WorldWideScience

Sample records for applying safety regulation

  1. Framework for applying probabilistic safety analysis in nuclear regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrijevic, V.B.

    1997-01-01

    The traditional regulatory framework has served well to assure the protection of public health and safety. It has been recognized, however, that in a few circumstances, this deterministic framework has lead to an extensive expenditure on matters hat have little to do with the safe and reliable operation of the plant. Developments of plant-specific PSA have offered a new and powerful analytical tool in the evaluation of the safety of the plant. Using PSA insights as an aid to decision making in the regulatory process is now known as 'risk-based' or 'risk-informed' regulation. Numerous activities in the U.S. nuclear industry are focusing on applying this new approach to modify regulatory requirements. In addition, other approaches to regulations are in the developmental phase and are being evaluated. One is based on the performance monitoring and results and it is known as performance-based regulation. The other, called the blended approach, combines traditional deterministic principles with PSA insights and performance results. (author)

  2. 75 FR 35366 - Pipeline Safety: Applying Safety Regulation to All Rural Onshore Hazardous Liquid Low-Stress Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-22

    ... by pipeline failures. Any interruption in the fuel supply impacts the U.S. economy by putting upward... applies specifically to breakout tanks prevails. Anhydrous ammonia breakout tanks need not comply with Sec...

  3. International regulations on labour health and safety applied to fishing and maritime transport sectors. Are maritime workers under-protected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Julio Louro; Portela, Rosa Mary de la Campa; Pardo, Guadalupe Martín

    2012-01-01

    The work activity developed on board is of great importance in our nearby environment, and it has a series of peculiarities that determine the service rendering of sea workers. On the other hand, work at sea is developed on an international basis. Nowadays such work becomes a completely globalised industrial sector in relation to the elements that make up the ship's operation, including manpower. For that reason several relevant international organisations have paid attention to this industrial sector and have adopted a broad regulation on this matter. In the case of the European Union, the Community procedure emphasises enormous interest in providing specific and comprehensive training to seafarers, as well as in regulating working time on board with the aim of minimising the safety problems caused by fatigue. In the present article a schematic presentation of regulations on workers' health and occupational safety protection derived from the European Union, the International Maritime Organisation, and the International Labour Organisation has been done. Also it shows what parts of these regulations are not applicable to the work on board, and it reveals how the workers of fishing and maritime transport sectors are under-protected with regard to the guarantee of their health and occupational safety compared to workers in other sectors.

  4. Safety regulations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, S.

    1987-01-01

    In Japan, it is provided in the Law for Regulations of Nuclear Source Material, Nuclear Fuel Material and Reactors (referred as LRNR) that the licensee shall establish the safety regulations for individual plant by themselves regarding the operating management of nuclear reactor facility to secure the concrete safety of the nuclear power plant, that he shall receive an authorization of responsible government agencies (Minister of International Trade and Industry for commercial power station) and that this regulation shall be kept by the licensee and its employees. Furthermore, it is also provided in the same law that the licensee shall voluntarily nominate a chief reactor engineer to supervise the safety of reactor operation and that those who are engaged to the reactor operation shall obey the chief reactor engineer's instruction for the safety of reactor operation. These two factors are the base of the voluntary security system for reactor safety

  5. Nuclear regulation and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrie, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear regulation and safety are discussed from the standpoint of a hypothetical country that is in the process of introducing a nuclear power industry and setting up a regulatory system. The national policy is assumed to be in favor of nuclear power. The regulators will have responsibility for economic, reliable electric production as well as for safety. Reactor safety is divided into three parts: shut it down, keep it covered, take out the afterheat. Emergency plans also have to be provided. Ways of keeping the core covered with water are discussed

  6. Nuclear Safety Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosel, N.; Prah, M.

    2008-01-01

    Beside new Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment ('Official Gazette' No. 15/08), from 2006 State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) adopted Ordinance on performing nuclear activities ('Official Gazette' No. 74/06) and Ordinance on special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety ('Official Gazette' No. 74/06), based on Nuclear Safety Act ('Official Gazette' No. 173/03). The Ordinance on performing nuclear activities regulates the procedure of notification of the intent to perform nuclear activities, submitting the application for the issue of a licence to perform nuclear activities, and the procedure for issuing decisions on granting a licence to perform a nuclear activity. The Ordinance also regulates the content of the forms for notification of the intent to perform nuclear activities, as well as of the application for the issue of a licence to perform the nuclear activity and the method of keeping the register of nuclear activities. According to the Nuclear Safety Act, nuclear activities are the production, processing, use, storage, disposal, transport, import, export, possession or other handling of nuclear material or specified equipment. The Ordinance on special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety regulates these mentioned conditions, whereas compliance is established by a decision passed by the SONS. Special requirements which expert organizations must fulfil in order to perform certain activities in the field of nuclear safety are organizational, technical, technological conditions and established system of quality assurance. In 2007, State Office for Nuclear Safety finalized the text of new Ordinance on conditions for nuclear safety and protection with regard to the siting, design, construction, use and decommissioning of a facility in which a nuclear activity is

  7. Applying radiation safety standards in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) cover the application of ionizing radiation for all practices and interventions and are, therefore, basic and general in nature. Users of radiation sources have to apply these basic requirements to their own particular practices. This requires a degree of 'interpretation' by the user, which can result in varying levels of regulatory compliance and inconsistencies between applications of the BSS to similar practices. In this context, the preamble of the BSS states that: The [regulatory body] may need to provide guidance on how certain regulatory requirements are to be fulfilled for various practices, for example in regulatory guideline documents. In order to guide the user to achieve a good standard of protection and to achieve a consistent national approach to licensing and inspection, some countries have developed practice specific regulatory guidance, while others have practice specific regulations. For obvious reasons, national regulatory guidance is tailored to a country's own legislation and regulations. This can lead to problems if the guidance is used in other States without appropriate modification to take local requirements into account. There would therefore appear to be scope for producing internationally harmonized guidance, while bearing in mind that the ultimate responsibility for the regulatory documents rests with the State. Some regions have taken the initiative of preparing guidance to facilitate the regional harmonization of regulatory control of certain common practices (e.g. radiotherapy). A number of draft regulatory guidance documents for the main practices involving the use of ionizing radiation have already been prepared. This initiative indicates that there is a global demand for such documents. In particular, it is felt that countries participating in the IAEA's technical cooperation model project on Upgrading

  8. Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, known as CFSAN, is one of six product-oriented centers, in addition to a nationwide field force, that carry out the...

  9. Radiation Safety (Qualifications) Regulations 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    These Regulations, promulgated pursuant to the provisions of the Radiation Safety Act, 1975-1979, require persons engaged in activities involving radiation to pass a radiation safety examination or to possess an approved qualification in radiation. The National Health and Medical Research Council is authorised to exempt persons from compliance with these requirements or, conversely, to impose such requirements on persons other than those designated. (NEA) [fr

  10. Nuclear safety: risks and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    Taking a fresh look at nuclear safety regulations, this study finds that the mandate and organization of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) militate against its making sound decisions. The author criticizes failures to make hard decisions on societal risk, to clarify responsibility, and to implement cost-effective safety measures. Among his recommendations are reorganization of the NRC under a single authoritative administrator, separation of technical issues from social ones, and reform of the Price-Anderson Act. The author concludes that the worst eventuality would be to continue the current state of indecision. 161 references, 6 figures, 4 tables

  11. NRC - regulator of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations

  12. A macromarketing perspective on food safety regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    of the major stakeholders in the Danish food marketing system. Adding to the literature on diffusion of regulatory initiatives, the analysis shows that the Danish ban on trans-fats had—and still has—an important impact on trans-fat regulation in other European and overseas countries. In the final section......This article discusses the implementation and diffusion of mandatory and voluntary food safety regulations from a marketing systems perspective, and specifically applies this framework to an analysis of the antecedents and implications of the Danish 2003 ban on trans-fatty acids (TFAs......). The analysis is based on reviews of published material and on interviews with food marketers, nutrition experts, and policy makers. It is established that the ban was implemented due to scientific proof of health risks associated with the intake of TFAs but also as a result of aligned interests and efforts...

  13. MEASURING THE IMPACT OF FOOD SAFETY REGULATION-AN OUTPUT DIRECTIONAL DISTANCE FUNCTION APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Hooker, Neal H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a novel methodology to measure the impact of food safety regulation. An output directional distance function approach is applied to estimate the opportunity cost of food safety regulation. Such a measure should be included as part of the overall cost for a more precise benefit-cost analysis of food safety regulation. Using US Census and food safety recall data, the value of potential output loss due to food safety regulation is suggested $2.5 billion.

  14. Leadership for Safety in Practice: Perspectives from a Nuclear Regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyobeka, B. M.

    2016-01-01

    The principal responsibility for a nuclear regulator is to assure compliance with regulations and safety standards by operators. One of these requirements is demonstration of, and adherence to, nuclear safety culture by the operators. At the same time, the regulators themselves are expected to live the talk and practice what they preach, i.e., demonstrate highest levels of nuclear safety culture within their organizations. Consequently, it is recognised that leadership is important in the creation of a culture that supports and promotes a strong nuclear safety performance of an organization. The leaders of a regulatory body are vital in inspiring employees to a higher level of safety and productivity, which means that they must apply good leadership attributes on a daily basis. This paper will attempt to bring forth and share attributes for strong leadership role in promoting a safety culture within a nuclear regulatory body by surveying world-wide practices and examples in developing and advanced nuclear countries. (author)

  15. Development of French technical safety regulations: safety fundamental rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebouleux, P.

    1983-01-01

    The technical regulation related to nuclear safety in France is made of a set of regulation texts, of a different nature, that define the requirements for the construction, commissioning and operating of nuclear facilities. Simultaneously, the safety authorities (Service Central de Surete des Installations Nucleaires: SCSIN) issue recommendations or guides which are not strictly speaking regulations in the juridicial sense; they are called Regles Fondamentales de Surete (RFS). The RFS set up and detail the conditions, the respect of which is deemed to be complying with the French regulation practice, for the subject to which they relate. Their purpose is to make known rules judged acceptable by safety authorities, thus making the safety review easier. The RFS program is described. A RFS - or a letter - can also give the result of the examination of the constructor and operator codes (RCC) by safety authorities

  16. OBTAINING FOOD SAFETY BY APPLYING HACCP SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ION CRIVEANU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase the confidence of the trading partners and consumers in the products which are sold on the market, enterprises producing food are required to implement the food safety system HACCP,a particularly useful system because the manufacturer is not able to fully control finished products . SR EN ISO 22000:2005 establishes requirements for a food safety management system where an organization in the food chain needs to proove its ability to control food safety hazards in order to ensure that food is safe at the time of human consumption. This paper presents the main steps which ensure food safety using the HACCP system, and SR EN ISO 20000:2005 requirements for food safety.

  17. Applied Health Physics and Safety annual report for 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-08-01

    This report describes and summarizes the activities of the applied sections and/or groups of the Health Physics Division. Projects and activities covered include personnel monitoring, environmental monitoring, radiation and safety surveys, and industrial safety

  18. Nuclear safety: economic analysis of American, French and Japanese regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, Francois

    2013-05-01

    While discussing and comparing the American, Japanese and French approaches and practices, and identifying the strengths and weaknesses of each of them, the author discusses why self-regulation and civil responsibility cannot guarantee a sufficient nuclear safety level, why the safety regulation authority must be independent from industry and government, whether a figure must be put to the safety objective (for example with a risk threshold), whether it is better to define detailed standards to be applied by manufacturers and operators or to define general performance criteria to be reached

  19. Overview of nuclear safety regulations in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkovskii, L.

    1996-01-01

    The status of national legislation and regulation governing nuclear and radiation safety in Ukraine, the organizational structure of Nuclear Regulatory Administration which is included in the Ministry for Environmental Protection and Nuclear Safety (MEPNS), and the licensing procedures for nuclear facilities are briefly presented

  20. The politics of nuclear safety regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.

    2002-01-01

    The paper discusses political aspects of decision making about the safety of nuclear power plants especially in Eastern Europe and in connection with the enlargement of the European Union. The problem of the Kozloduy NPP safety is also discussed. Recommendations on the policy and tasks for nuclear regulators are given

  1. Radiation Safety (General) Regulations 1983 (Western Australia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The provisions of the Regulations cover, inter alia, the general precautions and requirements relating to radiation safety of the public and radiation workers and registration of irradiating apparatus or premises on which such apparatus is operated. In addition, the Regulations set forth requirements for the operation of such apparatus and for the premises involved. (NEA) [fr

  2. Applying Digital Technologies to Strengthen Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huffeteau, S.; Roy, C.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The paper describes how the development of some information technologies can further contribute to the safety of nuclear facilities and their competitiveness. After repositioning the nuclear industry engineering practices in their historical and economic context, the paper describes five engineering practices or use cases widely developed especially in the aerospace industry: requirement management, business process enforcement by digitization of data and processes, facilities configuration management, engineering information unification, and digital licensing. Information technology (IT) plays a mandatory role for driving this change since IT is now mature enough to handle the level of complexity the nuclear industry requires. While the detailed evaluation of the expecting gains in cost decrease or safety increase can be difficult to quantify, the paper presents illustrative benefits reachable by a development of these practices. (author

  3. Applying the behaviour grid for improving safety in industrial environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de J. (Johannes); Heylen, D. (Dirk); Teeuw, W.B. (Wouter)

    2013-01-01

    The Saxion University of Applied Sciences recently started its “Safety at Work” project. Its objective is to increase safety in the workplace by combining and applying state-of-the-art factors from Ambient Intelligence, Industrial & Product Design and Smart Materials [1].The human

  4. THE OPPORTUNITY COST OF FOOD SAFETY REGULATION - AN OUTPUT DIRECTIONAL DISTANCE FUNCTION APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Hooker, Neal H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a novel methodology to measure the impact of food safety regulation. An output directional distance function approach is applied to estimate the opportunity cost of food safety regulation and the shadow price of food risk. Such measures should be included as part of the overall cost of compliance for a more precise comparison of the benefits and costs of food safety regulation. Further, comparing the implicit shadow price of food risk and willingness to pay for food safety...

  5. China's food safety regulation and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiaogang; Zhang, Feng; Nie, Xuemei; Wang, Wenzhi; Feng, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Food safety is essential to people's health and people's livelihood. To ensure that food safety is an important current strategy of the governments, both regulation and standardization are important support for implementing this strategic initiative effectively. The status and prospects of China's food laws, regulations, and standards system are introduced. China now has established a complete law regime providing a sound foundation and good environment for keeping the health of people, maintaining the order of social economy and promoting the international trade of food. At the same time, it is undoubtedly important to strengthen standardization and improve the food safety standards system. In the administration of food safety, mass spectrometry is becoming more and more important and many analytical methods developed in China are based on its application.

  6. Rules and regulations applying to incidents in radiotheraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, F.; Andre, L.; Georg, D.; Hodapp, N.

    2012-01-01

    Aims and purpose: Radiotherapy is an essential and reliable element of the treatment armamentarium in oncology. Numerous rules, regulations, and protocols minimize the associated risks. It can, however, never be excluded that errors in the treatment delivery chain result in inadequate tumor doses or unnecessary damage to organs at risk. A legal framework governs the management of such incidents. The most important European and North American regulations are reported. Results: Various directives issued by the European Union are differently implemented nationally. This applies particularly to the characterization of incidents that must be reported to authorities. Reporting thresholds, audit systems, and the extent of the integration of voluntary reporting systems vary. Conclusion: Radiotherapy incidents are dealt with differently on an international level. Changes are to be expected based on the European Basic Safety Standards Directive that is currently being prepared and will have to be implemented nationally in due course. (orig.)

  7. 42 CFR 55a.107 - What other regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR BLACK LUNG CLINICS General Provisions § 55a.107 What other regulations apply? Other regulations which apply to the Black Lung Clinics Program include, but are not limited to, the following: 42 CFR...

  8. Applying importance-performance analysis to patient safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yii-Ching; Wu, Hsin-Hung; Hsieh, Wan-Lin; Weng, Shao-Jen; Hsieh, Liang-Po; Huang, Chih-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    The Sexton et al.'s (2006) safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ) has been widely used to assess staff's attitudes towards patient safety in healthcare organizations. However, to date there have been few studies that discuss the perceptions of patient safety both from hospital staff and upper management. The purpose of this paper is to improve and to develop better strategies regarding patient safety in healthcare organizations. The Chinese version of SAQ based on the Taiwan Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation is used to evaluate the perceptions of hospital staff. The current study then lies in applying importance-performance analysis technique to identify the major strengths and weaknesses of the safety culture. The results show that teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, stress recognition and working conditions are major strengths and should be maintained in order to provide a better patient safety culture. On the contrary, perceptions of management and hospital handoffs and transitions are important weaknesses and should be improved immediately. Research limitations/implications - The research is restricted in generalizability. The assessment of hospital staff in patient safety culture is physicians and registered nurses. It would be interesting to further evaluate other staff's (e.g. technicians, pharmacists and others) opinions regarding patient safety culture in the hospital. Few studies have clearly evaluated the perceptions of healthcare organization management regarding patient safety culture. Healthcare managers enable to take more effective actions to improve the level of patient safety by investigating key characteristics (either strengths or weaknesses) that healthcare organizations should focus on.

  9. Safety supervision on high-pressure gas regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Il

    1991-01-01

    The first part lists the regulation on safety supervision of high-pressure gas, enforcement ordinance on high-pressure gas safety supervision and enforcement regulations about high-pressure gas safety supervision. The second part indicates safety regulations on liquefied petroleum gas and business, enforcement ordinance of safety on liquefied petroleum gas and business, enforcement regulation of safety supervision over liquefied petroleum gas and business. The third part lists regulation on gas business, enforcement ordinance and enforcement regulations on gas business. Each part has theory and explanation for questions.

  10. DNA vaccines: safety aspect assessment and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjitna, T D E; Stadler, C; Bruckner, L; Griot, C; Ottiger, H P

    2006-01-01

    For licensing purposes, besides the immunogenic aspects, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) vaccines present safety considerations that must be critically assessed during preclinical or/and clinical safety studies. The major concerns with regard to safety are integration of the plasmid DNA into the host genome, adverse immunopathological effects, the formation of anti-DNA antibodies resulting in auto-immune disease and the use of novel molecular adjuvants. Moreover, for veterinary vaccines intended to be used in husbandry animals, food safety aspects will become an important issue. All new vaccine candidates should therefore be thoroughly tested in target animals, keeping in mind that for food producing animals, the products will be consumed. Finally, a further safety aspect of interest concerns the possible spread of genetic material to the environment, by the potential transformation of the environmental microflora with only a few copies of complete or fragmented plasmid. These are issues that need to be considered in the final scientific decisions underpinning the registration of vaccines. Thus, to establish criteria for guidance and regulations for industry and licensing authorities, a project has been initiated to assess such risks of plasmid DNA vaccinations. Major emphasis will be placed on aspects such as the biodistribution of plasmid in vaccinated animals. This paper is intended as a contribution to the debate on the use of biotechnology in the future and should facilitate further discussions on the various safety aspects of DNA-based immunisations.

  11. Offshore regulators focus on incentives for safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, W.

    2000-11-27

    Strict safety regulations in effect at offshore drilling sites are discussed. The guiding principle in all existing regulation is that while economic or industrial considerations are important, the value and the concern for human life is paramount. Should some tragic event occur at an offshore drilling site that is shown to have been caused by negligence of an operator, there is no question at all that the regulatory authority, in this case the Canada-Newfoundland Offshore Petroleum Board (CNOPB), would take the negligent operator to court. Nevertheless, Canadian authorities remain confident that encouragement of maintaining a safe working environment is likely to be more successful in ensuring workplace safety than threats of punishment. Indeed, Canadian regulators have, in recent times, shown a tendency to move towards performance-based systems, as opposed to the more usual prescriptive or rule-bound regulatory regime. This new approach involves setting targets and giving companies the responsibility to implement measures to reach the targets rather than relying on government instructions. Still, performance-based regulation in Canada is relatively new and some regulations remain prescriptive. Examples are the requirement for two immersion suits and two lifeboat seats for every worker on a drilling unit.

  12. On the Regulation of Life Safety Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Michael Havbro; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper takes up the issue of appropriate choice of metric for life safety and health related risks in a regulatory context addressing effects of temporal and spatial scales for their consistent quantification and comparison across societal sectors, industries and application areas...... in a regulatory context are highlighted and discussed. It is identified and explained that the principle of decision optimization and conjoint fulfillment of the marginal lifesaving principle does not render the assessment of the individual life safety risks for specific individuals relevant. Nor is the resulting....... Starting point is taken in a short outline of what is considered to comprise the present best practice rationale for life safety and health risk regulation. Thereafter, based on selected principal examples from different application areas, inconsistencies in present best practice risk quantification...

  13. Regulatory Body Safety Culture in Non-nuclear HROs: Lessons for Nuclear Regulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, M.; Bowers, K.

    2016-01-01

    Regulator safety culture is a relatively new area of investigation, even though deficiencies in regulatory oversight have been identified in a number of public inquiries (e.g., Piper Alpha, Deep Water Horizon). More recently the IAEA report into the Fukushima disaster specifically identified the need for regulatory bodies to have a positive safety culture. While there are clear parallels between duty holder safety culture and regulator safety culture there are also likely to be differences. To date they have been no published studies investigating regulator safety culture. In order to develop a framework to understand regulator safety culture we conducted a literature review and interviewed safety culture subject matter experts from a range of HRO domains (e.g., offshore oil and gas). There was general consensus among participants that regulatory safety culture was an important topic that was worthy of further investigation. That there was general agreement that regulatory safety culture was multi-dimensional and that some of the elements of existing safety culture models applied to regulator culture (e.g., learning and leadership). The participants also identified unique dimensions of regulator safety culture including commitment to high standards and ethics, transparency and perceived role of the regulator. In this paper we will present the results of the interviews and present a model of regulator safety culture. This model will be contrasted with models being used in the nuclear industry. Implications for assessing regulatory safety culture will be discussed. (author)

  14. Safety practice and regulations in different IGORR member countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman, C.; Minguet, J.L.; Arnould, F.

    1999-01-01

    In the suggestions of the 1996 IGORR 5 conference, Technicatome proposed 'Comparing Regulations for Research Reactors in Participating Countries'. The aim was to enhance and facilitate the dissemination of pertinent information amongst potential utilities of operational research reactors. A questionnaire on the following topics was subsequently sent out to IGORR 5 participants : Procedures for Research Reactors and Associated Equipment, Safety Analysis, Safety Related Components, Radiation Protection and Management of Nuclear materials. The objective of the present paper is to identify major trends, similarities and differences in the approaches adopted by different countries. Its scope has been limited to: Licensing and Regulatory approach; Operating and Safety documents; Safety Analysis; Radiological Safety; Management of Nuclear Materials. The investigations carried out indicate that to a large extent international recommendations (IAEA, ICPR,..) are being followed and that there is a general tendency to integrate them into national legislation and regulations. Although Safety Culture varies from one country to another an overall general consensus exists on the basic approach to safety inasmuch as: different countries have their own legally defined Safety Authorities, a Preliminary Safety Report is required before a research reactor can be built, and a final Safety Report before the core can be loaded with nuclear fuel and the reactor made critical; these documents must be accepted by the Safety Authorities concerned; a combination of defense-in-depth strategy (deterministic approach) and probabilistic analysis is applied; three or more safety classes are used to categorize systems and components; the single failure criterion is taken into consideration for systems and components having safety functions; both Operating Basis and Safety Shutdown type earthquakes are considered; the crashing of an aircraft onto a research reactor is taken into consideration

  15. Nuclear safety as applied to space power reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    To develop a strategy for incorporating and demonstrating safety, it is necessary to enumerate the unique aspects of space power reactor systems from a safety standpoint. These features must be differentiated from terrestrial nuclear power plants so that our experience can be applied properly. Some ideas can then be developed on how safe designs can be achieved so that they are safe and perceived to be safe by the public. These ideas include operating only after achieving a stable orbit, developing an inherently safe design, ''designing'' in safety from the start and managing the system development (design) so that it is perceived safe. These and other ideas are explored further in this paper

  16. 34 CFR 661.3 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 661.3 Section 661.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BUSINESS AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAM General § 661.3 What regulations apply...

  17. 34 CFR 660.3 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 660.3 Section 660.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH AND STUDIES PROGRAM General § 660.3 What regulations apply...

  18. 34 CFR 364.3 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM: GENERAL PROVISIONS General § 364.3 What regulations apply? The following... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 364.3 Section 364.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND...

  19. 34 CFR 427.4 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 427.4 Section 427.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BILINGUAL VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAM General § 427.4 What regulations apply? The...

  20. 49 CFR 176.4 - Port security and safety regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Port security and safety regulations. 176.4... SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL General § 176.4 Port security and safety regulations. (a) Each carrier, master, agent, and charterer of a...

  1. Safety regulation on high-pressure gas and gas business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Du Yeoung; An, Dae Jun

    1978-09-01

    This book is divided into two parts. The first part introduces safety regulation on high-pressure gas, enforcement ordinance on safety regulation about high-pressure gas and enforcement regulation on safety regulation about high-pressure gas. The second part indicates regulations on gas business such as general rules, gas business gas supplies, using land, supervision, supple mentary rules and penalty. It has two appendixes on expected questions and questions during last years.

  2. FOOD SAFETY REGULATIONS BASED ON REAL SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huub LELIEVELD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Differences in regulations result in needless destruction of safe food and hamper food trade. The differences are not just the result of the history of food safety regulations, often developed in times before global cooperation, but are also built in new regulations. It may be responses to media hypes or for other reasons, but in most cases the differences cannot be justified scientifically. A major difficulty is that, due to the developments in analytical techniques the number of chemicals that are found in food is increasing rapidly and chemicals are always suspected to be a safety risk. By far most chemicals are of natural origin but could not be detected in the past because the methods available in the past were not sensitive enough. Demanding the absence of chemicals because the risk they present is unknown, however, would eventually make all food unacceptable. The general public should be shown that everything they eat is chemical, and all food components will be toxic if the amount is too high. It should also be shown that many of these chemicals will also cause illness and death if there is not enough of it as is the case with vitamins and minerals.

  3. The 7 basic tools of quality applied to radiological safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez F, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    This work seeks to establish a series of correspondences among the search of the quality and the optimization of the doses received by the occupationally exposed personnel. There are treated about the seven basic statistic tools of the quality: the Pareto technique, Cause effect diagrams, Stratification, Verification sheet, Histograms, Dispersion diagrams and Graphics and control frames applied to the Radiological Safety

  4. Applying a realistic evaluation model to occupational safety interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Louise Møller

    2018-01-01

    Background: Recent literature characterizes occupational safety interventions as complex social activities, applied in complex and dynamic social systems. Hence, the actual outcomes of an intervention will vary, depending on the intervention, the implementation process, context, personal characte......Background: Recent literature characterizes occupational safety interventions as complex social activities, applied in complex and dynamic social systems. Hence, the actual outcomes of an intervention will vary, depending on the intervention, the implementation process, context, personal...... characteristics of key actors (defined mechanisms), and the interplay between them, and can be categorized as expected or unexpected. However, little is known about ’how’ to include context and mechanisms in evaluations of intervention effectiveness. A revised realistic evaluation model has been introduced...... and qualitative methods. This revised model has, however, not been applied in a real life context. Method: The model is applied in a controlled, four-component, integrated behaviour-based and safety culture-based safety intervention study (2008-2010) in a medium-sized wood manufacturing company. The interventions...

  5. The role of the nuclear safety regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellado, I.

    2007-01-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), or Nuclear Safety Council, is the only Spanish institution qualified in nuclear safety and radiological protection. Created in 1980, the CSN is independent of the Central State Administration, and possesses its own legal standing, estate and resources acquired directly from tax revenues. The CSN proposes regulations and advises the government on subjects within its competence, including the criteria for siting nuclear facilities once the autonomous regions have been informed. The CSN is responsible for issuing mandatory and binding reports to the Ministry of Industry. Tourism and Commerce, and for inspections and evaluation of the facilities included within its realm of competence throughout their phases (construction, start-up, operating and decommissioning). It is also responsible for the radiological control and surveillance of workers, the general public and the environment, as described below. In 1999, a new responsibility was assigned to the CSN to perform studies, assessment and inspections in relation to all phases of radioactive waste and spent fuel management. The CSN reports to the Spanish Parliament and is not subject to the hierarchy or auspices of the Government or the organisations in charge of promoting nuclear energy. The Council itself is an Associative Body comprised of 5 members, appointed by Parliament for a 6 year term (these members cannot be removed). Under this Council is situated an extensive technical body. A General Secretary is seconded by Technical Directors in the area of Nuclear Safety and Radiological Protection. As well there are a R and D Office, an Inspection Office, and a Technical Standards Office. The CSN counts 446 workers, of which 191 are university graduate specialists in nuclear safety or radiological protection. The average age is 45 years. Ongoing training is provided in technical specialties and management. (author)

  6. 34 CFR 366.4 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 366.4 Section 366.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CENTERS FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING General § 366.4 What regulations...

  7. 34 CFR 428.4 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 428.4 Section 428.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BILINGUAL VOCATIONAL INSTRUCTOR TRAINING PROGRAM General § 428.4 What regulations...

  8. Regulations and classification advice: transport safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M.; Owen, K.

    1990-01-01

    The packaging of radioactive material for transport must conform with the regulations of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). These regulations are extensive and complex and require specialist interpretation. Packaging must be designed to contain the material, to limit radiation to safe levels, and to maintain the material in a safe state under both normal and accident conditions. British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. (BNFL) developed the TRANAID expert system to provide automated expert advice on the subject. It is used at BNFL and by other users internationally. The system was produced to meet an internal BNFL emphasis on accurate consistent and reliable interpretation of the complex IAEA regulations; and to provide a commercial product which would meet an external need. TRANAID provides reliable and consistent advice on safe transport procedures which reduce the workload on scarce skilled personnel, and allows them to concentrate on their primary task of packaging design. TRANAID also avoids overclassifying radioactive shipments, which would lead to the use of more expensive packaging than strictly is required. The IAEA regulations are applied internationally, and so there is a large potential worldwide market. The indications from the initial response are that future sales and use are expected to more than cover the investment. Other non-quantifiable benefits include the provision of consistent advice within a uniform approach, the safe-guarding of knowledge of the IAEA regulations, training and improvement in the expertise of users, improved management control, and enhancement of the professional image of BNFL. (author)

  9. 76 FR 33307 - Strengthen and Promote the Role of Local Health Departments in Retail Food Safety Regulation (U-50)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ...] Strengthen and Promote the Role of Local Health Departments in Retail Food Safety Regulation (U-50) AGENCY... Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) and the National Association of County and City Health... Requirements Contact: Scientific/Programmatic Contact: Peter A. Salsbury, Center for Food Safety and Applied...

  10. The theorization of nuclear safety regulation and legal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. W.; Jang, K. H.; Oh, B. J.; Kang, S. C.; Lee, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear safety regulation, which restricts the freedoms and rights of people, should be carried out under the principle of regulation by acts. Therefore, it should be starting point of understanding of nuclear safety regulation to understand theoretical system of administrative regulation such as legal system · sorts · effect of governmental regulatory administration. This report analysed, from a legal aspect, the concept of nuclear safety regulation and the spirit of the Framework Act on Administrative Regulation. Therefore, this report examined closely all kinds of regulatory actions sorted by its contents, discretion, added condition (Nebenbestimmungen). In addition to it, this report analysed the hierarchy of nuclear legislation in the form of act, presidential decree, enforcement regulation, notice of Minister of Science and Technology and regulatory guide of regulatory body. Finally, this report reviewed the principles for good regulation such as recommended by the NRC to grope for desirable attitude for staffs of nuclear safety regulation body

  11. 42 CFR 64.9 - Other HHS regulations that apply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., TRAINING NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE TRAINING GRANTS § 64.9 Other HHS regulations that apply. Several...) and requirements for drug-free workplace (grants). 45 CFR part 80—Nondiscrimination under programs...

  12. 34 CFR 658.3 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 658.3 Section 658.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE INTERNATIONAL STUDIES AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAM General § 658.3 What...

  13. 34 CFR 462.2 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 462.2 Section 462.2 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MEASURING EDUCATIONAL GAIN IN THE NATIONAL REPORTING SYSTEM FOR ADULT EDUCATION...

  14. 42 CFR 59a.17 - Other HHS regulations that apply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other HHS regulations that apply. 59a.17 Section 59a.17 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE GRANTS Establishment of Regional Medical Libraries § 59a.17 Other HHS regulations that...

  15. 34 CFR 365.3 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 365.3 Section 365.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE INDEPENDENT LIVING SERVICES General § 365.3 What...

  16. 34 CFR 535.4 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply? 535.4 Section 535.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND MINORITY LANGUAGES AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BILINGUAL EDUCATION: GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM...

  17. Safety goals and safety culture opening plenary. 2. Safety Regulation Implemented by Gosatomnadzor of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutsalov, A.T.; Bukrinsky, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes principles and approaches used by Gosatomnadzor of Russia in establishing safety goals. The link between safety goals and safety culture is demonstrated. The paper also contains information on nuclear regulatory activities in Russia. Regulatory documents of Gosatomnadzor of Russia do not provide precise definitions of safety goals as IAEA documents INSAG-3 or INSAG-12 do. However, overall activities of Gosatomnadzor of Russia are directed to the achievement of these safety goals, as Gosatomnadzor of Russia is a federal executive authority responsible for the regulation of nuclear and radiation safety in accordance with the Russian Federal Law 'On the Use of Nuclear Energy'. Thus, in the Statement of the Policy of the Russian Regulatory Authority, enacted in 1992, it was established that the overall activities of Gosatomnadzor of Russia are directed to the achievement of the main goal. This goal is to establish conditions that ensure that personnel, the public, and the environment are protected from unacceptable radiation and nonproliferation of nuclear materials. The practical application of such a method as given by the publication of Statements of Policy of Gosatomnadzor of Russia may be considered as a safety culture element. 'General Provisions of NPP Safety Ensuring' (OPB-88/ 97) is a regulatory document of the highest level in the hierarchy of regulatory documents of Gosatomnadzor of Russia. It establishes quantitative values of safety goals as do the foregoing IAEA documents. Thus, this regulatory document sets up the following: 1. The estimated total probability of severe accidents should not exceed 10 5 /reactor.yr. 2. The estimated probability of the worst possible radioactive release to the environment specified in the standards should not exceed 10 -7 /reactor.yr in the case of severe beyond-design-basis accidents. 3. The probability of a reactor vessel failure should not exceed 10 -7 /reactor.yr. The foregoing values are somehow

  18. 76 FR 73570 - Pipeline Safety: Miscellaneous Changes to Pipeline Safety Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 191, 192, 195 and 198 [Docket No. PHMSA-2010-0026] RIN 2137-AE59 Pipeline Safety: Miscellaneous Changes to Pipeline Safety Regulations AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration...

  19. AN ADVANCED TOOL FOR APPLIED INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potts, T. Todd; Hylko, James M.; Douglas, Terence A.

