n = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. The stacks are elongated with median axis ratios of b/a = 0.58 {+-} 0.09 in H{alpha} consistent with (possibly thick) disks at random orientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, with inclination corrected velocities of 90-330 km s{sup -1}. The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that star formation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be 'scaled-up' versions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(H{alpha}) {approx} 100 A out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  10. Power measurement for frequencies up to approx.1 GHz using a sampling oscilloscope and a low-frequency multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate measurement of electrical power above approx.1 MHz is accomplished by reconstruction of the voltage and current waveforms at a lower frequency using a sampling oscilloscope. The low-frequency waveforms are then multiplied in a 4-quadrant tranconductance-type multiplier module

  11. Reliability concerns with logical constants in Xilinx FPGA designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graham, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgan, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ostler, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Greg [JPL; Swift, Gary [XILINX; Tseng, Chen W [XILINX

    2009-01-01

    In Xilinx Field Programmable Gate Arrays logical constants, which ground unused inputs and provide constants for designs, are implemented in SEU-susceptible logic. In the past, these logical constants have been shown to cause the user circuit to output bad data and were not resetable through off-line rcconfiguration. In the more recent devices, logical constants are less problematic, though mitigation should still be considered for high reliability applications. In conclusion, we have presented a number of reliability concerns with logical constants in the Xilinx Virtex family. There are two main categories of logical constants: implicit and explicit logical constants. In all of the Virtex devices, the implicit logical constants are implemented using half latches, which in the most recent devices are several orders of magnitudes smaller than configuration bit cells. Explicit logical constants are implemented exclusively using constant LUTs in the Virtex-I and Virtex-II, and use a combination of constant LUTs and architectural posts to the ground plane in the Virtex-4. We have also presented mitigation methods and options for these devices. While SEUs in implicit and some types of explicit logical constants can cause data corrupt, the chance of failure from these components is now much smaller than it was in the Virtex-I device. Therefore, for many cases, mitigation might not be necessary, except under extremely high reliability situations.

  12. Fundamental Constants and Conservation Laws

    OpenAIRE

    Roh, Heui-Seol

    2001-01-01

    This work describes underlying features of the universe such as fundamental constants and cosmological parameters, conservation laws, baryon and lepton asymmetries, etc. in the context of local gauge theories for fundamental forces under the constraint of the flat universe. Conservation laws for fundamental forces are related to gauge theories for fundamental forces, their resulting fundamental constants are quantitatively analyzed, and their possible violations at different energy scales are...

  13. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Uzan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  14. Software corrected hot wire thermal lag for the constant voltage anemometer featuring a constant bandwidth at the selected compensation setting

    OpenAIRE

    Sarma, Garimella,; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève; Faure, Thierry M.

    1998-01-01

    International audience Software compensation correction for thermal lag of a hot wire in the application of a constant voltage anemometer (CVA) for turbulence measurements in the boundary layer of a supersonic wind tunnel has been demonstrated. The CVA was used with a fixed compensation setting while measuring the in situ thermal lag (time constant) of the hot wire. Using the measured time constant, corrections are applied to the fixed compensation output of the CVA in postprocessing of th...

  15. Bubble growth constants for liquid hydrogen and liquid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubble growth constants are calculated for liquid H2 and liquid He at various pressures and liquid superheats for spherically symmetric growth using Scrivens' solution (Chem. Eng. Sci.; 10 (1959)). The constants are shown to be applicable to bubble growth at a heated wall during boiling of cryogenic liquids. (author)

  16. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej, E-mail: Andrzej.Stankiewicz@seagate.com; Hernandez, Stephanie [Recording Heads Group, Seagate Technology, Bloomington, Minnesota 55435 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ∼0.03.

  17. From the Rydberg constant to the fundamental constants metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author since the beginning of his scientific career. This document is dedicated to the spectroscopy of hydrogen, deuterium and helium atoms. The first part is divided into 6 sub-sections: 1) the principles of hydrogen spectroscopy, 2) the measurement of the 2S-nS/nD transitions, 3) other optical frequency measurements, 4) our contribution to the determination of the Rydberg constant, 5) our current experiment on the 1S-3S transition, 6) the spectroscopy of the muonic hydrogen. Our experiments have improved the accuracy of the Rydberg Constant by a factor 25 in 15 years and we have achieved the first absolute optical frequency measurement of a transition in hydrogen. The second part is dedicated to the measurement of the fine structure constant and the last part deals with helium spectroscopy and the search for optical references in the near infrared range. (A.C.)

  18. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    CERN Document Server

    de Cesare, Marco; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2016-01-01

    We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  19. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cesare, Marco; Lizzi, Fedele; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2016-09-01

    We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  20. How fundamental are fundamental constants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    I argue that the laws of physics should be independent of one's choice of units or measuring apparatus. This is the case if they are framed in terms of dimensionless numbers such as the fine structure constant, ?. For example, the standard model of particle physics has 19 such dimensionless parameters whose values all observers can agree on, irrespective of what clock, rulers or scales? they use to measure them. Dimensional constants, on the other hand, such as ?, c, G, e and k ?, are merely human constructs whose number and values differ from one choice of units to the next. In this sense, only dimensionless constants are 'fundamental'. Similarly, the possible time variation of dimensionless fundamental 'constants' of nature is operationally well defined and a legitimate subject of physical enquiry. By contrast, the time variation of dimensional constants such as ? or ? on which a good many (in my opinion, confusing) papers have been written, is a unit-dependent phenomenon on which different observers might disagree depending on their apparatus. All these confusions disappear if one asks only unit-independent questions. We provide a selection of opposing opinions in the literature and respond accordingly.

  1. How fundamental are fundamental constants?

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, M J

    2014-01-01

    I argue that the laws of physics should be independent of one's choice of units or measuring apparatus. This is the case if they are framed in terms of dimensionless numbers such as the fine structure constant, alpha. For example, the Standard Model of particle physics has 19 such dimensionless parameters whose values all observers can agree on, irrespective of what clock, rulers, scales... they use to measure them. Dimensional constants, on the other hand, such as h, c, G, e, k..., are merely human constructs whose number and values differ from one choice of units to the next. In this sense only dimensionless constants are "fundamental". Similarly, the possible time variation of dimensionless fundamental "constants" of nature is operationally well-defined and a legitimate subject of physical enquiry. By contrast, the time variation of dimensional constants such as c or G on which a good many (in my opinion, confusing) papers have been written, is a unit-dependent phenomenon on which different observers might...

  2. The 1% concordance Hubble constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the Hubble constant has been a central goal in observational astrophysics for nearly a hundred years. Extraordinary progress has occurred in recent years on two fronts: the cosmic distance ladder measurements at low redshift and cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements at high redshift. The CMB is used to predict the current expansion rate through a best-fit cosmological model. Complementary progress has been made with baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at relatively low redshifts. While BAO data do not independently determine a Hubble constant, they are important for constraints on possible solutions and checks on cosmic consistency. A precise determination of the Hubble constant is of great value, but it is more important to compare the high and low redshift measurements to test our cosmological model. Significant tension would suggest either uncertainties not accounted for in the experimental estimates or the discovery of new physics beyond the standard model of cosmology. In this paper we examine in detail the tension between the CMB, BAO, and cosmic distance ladder data sets. We find that these measurements are consistent within reasonable statistical expectations and we combine them to determine a best-fit Hubble constant of 69.6 ± 0.7 km s–1 Mpc–1. This value is based upon WMAP9+SPT+ACT+6dFGS+BOSS/DR11+H 0/Riess; we explore alternate data combinations in the text. The combined data constrain the Hubble constant to 1%, with no compelling evidence for new physics.

  3. Observations of metals in the $z\\approx3.5$ intergalactic medium and comparison to the EAGLE simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Monica L; Crain, Robert A; Theuns, Tom; Wendt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We study the $z\\approx3.5$ intergalactic medium (IGM) by comparing new, very high-quality absorption spectra of eight QSOs with $\\langle z_{\\rm QSO} \\rangle=3.75$, to virtual observations of the EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. We employ the pixel optical depth method to study how the absorption of one ion varies as a function of another, and uncover strong correlations between various combinations of HI, CIII, CIV, SiIII, SiIV, and OVI. We find good agreement between the simulated and observed median optical depth relations of OVI(HI), CIII(CIV) and SiIII(SiIV). However, the observed median optical depths for the CIV(HI) and SiIV(HI) relations are higher than those measured from the mock spectra. The discrepancy increases from up to $\\approx0.1$ dex at $\\tau_{\\rm HI}=1$ to $\\approx1$ dex at $\\tau_{\\rm HI}=10^2$, where we are likely probing dense regions at small galactocentric distances. To try to uncover the origin of this discrepancy, we invoke (a) different models for the ionizing background...

  4. Learning Read-constant Polynomials of Constant Degree modulo Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattopadhyay, Arkadev; Gavaldá, Richard; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt;

    2011-01-01

    known to be learnable in any reasonable learning model. In this paper, we provide a deterministic polynomial time algorithm for learning Boolean functions represented by polynomials of constant degree over arbitrary finite rings from membership queries, with the additional constraint that each variable...

  5. From the Rydberg constant to the fundamental constants metrology; De la constante de Rydberg a la metrologie des constantes fondamentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nez, F

    2005-06-15

    This document reviews the theoretical and experimental achievements of the author since the beginning of his scientific career. This document is dedicated to the spectroscopy of hydrogen, deuterium and helium atoms. The first part is divided into 6 sub-sections: 1) the principles of hydrogen spectroscopy, 2) the measurement of the 2S-nS/nD transitions, 3) other optical frequency measurements, 4) our contribution to the determination of the Rydberg constant, 5) our current experiment on the 1S-3S transition, 6) the spectroscopy of the muonic hydrogen. Our experiments have improved the accuracy of the Rydberg Constant by a factor 25 in 15 years and we have achieved the first absolute optical frequency measurement of a transition in hydrogen. The second part is dedicated to the measurement of the fine structure constant and the last part deals with helium spectroscopy and the search for optical references in the near infrared range. (A.C.)

  6. Was ordinary matter synthesised from mirror matter? An attempt to explain why $\\Omega_{Baryon} \\approx 0.2\\Omega_{Dark}$

    OpenAIRE

    Foot, R.; Volkas, R. R.

    2003-01-01

    The cosmological dust has begun to settle. A likely picture is a universe comprised (predominantly) of three components: ordinary baryons ($\\Omega_B \\approx 0.05$), non-baryonic dark matter ($\\Omega_{Dark} \\approx 0.22$) and dark energy ($\\Omega_{\\Lambda} \\approx 0.7$). We suggest that the observed similarity of the abundances of ordinary baryons and non-baryonic dark matter ($\\Omega_{B}/\\Omega_{Dark} \\approx 0.20$) hints at an underlying similarity between the fundamental properties of ordin...

  7. N.M.R. study of organo-phosphorus compounds: non equivalence of methylenic protons in the α position of an asymmetric phosphorus atom. Application to study of coupling constants JP,H and JH,H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-equivalent methylenic protons, with respect to an asymmetric center, have been observed in the n.m.r. spectra of some three- and tetra-coordinated phosphorus compounds. The analysis of these spectra yield the following results: in the studied secondary phosphines, the inversion rate at the phosphorus atom is slow on the n.m.r. time scale; the geminal coupling constant, for a free-rotating methylene group attached to a phosphorus atom, is negative; in phosphines the non equivalence of methylenic protons reveals two 2JP-C-H coupling constants which differ by about 5 Hz. This result is in agreement with previous studies on cyclic phosphines. In phosphine oxides, the 2JP-C-H values are negative. The 3JH-P-C-H coupling constant is positive in both phosphines and phosphine oxides. In phosphines, the non-equivalent methylenic protons exhibit two nearly equal values for this coupling constant. (author)

  8. On constant elasticities of demand

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés Vázquez

    1998-01-01

    While the Slutsky matrix and duality theory have been used to establish that constant elasticity demand functions imply unitary income elasticities, zero cross price elasticities and own price elasticities equal to minus one, this note shows that these results can also be straightforwardly derived from the simple assumption that demand functions satisfy the budget constraint with strict equality.

  9. Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cont, Rama; Jessen, Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    Constant Proportion Debt Obligations (CPDOs) are structured credit derivatives that generate high coupon payments by dynamically leveraging a position in an underlying portfolio of investment-grade index default swaps. CPDO coupons and principal notes received high initial credit ratings from the...

  10. Kerma constant of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The values are tabulated of the gamma kerma constant for 106 radionuclides and an energy threshold of δ=0, 10, 20 and 30 keV. The calculated values will be useful in gamma radiation protection for ease of calculation of the kerma rate from a point radiation source. The study was required in view of the consistent introduction of SI units. (author)

  11. Exponential Decay of Expansive Constants

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Peng

    2011-01-01

    A map $f$ on a compact metric space is expansive if and only if $f^n$ is expansive. We study the exponential rate of decay of the expansive constant of $f^n$. A major result is that this rate times box dimension bounds topological entropy.

  12. The 1% concordance Hubble constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L. [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hinshaw, G., E-mail: cbennett@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2014-10-20

    The determination of the Hubble constant has been a central goal in observational astrophysics for nearly a hundred years. Extraordinary progress has occurred in recent years on two fronts: the cosmic distance ladder measurements at low redshift and cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements at high redshift. The CMB is used to predict the current expansion rate through a best-fit cosmological model. Complementary progress has been made with baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements at relatively low redshifts. While BAO data do not independently determine a Hubble constant, they are important for constraints on possible solutions and checks on cosmic consistency. A precise determination of the Hubble constant is of great value, but it is more important to compare the high and low redshift measurements to test our cosmological model. Significant tension would suggest either uncertainties not accounted for in the experimental estimates or the discovery of new physics beyond the standard model of cosmology. In this paper we examine in detail the tension between the CMB, BAO, and cosmic distance ladder data sets. We find that these measurements are consistent within reasonable statistical expectations and we combine them to determine a best-fit Hubble constant of 69.6 ± 0.7 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. This value is based upon WMAP9+SPT+ACT+6dFGS+BOSS/DR11+H {sub 0}/Riess; we explore alternate data combinations in the text. The combined data constrain the Hubble constant to 1%, with no compelling evidence for new physics.

  13. WHY IS THE SOLAR CONSTANT NOT A CONSTANT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to probe the mechanism of variations of the solar constant on the inter-solar-cycle scale, the total solar irradiance (TSI; the so-called solar constant) in the time interval of 1978 November 7 to 2010 September 20 is decomposed into three components through empirical mode decomposition and time-frequency analyses. The first component is the rotation signal, counting up to 42.31% of the total variation of TSI, which is understood to be mainly caused by large magnetic structures, including sunspot groups. The second is an annual-variation signal, counting up to 15.17% of the total variation, the origin of which is not known at this point in time. Finally, the third is the inter-solar-cycle signal, counting up to 42.52%, which is inferred to be caused by the network magnetic elements in quiet regions, whose magnetic flux ranges from (4.27-38.01) × 1019 Mx.

  14. Production in constant evolution; Produccion en constante evolucion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, T.

    2009-07-01

    The Cofrentes Nuclear Power Plant now has 25 years of operation behind it: a quarter century adding value and demonstrating the reasons why it is one of the most important energy producing facilities in the Spanish power market. Particularly noteworthy is the enterprising spirit of the plant, which has strived to continuously improve with the large number of modernization projects that it has undertaken over the past 25 years. The plant has constantly evolved thanks to the amount of investments made to improve safety and reliability and the perseverance to stay technologically up to date. Efficiency, training and teamwork have been key to the success of the plant over these 25 years of constant change and progress. (Author)

  15. Scales Set by the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Balaguera-Antolinez, A; Nowakowski, M; Balaguera-Antolinez, Andres; Boehmer, Christian G.; Nowakowski, Marek

    2006-01-01

    The cosmological constant sets certain scales important in cosmology. We show that \\Lambda in conjunction with other parameters like the Schwarzschild radius leads to scales relevant not only for cosmological but also for astrophysical applications. Of special interest is the extension of orbits and velocity of test particles traveling over Mpc distances. We will show that there exists a lower and an upper cut-off on the possible velocities of test particles. For a test body moving in a central gravitational field \\Lambda enforces a maximal value of the angular momentum if we insist on bound orbits of the test body which move at a distance larger than the Schwarzschild radius.

  16. Computing upper bounds on Friedrichs' constant

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vejchodský, Tomáš

    Prague : Institute of Math ematics AS CR, 2012 - (Brandts, J.; Chleboun, J.; Korotov, S.; Segeth, K.; Šístek, J.; Vejchodský, T.), s. 278-289 ISBN 978-80-85823-60-8. [Applications of Math ematics 2012. Prague (CZ), 02.05.2012-05.05.2012] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100760702 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Friedrichs' constant Subject RIV: BA - General Math ematics http://www. math .cas.cz/~am2012/proceedings/contributions/vejchodsky.pdf

  17. Pion mass and decay constant

    CERN Document Server

    Maris, P; Tandy, P C

    1998-01-01

    Independent of assumptions about the form of the quark-antiquark scattering kernel we derive the explicit relation between the pion Bethe-Salpeter amplitude, Gamma_pi, and the quark propagator in the chiral limit; Gamma_pi necessarily involves a non-negligible gamma_5 gamma.P term (P is the pion four-momentum). We also obtain exact expressions for the pion decay constant, f_pi, and mass, both of which depend on Gamma_pi; and demonstrate the equivalence between f_pi and the pion Bethe-Salpeter normalisation constant in the chiral limit. We stress the importance of preserving the axial-vector Ward-Takahashi identity in any study of the pion itself, and in any study whose goal is a unified understanding of the properties of the pion and other hadronic bound states.

  18. Wormholes and the cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review Coleman's wormhole mechanism for the vanishing of the cosmological constant. We show that in a minisuperspace model wormhole-connected universes dominate the path integral. We also provide evidence that the euclidean path integral over geometries with spherical topology is unstable with respect to formation of infinitely many wormhole-connected 4-spheres. Consistency is restored by summing over all topologies, which leads to Coleman's result. Coleman's argument for determination of other parameters is reviewed and applied to the mass of the pion. A discouraging result is found that the pion mass is driven to zero. We also consider qualitatively the implications of the wormhole theory for cosmology. We argue that a small number of universes containing matter and energy may exist in contact with infinitely many cold and empty universes. Contact with the cold universes insures that the cosmological constant in the warm ones is zero. (orig.)

  19. Three pion nucleon coupling constants

    CERN Document Server

    Arriola, E Ruiz; Perez, R Navarro

    2016-01-01

    There exist four pion nucleon coupling constants, $f_{\\pi^0, pp}$, $-f_{\\pi^0, nn}$, $f_{\\pi^+, pn} /\\sqrt{2}$ and $ f_{\\pi^-, np} /\\sqrt{2}$ which coincide when up and down quark masses are identical and the electron charge is zero. While there is no reason why the pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constants should be identical in the real world, one expects that the small differences might be pinned down from a sufficiently large number of independent and mutually consistent data. Our discussion provides a rationale for our recent determination $$f_p^2 = 0.0759(4) \\, , \\quad f_{0}^2 = 0.079(1) \\,, \\quad f_{c}^2 = 0.0763(6) \\, , $$ based on a partial wave analysis of the $3\\sigma$ self-consistent nucleon-nucleon Granada-2013 database comprising 6713 published data in the period 1950-2013.

  20. THE IMPACT OF THE SUPERSONIC BARYON-DARK MATTER VELOCITY DIFFERENCE ON THE z {approx} 20 21 cm BACKGROUND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McQuinn, Matthew; O' Leary, Ryan M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    Recently, Tseliakhovich and Hirata showed that during the cosmic Dark Ages the baryons were typically moving supersonically with respect to the dark matter with a spatially variable Mach number. Such supersonic motion may source shocks that inhomogeneously heat the universe. This motion may also suppress star formation in the first halos. Even a small amount of coupling of the 21 cm signal to this motion has the potential to vastly enhance the 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations at 15 {approx}< z {approx}< 40, as well as to imprint distinctive acoustic oscillations in this signal. We present estimates for the size of this coupling, which we calibrate with a suite of cosmological simulations of the high-redshift universe using the GADGET and Enzo codes. Our simulations, discussed in detail in a companion paper, are initialized to self-consistently account for gas pressure and the dark matter-baryon relative velocity, v {sub bc} (in contrast to prior simulations). We find that the supersonic velocity difference dramatically suppresses structure formation on 10-100 comoving kpc scales, it sources shocks throughout the universe, and it impacts the accretion of gas onto the first star-forming minihalos (even for halo masses as large as 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }). However, prior to reheating by astrophysical sources, we find that the v {sub bc}-sourced temperature fluctuations can contribute only as much as Almost-Equal-To 10% of the fluctuations in the 21 cm signal. We do find that v {sub bc} in certain scenarios could source an O(1) component in the power spectrum of the 21 cm background on observable scales via the X-ray (but not ultraviolet) backgrounds produced once the first stars formed. In a scenario in which {approx}10{sup 6} M {sub Sun} minihalos reheated the universe via their X-ray backgrounds, we find that the pre-reionization 21 cm signal would be larger than previously anticipated and exhibit more significant acoustic features. Such features would be a

  1. Henry's law constants of polyols

    OpenAIRE

    Compernolle, S.; J.-F. Müller

    2014-01-01

    Henry's law constants (HLC) are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. While deriving HLC and depending on the case, also infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs), solid state vapour pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediate results. An error analysis on the intermediate quantities and the obtained HLC is included....

  2. Henry's law constants of polyols

    OpenAIRE

    Compernolle, S.; J.-F. Müller

    2014-01-01

    Henry's law constants (HLC) are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. Depending on the case, infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs), solid state pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediary results. For most compounds, these are the first values reported, while others compare favourably with literature data in most ...

  3. Planck's constant measurement for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Damyanov, Desislav S; Ilieva, Simona I; Gourev, Vassil N; Yordanov, Vasil G; Mishonov, Todor M

    2015-01-01

    A simple experimental setup for measuring the Planck's constant, using Landauer quantization of the conductance of touching gold wires, is described. It consists of two gold wires with thickness of 500 micron and 1.5cm length, and a fast operational amplifier. The setup costs less than \\$30 and can be realized in every teaching laboratory in 10 days. The usage of oscilloscope is required.

  4. Neutron Scattering and Elastic Constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elastic constants of crystals obtained from neutron scattering techniques at frequencies, ω, of the order of 1012 cps, are frequently compared with those obtained with ultrasonic techniques for which ω 10 cps. If the normal modes of vibration of the crystal did not interact with each other or with other excitations in the crystal, these elastic constants would be identical. In a real crystal, however, interactions exist, and these lead to different behaviour, depending on whether the elastic wave propagates in a collision-free, ωτ >> 1, mode or a collision-dominated ωτ 3 have demonstrated this difference. In piezoelectric crystals τ is related to the time required for the electric polarization to follow the elastic wave. At frequencies so high that the electric polarization cannot follow the elastic wave, experiments on DKDP have shown that the elastic constants do not exhibit the anormaly present at low frequencies. Similar behaviour is expected to occur near many phase transitions which show anomalous elastic behaviour. Analogous, but probably smaller, effects occur through the interactions of elastic waves with conduction electrons in metals and with the spins in magnetic materials. (author)

  5. Cosmology with New Astrophysical Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Alfonso-Faus, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that Einstein field equations give two solutions for cosmology. The first one is the standard well known representative of the present status of cosmology. We identify it with the local point of view of a flat Universe with the values for the cosmological omega parameters (k = 0, lambda = 2/3, m = 1/3). The second one is a new one that we identify with a cosmic point of view, as given by free photons, neutrinos, tachyons and gravity quanta. We apply a wave to particle technique to find the matter propagation equation. Then we prove that all gravitational radii are constant, regardless of the possible time variations of the physical properties like the speed of light c, the gravitational constant G or the mass m of fundamental particles. We find two cosmological constants, c^3 /G and mc, with the condition that the field equations be derived from the action principle. With this result, and the integration of the Bianchi identity, we prove the existence of the two solutions for cosmology. We then va...

  6. Alternative set of defining constants for redefinition of four SI units

    OpenAIRE

    Khruschov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss different sets of defining constants, fixed values of which are considered in connection with the transition to new definitions of four SI units (the kilogram, the mole, the ampere, and the kelvin). The notion of constant's order in a given system of units is suggested. We propose an alternative set of fixed constants applicable for new definitions of the four SI units. We analyse and discuss in detail the set, which consists of the Planck constant, the Avogadro constant, the Boltz...

  7. A Luminosity Function of Ly(alpha)-Emitting Galaxies at Z [Approx. Equal to] 4.5(Sup 1),(Sup 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Steve; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Stern, Daniel; Wang, JunXian; Dey, Arjun; Spinrad, Hyron; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a catalog of 59 z [approx. equal to] 4:5 Ly(alpha)-emitting galaxies spectroscopically confirmed in a campaign of Keck DEIMOS follow-up observations to candidates selected in the Large Are (LALA) narrowband imaging survey.We targeted 97 candidates for spectroscopic follow-up; by accounting for the variety of conditions under which we performed spectroscopy, we estimate a selection reliability of approx.76%. Together with our previous sample of Keck LRIS confirmations, the 59 sources confirmed herein bring the total catalog to 73 spectroscopically confirmed z [approx. equal to] 4:5 Ly(alpha)- emitting galaxies in the [approx. equal to] 0.7 deg(exp 2) covered by the LALA imaging. As with the Keck LRIS sample, we find that a nonnegligible fraction of the co rest-frame equivalent widths (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) that exceed the maximum predicted for normal stellar populations: 17%-31%(93%confidence) of the detected galaxies show (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) 12%-27% (90% confidence) show (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) > 240 A. We construct a luminosity function of z [approx. equal to] 4.5 Ly(alpha) emission lines for comparison to Ly(alpha) luminosity function alpha) luminosity function evolution from z [approx. equal to] 3 to z [approx. equal to] 6. This result supports the conclusion that the intergalactic me largely reionized from the local universe out to z [approx. equal to] 6.5. It is somewhat at odds with the pronounced drop in the cosmic star formation rate density recently measured between z approx. 3 an z approx. 6 in continuum-selected Lyman-break galaxies, and therefore potentially sheds light on the relationship between the two populations.

  8. Cross sections of $\\alpha$-induced reactions for targets with masses $A \\approx 20-50$ at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Mohr, Peter

    2015-01-01

    A simple reduction scheme using so-called reduced energies $E_{\\rm{red}}$ and reduced cross sections $\\sigma_{\\rm{red}}$ allows the comparison of heavy-ion induced reaction cross sections for a broad range of masses of projectile and target and over a wide energy range. A global behavior has been found for strongly bound projectiles whereas much larger reduced cross sections have been observed for weakly bound and halo projectiles. It has been shown that this simple reduction scheme works also well for $\\alpha$-particle induced reactions on heavy target nuclei, but very recently significant deviations have been seen for $\\alpha$+$^{33}$S and $\\alpha$+$^{23}$Na. Motivated by these unexpected discrepancies, the present study analyses $\\alpha$-induced reaction cross sections for targets with masses $A \\approx 20-50$. The study shows that the experimental data for $\\alpha$-induced reactions on nuclei with $A \\approx 20-50$ deviate slightly from the global behavior of reduced cross sections. However, in general th...

  9. A $\\mathcal{M}\\approx3$ shock in `El Gordo' cluster and the origin of the radio relic

    CERN Document Server

    Botteon, A; Brunetti, G; Kale, R

    2016-01-01

    We present an X-ray and radio study of the famous `El Gordo', a massive and distant ($z=0.87$) galaxy cluster. In the deep (340 ks) Chandra observation, the cluster appears with an elongated and cometary morphology, a sign of its current merging state. The GMRT radio observations at 610 MHz reveal the presence of a radio halo which remarkably overlaps the X-ray cluster emission and connects a couple of radio relics. We detect a strong shock ($\\mathcal{M}\\approx3$) in the NW periphery of the cluster, co-spatially located with the radio relic. This is the most distant ($z=0.87$) and one of the strongest shock detected in a galaxy cluster. This work supports the relic-shock connection and allows to investigate the origin of these radio sources in a uncommon regime of $\\mathcal{M}\\approx3$. For this particular case we found that shock acceleration from the thermal pool is a viable possibility.

  10. THE SINS/zC-SINF SURVEY OF z {approx} 2GALAXY KINEMATICS: THE NATURE OF DISPERSION-DOMINATED GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard [Department of Astronomy, Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Buschkamp, Peter; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Kurk, Jaron; Lutz, Dieter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Shapiro Griffin, Kristen [Space Sciences Research Group, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, Padova I-35122 (Italy); Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Peng, Yingjie [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, ETH Zuerich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Bouche, Nicolas [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Burkert, Andreas [Universitaets-Sternwarte Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (USM), Scheinerstr. 1, Muenchen D-81679 (Germany); Cresci, Giovanni [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica Osservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Genel, Shy [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hicks, Erin K. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Naab, Thorsten, E-mail: sfnewman@berkeley.edu [Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl Schwarzschildstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2013-04-20

    We analyze the spectra, spatial distributions, and kinematics of H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] emission in a sample of 38, z {approx} 2.2 UV/optically selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the SINS and zC-SINF surveys, 34 of which were observed in the adaptive optics mode of SINFONI and 30 of those contain data presented for the first time here. This is supplemented by kinematic data from 43 z {approx} 1-2.5 galaxies from the literature. None of these 81 galaxies is an obvious major merger. We find that the kinematic classification of high-z SFGs as ''dispersion dominated'' or ''rotation dominated'' correlates most strongly with their intrinsic sizes. Smaller galaxies are more likely ''dispersion-dominated'' for two main reasons: (1) the rotation velocity scales linearly with galaxy size but intrinsic velocity dispersion does not depend on size or may even increase in smaller galaxies, and as such, their ratio is systematically lower for smaller galaxies, and (2) beam smearing strongly decreases large-scale velocity gradients and increases observed dispersion much more for galaxies with sizes at or below the resolution. Dispersion-dominated SFGs may thus have intrinsic properties similar to ''rotation-dominated'' SFGs, but are primarily more compact, lower mass, less metal enriched, and may have higher gas fractions, plausibly because they represent an earlier evolutionary state.

  11. Proceedings of the specialists' meeting on reactor group constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on Reactor Group Constants. The meeting was held on February 22-23, 2001 at Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with the participation of 59 specialists. The evaluation work for JENDL-3.3 is going on for the publication in a short time. The processing JENDL-3.3 file to make reactor group constants is needed when it is used in application fields. In the meeting, the present status of the reactor group constants was reviewed and the issues relating to them were discussed in such fields as thermal reactor, criticality safety, fast reactor, high energy region, burn-up calculation and radiation shielding. At the final session in the meeting, standardization of reactor group constants was discussed and the need of the reference group constants was confirmed by the participants. The 11 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  12. Alternative set of defining constants for redefinition of four SI units

    CERN Document Server

    Khruschov, V V

    2016-01-01

    We discuss different sets of defining constants, fixed values of which are considered in connection with the transition to new definitions of four SI units (the kilogram, the mole, the ampere, and the kelvin). The notion of constant's order in a given system of units is suggested. We propose an alternative set of fixed constants applicable for new definitions of the four SI units. We analyse and discuss in detail the set, which consists of the Planck constant, the Avogadro constant, the Boltzmann constant and the magnetic constant.

  13. Pion mass and decay constant

    OpenAIRE

    Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.; Tandy, P. C.

    1997-01-01

    Independent of assumptions about the form of the quark-antiquark scattering kernel we derive the explicit relation between the pion Bethe-Salpeter amplitude, Gamma_pi, and the quark propagator in the chiral limit; Gamma_pi necessarily involves a non-negligible gamma_5 gamma.P term (P is the pion four-momentum). We also obtain exact expressions for the pion decay constant, f_pi, and mass, both of which depend on Gamma_pi; and demonstrate the equivalence between f_pi and the pion Bethe-Salpeter...

  14. Hydrodynamic constants from cosmic censorship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a gravity dual of Bjorken flow of N=4 SYM-theory plasma. We point out that the cosmic censorship hypothesis may explain why the regularity of the dual geometry constrains the hydrodynamic constants. We also investigate the apparent horizon of the dual geometry. We find that the dual geometry constructed on Fefferman-Graham (FG) coordinates is not appropriate for examination of the apparent horizon since the coordinates do not cover the trapped region. However, the preliminary analysis on FG coordinates suggests that the location of the apparent horizon is very sensitive to the hydrodynamic parameters. (author)

  15. Exact constants in approximation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Korneichuk, N

    1991-01-01

    This book is intended as a self-contained introduction for non-specialists, or as a reference work for experts, to the particular area of approximation theory that is concerned with exact constants. The results apply mainly to extremal problems in approximation theory, which in turn are closely related to numerical analysis and optimization. The book encompasses a wide range of questions and problems: best approximation by polynomials and splines; linear approximation methods, such as spline-approximation; optimal reconstruction of functions and linear functionals. Many of the results are base

  16. Markov constant and quantum instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelantová, Edita; Starosta, Štěpán; Znojil, Miloslav

    2016-04-01

    For a qualitative analysis of spectra of certain two-dimensional rectangular-well quantum systems several rigorous methods of number theory are shown productive and useful. These methods (and, in particular, a generalization of the concept of Markov constant known in Diophantine approximation theory) are shown to provide a new mathematical insight in the phenomenologically relevant occurrence of anomalies in the spectra. Our results may inspire methodical innovations ranging from the description of the stability properties of metamaterials and of certain hiddenly unitary quantum evolution models up to the clarification of the mechanisms of occurrence of ghosts in quantum cosmology.

  17. Henry's law constants of polyols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Compernolle

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Henry's law constants (HLC are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. Depending on the case, infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs, solid state pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediary results. For most compounds, these are the first values reported, while others compare favourably with literature data in most cases. Using these values and those from a previous work (Compernolle and Müller, 2014, an assessment is made on the partitioning of polyols, diacids and hydroxy acids to droplet and aqueous aerosol.

  18. The big constant out, the small constant in

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some time ago, Tseytlin has made an original and unusual proposal for an action that eliminates an arbitrary cosmological constant. The form of the proposed action, however, is strongly modified by gravity loop effects, ruining its benefit. Here I discuss an embedding of Tseytlin's action into a broader context, that enables to control the loop effects. The broader context is another universe, with its own metric and dynamics, but only globally connected to ours. One possible Lagrangian for the other universe is that of unbroken AdS supergravity. A vacuum energy in our universe does not produce any curvature for us, but instead increases or decreases the AdS curvature in the other universe. I comment on how to introduce the accelerated expansion in this framework in a technically natural way, and consider the case where this is done by the self-accelerated solutions of massive gravity and its extensions

  19. Computing the Gromov hyperbolicity constant of a discrete metric space

    KAUST Repository

    Ismail, Anas

    2012-07-01

    Although it was invented by Mikhail Gromov, in 1987, to describe some family of groups[1], the notion of Gromov hyperbolicity has many applications and interpretations in different fields. It has applications in Biology, Networking, Graph Theory, and many other areas of research. The Gromov hyperbolicity constant of several families of graphs and geometric spaces has been determined. However, so far, the only known algorithm for calculating the Gromov hyperbolicity constant of a discrete metric space is the brute force algorithm with running time O (n4) using the four- point condition. In this thesis, we first introduce an approximation algorithm which calculates a O (log n)-approximation of the hyperbolicity constant , based on a layering approach, in time O (n2), where n is the number of points in the metric space. We also calculate the fixed base point hyperbolicity constant r for a fixed point r using a (max; min)matrix multiplication algorithm by Duan in time O (n2:688) [2]. We use this result to present a 2-approximation algorithm for calculating the hyperbolicity constant in time O (n2:688). We also provide an exact algorithm to compute the hyperbolicity constant in time O (n3:688) for a discrete metric space. We then present some partial results we obtained for designing some approximation algorithms to compute the hyperbolicity constant.

  20. Kepler's Constant and WDS Orbit

    CERN Document Server

    Siregar, S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work are to find a Kepler's constant by using polynomial regression of the angular separation \\rho = \\rho(t) and the position angle \\theta = \\theta(t). The Kepler's constant obtained is used to derive the element of orbit. As a case study the angular separation and the position angle of the WDS 00063 +5826 and the WDS 04403-5857 were investigated. For calculating the element of orbit the Thiele-Innes van den Bos method is used. The rough data of the angular separation \\rho(t) and the position angle \\theta(t) are taken from the US Naval Observatory, Washington. This work also presents the masses and absolute bolometric magnitudes of each star.These stars include into the main-sequence stars with the spectral class G5V for WDS04403-5857and the type of spectrum G3V for WDS 00063+5826. The life time of the primary star and the secondary star of WDS 04403-5857 nearly equal to 20 Gyr. The life time of the primary star and the secondary star of WDS 00063+5826 are 20 Gyr and 19 Gyr, respectively.

  1. $\\mathbf{\\alpha}$-induced reaction cross sections in the mass range $\\mathbf{A \\approx 20 - 50}$: a critical review

    CERN Document Server

    Mohr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In a recent review it was shown that the cross sections of $\\alpha$-induced reactions in the $A \\approx 20 - 50$ mass range follow a general and smooth trend in most cases. For comparison of cross sections of different targets at various energies the method of reduced cross sections $\\sigma_{\\rm{red}}$ and reduced energies $E_{\\rm{red}}$ was used. Four outliers were identified: $^{36}$Ar and $^{40}$Ar with unusally small cross sections and $^{23}$Na and $^{33}$S with unusually large cross sections. New data for $^{23}$Na were presented at this NPA-7 conference; contrary to the previous data, these new data fit into the general systematics. In addition, a relation between the most effective energy $E_0$ for astrophysical reaction rates (the so-called Gamow window) and the reduced energy $E_{\\rm{red}}$ is presented.

  2. Cleaning up the cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Kimpton, Ian

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel idea for screening the vacuum energy contribution to the overall value of the cosmological constant, thereby enabling us to choose the bare value of the vacuum curvature empirically, without any need to worry about the zero-point energy contributions of each particle. The trick is to couple matter to a metric that is really a composite of other fields, with the property that the square-root of its determinant is the integrand of a topological invariant, and/or a total derivative. This ensures that the vacuum energy contribution to the Lagrangian is non-dynamical. We then give an explicit example of a theory with this property that is free from Ostrogradski ghosts, and is consistent with solar system physics and cosmological tests.

  3. Coupling constant in dispersive model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Saleh-Moghaddam; M E Zomorrodian

    2013-11-01

    The average of the moments for event shapes in + - → hadrons within the context of next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative QCD prediction in dispersive model is studied. Moments used in this article are $\\langle 1 - T \\rangle, \\langle ρ \\rangle, \\langle B_{T} \\rangle$ and $\\langle B_{W} \\rangle$. We extract , the coupling constant in perturbative theory and α0 in the non-perturbative theory using the dispersive model. By fitting the experimental data, the values of $(M_{Z^{°}})$ = 0.1171 ± 0.00229 and 0 ($_{I} = 2{\\text{GeV}}$) = 0.5068 ± 0.0440 are found. Our results are consistent with the above model. Our results are also consistent with those obtained from other experiments at different energies. All these features are explained in this paper.

  4. Henry's law constants of polyols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compernolle, S.; Müller, J.-F.

    2014-12-01

    Henry's law constants (HLC) are derived for several polyols bearing between 2 and 6 hydroxyl groups, based on literature data for water activity, vapour pressure and/or solubility. While deriving HLC and depending on the case, also infinite dilution activity coefficients (IDACs), solid state vapour pressures or activity coefficient ratios are obtained as intermediate results. An error analysis on the intermediate quantities and the obtained HLC is included. For most compounds, these are the first values reported, while others compare favourably with literature data in most cases. Using these values and those from a previous work (Compernolle and Müller, 2014), an assessment is made on the partitioning of polyols, diacids and hydroxy acids to droplet and aqueous aerosol.

  5. Characterization of supercapacitor models for analyzing supercapacitors connected to constant power elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hengzhao; Zhang, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the power and energy performance of supercapacitors connected to constant power elements is important for many applications. This paper proposes a characterization method for two supercapacitor models that are used to analyze the power and energy behavior of supercapacitors connected to constant power elements: linear capacitance model and constant capacitance model. The linear or constant capacitance is determined by conducting a constant power experiment. A set of constant power experiments is designed. The proposed method can reduce the error in estimating the constant power experiment time for a variety of supercapacitor samples with different rated capacitance and voltage. The accuracy of using the linear capacitance model and the constant capacitance model is approximately equal. Moreover, the performance evaluation results suggest that using the linear or constant capacitance fitted through a low power discharge experiment can minimize the error, which can serve as a guideline to design the constant power experiment.

  6. Scales set by the cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cosmological constant, Λ, sets certain scales important in cosmology. We show that Λ in conjunction with other parameters such as the Schwarzschild radius leads to scales relevant not only for cosmological but also for astrophysical applications. Of special interest is the extension of orbits and velocity of test particles travelling over Mpc distances. We will show that there exist a lower and an upper cut-off on the possible velocities of test particles. For a test body moving in a central gravitational field, Λ enforces a maximal value of the angular momentum if we insist on bound orbits of the test body which move at a distance larger than the Schwarzschild radius

  7. Scales set by the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaguera-AntolInez, Andres [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de los Andes, AA 4976, Bogota, DC (Colombia); Boehmer, Christian G [ASGBG/CIU, Department of Mathematics, Apartado Postal C-600, University of Zacatecas (UAZ), Zacatecas, Zac 98060 (Mexico); Nowakowski, Marek [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de los Andes, AA 4976, Bogota, DC (Colombia)

    2006-01-21

    The cosmological constant, {lambda}, sets certain scales important in cosmology. We show that {lambda} in conjunction with other parameters such as the Schwarzschild radius leads to scales relevant not only for cosmological but also for astrophysical applications. Of special interest is the extension of orbits and velocity of test particles travelling over Mpc distances. We will show that there exist a lower and an upper cut-off on the possible velocities of test particles. For a test body moving in a central gravitational field, {lambda} enforces a maximal value of the angular momentum if we insist on bound orbits of the test body which move at a distance larger than the Schwarzschild radius.

  8. A Variant of Davenport's Constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Thangadurai

    2007-05-01

    Let be a prime number. Let be a finite abelian -group of exponent (written additively) and be a non-empty subset of $]n[:=\\{1,2,\\ldots,n\\}$ such that elements of are incongruent modulo and non-zero modulo . Let $k ≥ D(G)/|A|$ be any integer where () denotes the well-known Davenport’s constant. In this article, we prove that for any sequence $g_1,g_2,\\ldots,g_k$ (not necessarily distinct) in , one can always extract a subsequence $g_{i_1},g_{i_2},\\ldots,g_{i_l}$ with $1 ≤ l ≤ k$ such that $$\\sum\\limits_{j=1}^l a_j g_{i_j}=0 \\text{in} G,$$ where $a_j\\in A$ for all . We provide examples where this bound cannot be improved. Furthermore, for the cyclic groups, we prove some sharp results in this direction. In the last section, we explore the relation between this problem and a similar problem with prescribed length. The proof of Theorem 1 uses group-algebra techniques, while for the other theorems, we use elementary number theory techniques.

  9. Markov constant and quantum instabilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelantová, E.; Starosta, Š.; Znojil, Miloslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 15 (2016), s. 155201. ISSN 1751-8113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-22945S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : renormalizable quantum theories with ghosts * Pais-Uhlenbeck model * singular spectra * square-well model * number theory analysis * physical applications Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.583, year: 2014

  10. THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3: A TEST FOR STELLAR FEEDBACK, GALACTIC OUTFLOWS, AND COLD STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Sijing; Madau, Piero; Prochaska, J. Xavier [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Guedes, Javiera [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Mayer, Lucio [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-9057 Zurich (Switzerland); Wadsley, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2013-03-10

    We present new results on the kinematics, thermal and ionization state, and spatial distribution of metal-enriched gas in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of massive galaxies at redshift {approx}3, using the Eris suite of cosmological hydrodynamic ''zoom-in'' simulations. The reference run adopts a blastwave scheme for supernova feedback that produces large-scale galactic outflows, a star formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold, metal-dependent radiative cooling, and a model for the diffusion of metals and thermal energy. The effect of the local UV radiation field is added in post-processing. The CGM (defined as all gas at R > 0.2 R{sub vir} = 10 kpc, where R{sub vir} is the virial radius) contains multiple phases having a wide range of physical conditions, with more than half of its heavy elements locked in a warm-hot component at T > 10{sup 5} K. Synthetic spectra, generated by drawing sightlines through the CGM, produce interstellar absorption-line strengths of Ly{alpha}, C II, C IV, Si II, and Si IV as a function of the galactocentric impact parameter (scaled to the virial radius) that are in broad agreement with those observed at high redshift by Steidel et al. The covering factor of absorbing material declines less rapidly with impact parameter for Ly{alpha} and C IV compared to C II, Si IV, and Si II, with Ly{alpha} remaining strong (W{sub Ly{alpha}} > 300 mA) to {approx}> 5 R{sub vir} = 250 kpc. Only about one third of all the gas within R{sub vir} is outflowing. The fraction of sightlines within one virial radius that intercept optically thick, N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.2} cm{sup -2} material is 27%, in agreement with recent observations by Rudie et al. Such optically thick absorption is shown to trace inflowing ''cold'' streams that penetrate deep inside the virial radius. The streams, enriched to metallicities above 0.01 solar by previous episodes of star formation in the main host and in nearby

  11. Development and application of a constant temperature water-bath ultraviolet radiation instrument%恒温水浴紫外光照射仪研制与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚康标; 王金发; 王宏斌; 何炎明; 冯冬茹; 刘兵

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient constant temperature water-bath ultraviolet radiation instrument is developed for distinguishing color aberration and exchange of sister chromatids according to the nature of the material handling and special requirements with the staining of sister chromatids. By a wide range of continuous use and examining, it is proved that the constant temperature water-bath ultraviolet radiation instrument has the advantages of convenient operation, safe use and stable performance. The samples treated with the instrument are processed uniformly and have obvious color aberration and fine resolution.%根据姊妹染色单体色差染色材料处理的性质和特殊要求,研制一种能够高效分辨姊妹染色单体色差和互换的仪器——恒温水浴紫外光照射仪.经过大范围连续使用与测试结果表明,该仪器操作简便,安全稳定,样品玻片处理均匀,姊妹染色单体染色清晰,色差明显,分辨率高.

  12. Surfaces of a Constant Negative Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Gharib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available I study the geometric notion of a differential system describing surfaces of a constant negative curvature and describe a family of pseudospherical surfaces for the nonlinear partial differential equations with constant Gaussian curvature .

  13. Vacuum energy and the cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Bass, Steven D

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating expansion of the Universe points to a small positive value for the cosmological constant or vacuum energy density. We discuss recent ideas that the cosmological constant plus LHC results might hint at critical phenomena near the Planck scale.

  14. Critical survey of stability constants of EDTA complexes critical evaluation of equilibrium constants in solution stability constants of metal complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Anderegg, G

    2013-01-01

    Critical Survey of Stability Constants of EDTA Complexes focuses on the computations, values, and characteristics of stability constants. The book emphasizes that for a critical discussion of experimentally determined stability constants, it is important to consider the precision of the values that manifests the self-consistency of the constant, taking into consideration the random errors. The publication reviews the stability constants of metal complexes. The numerical calculations affirm the reactions and transformations of metal ions when exposed to varying conditions. The text also present

  15. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z {approx_equal} 1-3 IN THE HST/WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathi, N. P.; McCarthy, P. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Rutkowski, M. J. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Finkelstein, S. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Yan, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); O' Connell, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Straughn, A. N.; Kimble, R. A. [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Disney, M. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Dopita, M. A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Frogel, Jay A. [Astronomy Department, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Hall, D. N. B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Holtzman, J. A., E-mail: nhathi@obs.carnegiescience.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); and others

    2013-03-10

    We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx_equal} 1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST/WFC3 observations cover about 50 arcmin{sup 2} in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z {approx_equal} 1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high-redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout-selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope {beta} is redder than at high redshift (z > 3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at z {approx_equal} 1-3 are massive, dustier, and more highly star forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities (0.1L* {approx}< L {approx}< 2.5L*), though their median values are similar within 1{sigma} uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all redshifts, finds physically similar galaxies; and (4) the stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of {approx}0.46, and star formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of {approx}0.90. These relations hold true-within luminosities probed in this study-for LBGs from z {approx_equal} 1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z {approx_equal} 2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z > 3, a true Lyman break selection at z {approx_equal} 2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys, both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties and their evolution.

  16. Constant global population with demographic heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Joel E.

    2008-01-01

    To understand better a possible future constant global population that is demographically heterogeneous, this paper analyzes several models. Classical theory of stationary populations generally fails to apply. However, if constant global population size P(global) is the sum of all country population sizes, and if constant global annual number of births B(global) is the sum of the annual number of births of all countries, and if constant global life expectancy at birth e(global) is the populat...

  17. Origin of cosmological constant from Bulk manifold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem about cosmological constant is a difficult and important problem, people even don't know what it is really originated from. In this letter, the authors show up a kind of origin of the cosmological constant from the viewpoint of some extra dimensional spaces, obtain different values of the cosmological constant under different circumstances, acquire the evolution function with time t. And we achieve a cosmological constant that may be fitted with modern astronomic observation. (authors)

  18. The $D_s$, $D^+$, $B_s$ and $B$ decay constants from $2+1$ flavor lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavov, A; Bouchard, C; DeTar, C; Du, D; El-Khadra, A X; Foley, J; Freeland, E D; Gámiz, E; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Kim, J; Komijani, J; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Levkova, L; Mackenzie, P B; Mohler, D; Neil, E T; Oktay, M B; Qiu, S; Simone, J N; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, R

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the $D$ and $B$ leptonic decay constants on the MILC $N_f=2+1$ asqtad gauge ensembles using asqtad-improved staggered light quarks and clover heavy quarks in the Fermilab interpretation. Our previous analysis \\cite{Bazavov:2011aa} computed the decay constants at lattice spacings $a \\approx 0.14, 0.11$ and $0.083$ fm. We have extended the simulations to finer $a \\approx 0.058$ and $0.043$ fm lattice spacings, and have also increased statistics; this allows us to address many important sources of uncertainty. Technical advances include a two-step two-point fit procedure, better tuning of the heavy quark masses and a better determination of the axial-vector current matching. The present analysis remains blinded, so here we focus on the improvements and their predicted impact on the error budget compared to the prior analysis.

  19. Covariant description of shape evolution and shape coexistence in neutron-rich nuclei at N\\approx60

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, J; Li, Z X; Yao, J M; Meng, J

    2011-01-01

    The shape evolution and shape coexistence phenomena in neutron-rich nuclei at $N\\approx60$, including Kr, Sr, Zr, and Mo isotopes, are studied in the covariant density functional theory (DFT) with the new parameter set PC-PK1. Pairing correlations are treated using the BCS approximation with a separable pairing force. Sharp rising in the charge radii of Sr and Zr isotopes at N=60 is observed and shown to be related to the rapid changing in nuclear shapes. The shape evolution is moderate in neighboring Kr and Mo isotopes. Similar as the results of previous Hartree-Fock-Bogogliubov (HFB) calculations with the Gogny force, triaxiality is observed in Mo isotopes and shown to be essential to reproduce quantitatively the corresponding charge radii. In addition, the coexistence of prolate and oblate shapes is found in both $^{98}$Sr and $^{100}$Zr. The observed oblate and prolate minima are related to the low single-particle energy level density around the Fermi surfaces of neutron and proton respectively. Furthermo...

  20. Computer modelling of a short-pulse excited dielectric barrier discharge xenon excimer lamp (lambda approx 172 nm)

    CERN Document Server

    Carman, R J

    2003-01-01

    A detailed rate-equation analysis has been used to simulate the plasma kinetics in a pulsed-excited dielectric barrier discharge in xenon, under operating conditions where the discharge structure is spatially homogeneous. The one-dimensional model, incorporating 14 species and 70 reaction processes, predicts results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the electrical characteristics, and optical (vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and visible) pulse shapes. The model reveals that electrical breakdown of the discharge gap occurs via a fast-moving ionization/excitation wavefront that starts close to the anode dielectric and propagates towards the cathode at approx 3x10 sup 5 m s sup - sup 1. The wavefront appears as a result of successive avalanches of electrons that propagate across the discharge gap after release from the cathode dielectric. During breakdown, the mean electron energy in the bulk plasma is close to optimum for preferential excitation of the Xe* 1s sub 4 sub , sub 5 states that fe...

  1. The Not so Constant Gravitational "Constant" G as a Function of Quantum Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxmilian Caligiuri, Luigi

    Gravitation is still the less understood among the fundamental forces of Nature. The ultimate physical origin of its ruling constant G could give key insights in this understanding. According to the Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, a massive body determines a gravitational potential that alters the speed of light, the clock's rate and the particle size as a function of the distance from its own center. On the other hand, it has been shown that the presence of mass determines a modification of Zero-Point Field (ZPF) energy density within its volume and in the space surrounding it. All these considerations strongly suggest that also the constant G could be expressed as a function of quantum vacuum energy density somehow depending on the distance from the mass whose presence modifies the ZPF energy structure. In this paper, starting from a constitutive medium-based picture of space, it has been formulated a model of gravitational constant G as a function of Planck's time and Quantum Vacuum energy density in turn depending on the radial distance from center of the mass originating the gravitational field, supposed as spherically symmetric. According to this model, in which gravity arises from the unbalanced physical vacuum pressure, gravitational "constant" G is not truly unchanging but slightly varying as a function of the distance from the mass source of gravitational potential itself. An approximate analytical form of such dependence has been discussed. The proposed model, apart from potentially having deep theoretical consequences on the commonly accepted picture of physical reality (from cosmology to matter stability), could also give the theoretical basis for unthinkable applications related, for example, to the field of gravity control and space propulsion.

  2. Closed-form expression for the magnetic shielding constant of the relativistic hydrogenlike atom in an arbitrary discrete energy eigenstate: Application of the Sturmian expansion of the generalized Dirac-Coulomb Green function

    CERN Document Server

    Stefańska, Patrycja

    2016-01-01

    We present analytical derivation of the closed-form expression for the dipole magnetic shielding constant of a Dirac one-electron atom being in an arbitrary discrete energy eigenstate. The external magnetic field, by which the atomic state is perturbed, is assumed to be weak, uniform and time independent. With respect to the atomic nucleus we assume that it is pointlike, spinless, motionless and of charge Ze. Calculations are based on the Sturmian expansion of the generalized Dirac- Coulomb Green function [R. Szmytkowski, J. Phys. B 30, 825 (1997); erratum 30, 2747 (1997)], combined with the theory of hypergeometric functions. The final result is of an elementary form and agrees with corresponding formulas obtained earlier by other authors for some particular states of the atom.

  3. Closed-form expression for the magnetic shielding constant of the relativistic hydrogenlike atom in an arbitrary discrete energy eigenstate: Application of the Sturmian expansion of the generalized Dirac-Coulomb Green function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefańska, Patrycja

    2016-07-01

    We present analytical derivation of the closed-form expression for the dipole magnetic shielding constant of a Dirac one-electron atom being in an arbitrary discrete energy eigenstate. The external magnetic field, by which the atomic state is perturbed, is assumed to be weak, uniform, and time independent. With respect to the atomic nucleus we assume that it is pointlike, spinless, motionless, and of charge Z e . Calculations are based on the Sturmian expansion of the generalized Dirac-Coulomb Green function [R. Szmytkowski, J. Phys. B 30, 825 (1997), 10.1088/0953-4075/30/4/007; erratum R. Szmytkowski, J. Phys. B 30, 2747(E) (1997), 10.1088/0953-4075/30/11/023], combined with the theory of hypergeometric functions. The final result is of an elementary form and agrees with corresponding formulas obtained earlier by other authors for some particular states of the atom.

  4. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF THREE z-DROPOUT GALAXIES AT z = 6.844-7.213: DEMOGRAPHICS OF Ly{alpha} EMISSION IN z {approx} 7 GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko, E-mail: ono@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8582 (Japan); Mobasher, Bahram; Nayyeri, Hooshang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S. [National Optical Astronomical Observatories, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Penner, Kyle [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kashikawa, Nobunari [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Spinrad, Hyron [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of our ultra-deep Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy of z-dropout galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field and Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey's northern field. For 3 out of 11 objects, we detect an emission line at {approx}1 {mu}m with a signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}10. The lines show asymmetric profiles with high weighted skewness values, consistent with being Ly{alpha}, yielding redshifts of z = 7.213, 6.965, and 6.844. Specifically, we confirm the z = 7.213 object in two independent DEIMOS runs with different spectroscopic configurations. The z = 6.965 object is a known Ly{alpha} emitter, IOK-1, for which our improved spectrum at a higher resolution yields a robust skewness measurement. The three z-dropouts have Ly{alpha} fluxes of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and rest-frame equivalent widths EW{sup Ly{alpha}}{sub 0} = 33-43 A. Based on the largest spectroscopic sample of 43 z-dropouts, which is the combination of our and previous data, we find that the fraction of Ly{alpha}-emitting galaxies (EW{sup Ly{alpha}}{sub 0} > 25 A) is low at z {approx} 7; 17% {+-} 10% and 24% {+-} 12% for bright (M{sub UV} {approx_equal} -21) and faint (M{sub UV} {approx_equal} -19.5) galaxies, respectively. The fractions of Ly{alpha}-emitting galaxies drop from z {approx} 6 to 7 and the amplitude of the drop is larger for faint galaxies than for bright galaxies. These two pieces of evidence would indicate that the neutral hydrogen fraction of the intergalactic medium increases from z {approx} 6 to 7 and that the reionization proceeds from high- to low-density environments, as suggested by an inside-out reionization model.

  5. Recent advances in thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery method to eliminate the matrix effect between air and water samples: application to the accurate determination of Henry's law constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2014-05-16

    Accurate values for the Henry's law constants are essential to describe the environmental dynamics of a solute, but substantial errors are recognized in many reported data due to practical difficulties in measuring solubility and/or vapor pressure. Despite such awareness, validation of experimental approaches has scarcely been made. An experimental approach based on thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometery (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to concurrently allow the accurate determination of target compounds from the headspace and aqueous samples in closed equilibrated system. The analysis of six aromatics and eight non-aromatic oxygenates was then carried out in a static headspace mode. An estimation of the potential bias and mass balance (i.e., sum of mass measured individually from gas and liquid phases vs. the mass initially added to the system) demonstrates compound-specific phase dependency so that the best results are obtained by aqueous (less soluble aromatics) and headspace analysis (more soluble non-aromatics). Accordingly, we were able to point to the possible sources of biases in previous studies and provide the best estimates for the Henry's constants (Matm(-1)): benzene (0.17), toluene (0.15), p-xylene (0.13), m-xylene (0.13), o-xylene (0.19), styrene (0.27); propionaldehyde (9.26), butyraldehyde (6.19), isovaleraldehyde (2.14), n-valeraldehyde (3.98), methyl ethyl ketone (10.5), methyl isobutyl ketone (3.93), n-butyl acetate (2.41), and isobutyl alcohol (22.2). PMID:24704185

  6. USING THE STATIC HEADSPACE METHOD TO DETERMINE HENRY'S LAW CONSTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new, accurate, and experimentally simple method has been developed to determine dimensionless Henry's law constants using the static headspace method. he method appears applicable to a wide range of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds. he method work well even for methy...

  7. Local Experiments See Cosmologically Varying Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, D J; Barrow, John D.; Shaw, Douglas J.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a rigorous construction, using matched asymptotic expansions, which establishes under very general conditions that local terrestrial and solar-system experiments will measure the effects of varying `constants' of Nature occurring on cosmological scales to computable precision. In particular, `constants' driven by scalar fields will still be found to evolve in time when observed within virialised structures like clusters, galaxies, and planetary systems. This provides a justification for combining cosmological and terrestrial constraints on the possible time variation of many assumed `constants' of Nature, including the fine structure constant and Newton's gravitation constant.

  8. CLASH: DISCOVERY OF A BRIGHT z {approx_equal} 6.2 DWARF GALAXY QUADRUPLY LENSED BY MACS J0329.6-0211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zitrin, A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Moustakas, J. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Bradley, L.; Coe, D.; Postman, M.; Koekemoer, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Moustakas, L. A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Shu, X. [Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Zheng, W.; Ford, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Benitez, N. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Granada (Spain); Bouwens, R. [Leiden Observatory, University of Leiden, Leiden (Netherlands); Broadhurst, T. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Basque Country, Bilbao (Spain); Host, O.; Jouvel, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Meneghetti, M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Rosati, P. [European Southern Observatory, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Donahue, M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Grillo, C. [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Kelson, D., E-mail: adizitrin@gmail.com [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Pasadena, CA (United States); and others

    2012-03-15

    We report the discovery of a z{sub phot} = 6.18{sup +0.05}{sub -0.07} (95% confidence level) dwarf galaxy, lensed into four images by the galaxy cluster MACS J0329.6-0211 (z{sub l} = 0.45). The galaxy is observed as a high-redshift dropout in HST/ACS/WFC3 CLASH and Spitzer/IRAC imaging. Its redshift is securely determined due to a clear detection of the Lyman break in the 18-band photometry, making this galaxy one of the highest-redshift multiply lensed objects known to date with an observed magnitude of F125W =24.00 {+-} 0.04 AB mag for its most magnified image. We also present the first strong-lensing analysis of this cluster uncovering 15 additional multiply imaged candidates of five lower-redshift sources spanning the range z{sub s} {approx_equal} 2-4. The mass model independently supports the high photometric redshift and reveals magnifications of 11.6{sup +8.9}{sub -4.1}, 17.6{sup +6.2}{sub -3.9}, 3.9{sup +3.0}{sub -1.7}, and 3.7{sup +1.3}{sub -0.2}, respectively, for the four images of the high-redshift galaxy. By delensing the most magnified image we construct an image of the source with a physical resolution of {approx}200 pc when the universe was {approx}0.9 Gyr old, where the z {approx_equal} 6.2 galaxy occupies a source-plane area of approximately 2.2 kpc{sup 2}. Modeling the observed spectral energy distribution using population synthesis models, we find a demagnified stellar mass of {approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, subsolar metallicity (Z/Z{sub Sun} {approx} 0.5), low dust content (A{sub V} {approx} 0.1 mag), a demagnified star formation rate (SFR) of {approx}3.2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and a specific SFR of {approx}3.4 Gyr{sup -1}, all consistent with the properties of local dwarf galaxies.

  9. [O III] EMISSION AND GAS KINEMATICS IN A LYMAN-ALPHA BLOB AT z {approx} 3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLinden, Emily M. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Hibon, Pascale [Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile); Weijmans, Anne-Marie [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Tilvi, Vithal [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    We present spectroscopic measurements of the [O III] emission line from two subregions of strong Ly{alpha} emission in a radio-quiet Lyman-alpha blob (LAB). The blob under study is LAB1 at z {approx} 3.1, and the [O III] detections are from the two Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) embedded in the blob halo. The [O III] measurements were made with LUCIFER on the 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope and NIRSPEC on 10 m Keck Telescope. Comparing the redshift of the [O III] measurements to Ly{alpha} redshifts from SAURON allows us to take a step toward understanding the kinematics of the gas in the blob. Using both LUCIFER and NIRSPEC we find velocity offsets between the [O III] and Ly{alpha} redshifts that are modestly negative or consistent with 0 km s{sup -1} in both subregions studied (ranging from -72 {+-} 42- + 6 {+-} 33 km s{sup -1}). A negative offset means Ly{alpha} is blueshifted with respect to [O III] a positive offset then implies Ly{alpha} is redshifted with respect to [O III]. These results may imply that outflows are not primarily responsible for Lyman alpha escape in this LAB, since outflows are generally expected to produce a positive velocity offset. In addition, we present an [O III] line flux upper limit on a third region of LAB1, a region that is unassociated with any underlying galaxy. We find that the [O III] upper limit from the galaxy-unassociated region of the blob is at least 1.4-2.5 times fainter than the [O III] flux from one of the LBG-associated regions and has an [O III] to Ly{alpha} ratio measured at least 1.9-3.4 times smaller than the same ratio measured from one of the LBGs.

  10. The importance of being (a) constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author intends to show how the epistemological status of the physical constants bears witness to the development of physical science in general. He classifies the various physical constants into three types, properties of particular physical objects, characteristics of classes of physical phenomena and universal constants. He discusses the phenomena of fundamental constants experiencing a change in their type, at length on the example of two important constants, c and G. He considers Planck's constant and discusses the conceptual role of universal constants in general, as well as some aspects of quantum mechanics which appear in a new light from the proposed point of view. The existence is shown of hidden universal constants, forgotten ones in the realm of classical physics, as well as overlooked ones in modern physics. The velocity of light is studied as an example of general considerations on universal constants, and as a way to approach some epistemological problems of special relativity. Newton's gravitational constant is studied in connection with the interpretation of general relativity. (Auth./C.F.)

  11. Non-perturbative renormalization constants using Ward identities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We extend the application of vector and axial Ward identities to calculate bA, bP and bT, coefficients that give the mass dependence of the renormalization constants of the corresponding bilinear operators in the quenched theory. The extension relies on using operators with non-degenerate quark masses. It allows a complete determination of the O(a) improvement coefficients for bilinears in the quenched approximation using Ward Identities alone. Only the scale dependent normalization constants Z0P (or Z0S) and ZT are undetermined. We present results of a pilot numerical study using hadronic correlators

  12. A first-principles approach to finite temperature elastic constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y; Wang, J J; Zhang, H; Manga, V R; Shang, S L; Chen, L-Q; Liu, Z-K [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2010-06-09

    A first-principles approach to calculating the elastic stiffness coefficients at finite temperatures was proposed. It is based on the assumption that the temperature dependence of elastic stiffness coefficients mainly results from volume change as a function of temperature; it combines the first-principles calculations of elastic constants at 0 K and the first-principles phonon theory of thermal expansion. Its applications to elastic constants of Al, Cu, Ni, Mo, Ta, NiAl, and Ni{sub 3}Al from 0 K up to their respective melting points show excellent agreement between the predicted values and existing experimental measurements.