    2003-02-27

    WESKEM, LLC's Environmental, Safety and Health (ES&H) Department had previously assessed that a lack of consistency, poor communication and using antiquated communication tools could result in varying operating practices, as well as a failure to capture and disseminate appropriate Integrated Safety Management (ISM) information. To address these issues, the ES&H Department established an Activity Hazard Review (AHR)/Activity Hazard Analysis (AHA) process for systematically identifying, assessing, and controlling hazards associated with project work activities during work planning and execution. Depending on the scope of a project, information from field walkdowns and table-top meetings are collected on an AHR form. The AHA then documents the potential failure and consequence scenarios for a particular hazard. Also, the AHA recommends whether the type of mitigation appears appropriate or whether additional controls should be implemented. Since the application is web based, the information is captured into a single system and organized according to the >200 work activities already recorded in the database. Using the streamlined AHA method improved cycle time from over four hours to an average of one hour, allowing more time to analyze unique hazards and develop appropriate controls. Also, the enhanced configuration control created a readily available AHA library to research and utilize along with standardizing hazard analysis and control selection across four separate work sites located in Kentucky and Tennessee. The AHR/AHA system provides an applied example of how the ISM concept evolved into a standardized field-deployed tool yielding considerable efficiency gains in project planning and resource utilization. Employee safety is preserved through detailed planning that now requires only a portion of the time previously necessary. The available resources can then be applied to implementing appropriate engineering, administrative and personal protective equipment

  20. Environmental Regulation and Food Safety: Studies of Protection ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Environmental Regulation and Food Safety: Studies of Protection and Protectionism. Book cover Environmental Regulation and Food Safety: Studies of Protection and Protectionism. Directeur(s) : Veena Jha. Maison(s) d'édition : Edward Elgar, IDRC. 1 janvier 2006. ISBN : 184542512X. 250 pages. e-ISBN : 155250185X.

  1. 78 FR 11092 - Safety and Health Regulations for Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office LABOR DEPARTMENT Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR Part 1926 Safety and Health Regulations for Construction CFR Correction In Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1926, revised as of July 1, 2012...

  2. Identifying gaps in international food safety regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Benn; Ho, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    The rise in food importation in countries such as the United States, coupled with food safety incidents, has led to increased concern with the safety of imported food. This concern has prompted discussion of how international law and governance mechanisms might enhance food safety. This paper identifies the objectives underlying multilateral approaches to food safety such as raising food safety standards abroad, information sharing and ensuring market access. The paper then explores how these objectives are integrated into the international system and identifies how the current state of the law creates imbalances in the pursuit of these objectives.

  3. Domestic Regulation for Periodic Safety Review of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Daesik; Ahn, Seunghoon; Auh, Geunsun; Lee, Jonghyeok

    2015-01-01

    The so-called Periodic Safety Review (PSR) has been carried out such safety assessment throughout its life, on a periodic basis. In January 2001, the Atomic Energy Act and related regulations were amended to adopt the PSR institutional scheme from IAEA Nuclear Safety Guide 50-SG-O12. At that time the safety assessment was made to review the plant safety on 10 safety factors, such as aging management and emergency planning, where the safety factor indicates the important aspects of safety of an operating NPP to be addressed in the PSR. According to this legislation, the domestic utility, the KHNP has conducted the PSR for the operating NPP of 10 years coming up from operating license date, starting since May 2000. Some revisions in the PSR rule were made to include the additional safety factors last year. This paper introduces the current status of the PSR review and regulation, in particular new safety factors and updated technical regulation. Comprehensive safety assessment for Korea Nuclear Power Plants have performed a reflecting design and procedure changes and considering the latest technology every 10 years. This paper also examined the PSR system changes in Korea. As of July 2015, reviews for PSR of 18 units have been completed, with 229 nuclear safety improvement items. And implementation have been completed for 165 of them. PSR system has been confirmed that it has contributed to improvement of plant safety. In addition, this paper examined the PSR system change in Korea

  4. 34 CFR 400.3 - What other regulations apply to the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Applied Technology Education Programs? 400.3 Section 400.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAMS-GENERAL PROVISIONS § 400.3 What other regulations apply to the Vocational and Applied Technology Education Programs? The following regulations apply to the...

  5. MINING OPERATIONS'' SAFETY PROVISION - FUNDAMENTAL AND APPLIED SCIENCE TASK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharov V.N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The stages of the modern Russian scientiic school of comprehensive exploitation of mineral resourcesformation, the main directions of which were concentrated in the Institute of Comprehensive Exploitation of Mineral Resources are considered. The main directions of ICEMR scientiic activity and the most important results of fundamental and applied research are presented, which are the scientiic Ьasis of modern research related to the safety of mineral reserves use provision. The importance of studying the coal and methane interaction, gas dynamic phenomena in coal mines, coal seam degassing technologies and mine methane utilization, mathematical modeling and solving proЬlems in the ield of stressed-deformed state, strength, fracturing mechanics, thermal conductivity, hydromechanics, forced viЬration, etc. are outlined.The effectiveness analysis of the state, academic and industrial Ьranch scientiic centers, university science, design organizations and mining companies joint efforts to reduce industrial injuries in the mining sector of the Russian economy is conducted. The need for targeted measures to move to new technical-technological and regulatory levels of mining, allowing to prevent the accidents with massive fatal injuries, was determined. The solution of these tasks is possiЬle only Ьy comЬining the efforts of the specialized institutes of the Russian Academy of Sciences, of the Ьranch science, of universities and mining companies through the implementation of the "Mining Safety" Scientiic Research Comprehensive Plan, coordinated Ьy ICEMR RAS.

  6. International perspectives on food safety and regulations - a need for harmonized regulations: perspectives in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiumei

    2014-08-01

    Food safety is a major livelihood issue and a priority concern in China. Since the Food Safety Law of the People's Republic of China was issued in 2009, the food safety control system has been strengthened through, inter alia, the Food Safety Risk Surveillance System, the Food Safety Risk Assessment System and the Food Safety Standards System. In accordance with the Food Safety Law and regulations for implementation, the Ministry of Health released the 'Twelfth Five-year Plan' of Food Safety Standards. The existing 5000 food-related standards will be integrated. Notwithstanding, the supervision system in China needs to be further improved and strengthened. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Pakistan nuclear safety and radiation protection regulation 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In this act regulations of nuclear safety and radiation protection in Pakistan has been explained. A legal and licensing procedure to handle protection of nuclear materials, processing storage of radioactive products has been described under this regulation. In these regulations full explanation of accidental exposure, delegation of powers and record keeping/waste disposal of radioactive has been given. (A.B.)

  8. Safety of research reactors - A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    Due to historical reasons research reactors have received less regulatory attention in the world than nuclear power plants. This has given rise to several safety issues which, if not addressed immediately, may result in an undesirable situation. However, in Pakistan, research reactors and power reactors have received due attention from the regulatory authority. The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 has been under regulatory surveillance since 1965, the year of its commissioning. The second reactor has also undergone all the safety reviews and checks mandated by the licensing procedures. A brief description of the regulatory framework, the several safety reviews carried out have been briefly described in this paper. Significant activities of the regulatory authority have also been described in verifying the safety of research reactors in Pakistan along with the future activities. The views of the Pakistani regulatory authority on the specific issues identified by the IAEA have been presented along with specific recommendations to the IAEA. We are of the opinion that there are more Member States operating nuclear research reactors than nuclear power plants. Therefore, there should be more emphasis on the research reactor safety, which somehow has not been the case. In several recommendations made to the IAEA on the specific safety issues the emphasis has been, in general, to have a similar documentation and approach for maintaining and verifying operational safety at research reactors as is currently available for nuclear power reactors and may be planned for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (author)

  9. Toward introduction of risk informed safety regulation. Nuclear Safety Commission taskforce's interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Safety Commission's taskforce on 'Introduction of Safety Regulation Utilizing Risk Information' completed the interim report on its future subjects and directions in December 2005. Although current safety regulatory activities have been based on deterministic approach, this report shows the risk informed approach is expected to be very useful for making nuclear safety regulation and assurance activities reasonable and also for appropriate allocation of regulatory resources. For introduction of risk informed regulation, it also recommends pileups of experiences with gradual introduction and trial of the risk informed approach, improvement of plant maintenance rules and regulatory requirements utilizing risk information, and establishment of framework to assure quality of risk evaluation. (T. Tanaka)

  10. Safety culture in nuclear installations - The role of the regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karigi, Alice W.

    2002-01-01

    Safety culture is an amalgamation of values, standards, morals and norms of acceptable behavior by the licensees, Radiation workers and the Regulator. The role played by a Regulator in establishing safety culture in a nuclear installation is that related to Authorization, review, assessment, inspection and enforcement. The regulator is to follow the development of a facility or activity from initial selection of the site through design, construction, commissioning, radioactive waste management through to decommissioning and closure. He is to ensure safety measures are followed through out the operation of the facility by laying down in the license conditions of controlling construction of nuclear installations and ensuring competence of the operators. (author)

  11. Nuclear safety philosophy and its general application to fuel management and handling - a regulator's viewpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, I.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Division (NSD) of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) informs the UK Nuclear Industry of the principles that it applies in assessing whether licensees have demonstrated that their nuclear plants are as safe as is reasonably practicable. The paper commences with a discussion of the non-prescriptive approach to health and safety regulation which is the basis of the regulatory activities of NSD's operating arm -the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII). It then describes in broad terms the overall approach used by NII for analysing the safety of nuclear plant, including fuel, which will cover both deterministic and probabilistic methodologies. The paper then introduces the sections of the Safety Assessment Principles which apply to nuclear fuel safety (both fuel handling and management). Most of these principles are of a general nature and do not just apply to fuel. The paper explains how safety cases might relate to the SAPs and offers some views on how a licensee might interpret them in developing his safety case. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of submitting a high quality safety case and the type of information that should be in it. The advantages of the approach proposed, to the licensee as well as to the regulator, are identified. (author)

  12. Economic consideration of nuclear safety and cost benefit analysis in nuclear safety regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y. S.; Choi, K. S.; Choi, K. W.; Song, I. J.; Park, D. K.

    2001-01-01

    For the optimization of nuclear safety regulation, understanding of economic aspects of it becomes increasingly important together with the technical approach used so far to secure nuclear safety. Relevant economic theories on private and public goods were reviewed to re-illuminate nuclear safety from the economic perspective. The characteristics of nuclear safety as a public good was reviewed and discussed in comparison with the car safety as a private safety good. It was shown that the change of social welfare resulted from the policy change induced can be calculated by the summation of compensating variation(CV) of individuals. It was shown that the value of nuclear safety could be determined in monetary term by this approach. The theoretical background and history of cost benefit analysis of nuclear safety regulation were presented and topics for future study were suggested

  13. Review of Policy Documents for Nuclear Safety and Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woong Sik; Choi, Kwang Sik; Choi, Young Sung; Kim, Hho Jung; Kim, Ho Ki

    2006-01-01

    The goal of regulation is to protect public health and safety as well as environment from radiological hazards that may occur as a result of the use of atomic energy. In September 1994, the Korean government issued the Nuclear Safety Policy Statement (NSPS) to establish policy goals of maintaining and achieving high-level of nuclear safety and also help the public understand the national policy and a strong will of the government toward nuclear safety. It declares the importance of establishing safety culture in nuclear community and also specifies five nuclear regulatory principles (Independence, Openness, Clarity, Efficiency and Reliability) and provides the eleven regulatory policy directions. In 2001, the Nuclear Safety Charter was declared to make the highest goal of safety in driving nuclear business clearer; to encourage atomic energy- related institutions and workers to keep in mind the mission and responsibility for assuring safety; to guarantee public confidence in related organizations. The Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) also issues Yearly Regulatory Policy Directions at the beginning of every year. Recently, the third Atomic Energy Promotion Plan (2007-2011) has been established. It becomes necessary for the relevant organizations to prepare the detailed plans on such areas as nuclear development, safety management, regulation, etc. This paper introduces a multi-level structure of nuclear safety and regulation policy documents in Korea and presents some improvements necessary for better application of the policies

  14. Review of Policy Documents for Nuclear Safety and Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Woong Sik; Choi, Kwang Sik; Choi, Young Sung; Kim, Hho Jung; Kim, Ho Ki [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The goal of regulation is to protect public health and safety as well as environment from radiological hazards that may occur as a result of the use of atomic energy. In September 1994, the Korean government issued the Nuclear Safety Policy Statement (NSPS) to establish policy goals of maintaining and achieving high-level of nuclear safety and also help the public understand the national policy and a strong will of the government toward nuclear safety. It declares the importance of establishing safety culture in nuclear community and also specifies five nuclear regulatory principles (Independence, Openness, Clarity, Efficiency and Reliability) and provides the eleven regulatory policy directions. In 2001, the Nuclear Safety Charter was declared to make the highest goal of safety in driving nuclear business clearer; to encourage atomic energy- related institutions and workers to keep in mind the mission and responsibility for assuring safety; to guarantee public confidence in related organizations. The Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) also issues Yearly Regulatory Policy Directions at the beginning of every year. Recently, the third Atomic Energy Promotion Plan (2007-2011) has been established. It becomes necessary for the relevant organizations to prepare the detailed plans on such areas as nuclear development, safety management, regulation, etc. This paper introduces a multi-level structure of nuclear safety and regulation policy documents in Korea and presents some improvements necessary for better application of the policies.

  15. Managing for safety and safety culture within the UK nuclear industry. A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyrer, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper outlines the basis of the legal system for the regulation of health and safety at work within the United Kingdom (UK), and in particular, the regulation of the nuclear industry. The framework, formulated by the regulator, which has been published as a practical guide for directors, managers, health and safety professionals and employee representatives for the successful management of health and safety is explained. This guidance, however, concentrates, to a large extent, on management systems and only addresses in part the types of issues, such as behaviours, values, attitudes and beliefs which contribute to the safety culture of an organization. The regulator of the UK nuclear industry has considered research, and other work, carried out by several organizations in this area, notably the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (ACSNI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and produced its own framework for managing for safety at nuclear installations. As a regulator, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), and its inspectorate responsible for regulation of the nuclear industry, HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (HMNII), are not the appropriate organization to assess the safety culture of an organization, but positively encourage organizations to both carry out this assessment themselves and to monitor their performance. To this end, HSE has developed, and made available, the Health and Safety Climate Tool which is aimed at providing organizations with information which can be used as part of a continuous improvement process. (author)

  16. Special safety requirements applied to Brazilian nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepecki, W.P.S.; Hamel, H.J.E.; Koenig, N.; Vieira, P.C.R.; Fritzsche, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    Some safety aspects of the Angra 2 and 3 nuclear power plants are presented. An analysis of the civil and mechanical project of these nuclear power plant having in view a safety analysis is done. (E.G.) [pt

  17. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxier, J.A.; Davis, D.M.

    1978-06-01

    Progress is reported on the following: radiation monitoring with regard to personnel monitoring and health physics instrumentation; environs surveillance with regard to atmospheric monitoring, water monitoring, radiation background measurements, and soil and grass samples; radiation and safety surveys with regard to laboratory operations monitoring, radiation incidents, and laundry monitoring; industrial safety and special projects with regard to accident analysis, disabling injuries, and safety awards

  18. 76 FR 44803 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ...] Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation... published in the Federal Register. This notice lists temporary safety zones, security zones, special local... safety zones, security zones, special local regulations, regulated navigation areas or drawbridge...

  19. 76 FR 7107 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ...] Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation... published in the Federal Register. This document lists temporary safety zones, security zones, special local... safety zones, security zones, special local regulations, regulated navigation areas or drawbridge...

  20. Public opinion poll on safety and regulations of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M. I.; Park, B. I.; Lee, S. M. [Gallup Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    The purpose of this poll is not only to research understanding on safety and regulations of nuclear energy and to compare the result by time series followed 2003 to 2002 years, also to establish the public relations strategies and to offer information for developing long-term policies. The contents of the study are on the general perception, safety, management of nuclear power station, regulations and surroundings about nuclear energy.

  1. Radiation Safety of Accelerator Facility with Regard to Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedi Sunaryadi; Gloria Doloresa

    2003-01-01

    The radiation safety of accelerator facility and the status of the facilities according to licensee in Indonesia as well as lesson learned from the accidents are described. The atomic energy Act No. 10 of 1997 enacted by the Government of Indonesia which is implemented in Radiation Safety Government Regulation No. 63 and 64 as well as practice-specific model regulation for licensing request are discussed. (author)

  2. Impact of Construction Health & Safety Regulations on Project ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effectiveness of the construction industry can only be enhanced by repositioning the construction health and safety regulations to safeguard the health of the workers and the entire community. This paper seeks to assess the views of consultants and contractors about the impact of construction health and safety ...

  3. Alternative development and action plan for the atomic safety regulation instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. Y.; Ahn, S. K.; Ham, Y. S.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study to provide highly practical model to regulation agency. Since nuclear power safety regulation has different characteristics, compared to general regulation, it is important to have new point of view and approach. But application possibility for regulation that guarantees the 'perfect safety' is very low. Therefore, it is important establish nuclear power safety regulation that is realistic as well as safety securing. In order to establish high quality regulation, evaluation of existing regulation must be done first. Thus in this study, 6 standards to evaluate existing regulation are suggested. They are clearness, efficiency, flexibility, reliability, responsibility and political consideration. Also, strategies to complement the weak points of regulatory governance, regulatory sunset, regulatory map, regulatory negotiation, regulatory benefit cost analysis, etc. These strategies can be applied all in one regulation, and can strategically be selected for application. After analyzing the result if case analysis on nuclear furnace regulation for research study, agreement was made that it is most efficient to consider in the order if clearness reliability, flexibility, confidence, political consideration, administrative efficiency and economic efficiency

  4. Transportation of radioactive materials. Safety and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, Jean-Christophe

    2013-01-01

    This engineering-oriented publication first presents fluxes and risks related to the transportation of radioactive materials: fluxes, risks, in-depth defence, and parcel typology. The author then describes the elaboration process for transportation regulations: IAEA recommendations for the transportation of radioactive materials and their review process, IAEA recommendations for modal regulations. He presents the French transportation regulation framework: evolutions of IAEA recommendations, case of aerial transport, and case of maritime transport. The next part addresses the specific case of the transportation of uranium hexafluoride. The last part addresses incidents and accidents occurring during transportation: declarations to be made, brief presentations of several examples of incidents and accidents

  5. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auxier, J.A.; Davis, D.M.

    1978-06-01

    Progress is reported on the following: radiation monitoring with regard to personnel monitoring and health physics instrumentation; environs surveillance with regard to atmospheric monitoring, water monitoring, radiation background measurements, and soil and grass samples; radiation and safety surveys with regard to laboratory operations monitoring, radiation incidents, and laundry monitoring; industrial safety and special projects with regard to accident analysis, disabling injuries, and safety awards. (HLW)

  6. Developments in safety standards and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbison, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper explains, in broad terms, how regulatory control is exercised over licensed nuclear installations in the UK and how HSE has developed its safety standards to support its regulatory approach. It first sets out the scope of HSE's regulatory responsibilities, which NII exercises on its behalf, and briefly describes the licensing process and compliance monitoring through inspection over the life of a nuclear plant. It also refers to the role of assessment in NII's decision-making processes, and the part played in this by the consideration of costs and safety benefits. It then moves on to consider the challenges that HSE/NII are likely to face from the changing nuclear industry in the second half of the 1990s. (author)

  7. NRC safety research in support of regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This report, the ninth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1993. A special emphasis on accomplishments in nuclear power plant aging research reflects recognition that number of plants are entering the final portion of their original 40-year operating licenses and that, in addition to current aging effects, a focus on safety considerations for license renewal becomes timely. The primary purpose of performing regulatory research is to develop and provide the Commission and its staff with sound technical bases for regulatory decisions on the safe operation of licensed nuclear reactors and facilities, to find unknown or unexpected safety problems, and to develop data and related information for the purpose of revising the Commission's rules, regulatory guides, or other guidance

  8. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt... standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the

  9. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt' standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions

  10. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to ''establish or adopt standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the

  11. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. 2012 Edition. Specific Safety Requirements (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to 'establish or adopt' standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property' - standards that the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which States can apply by means of their regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. The IAEA does this in consultation with the competent organs of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies concerned. A comprehensive set of high quality standards under regular review is a key element of a stable and sustainable global safety regime, as is the IAEA's assistance in their application. The IAEA commenced its safety standards programme in 1958. The emphasis placed on quality, fitness for purpose and continuous improvement has led to the widespread use of the IAEA standards throughout the world. The Safety Standards Series now includes unified Fundamental Safety Principles, which represent an international consensus on what must constitute a high level of protection and safety. With the strong support of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its standards. Standards are only effective if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services encompass design, siting and engineering safety, operational safety, radiation safety, safe transport of radioactive material and safe management of radioactive waste, as well as governmental organization, regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations. These safety services assist Member States in the application of the standards and enable valuable experience and insights to be shared. Regulating safety is a national responsibility, and many States have decided to adopt the IAEA's standards for use in their national regulations. For parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions

  12. The Role of the Regulator in the Field of Safety Culture to Shun Nuclear Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    The 2011 accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan has, as might be expected, led to improvements in equipment at plants around the world that have fortified safety systems and allowed for better protection against rare, extreme natural events. Equally important to the process of improving nuclear safety is the emphasis placed on implementing quality improvements to the human side of nuclear safety, a crucial element that is often not considered by those outside the nuclear sector. Ensuring nuclear reactor safety is not only a question of physical protection against all credible threats, enhancing robustness of important safety systems and increasing redundancy of back-up power and water cooling systems, but also one of making certain that qualified and trained staff are supported by effective procedures. However, these assets are valued only in an organizational culture that places a premium on ensuring high levels of safety, or implementing what is called an effective “nuclear safety culture”. Principles, characteristics and factors for effective safety culture are to great extent similar between licencees and regulatory bodies and can be applied for developing RB’s safety. Safety is the primary purpose of the regulatory body, Regulator plays a significant role in the field of nuclear safety even though the prime responsibility for safety belongs to the operator, and it is the regulator which actually decides what is considered to be safe. In order to effectively implement the international principle of high level of nuclear safety, nuclear safety culture should be clearly named as an objective in international nuclear legal acts and the regulator’s responsibility for promotion of nuclear safety culture should be established. What is more difficult for the regulator is finding the right balance of firmness but fairness in dealing with the operator. In addition to enforcing safety regulations, the regulator should have a positive

  13. Major accident prevention through applying safety knowledge management approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalatpour, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Many scattered resources of knowledge are available to use for chemical accident prevention purposes. The common approach to management process safety, including using databases and referring to the available knowledge has some drawbacks. The main goal of this article was to devise a new emerged knowledge base (KB) for the chemical accident prevention domain. The scattered sources of safety knowledge were identified and scanned. Then, the collected knowledge was formalized through a computerized program. The Protégé software was used to formalize and represent the stored safety knowledge. The domain knowledge retrieved as well as data and information. This optimized approach improved safety and health knowledge management (KM) process and resolved some typical problems in the KM process. Upgrading the traditional resources of safety databases into the KBs can improve the interaction between the users and knowledge repository.

  14. Applying Sensor-Based Technology to Improve Construction Safety Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Cao, Tianzhuo; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2017-08-11

    Construction sites are dynamic and complicated systems. The movement and interaction of people, goods and energy make construction safety management extremely difficult. Due to the ever-increasing amount of information, traditional construction safety management has operated under difficult circumstances. As an effective way to collect, identify and process information, sensor-based technology is deemed to provide new generation of methods for advancing construction safety management. It makes the real-time construction safety management with high efficiency and accuracy a reality and provides a solid foundation for facilitating its modernization, and informatization. Nowadays, various sensor-based technologies have been adopted for construction safety management, including locating sensor-based technology, vision-based sensing and wireless sensor networks. This paper provides a systematic and comprehensive review of previous studies in this field to acknowledge useful findings, identify the research gaps and point out future research directions.

  15. Implementation of the new regulation on radiological safety in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gironzini, E.

    1997-01-01

    Since its creation in 1975, the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN) has enacted three regulations of national importance on the norms of protection against ionizing radiation. The first regulation, which is called regulation of radiological protection (1980) approved by a resolution of IPEN, is the result of the work of a committee constituted by IPEN and the Ministry of Health. Its implementation caused some problems as result of which, in 1989, a new regulation on radiological protection was enacted through a supreme decree. Taking into account the new recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the International Basic Safety Standard for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources, approved in May 1997, the regulation of radiological safety also considers evolving aspects in the Project ARCAL XVII/IAEA. This regulation includes various topics such as exclusions, requirements of protection (medical exposure, occupational exposure, public exposure, chronic exposure), requirements of source safety, interventions and emergencies, control of sources and practices (exemptions, authorizations, inspections) etc. The implementation of this regulation at the national level falls to IPEN, the unique authority commissioned to control nuclear installations, radioactivity and x ray facilities in medicine, industry and research

  16. A comparison of some Mexican/U.S. safety regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunner, W.R. [Training Associates, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In the US, safety and hygiene began to be enforced broadly with the formation of the US Department of Labor`s, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1970. In Mexico, the 1917 Constitution required companies to protect their workers against safety and hygiene hazards in the workplace. Additional requirements were added with the Federal Labor Law of 1931. General safety and hygiene regulations were added in 1934. Modern-day federal labor law in Mexico requires the creation of mixed safety and hygiene commissions in all industries. However, only about 114,000 workplaces have registered mixed commissions. In a similar vein, the most favored OSHA reform bill in the US proposes to require safety and health committees in all work places. At this time such committees are common in larger companies but not in smaller ones.

  17. Commercial space transportation regulation and its effects on space safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Norman C.; Lang, Derek E.

    1993-09-01

    Safety in space will become an increasingly important issue as the number of foreign space programs grow, and as the U.S. private sector increases its space activities. The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) is the federal agency responsible, under the Commercial Space launch Act of 1984, with regulation of the U.S. commercial space transportation industry in order to protect public health and safety, and safety of property. This paper discusses how the regulatory and licensing responsibilities of the Office of Commercial Space Transportation influence the safety of private sector launch operations in space. Of particular interest are impacts and benefits for commercial space services providers resulting from the government's safety research and technical safety evaluations.

  18. Applied health physics and safety annual report for 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxier, J.A.; Davis, D.M.

    1977-08-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas of research: personnel monitoring; health physics instrumentation; atmospheric monitoring; water monitoring; radiation background measurements; soil samples; laboratory operations monitoring; radiation incidents; laundry monitoring; accident analysis; and industrial safety

  19. Treaty implementation applied to conventions on nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montjoie, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Given that safety is the number one priority for the nuclear industry, it would seem normal that procedures exist to ensure the effective implementation of the provisions of the conventions on nuclear safety, as already exist for numerous international treaties. Unfortunately, these procedures are either weak or even nonexistent. Therefore, consideration must be given to whether this weakness represents a genuine deficiency in ensuring the main objective of these conventions, which is to achieve a high level of nuclear safety worldwide. But, before one can even address that issue, a prior question must be answered: does the specific nature of the international legal framework on nuclear safety automatically result in a lack of non-compliance procedures in international conventions on the subject? If so, the lack of procedures is justified, despite the drawbacks. The specific nature of the international law on nuclear safety, which in 1994 shaped the content of the CNS by notably not 'allowing' (even today) the incorporation of precise international rules have been taken into account. The next step is to examine whether the absence of non-compliance procedures (which could have been integrated into the text) is a hindrance in ensuring the objectives of the conventions on nuclear safety, and to examine the procedures that could have been used, based on existing provisions in other areas of international law (environmental law, financial law, disarmament law, human rights, etc.). International environmental law will be the main source of this study, as it has certain similarities with the international law on nuclear safety due to the sometimes vague nature of its obligations and irrespective of the fact that one of the purposes of nuclear safety is in particular to protect the environment from radiological hazards. Indeed, the provisions of the law on nuclear safety are mainly technical and designed to guarantee the normal operation of nuclear facilities

  20. The new EU regulations for food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Comodo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The inspirational principles of the norms known as the “Hygiene package”: the framework of new perspectives on food safety. At the beginning of the 1980s, all member states of the World Trade Organisation (WTO subscribed to international agreements regarding strategies for food production and its marketing. These agreements, known as TRIPS (Agreement on Trade- Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights, GATT (General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, GATS (General Agreement on Trade in Services and TRIMS (Agreement on Trade-Related Investment Measures [1] signalled the beginning of a new, globalized, commercial strategy on food products which has also caused importantrepercussions within the European boundaries, but with some fundamental differences.

  1. Regulations of 19 August 1978 on the optional principles of the Nuclear Safety Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    These regulations were published in the Turkish Official Gazette of 19 August 1978 and were made pursuant to Decree no. 7/9141 of 1975 on licensing of nuclear installations which established the Nuclear Safety Committee. They determine the duties and responsibilities of the Committee, its qualifications, its operating principles and its relations with the Nuclear Safety Assistance Service set up in the Turkish Atomic Energy Commission for the purposes of assisting its Secretary General. The regulations also lay down the procedures to be applied for consultations on granting licences. (NEA) [fr

  2. A German perspective on advances in safety standards and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H.P.; Herttrich, P.M.

    1993-01-01

    At present, different proposals for evolutionary or innovative reactors are under consideration. Therefore, it is necessary that the regulators give guidance on the required safety characteristics of future designs of nuclear power plants. On the one hand, existing regulations have to be updated according to the current state of science and technology. Best available and adequately approved technology has to be used as a yardstick for the acceptability of future basic design features. On the other hand, potential safety features of innovative or revolutionary designs must be considered as serious competitors and potential technical solutions taking the state of maturity of the concepts, the extent of practical experience and the level of effort needed for realization into due account. On this background, recent developments of the Atomic Energy Act, of safety regulations and investigations of requirements for future designs in the Federal Republic of Germany and current projects of international cooperation are presented. (author)

  3. Nuclear safety regulation in the People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Guangchang

    1987-01-01

    The present report gives a general view of how the problem of nuclear safety is dealt with in China, with particular reference to the nuclear power plants. The most relevant nuclear legal regulations and procedures are reported. Organization of the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) of China and its working activities are presented. The report gives also the principle and practice with regard to licensing process and regulatory inspection of nuclear power plant in China. (author)

  4. Fire safety engineering applied to high-rise building facades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sassi Samuele

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fire safety of high-rise building facades is a complex problem, therefore the use of prescriptive fire codes could not be sufficient to ensure a proper building fire safety level. In new high rise buildings the fire safety of facades can be taken into account by means of performance based fire design that can help in the selection of the best technological solutions and material choices. This article deals with a case study done on the Piedmont Region Headquarters (TORRE REGIONE PIEMONTE which is one of the highest office buildings in Italy. The “Torre Regione Piemonte” is located in Turin and has 45 storey and a total height of 183,61 m. The building is characterized by the closed enclosure called “Grand Space” which is continuous for almost the entire height of the building and contains volumes such as offices/meeting rooms named as “Satellites”. In order to fulfil Italian fire safety requirements, the “Torre Regione Piemonte” building has been assessed using the performance base design and fire safety engineering approach. This paper deals with the design process selection of the most representative fire scenarios focusing on the fire resistance performance requirements of structural and glazed elements of the facades. Furthermore, all the simulation, calculations and performance fire resistant requirements of the high rise building have been supported by specific laboratory tests and experimental results, that are reported and discussed within paper.

  5. 75 FR 50700 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, and Drawbridge...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ...] Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, and Drawbridge Operation... notice lists temporary safety zones, security zones, special local regulations, and drawbridge operation... responsive to the safety and security needs within their jurisdiction; therefore, District Commanders and...

  6. A Program Applying Professional Safety Basics in Construction Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entisar Kadhim Rasheed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available When industrial and constructional renaissance started in the world, the great interest was going on towards the equipment’s, which was the first mean for production. After industry was settled the interest was going on towards the men ship which manpower on which the production depends. It was approved that it represents the basic part in all of the processes and the protection of those individuals against dangers of these equipment’s, industry and its accidents was the basic things which was studied in many researches until it crystallized in general principles for all industries and other take care in each industry. The professional safety is concerned as restrict which aims to take care of humanitarian and material principles also to raise the production of these principles, in the aspect of safety, health and providing the suitable healthy condition to the worker so he can feel safety, confidence and sociological settle, this will increase the production. So In order to maintain the manpower of business risks and to enable them to fulfill their role better to increase production and improve the quality and maintain the machine and supporting the national economy and keep pace with industrial developments and technological came the idea of research to focus on the importance of studying the subject of occupational safety by conducting a field survey to see the reality of professional safety in the relevant departments and work sites and through a questionnaire on the subject and conduct personal interviews with those concerned in this area and to prepare a program for the application of professional safety for each resource (labor, machines, materials, money in construction sites and departments concerned.

  7. Statistical analysis applied to safety culture self-assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo Soares, P.P.

    2002-01-01

    Interviews and opinion surveys are instruments used to assess the safety culture in an organization as part of the Safety Culture Enhancement Programme. Specific statistical tools are used to analyse the survey results. This paper presents an example of an opinion survey with the corresponding application of the statistical analysis and the conclusions obtained. Survey validation, Frequency statistics, Kolmogorov-Smirnov non-parametric test, Student (T-test) and ANOVA means comparison tests and LSD post-hoc multiple comparison test, are discussed. (author)

  8. Applying the ionising radiation regulations to radon in the UK workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    As a response to the identification of a health risk from workplace radon in the UK, the Ionising Radiations Regulations include the protection of workers from excessive levels of radon. Employers are required to make risk assessments, and the interpretation of the Health and Safety Executive is that the regulations apply to workplace premises in locations already designated as Radon Affected Areas for domestic purposes, with the difference that in workplaces, it is the maximum winter radon concentration rather than the annual average which is the parameter of interest. This paper discusses the rationale behind the current regulatory environment, outlines the role and duties of Accredited Radiation Protection Advisers and summarises the strategies necessary to conform to the regulations. (authors)

  9. Food Safety Regulations Applied to Traditional and Ethnic Foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, van der B.M.J.; Juanjuan, Sun; Carvajal, Ricardo; Kite, Jonathon; Costa Dias, Thiago

    2016-01-01

    Traditional and ethnic foods are characterized by their history. By this category, they are usually considered safe on the basis of experience within the jurisdiction where they are indigenous. Elsewhere they may face authorization requirements.

    Foods characterized by historical production

  10. The UK nuclear regulator's view of external influences on safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past forty or so years, significant changes have taken place in the UK nuclear industry and the pace of change is continually increasing. As a consequence, the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII), the UK's nuclear regulator, has also had to change. This paper describes some of the challenges to safety that have arisen in recent years and how NII's style of regulation has had to adapt to ensure that safety is maintained and improved. NII's approach has been to: be proactive in its relations with Government and market regulators; adopt new competencies to equip it for the challenges it faces; strive to improve its efficiency and effectiveness; and develop new approaches to regulating changes in licensees' organisations and ways of working. Importantly, NII seeks to anticipate change rather than react to it. (author)

  11. Reactor safety study applied to the Forsmark 3 Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericsson, G.; Tiren, L.I.

    1978-01-01

    A reactor safety study of the Forsmark 3 BWR power plant has been carried out for the purpose of calculating core melt probabilities using WASH-1400 methods. A sensitivity analysis shows that the calculated core melt probability is changed by approximately a factor of 10 depending on assumptions made with respect to the probability of human error. The importance of the availability of off-site power and the influence of common cause failure is also discussed. (author)

  12. Safety Training: Ergonomics - Applying ergonomic principles in the workplace

    CERN Multimedia

    Isabelle Cusato

    2010-01-01

        We propose a half day awareness session on the hazards posed by a poor posture while working on a screen (back pain, eyestrain, sore wrists…) and best practices to address them. The next sessions will be held on 18 November 2010 (morning session in French and afternoon session in English). The registration via the Safety Training catalogue is mandatory. Places will be allocated in order of receipt. For any further information, please contact Isabelle Cusato, 73811.  

  13. Safety Culture for Regulator Competence Management in Embarking States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Safety is based on preventive actions where the ability of a regulatory body to fulfill its responsibilities depends largely on the competence of its staff. Building employees’ skills and knowledge is an investment for each employee and in the future of the organization. This building must be the competence of its staff integration with their safety culture, the essential to ensure competent human resources as required in the IAEA safety standards and other documents, in which the need and importance of ensuring regulatory competence is emphasized. As it involves both operational and management issues, safety culture is a sensitive topic for regulators whose role is to ensure compliance with safety requirements and not to intervene in management decisions. A number of embarking States are aspiring to develop nuclear power generation and this means that, among other things, regulatory bodies have to be established and rapidly expanded. This paper reports major considerations on the integration of safety culture with an adequate competence management system for regulators in embarking states. (author

  14. Safety Regulation of Nuclear Power Plant License Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiaoe; Liu, Ting; Qi, Yuan; Yang, LiLi

    2018-01-01

    China’s regulations stipulate that a nuclear power plant license is valid for a design life period (generally 30 or 40 years). Whether the nuclear power plant’s license is renewed after the expiration of the license is to be determined based on the safety and economy of the nuclear power plant..