  13. Dust-filled axially symmetric universes with a cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Aguiar, P; Aguiar, Paulo; Crawford, Paulo

    2000-01-01

    Following the recent recognition of a positive value for the vacuum energy density and the realization that a simple Kantowski-Sachs model might fit the classical tests of cosmology, we study the qualitative behavior of three anisotropic and homogeneous models: Kantowski-Sachs, Bianchi type-I and Bianchi type-III universes, with dust and a cosmological constant, in order to find out which are physically permitted. We find that these models undergo isotropization up to the point that the observations will not be able to distinguish between them and the standard model, except for the Kantowski-Sachs model $(\\Omega_{k_{0}}0)$ with $\\Omega_{\\Lambda_{0}}$ smaller than some critical value $\\Omega_{\\Lambda_{M}}$. Even if one imposes that the Universe should be nearly isotropic since the last scattering epoch ($z\\approx 1000$), meaning that the Universe should have approximately the same Hubble parameter in all directions (considering the COBE 4-Year data), there is still a large range for the matter density paramete...

  14. Constant Current Models of Brushless DC Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Krykowski, Krzysztof; Hetmańczyk, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Two constant current models of Permanent Magnet Brushless Direct Current Motor (PM BLDC) are presented in the paper. In the first part of the paper principle of operation, basic properties and mathematical equations describing PM BLDC models are given. Then, two different constant current models of PM BLDC motor are considered: In the first model, PM BLDC motor is approximated with dc motor; in the second model, modified constant current model is applied with additional block, which is used t...

  15. Cosmological Constant and Soft Terms in Supergravity

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Kiwoon; Kim, Jihn E.; Nilles, Hans Peter, Ramos-S\\xe1nchez, Sa\\xfal

    1994-01-01

    Some of the soft SUSY breaking parameters in hidden sector supergravity model depend on the expectation value of the hidden sector scalar potential, $$, whose tree level value is equal to the tree level cosmological constant. The current practice of calculating soft parameters assumes that $=0$. Quantum correction to the cosmological constant can differ from the correction to $$ by an amount of order $m^2_{3/2}M_{Pl}^2/8\\pi$. This implies that, for the vanishing cosmological constant, the $$-...

  16. Cosmological Constant and Axions in String Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svrcek, Peter; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-08-18

    String theory axions appear to be promising candidates for explaining cosmological constant via quintessence. In this paper, we study conditions on the string compactifications under which axion quintessence can happen. For sufficiently large number of axions, cosmological constant can be accounted for as the potential energy of axions that have not yet relaxed to their minima. In compactifications that incorporate unified models of particle physics, the height of the axion potential can naturally fall close to the observed value of cosmological constant.

  17. Bubble Universes With Different Gravitational Constants

    OpenAIRE

    Takamizu, Yu-ichi; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We argue a scenario motivated by the context of string landscape, where our universe is produced by a new vacuum bubble embedded in an old bubble and these bubble universes have not only different cosmological constants, but also their own different gravitational constants. We study these effects on the primordial curvature perturbations. In order to construct a model of varying gravitational constants, we use the Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) theory where different expectation values of scalar fi...

  18. ZEMO system for generating group constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The code system ZEMO for generating 26 group and 140-group constant sets for fast breeder reactors neutronics is considered. Group constant libraries, calculational techniques, formats of generated group constant sets and code control parameters are described. Results of one-dimensional model calculations for some critical assemblies and results of investigation of sodium void reactivity effect calculational error caused by 26-group approximation for two-dimensional model of BN-800 are presented. 14 refs.; 1 fig.; 3 tabs

  19. Surprises in numerical expressions of physical constants

    CERN Document Server

    Amir, Ariel; Tokieda, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    In science, as in life, `surprises' can be adequately appreciated only in the presence of a null model, what we expect a priori. In physics, theories sometimes express the values of dimensionless physical constants as combinations of mathematical constants like pi or e. The inverse problem also arises, whereby the measured value of a physical constant admits a `surprisingly' simple approximation in terms of well-known mathematical constants. Can we estimate the probability for this to be a mere coincidence, rather than an inkling of some theory? We answer the question in the most naive form.

  20. Tuning the Spring Constant of Cantilever-free Probe Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Brown, Keith A.; Boya, Radha; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-03-01

    The versatility of atomic force microscope (AFM) based techniques such as scanning probe lithography is due in part to the utilization of a cantilever that can be fabricated to match a desired application. In contrast, cantilever-free scanning probe lithography utilizes a low cost array of probes on a compliant backing layer that allows for high throughput nanofabrication but lacks the tailorability afforded by the cantilever in traditional AFM. Here, we present a method to measure and tune the spring constant of probes in a cantilever-free array by adjusting the mechanical properties of the underlying elastomeric layer. Using this technique, we are able to fabricate large-area silicon probe arrays with spring constants that can be tuned in the range from 7 to 150 N/m. This technique offers an advantage in that the spring constant depends linearly on the geometry of the probe, which is in contrast to traditional cantilever-based lithography where the spring constant varies as the cube of the beam width and thickness. To illustrate the benefit of utilizing a probe array with a lower spring constant, we pattern a block copolymer on a delicate 50 nm thick silicon nitride window.

  1. Biological productivity, terrigenous influence and noncrustal elements supply to the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Paleoceanography during the past approx. 1 Ma

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Masuzawa, T.; Borole, D.V.; Parthiban, G.; Jauhari, P.; Yamamoto, M.

    and few trace elements (Al, Ti, Fe, K, Mg, Zr, Sc, V, Mn, Cu, Ni, Zn, Co, and Ba) to understand the productivity and intensity of terrigenous supply. The age model of the sediment core is based on U-Th dating, occurrence of Youngest Toba Tuff of approx. 74...

  2. Electromechanical systems generating constant frequency alternating current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т.А. Мазур

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available  In the article we consider the usage of electromechanical drivers of constant speed rotation, which is based on many stepped electrodynamic reduction unit, in onboard main systems of electric supply of alternative current with constant frequency.

  3. Habitable sphere and fine structure constant

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlovskii, Miroslaw P; Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Marciak-Kozlowska, Janina

    2005-01-01

    Future space missions, TPF and Darwin will focus on searches of signatures of life on extrasolar planets. In this paper we look for model independ definition of the habitable zone. It will be shown that the radius of the habitable sphere depends only on the constants of the Nature. Key words: Habitable sphere, fine structure constant.

  4. Fullerene derivatives with increased dielectric constants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jahani, Fatemeh; Torabi, Solmaz; Chiechi, Ryan C; Koster, L Jan Anton; Hummelen, Jan C

    2014-01-01

    The invention of new organic materials with high dielectric constants is of extreme importance for the development of organic-based devices such as organic solar cells. We report on a synthetic way to increase the dielectric constant of fullerene derivatives. It is demonstrated that introducing trie

  5. Supplementary kinetic constants of charged particles

    OpenAIRE

    Ribaric, Marijan; Sustersic, Luka

    2006-01-01

    We put forward: (A) An improved description of classical, kinetic properties of a charged pointlike physical particle that consists, in addition to its mass and charge, also of the Eliezer and Bhabha kinetic constants; and (B) a proposal to evaluate these kinetic constants by considering the trajectories of charged particles in an acccelerator.

  6. FLOTATION RATE CONSTANT MODEL FOR FINE COAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuMaixi; CaiZhang; TaoYoujun; KuangYali

    1996-01-01

    The density of fine coal has a major effect on the value of its floxation rate constant. The collector dose can increase the flotation rate of fine coal, especially for low ash coal, but the effect for gangue is not notable. The flotation rate of gangue is mainly governed by the water entrainment. A coal flotation rate constant model has been developed.

  7. Constant-axial-intensity nondiffracting beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A J; D'Anna, J

    1992-02-15

    Numerical solutions of the Fresnel diffraction integral with various apodizing filter functions are used to indicate that a so-called nondiffracting beam can be produced that maintains a constant spot size and constant axial intensity over a considerable range, approximately 30 m in our example. PMID:19784285

  8. Atomic hydrogen and fundamental physical constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques are described which allow the study, in undergraduate laboratories, of the spectrum of atomic hydrogen. The Rydberg constant, the electron-proton mass ratio, and the fine-structure constant are evaluated from the measurements. The key to the series of experiments is a discharge tube in which atomic lines dominate over the molecular lines. (author)

  9. Effect of noradrenaline on tail arteries of SHR and WKY under perfusion at constant flow and constant pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Tarasova, Olga S; Timin, Eugeny N;

    1997-01-01

    pressure. Two series of experiments were performed. In the first series, vessels were perfused/superfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution. In the second one a modified salt solution was used, in which NaCl was totally replaced by an equimolar amount of KCI. Under constant flow conditions noradrenaline evoked......, vasoconstriction at constant pressure in SHR became more pronounced than that in WKY. We suggest that there is greater wall thickness:lumen diameter ratio in SHR vessels and thus different contribution of distension-activated myogenic response is of primary importance for the data obtained....... a more prominent resistance increase in SHR compared with WKY independently of the composition of solution (normal or high-K+) used. At constant pressure perfusion with normal solution, the vasoconstrictor response to noradrenaline was more prominent in WKY. Under application of high-K+ solution...

  10. Cosmic Time Variation of the Gravitational Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    2000-01-01

    A pre-relativistic cosmological approach to electromagnetism and gravitation is explored that leads to a cosmic time variation of the fundamental constants. Space itself is supposed to have physical substance, which manifests by its permeability. The scale factors of the permeability tensor induce a time variation of the fundamental constants. Atomic radii, periods, and energy levels scale in cosmic time, which results in dispersionless redshifts without invoking a space expansion. Hubble constant and deceleration parameter are reviewed in this context. The time variation of the gravitational constant at the present epoch can be expressed in terms of these quantities. This provides a completely new way to restrain the deceleration parameter from laboratory bounds on the time variation of the gravitational constant. This variation also affects the redshift dependence of angular diameters and the surface brightness, and we study in some detail the redshift scaling of the linear sizes of radio sources. The effec...

  11. Elastic constants of layers in isotropic laminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyliger, Paul R; Ledbetter, Hassel; Kim, Sudook; Reimanis, Ivar

    2003-11-01

    The individual laminae elastic constants in multilayer laminates composed of dissimilar isotropic layers were determined using ultrasonic-resonance spectroscopy and the linear theory of elasticity. Ultrasonic resonance allows one to measure the free-vibration response spectrum of a traction-free solid under periodic vibration. These frequencies depend on pointwise density, laminate dimensions, layer thickness, and layer elastic constants. Given a material with known mass but unknown constitution, this method allows one to extract the elastic constants and density of the constituent layers. This is accomplished by measuring the frequencies and then minimizing the differences between these and those calculated using the theory of elasticity for layered media to select the constants that best replicate the frequency-response spectrum. This approach is applied to a three-layer, unsymmetric laminate of WpCu, and very good agreement is found with the elastic constants of the two constituent materials. PMID:14649998

  12. Bubble Universes With Different Gravitational Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Takamizu, Yu-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We argue a scenario motivated by the context of string landscape, where our universe is produced by a new vacuum bubble embedded in an old bubble and these bubble universes have not only different cosmological constants, but also their own different gravitational constants. We study these effects on the primordial curvature perturbations. In order to construct a model of varying gravitational constants, we use the Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) theory where different expectation values of scalar fields produce difference of constants. In this system, we investigate the nucleation of bubble universe and dynamics of the wall separating two spacetimes. In particular, the primordial curvature perturbation on superhorizon scales can be affected by the wall trajectory as the boundary effect. We show the effect of gravitational constant in the exterior bubble universe can provide a peak like a bump feature at a large scale in a modulation of power spectrum.

  13. The cosmological constant: Plus CA change, plus C`est La Meme Chose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieman, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmological parameters have renewed interest in the cosmological constant {Lambda}. I briefly review the current status of these measurements and the corresponding arguments for and against cosmological models with non-zero {Lambda}. I outline a scenario which attempts to incorporate non-zero vacuum energy into the framework of particle physics, based on an ultra-light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson. With global spontaneous symmetry breaking scale f {approx_equal} 10{sup 18} GeV and explicit breaking scale comparable to MSW neutrino masses, M {approximately} 10{sup -3} eV, such a field, which acquires a mass M{sub {phi}} {approximately} M{sup 2}/f {approximately} H{sub 0}, would have become dynamical at recent epochs and currently dominate the energy density of the universe. The field acts as an effective cosmological constant for several expansion times and then relaxes into a condensate of coherent non-relativistic bosons. Such a model can reconcile dynamical estimates of the density parameter, {Omega}{sub m} {approximately} 0.2, with a spatially flat universe, and can yield an expansion age H{sub 0}t{sub 0} {approx_equal} 1 while remaining consistent with limits from gravitational lens statistics.

  14. Incommensurate structure of GdBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}}({delta}{approx}0.38)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizawa, N., E-mail: ishizawa@nitech.ac.jp [Nagoya Institute of Technology (Japan); Asaka, T.; Kudo, T.; Fukuda, K. [Nagoya Institute of Technology (Japan); Abe, N.; Arima, T. [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    The incommensurate structure of the GdBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}} ({delta}{approx}0.38) paramagnetic phase was studied using the single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The basic structure of the compound is a double-layered perovskite with an alternating layer sequence of [GdO{sub {delta}}]-[CoO{sub 2}]-[BaO]-[CoO{sub 2}] along the c axis. The crystal belongs to the five-dimensional superspace group P4/mmm({alpha}00)0000(0{alpha}0)0000, {alpha}=0.3368(1), with a 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 Multiplication-Sign 2-type tetragonal fundamental unit cell of a=3.8934(1) A and c=7.5267(1) A. The structure was refined to R=0.028 for all the observed 2216 reflections with I>3{sigma}(I), including 331 main reflections (R=0.017), 1039 observed first-order satellites (R=0.033), and 846 observed second-order satellites (R=0.045). The crystal has oxygen deficiency that occurs only in the [GdO{sub {delta}}] layer; however, it causes many positional modulations of the constituent atoms throughout the crystal in association with a valence fluctuation of Co between the divalent and trivalent states. Because the value of {alpha} was very close to 1/3, the structure was also investigated using both the commensurately modulated approach and the conventional three-dimensional approach assuming a 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 Multiplication-Sign 2 supercell of P4/mmm symmetry. These approaches successfully reproduced a prime structure of the compound that consists of intersecting CoO{sub 5} pyramidal arrays parallel to a or b axes. The bond valence sum and the charge neutrality principle suggested that the divalent and trivalent cobalt cations are distributed in an ordered way. The incommensurate approach also indicated the possible presence of a local disorder having a structural similarity with that of a high-temperature modification. - Graphical abstract: Changes in the Co-O3 bond length and bond valence sum of Co on the t-u section in the five-dimensional superspace and the local distortion of Co

  15. Some Zero-Sum Constants with Weights

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S D Adhikari; R Balasubramanian; F Pappalardi; P Rath

    2008-05-01

    For an abelian group , the Davenport constant () is defined to be the smallest natural number such that any sequence of elements in has a non-empty subsequence whose sum is zero (the identity element). Motivated by some recent developments around the notion of Davenport constant with weights, we study them in some basic cases. We also define a new combinatorial invariant related to $(\\mathbb{Z}/n\\mathbb{Z})^d$, more in the spirit of some constants considered by Harborth and others and obtain its exact value in the case of $(\\mathbb{Z}/n\\mathbb{Z})^2$ where is an odd integer.

  16. Some results concerning the constant astigmatism equation

    CERN Document Server

    Hlaváč, Adam

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we continue investigation of the constant astigmatism equation z_{yy} + (1/z)_{xx} + 2 = 0. We newly interpret its solutions as describing spherical orthogonal equiareal patterns, with relevance to two-dimensional plasticity. We show how the classical Bianchi superposition principle for the sine-Gordon equation can be extended to generate an arbitrary number of solutions of the constant astigmatism equation by algebraic manipulations. As a by-product, we show that sine-Gordon solutions give slip line fields on the sphere. Finally, we compute the solutions corresponding to classical Lipschitz surfaces of constant astigmatism via the corresponding equiareal patterns.

  17. Laser Propulsion and the Constant Momentum Mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that perfect propulsion requires a constant momentum mission, as a consequence of Newton's second law. Perfect propulsion occurs when the velocity of the propelled mass in the inertial frame of reference matches the velocity of the propellant jet in the rocket frame of reference. We compare constant momentum to constant specific impulse propulsion, which, for a given specification of the mission delta V, has an optimum specific impulse that maximizes the propelled mass per unit jet kinetic energy investment. We also describe findings of more than 50 % efficiency for conversion of laser energy into jet kinetic energy by ablation of solids

  18. On the constants for some Sobolev imbeddings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizzocchero Livio

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the imbedding inequality is the Sobolev space (or Bessel potential space of type and (integer or fractional order . We write down upper bounds for the constants , using an argument previously applied in the literature in particular cases. We prove that the upper bounds computed in this way are in fact the sharp constants if , , and exhibit the maximising functions. Furthermore, using convenient trial functions, we derive lower bounds on for in many cases these are close to the previous upper bounds, as illustrated by a number of examples, thus characterizing the sharp constants with little uncertainty.

  19. On structure constants of sl(2) theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkova, V.B. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Arnold-Sommerfeld Inst. fuer Mathematische Physik (ASI); Zuber, J.B. [CEA, Service de Physique Theorique de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    1995-03-27

    Structure constants of minimal conformal theories are reconsidered. It is shown that ratios of structure constants of spin zero fields of a non-diagonal theory over the same evaluated in the diagonal theory are given by a simple expression in terms of the components of the eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix of the corresponding Dynkin diagram. This is proved by inspection, which leads us to carefully determine the signs of the structure constants that had not all appeared in the former works on the subject. We also present a proof relying on the consideration of lattice correlation functions and speculate on the extension of these identities to more complicated theories. ((orig.)).

  20. Colossal dielectric constant in high entropy oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berardan, David; Franger, Sylvain; Dragoe, Diana; Meena, Arun Kumar; Dragoe, Nita [ICMMO (UMR 8182 CNRS), Universite Paris-Sud, Universite Paris-Saclay, 91405, Orsay (France)

    2016-04-15

    materials by widening their (already complex) phase space. As a first example, we report here that at least one HEOx composition exhibits colossal dielectric constants, which could make it very promising for applications as large-k dielectric materials. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. VI. RADIO OBSERVATIONS AT z {approx}< 1 AND CONSISTENCY WITH TYPICAL STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalowski, M. J.; Dunlop, J. S. [SUPA (Scottish Universities Physics Alliance), Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Kamble, A.; Kaplan, D. L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kruehler, T. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Reinfrank, R. F. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Bonavera, L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria, Avda. de los Castros s/n, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Castro Ceron, J. M. [Department of Radio Astronomy, Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex (INTA-NASA/INSA), Ctra. M-531, km. 7, E-28.294 Robledo de Chavela (Madrid) (Spain); Ibar, E. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Garrett, M. A. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Jakobsson, P. [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Massardi, M. [INAF-Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Pal, S. [ICRAR, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA (Australia); Sollerman, J. [Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Van der Horst, A. J., E-mail: mm@roe.ac.uk [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2012-08-20

    The objective of this paper is to determine the level of obscured star formation activity and dust attenuation in a sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts, and to test the hypothesis that GRB hosts have properties consistent with those of the general star-forming galaxy populations. We present a radio continuum survey of all z < 1 GRB hosts in The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) sample supplemented with radio data for all (mostly pre-Swift) GRB-SN hosts discovered before 2006 October. We present new radio data for 22 objects and have obtained a detection for three of them (GRB 980425, 021211, 031203; none in the TOUGH sample), increasing the number of radio-detected GRB hosts from two to five. The star formation rate (SFR) for the GRB 021211 host of {approx}825 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, the highest ever reported for a GRB host, places it in the category of ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We found that at least {approx}63% of GRB hosts have SFR < 100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and at most {approx}8% can have SFR > 500 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. For the undetected hosts the mean radio flux (<35 {mu}Jy 3{sigma}) corresponds to an average SFR < 15 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Moreover, {approx}> 88% of the z {approx}< 1 GRB hosts have ultraviolet dust attenuation A{sub UV} < 6.7 mag (visual attenuation A{sub V} < 3 mag). Hence, we did not find evidence for large dust obscuration in a majority of GRB hosts. Finally, we found that the distributions of SFRs and A{sub UV} of GRB hosts are consistent with those of Lyman break galaxies, H{alpha} emitters at similar redshifts, and of galaxies from cosmological simulations. The similarity of the GRB population with other star-forming galaxies is consistent with the hypothesis that GRBs, a least at z {approx}< 1, trace a large fraction of all star formation, and are therefore less biased indicators than once thought.

  2. An improved dosimeter having constant flow pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dosemeter designed for individual use which can be used to monitor toxic radon gas and toxic related products of radon gas in mines and which incorporates a constant air stream flowing through the dosimeter is described. (U.K.)

  3. Local experiments see cosmologically varying constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a rigorous matched asymptotic expansion, which establishes under very general conditions that local terrestrial and solar-system experiments will measure any variations in 'constants' of Nature occurring on cosmological scales

  4. Cosmology with a time dependent cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the context of the scalar-tensor theories we consider cosmological models with a time dependent cosmological constant. Several toy models are obtained among them there are solutions without singularity and accelerating. (Author)

  5. Asymptotic safety and the cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We study the non-perturbative renormalisation of quantum gravity in four dimensions. Taking care to disentangle physical degrees of freedom, we observe the topological nature of conformal fluctuations arising from the functional measure. The resulting beta functions possess an asymptotically safe fixed point with a global phase structure leading to classical general relativity for positive, negative or vanishing cosmological constant. If only the conformal fluctuations are quantised we find an asymptotically safe fixed point predicting a vanishing cosmological constant on all scales. At this fixed point we reproduce the critical exponent, ν = 1/3, found in numerical lattice studies by Hamber. Returning to the full theory we find that by setting the cosmological constant to zero the critical exponent agrees with the conformally reduced theory. This suggests the fixed point may be physical while hinting at solution to the cosmological constant problem.

  6. The time constant of the somatogravic illusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia Grácio, B.J.; Winkel, K.N. de; Groen, E.L.; Wentink, M.; Bos, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Met desdemona hebben we gevonden dat de tijd constante van de somatografische illusie rond twee seconden is. Dit resultaat verschilt van wat was gevonden in ander onderzoek dat gebruikt maakt van een gewone centrifuge

  7. Canonoid transformations and constants of motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The necessary and sufficient conditions for a canonoid transformation with respect to a given Hamiltonian are obtained in terms of the Lagrange brackets of the trasformation. The relation of these conditions with the constants of motion is discussed. (Author)

  8. Hydrolysis and formation constants at 250C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A database consisting of hydrolysis and formation constants for about 20 metals associated with the disposal of nuclear waste is given. Complexing ligands for the various ionic species of these metals include OH, F, Cl, SO4, PO4 and CO3. Table 1 consists of tabulated calculated and experimental values of log K/sub xy/, mainly at 250C and various ionic strengths together with references to the origin of the data. Table 2 consists of a column of recommended stability constants at 250C and zero ionic strength tabulated in the column headed log K/sub xy/(0); other columns contain coefficients for an extended Debye-Huckel equation to permit calculations of stability constants up to 3 ionic strength, and up to 0.7 ionic strength using the Davies equation. Selected stability constants calculated with these coefficients for various ionic strengths agree to an average of +- 2% when compared with published experimental and calculated values

  9. Constant conditional entropy and related hypotheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant entropy rate (conditional entropies must remain constant as the sequence length increases) and uniform information density (conditional probabilities must remain constant as the sequence length increases) are two information theoretic principles that are argued to underlie a wide range of linguistic phenomena. Here we revise the predictions of these principles in the light of Hilberg’s law on the scaling of conditional entropy in language and related laws. We show that constant entropy rate (CER) and two interpretations for uniform information density (UID), full UID and strong UID, are inconsistent with these laws. Strong UID implies CER but the reverse is not true. Full UID, a particular case of UID, leads to costly uncorrelated sequences that are totally unrealistic. We conclude that CER and its particular cases are incomplete hypotheses about the scaling of conditional entropies. (letter)

  10. Constant global population with demographic heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel E. Cohen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available To understand better a possible future constant global population that is demographically heterogeneous, this paper analyzes several models. Classical theory of stationary populations generally fails to apply. However, if constant global population size P(global is the sum of all country population sizes, and if constant global annual number of births B(global is the sum of the annual number of births of all countries, and if constant global life expectancy at birth e(global is the population-weighted mean of the life expectancy at birth of all countries, then B(global x e(global always exceeds P(global unless all countries have the same life expectancy at birth.

  11. Holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.; Setare, M. R.

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the holographic dark energy scenario with a varying gravitational constant, in flat and non-flat background geometry. We extract the exact differential equations determining the evolution of the dark energy density-parameter, which include G-variation correction terms. Performing a low-redshift expansion of the dark energy equation of state, we provide the involved parameters as functions of the current density parameters, of the holographic dark energy constant and of the G-variation.

  12. Holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the holographic dark energy scenario with a varying gravitational constant, in flat and non-flat background geometry. We extract the exact differential equations determining the evolution of the dark energy density-parameter, which include G-variation correction terms. Performing a low-redshift expansion of the dark energy equation of state, we provide the involved parameters as functions of the current density parameters, of the holographic dark energy constant and of the G-variation.

  13. Holographic dark energy with varying gravitational constant

    CERN Document Server

    Jamil, Mubasher; Setare, M R

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the holographic dark energy scenario with a varying gravitational constant, in flat and non-flat background geometry. We extract the exact differential equations determining the evolution of the dark energy density-parameter, which include $G$-variation correction terms. Performing a low-redshift expansion of the dark energy equation of state, we provide the involved parameters as functions of the current density parameters, of the holographic dark energy constant and of the $G$-variation.

  14. Prime rings with PI rings of constants

    CERN Document Server

    Kharchenko, V K; Rodríguez-Romo, S

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that if the ring of constants of a restricted differential Lie algebra with a quasi-Frobenius inner part satisfies a polynomial identity (PI) then the original prime ring has a generalized polynomial identitiy (GPI). If additionally the ring of constants is semiprime then the original ring is PI. The case of a non-quasi-Frobenius inner part is also considered.

  15. Siegel-Veech constants in H(2)

    OpenAIRE

    Lelièvre, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Abelian differentials on Riemann surfaces can be seen as translation surfaces, which are flat surfaces with cone-type singularities. Closed geodesics for the associated flat metrics form cylinders whose number under a given maximal length generically has quadratic asymptotics in this length, with a common coefficient constant for the quadratic asymptotics called a Siegel--Veech constant which is shared by almost all surfaces in each moduli space of translation surfaces. Square-tiled surfaces ...

  16. Emergent Gravity And The Cosmological Constant Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hyun Seok

    2007-01-01

    We address issues on the origin of gravity and the cosmological constant problem based on a recent understanding about the correspondence between noncommutative field theory and gravity. We suggest that the cosmological constant problem can be resolved in a natural way if gravity emerges from a gauge theory in noncommutative spacetime. Especially, we elucidate why the emergent gravity implies that vacuum energy does not gravitate but only fluctuations around the vacuum generate gravity. That ...

  17. Beyond lensing by the cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    The long-standing problem of whether the cosmological constant affects directly the deflection of light caused by a gravitational lens is reconsidered. We use a new approach based on the Hawking quasilocal mass of a sphere grazed by light rays and on its splitting into local and cosmological parts. Previous literature restricted to the cosmological constant is extended to any form of dark energy accelerating the universe in which the gravitational lens is embedded.

  18. Parametrized spaces model locally constant homotopy sheaves

    OpenAIRE

    Shulman, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    We prove that the homotopy theory of parametrized spaces embeds fully and faithfully in the homotopy theory of simplicial presheaves, and that its essential image consists of the locally homotopically constant objects. This gives a homotopy-theoretic version of the classical identification of covering spaces with locally constant sheaves. We also prove a new version of the classical result that spaces parametrized over X are equivalent to spaces with an action of the loop space of X. This giv...

  19. RNA structure and scalar coupling constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinoco, I. Jr.; Cai, Z.; Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Varani, G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Signs and magnitudes of scalar coupling constants-spin-spin splittings-comprise a very large amount of data that can be used to establish the conformations of RNA molecules. Proton-proton and proton-phosphorus splittings have been used the most, but the availability of {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled molecules allow many more coupling constants to be used for determining conformation. We will systematically consider the torsion angles that characterize a nucleotide unit and the coupling constants that depend on the values of these torsion angles. Karplus-type equations have been established relating many three-bond coupling constants to torsion angles. However, one- and two-bond coupling constants can also depend on conformation. Serianni and coworkers measured carbon-proton coupling constants in ribonucleosides and have calculated their values as a function of conformation. The signs of two-bond coupling can be very useful because it is easier to measure a sign than an accurate magnitude.

  20. The modified Black-Scholes model via constant elasticity of variance for stock options valuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edeki, S. O.; Owoloko, E. A.; Ugbebor, O. O.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the classical Black-Scholes option pricing model is visited. We present a modified version of the Black-Scholes model via the application of the constant elasticity of variance model (CEVM); in this case, the volatility of the stock price is shown to be a non-constant function unlike the assumption of the classical Black-Scholes model.

  1. Competitive kinetics as a tool to determine rate constants for reduction of ferrylmyoglobin by food components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongberg, Sisse; Lund, Marianne Nissen; Pattison, David I.;

    2016-01-01

    . This approach allows determination of apparent rate constants for the oxidation of proteins by haem proteins of relevance to food oxidation and should be applicable to other systems. A similar approach has provided approximate apparent rate constants for the reduction of MbFe(IV)=O by catechin and...

  2. A new combinatorial approach to the construction of constant composition codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Constant composition codes(CCCs)are a new generalization of binary constant weight codes and have attracted recent interest due to their numerous applications. In this paper, a new combinatorial approach to the construction of CCCs is proposed, and used to establish new optimal CCCs.

  3. A Constant Factor Approximation Algorithm for Reordering Buffer Management

    CERN Document Server

    Avigdor-Elgrabli, Noa

    2012-01-01

    In the reordering buffer management problem (RBM) a sequence of $n$ colored items enters a buffer with limited capacity $k$. When the buffer is full, one item is removed to the output sequence, making room for the next input item. This step is repeated until the input sequence is exhausted and the buffer is empty. The objective is to find a sequence of removals that minimizes the total number of color changes in the output sequence. The problem formalizes numerous applications in computer and production systems, and is known to be NP-hard. We give the first constant factor approximation guarantee for RBM. Our algorithm is based on an intricate "rounding" of the solution to an LP relaxation for RBM, so it also establishes a constant upper bound on the integrality gap of this relaxation. Our results improve upon the best previous bound of $O(\\sqrt{\\log k})$ of Adamaszek et al. (STOC 2011) that used different methods and gave an online algorithm. Our constant factor approximation beats the super-constant lower b...

  4. Running Newton constant, improved gravitational actions, and galaxy rotation curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A renormalization group (RG) improvement of the Einstein-Hilbert action is performed which promotes Newton's constant and the cosmological constant to scalar functions on spacetime. They arise from solutions of an exact RG equation by means of a 'cutoff identification' which associates RG scales to the points of spacetime. The resulting modified Einstein equations for spherically symmetric, static spacetimes are derived and analyzed in detail. The modifications of the Newtonian limit due to the RG evolution are obtained for the general case. As an application, the viability of a scenario is investigated where strong quantum effects in the infrared cause Newton's constant to grow at large (astrophysical) distances. For two specific RG trajectories exact vacuum spacetimes modifying the Schwarzschild metric are obtained by means of a solution-generating Weyl transformation. Their possible relevance to the problem of the observed approximately flat galaxy rotation curves is discussed. It is found that a power law running of Newton's constant with a small exponent of the order 10-6 would account for their non-Keplerian behavior without having to postulate the presence of any dark matter in the galactic halo

  5. Inverse problem in anisotropic poroelasticity: Drained constants from undrained ultrasound measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J.G.; Nakagawa, S.

    2009-11-20

    Poroelastic analysis has traditionally focused on the relationship between dry or drained constants which are assumed known and the saturated or undrained constants which are assumed unknown. However, there are many applications in this field of study for which the main measurements can only be made on the saturated/undrained system, and then it is uncertain what the eects of the uids were on the system, since the drained constants remain a mystery. The work presented here shows how to deduce drained constants from undrained constants for anisotropic systems having symmetries ranging from isotropic to orthotropic. Laboratory ultrasound data are then inverted for the drained constants in three granular packings: one of glass beads, and two others for distinct types of more or less angular sand grain packings. Experiments were performed under uniaxial stress, which resulted in hexagonal (transversely isotropic) symmetry of the poroelastic response. One important conclusion from the general analysis is that the drained constants are uniquely related to the undrained constants, assuming that porosity, grain bulk modulus, and pore uid bulk modulus are already known. Since the resulting system of equations for all the drained constants is linear, measurement error in undrained constants also propagates linearly into the computed drained constants.