  15. Environmental Regulation and Food Safety: Studies of Protection ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2006-01-01

    Jan 1, 2006 ... ... standard setting, not simply the technical process, North–South issues, and the political economy of organic food markets. Environmental Regulation and Food Safety will appeal to policymakers and NGOs, researchers and scholars of international and development economics, as well industry strategists.

  16. Risk assessment and safety regulations in offshore oil and gas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk management of which risk assessment is part, and safety regulations are common in the offshore oil and gas industry management system. The process of conducting risk assessment is mostly a challenge for operational personnel assigned to perform this function. The most significant problem is the decision to use ...

  17. Food Safety and Regulation: Evaluation of an Online Multimedia Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintauro, Stephen J.; Krahl, Augusta G.; Buzzell, Paul R.; Chamberlain, Valerie M.

    2005-01-01

    The effectiveness of, and student attitudes toward, an online Food Safety and Regulation course (WEB) were compared with lecture (LECTURE) and combined lecture/online (COMBINED) courses. All students took identical pre-tests, post-tests, and attitude assessments. No significant differences were detected in pre-test scores. Post-test results for…

  18. Environmental Regulation and Food Safety: Studies of Protection ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 janv. 2006 ... Environmental Regulation and Food Safety intéressera les artisans des politiques et les ONG , les chercheurs et les spécialistes de l'économie ... This funding will help strengthen the Science, Technology and Innovation Policy Research Organization's (STIPRO) role as a credible public policy institution in ...

  19. Nuclear safety regulations in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizmek, A.; Horvatic, M.; Ilijas, B.; Medakovic, S.

    2009-01-01

    Based on Nuclear Safety Act (Official Gazette No. 173/03) in 2006 State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) adopted beside Ordinance on performing nuclear activities (Official Gazette No. 74/06) and Ordinance on special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety (Official Gazette No. 74/06) the new Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment (Official Gazette No. 15/08) and Ordinance on conditions for nuclear safety and protection with regard to the sitting, design, construction, use and decommissioning of a facility in which a nuclear activity is to be performed (Official Gazette No. 71/08). The Ordinance on performing nuclear activities regulates the procedure of notification of the intent to perform nuclear activities, submitting the application for the issue of a licence to perform nuclear activities, and the procedure for issuing decisions on granting a license to perform nuclear activity. The Ordinance also regulates the content of the form for notification of the intent to perform nuclear activities, as well as of the application for the issue of a licence to perform the nuclear activity and the method of keeping the register of nuclear conditions, whereas compliance is established by the decision passed by SONS. Ordinance on special conditions (requirements) for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety regulates these mentioned activities Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment lays down the list of nuclear materials and special equipment as well as of nuclear activities covered by the system of control of production of special equipment and non-nuclear material, the procedure for notifying the intention to and filing the application for a licence to carry out nuclear activities, and the format and contents of the forms for doing so. This Ordinance

  20. NRC safety research in support of regulation, FY 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This report, the sixth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1990. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  1. NRC safety research in support of regulation, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    This report, the fourth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to Congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during 1988. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  2. NRC safety research in support of regulation--FY 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report, the fifth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1989. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  3. NRC safety research in support of regulation, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This report, the seventh in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1991. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  4. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-01

    Information is reported in sections entitled: radiation monitoring; Environmental Management Program; radiation and safety surveys; industrial safety and special projects; Office of Operational Safety; and training, lectures, publications, and professional activities. There were no external or internal exposures to personnel which exceeded the standards for radiation protection as defined in DOE Manual Chapter 0524. Only 35 employees received whole body dose equivalents of 10 mSv (1 rem) or greater. There were no releases of gaseous waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. There were no releases of liquid radioactive waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. The quantity of those radionuclides of primary concern in the Clinch River, based on the concentration measured at White Oak Dam and the dilution afforded by the Clinch River, averaged 0.16 percent of the concentration guide. The average background level at the Perimeter Air Monitoring (PAM) stations during 1980 was 9.0 ..mu..rad/h (0.090 ..mu..Gy/h). Soil samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for eleven radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.37 Bq/kg (0.01 pCi/g) to 1.5 Bq/kg (0.04 pCi/g), and the uranium-235 content ranged from 0.7 Bq/kg (0.02 pCi/g) to 16 Bq/kg (0.43 pCi/g). Grass samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for twelve radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.04 Bq/kg (0.001 pCi/g) to 0.07 Bq/kg (0.002 pCi/g), and the uranium-235 content ranged from 0.37 Bq/kg (0.01 pCi/g) to 12 Bq/kg (0.33 pCi/g).

  5. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    Information is reported in sections entitled: radiation monitoring; Environmental Management Program; radiation and safety surveys; industrial safety and special projects; Office of Operational Safety; and training, lectures, publications, and professional activities. There were no external or internal exposures to personnel which exceeded the standards for radiation protection as defined in DOE Manual Chapter 0524. Only 35 employees received whole body dose equivalents of 10 mSv (1 rem) or greater. There were no releases of gaseous waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. There were no releases of liquid radioactive waste from the Laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. The quantity of those radionuclides of primary concern in the Clinch River, based on the concentration measured at White Oak Dam and the dilution afforded by the Clinch River, averaged 0.16 percent of the concentration guide. The average background level at the Perimeter Air Monitoring (PAM) stations during 1980 was 9.0 μrad/h (0.090 μGy/h). Soil samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for eleven radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.37 Bq/kg (0.01 pCi/g) to 1.5 Bq/kg (0.04 pCi/g), and the uranium-235 content ranged from 0.7 Bq/kg (0.02 pCi/g) to 16 Bq/kg (0.43 pCi/g). Grass samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for twelve radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Plutonium-239 content ranged from 0.04 Bq/kg (0.001 pCi/g) to 0.07 Bq/kg (0.002 pCi/g), and the uranium-235 content ranged from 0.37 Bq/kg (0.01 pCi/g) to 12 Bq/kg

  6. 42 CFR 137.373 - Do Federal real property laws, regulations and procedures that apply to the Secretary also apply...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Do Federal real property laws, regulations and... HUMAN SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Other § 137.373 Do Federal real property laws, regulations and procedures that apply to the Secretary also apply to Self-Governance Tribes that purchase real...

  7. JICST Factual DatabaseJICST Chemical Substance Safety Regulation Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Atsushi; Sohma, Tohru

    JICST Chemical Substance Safety Regulation Database is based on the Database of Safety Laws for Chemical Compounds constructed by Japan Chemical Industry Ecology-Toxicology & Information Center (JETOC) sponsored by the Sience and Technology Agency in 1987. JICST has modified JETOC database system, added data and started the online service through JOlS-F (JICST Online Information Service-Factual database) in January 1990. JICST database comprises eighty-three laws and fourteen hundred compounds. The authors outline the database, data items, files and search commands. An example of online session is presented.

  8. Recent development in safety regulation of nuclear fuel cycle activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, S.

    2001-01-01

    Through the effort of deliberation and legislation over five years, Japanese government structure was reformed this January, with the aim of realizing simple, efficient and transparent administration. Under the reform, the Agency for Nuclear and Industrial Safety (ANIS) was founded in the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) to be responsible for safety regulation of energy-related nuclear activities, including nuclear fuel cycle activities, and industrial activities, including explosives, high-pressure gasses and mining. As one of the lessons learned from the JCO criticality accident of September 1999, it was pointed out that the government's inspection function was not enough for fuel fabrication facilities. Accordingly, new statutory regulatory activities were introduced, namely, inspection of observance of safety rules and procedures for all kinds of nuclear operators and periodic inspection of fuel fabrication facilities. In addition, in order to cope with insufficient safety education and training of workers in nuclear facilities, licensees of nuclear facilities are required by law to specify safety education and training for their workers. ANIS is committed to enforce these new regulatory activities effectively and efficiently. In addition, it is going to be prepared, in its capacity as safety regulatory authority, for future development of Japanese fuel cycle activities, including commissioning of JNFL Rokkasho reprocessing plant and possible application for licenses for JNFL MOX fabrication plant and for spent fuel interim storage facilities. (author)

  9. Recent development in safety regulation of nuclear fuel cycle activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, S.

    2002-01-01

    Through the effort of deliberation and legislation over five years, Japanese government structure was reformed this January, with the aim of realizing simple, efficient and transparent administration. Under the reform, the Agency for Nuclear and Industrial Safety (ANIS) was founded in the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) to be responsible for safety regulation of energy-related nuclear activities, including nuclear fuel cycle activities, and industrial activities, including explosives, high-pressure gasses and mining. As one of the lessons learned from the JCO criticality accident of September 1999, it was pointed out that government's inspection function was not enough for fuel fabrication facilities. Accordingly, new statutory regulatory activities were introduced, namely, inspection of observance of safety rules and procedures for all kinds of nuclear operators and periodic inspection of fuel fabrication facilities. In addition, in order to cope with insufficient safety education and training of workers in nuclear facilities, licensees of nuclear facilities are required by law to specify safety education and training for their workers. ANIS is committed to enforce these new regulatory activities effectively and efficiently. In addition, it is going to be prepared for, in its capacity of safety regulatory authority, future development of Japanese fuel cycle activities, including commissioning of JNFL Rokkasho reprocessing plant and possible application for licenses for JNFL MOX fabrication plant and for spent fuel interim storage facilities. (author)

  10. Industrial safety and applied health physics. Annual report for 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxier, J.A.

    1979-09-01

    There were no external or internal exposures to personnel which exceeded the standards for radiation protection as defined in DOE Manual Chapter 0524. Only 39 employees received whole body dose equivalents of one rem or greater. The highest whole body dose equivalent to an employee was 3.3 rem. The highest internal exposure was less than 25% of a maximum permissible dose for any calendar quarter. During 1978, 23 portable instruments were added to the inventory and 228 retired. The total number in service on January 1, 1979, was 1023. There were no releases of gaseous waste or liquid radioactive waste from the laboratory which were of a level that required an incident report to DOE. The average background level at the PAM stations during 1978 was 9.3 μR/hr, or 81 mR/yr. Soil samples were collected at all perimeter and remote monitoring stations and analyzed for eleven radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. Grass samples were collected and analyzed for twelve radionuclides including plutonium and uranium. During 1978, the Radiation and Safety Surveys personnel continued to assist the operating groups in keeping contamination, air concentrations, and personnel exposure levels below the established maximum permissible levels. Fourteen radiation incidents involving radioactive materials were recorded during 1978. Of the 582,000 articles of wearing apparel and 192,000 articles, such as mops, laundry bags, towels, etc., monitored during 1978 about four percent were found to be contaminated. Three lost workday cases occurred at ORNL in 1978, a frequency rate of 0.07. The Serious Injury frequency rate for 1978 was 1.40, as based on the new OSHA system for recording injuries and illness (RII). A total of 55 days were lost or charged for the three lost workday cases in 1978

  11. Development of a safety and regulation systems simulation program II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This report describes the development of a safety and regulation systems simulation program under contract to the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada. A systems logic interaction simulation (SLISIM) program was developed for the AECB's HP-1000 computer which operates in the interactive simulation (INSIM) program environment. The SLISIM program simulates the spatial neutron dynamics, the regulation of the reactor power and in this version the CANDU-PHW 600 MW(e) computerized shutdown systems' trip parameters. The modular concept and interactive capability of the INSIM environment provides the user with considerable flexibility of the setup and control of the simulation

  12. Regulation for delivery of subsidies for public relations and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The regulations provide for subsidies for the public relations activities and safety operations carried out by a local government for the local inhabitants in the vicinity of a nuclear power generation, etc. facility. This type of activity includes the dissemination of information on nuclear power, studies on securing the safety of the inhabitants and communication concerning the facility safety. The contents are as follows : limits of the subsidies, terms of subsidy allocations, the application for subsidies, determination of subsidy allocations, withdrawal of applications, the conditions to the allocations, a report on the work proceedings, a report on the results, confirmation on the sum of subsidies, withdrawal of the decision for subsidies, limitations for disposal of the properties, etc. (Kubozono, M.)

  13. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ON REGULATIONS AND SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR QUADRICYCLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pavlovic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a new class of compact vehicles has been emerging and wide-spreading all around Europe: the quadricycle. These four-wheeled motor vehicles, originally derived from motorcycles, are a small and fuel-efficient mean of transportation used in rural or urban areas as an alternative to motorbikes or city cars. In some countries, they are also endorsed by local authorities and institutions which support small and environmentally-friendly vehicles. In this paper, several general considerations on quadricycles will be provided including the vehicle classification, evolution of regulations (as homologation, driver licence, emissions, etc, technical characteristics, safety requirements, most relevant investigations, and other additional useful information (e.g. references, links. It represents an important and actual topic of investigation for designers and manufacturers considering that the new EU regulation on the approval and market surveillance of quadricycles will soon enter in force providing conclusive requirements for functional safety environmental protection of these promising vehicles.

  14. NRC safety research in support of regulation. Selected highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The report presents selected highlights of how research has contributed to the regulatory effort. It explains the research role of the NRC and nuclear safety research contributions in the areas of: pressure vessel integrity, piping, small- and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents, hydrogen and containment, source term analysis, seismic hazards and high-level waste management. The report also provides a summary of current and future research directions in support of regulation

  15. Resolution 12/2004 Guideline for implementation of safety regulations in the practice of industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    1. This guide is intended to clarify, in relation to its application in practice Industrial Radiography, the provisions of: a) Joint Resolution CITMA-MINSAP, of December 15, 2002, Regulation: B asic Radiation Safety Standards , hereinafter Regulation NBS; b) Resolution No. 25/98 of CITMA Regulation. A uthorization Practices Associated with the use of ionizing radiation , hereinafter Resolution 25/98; c) Resolution 121/2000 CITMA Regulation: F or the Safe Transport of Radioactive materials , hereinafter Resolution 121/2000; and in d) Joint Resolution CITMA-MINSAP, Regulation: S election, Training and Authorization of personnel performing Employment Practices Associated Radiation Ionizing . 2. For the purposes of applying this Guide considers the practice of Industrial Radiography includes the following techniques: a) Industrial Radiography with use of gamma radiation sources; b) crawler radiography equipment; and c) Industrial Radiography with X-rays

  16. Cost-benefit comparison of nuclear and nonnuclear health and safety protective measures and regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, E.P.; Mauro, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    This article compares the costs and benefits of health and safety measures and regulations in the nuclear and nonnuclear fields. A cost-benefit methodology for nuclear safety concerns is presented and applied to existing nuclear plant engineered safety features. Comparisons in terms of investment costs to achieve reductions in mortality rates are then made between nuclear plant safety features and the protective measures and regulations associated with nonnuclear risks, particularly with coal-fired power plants. These comparisons reveal a marked inconsistency in the cost effectiveness of health and safety policy, in which nuclear regulatory policy requires much greater investments to reduce the risk of public mortality than is required in nonnuclear areas where reductions in mortality rates could be achieved at much lower cost. A specific example of regulatory disparity regarding gaseous effluent limits for nuclear and fossil-fuel power plants is presented. It is concluded that a consistent health and safety regulatory policy based on uniform risk and cost-benefit criteria should be adopted and that future proposed Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory requirements should be critically evaluated from a cost-benefit viewpoint

  17. Food safety regulations in Australia and New Zealand Food Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Dilip

    2014-08-01

    Citizens of Australia and New Zealand recognise that food security is a major global issue. Food security also affects Australia and New Zealand's status as premier food exporting nations and the health and wellbeing of the Australasian population. Australia is uniquely positioned to help build a resilient food value chain and support programs aimed at addressing existing and emerging food security challenges. The Australian food governance system is fragmented and less transparent, being largely in the hands of government and semi-governmental regulatory authorities. The high level of consumer trust in Australian food governance suggests that this may be habitual and taken for granted, arising from a lack of negative experiences of food safety. In New Zealand the Ministry of Primary Industries regulates food safety issues. To improve trade and food safety, New Zealand and Australia work together through Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) and other co-operative agreements. Although the potential risks to the food supply are dynamic and constantly changing, the demand, requirement and supply for providing safe food remains firm. The Australasian food industry will need to continually develop its system that supports the food safety program with the help of scientific investigations that underpin the assurance of what is and is not safe. The incorporation of a comprehensive and validated food safety program is one of the total quality management systems that will ensure that all areas of potential problems are being addressed by industry. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. 77 FR 6007 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ...] Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation... they could be published in the Federal Register. This notice lists temporary safety zones, security... the safety and security needs within their jurisdiction; therefore, District Commanders and COTPs have...

  19. Arianespace Launch Service Operator Policy for Space Safety (Regulations and Standards for Safety)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdainne, Laurent

    2013-09-01

    Since December 10, 2010, the French Space Act has entered into force. This French Law, referenced as LOS N°2008-518 ("Loi relative aux Opérations Spatiales"), is compliant with international rules. This French Space Act (LOS) is now applicable for any French private company whose business is dealing with rocket launch or in orbit satellites operations. Under CNES leadership, Arianespace contributed to the consolidation of technical regulation applicable to launch service operators.Now for each launch operation, the operator Arianespace has to apply for an authorization to proceed to the French ministry in charge of space activities. In the files issued for this purpose, the operator is able to justify a high level of warranties in the management of risks through robust processes in relation with the qualification maintenance, the configuration management, the treatment of technical facts and relevant conclusions and risks reduction implementation when needed.Thanks to the historic success of Ariane launch systems through its more than 30 years of exploitation experience (54 successes in a row for latest Ariane 5 launches), Arianespace as well as European public and industrial partners developed key experiences and knowledge as well as competences in space security and safety. Soyuz-ST and Vega launch systems are now in operation from Guiana Space Center with identical and proved risks management processes. Already existing processes have been slightly adapted to cope with the new roles and responsibilities of each actor contributing to the launch preparation and additional requirements like potential collision avoidance with inhabited space objects.Up to now, more than 12 Ariane 5 launches and 4 Soyuz-ST launches have been authorized under the French Space Act regulations. Ariane 5 and Soyuz- ST generic demonstration of conformity have been issued, including exhaustive danger and impact studies for each launch system.This article will detail how Arianespace

  20. The Art World's Concept of Negative Space Applied to System Safety Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, James Ronald (Ronnie)

    2005-01-01

    Tools from several different disciplines can improve system safety management. This paper relates the Art World with our system safety world, showing useful art schools of thought applied to system safety management, developing an art theory-system safety bridge. This bridge is then used to demonstrate relations with risk management, the legal system, personnel management and basic management (establishing priorities). One goal of this presentation/paper is simply to be a fun diversion from the many technical topics presented during the conference.

  1. 75 FR 51374 - Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety Zones, Security Zones; Deepwater Ports in Boston Captain of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-20

    ...] RIN 1625-AA00, RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety Zones, Security Zones; Deepwater Ports... Coast Guard is establishing regulated navigation areas (RNAs) and safety and security zones around the... ``Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety Zones, Security Zones; Deepwater Ports in Boston Captain of the Port Zone...

  2. Radiation sources safety and radioactive materials security regulation in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyshliaiev, A.; Holubiev, V.; Makarovska, O.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation sources are widely used in Ukraine. There are about 2500 users in industry, science, education and about 2800 in medicine. About 80,000 sealed radiation sources with total kerma-equivalent of 450 Gy*M 2 /sec are used in Ukraine. The exact information about the radiation sources and their users will be provided in 2001 after the expected completion of the State inventory of radiation sources in Ukraine. In order to ensure radiation source safety in Ukraine, a State System for regulation of activities dealing with radiation sources has been established. The system includes the following elements: establishment of norms, rules and standards of radiation safety; authorization activity, i.e. issuance of permits (including those in the form of licences) for activities dealing with radiation sources; supervisory activity, i.e. control over observance of norms, rules and standards of radiation safety and fulfilment of conditions of licences for activities dealing with radiation sources, and also enforcement. Comprehensive nuclear legislation was developed and implemented from 1991 to 2000. Radiation source safety is regulated by three main nuclear laws in Ukraine: On the use of nuclear energy and radiation safety (passed on 8 February 1995); On Human Protection from Impact of Ionizing Radiation (passed on 14 January 1998); On permissive activity in the area of nuclear energy utilization (passed on 11 January 2000). The regulatory authorities in Ukraine are the Ministry for Ecology and Natural Resources (Nuclear Regulatory Department) and the Ministry of Health (State sanitary-epidemiology supervision). According to the legislation, activities dealing with radiation sources are forbidden without an officially issued permit in Ukraine. Permitted activities with radiation sources are envisaged: licensing of production, storage and maintenance of radiation sources; licensing of the use of radiation sources; obligatory certification of radiation sources and transport

  3. Health and safety regulation of uranium mining and milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1980-07-01

    The Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board licenses all nuclear facilities in Canada, including uranium mines and mills. The protection of health, safety and the environment is one of the requirements of each licence. A limit of 4 Working Level Months exposure to radon and radon daughters annually has been set, and guidelines for weekly or more frequent workplace monitoring have been established. Personal monitoring devices are being tested, and thermoluminescent dosimeters are to be introduced. The Board reviews its licensees' ventilation plans continuously. The staged licensing process involves the granting of the following documents: 1) ore removal; 2) underground exploration permit; 3) site and construction approval; 4) mining facility operating licence; 5) shut-down approval. Compliance with regulations and licence conditions is monitored mainly by inspectors appointed by provincial agencies, with Board staff exercising auditing fuctions. The Board involves the workers directly with their own health and safety by sending their unions copies of all relevant documents and inviting comments

  4. The UK health and safety executive's policies on information relating to nuclear safety regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.

    1994-01-01

    How a message is transmitted can be as important as what is said. To be effective a message has to be timely, targeted and clear. People do not always remember what was said, by how and when it was said. This paper discusses some of the tools which the Nuclear Safety Division (NSD), the UK's nuclear regulator, has used and emphasizes the need to recognize the importance of a recipient interest in attempting to transmit a message. (author). 4 refs

  5. 34 CFR 425.4 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS FOR THE INTEGRATION OF VOCATIONAL AND ACADEMIC LEARNING... Projects for the Integration of Vocational and Academic Learning Program: (a) The regulations in this part...

  6. Laser sources in dentistry and radiation safety regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, D.; Gaeta, G. M.; Lepore, M.

    2007-02-01

    Nowadays laser sources are largely adopted in dentistry due to their unique properties making them good candidates to substitute traditional scalpel and conventional diamond bur in the surgery of the soft and hard oral tissue, respectively. The large use of laser sources outside the research laboratories without the need of highly specialized personnel can ask for a widespread knowledge of safety issues related to this kind of equipment. The main hazard of accidental exposures regards eyes injury but increasing the power of the laser beam also skin can be involved. Safety legislations in Europe and U.S.A. take into account non ionizing radiations and laser radiation for the hazards for the health deriving from physical agents. Laser safety standards introduce 3 useful parameters for hazard characterization: "Accessible Emission Limit" (AEL), "Maximum Permissible Exposure" (MPE) and "Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance" (NOHD). We measured the MPE and NOHD for Er:YAG and other laser sources currently adopted in dentistry and we compared our results with data elaborated from standards in order to single out safe and comfortable working conditions. In fact an experimental assessment of the hazard parameters and the comparison with those of reference from safety standards turns out to be useful in order to estimate the residual hazard that can be still present after applying all the engineering protection and administrative rules.

  7. NRC safety research in support of regulation, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This report is the second in a series of annual reports responding to congressional inquiries as to the utilization of nuclear regulatory research. NUREG-1175, ''NRC Safety Research in Support of Regulation,'' published in May 1986, reported major research accomplishments between about FY 1980 and FY 1985. This report narrates the accomplishments of FY 1986 and does not restate earlier accomplishments. Earlier research results are mentioned in the context of current results in the interest of continuity. Both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge and their regulatory applications, when there has been a definite regulatory outcome during FY 1986, have been described

  8. 48 CFR 245.7311-2 - Safety, security, and fire regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety, security, and fire regulations. 245.7311-2 Section 245.7311-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Inventory 245.7311-2 Safety, security, and fire regulations. ...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.220 - What regulations apply to self-governance Tribes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INTERIOR ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Waiver of Regulations § 1000.220 What regulations apply to self-governance... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What regulations apply to self-governance Tribes? 1000...

  10. Laser regulation and safety in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, S

    2007-05-12

    Laser devices, instruments and machines vary in their potential for light energy emission from low-powered hand-held or integrated devices, to high-powered units capable of cutting and ablating tissue and materials. The safe use of lasers in dentistry extends to all personnel who might be exposed, either deliberately or by accident, and demands of the lead clinician an approach to their use in order that risk of accidental exposure to laser light is minimised. The scope for regulations extends in similar ways to those imposed on the use of ionising radiation in the dental practice. Laser safety measures in the dental surgery are often drawn from the safe approach to the use of lasers in general and other specialties in medicine and surgery. This article serves to examine the risks involved in laser use in dentistry, the regulations governing safe use and the responsibilities of personnel involved in providing treatment to patients.

  11. Practice specific model regulations: Radiation safety of non-medical irradiation facilities. Interim report for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (Standards or BSS) were published as IAEA Safety Series No. 115 in 1996. This publication is the culmination of efforts over the past decades towards harmonization of radiation protection and safety standards internationally, and is jointly sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Labour Organisation (ILO), the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), the Pan American Health Organisation (PAHO) and the World Health Organisation (WHO). The purpose of the Standards is to establish basic requirements for protection against the risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation and for the safety of radiation sources that may deliver such exposure (hereinafter called 'radiation safety'). The requirements are based on the principles set out in the Safety Fundamentals, published as IAEA Safety Series Nos 110 and 120. The Standards can be implemented only through an effective radiation safety infrastructure that includes adequate laws and regulations, an efficient regulatory system, supporting experts and services, and a 'safety culture' shared by all those with responsibilities for protection, including both management and workers. IAEA-TECDOC-1067, Organization and Implementation of a National Regulatory Infrastructure Governing Protection against Ionizing Radiation and the Safety of Radiation Sources, provides detailed guidance on how to establish or improve national radiation safety infrastructure in order to implement the requirements of the Standards. The TECDOC covers the elements of a radiation safety infrastructure at the national level needed to apply the Standards to radiation sources such as those used in medicine, agriculture, research, industry and education. It also provides advice on approaches to the organization and operation of

  12. How EPA's Asbestos Regulations Apply to Asbestos-Containing Vermiculite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letters and guidance that detail the requirements of asbestos National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants as is applies to vermiculite asbestos-containing material during residential demolitions

  13. Guide to Radiation Safety regulations and guidelines (SSMFS 2012:3) on the management of contaminated ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moere, Hans

    2012-06-01

    Energy producers burning peat or wood fuel can obtain ash that is contaminated with cesium-137 from Tjernobyl accident or naturally occurring uranium, thorium and potassium, from some peat bogs. Regulations (SSMFS 2012:3) have been developed which regulates how the contaminated ash should be handled. The regulations affect all who handle contaminated ash in incinerators, landfills, public works, ash recycling, transportation or recycling of ash in other ways. Radiation Safety regulations and guidelines (SSMFS 2012:3) on the management of contaminated ash will apply from 1 September 2012. At that time Regulations (SSMFS 2008:16) on the management of ash that is contaminated with cesium-137, ceases to apply. The contents have been incorporated into the new regulations. This report provides explanations and guidance to the Regulations in order to facilitate the practical application. This guidance is not legally binding

  14. A fresh start of nuclear safety regulation and international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    It should be explained more to the outside modestly the Fukushima nuclear accident would be a man-made complex disaster, which might be reluctant to do but not be neglected. Utmost efforts to change inward-looking attitude and reform safety culture should be done so as to prevent superficial reflection of the Fukushima nuclear accident. Since all nuclear regulatory functions ('3S': safety, security, safeguards) were integrated in Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA), NRA and secretariat of NRA became more responsible for international response, and strengthening of organization system and human resources development would be an urgent necessity. This article described present stage of NRA focusing on international dimension including personal views. Overseas strong concern over the Fukushima nuclear accident and international communications were reviewed. The Fukushima nuclear accident started from natural disaster and enlarged as a man-made complex disaster with many human factors (mainly inaction, wilful negligence) overlapping and safety culture flawed. Examples of overseas and Japanese action plan to learn and absorb lessons from the Fukushima accident were introduced. NRA's started activities on inviting IAEA's IRRS and OPPAS as soon as ready, strengthening nuclear security measures, safeguards to prevent nuclear proliferation, bilateral cooperation and international advisors were also presented. (T. Tanaka)

  15. 34 CFR 363.5 - What regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...). (4) 34 CFR part 80 (Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to... part 86 (Drug-Free Schools and Campuses). (b) The regulations in this part 363. (c) The following... Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1992. If these provisions conflict with statutory language, they are superseded...

  16. Unique differences in applying safety analyses for a graphite moderated, channel reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffitt, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    Unlike its predecessors, the N Reactor at the Hanford Site in Washington State was designed to produce electricity for civilian energy use as well as weapons-grade plutonium. This paper describes the major problems associated with applying safety analysis methodologies developed for commercial light water reactors (LWR) to a unique reactor like the N Reactor. The focus of the discussion is on non-applicable LWR safety standards and computer modeling/analytical variances of standards. The approaches used to resolve these problems to develop safety standards and limits for the N Reactor are described

  17. Applying different quality and safety models in healthcare improvement work: Boundary objects and system thinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiig, Siri; Robert, Glenn; Anderson, Janet E.; Pietikainen, Elina; Reiman, Teemu; Macchi, Luigi; Aase, Karina

    2014-01-01

    A number of theoretical models can be applied to help guide quality improvement and patient safety interventions in hospitals. However there are often significant differences between such models and, therefore, their potential contribution when applied in diverse contexts. The aim of this paper is to explore how two such models have been applied by hospitals to improve quality and safety. We describe and compare the models: (1) The Organizing for Quality (OQ) model, and (2) the Design for Integrated Safety Culture (DISC) model. We analyze the theoretical foundations of the models, and show, by using a retrospective comparative case study approach from two European hospitals, how these models have been applied to improve quality and safety. The analysis shows that differences appear in the theoretical foundations, practical approaches and applications of the models. Nevertheless, the case studies indicate that the choice between the OQ and DISC models is of less importance for guiding the practice of quality and safety improvement work, as they are both systemic and share some important characteristics. The main contribution of the models lay in their role as boundary objects directing attention towards organizational and systems thinking, culture, and collaboration

  18. On applying safety archetypes to the Fukushima accident to identify nonlinear influencing factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, A.L.; Ribeiro, A.C.O.; Duarte, J.P.; Frutuoso e Melo, P.F.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power plants are typically characterized as high reliable organizations. In other words, they are organizations defined as relatively error free over a long period of time. Another relevant characteristic of the nuclear industry is that safety efforts are credited to design. However, major accidents, like the Fukushima accident, have shown that new tools are needed to identify latent deficiencies and help improve their safety level. Safety archetypes proposed elsewhere (e. g., safety issues stalled in the face of technological advances and eroding safety) consonant with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) efforts are used to examine different aspects of accidents in a systemic perspective of the interaction between individuals, technology and organizational factors. Safety archetypes can help consider nonlinear interactions. Effects are rarely proportional to causes and what happens locally in a system (near the current operating point) often does not apply to distant regions (other system states), so that one has to consider the so-called nonlinear interactions. This is the case, for instance, with human probability failure estimates and safety level identification. In this paper, we discuss the Fukushima accident in order to show how archetypes can highlight nonlinear interactions of factors that influenced it and how to maintain safety levels in order to prevent other accidents. The initial evaluation of the set of archetypes suggested in the literature showed that at least four of them are applicable to the Fukushima accident, as is inferred from official reports on the accident. These are: complacency (that is, the effects of complacency on safety), decreased safety awareness, fixing on symptoms and not the real causes and eroding safety. (author)

  19. On applying safety archetypes to the Fukushima accident to identify nonlinear influencing factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, A.L., E-mail: alsousa@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ribeiro, A.C.O., E-mail: antonio.ribeiro@bayer.com [Bayer Crop Science Brasil S.A., Belford Roxo, RJ (Brazil); Duarte, J.P., E-mail: julianapduarte@poli.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Frutuoso e Melo, P.F., E-mail: frutuoso@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COOPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear power plants are typically characterized as high reliable organizations. In other words, they are organizations defined as relatively error free over a long period of time. Another relevant characteristic of the nuclear industry is that safety efforts are credited to design. However, major accidents, like the Fukushima accident, have shown that new tools are needed to identify latent deficiencies and help improve their safety level. Safety archetypes proposed elsewhere (e. g., safety issues stalled in the face of technological advances and eroding safety) consonant with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) efforts are used to examine different aspects of accidents in a systemic perspective of the interaction between individuals, technology and organizational factors. Safety archetypes can help consider nonlinear interactions. Effects are rarely proportional to causes and what happens locally in a system (near the current operating point) often does not apply to distant regions (other system states), so that one has to consider the so-called nonlinear interactions. This is the case, for instance, with human probability failure estimates and safety level identification. In this paper, we discuss the Fukushima accident in order to show how archetypes can highlight nonlinear interactions of factors that influenced it and how to maintain safety levels in order to prevent other accidents. The initial evaluation of the set of archetypes suggested in the literature showed that at least four of them are applicable to the Fukushima accident, as is inferred from official reports on the accident. These are: complacency (that is, the effects of complacency on safety), decreased safety awareness, fixing on symptoms and not the real causes and eroding safety. (author)

  20. THE IMPACT OF MARKET MECHANISMS AND HACCP REGULATION ON FOOD SAFETY QUALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Ollinger, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Economists have long debated the relative effectiveness of markets and regulations in reaching socially desirable outcomes. This empirical study of meat and poultry food safety regulation suggests that market mechanisms and flexible regulatory instruments, e.g. HACCP systems, have a greater impact on food safety quality than less flexible regulatory instruments. Subject code: 9 (Food Safety and Nutrition).

  1. 75 FR 16370 - Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety Zones, Security Zones; Deepwater Ports in Boston Captain of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...] RIN 1625-AA00, RIN 1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety Zones, Security Zones; Deepwater Ports... (COTP) Zone, off the coast of Gloucester, Massachusetts. The proposed RNAs and safety and security zones..., 165.11, 165.20, 165.30. Current regulations establishing RNAs, safety zones, and security zones for...

  2. Classification of research reactors and discussion of thinking of safety regulation based on the classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Chenxiu; Zhu Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Research reactors have different characteristics in the fields of reactor type, use, power level, design principle, operation model and safety performance, etc, and also have significant discrepancy in the aspect of nuclear safety regulation. This paper introduces classification of research reactors and discusses thinking of safety regulation based on the classification of research reactors. (authors)

  3. 20 CFR 645.260 - What health and safety provisions apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Administrative Requirements § 645.260 What health and safety provisions apply to participants in Welfare-to-Work... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What health and safety provisions apply to... this part, are subject to the same health and safety standards established under State and Federal law...

  4. Improving Patient Safety in Clinical Oncology: Applying Lessons From Normal Accident Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chera, Bhishamjit S; Mazur, Lukasz; Buchanan, Ian; Kim, Hong Jin; Rockwell, John; Milowsky, Matthew I; Marks, Lawrence B

    2015-10-01

    Concerns for patient safety persist in clinical oncology. Within several nonmedical areas (eg, aviation, nuclear power), concepts from Normal Accident Theory (NAT), a framework for analyzing failure potential within and between systems, have been successfully applied to better understand system performance and improve system safety. Clinical oncology practice is interprofessional and interdisciplinary, and our therapies often have narrow therapeutic windows. Thus, many of our processes are, in NAT terms, interactively complex and tightly coupled within and across systems and are therefore prone to unexpected behaviors that can result in substantial patient harm. To improve safety at the University of North Carolina, we have applied the concepts of NAT to our practice to better understand our systems' behavior and adopted strategies to reduce complexity and coupling. Furthermore, recognizing that we cannot eliminate all risks, we have stressed safety mindfulness among our staff to further promote safety. Many specific examples are provided herein. The lessons from NAT are translatable to clinical oncology and may help to promote safety.

  5. Possibilities and Limitations of Applying Software Reliability Growth Models to Safety- Critical Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Man Cheol; Jang, Seung Cheol; Ha, Jae Joo

    2006-01-01

    As digital systems are gradually introduced to nuclear power plants (NPPs), the need of quantitatively analyzing the reliability of the digital systems is also increasing. Kang and Sung identified (1) software reliability, (2) common-cause failures (CCFs), and (3) fault coverage as the three most critical factors in the reliability analysis of digital systems. For the estimation of the safety-critical software (the software that is used in safety-critical digital systems), the use of Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs) seems to be most widely used. The use of BBNs in reliability estimation of safety-critical software is basically a process of indirectly assigning a reliability based on various observed information and experts' opinions. When software testing results or software failure histories are available, we can use a process of directly estimating the reliability of the software using various software reliability growth models such as Jelinski- Moranda model and Goel-Okumoto's nonhomogeneous Poisson process (NHPP) model. Even though it is generally known that software reliability growth models cannot be applied to safety-critical software due to small number of expected failure data from the testing of safety-critical software, we try to find possibilities and corresponding limitations of applying software reliability growth models to safety critical software

  6. 77 FR 26287 - Cooperative Agreement To Support the Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... and continue to stimulate the integration of applied research, education, and outreach programs. DATES... global food supply, FDA continues to face complex food safety issues associated with products that it... cooperative agreement will provide continued support so that UMCP-JIFSAN can meet the following objectives...

  7. 34 CFR 97.401 - To what do these regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false To what do these regulations apply? 97.401 Section 97... ED Protections for Children Who Are Subjects in Research § 97.401 To what do these regulations apply... States, but in appropriate circumstances the Secretary may, under § 97.101(i), waive the applicability of...

  8. 25 CFR 900.216 - What other statutes and regulations apply to contract disputes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CONTRACTS UNDER THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Post-Award Contract Disputes § 900.216 What other statutes and regulations apply to... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What other statutes and regulations apply to contract...

  9. Improving the regulation of safety at DOE nuclear facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The report strongly recommends that, with the end of the Cold War, safety and health at DOE facilities should be regulated by outside agencies rather than by DOE itself. The three major recommendations are: under any regulatory scheme, DOE must maintain a strong internal safety management system; essentially all aspects of safety at DOE's nuclear facilities should be externally regulated; and existing agencies rather than a new one should be responsible for external regulation

  10. Assessing risks and regulating safety standards in the oil and gas industry: the Peruvian experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Arturo Leonardo Vásquez Cordano; Julio Salvador Jácome; Raúl Lizardo García Carpio; Victor Fernández Guzman

    2013-01-01

    Environmental regulation has usually focused on controlling continuous sources of pollution such as CO2 emissions through carbon taxes. However, the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has shown that accidents associated to safety failures can also generate bursts of pollution with serious environmental consequences. Regulating safety conditions to prevent accidents in the oil and gas industry is challenging because public regulators cannot perfectly observe whether firms comply with safety ...

  11. The Interplay of Regulation and Marketing Incentives in Providing Food Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Ollinger, Michael; Moore, Danna L.

    2009-01-01

    This report examines the impact of process regulations mandated under the Pathogen Reduction/Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (PR/HACCP) rule by the Food Safety and Inspection Service of USDA on food safety process control. The current level of food safety found in U.S. meat and poultry food products is a result of process and performance regulations and management-determined actions brought about by market incentives. Processing regulations include sanitation and other tasks relate...

  12. Improving the regulation of safety at DOE nuclear facilities. Final report: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The report strongly recommends that, with the end of the Cold War, safety and health at DOE facilities should be regulated by outside agencies rather than by any regulatory scheme, DOE must maintain a strong internal safety management system; essentially all aspects of safety at DOE's nuclear facilities should be externally regulated; and existing agencies rather than a new one should be responsible for external regulation

  13. Improving the regulation of safety at DOE nuclear facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The report strongly recommends that, with the end of the Cold War, safety and health at DOE facilities should be regulated by outside agencies rather than by DOE itself. The three major recommendations are: under any regulatory scheme, DOE must maintain a strong internal safety management system; essentially all aspects of safety at DOE`s nuclear facilities should be externally regulated; and existing agencies rather than a new one should be responsible for external regulation.

  14. Legislation for the countermeasures on special issues of nuclear safety regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Byung Sun; Lee, Mo Sung; Chung, Gum Chun; Kim, Heon Jin; Oh, Ho Chul

    2004-02-01

    Since the present nuclear safety regulation has some legal problems that refer to special issues and contents of regulatory provisions, this report has preformed research on the legal basic theory of nuclear safety regulation to solve the problems. In addition, this report analyzed the problems of each provisions and suggested the revision drafts on the basis of analyzing problems and the undergoing theory of nuclear safety regulation

  15. Improving the regulation of safety at DOE nuclear facilities. Final report: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The report strongly recommends that, with the end of the Cold War, safety and health at DOE facilities should be regulated by outside agencies rather than by any regulatory scheme, DOE must maintain a strong internal safety management system; essentially all aspects of safety at DOE`s nuclear facilities should be externally regulated; and existing agencies rather than a new one should be responsible for external regulation.

  16. Legislation for the countermeasures on special issues of nuclear safety regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Byung Sun; Lee, Mo Sung; Chung, Gum Chun; Kim, Heon Jin; Oh, Ho Chul [Chongju Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    Since the present nuclear safety regulation has some legal problems that refer to special issues and contents of regulatory provisions, this report has preformed research on the legal basic theory of nuclear safety regulation to solve the problems. In addition, this report analyzed the problems of each provisions and suggested the revision drafts on the basis of analyzing problems and the undergoing theory of nuclear safety regulation.

  17. 12 CFR 224.3 - Margin regulations to be applied by nonexempted borrowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Margin regulations to be applied by nonexempted... THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BORROWERS OF SECURITIES CREDIT (REGULATION X) § 224.3 Margin regulations to... shall obtain purpose credit from outside the United States unless it conforms to the following margin...

  18. 42 CFR 9.13 - Other federal laws, regulations, and statutes that apply to the sanctuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other federal laws, regulations, and statutes that... SANCTUARY SYSTEM § 9.13 Other federal laws, regulations, and statutes that apply to the sanctuary. (a) Animal Welfare Act (7 U.S.C. 2131-2159). (b) Animal Welfare Regulations, 9 CFR, subchapter A, parts 1 and...

  19. TCSC impedance regulator applied to the second benchmark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, J.P.; Dessaint, L.A. [Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Champagne, R. [Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Software and IT Engineering; Pare, D. [Institut de Recherche d' Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, PQ (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Due to the combination of electrical demand growth and the high cost of building new power transmission lines, series compensation is increasingly used in power systems all around the world. Series compensation has been proposed as a new way to transfer more power on existing lines. By adding series compensation to an existing line (a relatively small change), the power transfer can be increased significantly. One of the means used for line compensation is the addition of capacitive elements in series with the line. This paper presented a thyristor-controlled series capacitor (TCSC) model that used impedance as reference, had individual controls for each phase, included a linearization module and considered only the fundamental frequency for impedance computations, without using any filter. The model's dynamic behavior was validated by applying it to the second benchmark model for subsynchronous resonance (SSR). Simulation results from the proposed model, obtained using EMTP-RV and SimPowerSystems were demonstrated. It was concluded that SSR was mitigated by the proposed approach. 19 refs., 19 figs.

  20. Legislation for the countermeasures on special issues of nuclear safety regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Byung Sun; Lee, Mo Sung; Chung, Gum Chun; Kim, Hak Man; Oh, Ho Chul

    2003-02-01

    Since the present legal system on nuclear safety regulation has some problems that refer to contents of regulatory provisions, this mid-report has preformed research on the legal basic theory of nuclear safety regulation. And then secondly this report analyzed the problems of each provisions and suggested the revision drafts on the basis of analyzing problems and the undergoing theory of nuclear safety regulation. In order to interpret easily this report finally took the cases of judicial precedents on nuclear safety regulation in USA, Germany, Japan and Korea

  1. Legislation for the countermeasures on special issues of nuclear safety regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Byung Sun; Lee, Mo Sung; Chung, Gum Chun; Kim, Hak Man; Oh, Ho Chul [Chongju Univ., Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-15

    Since the present legal system on nuclear safety regulation has some problems that refer to contents of regulatory provisions, this mid-report has preformed research on the legal basic theory of nuclear safety regulation. And then secondly this report analyzed the problems of each provisions and suggested the revision drafts on the basis of analyzing problems and the undergoing theory of nuclear safety regulation. In order to interpret easily this report finally took the cases of judicial precedents on nuclear safety regulation in USA, Germany, Japan and Korea.

  2. Applying Mechatronics to Improve the Safety of Children in Vehicles - What Can Be Done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazziq Zufar, Khairul; Jazlan, Ahmad

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays, the media have reported an increasing number of cases where children are accidentally being trapped in vehicles while they parents and guardians are away attending to other matters. In this paper we discuss the feasibility of applying Mechatronics to improve the safety of children in vehicles with the ultimate goal of developing a means for parents,guardians and authorities to be informed if ever there is a child trapped in a vehicle and in need of urgent assistance. We have also presented some preliminary experiments we have carried out for a safety alert system which is currently being developed in our lab.

  3. 76 FR 36438 - Special Local Regulations; Safety and Security Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ...] RIN 1625-AA00; 1625-AA08; 1625-AA87 Special Local Regulations; Safety and Security Zones; Recurring... regulatory safety zones, security zones and special local regulations. This regulation carries out three... regulated areas, establish 32 new safety zones, three special local regulations, and one security zone, and...

  4. Industry example of how Safety and Security are applied within the Organizations: The Transnubel example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairiot, X.

    2016-01-01

    During more than 40 years of transport of radioactive materials, Transnubel noticed the evolution regarding Safety and Security requirements. These requirements have to be met within the frame of commercial activities, with constraints as planning, cost control, availabilities, .... In addition, other requirements issued by customers, eventually linked with Safety and Security, have also to be taken in account. Since many years, the company is therefore organized for all daily activities on basis of a Quality System: this Quality System, based on the ISO 9000, aims to give an answer to the ISO 9000 requirements, but also to the safety requirements, which are integrated at different levels in the Quality System. The trend of the last years concerning Security has an impact on the organization and documentation in the company. Due to the legal requirements, the implementation has not been possible within the same ISO 9000 structure. As a result, a Security system as been created on a similar basis as the ISO 9000: security manual, security procedures and security working instructions. Two systems therefore are existing within our company: a Quality System including Safety, and a Security System. In the frame of our international transports, we need to rely on the flexibility of our Quality System and Security System to allow us to take in account national regulations: the regulations dealing with Security and Safety (and their interpretations) are national competences, and differ once borders are crossed. The presentation will give an overview of the implementation of the Safety and Security aspects in the company: the structure and the implementation. And will try to answer the question: is the increase of the structure / documents always a benefit to the execution of the transports? (author)

  5. State of bus safety in the U.S. : summary of federal and state regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report provides a comprehensive overview of transit bus safety regulations and standards developed by all 50 states, as well as : information on how state departments of transportation (DOT) regulate the maintenance or operation of transit/parat...

  6. Regulation for delivery of subsidies for public relations and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This rule is established under the provisions of the law for the proper enforcement of subsidy budgets and the ordinance for the execution of this law, and to practice these provisions. It is applied to subsidies for the expenses of popularizing the knowledge of atomic power generation to inhabitants in the surrounding areas of atomic power generating facilities, investigation on the security of inhabitants in these areas, communication and coordination concerning the safety of such facilities during and after their installation and other expenses of establishing the facilities for public relations to inhabitants in the surrounding areas of these facilities. Basic terms are defined, such as atomic power generating facility, facility related to atomic power generation, and place of business. Subsidies are delivered to prefectures, cities, towns and villages where atomic power generating facilities are or are expected to be set up, prefectures including cities, towns and villages adjacent to those where such facilities are or are expected to be established, and prefectures which include the surrounding areas of those facilities. The limits of subsidies are stipulated in the lists attached. The terms of delivery vary according to the kinds of atomic power generating facilities and related facilities. Prefectures or cities, towns and villages which intend to apply for the delivery of subsidies shall file specified applications attached with the explanation of subsidy business outlines to the director of the ministry or agency concerned. Decision and conditions of delivery, reports on the situations and results of business and other concerned matters are defined, respectively. (Okada, K.)

  7. Legal status of minister's notices and technology standards of 'Korea institute of nuclear safety'(KINS) to regulate nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S. K.; Jung, M. M.; Kim, S. W.; Jang, K. H.; Oh, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    Concerning nuclear safety or technology standards, each of 'notices' issued by minister of science and technology(MOST) empowered by law of its regulation is obviously forceful as a law, if not all. But the standards made by the chief of Korea institute of nuclear safety(KINS) to meet the tasks entrusted to KINS by MOST is only conditionally forceful as a law, that is, on the condition that law or regulation empowered the chief of KINS to make nuclear safety and/or technology standards

  8. Australian Experience in Implementing Transport Safety Regulations and Transport Security Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Australian transport safety and security regulatory framework is governed by Commonwealth, State and Territory legislations. There are eleven competent authorities in Australia that includes three Commonwealth authorities, six states and two territory authorities. IAEA Regulations for Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS-R-1, 2005 edition) is applied through Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) Code of Practice for Transport of Radioactive Material 2008 by road, rail and waterways not covered by marine legislations. All states and territories apply this Transport Code through their regulatory system. For air transport, the Civil Aviation Act 1988 adopts the requirements of the ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air DOC 9284, which also adopts TS-R-1. The security of radioactive material in air transport is achieved via the Aviation Transport Security Act 2004. For sea transport Australian Marine Order 41 applies the requirements of IMDG (International Maritime Dangerous Goods) Code which also adopts TS-R-1. The security of radioactive material (nuclear material) is governed by two Commonwealth Agencies namely, ARPANSA and ASNO (Australian Safeguards and Non-proliferation Office) . ARPANSA regulates the security of radioactive sources through ARPANSA Code of Practice for the Security of Radioactive Sources 2007 which is based on the IAEA Draft Security Series. ASNO regulates security of nuclear material including U, Th and Pu through the Nuclear Non-Proliferation (Safeguards) Act, and the object of which is to give effect to certain obligations that Australia has as a party to the NPT, Australia’s safeguards agreement with the IAEA, and other bilateral safeguards agreements and certain obligations that Australia has as a party to the Convention for the Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials (CPPNM). This paper presents the effectiveness of regulatory approaches for safe and secure

  9. A safety assessment methodology applied to CNS/ATM-based air traffic control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vismari, Lucio Flavio, E-mail: lucio.vismari@usp.b [Safety Analysis Group (GAS), School of Engineering at University of Sao Paulo (Poli-USP), Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, Trav.3, n.158, Predio da Engenharia de Eletricidade, Sala C2-32, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Batista Camargo Junior, Joao, E-mail: joaocamargo@usp.b [Safety Analysis Group (GAS), School of Engineering at University of Sao Paulo (Poli-USP), Av. Prof. Luciano Gualberto, Trav.3, n.158, Predio da Engenharia de Eletricidade, Sala C2-32, CEP 05508-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    In the last decades, the air traffic system has been changing to adapt itself to new social demands, mainly the safe growth of worldwide traffic capacity. Those changes are ruled by the Communication, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) paradigm , based on digital communication technologies (mainly satellites) as a way of improving communication, surveillance, navigation and air traffic management services. However, CNS/ATM poses new challenges and needs, mainly related to the safety assessment process. In face of these new challenges, and considering the main characteristics of the CNS/ATM, a methodology is proposed at this work by combining 'absolute' and 'relative' safety assessment methods adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in ICAO Doc.9689 , using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets (FSPN) as the modeling formalism, and compares the safety metrics estimated from the simulation of both the proposed (in analysis) and the legacy system models. To demonstrate its usefulness, the proposed methodology was applied to the 'Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcasting' (ADS-B) based air traffic control system. As conclusions, the proposed methodology assured to assess CNS/ATM system safety properties, in which FSPN formalism provides important modeling capabilities, and discrete event simulation allowing the estimation of the desired safety metric.

  10. A safety assessment methodology applied to CNS/ATM-based air traffic control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vismari, Lucio Flavio; Batista Camargo Junior, Joao

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, the air traffic system has been changing to adapt itself to new social demands, mainly the safe growth of worldwide traffic capacity. Those changes are ruled by the Communication, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) paradigm , based on digital communication technologies (mainly satellites) as a way of improving communication, surveillance, navigation and air traffic management services. However, CNS/ATM poses new challenges and needs, mainly related to the safety assessment process. In face of these new challenges, and considering the main characteristics of the CNS/ATM, a methodology is proposed at this work by combining 'absolute' and 'relative' safety assessment methods adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in ICAO Doc.9689 , using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets (FSPN) as the modeling formalism, and compares the safety metrics estimated from the simulation of both the proposed (in analysis) and the legacy system models. To demonstrate its usefulness, the proposed methodology was applied to the 'Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcasting' (ADS-B) based air traffic control system. As conclusions, the proposed methodology assured to assess CNS/ATM system safety properties, in which FSPN formalism provides important modeling capabilities, and discrete event simulation allowing the estimation of the desired safety metric.

  11. Applying theory of planned behavior in predicting of patient safety behaviors of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Marzieh; Kadkhodaee, Maryam; Yaghoubi, Maryam; Maroufi, Maryam; Shams, Asadollah

    2013-01-01

    Patient safety has become a major concern throughout the world. It is the absence of preventable harm to a patient during the process of health care, ensuring safer care is an enormous challenge, psychosocial variables influences behaviors of human. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) is a well-validated behavioral decision-making model that has been used to predict social and health behaviors. This study is aimed to investigate predictors of nurse's patient safety intentions and behavior, using a TPB framework. Stratified sampling technique was used to choose 124 nurses who worked at the selected hospitals of Isfahan in 2011. Study tool was a questionnaire, designed by researchers team including 3 nurses a physician and a psychologist based on guideline of TPB model. Questionnaire Validity was confirmed by experts and its reliability was assessed by Cronbach's alpha as 0.87. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate how well each TPB variables predicted the variance in patient safety behavior. Analyzing was done by SPSS18. Finding revealed that "normative beliefs" had the greatest influence on nurses intention to implement patient safety behaviors. Analyzing data by hospital types and workplace wards showed that both in public and private hospitals normative beliefs has affected safety behaviors of nurses more than other variables. Also in surgical wards, nurses behaviors have been affected by "control beliefs" and in medical wards by normative beliefs. Normative beliefs, and subjective norms were the most influential factor of safety behavior of nurses in this study. Considering the role of cultural context in these issues, it seemseducation of managers and top individuals about patient safety and its importance is a priority also control believes were another important predicting factor of behavior in surgical wards and intensive care units. Regarding the complexity of work in these spaces, applying medical guidelines and effective

  12. Applying the WHO conceptual framework for the International Classification for Patient Safety to a surgical population

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, L. M.; Woods, D. M.; Yanes, A. F.; Skaro, A. I.; Daud, A.; Curtis, T.; Wymore, E.; Holl, J. L.; Abecassis, M. M.; Ladner, D. P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Efforts to improve patient safety are challenged by the lack of universally agreed upon terms. The International Classification for Patient Safety (ICPS) was developed by the World Health Organization for this purpose. This study aimed to test the applicability of the ICPS to a surgical population. Design A web-based safety debriefing was sent to clinicians involved in surgical care of abdominal organ transplant patients. A multidisciplinary team of patient safety experts, surgeons and researchers used the data to develop a system of classification based on the ICPS. Disagreements were reconciled via consensus, and a codebook was developed for future use by researchers. Results A total of 320 debriefing responses were used for the initial review and codebook development. In total, the 320 debriefing responses contained 227 patient safety incidents (range: 0–7 per debriefing) and 156 contributing factors/hazards (0–5 per response). The most common severity classification was ‘reportable circumstance,’ followed by ‘near miss.’ The most common incident types were ‘resources/organizational management,’ followed by ‘medical device/equipment.’ Several aspects of surgical care were encompassed by more than one classification, including operating room scheduling, delays in care, trainee-related incidents, interruptions and handoffs. Conclusions This study demonstrates that a framework for patient safety can be applied to facilitate the organization and analysis of surgical safety data. Several unique aspects of surgical care require consideration, and by using a standardized framework for describing concepts, research findings can be compared and disseminated across surgical specialties. The codebook is intended for use as a framework for other specialties and institutions. PMID:26803539

  13. Applying the WHO conceptual framework for the International Classification for Patient Safety to a surgical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, L M; Woods, D M; Yanes, A F; Skaro, A I; Daud, A; Curtis, T; Wymore, E; Holl, J L; Abecassis, M M; Ladner, D P

    2016-04-01

    Efforts to improve patient safety are challenged by the lack of universally agreed upon terms. The International Classification for Patient Safety (ICPS) was developed by the World Health Organization for this purpose. This study aimed to test the applicability of the ICPS to a surgical population. A web-based safety debriefing was sent to clinicians involved in surgical care of abdominal organ transplant patients. A multidisciplinary team of patient safety experts, surgeons and researchers used the data to develop a system of classification based on the ICPS. Disagreements were reconciled via consensus, and a codebook was developed for future use by researchers. A total of 320 debriefing responses were used for the initial review and codebook development. In total, the 320 debriefing responses contained 227 patient safety incidents (range: 0-7 per debriefing) and 156 contributing factors/hazards (0-5 per response). The most common severity classification was 'reportable circumstance,' followed by 'near miss.' The most common incident types were 'resources/organizational management,' followed by 'medical device/equipment.' Several aspects of surgical care were encompassed by more than one classification, including operating room scheduling, delays in care, trainee-related incidents, interruptions and handoffs. This study demonstrates that a framework for patient safety can be applied to facilitate the organization and analysis of surgical safety data. Several unique aspects of surgical care require consideration, and by using a standardized framework for describing concepts, research findings can be compared and disseminated across surgical specialties. The codebook is intended for use as a framework for other specialties and institutions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  14. European regulations on nutraceuticals, dietary supplements and functional foods: a framework based on safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppens, Patrick; da Silva, Miguel Fernandes; Pettman, Simon

    2006-04-03

    This article describes the legislation that is relevant in the marketing of functional foods in the European Union (EU), how this legislation was developed as well as some practical consequences for manufacturers, marketers and consumers. It also addresses some concrete examples of how the EU's safety requirements for food products have impacted a range of product categories. In the late nineties, research into functional ingredients was showing promising prospects for the use of such ingredients in foodstuffs. Due mainly to safety concerns, these new scientific developments were accompanied by an urgent call for legislation. The European Commission 2000 White Paper on Food Safety announced some 80 proposals for new and improved legislation in this field. Among others, it foresaw the establishment of a General Food Law Regulation, laying down the principles of food law and the creation of an independent Food Authority endowed with the task of giving scientific advice on issues based upon scientific risk assessment with clearly separated responsibilities for risk assessment, risk management and risk communication. Since then, more than 90% of the White Paper proposals have been implemented. However, there is not, as such, a regulatory framework for 'functional foods' or 'nutraceuticals' in EU Food Law. The rules to be applied are numerous and depend on the nature of the foodstuff. The rules of the general food law Regulation are applicable to all foods. In addition, legislation on dietetic foods, on food supplements or on novel foods may also be applicable to functional foods depending on the nature of the product and on their use. Finally, the two proposals on nutrition and health claims and on the addition of vitamins and minerals and other substances to foods, which are currently in the legislative process, will also be an important factor in the future marketing of 'nutraceuticals' in Europe. The cornerstone of EU legislation on food products, including

  15. European regulations on nutraceuticals, dietary supplements and functional foods: A framework based on safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppens, Patrick; Fernandes da Silva, Miguel; Pettman, Simon

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the legislation that is relevant in the marketing of functional foods in the European Union (EU), how this legislation was developed as well as some practical consequences for manufacturers, marketers and consumers. It also addresses some concrete examples of how the EU's safety requirements for food products have impacted a range of product categories. In the late nineties, research into functional ingredients was showing promising prospects for the use of such ingredients in foodstuffs. Due mainly to safety concerns, these new scientific developments were accompanied by an urgent call for legislation. The European Commission 2000 White Paper on Food Safety announced some 80 proposals for new and improved legislation in this field. Among others, it foresaw the establishment of a General Food Law Regulation, laying down the principles of food law and the creation of an independent Food Authority endowed with the task of giving scientific advice on issues based upon scientific risk assessment with clearly separated responsibilities for risk assessment, risk management and risk communication. Since then, more than 90% of the White Paper proposals have been implemented. However, there is not, as such, a regulatory framework for 'functional foods' or 'nutraceuticals' in EU Food Law. The rules to be applied are numerous and depend on the nature of the foodstuff. The rules of the general food law Regulation are applicable to all foods. In addition, legislation on dietetic foods, on food supplements or on novel foods may also be applicable to functional foods depending on the nature of the product and on their use. Finally, the two proposals on nutrition and health claims and on the addition of vitamins and minerals and other substances to foods, which are currently in the legislative process, will also be an important factor in the future marketing of 'nutraceuticals' in Europe. The cornerstone of EU legislation on food products, including

  16. 76 FR 70342 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ...] Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation... published in the Federal Register. This notice lists temporary safety zones, security zones, special local... Commanders and Captains of the Port (COTP) must be immediately responsive to the safety and security needs...

  17. Safety and regulation in the use of radiation in medicine: status in India and future perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopalakrishnan, A.; Parthasarathy, K.S.; Ghosh, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the history of radiation protection, regulatory aspects and the status of radiation safety in radiotherapy, radiodiagnosis and nuclear medicine in India. The revised basic safety standards and the future developments envisaged in the safety and regulation are also mentioned. (author). 24 refs., 8 tabs

  18. Understanding complex governance relationships in food safety regulation : The RIT model as a theoretical lens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, Tetty; Verbruggen, Paul

    In this contribution we discuss the added value of the RIT model for the analysis of complex governance relationships in the regulation of food safety. By exploring regimes of food safety involving the European Union and the Global Food Safety Initiative, we highlight the diverse and complex

  19. Sor/88-391, 21 July 1988, uranium mines (Ontario) occupational health and safety regulations, amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    These Regulations (SOR/84-435) were made to establish uniformity in the laws governing occupational health and safety in mines in the Province of Ontario. To ensure conformity, the legal references in the Regulations have been amended to accord with the 1987 amendment of the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act [fr

  20. Periodic Safety Review in Interim Storage Facilities - Current Regulation and Experiences in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neles, Julia Mareike; Schmidt, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Periodic safety reviews in nuclear power plants in Germany have been performed since the end of the 1980's as an indirect follow-up of the accident in Chernobyl and, in the meantime, are formally required by law. During this process the guidelines governing this review were developed in stages and reached their final form in 1996. Interim storage facilities and other nuclear facilities at that time were not included, so the guidelines were solely focused on the specific safety issues of nuclear power plants. Following IAEA's recommendations, the Western European Nuclear Regulator Association (WENRA) introduced PSRs in its safety reference levels for storage facilities (current version in WGWD report 2.1 as of Feb 2011: SRLs 59 - 61). Based on these formulations, Germany improved its regulation in 2010 with a recommendation of the Nuclear Waste Management Commission (Entsorgungskommission, ESK), an expert advisory commission for the federal regulatory body BMU. The ESK formulated these detailed requirements in the 'ESK recommendation for guides to the performance of periodic safety reviews for interim storage facilities for irradiated fuel elements and heat-generating radioactive waste'. Before finalization of the guideline a test phase was introduced, aimed to test the new regulation in practice and to later include the lessons learned in the final formulation of the guideline. The two-year test phase started in October 2011 in which the performance of a PSR will be tested at two selected interim storage facilities. Currently these recommendations are discussed with interested/concerned institutions. The results of the test phase shall be considered for improvements of the draft and during the final preparation of guidelines. Currently the PSR for the first ISF is in an advanced stage, the second facility just started the process. Preliminary conclusions from the test phase show that the implementation of the draft guideline requires interpretation. The aim of a

  1. Review of the regulation and safety assessment of food substances in various countries and jurisdictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Bernadene; Munro, Ian; Abbot, Peter; Baldwin, Nigel; Lopez-Garcia, Rebeca; Ly, Karen; McGirr, Larry; Roberts, Ashley; Socolovsky, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This review compares the regulations, definitions and approval processes for substances intentionally added to or unintentionally present in human food in the following specific countries/jurisdictions: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, the European Union, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and the United States. This includes direct food additives, food ingredients, flavouring agents, food enzymes and/or processing aids, food contact materials, novel foods, and nanoscale materials for food applications. The regulatory authority of each target jurisdiction/country uses its own regulatory framework and although the definitions, regulations and approval processes may vary among all target countries, in general there are many similarities. In all cases, the main purpose of each authority is to establish a regulatory framework and maintain/enforce regulations to ensure that food consumed and sold within its respective countries is safe. There is a move towards harmonisation of food regulations, as illustrated by Australia and New Zealand and by Mercosur. The European Union has also established regulations, which are applicable for all member states, to establish a common authorisation procedure for direct food additives, flavourings and enzymes. Although the path for approval of different categories of food additives varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, there are many commonalities in terms of the data requirements and considerations for assessment of the safety of use of food additives, including the use of positive lists of approved substances, pre-market approval, and a separation between science and policy decisions. The principles applied are largely reflective of the early work by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) committees and JECFA assessments of the safety of food additives for human and animal foods. PMID:23781843

  2. Review of the regulation and safety assessment of food substances in various countries and jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Bernadene; Munro, Ian; Abbot, Peter; Baldwin, Nigel; Lopez-Garcia, Rebeca; Ly, Karen; McGirr, Larry; Roberts, Ashley; Socolovsky, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This review compares the regulations, definitions and approval processes for substances intentionally added to or unintentionally present in human food in the following specific countries/jurisdictions: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, the European Union, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and the United States. This includes direct food additives, food ingredients, flavouring agents, food enzymes and/or processing aids, food contact materials, novel foods, and nanoscale materials for food applications. The regulatory authority of each target jurisdiction/country uses its own regulatory framework and although the definitions, regulations and approval processes may vary among all target countries, in general there are many similarities. In all cases, the main purpose of each authority is to establish a regulatory framework and maintain/enforce regulations to ensure that food consumed and sold within its respective countries is safe. There is a move towards harmonisation of food regulations, as illustrated by Australia and New Zealand and by Mercosur. The European Union has also established regulations, which are applicable for all member states, to establish a common authorisation procedure for direct food additives, flavourings and enzymes. Although the path for approval of different categories of food additives varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, there are many commonalities in terms of the data requirements and considerations for assessment of the safety of use of food additives, including the use of positive lists of approved substances, pre-market approval, and a separation between science and policy decisions. The principles applied are largely reflective of the early work by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) committees and JECFA assessments of the safety of food additives for human and animal foods.

  3. A Quantitative Feasibility Study on Potential Safety Improvement Effects of Advanced Safety Features in APR-1400 when Applied to OPR-1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ualikhan Zhiyenbayev [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Dae Wook [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This study aims to test the feasibility of the applications using Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). Particularly, three of those advanced safety features are selected as follows: 1. Providing an additional Emergency Diesel Generator (EDG); 2. Increasing the capacity of Class 1E batteries; 3. Placing a Refueling Water Storage Tank (RWST) inside containment, i.e., change from RWST to IRWST. The Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR-1400) adopts several advanced safety features compared to its predecessor, the Optimized Power Reactor 1000 (OPR-1000), which includes an additional Emergency Diesel Generator, increase in battery capacity, in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST), and so on. Considering the remarkable advantages of these safety features in safety improvement and the design similarities between APR-1400 and OPR-1000, it is feasible to apply key advanced safety features of APR-1400 to OPR-1000 to enhance the safety. The selected safety features are incorporated into OPR-1000 PSA model using the Advanced Information Management System (AIMS) for PSA and CDFs are re-evaluated for each application and combination of three applications. Based on current results, it is concluded that three of key advanced safety features of APR-1400 can be effectively applied to OPR-1000, resulting in considerable safety improvement. In aggregate, three advanced safety features, which are an additional EDG, increased battery capacity and IRWST, can reduce the CDF of OPR-1000 by more than 15% when applied altogether.

  4. 34 CFR 226.3 - What regulations apply to the State Charter School Facilities Incentive program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... part 98 (Student Rights in Research, Experimental Programs, and Testing). (12) 34 CFR part 99 (Family... (Definitions that Apply to Department Regulations). (4) 34 CFR part 79 (Intergovernmental Review of Department...

  5. CONFORMITY TO OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS IN MALAYSIAN SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES

    OpenAIRE

    Baba Md Deros; Ahmad Rasdan Ismail; Jaharah A. Ghani; Mohd Yusri Mohd Yusof

    2014-01-01

    Regulation on occupational safety and health in Malaysia had evolved from the prescriptive factory and machinery act to a self-regulated occupational safety and health act. However, from the authors’ observation the high standards of occupational safety and health culture that surpass the legal requirement were not widely practiced by Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). The two main objectives of this study are: First, first, to identify and determine the level of conformity and second...

  6. State government regulation of forestry practices applied to nonfederal forests: extent and intensity of agency involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul V. Ellefson; Michael A. Kilgore; James E. Granskog

    2006-01-01

    In 2003, 276 state governmental agencies regulated forestry practices applied to nonfederal forests. Fifty-four percent of these agencies were moderately to extensively involved in such regulation, and 68% engaged in moderate to extensive regulatory coordination with a state's lead forestry agency. The agencies employed an estimates 1,047 full-time equivalents (...

  7. 34 CFR 429.3 - What regulations apply to this program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What regulations apply to this program? 429.3 Section 429.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BILINGUAL VOCATIONAL MATERIALS, METHODS, AND...

  8. 25 CFR 900.50 - What Federal laws, regulations, and Executive Orders apply to subcontractors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Standards for Tribal or Tribal Organization Management..., regulations, and Executive Orders apply to subcontracts awarded under self-determination contracts. As a... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What Federal laws, regulations, and Executive Orders...

  9. Agriculture: Laws and Regulations that Apply to Your Agricultural Operation by Farm Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    A general description of EPA’s requirements applicable to agriculture, and should only be used as a guide. Since rules and regulations may change use this information is a starting place to determine which regulations apply to your agricultural operation.

  10. The Competence Promoting by NNSA for Keeping High Level Nuclear Safety: The Corner Stone of the Nuclear Safety Regulation Edifice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, L.

    2016-01-01

    Facing the fast development of the nuclear power industry and the application of radioactive sources, The MEP(NNSA) is endeavoured to promoting its competency, including: complementing the law system, training and recruiting staff to keep a capable team, constructing the R&D base to keep the basic capability, promoting safety culture both for the industry and the regulator. After the Fukushima nuclear accident, the MEP(NNSA) planned to construct R&D base, in which the Platform Nuclear Safety Monitoring and Emergency Responding, the Platform of Safety Technology of PWR Testing, the Laboratory of Safety Management Technology of Nuclear Waste Verification, the Laboratory of Environmental Radiation Monitoring and the Center of International Cooperation are included. On the other hand, the MEP(NNSA) issued Chinese nuclear safety culture policy declaration in 2014, and carried out a large scale Specialized Action for Nuclear Safety Promotion to promote the nuclear safety culture both for the industry and herself. For the nuclear regulator, It is essential to conduct the competence promoting by both “hardware” and “software”, the former is the material foundation of regulation authority, which will be effectively functioning under the facilitating of the latter. (author)

  11. Safety regulations concerning instrumentation and control systems for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shanshoury, A.I.