  6. Inverse problem in anisotropic poroelasticity: drained constants from undrained ultrasound measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, James G; Nakagawa, Seiji

    2010-02-01

    Poroelastic analysis has traditionally focused on the relationship between dry and drained constants, which are assumed known, and the saturated or undrained constants, which are assumed unknown. However, there are many applications in this field of study for which the main measurements can only be made on the saturated/undrained system, and then it is uncertain what the effects of the fluids were on the system, since the drained constants remain a mystery. The work presented here shows how to deduce drained constants from undrained constants for anisotropic systems having symmetries ranging from isotropic to orthotropic. Laboratory ultrasound data are then inverted for the drained constants in three granular packings: one of glass beads, and two others for distinct types of more or less angular sand grain packings. Experiments were performed under uniaxial stress, which resulted in hexagonal (transversely isotropic) symmetry of the poroelastic response. One important conclusion from the general analysis is that the drained constants are uniquely related to the undrained constants, assuming that porosity, grain bulk modulus, and pore fluid bulk modulus are already known. Since the resulting system of equations for all the drained constants is linear, measurement error in undrained constants also propagates linearly into the computed drained constants. PMID:20136194

  7. Estimation of Stability Constants of Complex Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raos, N.

    Full Text Available The stability constant of a complex generally depends on the electronic, stereochemical and steric factors, as well as on the chelate effect and interaction of the complex, metal and ligand with water. In the first part of the paper we discuss the Irving-Williams order of stability of bivalent transition metal ion complexes from Mn2+ to Zn2+, along with the HSAB model (hard and soft acids and bases of stability. The second part describes three kinds of models for the estimation of the stability constants of complex compounds. First are those based on molecular mechanics, which were used mainly for the estimation of the enantioselectivity effect, i. e. Gibbs energy differences between MLL and MDL isomers. The second kind of models are mechanistic, that rest on the presumption of linear dependence of measured stability constants of the complexes with the same ligand (stability constants of mono- and bis-complexes, protonation constants, etc.. The third kind of models are heuristic (QSPR, which encompass molecular descriptors calculated by the method of overlapping spheres (OS, as well as topological indices. Among the variety of topological indices, connectivity indices proved best. They were calculated for the ligand and various representations of the coordination compound structure.

  8. Environment-Dependent Fundamental Physical Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Terazawa, Hidezumi

    2012-01-01

    A theory of special inconstancy, in which some fundamental physical constants such as the fine-structure and gravitational constants may vary, is proposed in pregeometry. In the special theory of inconstancy, the \\alpha-G relation of \\alpha=3\\pi/[16ln(4\\pi/5GM_W^2)] between the varying fine-structure and gravitaional constants (where M_W is the charged weak boson mass) is derived from the hypothesis that both of these constants are related to the same fundamental length scale in nature. Furthermore, it leads to the prediction of dot{{\\alpha}}/\\alpha=(-0.8\\pm2.5)\\times10^{-14}yr^{-1} from the most precise limit of dot{G}/G=(-0.6\\pm2.0)\\times10^{-12}yr^{-1} by Thorsett, which is not only consistent with the recent observation of dot{{\\alpha}}/\\alpha=(0.5\\pm0.5)\\times10^{-14}yr^{-1} by Webb et al. but also feasible for future experimental tests. Also a theory of general inconstancy, in which any fundamental physical constants may vary, is proposed in "more general relativity", by assuming that the space-time is ...

  9. Theoretical Analysis of One-Dimensional Pressure Diffusion from a Constant Upstream Pressure to a Constant Downstream Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Insun

    2016-05-01

    The one-dimensional diffusion equation was solved to understand the pressure and flow behaviors along a cylindrical rock specimen for experimental boundary conditions of constant upstream pressure and constant downstream storage. The solution consists of a time-constant asymptotic part and a transient part that is a negative exponential function of time. This means that the transient flow exponentially decays with time and is eventually followed by a steady-state condition. For a given rock sample, the transient stage is shortest when the downstream storage is minimized. For this boundary condition, a simple equation was derived from the analytic solution to determine the hydraulic permeability from the initial flow rate during the transient stage. The specific storage of a rock sample can be obtained simply from the total flow into the sample during the entire transient stage if there is no downstream storage. In theory, both of these hydraulic properties could be obtained simultaneously from transient-flow stage measurements without a complicated curve fitting or inversion process. Sensitivity analysis showed that the derived permeability is more reliable for lower-permeability rock samples. In conclusion, the constant head method with no downstream storage might be more applicable to extremely low-permeability rocks if the upstream flow rate is measured precisely upstream.

  10. NMR an ever-advancing spectroscopic technique; La RMN, une spectroscopie en constant progres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desvaux, H.; Berthault, P. [CEA Saclay, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    The CEA, spearheaded by the Saclay centre, has fostered the development of a strong nuclear magnetic resonance research culture aimed at constantly embracing new fields of application for this matter-focused analytical technique. (authors)

  11. Stability constants for silicate adsorbed to ferrihydrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Christian Bruun; Wetche, T.P.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten;

    1994-01-01

    Intrinsic surface acidity constants (K(a1)intr, K(a2)intr) and surface complexation constant for adsorption of orthosilicate onto synthetic ferrihydrite (K(Si) for the complex = FeOSi(OH)3) have been determined from acid/base titrations in 0.001-0.1 m NaClO4 electrolytes and silicate adsorption...... experiments in 0.01 m NaNO3 electrolyte (pH 3-6). The surface equilibrium constants were calculated according to the two-layer model by Dzombak & Morel (1990). Near equilibrium between protons/hydroxyls in solution and the ferrihydrite surface was obtained within minutes while equilibration with silicate...

  12. The case for the cosmological constant

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Varun Sahni

    2000-07-01

    I present a short overview of current observational results and theoretical models for a cosmological constant. The main motivation for invoking a small cosmological constant (or -term) at the present epoch has to do with observations of high redshift Type Ia supernovae which suggest an accelerating universe. A flat accelerating universe is strongly favoured by combining supernovae observations with observations of CMB anisotropies on degree scales which give the `best-fit’ values ≃ 0.7 and m ≃ 0.3. A time dependent cosmological -term can be generated by scalar field models with exponential and power law potentials. Some of these models can alleviate the `fine tuning’ problem which faces the cosmological constant.

  13. Bounds on Gromov Hyperbolicity Constant in Graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    José M Rodríguez; José M Sigarreta

    2012-02-01

    If is a geodesic metric space and 1,2,3 $\\in$ , a geodesic triangle ={1,2,3} is the union of the three geodesics [1,2], [2,3] and [31] in . The space is -hyperbolic (in the Gromov sense) if any side of is contained in a -neighborhood of the union of two other sides, for every geodesic triangle in . If is hyperbolic, we denote by () the sharp hyperbolicity constant of , i.e. ()=$inf{$≥ 0$ : is -hyperbolic}. In this paper we relate the hyperbolicity constant of a graph with some known parameters of the graph, as its independence number, its maximum and minimum degree and its domination number. Furthermore, we compute explicitly the hyperbolicity constant of some class of product graphs.

  14. Gravitational Interactions and Fine-Structure Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D; Nandori, I

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic and gravitational central-field problems are studied with relativistic quantum mechanics on curved space-time backgrounds. Corrections to the transition current are identified. Analogies of the gravitational and electromagnetic spectra suggest the definition of a gravitational fine-structure constant. The electromagnetic and gravitational coupling constants enter the Einstein-Hilbert-Maxwell Lagrangian. We postulate that the variational principle holds with regard to a global dilation transformation of the space-time coordinates. The variation suggests is consistent with a functional relationship of the form alpha_QED being proportional to alpha_G^(1/2), where alpha_QED is the electrodynamic fine-structure constant, and alpha_G its gravitational analogue.

  15. Conformally invariant braneworld and the cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A six-dimensional braneworld scenario based on a model describing the interaction of gravity, gauge fields and 3+1 branes in a conformally invariant way is described. The action of the model is defined using a measure of integration built of degrees of freedom independent of the metric. There is no need to fine tune any bulk cosmological constant or the tension of the two (in the scenario described here) parallel branes to obtain zero cosmological constant, the only solutions are those with zero 4D cosmological constant. The two extra dimensions are compactified in a 'football' fashion and the branes lie on the two opposite poles of the compact 'football-shaped' sphere

  16. Symmetries and constant mean curvature surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we discuss the Lie symmetries, symmetry algebra and symmetry reductions of the equation which describes constant mean curvature surfaces via the generalized Weierstrass-Enneper formulae. First we point out that the equation admits an infinite-dimensional symmetry Lie algebra. Then using symmetry reductions, we obtain two integrable Hamiltonian systems (one autonomous, the other nonautonomous) with two degrees of freedom. The autonomous one was obtained by Konopelchenko and Taimanov by other means. Our method provides a new approach for construction of constant mean curvature surfaces. (author)

  17. Coulomb field in a constant electromagnetic background

    CERN Document Server

    Adorno, T C; Shabad, A E

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear Maxwell equations are written up to the third-power deviations from a constant-field background, valid within any local nonlinear electrodynamics including QED with Euler-Heisenberg effective Lagrangian. Linear electric response to imposed static finite-sized charge is found in the vacuum filled by an arbitrary combination of constant and homogeneous electric and magnetic fields. The modified Coulomb field, corrections to the total charge and to the charge density are given in terms of derivatives of the effective Lagrangian with respect to the field invariants.

  18. Atomic weights: no longer constants of nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Holden, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    Many of us were taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis have changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature

  19. Black Hole Constraints on Varying Fundamental Constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We apply the generalized second law of thermodynamics and derive upper limits on the variation in the fundamental constants. The maximum variation in the electronic charge permitted for black holes accreting and emitting in the present cosmic microwave background corresponds to a variation in the fine-structure constant of Δα/α≅2x10-23 per second. This value matches the variation measured by Webb et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 884 (1999); Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 091301 (2001)] using absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars and suggests the variation mechanism may be a coupling between the electron and the cosmic photon background

  20. The Cosmological Constant Problem (2/2)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will review the cosmological constant problem as a serious challenge to our notion of naturalness in Physics. Weinberg’s no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals possibly including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointing towards a global modification as being the most sensible option. The global nature of the cosmological constant problem is also emphasized, and as a result, the sequestering scenario is reviewed in some detail, demonstrating the cancellation of the Standard Model vacuum energy through a global modification of General Relativity.

  1. The Cosmological Constant Problem (1/2)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will review the cosmological constant problem as a serious challenge to our notion of naturalness in Physics. Weinberg’s no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals possibly including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointing towards a global modification as being the most sensible option. The global nature of the cosmological constant problem is also emphasized, and as a result, the sequestering scenario is reviewed in some detail, demonstrating the cancellation of the Standard Model vacuum energy through a global modification of General Relativity.

  2. Optimizing constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussen, Leo D.

    2016-06-01

    This article describes an analytic method to optimize constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers. It recasts the accepted mathematical description of resolution and intensity in terms of new variables and includes terms for vertical divergence, wavelength and some sample scattering effects. An undetermined multiplier method is applied to the revised equations to minimize the RMS value of resolution width at constant intensity and fixed wavelength. A new understanding of primary spectrometer transmission (presented elsewhere) can then be applied to choose beam elements to deliver an optimum instrument. Numerical methods can then be applied to choose the best wavelength.

  3. Stringy mechanism for a small cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the probability distributions of products of random variables, we propose a simple stringy mechanism that prefers the meta-stable vacua with a small cosmological constant. We state some relevant properties of the probability distributions of functions of random variables. We then illustrate the mechanism within the flux compactification models in Type IIB string theory. As a result of the stringy dynamics, we argue that the generic probability distribution for the meta-stable vacua typically peaks with a divergent behavior at the zero value of the cosmological constant. However, its suppression in the single modulus model studied here is modest

  4. Hermite's Constant for Quadratic Number Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Baeza, Ricardo; Coulangeon, Renaud; Icaza, Maria Ines; O'Ryan, Manuel

    2001-01-01

    We develop a method to compute the Hermite-Humbert constants $\\gam_{K,n}$ of a real quadratic number field $K$, the analogue of the classical Hermite constant $\\gam_n$ when $\\funnyQ$ is replaced by a quadratic extension. In the case $n=2$, the problem is equivalent to the determination of lowest points of fundamental domains in $\\H^2$ for the Hilbert modular group over $K$, that had been studied experimentally by H. Cohn. We establish the results he conjectured for the...

  5. Progress in our knowledge of the fundamental constants of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurements of quantities providing information on the values of the fundamental physical constants bring together a wide variety of measurements in very different parts of physics in a unique way. Taken both separately and together these measurements provide stringent tests of theory. They also throw light on the question: 'How well do we understand physics via measurements at the highest level of accuracy?' They also have important practical applications. In this way they can point the way to the inadequacies and strengths of our knowledge and be used to benefit mankind. The first thorough review of the measurements relevant to the determination of the values of fundamental physical constants was that of Birge in 1929, and the latest CODATA review by Mohr and Taylor was published in 2000. Over the intervening period most of the old textbook methods have either disappeared or been considerably refined. Many of them have been replaced by determinations based on developments in such diverse areas as, for example, quantum electrodynamics, solid-state physics, low-temperature physics and laser spectroscopy. These have improved our knowledge of the values of the fundamental constants by many orders of magnitude. In accordance with their role as the natural units of physics, many of the methods have already found important applications for both defining and maintaining the SI units. These provide the basic units for the measurements used in science, technology and everyday life. The measurements involved in the latest evaluation by the CODATA Task Group on Fundamental Physical Constants are discussed together with the likely developments in the next few years. The pace of the subject reflects the overall pace of physics and technology and this can be used as a guide to future developments. (author)

  6. Lattice Theta Constants vs Riemann Theta Constants and NSR Superstring Measures

    CERN Document Server

    Dunin-Barkowski, P; Sleptsov, A

    2009-01-01

    We discuss relations between two different representations of hypothetical holomorphic NSR measures, based on two different ways of constructing the semi-modular forms of weight 8. One of these ways is to build forms from the ordinary Riemann theta constants and another -- from the lattice theta constants. We discuss unexpectedly elegant relations between lattice theta constants, corresponding to 16-dimensional self-dual lattices, and Riemann theta constants and present explicit formulae expressing the former ones through the latter. Starting from genus 5 the modular-form approach to construction of NSR measures is clearly sick and it seems to fail completely already at genus 6.

  7. The Alpha Constant from Relativistic Groups

    CERN Document Server

    González-Martin, G R

    2000-01-01

    The value of the alpha constant, known to be equal to an algebraic expression in terms of pi and entire numbers related to certain group volumes, is derived from the relativistic structure group of a geometric unified theory, its subgroups and corresponding symmetric space quotients.

  8. Can compactifications solve the cosmological constant problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.; Masoumi, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Recently, there have been claims in the literature that the cosmological constant problem can be dynamically solved by specific compactifications of gravity from higher-dimensional toy models. These models have the novel feature that in the four-dimensional theory, the cosmological constant Λ is much smaller than the Planck density and in fact accumulates at Λ = 0. Here we show that while these are very interesting models, they do not properly address the real cosmological constant problem. As we explain, the real problem is not simply to obtain Λ that is small in Planck units in a toy model, but to explain why Λ is much smaller than other mass scales (and combinations of scales) in the theory. Instead, in these toy models, all other particle mass scales have been either removed or sent to zero, thus ignoring the real problem. To this end, we provide a general argument that the included moduli masses are generically of order Hubble, so sending them to zero trivially sends the cosmological constant to zero. We also show that the fundamental Planck mass is being sent to zero, and so the central problem is trivially avoided by removing high energy physics altogether. On the other hand, by including various large mass scales from particle physics with a high fundamental Planck mass, one is faced with a real problem, whose only known solution involves accidental cancellations in a landscape.

  9. Varying Constants: Constraints from Seasonal Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, Douglas J

    2010-01-01

    We analyse the constraints obtained from new atomic clock data on the possible time variation of the fine structure `constant' and the electron-proton mass ratio and show how they are strengthened when the seasonal variation of Sun's gravitational field at the Earth's surface is taken into account.

  10. Teaching Nanochemistry: Madelung Constants of Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Mark D.; Baker, A. David

    2010-01-01

    The Madelung constants for binary ionic nanoparticles are determined. The computational method described here sums the Coulombic interactions of each ion in the particle without the use of partial charges commonly used for bulk materials. The results show size-dependent lattice energies. This is a useful concept in teaching how properties such as…

  11. Variation of the fine structure constant

    CERN Document Server

    Lipovka, Anton A

    2016-01-01

    In present paper we evaluate the fine structure constant variation which should take place as the Universe is expanded and its curvature is changed adiabatically. This changing of the fine structure constant is attributed to the energy lost by physical system (consist of baryonic component and electromagnetic field) due to expansion of our Universe. Obtained ratio (d alpha)/alpha = 1. 10{-18} (per second) is only five times smaller than actually reported experimental limit on this value. For this reason this variation can probably be measured within a couple of years. To argue the correctness of our approach we calculate the Planck constant as adiabatic invariant of electromagnetic field, from geometry of our Universe in the framework of the pseudo- Riemannian geometry. Finally we discuss the double clock experiment based on Al+ and Hg+ clocks carried out by T. Rosenband et al. (Science 2008). We show that in this particular case there is an error in method and this way the fine structure constant variation c...

  12. Rotating spacetimes with a cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop solution-generating techniques for stationary metrics with one angular momentum and axial symmetry, in the presence of a cosmological constant and in arbitrary spacetime dimension. In parallel we study the related lower dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton static spacetimes with a Liouville potential. For vanishing cosmological constant, we show that the field equations in more than four dimensions decouple into a four dimensional Papapetrou system and a Weyl system. We also show that given any four dimensional 'seed' solution, one can construct an infinity of higher dimensional solutions parametrised by the Weyl potentials, associated to the extra dimensions. When the cosmological constant is non-zero, we discuss the symmetries of the field equations, and then extend the well known works of Papapetrou and Ernst (concerning the complex Ernst equation) in four-dimensional general relativity, to arbitrary dimensions. In particular, we demonstrate that the Papapetrou hypothesis generically reduces a stationary system to a static one even in the presence of a cosmological constant. We also give a particular class of solutions which are deformations of the (planar) adS soliton and the (planar) adS black hole. We give example solutions of these techniques and determine the four-dimensional seed solutions of the 5 dimensional black ring and the Myers-Perry black hole

  13. Pion decay constants in dense skyrmion matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H.-J.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available According to the QCD, the hadronic matter can have various phases with matter density and temperature. In general, when there is phase transition in a matter, it is known that a symmetry in the matter changes. In case of the hadronic matter, the chiral symmetry in the matter is expected to be restored when the matter density (or temperature increases. The actual order parameter with respect to the chiral symmetry in the hadronic matter is known as the quark condensate from the QCD, but the pion decay constant, corresponding to the radius of the chiral circle, plays the role of the order parameter in an effective field theoretical approach to the QCD. In this paper, by using the skyrmion model which is an effective theory to the QCD, we construct the skyrmion matter as a model of the hadronic matter (nuclear matter and calculate the pion decay constant in the matter. Because of presence of the matter, the pion decay constant is split into the two components, the temporal component and the spatial component. We discuss the phase transition in the skyrmion matter and behavior of the two components of the decay constant for massless pion with density of the skyrmion matter.

  14. Monopoly price discrimination with constant elasticity demand

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre Pérez, Iñaki; Cowan, Simon George

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents new results on the welfare e¤ects of third-degree price discrimination under constant elasticity demand. We show that when both the share of the strong market under uniform pricing and the elasticity di¤erence between markets are high enough,then price discrimination not only can increase social welfare but also consumer surplus.

  15. A combined value of the Hubble constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We combine measurements of the Hubble constant in M100, M96, NGC 5253 and IC 4182 including the correction due to the metallicity dependence of the period-luminosity relation of Cepheids, as determined by Beaulieu et al. and Sasselov et al. We pay special attention to error correlations

  16. Growth of KH2PO4 crystals at constant temperature and supersaturation. Final report, October 20, 1980-October 20, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large three-zone crystallizer system was constructed and successfully operated for growing KH2PO4 single crystals. Under conditions of constant crystallization temperature and supersaturation, growth rates exceding 5 mm per day were demonstrated for KH2PO4 crystals of 5 x 5 cm cross section. The optical quality of these crystals was equivalent to that of crystals grown at rates presently considered as state-of-the-art (approx. 1 mm/day). Sample crystals were supplied for comparison testing. The three-zone system appears to be ideally suitable for growth of large-diameter KH2PO4 crystals for the Laser Fusion Program

  17. Bouncing models with a cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto-Neto, Nelson; Pereira, Stella; Siffert, Beatriz [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Bouncing models have been proposed by many authors as a complementation, or even as an alternative to inflation for the description of the very early and dense Universe. However, most bouncing models contain a contracting phase from a very large and rarefied state, where dark energy might have had an important role as it has today in accelerating our large Universe. In that case, its presence can modify substantially the initial conditions and evolution of cosmological perturbations, changing the known results already obtained in the literature concerning their amplitude and spectrum. In this paper, we assume the simplest and most appealing candidate for dark energy, the cosmological constant, and evaluate its influence on the evolution of cosmological perturbations during the contracting phase of a bouncing model, which also contains a perfect fluid with constant equation of state parameter w. We show that the spectrum and the amplitude of the perturbations are substantially altered by the presence of a cosmological constant with value tuned to give the present acceleration of the Universe. In this case, one needs the presence of a stiff matter fluid in the contracting phase, which can be modelled by a scalar field with kinetic energy much greater than its potential energy, very plausible in this situation, in order to have a scale invariant spectrum of perturbations in the expanding phase, contrary to the case without a cosmological constant, where a dust fluid is required. The difference resides on the vacuum state choice we have to make when a cosmological constant is present. (author)

  18. Thermal shape fluctuations in hot rotating nuclei: Comparison of constant energy constraint and constant temperature constraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical shape fluctuations can be calculated with two alternative assumptions: (a) the temperature remains constant as the shape fluctuates, or (b) the energy remains constant as the shape fluctuates. These two possibilities are compared for a simple model, the Landau theory, and the finite-temperature HFB cranking theory. Average electric quadrupole moments are compared for these two constraints. (orig.)

  19. The amplitude of mass density fluctuations at $z\\approx 3.25$ from the Ly-alpha forest of Q1422+231

    OpenAIRE

    Nusser, Adi; Haehnelt, Martin

    1999-01-01

    The real-space optical depth distribution along the line of sight to the QSO Q1422+231 is recovered from two HIRES spectra. The first two moments of the truncated optical depth distribution are used to constrain the density fluctuation amplitude of the intergalactic medium (IGM). The $rms$ of the IGM density at $z\\approx 3.25$ estimated from the first spectrum is $\\sigma = \\sqrt{\\exp{[(1.8 \\pm 0.27)^2/\\alpha^2]}-1}$, with $1.56

  20. Nonergodic dynamics of nuclear spin 1/2 with equal constants of spin-spin interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Rudavets, M G

    2002-01-01

    The exact solution of the nuclear spins polarization evolution in the system with the similar q-constant spin-spin interaction (SSI) between all spin pairs is obtained in the case when only one (the first) spin was polarized at the initial time moment. It is shown that polarization of the first spin P sub 1 (t) has the form of periodical pulsations in the time with the 4 pi/g period. The P sub 1 (t) function changes in each period from the initial value P(0) = 1 up to 1/3 value during the time period of the t approx = 4 pi/Ng order, when the spins number is N >= 1 and remains in the P sub 1 (t) 1/3 state practically during the whole period. The simple classical model within the frames of the average field theory explains the physical cause of the nonergodic dynamics of the considered system

  1. Frequency Dependence of Attenuation Constant of Dielectric Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Zadgaonkar

    1975-01-01

    Full Text Available Different dielectric materials have been studied for frequency dependence of attenuation constant. The sensitive cathode ray oscillograph method has been used to evaluate to the dielectric constant and loss factor, and from these attenuation constants have been calculated. The temperature remaining constant, a regular increase has been observed in attenuation constant, at higher frequencies of electro-magnetic propagating wave.

  2. Diffusion Monte Carlo methods applied to Hamaker Constant evaluations

    CERN Document Server

    Hongo, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    We applied diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) methods to evaluate Hamaker constants of liquids for wettabilities, with practical size of a liquid molecule, Si$_6$H$_{12}$ (cyclohexasilane). The evaluated constant would be justified in the sense that it lies within the expected dependence on molecular weights among similar kinds of molecules, though there is no reference experimental values available for this molecule. Comparing the DMC with vdW-DFT evaluations, we clarified that some of the vdW-DFT evaluations could not describe correct asymptotic decays and hence Hamaker constants even though they gave reasonable binding lengths and energies, and vice versa for the rest of vdW-DFTs. We also found the advantage of DMC for this practical purpose over CCSD(T) because of the large amount of BSSE/CBS corrections required for the latter under the limitation of basis set size applicable to the practical size of a liquid molecule, while the former is free from such limitations to the extent that only the nodal structure of...

  3. Electronic transport in two-dimensional high dielectric constant nanosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuño, M; Somoza, A M; Vinokur, V M; Baturina, T I

    2015-01-01

    There has been remarkable recent progress in engineering high-dielectric constant two dimensional (2D) materials, which are being actively pursued for applications in nanoelectronics in capacitor and memory devices, energy storage, and high-frequency modulation in communication devices. Yet many of the unique properties of these systems are poorly understood and remain unexplored. Here we report a numerical study of hopping conductivity of the lateral network of capacitors, which models two-dimensional insulators, and demonstrate that 2D long-range Coulomb interactions lead to peculiar size effects. We find that the characteristic energy governing electronic transport scales logarithmically with either system size or electrostatic screening length depending on which one is shorter. Our results are relevant well beyond their immediate context, explaining, for example, recent experimental observations of logarithmic size dependence of electric conductivity of thin superconducting films in the critical vicinity of superconductor-insulator transition where a giant dielectric constant develops. Our findings mark a radical departure from the orthodox view of conductivity in 2D systems as a local characteristic of materials and establish its macroscopic global character as a generic property of high-dielectric constant 2D nanomaterials. PMID:25860804

  4. Reaction Rate Constant for Radiative Association of CF$^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Öström, Jonatan; Nyman, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations ($\\text{C}^+$) and fluorine atoms ($\\text{F}$) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition $1^1\\Pi \\rightarrow X^1\\Sigma^+$ and rovibrational transitions on the $X^1\\Sigma^+$ and $a^3\\Pi$ potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit--Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius--Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of $<3\\:\\%$. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of $10$ to $250\\:\\text{K}$, the rate constant is about $10^{-21}\\:\\text{cm}^3\\text{s}^{-1}$, rising toward $10^{-16}\\:\\text{cm}^3\\text{s}^{-1}$ fo...

  5. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öström, Jonatan, E-mail: jonatan.ostrom@gmail.com; Gustafsson, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.gustafsson@ltu.se [Applied Physics, Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Science and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden); Bezrukov, Dmitry S. [Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Nyman, Gunnar [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C{sup +}) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and rovibrational transitions on the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and a{sup 3}Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10{sup −21} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, rising toward 10{sup −16} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  6. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C+) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 11Π → X1Σ+ and rovibrational transitions on the X1Σ+ and a3Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10−21 cm3 s−1, rising toward 10−16 cm3 s−1 for a temperature of 30 000 K

  7. Dielectric Constant Measurements for Characterizing Lunar Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert C.; Buehler, M.; Seshadri, S.; Kuhlman, G.; Schaap, M.

    2005-01-01

    The return to the Moon has ignited the need to characterize the lunar regolith using fast, reliable in-situ methods. Characterizing the physical properties of the rocks and soils can be very difficult because of the many complex parameters that influence the measurements. In particular, soil electrical property measurements are influenced by temperature, mineral type, grain size, porosity, and soil conductivity. Determining the dielectric constant of lunar materials may be very important in providing quick characterization of surface deposits, especially for the Moon. A close examination of the lunar regolith samples collected by the Apollo astronauts indicates that the rocks and soils on the Moon are dominated by silicates and oxides. In this presentation, we will show that determining the dielectric constant measurements can provide a simple, quick detection method for minerals that contain titanium, iron, and water. Their presence is manifest by an unusually large imaginary permittivity.

  8. Molecular dynamics at constant temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxvaerd, S.

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms for molecular dynamics (MD) at constant temperature and pressure are investigated. The ability to remain in a regular orbit in an intermittent chaotic regime is used as a criterion for long-time stability. A simple time-centered algorithm (leap frog) is found to be the most stable of the commonly used algorithms in MD. A model of N one-dimensional dimers with a double-well intermolecular potential, for which the distribution functions at constant temperature T and pressure P can be calculated, is used to investigate MD-NPT dynamics. A time-centered NPT algorithm is found to sample correctly and to be very robust with respect to volume scaling.

  9. The Value of the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2011-01-01

    We make the cosmological constant, {\\Lambda}, into a field and restrict the variations of the action with respect to it by causality. This creates an additional Einstein constraint equation. It restricts the solutions of the standard Einstein equations and is the requirement that the cosmological wave function possess a classical limit. When applied to the Friedmann metric it requires that the cosmological constant measured today, t_{U}, be {\\Lambda} ~ t_{U}^(-2) ~ 10^(-122), as observed. This is the classical value of {\\Lambda} that dominates the wave function of the universe. Our new field equation determines {\\Lambda} in terms of other astronomically measurable quantities. Specifically, it predicts that the spatial curvature parameter of the universe is {\\Omega}_{k0} \\equiv -k/a_(0)^(2)H^2= -0.0055, which will be tested by Planck Satellite data. Our theory also creates a new picture of self-consistent quantum cosmological history.

  10. Regular Black Holes with Cosmological Constant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Wen-Juan; CAI Rong-Gen; SU Ru-Keng

    2006-01-01

    We present a class of regular black holes with cosmological constant Λ in nonlinear electrodynamics. Instead of usual singularity behind black hole horizon, all fields and curvature invariants are regular everywhere for the regular black holes. Through gauge invariant approach, the linearly dynamical stability of the regular black hole is studied. In odd-parity sector, we find that the Λ term does not appear in the master equations of perturbations, which shows that the regular black hole is stable under odd-parity perturbations. On the other hand, for the even-parity sector, the master equations are more complicated than the case without the cosmological constant. We obtain the sufficient conditions for stability of the regular black hole. We also investigate the thermodynamic properties of the regular black hole, and find that those thermodynamic quantities do not satisfy the differential form of first law of black hole thermodynamics. The reason for violating the first law is revealed.

  11. Incompressible flows with piecewise constant density

    CERN Document Server

    Danchin, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with variable density. The aim is to prove existence and uniqueness results in the case of discontinuous ini- tial density. In dimension n = 2, 3, assuming only that the initial density is bounded and bounded away from zero, and that the initial velocity is smooth enough, we get the local-in-time existence of unique solutions. Uniqueness holds in any dimension and for a wider class of velocity fields. Let us emphasize that all those results are true for piecewise constant densities with arbitrarily large jumps. Global results are established in dimension two if the density is close enough to a positive constant, and in n-dimension if, in addition, the initial velocity is small. The Lagrangian formula- tion for describing the flow plays a key role in the analysis that is proposed in the present paper.

  12. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O.A.

    1988-07-13

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90/degree/ intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. The fine structure constant and numerical alchemy

    CERN Document Server

    Dattoli, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    We comment on past and more recent efforts to derive a formula yielding the fine structure constant in terms of integers and transcendent numbers. We analyse these "exoteric" attitudes and describe the myths regarding {\\alpha}, which seems to have very ancient roots, tracing back to Cabbala and to medieval alchemic conceptions. We discuss the obsession for this constant developed by Pauli and the cultural "environment" in which such an "obsession" grew. We also derive a simple formula for {\\alpha} in terms of two numbers {\\pi} and 137 only. The formula we propose reproduces the experimental values up to the last significant digit, it has not any physical motivation and is the result of an alchemic combination of numbers. We make a comparison with other existing formulae, discuss the relevant limits of validity by comparison with the experimental values and discuss a criterion to recover a physical meaning, if existing, from their mathematical properties.

  14. Noncommuting contractions of oscillators with constant force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We find two noncommuting contractions of the Lie algebras u(N) and gl(N,R), realized as the symmetry algebras of N-dimensional isotropic harmonic and repulsive oscillators of spring constant k element of R, with a constant force of magnitude f. The contraction limit to the symmetry algebra of the N-dimensional free system is (k, f) → (0, 0). We take two paths in this plane, determined by the order of contraction of the two parameters, and show that they yield two closely related-but distinct-Euclidean-type symmetry algebras for the common contracted system. We also show briefly how the wavefunctions of the one-dimensional harmonic oscillator reduce to plane waves along the above two paths

  15. Cylindrical wormholes with positive cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Richarte, Mart'\\in G

    2013-01-01

    We construct cylindrical, traversable wormholes with finite radii by taking into account the cut-and-paste procedure for the case of cosmic string manifolds with a positive cosmological constant. Under reasonable assumptions about the equation of state of the matter located at the shell, we find that the wormhole throat undergoes a monotonous evolution provided it moves at a constant velocity. In order to explore the dynamical nonlinear behaviour of the wormhole throat, we consider that the matter at the shell is supported by anisotropic Chaplygin gas, anti-Chaplygin gas, or a mixed of Chaplygin and anti-Chaplygin gases implying that wormholes could suffer an accelerated expansion or contraction but the oscillatory behavior seems to be forbidden.