    2009-01-01

    A brief study on the safety and reliability issues related to instrumentation and control systems in nuclear reactor plants is performed. In response, technical and strategic issues are used to accomplish instrumentation and control systems safety. For technical issues there are ; systems aspects of digital I and C technology, software quality assurance, common-mode software, failure potential, safety and reliability assessment methods, and human factors and human machine interfaces. The strategic issues are the case-by-case licensing process and the adequacy of the technical infrastructure. The purpose of this work was to review the reliability of the safety systems related to these technical issues for research reactors

  12. The software safety analysis based on SFTA for reactor power regulating system in nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhaohui; Yang Xiaohua; Liao Longtao; Wu Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The digitalized Instrumentation and Control (I and C) system of Nuclear power plants can provide many advantages. However, digital control systems induce new failure modes that differ from those of analog control systems. While the cost effectiveness and flexibility of software is widely recognized, it is very difficult to achieve and prove high levels of dependability and safety assurance for the functions performed by process control software, due to the very flexibility and potential complexity of the software itself. Software safety analysis (SSA) was one way to improve the software safety by identify the system hazards caused by software failure. This paper describes the application of a software fault tree analysis (SFTA) at the software design phase. At first, we evaluate all the software modules of the reactor power regulating system in nuclear power plant and identify various hazards. The SFTA was applied to some critical modules selected from the previous step. At last, we get some new hazards that had not been identified in the prior processes of the document evaluation which were helpful for our design. (author)

  13. Rules and regulations applying to incidents in radiotheraphy; Rechtliche Grundlagen fuer den Umgang mit sicherheitsrelevanten Ereignissen in der Strahlentherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohr, F. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Baus, W. [Uniklinik Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Vorwerk, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Marburg-Giessen, Marburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Schloemp, B. [Berufsverband der Medizinisch-Technischen Radiologieassistenten (MTRA) in der Radioonkologie (VMTRO), Berlin (Germany); Andre, L. [Lindenhofspital Bern (Switzerland); Georg, D. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Strahlentherapie der Medizinischen Univ. Wien/AKH Wien, Vienna (Austria). Abt. fuer Medizinische Strahlenphysik; Hodapp, N. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg, Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde

    2012-07-15

    Aims and purpose: Radiotherapy is an essential and reliable element of the treatment armamentarium in oncology. Numerous rules, regulations, and protocols minimize the associated risks. It can, however, never be excluded that errors in the treatment delivery chain result in inadequate tumor doses or unnecessary damage to organs at risk. A legal framework governs the management of such incidents. The most important European and North American regulations are reported. Results: Various directives issued by the European Union are differently implemented nationally. This applies particularly to the characterization of incidents that must be reported to authorities. Reporting thresholds, audit systems, and the extent of the integration of voluntary reporting systems vary. Conclusion: Radiotherapy incidents are dealt with differently on an international level. Changes are to be expected based on the European Basic Safety Standards Directive that is currently being prepared and will have to be implemented nationally in due course. (orig.)

  14. Priority-based assessment of food additives database of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    Benz, R D; Irausquin, H

    1991-01-01

    The priority-based assessment of food additives (PAFA) is a database maintained by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. PAFA contains extensive administrative, chemical, and toxicological information on 1685 regulated direct food additives. The database also has limited administrative and chemical information on an additional 1236 direct additives. The total 2921 substances represent everything added to food in the United States. PAFA conta...

  15. An expert judgment model applied to estimating the safety effect of a bicycle facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leden, L; Gårder, P; Pulkkinen, U

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents a risk index model that can be used for assessing the safety effect of countermeasures. The model estimates risk in a multiplicative way, which makes it possible to analyze the impact of different factors separately. Expert judgments are incorporated through a Bayesian error model. The variance of the risk estimate is determined by Monte-Carlo simulation. The model was applied to assess the safety effect of a new design of a bicycle crossing. The intent was to gain safety by raising the crossings to reduce vehicle speeds and by making the crossings more visible by painting them in a bright color. Before the implementations, bicyclists were riding on bicycle crossings of conventional Swedish type, i.e. similar to crosswalks but delineated by white squares rather than solid lines or zebra markings. Automobile speeds were reduced as anticipated. However, it seems as if the positive effect of this was more or less canceled out by increased bicycle speeds. The safety per bicyclist was still improved by approximately 20%. This improvement was primarily caused by an increase in bicycle flow, since the data show that more bicyclists at a given location seem to benefit their safety. The increase in bicycle flow was probably caused by the new layout of the crossings since bicyclists perceived them as safer and causing less delay. Some future development work is suggested. Pros and cons with the used methodology are discussed. The most crucial parameter to be added is probably a model describing the interaction between motorists and bicyclists, for example, how risk is influenced by the lateral position of the bicyclist in relation to the motorist. It is concluded that the interaction seems to be optimal when both groups share the roadway.

  16. Safety Culture Activities of Russian Regulator (Rostechnadzor) TSOs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, V.; Smetnik, A.; Murlis, D.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the Federal Environmental, Industrial and Nuclear Supervision Service of Russia (Rostechnadzor) has two Technical and Scientific Support Organizations (TSOs): • FSUE VO “Safety”; • Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SEC NRS). Both TSOs provide Rostechnadzor with scientific and technical support in the area of safety culture.

  17. Development in France of nuclear safety technical regulations and standards used in the licensing procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebouleux, P.

    1983-04-01

    Initially, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique was the overall structure which encompassed all nuclear activities in France, including those connected with radiological protection and nuclear safety. As other partners appeared, the Authorities have laid down national regulations relative to nuclear installations since 1963. These regulations more particularly provide for the addition of prescriptions with which the applicant must comply to obtain the necessary licenses and the establishment of General Technical Regulations pertaining to nuclear safety. The technical regulation related to nuclear safety in France is made of a set of regulation texts, of a different nature, that define the requirements for the construction, commissioning and operation of nuclear facilities. Simultaneously, the safety authorities (Service Central de Surete des Installations Nucleaires: SCSIN) issue recommendations or guides which are not strictly speaking regulations in the juridical sense; they are called ''Regles Fondamentales de Surete'' (RFS). The RFS set up and detail the conditions, the respect of which is deemed to be complying with the French regulation practice, for the subject to which they relate. Their purpose is to make known rules judged acceptable by safety authorities, thus making the safety review easier. A RFS, or a letter, can also give the result of the examination of the constructor and operator codes (RCC) by safety authorities

  18. Survey of environmental regulations applying to geothermal exploration, development, and use.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeland, G.V.

    1984-03-01

    Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations that apply to geothermal energy development are summarized. Most attention is given to those regulations which deal with air pollution, water pollution, solid wastes and impact assessments. Analyses are made of the regulations with respect to resource definition, pollutants currently not controlled, duplicity and overlap in permit and impact assessment requirements, the lack of uniformity of regulations between states, and the probable future approaches to the regulatory problems. This project updates a similar document (EPA/600/7-78-014) dated February 1978.

  19. 76 FR 9646 - Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Parts 100, 117, 147, and 165 [USCG-2010-0399] Quarterly Listings; Safety Zones, Security Zones, Special Local Regulations, Drawbridge Operation Regulations and Regulated Navigation Areas AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of expired temporary rules...

  20. A study in improvement of administrative system in the nuclear safety regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yook, Dong Il; Kuk, Doe Hyeong; Lee, Seong Min; Kim, Jong Sam; Hwang, Sun Ho

    2001-03-01

    One of the most important tasks to improve nuclear safety regulation system is to separate nuclear regulatory institutes from public agencies which promote the development nuclear power. Moreover, nuclear safety regulation should be not only specialized but optimized to be adapted for new environments such as high-tech information age. Especially, it is necessary to reform the current nuclear safety regulation systems both to be effective under the local self-administration which began to operate in recent years and to be supported by local residents

  1. A study in improvement of administrative system in the nuclear safety regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yook, Dong Il; Kuk, Doe Hyeong; Lee, Seong Min; Kim, Jong Sam; Hwang, Sun Ho [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    One of the most important tasks to improve nuclear safety regulation system is to separate nuclear regulatory institutes from public agencies which promote the development nuclear power. Moreover, nuclear safety regulation should be not only specialized but optimized to be adapted for new environments such as high-tech information age. Especially, it is necessary to reform the current nuclear safety regulation systems both to be effective under the local self-administration which began to operate in recent years and to be supported by local residents.

  2. Applying Qualitative Hazard Analysis to Support Quantitative Safety Analysis for Proposed Reduced Wake Separation Conops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortle, John F.; Allocco, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a scenario-driven hazard analysis process to identify, eliminate, and control safety-related risks. Within this process, we develop selective criteria to determine the applicability of applying engineering modeling to hypothesized hazard scenarios. This provides a basis for evaluating and prioritizing the scenarios as candidates for further quantitative analysis. We have applied this methodology to proposed concepts of operations for reduced wake separation for closely spaced parallel runways. For arrivals, the process identified 43 core hazard scenarios. Of these, we classified 12 as appropriate for further quantitative modeling, 24 that should be mitigated through controls, recommendations, and / or procedures (that is, scenarios not appropriate for quantitative modeling), and 7 that have the lowest priority for further analysis.

  3. Study of fieldbus technology applied in a sterilization plant control and safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karam Junior, Dib

    2000-01-01

    Several sterilization processes have been used in these years for treatment of countless products. Some processes use high temperatures, thermal shocks and chemical agents. With the discovery of the ionizing radiation and its posterior technological developments turned possible application of that process, in 1960, also in the the sterilization, denominated radiation sterilization. This process became also applied in another areas of health and industrial as food conservation, gemstones enhancement and others. The radiation sterilization requests an effective control and it needs a high level of safety. The commercial use of the computers applied in industrial automation provides and the domain of new technologies in this field provides new applications then new designs now is possible. The Fieldbus technology, a new digital communication protocol, like a Local Area Network, can be an alternative in the cobalt-60 irradiation plant. The present work suggests, evaluates, qualifies and quantifies this possibility. (author)

  4. Safety constraints applied to an adaptive Bayesian condition-based maintenance optimization model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flage, Roger; Coit, David W.; Luxhøj, James T.; Aven, Terje

    2012-01-01

    A model is described that determines an optimal inspection and maintenance scheme for a deteriorating unit with a stochastic degradation process with independent and stationary increments and for which the parameters are uncertain. This model and resulting maintenance plans offers some distinct benefits compared to prior research because the uncertainty of the degradation process is accommodated by a Bayesian approach and two new safety constraints have been applied to the problem: (1) with a given subjective probability (degree of belief), the limiting relative frequency of one or more failures during a fixed time interval is bounded; or (2) the subjective probability of one or more failures during a fixed time interval is bounded. In the model, the parameter(s) of a condition-based inspection scheduling function and a preventive replacement threshold are jointly optimized upon each replacement and inspection such as to minimize the expected long run cost per unit of time, but also considering one of the specified safety constraints. A numerical example is included to illustrate the effect of imposing each of the two different safety constraints.

  5. A study on enforcement effects of radiation safety control regulations for diagnostic X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Mo IL; Park, Myeong Hwan; Kwon, Duk Moon; Lee, Joon IL

    1999-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to analyze the realities after enforcements of safety control regulations for diagnostic X-ray equipment and to suggest means for an improvement of low radiation safety control. A questionnaire survey for medical radiologic technologists was carried out to determine enforcement effects of the safety control regulations. The results of analysis from the survey are as follows. That is, most of he respondents realized the importance of the radiation safety control system, but about a half of them revealed that regulations were not well observed in accordance with their purposes. Only 43.9 percent of the respondents took an active part in quality control of radiation. And responsibility, sex, age, and knowledge for safety control were important indicators for observations of the regulations. Training for the safety control regulations are needed to ensure safety control and proper usage of diagnostic X-ray equipment. And management of organizations using diagnostic X-ray equipment have to understand and stress the importance of radiation safety control system. (author)

  6. An overview of safety assessment, regulation, and control of hazardous material use at NREL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.P.; Crandall, R.S.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the methodology we use to ensure the safe use of hazardous materials at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). First, we analyze the processes and the materials used in those processes to identify the hazards presented. Then we study federal, state, and local regulations and apply the relevant requirements to our operations. When necessary, we generate internal safety documents to consolidate this information. We design research operations and support systems to conform to these requirements. Before we construct the systems, we perform a semiquantitative risk analysis on likely accident scenarios. All scenarios presenting in unacceptable risk require system or procedural modifications to reduce the risk. Following these modifications, we repeat the risk analysis to ensure that the respective accident scenarios present acceptable risk. Once all risks are acceptable, we conduct an operational readiness review (ORR). A management appointed panel performs the ORR ensuring compliance with all relevant requirements. After successful completion of the ORR, operations can begin

  7. An overview of safety assessment, regulation, and control of hazardous material use at NREL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, B.P.; Crandall, R.S.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the methodology we use to ensure the safe use of hazardous materials at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). First, we analyze the processes and the materials used in those processes to identify the hazards presented. Then we study federal, state, and local regulations and apply the relevant requirements to our operations. When necessary, we generate internal safety documents to consolidate this information. We design research operations and support systems to conform to these requirements. Before we construct the systems, we perform a semiquantitative risk analysis on likely accident scenarios. All scenarios presenting an unacceptable risk require system or procedural modifications to reduce the risk. Following these modifications, we repeat the risk analysis to ensure that the respective accident scenarios present an acceptable risk. Once all risks are acceptable, we conduct an operational readiness review (ORR). A management-appointed panel performs the ORR ensuring compliance with all relevant requirements. After successful completion of the ORR, operations can begin

  8. Applying Hamming Code to Memory System of Safety Grade PLC (POSAFE-Q) Processor Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taehee; Hwang, Sungjae; Park, Gangmin [POSCO Nuclear Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    If some errors such as inverted bits occur in the memory, instructions and data will be corrupted. As a result, the PLC may execute the wrong instructions or refer to the wrong data. Hamming Code can be considered as the solution for mitigating this mis operation. In this paper, we apply hamming Code, then, we inspect whether hamming code is suitable for to the memory system of the processor module. In this paper, we applied hamming code to existing safety grade PLC (POSAFE-Q). Inspection data are collected and they will be referred for improving the PLC in terms of the soundness. In our future work, we will try to improve time delay caused by hamming calculation. It will include CPLD optimization and memory architecture or parts alteration. In addition to these hamming code-based works, we will explore any methodologies such as mirroring for the soundness of safety grade PLC. Hamming code-based works can correct bit errors, but they have limitation in multi bits errors.

  9. Applying Hamming Code to Memory System of Safety Grade PLC (POSAFE-Q) Processor Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taehee; Hwang, Sungjae; Park, Gangmin

    2013-01-01

    If some errors such as inverted bits occur in the memory, instructions and data will be corrupted. As a result, the PLC may execute the wrong instructions or refer to the wrong data. Hamming Code can be considered as the solution for mitigating this mis operation. In this paper, we apply hamming Code, then, we inspect whether hamming code is suitable for to the memory system of the processor module. In this paper, we applied hamming code to existing safety grade PLC (POSAFE-Q). Inspection data are collected and they will be referred for improving the PLC in terms of the soundness. In our future work, we will try to improve time delay caused by hamming calculation. It will include CPLD optimization and memory architecture or parts alteration. In addition to these hamming code-based works, we will explore any methodologies such as mirroring for the soundness of safety grade PLC. Hamming code-based works can correct bit errors, but they have limitation in multi bits errors

  10. Study of fieldbus technology confiability when applied in a Sterilization plant control and safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karma, D.; Sampa, M.H.O.; Rela, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    Several sterilization processes have been used in these years for treatment of countless products. Some processes use high temperatures, thermal shocks and chemical agents. With the discovery of the ionizing radiation and its posterior technological developments turned possible the application of that process, in 1960, also in the sterilization, denominated radiation sterilization. This process became also applied in another areas of health and industrial as food conservation, gemstones enhancement and others. The radiation sterilization requests an effective control and it needs a high level of safety. The commercial use of the computers applied in industrial automation provides and the domain of new technologies in this field provides news applications then new designs now is possible. The Fieldbus technology, a new digital communication protocol, like a Local Area Network, can be an alternative in the cobalt-60 irradiation plant. This paper show preliminary study about confiability in systems using Fieldbus technology. This technology was simulated in sterilization plant control and safety systems and the fail probability was quantified using Fail Tree Analysis Method. Fieldbus technology can be used in sterilization plants because the confiability in this systems is like PLCs and relays systems, was the conclusion

  11. Control of Nuclear Materials and Special Equipment (Nuclear Safety Regulations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizmek, A.; Prah, M.; Medakovic, S.; Ilijas, B.

    2008-01-01

    Based on Nuclear Safety Act (OG 173/03) the State Office for Nuclear Safety (SONS) in 2008 adopted beside Ordinance on performing nuclear activities (OG 74/06) and Ordinance on special conditions for individual activities to be performed by expert organizations which perform activities in the area of nuclear safety (OG 74/06) the new Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment (OG 15/08). Ordinance on the control of nuclear material and special equipment lays down the list of nuclear materials and special equipment as well as of nuclear activities covered by the system of control of production of special equipment and non-nuclear material, the procedure for notifying the intention to and filing the application for a license to carry out nuclear activities, and the format and contents of the forms for doing so. This Ordinance also lays down the manner in which nuclear material records have to be kept, the procedure for notifying the State administration organization (regulatory body) responsible for nuclear safety by the nuclear material user, and the keeping of registers of nuclear activities, nuclear material and special equipment by the State administration organization (regulatory body) responsible for nuclear safety, as well as the form and content of official nuclear safety inspector identification card and badge.(author)

  12. 77 FR 6954 - Special Local Regulations; Safety and Security Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ...] RIN 1625-AA00; 1625-AA08; 1625-AA87 Special Local Regulations; Safety and Security Zones; Recurring... local regulations, permanent safety zones for annual recurring marine events and a permanent security... Regulations; Safety and Security Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port Long Island Sound Zone in the...

  13. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... WIA? (a) Health and safety standards established under Federal and State law otherwise applicable to... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What health and safety standards apply to the... I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Administrative Rules, Costs and Limitations § 667.274 What health...

  14. Providing current radiation safety according to new version of 'Ukrytie' object regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovoj, A.A.; Vysotskij, E.D.; Krinitsyn, A.P.; Bogatov, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    Main provisions are given of the 'Ukryttia' object's Regulation related to provision of radiation safety during the object's operation. The safety is provided due to the realization by the object's personnel of functions of global monitoring of current radiation conditions, as well as of the measures of operative or preventive suppression of radiation abnormalities sources

  15. The current status and countermeasures of nuclear and radiation safety regulation in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chengzhan

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power utilization is an inevitable choice for the development of energy science and technology civilization of human. As a kind of clean and low-carbon energy, nuclear energy plays an irreplaceable role in optimizing the energy structure, promoting energy-saving, discharge reduction and reducing resource constraints. But it is inevitably to face the risk of nuclear safety during the application of nuclear energy. Ensuring nuclear and radiation safety is the precondition and foundation of achieving the sustainable development of nuclear energy and technology utilization. As the main body of nuclear and radiation safety regulation work development, the Chinese dream of National Nuclear Safety Administration is to insure nuclear and radiation safety, boost the construction of ecological civilization, guarantee the harmonious and healthy development of human and environmental. The necessary means to deal with the new situation of nuclear and radiation safety and to promote the work of nuclear and radiation safety regulation is to summarize the experiences and lessons learned, to innovate the regulation ideas, methods and measures, to plan the nuclear and radiation safety regulation development strategy. (author)

  16. The role of the EU in transnational regulation of food safety: extending experimentalist governance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weimer, M.; Vos, E.; Zeitlin, J.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter assesses whether and how far the EU adopts an experimentalist approach in transnational regulation of food safety. Both the EU system of import safety, including regulatory cooperation with third countries, and the EU’s embeddedness within global governance institutions, such as the WTO

  17. Evolving US Food Safety Regulations and International Competitors: Implementation Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekuni Nakuja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2011 US Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA represents a major initiative to improve food safety. The legislation mandates the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA with developing a regulatory system to implement the Act. Both domestic and foreign firms that wish to supply US consumers with food will face a considerable increase in regulatory costs. Implementation has proved challenging for the FDA leading to delays which increase investment risks for foreign suppliers, particulalry from developing countries. This paper sets out the major FSMA requirements and examines how the regulatory burden may fall on foreign versus US suppliers.

  18. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    licensing software-based systems. This document should neither be considered as a standard, nor as a new set of European regulations, nor as a common subset of national regulations, nor as a replacement for national policies. It is the account, as complete as possible, of a common technical agreement among regulatory and safety experts. National regulations may have additional requirements or different requirements, but hopefully in the end no essential divergence with the common positions. It is precisely from this common agreement that regulators can draw support and benefit when assessing safety cases, licensee's submissions, and issuing regulations. The document is also useful to licensees, designers, suppliers for issuing bids and developing new applications. Evidence to support the safety demonstration of a computer based digital system is produced throughout the system life cycle, and evolves in nature and substance with the project. The task force has adopted the view that three basic independent types of evidence can and must be produced: evidence related to the quality of the development process; evidence related to the adequacy of the product; and evidence of the competence and qualifications of the staff involved in all of the system life cycle phases. In addition, convincing operating experience may be needed to support the safety demonstration of pre-existing software. As a consequence, the task force reached early agreement on an important fundamental recommendation that applies at the inception of any project, namely: A safety plan shall be agreed upon at the beginning of the project between the licensor and the licensee. This plan shall identify how the safety demonstration will be achieved. More precisely, the plan shall identify the types of evidence that will be used, and how and when this evidence shall be produced. This report neither specifies nor imposes the contents of a specific safety plan. All the subsequent recommendations are founded on the

  19. Effectiveness of Direct Safety Regulations on Manufacturers and Users of Industrial Machines: Its Implications on Industrial Safety Policies in Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gi Heung

    2017-03-01

    Despite considerable efforts made in recent years, the industrial accident rate and the fatality rate in the Republic of Korea are much higher than those in most developed countries in Europe and North America. Industrial safety policies and safety regulations are also known to be ineffective and inefficient in some cases. This study focuses on the quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of direct safety regulations such as safety certification, self-declaration of conformity, and safety inspection of industrial machines in the Republic of Korea. Implications on safety policies to restructure the industrial safety system associated with industrial machines are also explored. Analysis of causes in industrial accidents associated with industrial machines confirms that technical causes need to be resolved to reduce both the frequency and the severity of such industrial accidents. Statistical analysis also confirms that the indirect effects of safety device regulation on users are limited for a variety of reasons. Safety device regulation needs to be shifted to complement safety certification and self-declaration of conformity for more balanced direct regulations on manufacturers and users. An example of cost-benefit analysis on conveyor justifies such a transition. Industrial safety policies and regulations associated with industrial machines must be directed towards eliminating the sources of danger at the stage of danger creation, thereby securing the safe industrial machines. Safety inspection further secures the safety of workers at the stage of danger use. The overall balance between such safety regulations is achieved by proper distribution of industrial machines subject to such regulations and the intensity of each regulation. Rearrangement of industrial machines subject to safety certification and self-declaration of conformity to include more movable industrial machines and other industrial machines with a high level of danger is also suggested.

  20. Effectiveness of Direct Safety Regulations on Manufacturers and Users of Industrial Machines: Its Implications on Industrial Safety Policies in Republic of Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Gi Heung

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite considerable efforts made in recent years, the industrial accident rate and the fatality rate in the Republic of Korea are much higher than those in most developed countries in Europe and North America. Industrial safety policies and safety regulations are also known to be ineffective and inefficient in some cases. Methods: This study focuses on the quantitative evaluation of the effectiveness of direct safety regulations such as safety certification, self-declaration o...

  1. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Regulations 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains statutory rules made under the Australian Radiation and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 defining how specified standards to be observed, practices and procedures to be followed and measures to be taken by controlled persons in relation to activities relating to controlled facilities, as well as in relation to dealings with controlled apparatus or controlled material

  2. Safety and regulation aspects of nuclear facilities shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, B.

    1977-01-01

    Technical dispositions that safety authorities will accept after shutdown of a nuclear installation and reglementation to use are examined. The different solutions from surveillance and maintenance, after removal of fissile materials and radioactive fluids, to dismantling are discussed especially for reactors. In each case the best solution has to be studied to ensure protection of public health and environment [fr

  3. Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Regulations 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    This document contains statutory rules made under the Australian Radiation and Nuclear Safety Act 1998 defining how specified standards to be observed, practices and procedures to be followed and measures to be taken by controlled persons in relation to activities relating to controlled facilities, as well as in relation to dealings with controlled apparatus or controlled material

  4. United States import safety, environmental health, and food safety regulation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyambok, Edward O; Kastner, Justin J

    2012-01-01

    China boasts a rapidly growing economy and is a leading food exporter. Since China has dominated world export markets in food, electronics, and toys, many safety concerns about Chinese exports have emerged. For example, many countries have had problems with Chinese food products and food-processing ingredients. Factors behind food safety and environmental health problems in China include poor industrial waste management, the use of counterfeit agricultural inputs, inadequate training of farmers on good farm management practices, and weak food safety laws and poor enforcement. In the face of rising import safety problems, the U.S. is now requiring certification of products and foreign importers, pursuing providing incentives to importers who uphold good safety practices, and considering publicizing the names of certified importers.

  5. Development of a Food Safety and Nutrition Education Program for Adolescents by Applying Social Cognitive Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghee; Jeong, Soyeon; Ko, Gyeongah; Park, Hyunshin; Ko, Youngsook

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an educational model regarding food safety and nutrition. In particular, we aimed to develop educational materials, such as middle- and high-school textbooks, a teacher's guidebook, and school posters, by applying social cognitive theory. To develop a food safety and nutrition education program, we took into account diverse factors influencing an individual's behavior, such as personal, behavioral, and environmental factors, based on social cognitive theory. We also conducted a pilot study of the educational materials targeting middle-school students (n = 26), high-school students (n = 24), and dietitians (n = 13) regarding comprehension level, content, design, and quality by employing the 5-point Likert scale in May 2016. The food safety and nutrition education program covered six themes: (1) caffeine; (2) food additives; (3) foodborne illness; (4) nutrition and meal planning; (5) obesity and eating disorders; and (6) nutrition labeling. Each class activity was created to improve self-efficacy by setting one's own goal and to increase self-control by monitoring one's dietary intake. We also considered environmental factors by creating school posters and leaflets to educate teachers and parents. The overall evaluation score for the textbook was 4.0 points among middle- and high-school students, and 4.5 points among dietitians. This study provides a useful program model that could serve as a guide to develop educational materials for nutrition-related subjects in the curriculum. This program model was created to increase awareness of nutrition problems and self-efficacy. This program also helped to improve nutrition management skills and to promote a healthy eating environment in middle- and high-school students.

  6. Applying Toyota production system techniques for medication delivery: improving hospital safety and efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Terry L; Steinmetz-Malato, Laura L; Van Dyke, Deborah L

    2011-01-01

    The inpatient medication delivery system used at a large regional acute care hospital in the Midwest had become antiquated and inefficient. The existing 24-hr medication cart-fill exchange process with delivery to the patients' bedside did not always provide ordered medications to the nursing units when they were needed. In 2007 the principles of the Toyota Production System (TPS) were applied to the system. Project objectives were to improve medication safety and reduce the time needed for nurses to retrieve patient medications. A multidisciplinary team was formed that included representatives from nursing, pharmacy, informatics, quality, and various operational support departments. Team members were educated and trained in the tools and techniques of TPS, and then designed and implemented a new pull system benchmarking the TPS Ideal State model. The newly installed process, providing just-in-time medication availability, has measurably improved delivery processes as well as patient safety and satisfaction. Other positive outcomes have included improved nursing satisfaction, reduced nursing wait time for delivered medications, and improved efficiency in the pharmacy. After a successful pilot on two nursing units, the system is being extended to the rest of the hospital. © 2010 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  7. 21 CFR 212.5 - To what drugs do the regulations in this part apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., quality assurance, holding, and distribution of PET drugs. Any human drug that does not meet the... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false To what drugs do the regulations in this part apply? 212.5 Section 212.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  8. 42 CFR 65a.11 - Other HHS regulations and policies that apply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... research for which PHS funding is sought 42 CFR part 52h—Scientific peer review of research grant... on Humane Care and Use of Laboratory animals,” Office for Protection from Research Risks, HIH... BASIC RESEARCH AND TRAINING GRANTS § 65a.11 Other HHS regulations and policies that apply. Several other...

  9. 36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR BOATING AND WATER USE ACTIVITIES § 3.17 What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in...

  10. 42 CFR 59a.11 - Programs to which these regulations apply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Programs to which these regulations apply. 59a.11 Section 59a.11 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE GRANTS Establishment of Regional Medical Libraries § 59a.11 Programs to which...

  11. 42 CFR 50.402 - To what program do these regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false To what program do these regulations apply? 50.402 Section 50.402 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS POLICIES OF GENERAL APPLICABILITY Public Health Service Grant Appeals Procedure § 50.402 To what program do...

  12. 42 CFR 64.1 - Programs to which these regulations apply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) in library science and the field of communications of information pertaining to sciences relating to..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE TRAINING GRANTS § 64.1 Programs to which these regulations... apply to research training support under the National Research Service Awards Program (see part 66 of...

  13. Emotion processing and regulation in women with morbid obesity who apply for bariatric surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, H.; Middendorp, H. van; Devaere, L.; Larsen, J.K.; Ramshorst, B. van; Geenen, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Emotional eating, the tendency to eat when experiencing negative affect, is prevalent in morbid obesity and may indicate that ways to deal with emotions are disturbed. Our aim was to compare emotion processing and regulation between 102 women with morbid obesity who apply for bariatric surgery and

  14. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 80 - Federal Financial Assistance to Which These Regulations Apply

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations Apply A Appendix A to Part 80 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... HUMAN SERVICES EFFECTUATION OF TITLE VI OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 Pt. 80, App. A Appendix A to... of Talent Search, Upward Bound, and Special Services Programs (20 U.S.C. 1068). 23. Land-grant...

  15. 25 CFR 900.182 - What other statutes and regulations apply to FTCA coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What other statutes and regulations apply to FTCA... HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CONTRACTS UNDER THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Federal Tort Claims Act Coverage General Provisions § 900.182 What other statutes...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.271 - What other statutes and regulations apply to FTCA coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR ANNUAL FUNDING AGREEMENTS UNDER THE TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNMENT ACT AMENDMENTS TO THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Federal Tort Claims § 1000.271 What other statutes and... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What other statutes and regulations apply to FTCA...

  17. 42 CFR 57.216 - What additional Department regulations apply to schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What additional Department regulations apply to schools? 57.216 Section 57.216 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... schools? (a) Participating schools are advised that in addition to complying with the terms and conditions...

  18. 42 CFR 57.316 - What additional Department regulations apply to schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... schools? 57.316 Section 57.316 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... STUDENT LOANS Nursing Student Loans § 57.316 What additional Department regulations apply to schools? Participating schools are advised that in addition to complying with the terms and conditions of these...

  19. NRC safety research in support of regulation, FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    This report, the eighth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1992. A special emphasis on accomplishments in nuclear power plant aging research reflects recognition that a number of plants are entering the final portion of their original 40-year operating licenses and that, in addition to current aging effects, a focus on safety considerations for license renewal becomes timely. The primary purpose of performing regulatory research is to develop and provide the Commission and its staff with the technical bases for regulatory decisions on the safe operation of licensed nuclear reactors and facilities, to find unknown or unexpected safety problems, and to develop data and related information for the purpose of revising the Commission's rules, regulatory guides, or other guidance

  20. The Regulation of Nuclear Trade: Non-Proliferation-Supply-safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    Volume II of the study on the regulation of nuclear trade deals with the national legislation of OECD countries with significant nuclear programmes and regulations in that field and, in essence, covers two aspects. The first concerns political and administrative controls over imports and exports of sensitive products, namely fissile materials and large nuclear equipment as well as technology transfers. In most cases, this description of the provisions applicable is completed with the list of nuclear items whose export is restricted. The second aspect concerns the licensing system governing trade in as well as the import and export of nuclear material to protect users and the public against the hazards created by its radioactive properties. This volume also contains information on regulations concerning physical protection, industrial property and transport, as well as on multilateral and bilateral agreements involving nuclear trade. (NEA) [fr

  1. A study on the safety regulation of byproduct material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jong Soon; Song, Yang Su [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-15

    The objective of this study is to develop the technical criteria and regulatory system for establishing the safe regulation of byproduct material institutionally. Up to this point, domestically, though many byproduct materials are distributed and used already, it seems that there are no related technical criteria and regulatory system and it becomes an obstacle in the development of relating industry. Since this kind of situation may give negative impact on the proper recognizance of the radiation to public, it is very urgent to establish the safe regulation of byproduct material. In relating to the domestic license of byproduct material, a survey of technical criteria and status of regulation in U.S.A. A determination of range of application and contents of byproduct material. A tentative suggestion of related technical criteria and regulatory system. A study was performed about the above topics to establish the safe regulation of byproduct material institutionally, and this can be contributed in establishing the proper domestic technical criteria related.

  2. Environmental Regulation and Food Safety: Studies of Protection ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    HACCP is not confined to food production, however, but is also used in many other industries such as healthcare. 5. See Tsunehiro Otsukti ... The revised Uruguay Round Agreement now defines technical regulations as rules which refer to 'product characteristics and their related production methods'. However, this wording ...

  3. 33 CFR 165.117 - Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety and Security Zones: Deepwater Ports, First Coast Guard District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Safety and Security Zones: Deepwater Ports, First Coast Guard District. 165.117 Section 165.117... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.117 Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety and Security... section are designated as regulated navigation areas. (2) Safety and security zones. All waters within a...

  4. The improvement of nuclear safety regulation : American, European, Japanese, and South Korean experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Byung Sun

    2005-01-01

    Key concepts in South Korean nuclear safety regulation are safety and risk. Nuclear regulation in South Korea has required reactor designs and safeguards that reduce the risk of a major accident to less than one in a million reactor-years-a risk supposedly low enough to be acceptable. To data, in South Korean nuclear safety regulation has involved the establishment of many technical standards to enable administration enforcement. In scientific lawsuits in which the legal issue is the validity of specialized technical standards that are used for judge whether a particular nuclear power plant is to be licensed, the concept of uncertainty law is often raised with regard to what extent the examination and judgement by the judicial power affects a discretion made by the administrative office. In other words, the safety standards for nuclear power plants has been adapted as a form of the scientific technical standards widely under the idea of uncertainty law. Thus, the improvement of nuclear safety regulation in South Korea seems to depend on the rational lawmaking and a reasonable, judicial examination of the scientific standards on nuclear safety

  5. The role of the regulator in promoting and evaluating safety culture. Operating experience feedback programme approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, S.