  16. Quantum Exclusion of Positive Cosmological Constant?

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2014-01-01

    We show that a positive cosmological constant is incompatible with the quantum-corpuscular resolution of de Sitter metric in form of a coherent state. The reason is very general and is due to the quantum self-destruction of the coherent state because of the scattering of constituent graviton quanta. This process creates an irreversible quantum clock, which precludes eternal de Sitter. It also eliminates the possibility of Boltzmann brains and Poincare recurrences. This effect is expected to be part of any microscopic theory that takes into account the quantum corpuscular structure of the cosmological background. This observation puts the cosmological constant problem in a very different light, promoting it, from a naturalness problem, into a question of quantum consistency. We are learning that quantum gravity cannot tolerate exceedingly-classical sources.

  17. Some Dynamical Effects of the Cosmological Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axenides, M.; Floratos, E. G.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    Newton's law gets modified in the presence of a cosmological constant by a small repulsive term (antigravity) that is proportional to the distance. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data (Λ~=10-52 m-2), we investigate the significance of this term on various astrophysical scales. We find that on galactic scales or smaller (less than a few tens of kpc), the dynamical effects of the vacuum energy are negligible by several orders of magnitude. On scales of 1 Mpc or larger however we find that the vacuum energy can significantly affect the dynamics. For example we show that the velocity data in the local group of galaxies correspond to galactic masses increased by 35% in the presence of vacuum energy. The effect is even more important on larger low density systems like clusters of galaxies or superclusters.

  18. Lectures on the Cosmological Constant Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Padilla, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    These lectures on the cosmological constant problem were prepared for the X Mexican School on Gravitation and Mathematical Physics. The problem itself is explained in detail, emphasising the importance of radiative instability and the need to repeatedly fine tune as we change our effective description. Weinberg's no go theorem is worked through in detail. I review a number of proposals including Linde's universe multiplication, Coleman's wormholes, the fat graviton, and SLED, to name a few. Large distance modifications of gravity are also discussed, with causality considerations pointing towards a global modification as being the most sensible option. The global nature of the cosmological constant problem is also emphasized, and as a result, the sequestering scenario is reviewed in some detail, demonstrating the cancellation of the Standard Model vacuum energy through a global modification of General Relativity.

  19. Cosmic concordance and the fine structure constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent measurements of a peak in the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background suggest that the geometry of the universe is close to flat. But if other accepted indicators of cosmological parameters are also correct then the best fit model is marginally closed, with the peak in the spectrum at slightly larger scales than in a flat universe. If these observations persevere, one way they might be reconciled with a flat universe is if the fine structure constant had a lower value at earlier times, which would delay the recombination of electrons and protons and also act to suppress secondary oscillations as observed. We discuss evidence for a few percent increase in the fine structure constant between the time of recombination and the present

  20. Pole placement with constant gain output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, B.; Lindorff, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    Given a linear time invariant multivariable system with m inputs and p outputs, it was shown that p closed loop poles of the system can be preassigned arbitrarily using constant gain output feedback provided (A circumflex, B circumflex) is controllable. These data show that if (A circumflex, B circumflex, C circumflex) is controllable and observable, and Rank B circumflex = m, Rank C circumflex = p, then max (m,p) poles of the system can be assigned arbitarily using constant gain output feedback. Further, it is shown that in some cases more than max (m,p) poles can be arbitrarily assigned. A least square design technique is outlined to approximate the desired pole locations when it is not possible to place all the poles.

  1. Cosmological Constant or Variable Dark Energy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Li-Xin; ZHANG Cheng-Wu; LIU Hong-Ya

    2007-01-01

    @@ Selection statics of the Akaike information criterion (AIC) model and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC)model are applied to the Λ-cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological model, the constant equation of state of dark energy, w =constant, and the parametrized equation of state of dark energy, w(z) = w0 + w1z/(1 + z),to determine which one is the better cosmological model to describe the evolution of the universe by combining the recent cosmic observational data including Sne Ia, the size of baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak from SDSS, the three-year WMAP CMB shift parameter. The results show that AIC, BIC and current datasets are not powerful enough to discriminate one model from the others, though odds suggest differences between them.

  2. Curvature induced running of the cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Markkanen, Tommi

    2014-01-01

    In this work we investigate the renormalization group flow of the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ induced by the change in space-time curvature in the electroweak vacuum. We calculate the generic magnitude resulting from running in the standard model in a subtraction scheme that respects the Appelquist-Carazzone decoupling theorem. Interestingly, we find in this prescription that for a non-minimal coupling $\\xi\\lesssim 10^4$ the magnitude of the generated contribution remains below the value consistent with observations.

  3. String coupling constant seems to be 1

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Youngsub

    2016-01-01

    We present a reasoning that the string coupling constant should be 1 from the assumption that the area spectrum derived from loop quantum gravity must be equal to the area spectrum calculated from "stringy differential geometry." To this end, we will use the loop quantum gravity area spectrum constructions proposed by Brian Kong and us, and stringy differential geometry based on double field theory recently proposed by Imtak Jeon, Kanghoon Lee and Jeong-Hyuck Park.

  4. Bose-Einstein condensation at constant temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, M.; Schmaljohann, H.; Kronjäger, J.; Bongs, K.; Sengstock, K.

    2004-09-01

    We present an experimental approach to Bose-Einstein condensation by increasing the particle number of the system at almost constant temperature. In particular, the emergence of a new condensate is observed in multicomponent F=1 spinor condensates of Rb87 . Furthermore, we develop a simple rate-equation model for multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensate thermodynamics at finite temperature which well reproduces the measured effects.

  5. Light Dragging, the Origin of Hubble's Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen Jr, Walter J.

    2008-01-01

    Recently E. Harrison has argued the Red Shift distance law proposed by Hubble and velocity-distance law developed later on theoretical grounds has no general proof demonstrating the two laws are actually equivalent. It is the purpose of this paper to account for the nebular redshift law of Hubble based on two principles: 1) Spacetime motion and light dragging. 2) An overall spacetime index of refraction based on Hubble's Constant.

  6. Constant fraction timing with scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model is presented for constant fraction pick-off timing with scintillator-photomultiplier detectors based on a statistical method for leading edge timing. Many of the essential features of this technique are obtained such as prompt time-response, the dependence of FWHM on dynamic range of pulse heights and on maximum energy deposited in scintillator; also the effect of delay time on the optimum resolution in CFPHT and ARC timing. The Walk component in this technique is also satisfactory reproduced

  7. Standard-model coupling constants from compositeness

    OpenAIRE

    Besprosvany, J.

    2003-01-01

    A coupling-constant definition is given based on the compositeness property of some particle states with respect to the elementary states of other particles. It is applied in the context of the vector-spin-1/2-particle interaction vertices of a field theory, and the standard model. The definition reproduces Weinberg's angle in a grand-unified theory. One obtains coupling values close to the experimental ones for appropriate configurations of the standard-model vector particles, at the unifica...

  8. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi; Zhang, Kaituo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, $\\Lambda = \\sigma H + \\Lambda_0$, in which the $\\Lambda$CDM limit is recovered by taking $\\sigma=0$. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann-Lema\\"itre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current ob...

  9. Chiral Heterotic Strings with Positive Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Florakis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    We present explicit examples of semi-realistic heterotic models with spontaneously broken supersymmetry, which dynamically lead to breaking scales much smaller than $M_{\\rm Planck}$ and exponentially small positive values for the cosmological constant. Contrary to field theoretic intuition, we find that the global structure of the effective potential is significantly affected by contributions of massive and non-level matched string states and we investigate the conditions that dynamically ensure a number of desired properties.

  10. Some constant solutions to Zamolodchikov's tetrahedron equations

    CERN Document Server

    Hietarinta, Jarmo

    1992-01-01

    In this letter we present constant solutions to the tetrahedron equations proposed by Zamolodchikov. In general, from a given solution of the Yang-Baxter equation there are two ways to construct solutions to the tetrahedron equation. There are also other kinds of solutions. We present some two-dimensional solutions that were obtained by directly solving the equations using either an upper triangular or Zamolodchikov's ansatz.

  11. Comoving suppression mechanism and cosmological constant problem

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Jian Qi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we assume that the observer is fixed in a comoving frame of reference with $g_{00}=\\frac{\\lambda}{\\Lambda}$, where $\\lambda$ and $\\Lambda$ denote the comoving parameter and the cosmological constant, respectively. By using the {\\it comoving suppression mechanism} and {\\it Mach's principle} (the latter of which is used to determine the comoving parameter $\\lambda$), we calculate the vacuum energy density of quantum fluctuation field in the above-mentioned comoving frame of refer...

  12. Elastic constants from microscopic strain fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta, Surajit; Nielaba, Peter; Rao, Madan; Binder, K.

    1999-01-01

    Fluctuations of the instantaneous local Lagrangian strain $\\epsilon_{ij}(\\bf{r},t)$, measured with respect to a static ``reference'' lattice, are used to obtain accurate estimates of the elastic constants of model solids from atomistic computer simulations. The measured strains are systematically coarse- grained by averaging them within subsystems (of size $L_b$) of a system (of total size $L$) in the canonical ensemble. Using a simple finite size scaling theory we predict the behaviour of th...

  13. Chemical procedure for extracting {sup 129}I, {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al from marine sediments: Prospects for detection of a {approx}2.8 My old supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitoussi, Caroline [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM) IN2P3/CNRS, Campus d' Orsay, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay (France)]. E-mail: caroline.fitoussi@erdw.ethz.ch; Raisbeck, Grant M. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM) IN2P3/CNRS, Campus d' Orsay, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2007-06-15

    For the past three years, we have been developing a procedure to measure carrier-free {sup 129}I/I in gram size quantities of marine sediments containing microgram quantities of iodine. Potential applications involve dating of old (>10 My) sediments and the detection of {sup 129}I (t {sub 1/2} = 15.7 My) from a purported supernova (SN) explosion {approx}2.8 million years ago, that has been inferred from a {sup 60}Fe (t {sub 1/2} = 1.5 My) signal in a deep-sea ferromanganese crust [K. Knie, G. Korschinek, T. Faestermann, E.A. Dorfi, G. Rugel, A. Wallner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 171103]. The procedure consists in washing the sediment with a NH{sub 2}OH . HCl-HOAc mixture, extraction of iodine from the organic phase with TMAH, separation and purification using anion-exchange chromatography, and coprecipitation as AgI-Ag{sub 2}O. We realized the washing step, which extracts authigenic iron and aluminum, could also be used to measure {sup 60}Fe/{sup 56}Fe and {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al in this phase of the same sediment sample. We outline here the chemical procedures developed, and briefly comment on their possible application to the supernova problem. We also point out a large discrepancy between the theoretically calculated {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio in pre-anthropogenic marine sediments, and that derived from experimental measurements.

  14. Observation of large incomplete fusion in {sup 16}O + {sup 103}Rh system at {approx}3-5 MeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Unnati; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, Devendra P.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Yadav, Abhishek [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, A.M. University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Kumar, Rakesh [NP-Group, Inter-University Accelerator Center, PO Box No. 10502, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi-110067 (India); Singh, B.P. [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, A.M. University, Aligarh-202002 (India)], E-mail: bpsinghamu@gmail.com; Prasad, R. [Accelerator Laboratory, Department of Physics, A.M. University, Aligarh-202002 (India)

    2008-10-01

    Incomplete fusion of {sup 16}O({approx}3-5 MeV/nucleon) with {sup 103}Rh has been investigated using measurement and analysis of excitation functions. Some pxn/{alpha}pxn-channels are found to have contribution from pre-cursor decay, which has been separated out from cumulative cross-section of evaporation residues. The xn/pxn-channels are found to be satisfactorily reproduced with the predictions of PACE4 after subtraction of pre-cursor decay contribution, in general. Sizable enhancement in the experimental cross-sections has been observed for {alpha}-emitting channels over the theoretical once, which may be attributed to the incomplete fusion. The percentage fraction of incomplete fusion has also been deduced, which seems to be sensitive for projectile energy, entrance channel mass-asymmetry and/or projectile structure. The present work deals with the competition of incomplete fusion with complete fusion even at {approx}3-5 MeV/nucleon for {sup 16}O + {sup 103}Rh system.

  15. THE BOSS EMISSION-LINE LENS SURVEY (BELLS). I. A LARGE SPECTROSCOPICALLY SELECTED SAMPLE OF LENS GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT {approx}0.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownstein, Joel R.; Bolton, Adam S.; Pandey, Parul [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Schlegel, David J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel J. [Harvard College Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Connolly, Natalia [Department of Physics, Hamilton College, Clinton, NY 13323 (United States); Maraston, Claudia [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Seitz, Stella [University Observatory Munich, Scheinstrasse 1, 81679 Muenchen (Germany); Wake, David A. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Wood-Vasey, W. Michael [Pittsburgh Center for Particle Physics, Astrophysics, and Cosmology (PITT-PACC), Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Brinkmann, Jon [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Weaver, Benjamin A. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We present a catalog of 25 definite and 11 probable strong galaxy-galaxy gravitational lens systems with lens redshifts 0.4 {approx}< z {approx}< 0.7, discovered spectroscopically by the presence of higher-redshift emission lines within the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of luminous galaxies, and confirmed with high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of 44 candidates. Our survey extends the methodology of the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys survey (SLACS) to higher redshift. We describe the details of the BOSS spectroscopic candidate detections, our HST ACS image processing and analysis methods, and our strong gravitational lens modeling procedure. We report BOSS spectroscopic parameters and ACS photometric parameters for all candidates, and mass-distribution parameters for the best-fit singular isothermal ellipsoid models of definite lenses. Our sample to date was selected using only the first six months of BOSS survey-quality spectroscopic data. The full five-year BOSS database should produce a sample of several hundred strong galaxy-galaxy lenses and in combination with SLACS lenses at lower redshift, strongly constrain the redshift evolution of the structure of elliptical, bulge-dominated galaxies as a function of luminosity, stellar mass, and rest-frame color, thereby providing a powerful test for competing theories of galaxy formation and evolution.

  16. High-temperature rate constant measurements for OH+xylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid

    2015-06-01

    The overall rate constants for the reactions of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with o-xylene (k 1), m-xylene (k 2), and p-xylene (k 3) were measured behind reflected shock waves over 890-1406K at pressures of 1.3-1.8atm using OH laser absorption near 306.7nm. Measurements were performed under pseudo-first-order conditions. The measured rate constants, inferred using a mechanism-fitting approach, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as:k1=2.93×1013exp(-1350.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(890-1406K)k2=3.49×1013exp(-1449.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(906-1391K)k3=3.5×1013exp(-1407.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(908-1383K)This paper presents, to our knowledge, first high-temperature measurements of the rate constants of the reactions of xylene isomers with OH radicals. Low-temperature rate-constant measurements by Nicovich et al. (1981) were combined with the measurements in this study to obtain the following Arrhenius expressions, which are applicable over a wider temperature range:k1=2.64×1013exp(-1181.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1406K)k2=3.05×109exp(-400/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1391K)k3=3.0×109exp(-440/T)cm3mol-1s-1(526-1383K) © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  17. Fundamental Constants as Monitors of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Rodger I

    2016-01-01

    Astronomical observations have a unique ability to determine the laws of physics at distant times in the universe. They, therefore, have particular relevance in answering the basic question as to whether the laws of physics are invariant with time. The dimesionless fundamental constants, such as the proton to electron mass ratio and the fine structure constant are key elements in the investigation. If they vary with time then the answer is clearly that the laws of physics are not invariant with time and significant new physics must be developed to describe the universe. Limits on their variance, on the other hand, constrains the parameter space available to new physics that requires a variation with time of basic physical law. There are now observational constraints on the time variation of the proton to electron mass ratio mu at the 1.E-7 level. Constraints on the variation of the fine structure constant alpha are less rigorous, 1E-5, but are imposed at higher redshift. The implications of these limits on ne...

  18. Which Fundamental Constants for CMB and BAO?

    CERN Document Server

    Rich, James

    2015-01-01

    We study the Cosmic Microwave Background using the three-scale framework of Hu et al. to derive the dependence of the CMB temperature anisotropy spectrum on the fundamental constants. We show that, as expected, the observed spectrum depends only on \\emph{dimensionless} combinations of the constants, and we emphasize the points that make this generally true for cosmological observations. Our analysis suggests that the CMB spectrum shape is mostly determined by $\\alpha^2m_e/m_p$ and the proton-CDM-particle mass ratio, $m_p/\\mchi$, with a sub-dominant dependence on $(G\\mchi m_e/\\hbar c)\\alpha^\\beta$ with $\\beta\\sim -7$. The distance to the last-scattering surface depends on $Gm_p\\mchi/\\hbar c$, so published CMB observational limits on time variations of the constants, besides making assumptions about the form of the dark-energy, implicitly assume the time-independence of this quantity. On the other hand, low-redshift $H_0$, BAO and large-scale structure data can be combined with the \\emph{shape} of the CMB spect...

  19. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions of Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Kenneth; Ackmann, James

    1996-03-01

    Measurements of the complex dielectric constant of suspensions of blood cells have recently been reported by Ackmann, et al.(J. J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). At frequencies below 100 kHz, the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') goes through a maximum at a blood cell volume fraction of about 70%. Effective medium approximations do not agree well with this behavior. As a more realistic model, we are studying the grain consolidation model of Roberts and Schwartz(J. N. Roberts and L. M. Schwartz, Phys. Rev. B 31), 5990 (1985). We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of this model for a cubic array of spheres. The simulations agree remarkably well with experiment. They suggest, however, that ɛ' may be showing oscillations rather than a simple maximum. Comparison of the simulated and experimental points suggests that this is not an artifact of the periodic array used in the model. Furthermore the simulations indicate that the maximum (or oscillations) disappears at low conductivities of the suspending fluid.

  20. A constant current source for extracellular microiontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, T; Dillman, N; Weiss, M L

    1995-12-01

    A sophisticated constant-current source suitable for extracellular microiontophoresis of tract-tracing substances, such as Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, Biocytin or Fluoro-Gold, is described. This design uses a flyback switched-mode power supply to generate controllable high-voltage and operational amplifier circuitry to regulate current and provide instrumentation. Design features include a fast rise time, +/- 2000 V supply (stable output in current and voltage monitoring, and separate pumping and holding current settings. Three features of this constant-current source make it especially useful for extracellular microiontophoresis. First, the output voltage monitor permits one to follow changes in the microelectrode resistance during current injection. Second, the voltage-limit (or out-of-compliance) indicator circuitry will sound an alarm when the iontophoretic pump is unable to generate the desired current, such as when the micropipette is blocked. Third, the high-compliance voltage power supply insures up to +/- 20 microA of current through 100 M omega resistance. This device has proven itself to be a reliable constant-current source for extracellular microiontophoresis in the laboratory. PMID:8788057

  1. Nonminimal coupling and the cosmological constant problem

    CERN Document Server

    Glavan, Dražen

    2015-01-01

    We consider a universe with a positive effective cosmological constant and a nonminimally coupled scalar field. When the coupling constant is negative, the scalar field exhibits linear growth at asymptotically late times, resulting in a decaying effective cosmological constant. The Hubble rate in the Jordan frame reaches a self-similar solution, $H=1/(\\epsilon t)$, where the principal slow roll parameter $\\epsilon$ depends on $\\xi$, reaching maximally $\\epsilon=2$ (radiation era scaling) in the limit when $\\xi\\rightarrow -\\infty$. Similar results are found in the Einstein frame (E), with $H_E=1/(\\epsilon_E t)$, but now $\\epsilon_E \\rightarrow 4/3$ as $\\xi\\rightarrow -\\infty$. Therefore in the presence of a nonminimally coupled scalar de Sitter is not any more an attractor, but instead (when $\\xi4/3$ at a rate $\\Gamma\\gg H$, the scaling changes to that of matter, $\\epsilon\\rightarrow \\epsilon_m$, and the energy density in the effective cosmological becomes a fixed fraction of the matter energy density, $M_{\\rm...

  2. Planck Constant Determination from Power Equivalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, David B.

    2000-04-01

    Equating mechanical to electrical power links the kilogram, the meter, and the second to the practical realizations of the ohm and the volt derived from the quantum Hall and the Josephson effects, yielding an SI determination of the Planck constant. The NIST watt balance uses this power equivalence principle, and in 1998 measured the Planck constant with a combined relative standard uncertainty of 8.7 x 10-8, the most accurate determination to date. The next generation of the NIST watt balance is now being assembled. Modification to the experimental facilities have been made to reduce the uncertainty components from vibrations and electromagnetic interference. A vacuum chamber has been installed to reduce the uncertainty components associated with performing the experiment in air. Most of the apparatus is in place and diagnostic testing of the balance should begin this year. Once a combined relative standard uncertainty of one part in 10-8 has been reached, the power equivalence principle can be used to monitor the possible drift in the artifact mass standard, the kilogram, and provide an accurate alternative definition of mass in terms of fundamental constants. *Electricity Division, Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory, Technology Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. Contribution of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, not subject to copyright in the U.S.

  3. Twelve Elastic Constants of Betula platyphylla Suk.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liyu; Lu Zhenyou

    2004-01-01

    Wood elastic constants are needed to describe the elastic behaviors of wood and be taken as an important design parameter for wood-based composite materials and structural materials. This paper clarified the relationships between compliance coefficients and engineering elastic constants combined with orthotropic properties of wood, and twelve elastic constants of Betula platyphylla Suk. were measured by electrical strain gauges. Spreading the adhesive quantity cannot be excessive or too little when the strain flakes were glued. If excessive, the glue layer was too thick which would influence the strain flakes' performance, and if too little, glues plastered were not firm, which could not accurately transmit the strain. Wood as an orthotropic material, its modulus of elasticity and poisson's ratios are related by two formulas:μij /Ei =μji /Ej and μij 0.95) between the reciprocal of elastic modulus MOE-1 and the square of the ratio of depth to length (h/l)2, which indicate that shear modulus values measured were reliable by three point bending experiment.

  4. Fundamental physics constants and mass metrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SI international system of units uses a unit of mass represented by a Pt-Ir cylinder of equal height and diameter. The prototype is conserved along with six copies by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures. The development of new scales with accuracies greater than one micro-gram has evidenced that the use of such material reference units presents inaccuracies due to mass increases with time caused by the absorption of substances and the effects of cleaning operations and aging. Progress in the determination of some physics constants, in particular, developments in electrical metrology related to the Josephson and Hall quantistic effects, has led to the investigation of the possible re-definition of units of mass. Two approaches appear to be interesting. The first is connected with the 'classic' concept of mass, synonym of quantity of material, and leads to the definition of the kilogram based on the Avogadro constant, the Faraday constant and the atomic scale. The second is derived from the units of time and length based on the use of the Planck and De Broglie relationships

  5. CONSTANT LEVERAGE AND CONSTANT COST OF CAPITAL: A COMMON KNOWLEDGE HALF-TRUTH

    OpenAIRE

    IGNACIO VÉLEZ-PAREJA; RAUF IBRAGIMOV; JOSEPH THAM

    2008-01-01

    Un enfoque típico para valorar flujos de caja finitos es suponer que el endeudamiento es constante (generalmente como un endeudamiento objetivo o deseado) y que por tanto, el costo del patrimonio, Ke y el costo promedio ponderado de capital CPPC, también son constantes. Para los flujos de caja perpetuos, y con el costo de la deuda, Kd como la tasa de descuento para el ahorro en impuestos o escudo fiscal, Ke y el CPPC aplicado al flujo de caja libre FCL son constantes si el endeudamiento es co...

  6. Analysis of the chemical equilibrium of combustion at constant volume

    OpenAIRE

    Marius BREBENEL

    2014-01-01

    Determining the composition of a mixture of combustion gases at a given temperature is based on chemical equilibrium, when the equilibrium constants are calculated on the assumption of constant pressure and temperature. In this paper, an analysis of changes occurring when combustion takes place at constant volume is presented, deriving a specific formula of the equilibrium constant. The simple reaction of carbon combustion in pure oxygen in both cases (constant pressure and constant ...

  7. Computing the dielectric constant of liquid water at constant dielectric displacement

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The static dielectric constant of liquid water is computed using classical force field based molecular dynamics simulation at fixed electric displacement D. The method to constrain the electric displacement is the finite temperature classical variant of the constant-D method developed by Stengel, Spaldin and Vanderbilt (Nat. Phys. 2009, 5: 304). There is also a modification of this scheme imposing fixed values of the macroscopic field E. The method is applied to the popular SPC/E model of liquid water. We compare four different estimates of the dielectric constant, two obtained from fluctuations of the polarization at D = 0 and E = 0 and two from the variation of polarization with finite D and E. It is found that all four estimates agree when properly converged. The computational effort to achieve convergence varies however, with constant D calculations being substantially more efficient. We attribute this difference to the much shorter relaxation time of longitudinal polarization compared to transverse polar...

  8. Vacuum Polarization in an Anti-de Sitter Space as an Origin for a Cosmological Constant in a Brane World

    CERN Document Server

    Li, L X

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter we show that the vacuum polarization of quantum fields in an anti-de Sitter space naturally gives rise to a small but nonzero cosmological constant in a brane world living in it. To explain the extremely small ratio of mass density in the cosmological constant to the Planck mass density in our universe (\\approx 10^{-123}) as suggested by cosmological observations, all we need is a four-dimensional brane world (our universe) living in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space with a curvature radius r_0 \\sim 10^{-3}cm and a fundamental Planck energy M_P \\sim 10^9 GeV, and a scalar field with a mass m \\sim r_0^{-1}\\sim 10^{-2}eV. Probing gravity down to a scale \\sim 10^{-3}cm, which is attainable in the near future, will provide a test of the model.

  9. Temperature corrections for constant temperature and constant current hot-wire anemometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the ambient fluid temperature change the calibration curve for velocity measurements taken using hot-wire anemometry. New correction methods are proposed to account for the effects of relatively large temperature changes in the heat-transfer process and on the fluid properties. The corrections do not assume any particular heat-transfer correlation, and they do not require multiple calibrations over a range of temperatures. The corrections are derived for the constant temperature and constant current modes of operation

  10. New Improved Massive Gravity and Three Dimensional Spacetimes of Constant Curvature and Constant Torsion

    CERN Document Server

    Dereli, T

    2016-01-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti de-Sitter space $AdS_3$) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  11. Proceedings of the specialists' meeting on reactor group constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katakura, Jun-ichi (ed.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on Reactor Group Constants. The meeting was held on February 22-23, 2001 at Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with the participation of 59 specialists. The evaluation work for JENDL-3.3 is going on for the publication in a short time. The processing JENDL-3.3 file to make reactor group constants is needed when it is used in application fields. In the meeting, the present status of the reactor group constants was reviewed and the issues relating to them were discussed in such fields as thermal reactor, criticality safety, fast reactor, high energy region, burn-up calculation and radiation shielding. At the final session in the meeting, standardization of reactor group constants was discussed and the need of the reference group constants was confirmed by the participants. The 11 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  12. N.M.R. study of organo-phosphorus compounds: non equivalence of methylenic protons in the {alpha} position of an asymmetric phosphorus atom. Application to study of coupling constants J{sub P,H} and J{sub H,H}; R.M.N. de composes organo-phosphores: non equivalence de protons methyleniques en {alpha} d'un phosphore asymetrique. Application a l'etude des constantes de couplage J{sub P,H} et J{sub H,H}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrand, J.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Non-equivalent methylenic protons, with respect to an asymmetric center, have been observed in the n.m.r. spectra of some three- and tetra-coordinated phosphorus compounds. The analysis of these spectra yield the following results: in the studied secondary phosphines, the inversion rate at the phosphorus atom is slow on the n.m.r. time scale; the geminal coupling constant, for a free-rotating methylene group attached to a phosphorus atom, is negative; in phosphines the non equivalence of methylenic protons reveals two {sup 2}J{sub P-C-H} coupling constants which differ by about 5 Hz. This result is in agreement with previous studies on cyclic phosphines. In phosphine oxides, the {sup 2}J{sub P-C-H} values are negative. The {sup 3}J{sub H-P-C-H} coupling constant is positive in both phosphines and phosphine oxides. In phosphines, the non-equivalent methylenic protons exhibit two nearly equal values for this coupling constant. (author) [French] La non-equivalence de protons methyleniques observee dans quelques composes phosphores tricoordines et tetracoordines a apporte les resultats suivants, concernant la stereochimie et les constantes de couplage dans ces composes: dans les phosphines secondaires, la structure pyramidale des liaisons issues du phosphore est fixe a l'echelle de temps de mesure de la R.M.N.; la constante de couplage {sup 2}J{sub H-C-H}, pour un methylene en libre rotation en {alpha} d'un atome de phosphore, est negative; dans les phosphines etudiees, la non-equivalence. observee pour les protons methyleniques s'accompagne d'une difference importante (5 Hz) entre les deux constantes de couplage {sup 2}J{sub P-C-H} determinees par l'analyse; ce resultat est en accord avec la stereospecificite deja observee pour ce couplage dans les phosphines cycliques. Les valeurs observees pour {sup 2}J{sub P-C-H} dans les oxydes de phosphines sont negatives. Les valeurs de la constante de couplage {sup 3}J{sub H-P-C-H}, dans les phosphines

  13. CONSTANT LEVERAGE AND CONSTANT COST OF CAPITAL: A COMMON KNOWLEDGE HALF-TRUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGNACIO VÉLEZ-PAREJA

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Un enfoque típico para valorar flujos de caja finitos es suponer que el endeudamiento es constante (generalmente como un endeudamiento objetivo o deseado y que por tanto, el costo del patrimonio, Ke y el costo promedio ponderado de capital CPPC, también son constantes. Para los flujos de caja perpetuos, y con el costo de la deuda, Kd como la tasa de descuento para el ahorro en impuestos o escudo fiscal, Ke y el CPPC aplicado al flujo de caja libre FCL son constantes si el endeudamiento es constante. Sin embargo esto no es verdad para los flujos de caja finitos. En este documento mostramos que para flujos de caja finitos, Ke y por lo tanto el CPPC dependen de la tasa de descuento que se utiliza para valorar el ahorro en impuestos, AI y según lo esperado, Ke y el CPPC no son constantes con Kd como la tasa de descuento para el ahorro en impuestos, aunque el endeudamiento sea constante. Ilustramos esta situación con un ejemplo simple. Analizamos cinco métodos: el flujo de caja descontado, FCD, usando APV, el FCD y la formulación tradicional y general del CPPC, el valor presente del flujo de caja del accionista, FCA más deuda y el flujo de caja de capital, FCC.

  14. A REFINED ESTIMATE OF THE IONIZING EMISSIVITY FROM GALAXIES AT z {approx_equal} 3: SPECTROSCOPIC FOLLOW-UP IN THE SSA22a FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestor, Daniel B.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kornei, Katherine A. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Steidel, Charles C.; Siana, Brian [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 105-24, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the contribution of star-forming galaxies to the ionizing background at z {approx} 3, building on previous work based on narrowband (NB3640) imaging in the SSA22a field. We use new Keck/LRIS spectra of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and narrowband-selected Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) to measure redshifts for 16 LBGs and 87 LAEs at z > 3.055, such that our NB3640 imaging probes the Lyman-continuum (LyC) region. When we include the existing set of spectroscopically confirmed LBGs, our total sample with z > 3.055 consists of 41 LBGs and 91 LAEs, of which 9 LBGs and 20 LAEs are detected in our NB3640 image. With our combined imaging and spectroscopic data sets, we critically investigate the origin of NB3640 emission for detected LBGs and LAEs. We remove from our samples three LBGs and three LAEs with spectroscopic evidence of contamination of their NB3640 flux by foreground galaxies and statistically model the effects of additional, unidentified foreground contaminants. The resulting contamination and LyC-detection rates, respectively, are 62% {+-} 13% and 8% {+-} 3% for our LBG sample, and 47% {+-} 10% and 12% {+-} 2% for our LAE sample. The corresponding ratios of non-ionizing UV to LyC flux density, corrected for intergalactic medium (IGM) attenuation, are 18.0{sup +34.8} {sub -7.4} for LBGs and 3.7{sup +2.5} {sub -1.1} for LAEs. We use these ratios to estimate the total contribution of star-forming galaxies to the ionizing background and the hydrogen photoionization rate in the IGM, finding values larger than, but consistent with, those measured in the Ly{alpha} forest. Finally, the measured UV to LyC flux-density ratios imply model-dependent LyC escape fractions of f {sup LyC} {sub esc} {approx} 5%-7% for our LBG sample and f {sup LyC} {sub esc} {approx} 10%-30% for our fainter LAE sample.