    2002-01-01

    Promoting and Evaluating Safety Culture (S.C.) in Operating Organizations must be one of the main Nuclear Regulator goals to achieve. This can be possible only if each and every one of the regulatory activities inherently involves S.C. It can be seen throughout attitudes, values, uses and practices in both individuals and the whole regulatory organization. One among all the regulatory tools commonly used by regulators to promote and evaluate the commitment of the licensees with safety culture as a whole involves organizational factors and particular attention is directed to the operating organization. This entailed a wide range of activities, including all those related with management of safety performance. Operating Experience Feedback Programme as a tool to enhance safety operation is particularly useful for regulators in the evaluation of the role of S.C. in operating organization. Safety Culture is recognized as a subset of the wider Organizational Culture. Practices that improve organizational effectiveness can also contribute to enhance safety. An effective event investigation methodology is a specific practice, which contributes to a healthy Safety Culture. (author)

  6. Development of Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Regulation Plan for 2007-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Sung; Kim, Woong Sik; Park, Dong Keuk; Kim, Ho Ki

    2006-01-01

    The Article 8-2 of Atomic Energy Act requires the government to establish Atomic Energy Promotion Plan every five years. It sets out national nuclear energy policies in a systematic and consistent way. The plan presents the goals and basic directions of national nuclear energy policies on the basis of current status and prospects. Both areas of utilization and safety management of nuclear energy are included and various projects and schedules are delineated based on the national policy directions. The safety management area in this plan deals with the overall safety and regulation policy. Its detail projects and schedule should be developed in separate plans by responsible ministries under the mediation of the MOST. As a regulatory authority, MOST is responsible for safety management area and its technical support organization, KINS has developed Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Regulation Plan as an implementation plan of safety area. This paper presents the development process and specific projects contained in the Comprehensive Nuclear Safety Regulation Plan which is under development now

  7. Regulation of chemical safety at fuel cycle facilities by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    When the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was established in 1975, its regulations were based on radiation dose limits. Chemical hazards rarely influenced NRC regulations. After the Three Mile Island reactor accident in 1979, the NRC staff was directed to address emergency planning at non-reactor facilities. Several fuel cycle facilities were ordered to submit emergency plans consistent with reactor emergency plans because no other guidance was available. NRC published a notice that it was writing regulations to codify the requirements in the Orders and upgrade the emergency plans to address all hazards, including chemical hazards. The legal authority of NRC to regulate chemical safety was questioned. In 1986, an overfilled uranium hexafluoride cylinder ruptured and killed a worker. The NRC staff was directed to address emergency planning for hazardous chemicals in its regulations. The final rule included a requirement for fuel cycle facilities to certify compliance with legislation requiring local authorities to establish emergency plans for hazardous chemicals. As with emergency planning, NRC's authority to regulate chemical safety during routine operations was limited. NRC established memoranda of understanding (MOUs) with other regulatory agencies to encourage exchange of information between the agencies regarding occupational hazards. In 2000, NRC published new, performance-based, regulations for fuel cycle facilities. The new regulations required an integrated safety analysis (ISA) which used quantitative standards to assess chemical exposures. Some unique chemical exposure cases were addressed while implementing the new regulations. In addition, some gaps remain in the regulation of hazardous chemicals at fuel cycle facilities. The status of ongoing efforts to improve regulation of chemical safety at fuel cycle facilities is discussed. (authors)

  8. Safety regulations of radiation sources in industry in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) by virtue of Republic Act 2067, as amended, Republic Act 5207 and Executive Order 128 (1987), was mandated to advance and regulate the safe and peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology in the Philippines. The PNRI was formerly the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission established in 1958. This report aims to share the experiences of the PNRI on licensing and regulating the safe use of radioactive materials in industry, particularly in industrial gamma radiography, nuclear gauges and radioactive tracers. It enumerates the licensing and enforcement procedures. Some common problems encountered in the licensing and enforcement activities and comments of future plans to resolve the problems were also discussed. (Author)

  9. Applying successfully proven measures in roadway safety to reduce harmful collisions in SC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-06

    The overall goal of this research was to identify proven successful safety programs used in other states and assess the potential for safety improvement if similar programs were implemented in South Carolina. The research team not only sought out eng...

  10. LED radiation: possible photobiological risks and safety regulations. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, W.

    2008-01-01

    With all due euphoria regarding the new illumination possibilities, one can quite often observe a certain degree of uncertainty concerning eye hazard issues in conjunction with intense LED radiation. Moreover, the related general requirements for product- as well as for workplace-safety are rather new. Thus, the possible hazards by the optical radiation of LEDs will be analyzed in this two-port contribution. Part 1 aims to provide a review of these hazards as well as of the bases for their evaluation. The impact of these requirements on state-of-the-art LEDs will be examined in part 2. Compared with conventional light sources, it turns out that there are hardly any differences in this respect. (orig.)

  11. The safety of French pressurised water reactors: a regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacoste, A.-C.

    1993-01-01

    France has invested heavily in nuclear technology and is today, arguably, the dominant player in the industry: in EdF we have a utility operating over 50 reactors; in Cogema we have a company operating in every sector of the fuel cycle industry; and in Framatome, perhaps the major nuclear reactor constructor in the world. As wedded as the country is to nuclear energy, France has to be aware of any potentially harmful developments - politically, socially and industrially. Neither can the international arena be neglected, where events can have a profound effect on France's worldwide interests. The following articles demonstrate how much energy and ingenuity France is devoting to resolving the many critical issues facing its nuclear industry, including safety, economics and waste disposal. (Author)

  12. The precautionary principle and the regulation of U.S. food and drug safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, Ed

    2004-06-01

    This article probes the advisability of regulating U.S. food and drug safety according to the precautionary principle. To do so, a precautionary regulatory regime is formulated on the basis of the beliefs that motivate most proponents of this initiative. That hypothetical regime is critically analyzed on the basis of an actual instantiation of a similarly stylized initiative. It will be argued that the precautionary principle entails regulatory constraints that are apt to violate basis tenets of political legitimacy. The modifications that would change this finding would also change precautionary regulation to the point that it would be indistinguishable from orthodox safety protocols. It is concluded on the basis of its impoverished content that the precautionary principle should not be taken seriously as a formal approach to the regulation of U.S. food and drug safety.

  13. Challenges in developing competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Thippaiah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Food Safety and Standards Act have redefined the roles and responsibilities of food regulatory workforce and calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Aims: 1 Identify the competencies needed among the food regulatory workforce in India. 2 Develop a competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in the country. 3 Develop training materials for use to train the food regulatory workforce. Settings and Design: The Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, led the development of training curriculum on food safety with technical assistance from the Royal Society for Public Health, UK and the National Institute of Nutrition, India. The exercise was to facilitate the implementation of new Act by undertaking capacity building through a comprehensive training program. Materials and Methods: A competency-based training needs assessment was conducted before undertaking the development of the training materials. Results: The training program for Food Safety Officers was designed to comprise of five modules to include: Food science and technology, Food safety management systems, Food safety legislation, Enforcement of food safety regulations, and Administrative functions. Each module has a facilitator guide for the tutor and a handbook for the participant. Essentials of Food Hygiene-I (Basic level, II and III (Retail/ Catering/ Manufacturing were primarily designed for training of food handlers and are part of essential reading for food safety regulators. Conclusion: The Food Safety and Standards Act calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Despite having developed a comprehensive competency-based training curriculum by joint efforts by the local, national, and international agencies, implementation remains a challenge in resource-limited setting.

  14. Challenges in Developing Competency-based Training Curriculum for Food Safety Regulators in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippaiah, Anitha; Allagh, Komal Preet; Murthy, G. V.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The Food Safety and Standards Act have redefined the roles and responsibilities of food regulatory workforce and calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Aims: 1) Identify the competencies needed among the food regulatory workforce in India. 2) Develop a competency-based training curriculum for food safety regulators in the country. 3) Develop training materials for use to train the food regulatory workforce. Settings and Design: The Indian Institute of Public Health, Hyderabad, led the development of training curriculum on food safety with technical assistance from the Royal Society for Public Health, UK and the National Institute of Nutrition, India. The exercise was to facilitate the implementation of new Act by undertaking capacity building through a comprehensive training program. Materials and Methods: A competency-based training needs assessment was conducted before undertaking the development of the training materials. Results: The training program for Food Safety Officers was designed to comprise of five modules to include: Food science and technology, Food safety management systems, Food safety legislation, Enforcement of food safety regulations, and Administrative functions. Each module has a facilitator guide for the tutor and a handbook for the participant. Essentials of Food Hygiene-I (Basic level), II and III (Retail/ Catering/ Manufacturing) were primarily designed for training of food handlers and are part of essential reading for food safety regulators. Conclusion: The Food Safety and Standards Act calls for highly skilled human resources as it involves complex management procedures. Despite having developed a comprehensive competency-based training curriculum by joint efforts by the local, national, and international agencies, implementation remains a challenge in resource-limited setting. PMID:25136155

  15. Food suppliers' perceptions and practical implementation of food safety regulations in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hwa Ko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between the perceptions and practical implementation of food safety regulations by food suppliers in Taiwan were evaluated. A questionnaire survey was used to identify individuals who were full-time employees of the food supply industry with at least 3 months of experience. Dimensions of perceptions of food safety regulations were classified using the constructs of attitude of employees and corporate concern attitude for food safety regulation. The behavior dimension was classified into employee behavior and corporate practice. Food suppliers with training in food safety were significantly better than those without training with respect to the constructs of perception dimension of employee attitude, and the constructs of employee behavior and corporate practice associated with the behavior dimension. Older employees were superior in perception and practice. Employee attitude, employee behavior, and corporate practice were significantly correlated with each other. Satisfaction with governmental management was not significantly related to corporate practice. The corporate implementation of food safety regulations by suppliers was affected by employees' attitudes and behaviors. Furthermore, employees' attitudes and behaviors explain 35.3% of corporate practice. Employee behavior mediates employees' attitudes and corporate practices. The results of this study may serve as a reference for governmental supervision and provide training guidelines for workers in the food supply industry.

  16. Food suppliers' perceptions and practical implementation of food safety regulations in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wen-Hwa

    2015-12-01

    The relationships between the perceptions and practical implementation of food safety regulations by food suppliers in Taiwan were evaluated. A questionnaire survey was used to identify individuals who were full-time employees of the food supply industry with at least 3 months of experience. Dimensions of perceptions of food safety regulations were classified using the constructs of attitude of employees and corporate concern attitude for food safety regulation. The behavior dimension was classified into employee behavior and corporate practice. Food suppliers with training in food safety were significantly better than those without training with respect to the constructs of perception dimension of employee attitude, and the constructs of employee behavior and corporate practice associated with the behavior dimension. Older employees were superior in perception and practice. Employee attitude, employee behavior, and corporate practice were significantly correlated with each other. Satisfaction with governmental management was not significantly related to corporate practice. The corporate implementation of food safety regulations by suppliers was affected by employees' attitudes and behaviors. Furthermore, employees' attitudes and behaviors explain 35.3% of corporate practice. Employee behavior mediates employees' attitudes and corporate practices. The results of this study may serve as a reference for governmental supervision and provide training guidelines for workers in the food supply industry. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Qualified Presumption of Safety (QPS) is a generic risk assessment approach applied by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leuschner, R. G. K.; Robinson, T. P.; Hugas, M.

    2010-01-01

    and value of the QPS assessment for EFSA and to explain its principles such as the unambiguous identity of a taxonomic unit, the body of knowledge including potential safety concerns and how these considerations lead to a list of biological agents recommended for QPS which EFSA keeps updated through...

  18. INFLUENCE OF PLANNING, ORGANIZATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS AND REGULATION ON ROAD TRAFFIC SAFETY OF PEDESTRIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Kuharenok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on planning, organizational characteristics and regulation modes at  the regulated pedestrian crossings, located out of crossroads in the street and road network of Minsk. Some regularities pertaining to the influence of the investigated characteristics on road traffic safety of pedestrians are revealed in the paper. Practical offers on increase of road traffic safety of pedestrians in the Republic of Belarus have been developed on the basis of the executed investigations and cited in the paper. 

  19. Legal issues of the environmental safety regulation in the sphere of nanotechnology in Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belokrylova, Ekaterina A

    2013-01-01

    development and application of nanoproducts, inspite of fact, that these relationships have a significant financial segment. Thus, according to the Federal Act from December 13, 2010 'About federal budget for 2011 year and the period of 2012 and 2013 years' the expenses for realisation of program 'The infrastructure development of nano industry in Russian Federation for 2008-2011' were 250 milliard of Russian rubbles. The profound analyses of the current legal systems has demonstrated that nowadays the main legal regulation in nano sphere consist of some range of frame documents (accentuated by the author). Thereby, one of the most dynamic and developed field of innovative activities in Russian Federation – nanotechnology – is left out of environmental and legal area of protection and that is might lead to the raising level of ecological risks at the stage of creation and application nano products to the environment and humans' health. During the analyses of annual norms of the Report OECD 'Nano technologies: the Environment, health and safety' the conclusion is following – 2010 Russia has an extremely low degree of conceptual realization of the program in the sphere of forming the policy connected with nanotechnology and its impact on the environment and also a lack of implementations of norms into the national legal systems in terms of the assessment criteria of nano safety EHS (Environmental, Health and Safety) and ELSI (Ethical, Legal and Social Issues). To the great regret, there is no independent and precise legal act about the ways to creat and apply nano products with the certain definitions and principles and, more importantly, with the level of legal obligations and responsibility. This gap is not possible to fill by just altering and editing the existed legal acts due to the lack of the state Russian regulation. Thus, one of the most dynamic fields of innovative activities – nano technologies – is practically out of the regulation. It might lead to an

  20. Legal issues of the environmental safety regulation in the sphere of nanotechnology in Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belokrylova, Ekaterina A.

    2013-04-01

    development and application of nanoproducts, inspite of fact, that these relationships have a significant financial segment. Thus, according to the Federal Act from December 13, 2010 "About federal budget for 2011 year and the period of 2012 and 2013 years" the expenses for realisation of program "The infrastructure development of nano industry in Russian Federation for 2008-2011" were 250 milliard of Russian rubbles. The profound analyses of the current legal systems has demonstrated that nowadays the main legal regulation in nano sphere consist of some range of frame documents (accentuated by the author). Thereby, one of the most dynamic and developed field of innovative activities in Russian Federation - nanotechnology - is left out of environmental and legal area of protection and that is might lead to the raising level of ecological risks at the stage of creation and application nano products to the environment and humans' health. During the analyses of annual norms of the Report OECD "Nano technologies: the Environment, health and safety" the conclusion is following - 2010 Russia has an extremely low degree of conceptual realization of the program in the sphere of forming the policy connected with nanotechnology and its impact on the environment and also a lack of implementations of norms into the national legal systems in terms of the assessment criteria of nano safety EHS (Environmental, Health and Safety) and ELSI (Ethical, Legal and Social Issues). To the great regret, there is no independent and precise legal act about the ways to creat and apply nano products with the certain definitions and principles and, more importantly, with the level of legal obligations and responsibility. This gap is not possible to fill by just altering and editing the existed legal acts due to the lack of the state Russian regulation. Thus, one of the most dynamic fields of innovative activities - nano technologies - is practically out of the regulation. It might lead to an increase of

  1. Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division, annual report for 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-12-01

    Activities during the past year are summarized for the Health Physics Department, the Environmental Management Department, and the Safety Department. The Health Physics Department conducts radiation and safety surveys, provides personnel monitoring services for both external and internal radiation, and procures, services, and calibrates appropriate portable and stationary health physics instruments. The Environmental Management Department insures that the activities of the various organizations within ORNL are carried out in a responsible and safe manner. This responsibility involves the measurement, field monitoring, and evaluation of the amounts of radionuclides and hazardous materials released to the environment and the control of hazardous materials used within ORNL. The department also collaborates in the design of ORNL Facilities to help reduce the level of materials released to the environment. The Safety Department is responsible for maintaining a high level of staff safety. This includes aspects of both operational and industrial safety and also coordinates the activities of the Director's Safety Review Committee. (ACR)

  2. Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division, annual report for 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-12-01

    Activities during the past year are summarized for the Health Physics Department, the Environmental Management Department, and the Safety Department. The Health Physics Department conducts radiation and safety surveys, provides personnel monitoring services for both external and internal radiation, and procures, services, and calibrates appropriate portable and stationary health physics instruments. The Environmental Management Department insures that the activities of the various organizations within ORNL are carried out in a responsible and safe manner. This responsibility involves the measurement, field monitoring, and evaluation of the amounts of radionuclides and hazardous materials released to the environment and the control of hazardous materials used within ORNL. The department also collaborates in the design of ORNL Facilities to help reduce the level of materials released to the environment. The Safety Department is responsible for maintaining a high level of staff safety. This includes aspects of both operational and industrial safety and also coordinates the activities of the Director's Safety Review Committee

  3. Safety of UV-treated milk as a novel food pursuant to Regulation (EC) No 258/97

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on UV-treated milk as a novel food submitted pursuant to Regulation (EC) No 258/97, taking into account the comments and objections of a scientific...... nature raised by Member States. The novel food is cow’s milk (whole, semi-skimmed or skimmed) to which a treatment with ultraviolet (UV) radiation is applied after pasteurisation in order to extend the shelf life of the milk. This treatment results in an increase in the vitamin D3 concentrations....... The Panel considers that the provided compositional data, the specifications and the data from batch testing do not give rise to safety concerns. The data provided on the production process are sufficient and do not give rise to safety concerns. The target group is the general population with the exclusion...

  4. International experts conclude IAEA peer review of Iran's safety regulation of Bushehr NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts today completed an IAEA mission to review the effectiveness of Iran's safety regulation of its first nuclear power plant and to identify possible improvements before the plant begins operation. Upon invitation of the Islamic Republic of Iran, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assembled a team of senior regulators from seven Member States for an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. The scope of the mission was limited to the safety regulation of Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP-1). The IRRS review took place from 20 February to 2 March at the INRA offices in Tehran and included a technical visit to the BNPP-1 site. The mission was an objective peer review based on IAEA safety standards, and was neither an inspection, nor an audit. Ms. Olena Mykolaichuk, IRRS Team Leader and Head of the State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine, commended her INRA counterparts: 'The regulatory work performed on the Bushehr construction and in preparation for commissioning has demonstrated significant progress of INRA as a nuclear regulatory authority,' she said. Philippe Jamet, Director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division, added: 'Through this IRRS mission, both Iran and the international experts contribute to the enhancement of nuclear safety and worldwide experience sharing.' In the course of its review the IRRS team identified the following strengths: - INRA has a dedicated, conscientious staff, demonstrating clear commitments to further improvements. - INRA clearly recognizes the value of peer reviews and international cooperation regarding nuclear safety. - Despite a shortage of staff, INRA demonstrated strong leadership while performing both review and assessment and inspection tasks during the BNPP-1 construction and pre-commissioning. - INRA has developed an excellent computerized documentation control system. Recommendations and suggestions to improve INRA's regulatory

  5. Regulating the long-term safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste: practical issues and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Regulating the long-term safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste is a key part of making progress on the radioactive waste management issue. A survey of member countries has shown that differences exist both in the protection criteria being applied and in the methods for demonstrating compliance, reflecting historical and cultural differences between countries which in turn result in a diversity of decision-making approaches and frameworks. At the same time, however, these differences in criteria are unlikely to result in significant differences in long-term protection, as all the standards being proposed are well below levels at which actual effects of radiological exposure can be observed and a range of complementary requirements is foreseen. In order to enable experts from a wide range of backgrounds to debate the various aspects of these findings, the NEA organised an international workshop in November 2006 in Paris, France. Discussions focused on diversity in regulatory processes; the basis and tools for assuring long-term protection; ethical responsibilities of one generation to later generations and how these can be discharged; and adapting regulatory processes to the long time frames involved in implementing geological disposal. These proceedings include a summary of the viewpoints expressed as well as the 22 papers presented at the workshop. (author)

  6. Utility regulation-The scope and structure of electrical safety regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, Malcolm; Cohen, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    As a consequence of policies in Australia and New Zealand to increase competition in the utilities sector, regulatory agencies have been created in each state to provide independent and authorative advice on matters such as electricity pricing, access to infrastructure, service quality and security of supply. In addition arrangements have been established to maintain safety standards in the industry. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the major issues that have arisen in the creation of regulatory agencies responsible for electrical safety standards in Australia and New Zealand, and how they have impacted on liberalised electricity markets. - Highlights: → Policies in Australia and New Zealand to increase competition have led to the creation of electrical safety agencies. → These agencies have been created in response to perceived market failures. → There is a variance in agencies in terms of their independence and industry coverage. → These agencies have been created at a time of falling fatalities.

  7. Knowledge Management for Safety Regulators: Cooperation to Achieve a Much Needed Product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Knowledge management (KM) has been identified by a number of IAEA documents as one of the key factors that can contribute to the safe and efficient operation of nuclear facilities in Member States. The IAEA Strategic Approaches to Education and Training in Nuclear and Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety identify and underline KM as an important line of action for effective national and organizational strategies in education and training. The capacity building “umbrella concept”, developed within the Action Plan in Nuclear Safety, also recognizes KM as one of the main four pillars (Education and Training, Human Resource Development, Knowledge Management and Knowledge Networks) of capacity building. Within existing IAEA publications, there is currently no specific practical guidance on how to develop and implement KM programmes for regulators. As such, in 2014, the IAEA Steering Committee on Regulatory Capacity Building and Knowledge Management requested the IAEA to develop a publication providing such practical guidance. The objective of the publication is to provide practical guidance to Member States on how to plan, establish and maintain an effective safety KM programme for regulators of facilities and activities. The report will identify benefits and uses of KM by regulators and will describe how a regulator could use KM in support of its functions. This presentation will provide an overview of the Knowledge Management for Safety Regulators document while highlighting the cross-departmental cooperation (i.e., NS and NE) used in its development. Furthermore, this presentation will provide insight into the challenges currently being faced by safety regulators vis-à-vis KM programmes and present potential paths forward with respect to the definition of efficient and effective KM indicators. (author

  8. Resolution No. 6/04 Regulations for the recognition of the competence of services for radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Regulation aims to establish the rules that govern the process to recognize the competence of services for radiation safety, they are no authorized under Resolution No. 25, dated May 29, 1998, the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment, A uthorization Regulation Practices Associated with Use of Ionizing Radiation , in order to ensure that services that are related to the practices associated with the use of nuclear energy, with the requisite expertise. This Regulation applies to all natural or legal persons performing or purporting to perform service activities for radiation safety in the country. These services are: 2.1. Individual Radiation Monitoring Services, in one or more of the following areas: 2.1.1. Control of external exposure a) Electromagnetic Radiation. b) beta radiation. c) neutron radiation. 2.1.2. Control of internal contamination a) Determination of internal contamination by direct measurements. b) Determination of internal contamination by analysis of biological samples. c) Monitoring of air, personal and total. 2.2. Service environmental measurements and samples. 2.3. Service control radioactive contamination in foods. 2.4. Service measuring dose rate, surface contamination and air pollution. 2.5. Calibration and verification of equipment. 2.6. Service courses in radio-logical protection. 2.7. Consultancy services in radiation protection. 2.8. Service control radioactive contamination in scrap. 2.9. Service quality control equipment that is used in the practices associated with the use of ionizing radiation. 2.10. Any other service in the field of radiation safety in scope and interest of end-National Center for Nuclear Safety.

  9. Revolutionizing safety and security in the chemical and process industry: applying the CHESS concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reniers, G.L.L.M.E.; Khakzad Rostami, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper argues that a new concept, summarized as ‘CHESS’, should be used in the chemical industry to further substantially advance safety (where we use the term in a broad sense, that is, safety and physical security, amongst others). The different domains that need to be focused upon, and where

  10. Blended Risk Approach in Applying PSA Models to Risk-Based Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrijevic, V. B.; Chapman, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, the authors will discuss a modern approach in applying PSA models in risk-based regulation. The Blended Risk Approach is a combination of traditional and probabilistic processes. It is receiving increased attention in different industries in the U. S. and abroad. The use of the deterministic regulations and standards provides a proven and well understood basis on which to assess and communicate the impact of change to plant design and operation. Incorporation of traditional values into risk evaluation is working very well in the blended approach. This approach is very application specific. It includes multiple risk attributes, qualitative risk analysis, and basic deterministic principles. In blending deterministic and probabilistic principles, this approach ensures that the objectives of the traditional defense-in-depth concept are not compromised and the design basis of the plant is explicitly considered. (author)

  11. Safety regulation for the design approval of special form radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Woon-Kap

    2009-01-01

    Several kinds of special form radioactive sources for industrial, medical applications are being produced in Korea. Special form radioactive sources should meet strict safety requirements specified in the domestic safety regulations and the design of the sources should be certified by the regulatory authority, the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST). Several safety tests such as impact, percussion, heating, and leak tests are performed on the sources according to the domestic regulations and the international safety standards such as ANSI N542-1977 and ISO 2919-1999(E). As a regulatory expert body, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) assesses various types of application documents, such as safety analysis report, quality assurance program, and other documents evidencing fulfillment of requirements for design approval of the special form radioactive sources, submitted by a legal person who intends to produce special form radioactive sources and then reports the assessment result to MEST. A design approval certificate is issued to the applicant by MEST on the basis of a technical evaluation report presented by KINS.

  12. The safety and regulation of natural products used as foods and food ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Ali; Anyangwe, Njwen; Carlacci, Louis; Casper, Steve; Danam, Rebecca P; Enongene, Evaristus; Erives, Gladys; Fabricant, Daniel; Gudi, Ramadevi; Hilmas, Corey J; Hines, Fred; Howard, Paul; Levy, Dan; Lin, Ying; Moore, Robert J; Pfeiler, Erika; Thurmond, T Scott; Turujman, Saleh; Walker, Nigel J

    2011-10-01

    The use of botanicals and dietary supplements derived from natural substances as an adjunct to an improved quality of life or for their purported medical benefits has become increasingly common in the United States. This review addresses the safety assessment and regulation of food products containing these substances by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The issue of safety is particularly critical given how little information is available on the toxicity of some of these products. The first section uses case studies for stevia and green tea extracts as examples of how FDA evaluates the safety of botanical and herbal products submitted for consideration as Generally Recognized as Safe under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetics Act. The 1994 Dietary Supplement Health Education Act (DSHEA) created a regulatory framework for dietary supplements. The article also discusses the regulation of this class of dietary supplements under DSHEA and addresses the FDA experience in analyzing the safety of natural ingredients described in pre-market safety submissions. Lastly, we discuss an ongoing interagency collaboration to conduct safety testing of nominated dietary supplements.

  13. The challenges for global harmonisation of food safety norms and regulations: issues for India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jamuna

    2014-08-01

    Safe and adequate food is a human right, safety being a prime quality attribute without which food is unfit for consumption. Food safety regulations are framed to exercise control over all types of food produced, processed and sold so that the customer is assured that the food consumed will not cause any harm. From the Indian perspective, global harmonisation of food regulations is needed to improve food and nutrition security, the food trade and delivery of safe ready-to-eat (RTE) foods at all places and at all times. The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) put forward to transform developing societies incorporate many food safety issues. The success of the MDGs, including that of poverty reduction, will in part depend on an effective reduction of food-borne diseases, particularly among the vulnerable group, which includes women and children. Food- and water-borne illnesses can be a serious health hazard, being responsible for high incidences of morbidity and mortality across all age groups of people. Global harmonisation of food regulations would assist in facilitating food trade within and outside India through better compliance, ensuring the safety of RTE catered foods, as well as addressing issues related to the environment. At the same time, regulations need to be optimum, as overregulation may have undue negative effects on the food trade. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Moving beyond command-and-control: reflexivity in the regulation of occupational safety and health and the environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalders, M.V.C.; Wilthagen, T.

    1997-01-01

    Direct or "command-and-control" regulation has had limited success in dealing with occupational health and safety and with environmental regulation. This lack of success has led policymakers to experiment with self-regulation as an alternative means of achieving the goals of social regulation. The

  15. The impact of assay technology as applied to safety assessment in reducing compound attrition in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Craig E; Will, Yvonne

    2012-02-01

    Attrition in the drug industry due to safety findings remains high and requires a shift in the current safety testing paradigm. Many companies are now positioning safety assessment at each stage of the drug development process, including discovery, where an early perspective on potential safety issues is sought, often at chemical scaffold level, using a variety of emerging technologies. Given the lengthy development time frames of drugs in the pharmaceutical industry, the authors believe that the impact of new technologies on attrition is best measured as a function of the quality and timeliness of candidate compounds entering development. The authors provide an overview of in silico and in vitro models, as well as more complex approaches such as 'omics,' and where they are best positioned within the drug discovery process. It is important to take away that not all technologies should be applied to all projects. Technologies vary widely in their validation state, throughput and cost. A thoughtful combination of validated and emerging technologies is crucial in identifying the most promising candidates to move to proof-of-concept testing in humans. In spite of the challenges inherent in applying new technologies to drug discovery, the successes and recognition that we cannot continue to rely on safety assessment practices used for decades have led to rather dramatic strategy shifts and fostered partnerships across government agencies and industry. We are optimistic that these efforts will ultimately benefit patients by delivering effective and safe medications in a timely fashion.

  16. Distance-Based Access Modifiers Applied to Safety in Home Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kjeld Høyer; Schougaard, Kari Rye; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh

    2004-01-01

    Home networks and the interconnection of home appliances is a classical theme in ubiquitous computing research. Security is a recurring concern, but there is a lack of awareness of safety: preventing the computerized house from harming the inhabitants, even in a worst-case scenario where...... an unauthorized user gains remote control of the facilities. We address this safety issue at the middleware level by restricting the operations that can be performed on devices according to the physical location of the user initiating the request. Operations that pose a potential safety hazard can only...... be performed within a physical proximity that ensures safety. We use a declarative approach integrated with an IDL language to express location-based restrictions on operations. This model has been implemented in a middleware for home audio-video devices, using infrared communication and a local-area network...

  17. Distance-Based Access Modifiers Applied to Safety in Home Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kjeld H.; Schultz, Ulrik Pagh; Nørgaard, Kari Rye Schougaard

    2004-01-01

    an unauthorized user gains remote control of the facilities. We address this safety issue at the middleware level by restricting the operations that can be performed on devices according to the physical location of the user initiating the request. Operations that pose a potential safety hazard can only......Home networks and the interconnection of home appliances is a classical theme in ubiquitous computing research. Security is a recurring concern, but there is a lack of awareness of safety: preventing the computerized house from harming the inhabitants, even in a worst-case scenario where...... be performed within a physical proximity that ensures safety. We use a declarative approach integrated with an IDL language to express location-based restrictions on operations. This model has been implemented in a middleware for home audio-video devices, using infrared communication and a local-area network...

  18. Leachables and extractables handbook: safety evaluation, qualification, and best practices applied to inhalation drug products

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ball, Douglas J

    2012-01-01

    ...). It discusses best practices for evaluation and management of leachables and extractables throughout the pharma product lifecycle by providing practical knowledge about how and why safety thresholds were developed...

  19. Thermal-hydraulic calculations using MARS code applied to low power and shutdown probabilistic safety assessment in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Young-Seok; Shin, Jee-Young; Lim, Ho-Gon; Park, Jin-Hee; Jang, Seung-Cheol

    2005-01-01

    The methods developed for full-power probabilistic safety assessment, including thermal-hydraulic methods, have been widely applied to low power and shutdown conditions. Experience from current low power and shutdown probabilistic safety assessments, however, indicates that the thermal-hydraulic methods developed for full-power probabilistic safety assessments are not always reliable when applied to low power and shutdown conditions and consequently may yield misleading and inaccurate risk insights. To increase the usefulness of the low power and shutdown risk insights, the current methods and tools used for thermal-hydraulic calculations should be examined to ascertain whether they function effectively for low power and shutdown conditions. In this study, a platform for relatively detailed thermal-hydraulic calculations applied to low power and shutdown conditions in a pressurized water reactor was developed based on the best estimate thermal-hydraulic analysis code, MARS2.1. To confirm the applicability of the MARS platform to low power and shutdown conditions, many thermal-hydraulic analyses were performed for the selected topic, i.e. the loss of shutdown cooling events for various plant operating states at the Korean standard nuclear power plant. The platform developed in this study can deal effectively with low power and shutdown conditions, as well as assist the accident sequence analysis in low power and shutdown probabilistic safety assessments by providing fundamental data. Consequently, the resulting analyses may yield more realistic and accurate low power and shutdown risk insights

  20. Safety, reliability, risk management and human factors: an integrated engineering approach applied to nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Silva, Eliane Magalhaes Pereira da; Costa, Antonio Carlos Lopes da; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear energy has an important engineering legacy to share with the conventional industry. Much of the development of the tools related to safety, reliability, risk management, and human factors are associated with nuclear plant processes, mainly because the public concern about nuclear power generation. Despite the close association between these subjects, there are some important different approaches. The reliability engineering approach uses several techniques to minimize the component failures that cause the failure of the complex systems. These techniques include, for instance, redundancy, diversity, standby sparing, safety factors, and reliability centered maintenance. On the other hand system safety is primarily concerned with hazard management, that is, the identification, evaluation and control of hazards. Rather than just look at failure rates or engineering strengths, system safety would examine the interactions among system components. The events that cause accidents may be complex combinations of component failures, faulty maintenance, design errors, human actions, or actuation of instrumentation and control. Then, system safety deals with a broader spectrum of risk management, including: ergonomics, legal requirements, quality control, public acceptance, political considerations, and many other non-technical influences. Taking care of these subjects individually can compromise the completeness of the analysis and the measures associated with both risk reduction, and safety and reliability increasing. Analyzing together the engineering systems and controls of a nuclear facility, their management systems and operational procedures, and the human factors engineering, many benefits can be realized. This paper proposes an integration of these issues based on the application of systems theory. (author)

  1. Applying Learning Theory to Safety and Health Training for Hispanic Immigrant Dairy Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Carrillo, Patricia M; Liebman, Amy K; Reyes, Iris Anne C; Ninco Sánchez, Yurany V; Keifer, Matthew C

    2017-07-01

    We designed a safety and health curriculum for dairy immigrant workers aiming to increase knowledge, encourage safe behavior, and reduce worker communication inequalities to prevent occupational injury and diseases. The design is largely based on the Taxonomy of Significant Learning and incorporated behavioral and adult learning theories and principles of occupational hazard control. Trainings were implemented with 836 Spanish-speaking workers from 67 farms in Wisconsin. Sixty-seven percent of workers reported never being trained before in dairy safety, 65% of these worked in dairy for 5 or fewers years, and 26% of workers reported being ever injured while working on dairy. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the trainings suggest that our curriculum successfully increased worker knowledge and promoted contemplation of safe practices. The overall knowledge gain of 25% was statistically significant ( p behavior, and mentioned their intention to communicate safety concerns to farmers. To our knowledge, this is the first Taxonomy of Significant Learning application to occupational safety and health education. Our curriculum can support dairy farmers' compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration's annual training requirements by providing our basic safety and health training to workers at early job stages.

  2. Safety, reliability, risk management and human factors: an integrated engineering approach applied to nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Vanderley de; Silva, Eliane Magalhaes Pereira da; Costa, Antonio Carlos Lopes da; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: vasconv@cdtn.br, e-mail: silvaem@cdtn.br, e-mail: aclc@cdtn.br, e-mail: reissc@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear energy has an important engineering legacy to share with the conventional industry. Much of the development of the tools related to safety, reliability, risk management, and human factors are associated with nuclear plant processes, mainly because the public concern about nuclear power generation. Despite the close association between these subjects, there are some important different approaches. The reliability engineering approach uses several techniques to minimize the component failures that cause the failure of the complex systems. These techniques include, for instance, redundancy, diversity, standby sparing, safety factors, and reliability centered maintenance. On the other hand system safety is primarily concerned with hazard management, that is, the identification, evaluation and control of hazards. Rather than just look at failure rates or engineering strengths, system safety would examine the interactions among system components. The events that cause accidents may be complex combinations of component failures, faulty maintenance, design errors, human actions, or actuation of instrumentation and control. Then, system safety deals with a broader spectrum of risk management, including: ergonomics, legal requirements, quality control, public acceptance, political considerations, and many other non-technical influences. Taking care of these subjects individually can compromise the completeness of the analysis and the measures associated with both risk reduction, and safety and reliability increasing. Analyzing together the engineering systems and controls of a nuclear facility, their management systems and operational procedures, and the human factors engineering, many benefits can be realized. This paper proposes an integration of these issues based on the application of systems theory. (author)

  3. 33 CFR 165.1318 - Security and Safety Zone Regulations, Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Portland, OR Captain of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security and Safety Zone... Limited Access Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1318 Security and Safety Zone Regulations... suspension of enforcement. The large passenger vessel security and safety zone established by this section...