  15. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    improved techniques and discoveries in quantum mechanics steadily reduced the uncertainty of h. The central part of this review describes the technical details of the watt balance technique, which is a combination of the mechanical and electronic measurements that now determine h as a direct result, i.e. not requiring measured values of additional fundamental constants. The first technical section describes the basics and some of the common details of many watt balance designs. Next is a review of the ongoing advances at the (currently) seven national metrology institutions where these experiments are pursued. A final summary of the recent h determinations of the last two decades shows how history keeps repeating itself; there is again a question of whether there is a shift in the newest results, albeit at uncertainties that are many orders of magnitude less than the original experiments. The conclusion is that there is room for further development to resolve these differences and find new ideas for a watt balance system with a more universal application. Since the next generation of watt balance experiments are expected to become kilogram realization standards, the historical record suggests that there is yet a need for proof that Planck constant results are finally reproducible at an acceptable uncertainty. PMID:23249618

  16. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    techniques and discoveries in quantum mechanics steadily reduced the uncertainty of h. The central part of this review describes the technical details of the watt balance technique, which is a combination of the mechanical and electronic measurements that now determine h as a direct result, i.e. not requiring measured values of additional fundamental constants. The first technical section describes the basics and some of the common details of many watt balance designs. Next is a review of the ongoing advances at the (currently) seven national metrology institutions where these experiments are pursued. A final summary of the recent h determinations of the last two decades shows how history keeps repeating itself; there is again a question of whether there is a shift in the newest results, albeit at uncertainties that are many orders of magnitude less than the original experiments. The conclusion is that there is room for further development to resolve these differences and find new ideas for a watt balance system with a more universal application. Since the next generation of watt balance experiments are expected to become kilogram realization standards, the historical record suggests that there is yet a need for proof that Planck constant results are finally reproducible at an acceptable uncertainty.

  17. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    improved techniques and discoveries in quantum mechanics steadily reduced the uncertainty of h. The central part of this review describes the technical details of the watt balance technique, which is a combination of the mechanical and electronic measurements that now determine h as a direct result, i.e. not requiring measured values of additional fundamental constants. The first technical section describes the basics and some of the common details of many watt balance designs. Next is a review of the ongoing advances at the (currently) seven national metrology institutions where these experiments are pursued. A final summary of the recent h determinations of the last two decades shows how history keeps repeating itself; there is again a question of whether there is a shift in the newest results, albeit at uncertainties that are many orders of magnitude less than the original experiments. The conclusion is that there is room for further development to resolve these differences and find new ideas for a watt balance system with a more universal application. Since the next generation of watt balance experiments are expected to become kilogram realization standards, the historical record suggests that there is yet a need for proof that Planck constant results are finally reproducible at an acceptable uncertainty. (review article)

  18. Localized (super)gravity and cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider localization of gravity in domain wall solutions of Einstein's gravity coupled to a scalar field with a generic potential. We discuss conditions on the scalar potential such that domain wall solutions are non-singular. Such solutions even exist for appropriate potentials which have no minima at all and are unbounded below. Domain walls of this type have infinite tension, while usual kink type of solutions interpolating between two AdS minima have finite tension. In the latter case the cosmological constant on the domain wall is necessarily vanishing, while in the former case it can be zero or negative. Positive cosmological constant is allowed for singular domain walls. We discuss non-trivial conditions for physically allowed singularities arising from the requirement that truncating the space at the singularities be consistent. Non-singular domain walls with infinite tension might a priori avoid recent 'no-go' theorems indicating impossibility of supersymmetric embedding of kink type of domain walls in gauged supergravity. We argue that (non-singular) domain walls are stable even if they have infinite tension. This is essentially due to the fact that localization of gravity in smooth domain walls is a Higgs mechanism corresponding to a spontaneous breakdown of translational invariance. As to discontinuous domain walls arising in the presence of δ-function 'brane' sources, they explicitly break translational invariance. Such solutions cannot therefore be thought of as limits of smooth domain walls. We point out that if the scalar potential has no minima and approaches finite negative values at infinity, then higher derivative terms are under control, and do not affect the cosmological constant which is vanishing for such backgrounds. Nonetheless, we also point out that higher curvature terms generically delocalize gravity, so that the desired lower-dimensional Newton's law is no longer reproduced

  19. Elucidation of constant current density molecular plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of thin layers by means of constant current or constant voltage electrolysis in organic media is commonly known as molecular plating. Despite the fact that this method has been applied for decades and is known to be among the most efficient ones for obtaining quantitative deposition, a full elucidation of the molecular plating is still lacking. In order to get a general understanding of the process and hence set the basis for further improvements of the method, constant current density electrolysis experiments were carried out in a mixture of isopropanol and isobutanol containing millimolar amounts of HNO3 together with [Nd(NO3)3·6H2O] used as a model electrolyte. The process was investigated by considering the influence of different parameters, namely the electrolyte concentrations (i.e., Nd(NO3)3·6H2O: 0.11, 0.22, 0.44 mM, and HNO3: 0.3, 0.4 mM), the applied current (i.e., 2 mA and 6 mA), and the surface roughness of the deposition substrates (i.e., a few tens to several hundreds of nm). The response of the process to changes of these parameters was monitored recording cell potential curves, which showed to be strongly influenced by the investigated conditions. The produced layers were characterized using γ-ray spectroscopy for the evaluation of Nd deposition yields, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for chemical analysis of the surfaces, and atomic force microscopy for surface roughness evaluation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results clearly indicate that Nd is present only as Nd3+ on the cathodic surface after molecular plating. The results obtained from this characterization and some basic features inferred from the study of the cell potential curves were used to interpret the different behaviours of the deposition processes as a consequence of the applied variables.

  20. PET physiological measurements using constant infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide range of study designs can be used with positron emission tomography methods to provide quantitative measurements of physiological parameters. While bolus injection of tracer is the conventional approach, use of combined bolus plus constant infusion provides a number of advantages for receptor-binding tracers. Of recent interest is the use of this approach to dynamically follow the displacement of tracer during in vivo changes in neurotransmitter concentrations. This paper provides an overview of the tradeoffs in using bolus/infusion methods versus conventional bolus injection for receptor binding studies

  1. Bouncing Anisotropic Universes with Varying Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D

    2013-01-01

    We examine the evolution of a closed, homogeneous and anisotropic cosmology subject to a variation of the fine structure 'constant', \\alpha, within the context of the theory introduced by Bekenstein, Sandvik, Barrow and Magueijo, which generalises Maxwell's equations and general relativity. The variation of \\alpha permits an effective ghost scalar field, whose negative energy density becomes dominant at small length scales, leading to a bouncing cosmology. A thermodynamically motivated coupling which describes energy exchange between the effective ghost field and the radiation field leads to an expanding, isotropizing sequence of bounces. In the absence of entropy production we also find solutions with stable anisotropic oscillations around a static universe.

  2. Scalar field collapse with negative cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, R.; Nishimura, H.; Stricker, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    The formation of black holes or naked singularities is studied in a model in which a homogeneous time-dependent scalar field with an exponential potential couples to four-dimensional gravity with negative cosmological constant. An analytic solution is derived and its consequences are discussed. The model depends only on one free parameter, which determines the equation of state and decides the fate of the spacetime. Without fine tuning the value of this parameter the collapse ends in a generic formation of a black hole or a naked singularity. The latter case violates the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  3. Scalar field collapse with negative cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Baier, R; Stricker, S A

    2014-01-01

    The formation of black holes or naked singularities is studied in a model in which a homogeneous time-dependent scalar field with an exponential potential couples to four dimensional gravity with negative cosmological constant. An analytic solution is derived and its consequences are discussed. The model depends only on one free parameter which determines the equation of state and decides the fate of the spacetime. Depending on the value of this parameter the collapse ends in a black hole or a naked singularity. The latter case violates the cosmic censorship conjecture.

  4. Standard-model coupling constants from compositeness

    CERN Document Server

    Besprosvany, J

    2003-01-01

    A coupling-constant definition is given based on the compositeness property of some particle states with respect to the elementary states of other particles. It is applied in the context of the vector-spin-1/2-particle interaction vertices of a field theory, and the standard model. The definition reproduces Weinberg's angle in a grand-unified theory. One obtains coupling values close to the experimental ones for appropriate configurations of the standard-model vector particles, at the unification scale within grand-unified models, and at the electroweak breaking scale.

  5. TASI Lectures on the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael

    2007-08-30

    The energy density of the vacuum, Lambda, is at least 60 orders of magnitude smaller than several known contributions to it. Approaches to this problem are tightly constrained by data ranging from elementary observations to precision experiments. Absent overwhelming evidence to the contrary, dark energy can only be interpreted as vacuum energy, so the venerable assumption that Lambda=0 conflicts with observation. The possibility remains that Lambda is fundamentally variable, though constant over large spacetime regions. This can explain the observed value, but only in a theory satisfying a number of restrictive kinematic and dynamical conditions. String theory offers a concrete realization through its landscape of metastable vacua.

  6. Fine Structure Constant: Theme With Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Bezerra, V B; Muniz, C R; Tahim, M O; Vieira, H S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study the spatial variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ due to the presence of a static and spherically symmetric gravitational source. The procedure consists of calculating the solution including the energy eigenvalues of a massive scalar field around that source, considering the weak-field regimen, which yields the gravitational analog of the atomic Bohr levels. From this result, we obtain several values for the effective $\\alpha$ by considering some scenarios of semi-classical and quantum gravities. Constraints on the parameters of the involved theories are calculated from astrophysical observations of the white dwarf emission spectra. Such constraints are compared with those ones obtained in the literature.

  7. Intrinsic Redshifts and the Hubble Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, M. B.; Comeau, S. P.

    2003-01-01

    We show that the V_CMB velocities of the Fundamental Plane (FP) clusters studied in the Hubble Key Project appear to contain the same discrete "velocities" found previously by us and by Tifft to be present in normal galaxies. Although there is a particular Hubble constant associated with our findings we make no claim that its accuracy is better than that found by the Hubble Key Project. We do conclude, however, that if intrinsic redshifts are present and are not taken into account, the Hubble...

  8. Quilted Floer trajectories with constant components

    CERN Document Server

    Wehrheim, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    We fill a gap in the proof of the transversality result for quilted Floer trajectories in arXiv:0905.1370 by addressing trajectories for which some but not all components are constant. Namely we show that for generic sets of split Hamiltonian perturbations and split almost complex structures, the moduli spaces of parametrized quilted Floer trajectories of a given index are smooth of expected dimension. An additional benefit of the generic split Hamiltonian perturbations is that they perturb the given cyclic Lagrangian correspondence such that any geometric composition of its factors is transverse and hence immersed.

  9. Timelike Constant Mean Curvature Surfaces with Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Brander, David

    2011-01-01

    We use integrable systems techniques to study the singularities of timelike non-minimal constant mean curvature (CMC) surfaces in the Lorentz-Minkowski 3-space. The singularities arise at the boundary of the Birkhoff big cell of the loop group involved. We examine the behaviour of the surfaces at the big cell boundary, generalize the definition of CMC surfaces to include those with finite, generic singularities, and show how to construct surfaces with prescribed singularities by solving a singular geometric Cauchy problem. The solution shows that the generic singularities of the generalized surfaces are cuspidal edges, swallowtails and cuspidal cross caps.

  10. The Fine Structure Constant and Habitable Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Sandora, McCullen

    2016-01-01

    We use the existence of habitable planets to impose anthropic requirements on the fine structure constant, $\\alpha$. To this effect, we present two considerations that restrict its value to be very near the one observed. The first, that the end product of stellar fusion is iron and not one of its neighboring elements, restricts $\\alpha^{-1}$ to be $145\\pm 50$. The second, that radiogenic heat in the Earth's interior remains adequately productive for billions of years, restricts it to be $145\\pm9$. A connection with the grand unified theory window is discussed, effectively providing a route to probe ultra-high energy physics with upcoming advances in planetary science.

  11. Rugged constant-temperature thermal anemometer

    CERN Document Server

    Palma, J

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a robust thermal anemometer which can be easily built. It was conceived to measure outdoor wind speeds, and for airspeed monitoring in wind tunnels and other indoor uses. It works at a constant, low temperature of approximately 90$^\\circ$C, so that an independent measurement of the air temperature is required to give a correct speed reading. Despite the size and high thermal inertia of the probe, the test results show that this anemometer is capable of measuring turbulent fluctuations up to ~100 Hz in winds of ~14 m/s, which corresponds to a scale similar to the length of the probe.

  12. Radiation balances and the solar constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crommelynck, D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiometric concepts are defined in order to consider various types of radiation balances and relate them to the diabetic form of the energy balance. Variability in space and time of the components of the radiation field are presented. A specific concept for sweeping which is tailored to the requirements is proposed. Finally, after establishing the truncated character of the present knowledge of the radiation balance. The results of the last observations of the solar constant are given. Ground and satellite measurement techniques are discussed.

  13. Penning-trap mass spectrometry of highly charged, neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes in the vicinity of $A\\approx100$

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, V V; Chowdhury, U; Eberhardt, B; Ettenauer, S; Gallant, A T; Mané, E; Simon, M C; Delheij, P; Pearson, M R; Audi, G; Gwinner, G; Lunney, D; Schatz, H; Dilling, J

    2012-01-01

    The neutron-rich mass region around $A\\approx100$ presents challenges for modeling the astrophysical $r$-process because of rapid shape transitions. We report on mass measurements using the TITAN Penning trap at TRIUMF-ISAC to attain more reliable theoretical predictions of $r$-process nucleosynthesis paths in this region. A new approach using highly charged ($q=15+$) ions has been applied which considerably saves measurement time and preserves accuracy. New mass measurements of neutron-rich $^{94,97,98}$Rb and $^{94,97-99}$Sr have uncertainties of less than 4 keV and show deviations of up to 11$\\sigma$ to previous measurements. An analysis using a parameterized $r$-process model is performed and shows that mass uncertainties for the A=90 abundance region are eliminated.

  14. Irradiation creep and void swelling of two LMR heat of HT9 at {approx}400{degrees}C and 165 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toloczko, M.B. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Two nominally identical heats of HT9 ferritic-martensitic steel were produced, fabricated into pressurized tubes, and then irradiated in FFTF, using identical procedures. After reaching 165 dpa at {approx}400C, small differences in strains associated with both phase-related change in lattice parameter and void swelling were observed in comparing the two heats. The creep strains, while different, exhibited the same functional relationship to the swelling behavior. The derived creep coefficients, the one associated with creep in the absence of swelling and the one directly responsive to swelling, were essentially identical for the two heats. Even more significantly, the creep coefficients for this bcc ferritic-martensitic steel appear to be very similar and possibly identical to those routinely derived from creep experiments on fcc austenitic steels.

  15. Studies on Simulation and Application of Characteristics of Constant Phase Element and in Dye-sensitized Solar Cells%染料敏化太阳电池中常相角元件特性模拟及应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伟庆; 周明; 梁忠冠

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy ( EIS) may be used to study the internal impedance information of dye-sensitized solar cells( DSC) in the range of wide frequency. There is capacitance dispersion effect due to the roughness and inhomogeneity of main contact interfaces in DSC. A constant phase element( CPE)is an equivalent electrical circuit component that models the behavior of an imperfect capacitance. This paper simulates and analyzes the frequency response characteristic of CPE with several different indexes. The effect of CPE index on impedance of RC circuit and the conversion between CPE and a pure capacitance are studied. CPE and capacitance are used respectively in three distinct frequency ranges to fit EIS spectrum through experiments. The application of CPE in the interfacial electron transfer process and extraction of kinetic parameters are analysed. The results show that the CPE index deter-mines the element performance and it is more suitable to use a CPE instead of a pure capacitance for constructing EIS equivalent circuits, DSC internal electron transfer kinetic constants can be obtained by using CPE after a simple calculation.%电化学阻抗谱(EIS)可在宽频率范围内研究染料敏化太阳电池(DSC)内部阻抗信息.由于DSC内部主要接触界面的电容存在弥散效应,所以采用常相角元件(CPE)代替电容构建等效电路来解析EIS谱.通过模拟和分析CPE在不同指数变化下的频率响应特性,研究了CPE指数对与等效电阻并联的RC电路阻抗特性影响以及电容与CPE的换算.通过实验,在3个频率区间分别利用CPE和电容对DSC的EIS谱进行拟合,分析了CPE在DSC接触界面电子转移过程和动力学常数提取中的应用.结果表明,CPE指数决定了元件的性能,采用CPE代替电容更加适合构建DSC等效电路,经过计算即可利用CPE获得DSC内部电子界面转移动力学常数.

  16. ULTRA-DEEP HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD: THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF STARS WITH M {approx}< 1 M {sub Sun}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Anderson, Jay; Dotter, Aaron; Reid, I. Neill [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Richer, Harvey B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Fahlman, Gregory G. [National Research Council, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Victoria, BC (Canada); Hansen, Brad M. S.; Rich, R. Michael [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Hurley, Jarrod [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn VIC 3122 (Australia); Shara, Michael M., E-mail: jkalirai@stsci.edu, E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu, E-mail: dotter@stsci.edu, E-mail: richer@astro.ubc.ca, E-mail: greg.fahlman@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: rmr@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: jhurley@swin.edu.au, E-mail: mshara@amnh.org [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We present a new measurement of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) based on ultra-deep, high-resolution photometry of >5000 stars in the outskirts of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) galaxy. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys observations reveal this rich, cospatial population behind the foreground globular cluster 47 Tuc, which we targeted for 121 HST orbits. The stellar main sequence of the SMC is measured in the F606W, F814W color-magnitude diagram down to {approx}30th magnitude, and is cleanly separated from the foreground star cluster population using proper motions. We simulate the SMC population by extracting stellar masses (single and unresolved binaries) from specific IMFs and converting those masses to luminosities in our bandpasses. The corresponding photometry for these simulated stars is drawn directly from a rich cloud of 4 million artificial stars, thereby accounting for the real photometric scatter and completeness of the data. Over a continuous and well-populated mass range of M = 0.37-0.93 M {sub Sun} (e.g., down to a {approx}75% completeness limit at F606W = 28.7), we demonstrate that the IMF is well represented by a single power-law form with slope {alpha} = -1.90 ({sup +0.15} {sub -0.10}) (3{sigma} error) (e.g., dN/dM{proportional_to} M {sup {alpha}}). This is shallower than the Salpeter slope of {alpha} = -2.35, which agrees with the observed stellar luminosity function at higher masses. Our results indicate that the IMF does not turn over to a more shallow power-law form within this mass range. We discuss implications of this result for the theory of star formation, the inferred masses of galaxies, and the (lack of a) variation of the IMF with metallicity.

  17. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies With Relatively Old Stellar Populations at z Approx. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tease, Katherine Whitaker; vanDokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijin; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F.; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at z approx. 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H (4861 ),we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band (4304 ),Mgi (5175 ), and Na i (5894 ). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was approx. 3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3+0.10.3 Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80 of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6+0.50.4 Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9+0.20.1 Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O iii] and H emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with LOiii = 1.7+/- 0.3 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  18. QUIESCENT GALAXIES IN THE 3D-HST SURVEY: SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF A LARGE NUMBER OF GALAXIES WITH RELATIVELY OLD STELLAR POPULATIONS AT z {approx} 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, Katherine E. [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind; Nelson, Erica J. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Kriek, Mariska [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lundgren, Britt F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Rix, Hans-Walter, E-mail: kate.whitaker@nasa.gov [Max Planck Institut fur Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    Quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H{beta} ({lambda}4861 A), we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band ({lambda}4304 A), Mg I ({lambda}5175 A), and Na I ({lambda}5894 A). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was {approx}3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3{sup +0.1}{sub -0.3} Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80% of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6{sup +0.5}{sub -0.4} Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O III] and H{beta} emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with L{sub OIII}=1.7{+-}0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  19. Hyperscaling violation and the shear diffusion constant

    CERN Document Server

    Kolekar, Kedar S; Narayan, K

    2016-01-01

    We consider holographic theories in bulk $(d+1)$-dimensions with Lifshitz and hyperscaling violating exponents $z,\\theta$ at finite temperature. By studying shear gravitational modes in the near-horizon region given certain self-consistent approximations, we obtain the corresponding shear diffusion constant on an appropriately defined stretched horizon, adapting the analysis of Kovtun, Son and Starinets. For generic exponents with $d-z-\\theta>-1$, we find that the diffusion constant has power law scaling with the temperature, motivating us to guess a universal relation for the viscosity bound. When the exponents satisfy $d-z-\\theta=-1$, we find logarithmic behaviour. This relation is equivalent to $z=2+d_{eff}$ where $d_{eff}=d_i-\\theta$ is the effective boundary spatial dimension (and $d_i=d-1$ the actual spatial dimension). It is satisfied by the exponents in hyperscaling violating theories arising from null reductions of highly boosted black branes, and we comment on the corresponding analysis in that cont...

  20. Is cosmological constant needed in Higgs inflation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Chao-Jun, E-mail: fengcj@shnu.edu.cn [Shanghai United Center for Astrophysics (SUCA), Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Xin-Zhou, E-mail: kychz@shnu.edu.cn [Shanghai United Center for Astrophysics (SUCA), Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2014-11-10

    The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of r, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts r≈0.2, n{sub s}≈0.96 with e-folds number N≈56, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly Λ∼(10{sup 14} GeV){sup 2}, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.

  1. Dynamical Vacuum against a rigid Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Sola, Joan; Gomez-Valent, Adria; Nunes, Rafael C

    2016-01-01

    When we are approaching the centenary of the introduction of the cosmological constant $\\Lambda$ by Einstein in his gravitational field equations, and after about two decades of the first observational papers confirming the existence of a non-vanishing, positive, $\\Lambda$ as the most likely explanation for the observed acceleration of the Universe, we are still facing the question whether $\\Lambda$ is truly a fundamental constant of Nature or a mildly evolving dynamical variable. In this work we compare three types of cosmological scenarios involving dynamical vacuum energy in interaction with matter. By performing an overall fit to the cosmological observables $SNIa+BAO+H(z)+LSS+CMB$, we find that the dynamical $\\Lambda$ models are significantly more favored than the $\\Lambda$CDM, suggesting that a rigid $\\Lambda$-term is excluded at $\\sim 3\\sigma$ c.l. This conclusion is strongly supported by Akaike and Bayesian information criteria which render more than 10 points of difference in favor of the dynamical v...

  2. Ventricular fibrillation time constant for swine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strength–duration curve for cardiac excitation can be modeled by a parallel resistor–capacitor circuit that has a time constant. Experiments on six pigs were performed by delivering current from the X26 Taser dart at a distance from the heart to cause ventricular fibrillation (VF). The X26 Taser is an electromuscular incapacitation device (EMD), which generates about 50 kV and delivers a pulse train of about 15–19 pulses s−1 with a pulse duration of about 150 µs and peak current about 2 A. Similarly a continuous 60 Hz alternating current of the amplitude required to cause VF was delivered from the same distance. The average current and duration of the current pulse were estimated in both sets of experiments. The strength–duration equation was solved to yield an average time constant of 2.87 ms ± 1.90 (SD). Results obtained may help in the development of safety standards for future electromuscular incapacitation devices (EMDs) without requiring additional animal tests

  3. Is cosmological constant needed in Higgs inflation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Jun Feng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The detection of B-mode shows a very powerful constraint to theoretical inflation models through the measurement of the tensor-to-scalar ratio r. Higgs boson is the most likely candidate of the inflaton field. But usually, Higgs inflation models predict a small value of r, which is not quite consistent with the recent results from BICEP2. In this paper, we explored whether a cosmological constant energy component is needed to improve the situation. And we found the answer is yes. For the so-called Higgs chaotic inflation model with a quadratic potential, it predicts r≈0.2, ns≈0.96 with e-folds number N≈56, which is large enough to overcome the problems such as the horizon problem in the Big Bang cosmology. The required energy scale of the cosmological constant is roughly Λ∼(1014 GeV2, which means a mechanism is still needed to solve the fine-tuning problem in the later time evolution of the universe, e.g. by introducing some dark energy component.

  4. In-medium pion weak decay constants

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, H

    2002-01-01

    In nuclear matter, the pion weak decay constant is separated into the two components $f^t, f^s$ corresponding to the time and space components of the axial-vector current. Using QCD sum rules, we compute the two decay constants from the pseudoscalar-axial vector correlation function in the matter $i \\int d^4x~ e^{ip\\cdot x} $. It is found that the sum rule for $f^t$ satisfies the in-medium Gell-Mann$-$Oakes$-$Renner (GOR) relation precisely while the $f^s$ sum rule does not. The $f^s$ sum rule contains the nonnegligible contribution from the dimension 5 condensate $_N + {1\\over 8} _N$ in addition to the in-medium quark condensate. Using standard set of QCD parameters and ignoring the in-medium change of the pion mass, we obtain $f^t =105$ MeV at the nuclear saturation density. The prediction for $f^s$ depends on values of the dimension 5 condensate and slightly on the Borel mass. However, the OPE constrains that $f^s/f^t \\ge 1 $, which does not agree with the prediction from the in-medium chiral perturbation ...

  5. Do Wormholes Fix the Coupling Constants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2004-05-01

    If Newtonian gravitation is modified to use surface-to-surface separation between particles, it can have the strength of nuclear force between nucleons. This may be justified by possible existence of quantum wormholes in particles. All gravitational interactions would be between coupled wormholes, emitting 1/r graviton flux from their exit mouths as a function of the particle size, allowing the point-like treatment above. When the wormhole exit mouths are 1 Planck length apart, the resultant force is the known strong force coupling constant with an order of magnitude of 40 compared to the normal gravitational strength for nucleons. In addition to being mathematically simple, the above finding is consistent with observations of other coupling constants, Feynman's speculation of "transfusion" of two particles into spin 2 gravitons (published in 1962), Hawking radiation, big-bang theory abundance of quantum wormholes, wormhole theory fine-tuned by Kip S. Thorne and Matt Visser, and recent microscopic gravity measurements. It potentially leads to the holographic principle being promoted by Dr. G. t' Hooft, by naturally pointing out that the mass of the particles is proportional to their diameter squared.

  6. THE GASEOUS ENVIRONMENT OF HIGH-z GALAXIES: PRECISION MEASUREMENTS OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM OF z {approx} 2-3 GALAXIES IN THE KECK BARYONIC STRUCTURE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudie, Gwen C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Trainor, Ryan F. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rakic, Olivera [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bogosavljevic, Milan [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Pettini, Max [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Reddy, Naveen [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Shapley, Alice E. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (United States); Erb, Dawn K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Law, David R., E-mail: gwen@astro.caltech.edu [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto M5S 3H4, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    We present results from the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS), a unique spectroscopic survey of the distant universe designed to explore the details of the connection between galaxies and intergalactic baryons within the same survey volumes, focusing particularly on scales from {approx}50 kpc to a few Mpc. The KBSS is optimized for the redshift range z {approx} 2-3, combining S/N {approx}100 Keck/HIRES spectra of 15 of the brightest QSOs in the sky at z {approx_equal} 2.5-2.9 with very densely sampled galaxy redshift surveys within a few arcmin of each QSO sightline. In this paper, we present quantitative results on the distribution, column density, kinematics, and absorber line widths of neutral hydrogen (H I) surrounding a subset of 886 KBSS star-forming galaxies with 2.0 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.8 and with projected distances {<=}3 physical Mpc from a QSO sightline. Using Voigt profile decompositions of the full Ly{alpha} forest region of all 15 QSO spectra, we compiled a catalog of {approx}6000 individual absorbers in the redshift range of interest, with 12 {<=} log (N{sub HI}) {<=}21. These are used to measure H I absorption statistics near the redshifts of foreground galaxies as a function of projected galactocentric distance from the QSO sightline and for randomly chosen locations in the intergalactic medium (IGM) within the survey volume. We find that N{sub HI} and the multiplicity of velocity-associated H I components increase rapidly with decreasing galactocentric impact parameter and as the systemic redshift of the galaxy is approached. The strongest H I absorbers within {approx_equal} 100 physical kpc of galaxies have N{sub HI} {approx}3 orders of magnitude higher than those near random locations in the IGM. The circumgalactic zone of most significantly enhanced H I absorption is found within transverse distances of {approx}< 300 kpc and within {+-}300 km s{sup -1} of galaxy systemic redshifts. Taking this region as the defining bounds of the

  7. PREFACE: Fundamental Constants in Physics and Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klose, Volkmar; Kramer, Bernhard

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the 70th PTB Seminar which, the second on the subject "Fundamental Constants in Physics and Metrology", was held at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig from October 21 to 22, 1985. About 100 participants from the universities and various research institutes of the Federal Republic of Germany participated in the meeting. Besides a number of review lectures on various broader subjects there was a poster session which contained a variety of topical contributed papers ranging from the theory of the quantum Hall effect to reports on the status of the metrological experiments at the PTB. In addition, the participants were also offered the possibility to visit the PTB laboratories during the course of the seminar. During the preparation of the meeting we noticed that even most of the general subjects which were going to be discussed in the lectures are of great importance in connection with metrological experiments and should be made accessible to the scientific community. This eventually resulted in the idea of the publication of the papers in a regular journal. We are grateful to the editor of Metrologia for providing this opportunity. We have included quite a number of papers from basic physical research. For example, certain aspects of high-energy physics and quantum optics, as well as the many-faceted role of Sommerfeld's fine-structure constant, are covered. We think that questions such as "What are the intrinsic fundamental parameters of nature?" or "What are we doing when we perform an experiment?" can shed new light on the art of metrology, and do, potentially, lead to new ideas. This appears to be especially necessary when we notice the increasing importance of the role of the fundamental constants and macroscopic quantum effects for the definition and the realization of the physical units. In some cases we have reached a point where the limitations of our knowledge of a fundamental constant and

  8. Long-range carbon-proton spin-spin coupling constants in conformational analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author has collected a reliable set of data on long range 13C-1H coupling constants in aliphatic compounds and developed the use of long range 13C-1H coupling constants as a tool in the conformational analysis of aliphatic compounds. An empirical determination of the torsion angle dependence of the vicinal 13C-1H coupling constant for model compounds is described and the dependence of long range 13C-1H coupling constants on the electronegativity of substituents attached to the coupling pathway reported for the monohalogen substituted ethanes and propanes. The electronegativity dependence of the vicinal 13C-1H coupling was studied in monosubstituted propanes whose substituents are elements from the first row of the periodic table and it is shown that the vicinal 13C-1H coupling constant in aliphatic systems is a constitutive property. The geminal 13C-1H coupling constants in ethyl, isopropyl and tert-butyl compounds, which have been substituted by an element of the first row of the periodic table or a haline atom, are reported and the influence of electronegative substituents on the vicinal 13C-1H coupling constants in the individual rotamers of 13CH3-C(X)H-C(Y)H-1H fragments discussed. The application of long range 13C-1H coupling constants to the conformational analysis of CMP-N-Acetylneuraminic acid and 2,6-dichloro-1,4-oxathiane is described. (Auth.)

  9. Fusion applications study: FAME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    Fusion has a wide spectrum of applications that appear technically possible and may become economically feasible. Near-term (approx. 2000) application for production of nuclear fuels and useful radioisotopes is an economically attractive possibility as soon as fusion is ready. Electricity production will remain a prime, large-scale application of fusion. In the longer term, as fossil fuels dwindle, production of hydrogen could become a major application. Additional applications some of which have not even been conceived of yet, will add to this potential richness and diversity of fusion. It is the purpose of the fusion applications study - FMAE - to innovate, investigate, and evaluate these potential applications.

  10. Garbage-free reversible constant multipliers for arbitrary integers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Torben Ægidius

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for constructing reversible circuitry for multiplying integers by arbitrary integer constants. The method is based on Mealy machines and gives circuits whose size are (in the worst case) linear in the size of the constant. This makes the method unsuitable for large constants, ......, but gives quite compact circuits for small constants. The circuits use no garbage or ancillary lines....

  11. Dielectric constant dependence of formation constants: complexation of dioxovanadium(V) with methionine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of dioxovanadium(V) with methionine was studied by spectrophotometric titration in mixed solvent systems of methanol + water and dioxane + water at 25 Deg C and constant ionic strength 0.15 mol dm-3 NaClO4 in the pH range 1.5 - 8, with high ligand of metal ratios. Two mononuclear complexes ML and ML2 have been characterized for the ligands. The stability constants of the complexes formed and their stoichiometry are given and interpreted. Linear relationships are observed when log β is plotted versus 1/D, where β and D represent formation and dielectric constants, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of the effect of solvent protonation and complexation

  12. A new approach for constraining the Hubble constant from proper motions of radio jets

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, B; Britzen, S; Gawronski, M P; Lew, Bartosz; Roukema, Boudewijn F.; Britzen, Silke; Gawronski, Marcin P.

    2005-01-01

    A new method for constraining the Hubble constant, based on proper motions and Inverse Compton Doppler factors of superluminally expanding jets, is presented. This approach relies on statistical Monte-Carlo simulations of the most probable viewing angle (\\theta) and the relativistic velocity of particles in a jet (\\beta). According to recent constraints on the density parameters \\Omega_m = 0.27 and \\Omega_\\Lambda = 0.73, a flat cosmological model is assumed. The value of the current Hubble constant is derived on basis of a sample of 234 jets from the VLBI CJF (Caltech-Jodrell Bank Flat-Spectrum) catalog of flat spectrum radio sources (Britzen et al. 2005c). Additional consistency checks have also been performed on specifically selected subsamples from the CJF catalog. We derive the probability distribution function of \\beta (\\phi_\\beta) in order to derive a constraint on the most common velocity value of particles in jets in the sample, \\beta_fit \\approx 0.987. Using a Monte-Carlo method over various hypothes...

  13. Explicit curvature dependence of coupling constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider a renormalizable quantum field theory, such as a grand unified theory, in a general curved spacetime. We use a new partially summed form of the proper-time or heat-kernel expansion of the propagator to obtain curvature-dependent logarithmic terms in the effective action. We demonstrate the connection between these terms and the renormalization group. The explicit form of the logarithmic curvature dependence permits us to obtain the modified gravitational field equations. The logarithmic terms are of importance for dynamical models of the early universe, including inflationary models. These terms are also of interest at the present time. We use them, together with the observed upper limit on the present value of the cosmological constant, to place an upper limit on the masses of the heaviest particles in renormalizable field theories. This upper limit is of the order of 1019 GeV for Higgs bosons in minimal SU(5) theory

  14. Eternal Higgs inflation and cosmological constant problem

    CERN Document Server

    Hamada, Yuta; Oda, Kin-ya

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the Higgs potential beyond the Planck scale in the superstring theory, under the assumption that the supersymmetry is broken at the string scale. We identify the Higgs field as a massless state of the string, which is indicated by the fact that the bare Higgs mass can be zero around the string scale. We find that, in the large field region, the Higgs potential is connected to a runaway vacuum with vanishing energy, which corresponds to opening up an extra dimension. We verify that such universal behavior indeed follows from the toroidal compactification of the non-supersymmetric $SO(16)\\times SO(16)$ heterotic string theory. We show that this behavior fits in the picture that the Higgs field is the source of the eternal inflation. The observed small value of the cosmological constant of our universe may be understood as the degeneracy with this runaway vacuum, which has vanishing energy, as is suggested by the multiple point criticality principle.

  15. More on Lensing by a Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Ishak, Mustapha; Dossett, Jason

    2008-01-01

    The question of whether or not the cosmological constant affects the bending of light around a concentrated mass has been the subject of some recent papers. We present here a simple, specific and transparent example where $\\Lambda$ bending clearly takes place, and where it is clearly neither a coordinate effect nor an aberration effect, as has been claimed in some of these papers. We then show that in some recent works using perturbation theory the $\\Lambda$ contribution was missed because of initial too-stringent smallness assumptions. Namely: Our method has been to insert a Kottler (Schwarzschild with $\\Lambda$) vacuole into a Friedman universe, and to calculate the total bending within the vacuole. We assume that no more bending occurs outside. It is important to observe that while the mass contribution to the bending takes place mainly quite near the lens, the $\\Lambda$ bending continues throughout the vacuole. Thus if one deliberately restricts one's search for $\\Lambda$ bending to the immediate neighbor...

  16. Fine structure constant variation or spacetime anisotropy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations on the quasar absorption spectra supply evidence for the variation of the fine structure constant α. In this paper, we propose another interpretation of the observational data on the quasar absorption spectra: a scenario with spacetime inhomogeneity and anisotropy. Maybe the spacetime is characterized by the Finsler geometry instead of the Riemann one. The Finsler geometry admits fewer symmetries than the Riemann geometry does. We investigate the Finslerian geodesic equations in the Randers spacetime (a special Finsler spacetime). It is found that the cosmological redshift in this spacetime deviates from the one in general relativity. The modification term to the redshift could be generally revealed as a monopole plus dipole function of spacetime locations and directions. We suggest that this modification corresponds to the spatial monopole and dipole of α variation in the quasar absorption spectra. (orig.)

  17. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Zhang, Kaituo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, $\\Lambda = \\sigma H + \\Lambda_0$, in which the $\\Lambda$CDM limit is recovered by taking $\\sigma=0$. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann-Lema\\"itre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that $\\sigma H_0/ \\Lambda_0 \\lesssim 2.63 \\times 10^{-2}$ and $6.74 \\times 10^{-2}$ for $\\Lambda(t)$ coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  18. Hawking temperature of constant curvature black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The constant curvature (CC) black holes are higher dimensional generalizations of Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes. It is known that these black holes have the unusual topology of MD-1xS1, where D is the spacetime dimension and MD-1 stands for a conformal Minkowski spacetime in D-1 dimensions. The unusual topology and time-dependence for the exterior of these black holes cause some difficulties to derive their thermodynamic quantities. In this work, by using a globally embedding approach, we obtain the Hawking temperature of the CC black holes. We find that the Hawking temperature takes the same form when using both the static and global coordinates. Also, it is identical to the Gibbons-Hawking temperature of the boundary de Sitter spaces of these CC black holes.

  19. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ronald E.; Tadmor, Ellad B.; Gibson, Joshua S.; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  20. String Phenomenology and the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    de Alwis, S P

    2007-01-01

    It is argued that classical string solutions should not be fine tuned to have a positive cosmological constant (CC) at the observed size, since even the quantum corrections from standard model effects will completely negate any classical string theory solution with such a CC. In fact it is even possible that there is no need at all for any ad hoc uplifting term in the potential since these quantum effects may well take care of this. Correspondingly any calculation of the parameters of the MSSM has to be rethought to take into account the evolution of the CC. This considerably complicates the issue since the initial conditions for RG evolution of these parameters are determined by the final condition on the CC! The Anthropic Principle is of no help in addressing these issues.

  1. Explosive helium burning at constant pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M.-A.; Hanawa, T.; Sugimoto, D.

    The results of numerical calculations of nucleosynthesis under adiabatic conditions, i.e., when the only heat exchange with the external regions takes place through neutrinos, are reported. Attention is focused on explosive burning associated with shell flashes, assuming that nuclear energy is deposited in a mass element, followed by expansion and density decrease. Consideration is given to three cases, the shell flash near the surface of a degenerate star, to nuclear burning concentrated in a small region of a star, and to the heat energy being deposited in intermediate layers. A reaction network of 181 nuclear species was constructed and the thermodynamic evolution was calculated assuming constant pressure and adiabatic conditions. The final products of the reactions of H-1 to Cu-62 were projected to by O-16, Mg-24, Si-28, S-32, Ca-40, Ti-44, Cr-48, and Fe-52.

  2. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi; Zhang, Kaituo

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, Λ = σH +Λ0, in which the ΛCDM limit is recovered by taking σ = 0. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann-Lemaïtre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that σH0 /Λ0 ≲ 2.63 ×10-2 and 6.74 ×10-2 for Λ (t) coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  3. Black holes and the positive cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Sourav

    2013-01-01

    We address some aspects of black hole spacetimes endowed with a positive cosmological constant, i.e. black holes located inside a cosmological event horizon. First we establish a general criterion for existence of cosmological event horizons. Using the geometrical set up built for this, we study classical black hole no hair theorems for both static and stationary axisymmetric spacetimes. We discuss cosmic Nielsen-Olesen strings as hair in Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime. We also give a general calculation for particle creation by a Killing horizon using complex path analysis and using this we study particle creation in Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime by both black hole and the cosmological event horizons.

  4. Fast Fourier Transforms of Piecewise Constant Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorets, Eugene

    1995-02-01

    We present an algorithm for the evaluation of the Fourier transform of piecewise constant functions of two variables. The algorithm overcomes the accuracy problems associated with computing the Fourier transform of discontinuous functions; in fact, its time complexity is O (N2 logN + NP log2 (1/ε) + V log3 (1/ε)), where ε is the accuracy, N is the size of the problem, P is the perimeter of the set of discontinuities, and V is its number of vertices. The algorithm is based on the Lagrange interpolation formula and the Green's theorem, which are used to preprocess the data before applying the fast Fourier transform. It readily generalizes to higher dimensions and to piecewise smooth functions.

  5. Constant current electric motor drive for fan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, C.A.

    1988-03-23

    A motor for driving air through a replaceable filter to the face of a wearer of a protective helmet is supplied with power from a rechargeable battery pack through a current regulator which is controlled to tend to maintain the motor current constant in spite of variations in the battery voltage or the degree of clogging of the filter. The voltage across the motor, measured by resistors can be used as a measure of the degree of clogging of the filter to actuate an audible or visible alarm if the filter becomes too clogged. The voltage across the regulator measured by resistors can be used as a measure of the voltage of the battery to give a visible or audible warning if the battery charge gets too low. The two different warnings can be distinguishable from one another.

  6. Higgs inflation and the cosmological constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegerlehner, Fred [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    The Higgs not only induces the masses of all SM particles, the Higgs, given its special mass value, is the natural candidate for the inflaton and in fact is ruling the evolution of the early universe, by providing the necessary dark energy which remains the dominant energy density. SM running couplings not only allow us to extrapolate SM physics up to the Planck scale, but equally important they are triggering the Higgs mechanism. This is possible by the fact that the bare mass term in the Higgs potential changes sign at about μ{sub 0}≅1.40 x 10{sup 16} GeV and in the symmetric phase is enhanced by quadratic terms in the Planck mass. Such a huge Higgs mass term is able to play a key role in triggering inflation in the early universe. In this article we extend our previous investigation by working out the details of a Higgs inflation scenario. We show how different terms contributing to the Higgs Lagrangian are affecting inflation. Given the SM and its extrapolation to scales μ>μ{sub 0} we find a calculable cosmological constant V(0) which is weakly scale dependent and actually remains large during inflation. This is different to the Higgs fluctuation field dependent ΔV(φ), which decays exponentially during inflation, and actually would not provide a sufficient amount of inflation. The fluctuation field has a different effective mass which shifts the bare Higgs transition point to a lower value μ'{sub 0} ≅7.7 x 10{sup 14} GeV. The vacuum energy V(0) being proportional to M{sub Pl}{sup 4} has a coefficient which vanishes near the Higgs transition point, such that the bare and the renormalized cosmological constant match at this point. The role of the Higgs in reheating and baryogenesis is emphasized.

  7. Theoretical grounds of relativistic methods for calculation of spin–spin coupling constants in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakova, I. L.; Rusakov, Yu Yu; Krivdin, L. B.

    2016-04-01

    The theoretical grounds of the modern relativistic methods for quantum chemical calculation of spin–spin coupling constants in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra are considered. Examples and prospects of application of relativistic calculations of these constants in the structural studies of organic and heteroorganic compounds are discussed. Practical recommendations on relativistic calculations of spin–spin coupling constants using the available software are given. The bibliography includes 622 references.

  8. Analytical estimation of the gravitational constant with atomic and nuclear physical constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If NA represents the Avogadro's number, gravitational constant associated with atomic electromagnetic interaction can be expressed as GE ≅ N2AG. With GE and with the assumed two new pseudo numbers x ≈ 38.725 and y ≈ 47.415, value of G can be fixed for 10 digits in a verifiable approach. (x, y) can be called as the back ground analytical numbers using by which micro-macro physical constants can be interlinked qualitatively and quantitatively

  9. Towards the core of the cosmological constant problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We apply a new self-tuning mechanism to the well-known Kachru–Kallosh–Linde–Trivedi (KKLT) model to address the cosmological constant problem. In this mechanism, the cosmological constant λ contains a supersymmetry breaking term ESB besides the usual scalar potential Vscalar of the N=1 supergravity, which is distinguished from the usual theories where λ is directly identified with Vscalar alone. Also in this mechanism, whether λ vanishes or not is basically determined by the tensor structure of the scalar potential density, not by the zero or nonzero values of the scalar potential itself. As a result of this application, we find that the natural scenario for the vanishing λ of the present universe is to take one of the anti-de Sitter (AdS) (rather than de Sitter (dS)) vacua of KKLT as the background vacuum of our present universe. This AdS vacuum scenario has nicer properties as compared with dS vacua of the usual flux compactifications. The background vacuum is stable both classically and quantum mechanically (no tunneling instabilities), and the value λ=0 is also stable against quantum corrections because in this scenario the perturbative corrections of Vscalar and quantum fluctuations δQI-^brane(NS)+δQI-^brane(R) on the branes are all gauged away by an automatic cancellation between Vscalar+δQI-^brane(NS)+δQI-^brane(R) and ESB

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Solutions at Constant Chemical Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Perego, Claudio; Parrinello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, that range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, that influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a Grand-Canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work we propose the C$\\mu$MD method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the C$\\mu$MD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystall...

  11. Coupling constant metamorphosis, the Staeckel transform and superintegrability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is dedicated to the memory of Marcos Moshinsky. In this paper, we discuss the important role that coupling constant metamorphosis (CCM) and the Staeckel transform have played in the analysis of superintegrable systems. We explain the relation between the two and in particular show that they coincide when transforming between second-order superintegrable systems. Unlike in the case of second-order superintegrability, the quantum analog of CCM has only been proven for a subclass of systems with integrals of a specific form. We give the proof and as an application show the mapping of a family of superintegrable deformations of the simple harmonic oscillator to an associated family of superintegrable deformations of the Kepler-Coulomb potential.

  12. Nuclear data evaluation and group constant generation for reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear or shielding design analysis for reactors including nuclear facilities, nuclear data are one of the primary importances. Research project for nuclear data evaluation and their effective applications has been continuously performed. The objectives of this project are (1) to compile the latest evaluated nuclear data files, (2) to establish their processing code systems, and (3) to evaluate the multigroup constant library using the newly compiled data files and the code systems. As the results of this project, JEF-2.2 which is latest version of Joint Evaluated File developed at OECD/NEA was compiled and COMPLOT and EVALPLOT utility codes were installed in personal computer, which are able to draw ENDF/B-formatted nuclear data for comparison and check. Computer system (NJOY/ACER) for generating continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP library was established and the system was validated by analyzing a number of experimental data. (Author)

  13. Solar proton event of April 16, 1970. 3. Evolution of pitch angle distribution as < or approx. =1-MeV protons propagate into the high-latitude magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solar proton event of April 16, 1970 was monitored by Vela satellites, of orbit r=18 R/sub E/, in the solar wind and high-latitude magnetotail (lobe). Intensity structure at < or approx. =1 MeV indicates a delay of 85--102 min in access of protons to near the center of the north lobe, corresponding to entry points at 340--370 R/sub E/ from the earth. In three sequential periods, of 16, 181, and 124 min duration, the average intensity in the north lobe was lower, higher, and lower, respectively, than that in interplanetary space, by factors which varied from 2 to 5. These reversals were a consequence of reversals in field-aligned anisotropy in interplanetary space, the interplanetary magnetic field remaining southward. Pitch angle distributions were measured in three dimensions in interplanetary space and in the north lobe. In the lobe the distributions were essentially isotropic at r=18 R/sub E/. Comparison is made with theoretical propagation of solar particles along field lines in an open tail model, under the following conditions along a trajectory: (1) adiabatic motion all the way (Liouville theorem) : the 'adiabatic access model' (2) isotropization at the magnetopause followed by adiabatic motion: the 'nonadiabatic access model'. Neither mode of access explains the observations adequately. A hybrid mode is proposed, in which a minimal amount of scattering occurs as particles enter the tail, followed by amplification (attenuation) of intensity as the pitch distribution is transformed to near 18 R/sub E/ in the favored (unfavored) lobe. In this mode a large part of the isotropization at Vela orbit is accomplished by the Liouville transformation, since particles entering the tail beyond approx. =100 R/sub E/ will see an increase in magnetic field by a factor of 3 as they propagate along the tail. The amount of scatter at the magnetopause is estimated to be Δμ (rms) =0.3, where μ is cosine of pitch angle

  14. THE GEMINI CLUSTER ASTROPHYSICS SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY (GCLASS): THE ROLE OF ENVIRONMENT AND SELF-REGULATION IN GALAXY EVOLUTION AT z {approx} 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzin, Adam; Van Dokkum, Pieter [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Wilson, Gillian; Rettura, Alessandro [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Yee, H. K. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Gilbank, David [South African Astronomical Observatory, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Hoekstra, Henk; Franx, Marijn [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Demarco, Ricardo; Nantais, Julie [Department of Astronomy, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile); Balogh, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Ellingson, Erica [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Hicks, Amalia [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-2320 (United States); Noble, Allison; Webb, Tracy [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Lacy, Mark [North American ALMA Science Center, NRAO Headquarters, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Lidman, Chris [Australian Astronomical Observatory, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Surace, Jason, E-mail: adam.muzzin@yale.edu [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 220-6 Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-02-20

    We evaluate the effects of environment and stellar mass on galaxy properties at 0.85 9.3 the well-known correlations between environment and properties such as star-forming fraction (f{sub SF}), star formation rate (SFR), specific SFR (SSFR), D{sub n}(4000), and color are already in place at z {approx} 1. We separate the effects of environment and stellar mass on galaxies by comparing the properties of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at fixed environment and fixed stellar mass. The SSFR of star-forming galaxies at fixed environment is correlated with stellar mass; however, at fixed stellar mass it is independent of environment. The same trend exists for the D{sub n}(4000) measures of both the star-forming and quiescent galaxies and shows that their properties are determined primarily by their stellar mass, not by their environment. Instead, it appears that environment's primary role is to control the fraction of star-forming galaxies. Using the spectra we identify candidate poststarburst galaxies and find that those with 9.3 < log M{sub *}/M{sub Sun} < 10.7 are 3.1 {+-} 1.1 times more common in high-density regions compared to low-density regions. The clear association of poststarbursts with high-density regions as well as the lack of a correlation between the SSFRs and D{sub n}(4000)s of star-forming galaxies with their environment strongly suggests that at z {approx} 1 the environmental-quenching timescale must be rapid. Lastly, we construct a simple quenching model which demonstrates that the lack of a correlation between the D{sub n}(4000) of quiescent galaxies and their environment results naturally if self quenching dominates over environmental quenching at z > 1, or if the evolution of the self-quenching rate mirrors the evolution of

  15. Symmetry breakdown and coupling constants of leptons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil C. Marques

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on a new approach to symmetries of the fundamental interactions we deal, in this paper, with the electroweak interactions of leptons. We show that the coupling constants, arising in the way leptons are coupled to intermediate bosons, can be understood as parameters associated to the breakdown of SU(2 and parity symmetries. The breakdown of both symmetries is characterized by a new parameter (the asymetry parameter of the electroweak interactions. This parameter gives a measure of the strength of breakdown of symmetries. We analyse the behaviour of the theory for three values of this parameter. The most relevant value is the one for which only the electromagnetic interactions do not break parity (the maximally allowed left-right asymetric theory. Maximamally allowed parity asymmetry is a requirement that is met for a value of Weinberg's theta-angle that is quite close to the experimental value of this parameter.Com base em uma formulação nova para simetrias das interações fundamentais nós lidamos, neste trabalho, com interações eletrofracas de leptons. Mostramos que as constantes do acoplamento, associadas aos acoplamentos de bósons intermediários, podem ser entendidas como parâmetros associados à quebra de simetrias SU(2 e paridade. A quebra de ambas as simetrias é caracterizada por um parâmetro novo (o parâmetro de assimetria das interações eletrofracas. Este parâmetro dá uma medida da intensidade com que a simetria é quebrada. Analisamos o comportamento da teoria para três valores deste parâmetro. O valor mais relevante é aquele para o qual apenas as interações eletromagnéticas não quebram a paridade (a teoria assimétrica esquerda-direita permitida da maneira máxima. A assimetria máxima permitida é uma exigência que leva a um ângulo de Weinberg cujo valor é próximo daquele observado experimentalmente.

  16. Holographic Dark Energy with Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the $\\Lambda$HDE model. By studying the $\\Lambda$HDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters $c$ and $\\Omega_{hde}$ are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the $\\Lambda$HDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields $\\chi^2_{\\rm min}=426.27$ when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant $\\Lambda$CDM model (431.35). At 68.3\\% CL, we obtain $-0.07<\\Omega_{\\Lambda0}<0.68$ and correspondingly $0.04<\\Omega_{hde0}<0.79$, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy bet...

  17. Type Ia Supernovae and the Hubble Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Branch, D

    1998-01-01

    The focus of this review is the work that has been done during the 1990s on using Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) to measure the Hubble constant ($H_0$). SNe Ia are well suited for measuring $H_0$. A straightforward maximum-light color criterion can weed out the minority of observed events that are either intrinsically subluminous or substantially extinguished by dust, leaving a majority subsample that has observational absolute-magnitude dispersions of less than $\\sigma_{obs}(M_B) \\simeq \\sigma_{obs}(M_V) \\simeq 0.3$ mag. Correlations between absolute magnitude and one or more distance-independent SN Ia or parent-galaxy observables can be used to further standardize the absolute magnitudes to better than 0.2 mag. The absolute magnitudes can be calibrated in two independent ways --- empirically, using Cepheid-based distances to parent galaxies of SNe Ia, and physically, by light curve and spectrum fitting. At present the empirical and physical calibrations are in agreement at $M_B \\simeq M_V \\simeq -19.4$ or -19....

  18. Elastic stiffness constants of lead chlorophosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the preparation of a series of binary (PbO)x(P2O5)1-x lead phosphate and ternary (PbCl2)y (PbO.2P2O5)1-5 lead chlorophosphate glasses by the melt quenching technique. Their physical as well as elastic properties have been determined at room temperature by using the ultrasonic pulse echo overlap method. The density of both series of glasses increases linearly with the mole fraction of PbO and PbCl2 respectively. The experimental results show that the elastic constants C11 and C44 of the binary lead phosphate glasses decrease linearly with the mole fraction of PbO; the addition of PbO weakens the structure of phosphate glasses due to an increase of non-bridging oxygen. An introduction of PbCl2 into the lead phosphate glassy matrix also causes the decrease of elastic modulli C11, C44 and bulk modulus; the chloride ions breaking up the bridging oxygen into non-bridging oxygen. The Debye temperatures of both series of glasses have been calculated by using the room temperature ultrasonic velocities data

  19. Neutron stars and the cosmological constant problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gravitational aether theory is a modification of general relativity that decouples vacuum energy from gravity, and thus can potentially address the cosmological constant problem. The classical theory is distinguishable from general relativity only in the presence of relativistic pressure (or vorticity). Since the interior of neutron stars has high pressure and as their mass and radius can be measured observationally, they are the perfect laboratory for testing the validity of the aether theory. In this paper, we solve the equations of stellar structure for the gravitational aether theory and find the predicted mass-radius relation of nonrotating neutron stars using two different realistic proposals for the equation of state of nuclear matter. We find that the maximum neutron-star mass predicted by the aether theory is 12%-16% less than the maximum mass predicted by general relativity assuming these two equations of state. We also show that the effect of aether is similar to modifying the equation of state in general relativity. The effective pressure of the neutron star given by the aether theory at a fiducial density differs from the values given by the two nuclear equations of state to an extent that can be constrained using future gravitational wave observations of neutron stars in compact systems. This is a promising way to test the aether theory if further progress is made in constraining the equation of state of nuclear matter in densities above the nuclear saturation density.

  20. Backlight illumination design using constant extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgart, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Light guiding backlights are a good solution to attain ambient or display illuminations. Generally, they are attained using intended macroscopic defects (dots). Their size, shape and density are designed using ray tracing software. Smaller defects have the fascinating feature that they may not be perceived by the eye. Such a light guide will therefore look transparent and undisturbed. However, such microscopic or even nanoscaled defects are well beyond the limitations of geometrical optics and therefore need other approaches for their design. An interesting alternative to surface defects are particles inside the material or a well-defined surface roughness. In contrast to a defect structure, particle densities or surface roughness cannot be changed without difficulty. These may, however, be much more easily manufactured. In this paper, a simple analytical method for the design of such light guides will be presented. This method is compared to the results of commercial software and will be used to design a homogeneous illumination adopting constant particle density inside the material.

  1. Theophylline: constant-rate infusion predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, C A; Sahebjami, H; Imhoff, T; Thomas, J P; Myre, S A

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate a method of prospectively estimating appropriate aminophylline infusion rates in acutely ill, hospitalized patients with bronchospasm. Steady-state serum theophylline concentrations (Css), clearances (Cl), and half-lives (t1/2) were estimated by the Chiou method using serum concetrantions obtained 1 and 6 h after the start of a constant-rate intravenous aminophylline infusion in 10 male patients averaging 57 years of age. Using an enzyme-multiplied immunoassay (EMIT) system for theophylline analysis, pharmacokinetic estimations were excellent for Css (r = 0.9103, p less than 0.01) and Cl (r = 0.9750, p less than 0.01). The mean estimation errors were 9.4% (range 0.8-21.5) for Css and 12.3% (range 1.3-28.0) for Cl. There was no correlation between patient age and Cl. This method is useful for rapidly individualizing aminophylline therapy in patients with acute bronchospasm. PMID:6740734

  2. On the free electron state in the internal conversion and on the relation ICC approx. equal to vertical stroke psi(0) vertical stroke 2 for Tc-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The final continuum electron states in the internal conversion (IC) process are considered under two points of view: 1) Regarding the potential for the free electron we use neither the unchanged atomic potential (no-hole model) nor the Rose- or the Band-hole model, but we apply another model which is introduced and discussed. The differences between the models are significant for low kinetic energies (a few keV). 2) Changes of the chemical or ionization state of the atom cause variations of the IC coefficients (ICC) not only via the bound states (proportionality relation ICC approx. equal to vertical stroke psi(0) vertical stroke 2), but in principle via the continuum states, too, especially for low kinetic energies or for inner shells. This effect is examined for the transition of Tc-99m (2.17 keV; E3) with variation of the transition energy. For the non-s-subshells it turns out that the simple proportionality relation holds for the Tc-99m transition, but for lower energy it has to be extended to the free electron wave functions. In the s-shells there appear discrepancies with decreasing energy even from the extended proportionality relation. A short description of the used ICC code is included in the paper. (orig.)

  3. THE COLORS OF CENTRAL AND SATELLITE GALAXIES IN zCOSMOS OUT TO z {approx_equal} 0.8 AND IMPLICATIONS FOR QUENCHING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knobel, C.; Lilly, S. J.; Kovac, K.; Peng, Y.; Bschorr, T. J.; Carollo, C. M.; Caputi, K. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland); Contini, T. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, CNRS, 14, avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fevre, O. [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, CNRS/Aix-Marseille Universite, 38 rue Frederic Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille cedex 13 (France); Mainieri, V. [European Southern Observatory, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Renzini, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Scodeggio, M. [INAF-IASF Milano, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Zamorani, G.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Bongiorno, A. [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Cucciati, O. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, I-20121 Milan (Italy); De la Torre, S.; De Ravel, L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-05-20

    We examine the red fraction of central and satellite galaxies in the large zCOSMOS group catalog out to z {approx_equal} 0.8, correcting for both the incompleteness in stellar mass and for the less than perfect purities of the central and satellite samples. We show that at all masses and at all redshifts, the fraction of satellite galaxies that have been quenched, i.e., that are red, is systematically higher than that of centrals, as seen locally in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The satellite quenching efficiency, which is the probability that a satellite is quenched because it is a satellite rather than a central, is, as locally, independent of stellar mass. Furthermore, the average value is about 0.5, which is also very similar to that seen in the SDSS. We also construct the mass functions of blue and red centrals and satellites and show that these broadly follow the predictions of the Peng et al. analysis of the SDSS groups. Together, these results indicate that the effect of the group environment in quenching satellite galaxies was very similar to what it is today when the universe was about half its present age.

  4. Constraints on the Nucleon Strange Form Factors at Q{sup 2} {approx} 0.1 GeV{sup 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.A. Aniol; D.S. Armstrong; T. Averett; H. Benaoum; P.Y. Bertin; E. Burtin; J. Cahoon; G.D. Cates; C.C. Chang; Y.-C. Chao; J.-P. Chen; Seonho Choi; E. Chudakov; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; Piotr Decowski; D. Deepa; C. FERDI; R.J. Feuerbach; J.M. Finn; S. Frullani; K. Fuoti; F. Garibaldi; R. Gilman; A. Glamazdin; V. Gorbenko; J.M. Grames; J. Hansknecht; D.W. Higinbotham; R. Holmes; T. Holmstrom; T.B. Humensky; H. Ibrahim; C.W. de Jager; X. Jiang; L.J. Kaufman; A. Kelleher; A. Kolarkar; S. Kowalski; K.S. Kumar; D. Lambert; P. LaViolette; J. LeRose; D. Lhuillier; N. Liyanage; M. Mazouz; K. McCormick; D.G. Meekins; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; C. Munoz-Camacho; S. Nanda; V. Nelyubin; D. Neyret; K.D. Paschke; M. Poelker; R. Pomatsalyuk; Y. Qiang; B. Reitz; J. Roche; A. Saha; J. Singh; R. Snyder; P.A. Souder; R. Subedi; R. Suleiman; V. Sulkosky; W.A. Tobias; G.M. Urciuoli; A. Vacheret; E. Voutier; K. Wang; R. Wilson; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng

    2005-06-01

    We report the most precise measurement to date of a parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering. The measurement was carried out with a beam energy of 3.03 GeV and a scattering angle <{theta}{sub lab}> = 6.0 degrees, with the result A{sub PV} = -1.14 {+-} 0.24 (stat) {+-} 0.06 (syst) parts per million. From this we extract, at Q{sup 2} = 0.099 GeV{sup 2}, the strange form factor combination G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.080 G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.030 {+-} 0.025 (stat) {+-} 0.006 (syst) {+-} 0.012 (FF) where the first two errors are experimental and the last error is due to the uncertainty in the neutron electromagnetic form factor. The measurement significantly improves existing constraints on G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} at Q{sup 2} {approx}0.1 GeV{sup 2}. A consistent picture emerges from all measurements at this Q{sup 2}. A combined fit shows that G{sub E}{sup s} is consistent with zero while G{sub M}{sup s} prefers positive values though G{sub E}{sup s} = G{sub M}{sup s} = 0 is compatible with the data at 95% C.L.

  5. Determination of magneto-optical constant of Fe films with weak measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this letter, a detecting method for the magneto-optical constant is presented by using weak measurements. The photonic spin Hall effect (PSHE), which manifests itself as spin-dependent splitting, is introduced to characterize the magneto-optical constant, and a propagation model to describe the quantitative relation between the magneto-optical constant and the PSHE is established. According to the amplified shift of the PSHE detected by weak measurements, we determinate the magneto-optical constant of the Fe film sample. The Kerr rotation is measured via the standard polarimetry method to verify the rationality and feasibility of our method. These findings may provide possible applications in magnetic physics research.

  6. Study on cipher propertys of constant weight codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Bogang

    2006-01-01

    Constant weight code is an important error-correcting control code in communications. Basic structure of constant weight codes for some arriving at Johnson bound, A(n, 2u, w), is presented. Some correlative propertys of the codes, the solution of arriving at Johnson bound, and the results on the couple constant code and some constant weight codes are discussed. The conclusion is verified through four examples.

  7. New multitarget constant modulus array for CDMA systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jidong; Zheng Baoyu

    2006-01-01

    A new multitarget constant modulus array is proposed for CDMA systems based on least squares constant modulus algorithm. The new algorithm is called pre-despreading decision directed least squares constant modulus algorithm (DDDLSCMA). In the new algorithm, the pre-despreading is first applied for multitarget arrays to remove some multiple access signals, then the despreaded signal is processed by the algorithm which united the constant modulus algorithm and decision directed method. Simulation results illustrate the good performance for the proposed algorithm.

  8. A relation between diffusion,temperature and the cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Haba, Z

    2016-01-01

    We show that the temperature of a diffusing fluid with the diffusion constant \\kappa^{2} in an expanding universe approaches a constant limit T=\\kappa^{2}/H in its final de Sitter stage characterized by the horizon 1/H determined by the Hubble constant. If de Sitter surface temperature in the final equilibrium state coincides with the fluid temperature then the cosmological constant \\Lambda=3H^{2}=6\\pi\\kappa^{2}.

  9. Stunt Barbie - A Laboratory Practicum Combining Constant Velocity and Constant Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertting, Scott

    2011-04-01

    In preparing to teach the advanced physics course at my high school, I found it useful to work through the end-of-chapter problems in the book used by the advanced class. A problem on motion in one dimension involved a stunt woman in free fall from a tree limb onto a horse running beneath her.2 The problem presents a connected learning opportunity for students because it requires the use of the constant velocity model xf = v*t + xi and the constant acceleration model yf = ½* g* t2 + vyi* t + yi (where g = 9.8 m/s/s) to solve it. I named the stunt woman Barbie and created an activity titled "Stunt Barbie."