  4. Tough but True: School Board Neglect of Bus Safety Led to Government's Overblown, Under-Researched Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School Board Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The apparent lack of concern school boards evidenced in the past over school bus safety has precipitated the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration regulations that have angered board members and bus manufacturers alike. It is argued that the new regulations are not based on research. (Author/IRT)

  5. International Nuclear Officials Discuss IAEA Peer Reviews of Nuclear Safety Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Senior nuclear regulators today concluded a Workshop on the Lessons Learned from the IAEA Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) Missions. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) hosted the workshop, in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, in Washington, DC, from 26 to 28 October 2011. About 60 senior regulators from 22 IAEA Member States took part in this workshop. The IRRS programme is an international peer review service offered by the IAEA to its Member States to provide an objective evaluation of their nuclear safety regulatory framework. The review is based on the internationally recognized IAEA Safety Standards. ''The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission was pleased to host the IAEA's IRRS meeting this week. The discussions over the past three days have provided an important opportunity for regulators from many countries to come together to strengthen the international peer review process,'' said U.S. NRC Chairman Gregory B. Jaczko. ''Especially after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the global community recognizes that IRRS missions fill a vital role in strengthening nuclear safety and security programs around the world, and we are proud to be a part of this important effort.'' The IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety includes actions focused towards strengthening the existing IAEA peer reviews, incorporating lessons learned and improving their effectiveness. The workshop provided a platform for the exchange of information, experience and lessons learned from the IRRS missions, as well as expectations for the IRRS programme for the near future. Further improvements in the planning and implementation of the IRRS missions in the longer term were discussed. A strong commitment of all relevant national authorities to the IRRS programme was identified as a key element of an effective regulatory framework. The conclusions of the workshop will be issued in November 2011 and the main results will be reported to the IAEA

  6. Preparing Safety Cases for Operating Outside Prescriptive Fatigue Risk Management Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, Philippa; Mangie, Jim; Wu, Lora; van den Berg, Margo; Signal, Leigh; Phillips, Adrienne

    2017-07-01

    Transport operators seeking to operate outside prescriptive fatigue management regulations are typically required to present a safety case justifying how they will manage the associated risk. This paper details a method for constructing a successful safety case. The method includes four elements: 1) scope (prescriptive rules and operations affected); 2) risk assessment; 3) risk mitigation strategies; and 4) monitoring ongoing risk. A successful safety case illustrates this method. It enables landing pilots in 3-pilot crews to choose the second or third in-flight rest break, rather than the regulatory requirement to take the third break. Scope was defined using a month of scheduled flights that would be covered (N = 4151). These were analyzed in the risk assessment using existing literature on factors affecting fatigue to estimate the maximum time awake at top of descent and sleep opportunities in each break. Additionally, limited data collected before the new regulations showed that pilots flying at landing chose the third break on only 6% of flights. A prospective survey comparing subjective reports (N = 280) of sleep in the second vs. third break and fatigue and sleepiness ratings at top of descent confirmed that the third break is not consistently superior. The safety case also summarized established systems for fatigue monitoring, risk assessment and hazard identification, and multiple fatigue mitigation strategies that are in place. Other successful safety cases have used this method. The evidence required depends on the expected level of risk and should evolve as experience with fatigue risk management systems builds.Gander P, Mangie J, Wu L, van den Berg M, Signal L, Phillips A. Preparing safety cases for operating outside prescriptive fatigue risk management regulations. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(7):688-696.

  7. Outline of safety regulations and administrations for commercial nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinichi Yamamoto

    1987-01-01

    Outline of safety regulations and administrations for the commercial nuclear power plants in Japan is briefly described. The strict measures for safety assurance are always taken based on the principle of defense-indepth. In the actual procedures of regulatory control, the examinations and inspections shall be performed at each individual step in the stage of applications, and also in the stage of constructions. Thus, those regulatory examinations and inspections shall be performed in detail and carefully, and at the most suitable time; resulting in an effective regulatory control by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. (author)

  8. Safety evaluation methods applied at the Technical department of the Institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabol, B.

    1990-12-01

    Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IPSN) has established a Technical emergency center (CTC) for nuclear facilities with the aim to supply the public with technical data analysis of incidents, mainly, all the predicted consequences of radioactive release into the environment. From technical point of view, the functioning of CTC relies on the work of two units, one in charge of the state of accident installation, and the second responsible for evaluation of radiological environmental effects. The latter is concerned with the meteorological situation, it relies sometimes on local, and sometimes on national weather forecast in order to compile data needed for calculating atmospheric transport at the and in the vicinity of the affected site, and further in the region and across the borders. For this analysis the Unit possesses operational computer codes. The code (SIROCCO) can take into account the kinetics of particulates and all the time dependent meteorological conditions. This calculation model can either treat the dispersed isotopes or isotope chains (rare gases, cesium isotopes, iodine isotopes...). One version of this code enables calculation of the consequences at medium and long distances using the methods of Meteorologie Nationale [fr

  9. Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division annual report for 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auxier, J.A.; Oakes, T.W.

    1982-08-01

    Activities over the past year are summarized for the Health Physics Department, the Environmental Management Program, and the Safety Department. The Health Physics Department conducts radiation and safety surveys, provides personnel monitoring services for both external and internal radiation, and procures, services, and calibrates appropriate portable and stationary health physics instruments. It was determined that the maximum whole-body dose sustained by an employee was about 3.8 rems, which is 76% of the applicable standard of 5 rems. The greatest cumulative dose to the skin of the whole body received by an employee during 1981 was about 5.9 rems, or 39% of the applicable standard of 15 rems. Atmospheric iodine sampled by the Department of Environmental Management at the perimeter stations averged 0.13E to 14 ..mu..Ci/cc during 1981. This average represents < 0.005% of the concentration guide of 1E to 10 ..mu..Ci/cc applicable to inhalation of /sup 131/I released to uncontrolled areas. All air samples taken had values below the allowable standards. The concentrations of /sup 90/Sr in milk from both the immediate and remote environs of ORNL are also within FRC range I. The average value of 1.5 E to 9 ..mu..Ci/mL represents 0.5% of the CG/sub w/ for drinking water applicable to individuals in the general population. The Safety Department reported that the continuing emphasis on safety during CY 1981 resulted in significant improvements in the ORNL safety program: safety performance was better than all CY 1981 on-the-job injury and illness goals. Through December 31, 1981, the Laboratory had worked 600 days and accumulated 14,015,826 exposure-hours since the last lost-work-day case.

  10. Applying ethnography to the study of context in healthcare quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Myles; Paradis, Elise; Gropper, Michael A; Reeves, Scott; Kitto, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Translating and scaling healthcare quality improvement (QI) and patient safety interventions remains a significant challenge. Context has been identified as a major factor in this. QI and patient safety research have begun to focus on context, with ethnography seen as a promising methodology for understanding the professional, organisational and cultural aspects of context. While ethnography is used to investigate the context of a variety of QI and safety interventions, the challenges inherent in effectively importing a qualitative methodology and its social science practitioners into this work have been largely unexamined. We explain ethnography as a research practice grounded in theory and dependent on observations gathered and interpreted in particular ways. We then review the approach of health services literature to evaluating this sort of qualitative research. Although the study of context is an interest shared by both social scientists and healthcare QI and safety researchers, we identify three key points at which those 'exporting' ethnography as a methodology and those 'importing' it to deal with QI and safety challenges may diverge. We describe perspectival divergences on the methodology's mission, form and scale. At the level of mission we demonstrate how ethnography has been adapted to a 'describe and feed back' role in the service of QI. At the level of form, we show how the long-term embedded observation at the heart of ethnography can be adapted only so far to accommodate QI interests if both data quality and ethical standards are to be upheld. Finally, at the level of scale, we demonstrate one ethnographic study design that balances breadth of exposure with depth of experience in its observations and so generates a particular type of scalable findings. The effective export of ethnography into QI and safety research requires discussion and negotiation between social scientific and health services research perspectives, as well as creative approaches

  11. Improving health, safety and energy efficiency in New Zealand through measuring and applying basic housing standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie-Bennett, Julie; Keall, Michael; Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Baker, Michael G

    2013-08-02

    Substandard housing is a problem in New Zealand. Historically there has been little recognition of the important aspects of housing quality that affect people's health and safety. In this viewpoint article we outline the importance of assessing these factors as an essential step to improving the health and safety of New Zealanders and household energy efficiency. A practical risk assessment tool adapted to New Zealand conditions, the Healthy Housing Index (HHI), measures the physical characteristics of houses that affect the health and safety of the occupants. This instrument is also the only tool that has been validated against health and safety outcomes and reported in the international peer-reviewed literature. The HHI provides a framework on which a housing warrant of fitness (WOF) can be based. The HHI inspection takes about one hour to conduct and is performed by a trained building inspector. To maximise the effectiveness of this housing quality assessment we envisage the output having two parts. The first would be a pass/fail WOF assessment showing whether or not the house meets basic health, safety and energy efficiency standards. The second component would rate each main assessment area (health, safety and energy efficiency), potentially on a five-point scale. This WOF system would establish a good minimum standard for rental accommodation as well encouraging improved housing performance over time. In this article we argue that the HHI is an important, validated, housing assessment tool that will improve housing quality, leading to better health of the occupants, reduced home injuries, and greater energy efficiency. If required, this tool could be extended to also cover resilience to natural hazards, broader aspects of sustainability, and the suitability of the dwelling for occupants with particular needs.

  12. Industrial Safety and Applied Health Physics Division annual report for 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxier, J.A.; Oakes, T.W.

    1982-08-01

    Activities over the past year are summarized for the Health Physics Department, the Environmental Management Program, and the Safety Department. The Health Physics Department conducts radiation and safety surveys, provides personnel monitoring services for both external and internal radiation, and procures, services, and calibrates appropriate portable and stationary health physics instruments. It was determined that the maximum whole-body dose sustained by an employee was about 3.8 rems, which is 76% of the applicable standard of 5 rems. The greatest cumulative dose to the skin of the whole body received by an employee during 1981 was about 5.9 rems, or 39% of the applicable standard of 15 rems. Atmospheric iodine sampled by the Department of Environmental Management at the perimeter stations averged 0.13E to 14 μCi/cc during 1981. This average represents 131 I released to uncontrolled areas. All air samples taken had values below the allowable standards. The concentrations of 90 Sr in milk from both the immediate and remote environs of ORNL are also within FRC range I. The average value of 1.5 E to 9 μCi/mL represents 0.5% of the CG/sub w/ for drinking water applicable to individuals in the general population. The Safety Department reported that the continuing emphasis on safety during CY 1981 resulted in significant improvements in the ORNL safety program: safety performance was better than all CY 1981 on-the-job injury and illness goals. Through December 31, 1981, the Laboratory had worked 600 days and accumulated 14,015,826 exposure-hours since the last lost-work-day case

  13. Stakeholder confidence in effective safety regulation. A regulator's view on the role of independent research capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotra, Janet; Mohanty, Sitakanto

    2006-01-01

    The authors provided a regulator's view on the role of independent research capability and its relationship to stakeholder confidence. They underscored the NRC's commitment to regulatory openness in its Strategic Plan. A number of actions have been adopted to achieve openness: public access to information about risks, safety and licensee performance that is accurate and timely; enhanced awareness of NRC as an independent regulator; fair and timely process for public involvement in NRC's decision-making; and early public involvement and two-way communication to enhance public confidence in NRC's regulatory process. The presentation reviewed the ways through which the NRC seeks to inspire confidence in its process as independent regulator and in future decisions concerning whether to authorize the U.S. DOE to construct the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. Key to this will be reviewing all information objectively, making open decisions based on sound, scientific judgements about the facts; and maintaining an open and fair public process, and accessing independent R and D. It was noted that among the requirements for the safety review for the Yucca Mountain repository will be extensive technical and scientific analyses, evaluation of expert judgement, and long-range modelling assessments of expected repository performance. NRC requires independent scientific and engineering analyses to develop technical bases for regulations and guidance; evaluate adequacy of DOE's safety case for a potential repository; assist preparation of NRC Safety Evaluation Report; provide technical support for NRC testimony during licensing hearing; and develop effective outreach and communication tools. Confidence in NRC's use of science and engineering will depend upon: competence; independence; open and fair process; regulatory outcomes that are subject to verification and monitoring. To assist, the NRC established the Centre for Nuclear Waste Regulatory

  14. Features, events, processes, and safety factor analysis applied to a near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, M.E.; Dolinar, G.M.; Lange, B.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    An analysis of features, events, processes (FEPs) and other safety factors was applied to AECL`s proposed IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) near-surface LLRW disposal facility. The FEP analysis process which had been developed for and applied to high-level and transuranic disposal concepts was adapted for application to a low-level facility for which significant efforts in developing a safety case had already been made. The starting point for this process was a series of meetings of the project team to identify and briefly describe FEPs or safety factors which they thought should be considered. At this early stage participants were specifically asked not to screen ideas. This initial list was supplemented by selecting FEPs documented in other programs and comments received from an initial regulatory review. The entire list was then sorted by topic and common issues were grouped, and issues were classified in three priority categories and assigned to individuals for resolution. In this paper, the issue identification and resolution process will be described, from the initial description of an issue to its resolution and inclusion in the various levels of the safety case documentation.

  15. Applying the Food Safety Objective and related concepts to thermal inactivation of Salmonella in poultry meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Membré, J.M.; Bassett, J.; Gorris, L.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the practicality of designing a heat treatment process in a food manufacturing operation for a product governed by a Food Safety Objective (FSO). Salmonella in cooked poultry meat was taken as the working example. Although there is no FSO for this

  16. RiskSOAP: Introducing and applying a methodology of risk self-awareness in road tunnel safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzimichailidou, Maria Mikela; Dokas, Ioannis M

    2016-05-01

    Complex socio-technical systems, such as road tunnels, can be designed and developed with more or less elements that can either positively or negatively affect the capability of their agents to recognise imminent threats or vulnerabilities that possibly lead to accidents. This capability is called risk Situation Awareness (SA) provision. Having as a motive the introduction of better tools for designing and developing systems that are self-aware of their vulnerabilities and react to prevent accidents and losses, this paper introduces the Risk Situation Awareness Provision (RiskSOAP) methodology to the field of road tunnel safety, as a means to measure this capability in this kind of systems. The main objective is to test the soundness and the applicability of RiskSOAP to infrastructure, which is advanced in terms of technology, human integration, and minimum number of safety requirements imposed by international bodies. RiskSOAP is applied to a specific road tunnel in Greece and the accompanying indicator is calculated twice, once for the tunnel design as defined by updated European safety standards and once for the 'as-is' tunnel composition, which complies with the necessary safety requirements, but calls for enhancing safety according to what EU and PIARC further suggest. The derived values indicate the extent to which each tunnel version is capable of comprehending its threats and vulnerabilities based on its elements. The former tunnel version seems to be more enhanced both in terms of it risk awareness capability and safety as well. Another interesting finding is that despite the advanced tunnel safety specifications, there is still room for enriching the safe design and maintenance of the road tunnel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 34 CFR 225.3 - What regulations apply to the Credit Enhancement for Charter School Facilities Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Human Subjects). (11) 34 CFR part 98 (Student Rights in Research, Experimental Programs, and Testing... Programs). (3) 34 CFR part 77 (Definitions that Apply to Department Regulations). (4) 34 CFR part 79...

  18. Notes on the nuclear safety regulations concerning research reactors and use of nuclear fuel material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzawa, Tomio

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear regulation system of Japan has drastically reconsidered after the nuclear disaster caused by the reactor accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. As a result a law was enacted to establish a nuclear regulation authority in June 27, 2012, and the laws relating the atomic power were largely revised. In this article, we show major revisions in the laws concerning research reactor facilities and those facilities which treat nuclear fuel materials. It should be noted that the law is only a formality and that the application of the law by persons enables to produces effectiveness. Persons hold the key to the safety. (J.P.N.)

  19. Mines Safety Control (Radiation Protection) Regulations (Northern Territory) No. 30 of 25 September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    These Regulations, pursuant to the Mines Safety Control Act, are intended to prevent or limit the radiation risk to persons involved in the mining or milling of radioactive ores. The duties and responsibilities imposed by the Regulations on owners, managers and employees of the mines are identical with those set forth in the 1980 Code of Practice on Radiation Protection in the Mining and Milling of Radioactive Ores which establishes radiation standards and exposure limits, requires health surveillance of employees and provides for the management of radioactive wastes. (NEA) [fr

  20. An Overview of Seafood Supply, Food Safety and Regulation in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Malik A; Saputra, Themy; Szabo, Elizabeth A; Nelan, Bruce

    2017-07-19

    Seafood consumption is increasing in Australia, especially in New South Wales (NSW). Average per capita seafood consumption in NSW is higher than the national average. Seafood supply in NSW comes from domestic (wild catch and aquaculture) and overseas (seafood imports) sources. The contribution of wild catch and aquaculture in domestic seafood production (2012-2013) was 73.42% and 26.52%, respectively. Seafood-associated foodborne illness outbreaks are not common and on an average four outbreaks occur each year in NSW. Most of the outbreaks in 2015 and 2016 were related to ciguatera poisoning. The regulation of the seafood industry and the management of food safety is an example of the coordinated work of multiple government agencies and organizations in which NSW Food Authority is responsible for managing the overall risks through the Seafood Safety Scheme. Overall, seafood supply in NSW is of high quality and poses low food safety risk to consumers.

  1. The costs of uncertainty: regulating health and safety in the Canadian uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, I.

    1982-04-01

    Federalism, and particularly federal/provincial jurisdictional relationships, have led to considerable uncertainty in the regulation of occupational health and safety and of environmental protection in the Canadian uranium mining industry. The two principal uranium producing provinces in Canada are Saskatchewan and Ontario. Since 1978, in an attempt to avoid constitutional issues, both these provinces and the federal government as well have proceeded unilaterally with health and safety reforms for the industry. In Saskatchewan this has resulted in areas of overlapping jurisdiction, which have led to uncertainty over the legal enforceability of the provincial regulations. In Ontario, the province has left significant gaps in the protection of both workers and the environment. Little progress can be expected in eliminating these gaps and overlaps until the current administrative and jurisdictional arrangements are understood

  2. Aspects of the state safety regulation dealing with management of radioactive wastes from nuclear vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarov, Valentin G.

    1999-01-01

    According to this presentation, the Constitution of the Russian Federation states that nuclear power engineering and fissile materials are under the jurisdiction of the Russian Federation. But there is no federal law with detailed directions for radioactive waste (RW) management, which thus comes under the Federal law ''On Use of Atomic Energy''. This law defines the legal basis and principles of regulating the relations occurring during RW management and sets some general requirements. RW management safety is regulated by the federal norms and rules (1) Radiation Safety Norms (NRB-96), Basic Sanitary Rules (OSP-72, 87) and (3) Sanitary Rules for RW Management (SPORO-85), etc. A number of normative documents on RW management will be put in force in 1999. For work in the field of RW management, licence must in general be obtained from Gozatomnazdor of Russia. The conditions for receiving a license for the management of RW from vessels are presented

  3. Role of Laws and Regulations For Nuclear Energy Installation in Developing Safety Measures Against Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, A.Z.; Zakaria, Kh.M.

    2011-01-01

    The energy industry has been considered as an economic development driver. The fundamental safety policy for nuclear facilities is to protect health and safety of the public and the site personnel against undue risks associated with radiation and radioactive materials resulting from normal operation and abnormal conditions. This policy is implemented, based on the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle for normal operation and the defense-in-depth principle (prevention of the occurrence of anomalies, prevention of the escalation of anomalies into accidents, and prevention of excessive release of radioactive materials into the environment), through establishment of safety guides and standards. More over the consideration of suitable site selection and safety design, verification by safety evaluation, quality assurance for manufacturing, construction and operation, periodic testing and inspection, confirmation by regulatory bodies, and reflection of experienced troubles to safety countermeasures. Are of these paramount importance concepts are applied variety of nuclear facilities, which is, nuclear reactors, uranium enrichment plants, fuel conversion/fabrication plants, reprocessing plants, radioactive waste management facilities, and so on, considering unique features of each facility.

  4. An Examination of Commercial Motor Vehicle Hours of Service Safety Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    2002; Min 2009b); and attitudes (Douglas & Swartz 2009). Thus, HOS may have different results than other safety regulations because it is not...Morrow 2002; Min 2009b); and attitudes (Douglas & Swartz 2009). This dissertation research incorporates this previous research and builds upon it by...of driving or duty hours in a given period. Unlike the permanent obsolescence of milk , which the U.S. Federal Drug Administration (FDA) prohibits

  5. Safety of and regulations for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Report of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    In order to compile information on the nature of the safety concerns and current status of the regulations concerning nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Member States, an IAEA Technical Committee meeting on this topic was convened from 8 to 12 May 2000 in Vienna. The present publication contains the results of this meeting. The contributions of the participants in Annex 3 exemplify the work done in some Member States to develop an adequate regulatory framework to oversee the safe operation of these facilities

  6. SAFETY ASSESSMENT AND LIABILITY REGULATIONS IN THE CONTEXT OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD IN THE BRICS COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. K. Balashanmugam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available International trade of food products is expected to increase rapidly with the widespread introduction of genetically modified (GM food. There will be greater participation of developing countries based on investment as well as research and development. Investment in research and development and commercial production of GM crops is high in Asia, particularly in India and China, but also in Latin American countries, such as Brazil, and on the African continent, especially in South Africa. Despite the merits, the introduction of GM foods in the world market has continued to raise public concerns touching upon health, legal, social, ethical and environmental issues. Especially, the issue of contamination is considered asignificant threat at many stages of development of GM food. Transboundary aspects and certain aspects of the components of the food safety system such as safety assessment, liability and redress are still not completely addressed. The present study is the systematic review of the extent of the development of legislation and institutional mechanisms in relation to safety assessment and liability mechanisms for regulating the emerging GM foods in the developing countries of BRICS. Additionally, the comparison of the components of national food safety systems of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa reveals differences in policy and regulation in relation to GM food.

  7. Science and regulation 50 years hand in hand in radiation safety work in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksonen, Jukka; Mustonen, Raimo; Ikaheimonen, Tarja

    2008-01-01

    The first predecessor of the present Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of Finland (STUK) was founded in 1958 to regulate the use of radiation and to study artificial radiation in the environment. In those days radiation was used only in medical and industrial applications and there were also first indications that atmospheric nuclear tests might cause significant exposure to radiation, especially in the Northern Finland. Focusing activities of the new Institute of Radiation Physics, as STUK was called in those days, to these two activities laid foundation for the operations culture where regulators and scientists work together to achieve the optimum level of safety. Since those early days STUK has continued this operations model and developed it to include also other activities. Today STUK is the national regulatory body for both radiation protection and nuclear safety, but at the same time it is a research organisation and an expert body, supporting for instance the national emergency preparedness for nuclear and radiation accidents. This has brought great synergy benefits and given STUK an opportunity to use the limited national resources in the most effective way. This paper describes the main functions of STUK in its fifty years' operation and highlights the arguments favouring to keep regulatory and research activities as close to each other as possible. In today's world nuclear safety, radiation protection, and radiological preparedness and security issues are so closely connected with each other that organisations dealing with them should have comprehensive knowledge about all of them. (author)

  8. Investigation and consideration on the framework of oversight-based safety regulation. U.S. NRC 'Risk-Informed, Performance-Based' Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Gen

    2001-01-01

    Regulation on safety, environment and health in Japan has before today been intended to correspond with an accident at forms of reinforcement of national standards and monitoring, if any. However, as it was thought that such regulation reinforcement was afraid to bring some social rigidity, and to weaken independent responsibility, as a result, because of anxiety of losing peoples' merits inversely, some fundamental directivity such as respect of self-responsibility principle' and 'necessary and least limit of regulation' were selected as a part of political innovation. On the other hand, at a background of wide improvements on various indexing values showing operation results of nuclear power stations in U.S.A., private independent effort on upgrading of safety is told to largely affect at beginning of INPO (Institute of Nuclear Power Operations), without regulation reinforcement of NRC side. This is a proof of concrete effect of transfer to oversight-based safety regulation. Here were introduced on nuclear safety in U.S.A. at a base of some references obtained on entering the 'MIT summer specialist program. Nuclear system safety', on focussing at new safety regulation of NRC and its effect and so on, and adding some considerations based on some knowledge thereafter. (G.K.)

  9. Trends in pharmacy staff’s perception of patient safety in Swedish community pharmacies after re-regulation of conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia; Nordén-Hägg, Annika

    2014-01-01

    pharmacies prior to and after the 2009 changes in regulation of the Swedish community pharmacy market. Methods: Questionnaires targeted at pharmacy staff before and after the changes in regulation (in 2008, 2011/12, and 2012/13 respectively) used four identical items, making comparisons of some aspects......Background: All changes in the regulation of pharmacies have an impact on the work carried out in pharmacies and also on patient safety, regardless of whether this is the intention or not. Objective: To compare staff apprehension regarding some aspects of patient safety and quality in community......, in order to counteract conceivable decline in factors including patient safety and working conditions....

  10. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Plagge, C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

    Fire Safety – Essential for a particle detector The CMS detector is a marvel of high technology, one of the most precise particle measurement devices we have built until now. Of course it has to be protected from external and internal incidents like the ones that can occur from fires. Due to the fire load, the permanent availability of oxygen and the presence of various ignition sources mostly based on electricity this has to be addressed. Starting from the beam pipe towards the magnet coil, the detector is protected by flooding it with pure gaseous nitrogen during operation. The outer shell of CMS, namely the yoke and the muon chambers are then covered by an emergency inertion system also based on nitrogen. To ensure maximum fire safety, all materials used comply with the CERN regulations IS 23 and IS 41 with only a few exceptions. Every piece of the 30-tonne polyethylene shielding is high-density material, borated, boxed within steel and coated with intumescent (a paint that creates a thick co...

  11. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice in 1997 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Nuclear safety; (2) Industrial and health safety; (3) Radiation safety; and Fire protection

  12. Integrating environmental management into food safety and food packaging in Malaysia: review of the food regulation 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, N. H.; Hara, H.; Kaida, N.

    2017-05-01

    Food safety is an important issue that is related to public safety to prevent the toxicity threats of the food. Management through legal approach has been used in Malaysia as one of the predominant approaches to manage the environment. In this regard, the Food Regulation 1985 has been one of the mechanisms of environmental management through legal approach in controlling the safety of packaged food in food packaging industry in Malaysia. The present study aims to analyse and to explain the implementation of the Food Regulation 1985 in controlling the safety of packaged food in Malaysia and to integrate the concept of environmental management into the food safety issue. Qualitative analysis on the regulation document revealed that there are two main themes, general and specific, while their seven sub themes are included harmful packages, safety packages, reuse packages, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), alcoholic bottle, toys, money and others and iron powder. The implementation of the Food Regulation 1985 in controlling the safety of packaged food should not be regarded solely for regulation purposes but should be further developed for a broader sense of food safety from overcoming the food poisoning.

  13. For improvements of issues behind food safety regulations implemented following the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Ogino, Haruyuki

    2011-01-01

    The great quake and a subsequent tsunami seriously damaged the Fukushima nuclear power plants on 11 March 2011, followed by radionuclide releases outside the crippled reactors. Regulatory limits stipulated as 'provisional regulation values' were set to minimize internal exposure via ingestion of contaminated food and drink. Tap water, raw milk, vegetables, seafood and tea exceeded the limit, and distribution and/or consumption of these stuffs were temporality restricted. It took 7 and 11 days to set the provisional regulation values and to order the first restriction after the declaration of nuclear emergency situations, respectively. All restrictions began within 25 days after the first excess in each item, but the commencement of restrictions was concomitant with the social dislocations. All restrictions for tap water were withdrawn within 51 days, but restrictions for food have yet to be lifted. Among all items, maximum levels were detected in leafy vegetables (54,100 Bq/kg of 131 I, 82,000 Bq/kg of 134 Cs and 137 Cs). Most provisional regulation values were adopted from the preexisting 'index values'. Index values were logically designed and practically convenient. However, food and radionuclides were not comprehensively covered, and the same value was given to emergency and existing exposure situations. Also, different provisional regulation values were set for infants and others. In this respect, we here propose the concept of the 'graded triphasic reference level system' to optimize food safety regulations in early, intermediate and late phases following the accident, where each example phase-specific reference level value is provided. This paper focuses on the logic and issues behind such food safety regulations. The food monitoring data of 24,685 samples and the enforced restrictions shall also be outlined predicated on the information available as of 12 June 2011. (author)

  14. The sociocultural perspective applied to mobility and road safety: a case study through social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Parra Contreras

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the sociocultural paradigm as a theoretical framework to address mobility and road safety from the social sciences. This approach includes analysis of issues such as the uses and attributes of the car, cultural and social values associated with it, and the implications in processes in structuring and social exclusion. In order to this, we present a case study on alcohol and drugs and driving where we show the demographic, economic and occupational characteristics that mediate the different relation of the people with the car, but also their cultural characteristics, lifestyles and leisure. The research design combines data from a brief online survey with qualitative data such as tastes and preferences, from the social network Facebook. The analysis shows that there are groups of drivers who differ in their patterns of no dissociation in their consumption of alcohol / drugs and driving in terms of classical structural variables and lifestyles that are  reflected in their Facebook likes. The discussion and conclusions examine the need to analyze the social context in which road accident occurs and its usefulness in the design of awareness campaigns and intervention in road safety.

  15. Applying the Toyota Production System: using a patient safety alert system to reduce error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Cathie; Caplan, Robert

    2007-07-01

    In 2002, Virginia Mason Medical Center (VMMC) adapted the Toyota Production System, also known as lean manufacturing. To translate the techniques of zero defects and stopping the line into health care, the Patient Safety Alert (PSA) system requires any employee who encounters a situation that is likely to harm a patient to make an immediate report and to cease any activity that could cause further harm (stopping the line). IMPLEMENTING THE PSA SYSTEM--STOPPING THE LINE: If any VMMC employee's practice or conduct is deemed capable of causing harm to a patient, a PSA can cause that person to be stopped from working until the problem is resolved. A policy statement, senior executive commitment, dedicated resources, a 24-hour hotline, and communication were all key features of implementation. As of December 2006, 6,112 PSA reports were received: 20% from managers, 8% from physicians, 44% from nurses, and 23% from nonclinical support personnel, for example. The number of reports received per month increased from an average of 3 in 2002 to 285 in 2006. Most reports were processed within 24 hours and were resolved within 2 to 3 weeks. Implementing the PSA system has drastically increased the number of safety concerns that are resolved at VMMC, while drastically reducing the time it takes to resolve them. Transparent discussion and feedback have helped promote staff acceptance and participation.

  16. Proactive Safety Management in Trauma Care: Applying the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Tara N; Cabrera, Jennifer S; Litzinger, Tracy L; Captain, Kevin A; Fabian, Michael A; Miles, Steven G; Reeves, Scott T; Shappell, Scott A; Boquet, Albert J

    2017-06-30

    This article examines the reliability of the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) for classifying observational human factors data collected prospectively in a trauma resuscitation center. Three trained human factors analysts individually categorized 1,137 workflow disruptions identified in a previously collected data set involving 65 observed trauma care cases using the HFACS framework. Results revealed that the framework was substantially reliable overall (κ = 0.680); agreement increased when only the preconditions for unsafe acts were investigated (κ = 0.757). Findings of the analysis also revealed that the preconditions for unsafe acts category was most highly populated (91.95%), consisting mainly of failures involving communication, coordination, and planning. This study helps validate the use of HFACS as a tool for classifying observational data in a variety of medical domains. By identifying preconditions for unsafe acts, health care professionals may be able to construct a more robust safety management system that may provide a better understanding of the types of threats that can impact patient safety.

  17. SAFETY

    CERN Multimedia

    C. Schaefer and N. Dupont

    2013-01-01

      “Safety is the highest priority”: this statement from CERN is endorsed by the CMS management. An interpretation of this statement may bring you to the conclusion that you should stop working in order to avoid risks. If the safety is the priority, work is not! This would be a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. One should understand that “working safely” or “operating safely” is the priority at CERN. CERN personnel are exposed to different hazards on many levels on a daily basis. However, risk analyses and assessments are done in order to limit the number and the gravity of accidents. For example, this process takes place each time you cross the road. The hazard is the moving vehicle, the stake is you and the risk might be the risk of collision between both. The same principle has to be applied during our daily work. In particular, keeping in mind the general principles of prevention defined in the late 1980s. These principles wer...

  18. 76 FR 25576 - Pipeline Safety: Applying Safety Regulations to All Rural Onshore Hazardous Liquid Low-Stress Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... commercial area, such as a subdivision, a business or shopping center, or community development. The PIPES... was posted on the PHMSA OPS Online Data Entry Web site (ODES). An e-mail announcing the survey was... potentially affected pipeline operators was collected from a compilation of Dun & Bradstreet data, online...

  19. New Safety rules

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Commission

    2008-01-01

    The revision of CERN Safety rules is in progress and the following new Safety rules have been issued on 15-04-2008: Safety Procedure SP-R1 Establishing, Updating and Publishing CERN Safety rules: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/SP-R1.htm; Safety Regulation SR-S Smoking at CERN: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/SR-S.htm; Safety Regulation SR-M Mechanical Equipment: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/SR-M.htm; General Safety Instruction GSI-M1 Standard Lifting Equipment: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/GSI-M1.htm; General Safety Instruction GSI-M2 Standard Pressure Equipment: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/GSI-M2.htm; General Safety Instruction GSI-M3 Special Mechanical Equipment: http://cern.ch/safety-rules/GSI-M3.htm. These documents apply to all persons under the Director General’s authority. All Safety rules are available at the web page: http://www.cern.ch/safety-rules The Safety Commission

  20. Bases of updating of nuclear safety regulations for NPP in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, Lucian; Serbanescu, Dan

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the basic principles of reviewing and updating process of the regulatory environment pyramid. The main part of this review process refers to Cernavoda NPP Unit 2. However, there is an important impact on Cernavoda NPP Unit 1. The basic principles were defined in 1993/1994 when the licensing process for Unit 1 was resumed in order to be in accordance with the latest developments of Candu 600 worldwide and with the IAEA and NEA latest recommended documents and practices. After the licensing process for the Unit 1 was completed up to operation stage, CNCAN developed new updated regulations on nuclear safety and the regulatory pyramid in the framework of the RAMG PHARE project. CNCAN issued in 1996 the regulatory Policy for Unit 2, self-sustained and independent of future possible revisions of the regulations. The use of the concept of hierarchical systems, systematic review of safety criteria and objectives and margins along with the feedback from international and national experience on this topic ensured issuance of a reference document for future approach of nuclear safety in Romania. (authors)

  1. Methodology applied in Cuba for siting, designing, and building a radioactive waste repository under safety conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orbera, L.; Peralta, J.L.; Franklin, R.; Gil, R.; Chales, G.; Rodriguez, A.