  10. Articles translated from Journal Yadernye Konstanty (Nuclear Constants). Series: Nuclear Constants, Issue No. 1, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains translations of eight papers published in the Nuclear Constants journal (Voprosy Atomnoj Nauki I Teknniki, seriya: Yadernye Konstanty (YK), vypusk 1, 2001). They are marked as 'Translated from Russian'. Six original papers published in YK in English are included with correction of found misprints and small format changes. As a result the report contains all papers presented in YK, 1 (2001). (author)

  11. Influences of brain tissue poroelastic constants on intracranial pressure (ICP) during constant-rate infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaogai; von Holst, Hans; Kleiven, Svein

    2013-01-01

    A 3D finite element (FE) model has been developed to study the mean intracranial pressure (ICP) response during constant-rate infusion using linear poroelasticity. Due to the uncertainties in the poroelastic constants for brain tissue, the influence of each of the main parameters on the transient ICP infusion curve was studied. As a prerequisite for transient analysis, steady-state simulations were performed first. The simulated steady-state pressure distribution in the brain tissue for a normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation system showed good correlation with experiments from the literature. Furthermore, steady-state ICP closely followed the infusion experiments at different infusion rates. The verified steady-state models then served as a baseline for the subsequent transient models. For transient analysis, the simulated ICP shows a similar tendency to that found in the experiments, however, different values of the poroelastic constants have a significant effect on the infusion curve. The influence of the main poroelastic parameters including the Biot coefficient α, Skempton coefficient B, drained Young's modulus E, Poisson's ratio ν, permeability κ, CSF absorption conductance C(b) and external venous pressure p(b) was studied to investigate the influence on the pressure response. It was found that the value of the specific storage term S(ε) is the dominant factor that influences the infusion curve, and the drained Young's modulus E was identified as the dominant parameter second to S(ε). Based on the simulated infusion curves from the FE model, artificial neural network (ANN) was used to find an optimised parameter set that best fit the experimental curve. The infusion curves from both the FE simulation and using ANN confirmed the limitation of linear poroelasticity in modelling the transient constant-rate infusion. PMID:22452461

  12. Articles translated from Journal Yadernye Konstanty (Nuclear Constants). Series: Nuclear Constants, Issue No. 2, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains translations of five papers published in the Nuclear Constants journal (Voprosy Atomnoj Nauki I Teknniki, seriya: Yadernye Konstanty (YK), vypusk 2, 2000). They are marked as 'Translated from Russian'. Two original papers published in YK in English are included with correction of found misprints and small format changes. As a result, the report contains all papers presented in YK, 2 (2000). (author)

  13. Articles translated from Journal Yadernye Konstanty (Nuclear Constants). Series: Nuclear Constants, Issue No. 2, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains translations of three papers published in the Nuclear Constants journal (Voprosy Atomnoj Nauki I Teknniki, seriya: Yadernye Konstanty (YK), vypusk 2, 2001). They are marked as 'Translated from Russian'. Three original YK papers published in English and one sent by the author are included with corrections of misprints and small format changes. As a result the report contains seven of nine papers presented in YK, 2 (2001). (author)

  14. Articles translated from journal Yadernye Konstanty (Nuclear Constants). Series: Nuclear Constants, Issue No. 2, 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains translations of eleven papers published in the Nuclear Constants journal (Voprosy Atomnoj Nauki I Teknniki, seriya: Yadernye Konstanty (YK), vypusk 2, 1999). They are marked as ''Translated from Russian''. Four original papers published in YK in English are included with correction of found misprints and small format changes. As a result the report contains all papers presented in YK, 2 (1999). (author)

  15. Articles translated from Journal Yadernye Konstanty (Nuclear Constants). Series: Nuclear Constants, Issue No. 1, 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains translations of seven papers published in the Nuclear Constants journal (Voprosy Atomnoj Nauki I Teknniki, seriya: Yadernye Konstanty (YK), vypusk 1, 2000). They are marked as 'Translated from Russian'. Two original papers published in YK in English are included with correction of found misprints and small format changes. As a result the report contains all papers presented in YK, 1 (2000). (author)

  16. Determination of the lumped constant and the kinetic constants for deoxyglucose and fluorodeoxyglucose in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If both the time course of the arterial plasma radionuclide concentration and the brain tissue radionuclide concentrations are known, it is possible to calculate the kinetic constants (k1*, k2*, k3*, k4*) of the glucose analogue. In a series of male subjects, arterial blood samples were obtained at frequent intervals immediately following the bolus administration of 18F-FDG and then at less frequent intervals for up to 5 hours after the radionuclide administration. The tissue time course was obtained by making positron emission tomographic scans every three minutes for 30 minutes and then at less frequent intervals for 5 hours. These images were used to construct the time course of 18F activity in gray and white matter structures. Using these values for the lumped constants and the kinetic constants, the values obtained for the global metabolic rate for glucose in two series of young male subjects were 4.99 +- 0.23 and 5.55 +- 0.37 mg/100 g/min when 11C-DG and 18F-FDG were used as tracers respectively

  17. On gradient Ricci solitons with constant scalar curvature

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez-Lopez, Manuel; Garcia-Rio, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We use the theory of isoparametric functions to investigate gradient Ricci solitons with constant scalar curvature. We show rigidity of gradient Ricci solitons with constant scalar curvature under some conditions on the Ricci tensor, which are all satisfied if the manifold is curvature homogeneous. This leads to a complete description of four- and six-dimensional Kaehler gradient Ricci solitons with constant scalar curvature.

  18. Beauty vector meson decay constants from QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the outcomes of a very recent investigation of the decay constants of nonstrange and strange heavy-light beauty vector mesons, with special emphasis on the ratio of any such decay constant to the decay constant of the corresponding pseudoscalar meson, by means of Borel-transformed QCD sum rules. Our results suggest that both these ratios are below unity

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance J coupling constant polarizabilities of hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Hanna; Nielsen, Monia R.; Pagola, Gabriel I.;

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present the so far most extended investigation of the calculation of the coupling constant polarizability of a molecule. The components of the coupling constant polarizability are derivatives of the NMR indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constant with respect to an external elec...

  20. Beauty Vector Meson Decay Constants from QCD Sum Rules

    CERN Document Server

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Simula, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    We present the outcomes of a very recent investigation of the decay constants of nonstrange and strange heavy-light beauty vector mesons, with special emphasis on the ratio of any such decay constant to the decay constant of the corresponding pseudoscalar meson, by means of Borel-transformed QCD sum rules. Our results suggest that both these ratios are below unity.

  1. Beauty vector meson decay constants from QCD sum rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    We present the outcomes of a very recent investigation of the decay constants of nonstrange and strange heavy-light beauty vector mesons, with special emphasis on the ratio of any such decay constant to the decay constant of the corresponding pseudoscalar meson, by means of Borel-transformed QCD sum rules. Our results suggest that both these ratios are below unity.

  2. Beauty vector meson decay constants from QCD sum rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucha, Wolfgang [Institute for High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); Melikhov, Dmitri [Institute for High Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfergasse 18, A-1050 Vienna (Austria); D. V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Simula, Silvano [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146, Roma (Italy)

    2016-01-22

    We present the outcomes of a very recent investigation of the decay constants of nonstrange and strange heavy-light beauty vector mesons, with special emphasis on the ratio of any such decay constant to the decay constant of the corresponding pseudoscalar meson, by means of Borel-transformed QCD sum rules. Our results suggest that both these ratios are below unity.

  3. Higher-dimensional dilaton black holes with cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metric of a higher-dimensional dilaton black hole in the presence of a cosmological constant is constructed. It is found that the cosmological constant is coupled to the dilaton in a non-trivial way. The dilaton potential with respect to the cosmological constant consists of three Liouville-type potentials

  4. Stability constants of the Europium complexes with the chloride ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability constants of lanthanides complexes with chloride ions which were determined at the same ionic force but in different media, are significantly different. It does not exist a systematic study over these stability constants. The purpose of this work is to determine the stability constants of the europium complexes with chloride ions at 303 K, by the solvents extraction method. (Author)

  5. Towards Grothendieck constants and LHV models in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We adopt a continuous model to estimate the Grothendieck constants. An analytical formula to compute the lower bounds of Grothendieck constants has been explicitly derived for arbitrary orders, which improves previous bounds. Moreover, our lower bound of the Grothendieck constant of order three gives a refined bound of the threshold value for the nonlocality of the two-qubit Werner states. (paper)

  6. 21 CFR 1250.42 - Water systems; constant temperature bottles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Water systems; constant temperature bottles. 1250...; constant temperature bottles. (a) The water system, whether of the pressure or gravity type, shall be... at all times as to prevent contamination of the water. (e) Constant temperature bottles and...

  7. Higher Dimensional Dilaton Black Holes with Cosmological Constant

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Chang Jun; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2004-01-01

    The metric of a higher-dimensional dilaton black hole in the presence of a cosmological constant is constructed. It is found that the cosmological constant is coupled to the dilaton in a non-trivial way. The dilaton potential with respect to the cosmological constant consists of three Liouville-type potentials.

  8. Effects of porous carbon additives and induced fluorine on low dielectric constant polyimide synthesized with an e-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the synthesis of a polyimide matrix with a low dielectric constant for application as an intercalation material between metal interconnections in electronic devices. Porous activated carbon was embedded in the polyimide to reduce the dielectric constant, and a thin film of the complex was obtained using the spin-coating and e-beam irradiation methods. The surface of the thin film was modified with fluorine functional groups to impart water resistance and reduce the dielectric constant further. The water resistance was significantly improved by the modification with hydrophobic fluorine groups. The dielectric constant was effectively decreased by porous activated carbon. The fluorine modification also resulted in a low dielectric constant on the polyimide surface by reducing the polar surface free energy. The dielectric constant of polyimide film decreased from 2.98 to 1.9 by effects of porous activated carbon additive and fluorine surface modification.

  9. Hamiltonians for the Quantum Hall Effect on Spaces with Non-Constant Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Paul Francis

    2007-01-01

    The problem of studying the quantum Hall effect on manifolds with non constant metric is addressed. The Hamiltonian on a space with hyperbolic metric is determined, and the spectrum and eigenfunctions are calculated in closed form. The hyperbolic disk is also considered and some other applications of this approach are discussed as well.

  10. Calculation of the connective constant for self-avoiding walks via the pivot algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Clisby, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We calculate the connective constant for self-avoiding walks on the simple cubic lattice to unprecedented accuracy, using a novel application of the pivot algorithm. We estimate that \\mu = 4.684 039 931(27). Our method also provides accurate estimates of the number of self-avoiding walks, even for walks with millions of steps.

  11. Library of neutron reaction cross-sections in the ABBN-93 constant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The library of neutron reaction group cross-sections in the ABBN-93 constant set is described. The format used for data representation, the content and purpose of the sub-libraries and their practical application in the SCALE criticality safety estimation system are discussed. (author)

  12. Non-gauge spin-3/2 fields from supercovariantly constant spinors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We point out a limiting procedure which enables one to construct in supergravity theories non-gauge, linearized spin-3/2 fields with the aid of the supercovariantly constant spinors. We give an explicit application of the procedure for N=2 supergravity. (Author)

  13. Dirichlet problem for the constant mean curvature equation and CMC foliation in the extended Schwarzschild spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuo-Wei

    2016-09-01

    We prove the existence and uniqueness of the Dirichlet problem for the spacelike, spherically symmetric, constant mean curvature equation with symmetric boundary data in the extended Schwarzschild spacetime. As an application, we completely solve the CMC foliation conjecture which is proposed by Malec and Murchadha (2003 Phys. Rev. D 68 124019).

  14. Dirichlet problem for the constant mean curvature equation and CMC foliation in the extended Schwarzschild spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kuo-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We prove the existence and uniqueness of the Dirichlet problem for spacelike, spherically symmetric, constant mean curvature equation with symmetric boundary data in the extended Schwarzschild spacetime. As an application, we completely solve the CMC foliation conjecture which is posted by Malec and O Murchadha in 2003.

  15. Planck’s constant as a natural unit of measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quincey, Paul

    2013-09-01

    The proposed revision of SI units would embed Planck’s constant into the definition of the kilogram, as a fixed constant of nature. Traditionally, Planck’s constant is not readily interpreted as the size of something physical, and it is generally only encountered by students in the mathematics of quantum physics. Richard Feynman’s path integral formulation of quantum mechanics allows a neat visualization of the constant as the circumference of a surveyor’s wheel for measuring action along each path, making Planck’s constant a natural yardstick, almost literally. This approach is shown to have other benefits in the presentation of other basic quantum phenomena.

  16. Creep curve formularization by constant stress creep tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creep tests under constant stress were conducted on a nickel-base heat-resistant alloy, Hastelloy XR-II, which is one of the condidate alloys for applications in the process-heat high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). In those tests relation between minimum creep strain rate, time to onset of tertiary creep, time to rupture and stress were investigated. Then, creep constitutive equation was made based on the Garofalo formula for the primary and secondary creep and the Kachanov-Rabotnov formula for the tertiary creep using these parameters. As results of the comparison between a calculated creep curve using these creep constitutive equation and an experimental creep curve, it was found that these equation could predict fairly well the creep strain behavior under the constant stress condition. Numberical analyses of relaxation behavior under tension strain hold waves in high-temperature low-cycle fatigue tests were performed using creep constitutive equation and strain hardening law. As results of comparison with numerical analyses and experimental results, it was found that the values of calculated stress were somewhat higher than those of the test results. In addition, relaxation tests were conducted on Hastelloy XR-II at 850degC under εt = 0.15 % condition and comparison between experimental results and calculated results which were performed using two types of creep constitutive equations were carried out. As these results, it was found that the values of calculated stress were somewhat higher than those of the experimental results. Therefore, it is still necessary to investigate the accuracy of creep constitutive equation. (author)

  17. Note: Determination of torsional spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers: Combining normal spring constant and classical beam theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez-Asencio, R.; Thormann, Esben; Rutland, M.W.

    2013-01-01

    A technique has been developed for the calculation of torsional spring constants for AFM cantilevers based on the combination of the normal spring constant and plate/beam theory. It is easy to apply and allow the determination of torsional constants for stiff cantilevers where the thermal power...

  18. Multiple constant multiplication optimizations for field programmable gate arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Kumm, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This work covers field programmable gate array (FPGA)-specific optimizations of circuits computing the multiplication of a variable by several constants, commonly denoted as multiple constant multiplication (MCM). These optimizations focus on low resource usage but high performance. They comprise the use of fast carry-chains in adder-based constant multiplications including ternary (3-input) adders as well as the integration of look-up table-based constant multipliers and embedded multipliers to get the optimal mapping to modern FPGAs. The proposed methods can be used for the efficient implementation of digital filters, discrete transforms and many other circuits in the domain of digital signal processing, communication and image processing. Contents Heuristic and ILP-Based Optimal Solutions for the Pipelined Multiple Constant Multiplication Problem Methods to Integrate Embedded Multipliers, LUT-Based Constant Multipliers and Ternary (3-Input) Adders An Optimized Multiple Constant Multiplication Architecture ...

  19. Growth of KH2PO4 crystals at constant temperature and supersaturation. Final report, 20 October 1980-20 October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large three-zone cyrstallizer system was constructed and successfully operated for growing KH2PO4 single crystals. Under conditions of constant crystallization temperature and supersaturation, growth rates exceeding 5 mm per day were demonstrated for KH2PO4 crystals of 5 x 5 cm cross section. The optical quality of these crystals was equivalent to that of crystals grown at rates presently considered as state-of-the-art (approx. 1 mm/day). Sample crystals were supplied for comparison testing. The three-zone system appears to be ideally suitable for growth of large-diameter KH2PO4 crystals for the Laser Fusion Program

  20. Biobanking in a Constantly Developing Medical World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan-Alexandru Artene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biobank is a very sophisticated system that consists of a programmed storage of biological material and corresponding data. Biobanks are created to be used in medical research, in clinical and translational medicine, and in healthcare. In the past 20 years, a large number of biobanks have been set up around the world, to support the modern research directions in medicine such as omix and personalized medicine. More recently, embryonic and adult stem cell banks have been developed. Stem cell banking was reported to be required for medical research as well as clinical transplant applications. The quality of the samples stored in a biobank is very important. The standardization is also important; the biological material stored in a biobank must be processed in a manner that allows compatibility with other biobanks that preserve samples in the same field. In this paper, we review some issues related to biobanks purposes, quality, harmonization, and their financial and ethical aspects.

  1. Realistic Silver Optical Constants for Plasmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yajie; Pillai, Supriya; Green, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Silver remains the preferred conductor for optical and near-infrared plasmonics. Many high-profile studies focus exclusively on performance simulation in such applications. Almost invariably, these use silver optical data either from Palik's 1985 handbook or, more frequently, an earlier Johnson and Christy (J&C) tabulation. These data are inconsistent, making it difficult to ascertain the reliability of the simulations. The inconsistency stems from challenges in measuring representative properties of pristine silver, due to tarnishing on air exposure. We demonstrate techniques, including use of silicon-nitride membranes, to access the full capabilities of multiple-angle, spectrometric-ellipsometry to generate an improved data set, representative of overlayer-protected, freshly-deposited silver films on silicon-nitride and glass. PMID:27470307

  2. FOREWORD: International determination of the Avogadro constant International determination of the Avogadro constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Enrico; Nicolaus, Arnold

    2011-04-01

    This issue of Metrologia collects papers about the results of an international research project aimed at the determination of the Avogadro constant, NA, by counting the atoms in a silicon crystal highly enriched with the isotope 28Si. Fifty years ago, Egidi [1] thought about realizing an atomic mass standard. In 1965, Bonse and Hart [2] operated the first x-ray interferometer, thus paving the way to the achievement of Egidi's dream, and soon Deslattes et al [3] completed the first counting of the atoms in a natural silicon crystal. The present project, outlined by Zosi [4] in 1983, began in 2004 by combining the experiences and capabilities of the BIPM, INRIM, IRMM, NIST, NPL, NMIA, NMIJ and PTB. The start signal, ratified by a memorandum of understanding, was a contract for the production of a silicon crystal highly enriched with 28Si. The enrichment process was undertaken by the Central Design Bureau of Machine Building in St Petersburg. Subsequently, a polycrystal was grown in the Institute of Chemistry of High-Purity Substances of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Nizhny Novgorod and a 28Si boule was grown and purified by the Leibniz-Institut für Kristallzüchtung in Berlin. Isotope enrichment made it possible to apply isotope dilution mass spectroscopy, to determine the Avogadro constant with unprecedented accuracy, and to fulfil Egidi's dream. To convey Egidi's 'fantasy' into practice, two 28Si kilogram prototypes shaped as quasi-perfect spheres were manufactured by the Australian Centre for Precision Optics; their isotopic composition, molar mass, mass, volume, density and lattice parameter were accurately determined and their surfaces were chemically and physically characterized at the atomic scale. The paper by Andreas et al reviews the work carried out; it collates all the findings and illustrates how Avogadro's constant was obtained. Impurity concentration and gradients in the enriched crystal were measured by infrared spectroscopy and taken into

  3. Spectrophotometric determination of acidity constants by two-rank annihilation factor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annihilation of the contribution of one chemical component from the original data matrix is a general method in rank annihilation factor analysis (RAFA). However, RAFA is not applicable for studying the protonation equilibria of multiprotic acids. In this work, a two-rank annihilation factor analysis (TRAFA) method was proposed for determination of the acidity constants of diprotic acids. After recording the electronic absorbance spectra of the acids at different pH, the contributions of both H2A and A2- were annihilated from the absorbance data, which made feasible the determination of two successive acidity constants. The method was validated by analysis of simulated data and its application to the determination of the acidity constants of calmagite, as a reference compound. A close agreement was obtained between the resulted values by TRAFA and the declared values. Indeed, the method was used for determination of the acidity constants of two new chromenone derivatives in binary solvents mixtures of methanol and water. The effects of changing solvent composition on acidity constant data were explained by linear solvation free energy relationships (LSFER) utilizing solvatochromic parameters

  4. Constant gluon propagator and quark confinement in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwinger-Dyson equation for quark propagator in QCD is investigated in the infrared region. Gauge identity is taken into account. It is shown that the infrared behaviour of the gluon propagator in the covariant gauge D(K)approxδ(K) leads to the quark confinement. All the obtained solutions for quark propagator are of the confinement type, have a nonperturbative character and do not break chiral invariance

  5. Effects of constant voltage and constant current stress in PCBM:P3HT solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cester, Andrea; Rizzo, Aldo; Bazzega, A.; Lago, N.; Favaro, J.; Barbato, M.; Wrachien, N.; Gevorgyan, Suren A.; Corazza, Michael; Krebs, Frederik C

    2015-01-01

    The aimof this work is the investigation of forward and reverse bias stress effects, cell self-heating and annealing in roll coated organic solar cells with PCBM:P3HT active layer. In reverse bias stress cells show a constant degradation over time. In forward current stress cells alternate...... degradation and annealing phases, which are explained through the high power dissipation during the current stress, and the consequent self-heating. The high temperature is able to recover the cell performances at least until a critical temperature is reached. The degradation can be explained by the following...

  6. Systematic Angle Random Walk Estimation of the Constant Rate Biased Ring Laser Gyro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohu Feng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An actual account of the angle random walk (ARW coefficients of gyros in the constant rate biased rate ring laser gyro (RLG inertial navigation system (INS is very important in practical engineering applications. However, no reported experimental work has dealt with the issue of characterizing the ARW of the constant rate biased RLG in the INS. To avoid the need for high cost precise calibration tables and complex measuring set-ups, the objective of this study is to present a cost-effective experimental approach to characterize the ARW of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS. In the system, turntable dynamics and other external noises would inevitably contaminate the measured RLG data, leading to the question of isolation of such disturbances. A practical observation model of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS was discussed, and an experimental method based on the fast orthogonal search (FOS for the practical observation model to separate ARW error from the RLG measured data was proposed. Validity of the FOS-based method was checked by estimating the ARW coefficients of the mechanically dithered RLG under stationary and turntable rotation conditions. By utilizing the FOS-based method, the average ARW coefficient of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system is estimated. The experimental results show that the FOS-based method can achieve high denoising ability. This method estimate the ARW coefficients of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system accurately. The FOS-based method does not need precise calibration table with high cost and complex measuring set-up, and Statistical results of the tests will provide us references in engineering application of the constant rate biased RLG INS.

  7. THE SLOW DEATH (OR REBIRTH?) OF EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN z {approx} 0.1 GREEN VALLEY EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M. [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Salim, Samir [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47404 (United States); Graves, Genevieve J. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rich, R. Michael, E-mail: jjfang@ucolick.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-12-10

    UV observations in the local universe have uncovered a population of early-type galaxies with UV flux consistent with low-level recent or ongoing star formation. Understanding the origin of such star formation remains an open issue. We present resolved UV-optical photometry of a sample of 19 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) early-type galaxies at z {approx} 0.1 drawn from the sample originally selected by Salim and Rich to lie in the bluer part of the green valley in the UV-optical color-magnitude diagram as measured by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Utilizing high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far-UV imaging provides unique insight into the distribution of UV light in these galaxies, which we call ''extended star-forming early-type galaxies'' (ESF-ETGs) because of extended UV emission that is indicative of recent star formation. The UV-optical color profiles of all ESF-ETGs show red centers and blue outer parts. Their outer colors require the existence of a significant underlying population of older stars in the UV-bright regions. An analysis of stacked SDSS spectra reveals weak LINER-like emission in their centers. Using a cross-matched SDSS DR7/GALEX GR6 catalog, we search for other green valley galaxies with similar properties to these ESF-ETGs and estimate that Almost-Equal-To 13% of dust-corrected green valley galaxies of similar stellar mass and UV-optical color are likely ESF-candidates, i.e., ESF-ETGs are not rare. Our results are consistent with star formation that is gradually declining in existing disks, i.e., the ESF-ETGs are evolving onto the red sequence for the first time, or with rejuvenated star formation due to accreted gas in older disks provided that the gas does not disrupt the structure of the galaxy and the resulting star formation is not too recent and bursty. ESF-ETGs may typify an important subpopulation of galaxies that can linger in the green valley for up to several Gyrs, based on their resemblance

  8. Light pseudoscalar decay constants, quark masses, and low energy constants from three-flavor lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, C; DeTar, C E; Gottlieb, S; Gregory, E B; Heller, U M; Hetrick, J E; Osborn, J; Sugar, R; Toussaint, D; Gottlieb, Steven

    2004-01-01

    As part of our program of lattice simulations of three flavor QCD with improved staggered quarks, we have calculated pseudoscalar meson masses and decay constants for a range of valence quark masses and sea quark masses on lattices with lattice spacings of about 0.125 fm and 0.09 fm. We fit the lattice data to forms computed with staggered chiral perturbation theory. Our results provide a sensitive test of the lattice simulations, and especially of the chiral behavior, including the effects of chiral logarithms. We find: f_\\pi=129.5(0.9)(3.5)MeV, f_K=156.6(1.0)(3.6)MeV, and f_K/f_\\pi=1.210(4)(13), where the errors are statistical and systematic. Following a recent paper by Marciano, our value of f_K/f_\\pi implies |V_{us}|=0.2219(26). Further, we obtain m_u/m_d= 0.43(0)(1)(8), where the errors are from statistics, simulation systematics, and electromagnetic effects, respectively. The data can also be used to determine several of the constants of the low energy effective Lagrangian: in particular we find 2L_8-L...

  9. Legal reality of Russia: constants and variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Valeryevich Skorobogatov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective to develop the sciencebased knowledge about essential and substantial aspects of the current legal reality of Russia in the context of postclassical paradigm. Methods the methodological basis of this research is the synthesis of classical and postclassical paradigms that determine the choice of specific methods of research formallegal comparative legal modeling method hermeneutic discursive methods. Results basing on the postclassical methodology it is proved that the legal reality of Russia consists of three levels legislation law enforcement and legal behavior. The determinant level of legal reality is legal behavior that is aimed at observing the unwritten rules. The legal reality of Russia is characterized by a transgressive state of the modern Russian society expressed in broad application of nonlegislative nonlegal practices low level of legal culture legal nihilism and legal infantilism. Scientific novelty the article for the first time analyzes the ontological and phenomenological essence of the legal reality in Russia and determines its transgressive nature at the present stage of development. Practical value the main provisions and conclusions of the article can be used in scientific and pedagogical activity when considering questions about the nature and content of legal development. nbsp

  10. Impact of the differential fluence distribution of brachytherapy sources on the spectroscopic dose-rate constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malin, Martha J.; Bartol, Laura J.; DeWerd, Larry A., E-mail: mmalin@wisc.edu, E-mail: ladewerd@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate why dose-rate constants for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds computed using the spectroscopic technique, Λ{sub spec}, differ from those computed with standard Monte Carlo (MC) techniques. A potential cause of these discrepancies is the spectroscopic technique’s use of approximations of the true fluence distribution leaving the source, φ{sub full}. In particular, the fluence distribution used in the spectroscopic technique, φ{sub spec}, approximates the spatial, angular, and energy distributions of φ{sub full}. This work quantified the extent to which each of these approximations affects the accuracy of Λ{sub spec}. Additionally, this study investigated how the simplified water-only model used in the spectroscopic technique impacts the accuracy of Λ{sub spec}. Methods: Dose-rate constants as described in the AAPM TG-43U1 report, Λ{sub full}, were computed with MC simulations using the full source geometry for each of 14 different {sup 125}I and 6 different {sup 103}Pd source models. In addition, the spectrum emitted along the perpendicular bisector of each source was simulated in vacuum using the full source model and used to compute Λ{sub spec}. Λ{sub spec} was compared to Λ{sub full} to verify the discrepancy reported by Rodriguez and Rogers. Using MC simulations, a phase space of the fluence leaving the encapsulation of each full source model was created. The spatial and angular distributions of φ{sub full} were extracted from the phase spaces and were qualitatively compared to those used by φ{sub spec}. Additionally, each phase space was modified to reflect one of the approximated distributions (spatial, angular, or energy) used by φ{sub spec}. The dose-rate constant resulting from using approximated distribution i, Λ{sub approx,i}, was computed using the modified phase space and compared to Λ{sub full}. For each source, this process was repeated for each approximation in order to determine which approximations used in

  11. Holographic Dark Energy in Higher Derivative Gravity with Varying Gravitational Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Bharat; Ansari, M.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the holographic dark energy scenario in higher derivative gravity with a varying gravitational constant. We introduce a kind of energy density from higher derivative gravity which has role of the same as holographic dark energy. We obtain the exact differential equation , which determine the evolution of the dark energy density based on varying gravitational constant G. We also find out a cosmological application of our work by evaluating a relation for the equation of state of dark energy for low redshifts containing varying G correction.

  12. Deflation of the cosmological constant associated with inflation and dark energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2016-06-01

    In order to solve the fine-tuning problem of the cosmological constant, we propose a simple model with the vacuum energy non-minimally coupled to the inflaton field. In this model, the vacuum energy decays to the inflaton during pre-inflation and inflation eras, so that the cosmological constant effectively deflates from the Planck mass scale to a much smaller one after inflation and plays the role of dark energy in the late-time of the universe. We show that our deflationary scenario is applicable to arbitrary slow-roll inflation models. We also take two specific inflation potentials to illustrate our results.

  13. Deflation of the cosmological constant associated with inflation and dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    In order to solve the fine-tuning problem of the cosmological constant, we propose a simple model with the vacuum energy non-minimally coupled to the inflaton field. In this model, the vacuum energy decays to the inflaton during pre-inflation and inflation eras, so that the cosmological constant effectively deflates from the Planck mass scale to a much smaller one after inflation and plays the role of dark energy in the late-time of the universe. We show that our deflationary scenario is applicable to arbitrary slow-roll inflation models. We also take two specific inflation potentials to illustrate our results.

  14. The decay constants fDs and fD+ form lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, James N [Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Recent calculations of the decay constants in lattice QCD are reviewed and compared to experiment. The decay constants are tabulated in Table 2 and plotted in Figure 2. The most precise f{sub Ds} value is from HPQCD. It is about 2{sigma} higher than their previous result. The change is due to a more precise determination of the lattice spacing and better tuning of the quark masses. They have updated f{sub D+} using the new f{sub Ds} and their older f{sub Ds}/f{sub D+} ratio which is expected to be less sensitive to mistuning of the lattice spacing and masses. The preliminary FNAL/MILC f{sub Ds} value is about 1.4{sigma} higher than the HPQCD result but with a larger error. The f{sub D+} values, however, are in better agreement. FNAL/MILC expect to finalize their results once the charm quark mass tuning is complete. The two flavor ETM f{sub D+} value is about 1.6{sigma} lower than the HPQCD value while f{sub Ds} is in better agreement. It is not clear how much of the difference is from neglecting the strange sea quark, given the errors. Lattice and experiment differ most significantly for f{sub Ds}. Figure 3 shows Kronfeld's (updated) history of f{sub Ds}. The yellow bands depict the evolution of the experimental average while the three-flavor lattice average is shown in grey. The right-hand scale and green lines show the differences in sigmas. The 3.8{sigma} discrepancy around t {approx} 2 provoked the 'f{sub Ds} puzzle'. That discrepancy has now shrunk to 1.6{sigma}. Future lattice and experiment will be decisive.

  15. The cosmological constant and black-hole thermodynamic potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The thermodynamics of black holes in various dimensions are described in the presence of a negative cosmological constant which is treated as a thermodynamic variable, interpreted as a pressure in the equation of state. The black hole mass is then identified with the enthalpy, rather than the internal energy, and heat capacities are calculated at constant pressure not at constant volume. The Euclidean action is associated with a bridge equation for the Gibbs free energy and not th...

  16. Non-minimally coupled varying constants quantum cosmologies

    OpenAIRE

    Balcerzak, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We consider gravity theory with varying speed of light and varying gravitational constant. Both constants are represented by non-minimally coupled scalar fields. We examine the cosmological evolution in the near curvature singularity regime. We find that at the curvature singularity the speed of light goes to infinity while the gravitational constant vanishes. This corresponds to the Newton's Mechanics limit represented by one of the vertex of the Bronshtein-Zelmanov-Okun cube. The cosmologic...

  17. Experimental determination of the effective strong coupling constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandre Deur; Volker Burkert; Jian-Ping Chen; Wolfgang Korsch

    2005-09-15

    We extract an effective strong coupling constant from low Q2 data on the Bjorken sum. Using sum rules, we establish its Q2-behavior over the complete Q2-range. The result is compared to effective coupling constants extracted from different processes and to calculations based on Schwinger-Dyson equations, hadron spectroscopy or lattice QCD. Although the connection between the experimentally extracted effective coupling constant and the calculations is not clear, the results agree surprisingly well.

  18. On multisoliton solutions of the constant astigmatism equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaváč, Adam

    2015-09-01

    We introduce an algebraic formula producing infinitely many exact solutions of the constant astigmatism equation {z}{yy}+{(1/z)}{xx}+2=0 from a given seed. A construction of corresponding surfaces of constant astigmatism is then a matter of routine. As a special case, we consider multisoliton solutions of the constant astigmatism equation defined as counterparts of famous multisoliton solutions of the sine-Gordon equation. A few particular examples are surveyed as well.

  19. On multisoliton solutions of the constant astigmatism equation

    OpenAIRE

    Hlaváč, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an algebraic formula producing infinitely many exact solutions of the constant astigmatism equation $ z_{yy} + ({1}/{z})_{xx} + 2 = 0 $ from a given seed. A construction of corresponding surfaces of constant astigmatism is then a matter of routine. As a special case, we consider multisoliton solutions of the constant astigmatism equation defined as counterparts of famous multisoliton solutions of the sine-Gordon equation. A few particular examples are surveyed as well.

  20. On Riemannian manifolds (Mn, g) of quasi-constant curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Riemannian manifold (Mn, g) of quasi-constant curvature is defined. It is shown that an (Mn, g) in association with other class of manifolds gives rise, under certain conditions, to a manifold of quasi-constant curvature. Some observations on how a manifold of quasi-constant curvature accounts for a pseudo Ricci-symmetric manifold and quasi-umbilical hypersurface are made. (author). 10 refs