    1993-01-01

    The work presents the methodology used in Cuba for siting, designing, and building a radioactive waste repository safely. This methodology covers both the technical and socio-economic factors, as well as those of design and construction so as to have a safe siting for this kind of repository under Cuba especial condition. Applying this methodology will results in a safe repository

  2. Applying toxicological risk assessment principles to constituents of smokeless tobacco products: implications for product regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayo-Yusuf, Olalekan A; Connolly, Greg N

    2011-01-01

    To determine how information on chemical constituents of different smokeless tobacco products (STPs) may be used in cancer risk assessment for regulatory purposes. This study investigated select STP constituents potentially associated with significant cancer risk by applying a known toxicological risk assessment framework. Cancer risk estimates were obtained for selected constituents of STPs and a medicinal nicotine gum formulation with comparable toxicity information and also median concentration data on the GothiaTek analytes. The calculated cancer risk was considered 'unacceptable' if it exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA's) benchmark of an 'acceptable' cancer risk of 10E-6. The cancer risk estimates derived from daily use of 10 g of STPs meeting the industry-set GothiaTek limits exceed the levels generally considered 'acceptable' by the USEPA at least 8000 times. Except for the medicinal nicotine tested, all the STP types, including the relatively lower tobacco specific nitrosamine (TSNA)-containing snus, were found to carry an 'unacceptable' cancer risk. The calculated cancer risks associated with the snus and the US moist snuff products were, respectively, at least 1000 times and 6000 times greater than the minimum acceptable. TSNA and cadmium are associated with the largest estimated cancer risks for all the STPs evaluated. This study's findings provide an empirical risk assessment that could guide STP regulation using an existing toxicological assessment framework. The study findings question the scientific rationale of the industry-set standards and highlight the need for regulatory actions to reduce specific toxicants in all STPs.

  3. Harmonization of legislation and regulations to achieve food safety: US and Canada perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, Larry; Nicholson-Keener, Sophia M; Koutchma, Tatiana

    2014-08-01

    Trade in food and food ingredients among the nations of the world is rapidly expanding and, with this expansion, new supply chain partners, from globally disparate geographic regions, are being enrolled. Food and food ingredients are progressively sourced more from lesser developed nations. Food safety incidents in the USA and Canada show a high unfavorable correlation between illness outbreaks and imported foods. In the USA, for example, foodborne disease outbreaks caused by imported food appeared to rise in 2009 and 2010, and nearly half of the outbreaks, associated with imported food, implicated foods imported from areas which previously had not been associated with outbreaks. Projecting supply chains into new geographical regions raises serious questions about the capacity of the new supply chain partners to provide the requisite regulatory framework and sufficiently robust public health measures for ensuring the safety of the foods and foodstuffs offered for international trade. The laws, regulation and legislation among the many nations participating in the global food trade are, at best, inconsistent. These inconsistencies frequently give rise to trade disputes and cause large quantities of food to be at risk of destruction on the often dubious pretext that they are not safe. Food safety is often viewed through a political or normative lens. Often as not, this lens has been wrought absent scientific precision. Harmonization of food safety legislation around sound scientific principles, as advocated by the US Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), would ultimately promote trade and likely provide for incremental improvement in public health. Among the priority roles of most national governments are the advancement of commerce and trade, preservation of public health and ensuring domestic tranquility. Achieving these priorities is fundamental to creating and preserving the wealth of nations. Countries such as the Netherlands, Canada, Germany, Japan and the USA

  4. The elements of nuclear safety applied to the construction of the IRE buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekers, J.; Raikem, C. de

    1976-01-01

    The techniques used for the construction of the IRE complex, the initial option which had to be chosen, and the health physics standards in force, have led in a natural way to the definition and elaboration of the nuclear safety principles for these installations. The gaseous and liquid effluents, the solid waste, the access and circulation of personnel and materials, the particular protection means and the equipments have been subjected to a particular attention. Consequently it has been necessary to involve the authorized health physics control body in charge of IRE, in the conception, the studies, and in the realisation. A common view among the persons in charge of Health Physics, the users and the contractors, was essential for a rational conception, for efficient use of the suitable exploitation methods. (author)

  5. Geographically weighted negative binomial regression applied to zonal level safety performance models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marcos José Timbó Lima; Cunto, Flávio; da Silva, Alan Ricardo

    2017-09-01

    Generalized Linear Models (GLM) with negative binomial distribution for errors, have been widely used to estimate safety at the level of transportation planning. The limited ability of this technique to take spatial effects into account can be overcome through the use of local models from spatial regression techniques, such as Geographically Weighted Poisson Regression (GWPR). Although GWPR is a system that deals with spatial dependency and heterogeneity and has already been used in some road safety studies at the planning level, it fails to account for the possible overdispersion that can be found in the observations on road-traffic crashes. Two approaches were adopted for the Geographically Weighted Negative Binomial Regression (GWNBR) model to allow discrete data to be modeled in a non-stationary form and to take note of the overdispersion of the data: the first examines the constant overdispersion for all the traffic zones and the second includes the variable for each spatial unit. This research conducts a comparative analysis between non-spatial global crash prediction models and spatial local GWPR and GWNBR at the level of traffic zones in Fortaleza/Brazil. A geographic database of 126 traffic zones was compiled from the available data on exposure, network characteristics, socioeconomic factors and land use. The models were calibrated by using the frequency of injury crashes as a dependent variable and the results showed that GWPR and GWNBR achieved a better performance than GLM for the average residuals and likelihood as well as reducing the spatial autocorrelation of the residuals, and the GWNBR model was more able to capture the spatial heterogeneity of the crash frequency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Global harmonization of food safety regulation from the perspective of Korea and a novel fast automatic product recall system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Mun-Gi; Oh, Sangsuk

    2014-08-01

    Efforts have been made for global harmonization of food safety regulations among countries through international organizations such as WTO and WHO/FAO. Global harmonization of food safety regulations is becoming increasingly important for Korean consumers because more than half of food and agricultural products are imported and consumed. Through recent reorganization of the Korean government, a consolidated national food safety authority-the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS)-has been established for more efficient food safety control and better communication with consumers. The Automatic Sales Blocking System (ASBS), which blocks the sales of the recalled food products at the point of sale, has been implemented at over 40,000 retail food stores around the nation using state-of-the art information and communication technology (ICT) for faster recall of adulterated food products, and the e-Food Safety Control System has been developed for more efficient monitoring of national food safety surveillance situations. The National Food Safety Information Service was also established for monitoring and collecting food safety information and incidents worldwide, and shares relevant information with all stakeholders. The new approaches adopted by the Korean Food Safety Authority are expected to enhance public trust with regard to food safety issues and expedite the recall process of adulterated products from the market. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Safety and regulation of yeasts used for biocontrol or biopreservation in the food or feed chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundh, Ingvar; Melin, Petter

    2011-01-01

    Yeasts have been important components of spontaneous fermentations in food and beverage processing for millennia. More recently, the potential of utilising antagonistic yeasts, e.g. Pichia anomala and Candida spp., for post-harvest biological control of spoilage fungi during storage of plant-derived produce ('biopreservation') has been clearly demonstrated. Although some yeast species are among the safest microorganisms known, several have been reported in opportunistic infections in humans, including P. anomala and bakers' yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. More research is needed about the dominant pathogenicity and virulence factors in opportunistic yeasts, and whether increased utilisation of biopreservative yeasts in general could contribute to an increased prevalence of yeast infections. The regulatory situation for yeasts used in post-harvest biocontrol is complex and the few products that have reached the market are mainly registered as biological pesticides. The qualified presumption of safety (QPS) approach to safety assessments of microorganisms intentionally added to food or feed, recently launched by the European Food Safety Authority, can lead to more efficient evaluations of new products containing microbial species with a sufficient body of knowledge or long-term experience on their safety. P. anomala is one of several yeast species that have been given QPS status, although the status is restricted to use of this yeast for enzyme and metabolite production purposes. With regard to authorisation of new biopreservative yeasts, we recommend that the possibility to regulate microorganisms for food biopreservation as food additives be considered.

  8. After the Fukushima Daiichi Accident, Extending the Human and Organizational Factors (HOF) Framework to Safety Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanton, O.; Mangeon, M.; Jeffroy, F.

    2016-01-01

    The accident of Fukushima-Daichi is regarded as a product of multiple failures of the nuclear risks regulation system in Japan and more particularly as a failure of the regulatory system (authorities, regulator and operator) to take into account seismic risks and flood risks caused by tsunamis. This statement conducted the French institute for radiological protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) to develop a research program dedicated to the study of the way the French nuclear regulatory system developed and addresses flood risks. A regulatory system rests upon a number of institutional and organizational devices and upon normative tools, such as technical standards or guidelines. The aim of these normative tools is to guide NPP operators during both stages of risks identification and characterisation and of the design of protections against risks. These instruments have profound and multiple effects on the stakeholders involved. They affect the design of nuclear facilities, significantly influence the safety demonstration of a plant, but also the manner in which the actions implemented by the operator are evaluated and their reality controlled by the regulator.

  9. Regulation and safety implementation of nanotechnology for chemical enterprises in the Central Europe Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, A; Hartl, S; Sinner, F

    2013-01-01

    As result of the gradually increasing nanotechnology sector there is the necessity of a contemporary analysis of the present regulations used for nanomaterials, to outline the current situation of the nanotechnology sector, to promote international cooperation and research's coordination to overcome disciplinary boundaries, to fill the gap between more and less experienced regions and to turn investments in R and D in industrial innovations. The general objective of the Central Europe project NANOFORCE, which is developed by national and regional chemistry associations and R and D Centres of the Central Europe area, is to foster the innovative nanotechnology-sector networks across Central Europe regions by bringing together public and private organizations to carry out collaborative and interdisciplinary researches on nanomaterials (in the frame of REACH Regulation) and to turn the most promising laboratory results into innovative industrial applications. To build up a legal advisory board for chemical enterprises starting in nanotechnology, a state of the art report on existing safety procedures and nanotech related regulations was produced to give an overview on currently available regulations used by chemical industries and manufacturing companies within the European region to secure their products. The main emphasis was placed on REACH regulation to search for relevant sections concentrating on nanomaterials which are applicable for nanotechnology. In addition, all relevant directives and amendments of REACH were screened with regard to identify gaps where action is still needed and give possible recommendations for the European Commission. Beyond literature research a questionnaire for producers, users, researchers and financiers was developed with the goal to collect information about the nanotechnology sector in the CE region concerning development, financial status, and international cooperation within joint ventures, safety and nanotoxicology.

  10. Regulation and safety implementation of nanotechnology for chemical enterprises in the Central Europe Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, A.; Hartl, S.; Sinner, F.

    2013-04-01

    As result of the gradually increasing nanotechnology sector there is the necessity of a contemporary analysis of the present regulations used for nanomaterials, to outline the current situation of the nanotechnology sector, to promote international cooperation and research's coordination to overcome disciplinary boundaries, to fill the gap between more and less experienced regions and to turn investments in R&D in industrial innovations. The general objective of the Central Europe project NANOFORCE, which is developed by national and regional chemistry associations and R&D Centres of the Central Europe area, is to foster the innovative nanotechnology-sector networks across Central Europe regions by bringing together public and private organizations to carry out collaborative and interdisciplinary researches on nanomaterials (in the frame of REACH Regulation) and to turn the most promising laboratory results into innovative industrial applications. To build up a legal advisory board for chemical enterprises starting in nanotechnology, a state of the art report on existing safety procedures and nanotech related regulations was produced to give an overview on currently available regulations used by chemical industries and manufacturing companies within the European region to secure their products. The main emphasis was placed on REACH regulation to search for relevant sections concentrating on nanomaterials which are applicable for nanotechnology. In addition, all relevant directives and amendments of REACH were screened with regard to identify gaps where action is still needed and give possible recommendations for the European Commission. Beyond literature research a questionnaire for producers, users, researchers and financiers was developed with the goal to collect information about the nanotechnology sector in the CE region concerning development, financial status, and international cooperation within joint ventures, safety and nanotoxicology.

  11. Learning from disasters to improve patient safety: applying the generic disaster pathway to health system errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglia, Joanne F; Hughes, Clifford; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    In a previous paper we developed a generic disaster pathway model drawing from disaster inquiries in the space, shipping, aviation, mining, rail and nuclear industries. To test our hypothesis that our generic disaster model can be applied to healthcare errors, we ustilised three exemplar cases featuring different types and sources of errors. We found that it is possible to apply our generic disaster pathway to healthcare errors, and to identify the combination of human, organisational and design risk factors which contribute to the severity and speed at which errors occur. We conclude that error pathways provide a useful tool from which healthcare services can learn to appreciate and potentially circumvent or ameliorate errors, prior to their reaching the no-return threshold.

  12. 76 FR 69613 - Special Local Regulations and Safety Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port New York Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... Harbor Safety Launch site: A barge Zone. located in approximate position 40[deg]51'58'' N 073[deg]39'34...] RIN 1625-AA00; 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations and Safety Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port New York Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is...

  13. The role and use of risk management as applied to the safety of Seven Mile Dam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, C. W.; Barkwer, M. B.

    1997-01-01

    Risk assessment is defined and aspects of risk management as applied during the deficiency investigation of the Seven Mile Dam in southern British Columbia, were discussed. The technique to integrate the seismic hazard curve and the fragility curve to obtain the annual frequency of failure under seismic loading was described, and the manner in which the information gained confirmed the need for further detailed seismic hazard and structural analysis of the dam, was illustrated.5 refs., 3 figs

  14. Safeguarding of installations, industrial safety regulations, and labour-management relations in Atomic Energy Law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herkommer, E.; Wollenschlaeger, M.

    1982-10-01

    The contribution first deals with the legal provisions governing physical protection against sabotage and other unauthorized activities, as required by the Atomic Energy Law and the Radiation Protection Ordinance. In order to obtain a more precise explanation of the concept of ''physical protection'', catalogues of recommended physical protection measures and strategies, issued by the Conference of the Home Secretaries of the Laender or by the Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit, (GRS), are referred to. Also, the recommendations published by the IAEA in INFCIRC 225 are mentioned. In the second part, the legal provisions governing occupational safety in the FRG are reviewed, especially regulations concerning the prevention of accidents and protection from the hazards of ionizing radiation. Examples are given to explain situations in practice where the interests of occupational safety (radiation protection) and physical protection may not be easy to reconcile.

  15. Safety regulations of food and water implemented in the first year following the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Ogino, Haruyuki; Fujimichi, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    An earthquake and tsunami of historic proportions caused massive damage across the northeastern coast of Japan on the afternoon of 11 March 2011, and the release of radionuclides from the stricken reactors of the Fukushima nuclear power plant 1 was detected early on the next morning. High levels of radioiodines and radiocesiums were detected in the topsoil and plants on 15 March 2011, so sampling of food and water for monitoring surveys began on 16 March 2011. On 17 March 2011, provisional regulation values for radioiodine, radiocesiums, uranium, plutonium and other transuranic α emitters were set to regulate the safety of radioactively contaminated food and water. On 21 March 2011, the first restrictions on distribution and consumption of contaminated items were ordered. So far, tap water, raw milk, vegetables, mushrooms, fruit, nut, seaweeds, marine invertebrates, coastal fish, freshwater fish, beef, wild animal meat, brown rice, wheat, tea leaves and other foodstuffs had been contaminated above the provisional regulation values. The provisional regulation values for radioiodine were exceeded in samples taken from 16 March 2011 to 21 May 2011, and those for radiocesiums from 18 March 2011 to date. All restrictions were imposed within 318 days after the provisional regulation values were first exceeded for each item. This paper summarizes the policy for the execution of monitoring surveys and restrictions, and the outlines of the monitoring results of 220 411 samples and the enforced restrictions predicated on the information available as of 31 March 2012. PMID:22843368

  16. Barriers to Construction Health and Safety Self-regulation: A Scoping Case of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umeokafor Nnedinma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This scoping study builds on the recent uncovering that in terms of health and safety (H&S, the Nigerian construction industry is self-regulated in various forms, not unregulated and that the size of company can further explain H&S self-regulation. Consequently, the barriers identified through literature review were assessed using questionnaires. Analysis of the data collected from construction practitioners in Nigeria shows that ‘economic factors’ mostly explains the barriers to construction H&S self-regulation. This is followed by the ‘ability to self-regulate’ and ‘lack of awareness’. Furthermore, the results show significant differences among small, medium and large construction contractors on seven factors of which include ‘normative case’ factors, ‘H&S is a duty’, ‘H&S is the right thing’ and ‘unfair H&S standards or legislation’. Although a scoping study, the study draws attention to the barriers to construction H&S self-regulation in Nigeria and demonstrates an alternative to state regulation of H&S.

  17. Safety regulations of food and water implemented in the first year following the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Ogino, Haruyuki; Fujimichi, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    An earthquake and tsunami of historic proportions caused massive damage across the northeastern coast of Japan on the afternoon of 11 March 2011, and the release of radionuclides from the stricken reactors of the Fukushima nuclear power plant 1 was detected early on the next morning. High levels of radioiodines and radiocesiums were detected in the topsoil and plants on 15 March 2011, so sampling of food and water for monitoring surveys began on 16 March 2011. On 17 March 2011, provisional regulation values for radioiodine, radiocesiums, uranium, plutonium and other transuranic α emitters were set to regulate the safety of radioactively contaminated food and water. On 21 March 2011, the first restrictions on distribution and consumption of contaminated items were ordered. So far, tap water, raw milk, vegetables, mushrooms, fruit, nut, seaweeds, marine invertebrates, coastal fish, freshwater fish, beef, wild animal meat, brown rice, wheat, tea leaves and other foodstuffs had been contaminated above the provisional regulation values. The provisional regulation values for radioiodine were exceeded in samples taken from 16 March 2011 to 21 May 2011, and those for radiocesiums from 18 March 2011 to date. All restrictions were imposed within 318 days after the provisional regulation values were first exceeded for each item. This paper summarizes the policy for the execution of monitoring surveys and restrictions, and the outlines of the monitoring results of 220 411 samples and the enforced restrictions predicated on the information available as of 31 March 2012. (author)

  18. Food safety regulations: what we learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Ogino, Haruyuki

    2012-01-01

    On 11 March 2011, the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and a substantial tsunami struck off the northeast coast of Japan. The Fukushima nuclear power plants were inundated and stricken, followed by radionuclide releases outside the crippled reactors. Provisional regulation values for radioactivity in food and drink were set on 17 March and were adopted from the preset index values, except that for radioiodines in water and milk ingested by infants. For radiocesiums, uranium, plutonium and transuranic α emitters, index values were defined in all food and drink not to exceed a committed effective dose of 5 mSv/year. Index values for radioiodines were defined not to exceed a committed equivalent dose to the thyroid of 50 mSv/year, and set in water, milk and some vegetables, but not in other foodstuffs. Index values were calculated as radioactive concentrations of indicator radionuclides ( 131 I for radioiodines, 134 Cs and 137 Cs for radiocesiums) by postulating the relative radioactive concentration of coexisting radionuclides (e.g., 132 I, 133 I, 134 I, 135 I and 132 Te for 131 I). Surveys were thence conducted to monitor levels of 131 I, 134 Cs and 137 Cs. Provisional regulation values were exceeded in tap water, raw milk and some vegetables, and restrictions on distribution and consumption began on 21 March. Fish contaminated with radioiodines at levels of concern were then detected, so that the provisional regulation value for radioiodines in seafood adopted from that in vegetables were additionally set on 5 April. Overall, restrictions started within 25 days after the first excess in each food or drink item, and maximum levels were detected in leafy vegetables (54,100 Bq/kg for 131 I, and a total of 82,000 Bq/kg for 134 Cs and 137 Cs). This paper focuses on the logic behind such food safety regulations, and discusses its underlying issues. The outlines of the food monitoring results for 24,685 samples and the enforced restrictions will also be described. - Highlights

  19. The safety regulation of small-scale coal mines in China: Analysing the interests and influences of stakeholders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Xiaoqian; Mu, Xiaoyi

    2013-01-01

    Small scale coal mines (SCMs) have played an important role in China’s energy supply. At the same time, they also suffer from many social, economic, environmental, and safety problems. The Chinese government has made considerable efforts to strengthen the safety regulation of the coal mining industry. Yet, few of these efforts have proven to be very effective. This paper analyzes the interests and influences of key stakeholders in the safety regulation of SCMs, which includes the safety regulator, the local government, the mine owner, and mineworkers. We argue that the effective regulation of coal mine safety must both engage and empower mineworkers. - Highlights: ► Small scale coal mines have played an important role in China's energy supply. ► We analyze the interests and influences of key stakeholders in the safety regulation of small coal mines. ► The mineworkers have the strongest interest but least influence. ► An effective regulation must engage the mineworkers, organize, and empower them.

  20. 36 CFR 3.2 - Do other boating laws and regulations apply to me when I operate my boat on park waters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... regulations apply to me when I operate my boat on park waters? 3.2 Section 3.2 Parks, Forests, and Public... boating laws and regulations apply to me when I operate my boat on park waters? (a) In addition to the.... NPS applies the adopted laws and regulations to vessels and their operation on all waters (navigable...

  1. Application of a support vector machine algorithm to the safety precaution technique of medium-low pressure gas regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xuejun; An, Xaioran; Wu, Bo; He, Shaoping

    2018-02-01

    In the gas pipeline system, safe operation of a gas regulator determines the stability of the fuel gas supply, and the medium-low pressure gas regulator of the safety precaution system is not perfect at the present stage in the Beijing Gas Group; therefore, safety precaution technique optimization has important social and economic significance. In this paper, according to the running status of the medium-low pressure gas regulator in the SCADA system, a new method for gas regulator safety precaution based on the support vector machine (SVM) is presented. This method takes the gas regulator outlet pressure data as input variables of the SVM model, the fault categories and degree as output variables, which will effectively enhance the precaution accuracy as well as save significant manpower and material resources.

  2. Safety experts complete second IAEA regulatory review of UK nuclear regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear safety experts today concluded a 10-day mission to peer-review the UK Nuclear Regulator: Health and Safety Executive (HSE), Nuclear Directorate (ND). At the request of the UK Government, the International Atomic Energy Agency assembled a team of ten high-level regulatory experts from eight nations to conduct the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. The mission was the second of three planned IRRS missions for the United Kingdom. The first was held in March 2006 to begin a process to assess the nation's readiness to regulate and license new reactor designs, considered as a result of the Energy Policy review initiated by the British Prime Minister and the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry (DTI) in 2005. The IRRS team leader Mr. William Borchardt, Executive Director of Operations from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, stated, ''The IAEA IRRS serves an important role in both benchmarking against its safety standards and in promoting dialogue between nuclear safety regulators from around the world.'' During the 2nd mission the IRRS the team reviewed HSE/ND progress since the first IRRS mission and recent regulatory developments, the regulation of operating power plants and fuel cycle facilities, the inspection and enforcement programme for nuclear power plants and fuel cycle facilities, and the emergency preparedness and response programme. The IAEA found that HSE/ND has made significant progress toward improving its effectiveness in regulating existing nuclear power plants and in preparing to license new nuclear reactors designs. Many of the findings identified in the 2006 report had been fully addressed and therefore could be considered closed, the others are being addressed in accordance with a comprehensive action plan. IRRS team members visited the Heysham 1 Nuclear Power Plant near Lancaster, the Sellafield site at Cumbria and the Strategic Control Centre at Hutton, and they met senior managers from HSE and a UK

  3. Applying lean methods to improve quality and safety in surgical sterile instrument processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, C Craig; Bishop, Robbi; Luker, Samuel; Williams, Barbara L

    2013-03-01

    Surgical instrument processing is critical to safe, high-quality surgical care but has received little attention in the medical literature. Typical hospitals have inventories in the tens of thousands of surgical instruments organized into thousands of instrument sets. The use of these instruments for multiple procedures per day leads to millions of instrument sets being reprocessed yearly in a single hospital. Errors in the processing of sterile instruments may lead to increased operative times and costs, as well as potentially contributing to surgical infections and perioperative morbidity. At Virginia Mason Medical Center (Seattle), a quality monitoring approach was developed to identify and categorize errors in sterile instrument processing, through use of a daily defect sheet. Lean methods were used to improve the quality of surgical instrument processing through redefining operator roles, alteration of the workspace, mistake-proofing, quality monitoring, staff training, and continuous feedback. To study the effectiveness of the quality improvement project, a before/after comparison of prospectively collected sterile processing error rates during a 37-month time frame was performed. Before the intervention, instrument processing errors occurred in 3.0% of surgical cases, decreasing to 1.5% at the final follow-up (p instrument processing errors are a barrier to the highest quality and safety in surgical care but are amenable to substantial improvement using Lean techniques.

  4. Safety of betaine as a novel food pursuant to Regulation (EC) No 258/97

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjödin, Anders Mikael

    2017-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on betaine as a novel food (NF) pursuant to Regulation (EC) No 258/97. The information provided on the composition, the specifications, the batch......-to-batch variability, stability and production process of the NF is sufficient and does not raise concerns about the safety of the NF. The NF is proposed to be used in foods intended to meet additional requirements for intense muscular effort with a maximum intake of 2.5 g/day of betaine for sports people above 10...

  5. Regulation of toxin production by Bacillus cereus and its food safety implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceuppens, Siele; Rajkovic, Andreja; Heyndrickx, Marc; Tsilia, Varvara; Van De Wiele, Tom; Boon, Nico; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2011-08-01

    Toxin expression is of utmost importance for the food-borne pathogen B. cereus, both in food poisoning and non-gastrointestinal host infections as well as in interbacterial competition. Therefore it is no surprise that the toxin gene expression is tightly regulated by various internal and environmental signals. An overview of the current knowledge regarding emetic and diarrheal toxin transcription and expression is presented in this review. The food safety aspects and management tools such as temperature control, food preservatives and modified atmosphere packaging are discussed specifically for B. cereus emetic and diarrheal toxin production.

  6. Applying hierarchical loglinear models to nonfatal underground coal mine accidents for safety management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onder, Mustafa; Onder, Seyhan; Adiguzel, Erhan

    2014-01-01

    Underground mining is considered to be one of the most dangerous industries and mining remains the most hazardous occupation. Categorical analysis of accident records may present valuable information for preventing accidents. In this study, hierarchical loglinear analysis was applied to occupational injuries that occurred in an underground coal mine. The main factors affecting the accidents were defined as occupation, area, reason, accident time and part of body affected. By considering subfactors of the main factors, multiway contingency tables were prepared and, thus, the probabilities that might affect nonfatal injuries were investigated. At the end of the study, important accident risk factors and job groups with a high probability of being exposed to those risk factors were determined. This article presents important information on decreasing the number accidents in underground coal mines.

  7. Exogenously Applied Plant Growth Regulators Enhance the Morpho-Physiological Growth and Yield of Rice under High Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Ihsan, Zahid; Shah, Adnan N.; Wu, Chao; Yousaf, Muhammad; Nasim, Wajid; Alharby, Hesham; Alghabari, Fahad; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    A two-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR) on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT) and high night temperature (HNT). Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan) were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc), alpha-tocopherol (Ve), brassinosteroids (Br), methyl jasmonates (MeJA) and triazoles (Tr) were applied. High temperature s...

  8. Opinion paper food supplements: the European regulation and its application in France. Thoughts on safety of food supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maixent, J M

    2012-06-30

    The first definition of food supplements in France was established by decree 96-307 of April 10th 1996. In 2002, the European Community adopted a regulation for food supplements (European Directive 2002/46/CE June 10th). This was an important event in the regulation of food supplements. The European regulation was adopted in France, with some modifications, by decree 2006-352 of March 20th 2006. The European Regulation on food supplements is more defined than those for any other food types and is exemplary. The Regulation on addition of vitamins and minerals to food differs from the regulation on the addition of other substances such as amino acids, essential fatty acids, fibers, carbohydrates, various plant, and herbal extracts. While the Regulation includes vitamins and minerals to the positive list of supplements, other substances are included in the negative list of supplements. According to the Regulation, substances added to food supplements must have a nutritional or physiological effect. The increased use of food supplements led to the creation of a department specialized in the safety of food supplement. The safety of food supplements is a permanent concern for sanitary authorities. These authorities have recently combined scientific methodological approaches and a collective expertise to implement and monitor simple and useful rules that insure consumer's safety. Safety laws aim to protect the consumers of food supplements.

  9. Occupational Safety and Health professionals' work ability concept perception, and comprehension of regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Abdulqadir Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) professionals are key players in workplace regulation compliance and promotion of health. To assess OSH professionals' perceptions of the concept of work ability in an attempt to explain the varied, and in some cases failure of, implementation of regulations and policies. An electronic questionnaire sent to approved Occupational Health Services (OHS) in Norway asked several questions, including one on the concept of work ability. Responses from OSH professionals in the OHS serving cleaning companies were analysed for commonalities and dissimilarities, thereby establishing some perception patterns. OSH professionals from 40 OHS included in the study responded with explanations characterized by variations. Some included elaborate aspects in the explanations, others ranged from simple to lacking aspects of explanation compared to an identified benchmark definition. There are significant comprehension disparities in the understanding of the concept of work ability. Correct understanding of the concepts and constructs in a given regulatory framework are tantamount to the proper implementation of the requirements of the regulation provisions. There is a need to streamline and improve the understanding of OSH professionals in order to ensure uniformity of purpose, and hence fulfilment of the vision of the regulation in focus.

  10. Does applying technology throughout the medication use process improve patient safety with antineoplastics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubalo, Joseph; Warden, Bruce A; Wiegel, Joshua J; Nishida, Tess; Handel, Evelyn; Svoboda, Leanne M; Nguyen, Lam; Edillo, P Neil

    2014-12-01

    antineoplastic population, benefit from many other technologies may have to be inferred based on data from other patient populations. As health systems begin to widely adopt and implement new technologies it is important to critically assess their effectiveness in improving patient safety. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. A double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus with improved safety for adenocarcinoma therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Na; Fan, Jun Kai; Gu, Jin Fa; He, Ling Feng; Tang, Wen Hao; Cao, Xin; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Safety and efficiency are equally important to be considered in developing oncolytic adenovirus. Previously, we have reported that ZD55, an oncolytic adenovirus with the deletion of E1B-55K gene, exhibited potent antitumor activity. In this study, to improve the safety of ZD55, we utilized MUC1 promoter to replace the native promoter of E1A on the basis of ZD55, and generated a double-regulated adenovirus, named MUD55. Our data demonstrated that the expression of early and late genes of MUD55 was both reduced in MUC1-negative cells, resulting in its stricter glandular-tumor selective progeny production. The cytopathic effect of MUD55 was about 10-fold lower than mono-regulated adenovirus ZD55 or Ad.MUC1 in normal cells and not obviously attenuated in glandular tumor cells. Moreover, MUD55 showed the least liver toxicity when administrated by intravenous injection in nude mice. These results indicate that MUD55 could be a promising candidate for the treatment of adenocarcinoma.

  12. Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, 2009 ed. Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication establishes the regulations that are applied to the transport of radioactive material by all modes of transport on land, water or in the air, including transport that is incidental to the use of the radioactive material. The objective and scope of the regulations are described in detail as well as the range of their application. The publication provides requirements useful to governments, regulators, operators of nuclear and radiation facilities, carriers, users of radiation sources and cargo handling personnel. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Definitions; 3. General provisions; 4. Activity limits and classification; 5. Requirements and controls for transport; 6. Requirements for radioactive materials and for packagings and packages; 7. Test procedures; 8. Approval and administrative requirements; Annex I: Summary of approval and prior notification requirements; Annex II: Conversion factors and prefixes.

  13. Converting the GSR part3 into a national regulations for the protection and safety of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatim, Abdulrahman

    2016-04-01

    The achievement and maintenance of a high level of Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources depends on a sound legal and governmental infrastructure, including a regulatory body with well-defined responsibilities and functions. The project aimed at converting the IAEA GRS Part 3 into National regulations in Sudan for the protection against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation and safety of radiation sources. The regulations developed covered general requirements for radiation protection, verification of safety, planned exposure situations, emergency exposure situations and existing exposure situation. The Government of Sudan is expected to empower the Sudanese Nuclear Radiological Regulatory Authority (SNRAA) and other relevant authorities to undertake the conversion of IAEA GSR Part 3 into national regulations to be used to regulate all facilities and activities in Sudan. (au)

  14. SAFETY

    CERN Document Server

    Niels Dupont

    2013-01-01

    CERN Safety rules and Radiation Protection at CMS The CERN Safety rules are defined by the Occupational Health & Safety and Environmental Protection Unit (HSE Unit), CERN’s institutional authority and central Safety organ attached to the Director General. In particular the Radiation Protection group (DGS-RP1) ensures that personnel on the CERN sites and the public are protected from potentially harmful effects of ionising radiation linked to CERN activities. The RP Group fulfils its mandate in collaboration with the CERN departments owning or operating sources of ionising radiation and having the responsibility for Radiation Safety of these sources. The specific responsibilities concerning "Radiation Safety" and "Radiation Protection" are delegated as follows: Radiation Safety is the responsibility of every CERN Department owning radiation sources or using radiation sources put at its disposition. These Departments are in charge of implementing the requi...

  15. Applying Web-Based Co-Regulated Learning to Develop Students' Learning and Involvement in a Blended Computing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated, via quasi-experiments, the effects of web-based co-regulated learning (CRL) on developing students' computing skills. Two classes of 68 undergraduates in a one-semester course titled "Applied Information Technology: Data Processing" were chosen for this research. The first class (CRL group, n = 38) received…

  16. Risk regulation in environment, health and safety : Decision in the face of uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ettlinger, L.A. [The Oxford Group, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1999-12-01

    relationship are unlikely to be resolved solely by administrative reform, reliance on experts, or risk education because, generally, these reforms are focused strictly on narrowing the risk uncertainty. From economic principles, however, we recognize that the value of efforts to minimize this risk uncertainty (or to maximize the technical and scientific information about risks) is subject to 'diminishing marginal utility'. Thus, these efforts ultimately can be expected to become unpopular with both citizens and elected officials. We expect, therefore, that the outcome of the risk regulation debate, and ultimately environment, health and safety policy decisions, will primarily be determined by the values of the proponents and opponents as to the relative ranking of efficiency and equity. Most likely, the best means available for reforming risk regulation and making it more coherent and to avoid some of the costly mistakes of the past is to: 1. increase the resources available for identifying risks and effective responses to them, 2. build in mechanisms for informing the public that policy decisions using these regulations are value laden, and 3. publicize both the process and the outcomes of risk regulations and policy decisions.

  17. Risk regulation in environment, health and safety : Decision in the face of uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettlinger, L.A.

    1999-01-01

    unlikely to be resolved solely by administrative reform, reliance on experts, or risk education because, generally, these reforms are focused strictly on narrowing the risk uncertainty. From economic principles, however, we recognize that the value of efforts to minimize this risk uncertainty (or to maximize the technical and scientific information about risks) is subject to 'diminishing marginal utility'. Thus, these efforts ultimately can be expected to become unpopular with both citizens and elected officials. We expect, therefore, that the outcome of the risk regulation debate, and ultimately environment, health and safety policy decisions, will primarily be determined by the values of the proponents and opponents as to the relative ranking of efficiency and equity. Most likely, the best means available for reforming risk regulation and making it more coherent and to avoid some of the costly mistakes of the past is to: 1. increase the resources available for identifying risks and effective responses to them, 2. build in mechanisms for informing the public that policy decisions using these regulations are value laden, and 3. publicize both the process and the outcomes of risk regulations and policy decisions

  18. 40 CFR 1068.40 - What special provisions apply for implementing changes in the regulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS GENERAL COMPLIANCE PROVISIONS FOR ENGINE PROGRAMS... may comply with earlier versions of applicable regulations as follows: (1) Prior to June 1, 2010, you...

  19. Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This annual report of the Senior Inspector for the Nuclear Safety, analyses the nuclear safety at EDF for the year 1999 and proposes twelve subjects of consideration to progress. Five technical documents are also provided and discussed concerning the nuclear power plants maintenance and safety (thermal fatigue, vibration fatigue, assisted control and instrumentation of the N4 bearing, 1300 MW reactors containment and time of life of power plants). (A.L.B.)

  20. Safety

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Please note that the safety codes A9, A10 AND A11 (ex annexes of SAPOCO/42) entitled respectively "Safety responsibilities in the divisions" "The safety policy committee (SAPOCO) and safety officers' committees" and "Administrative procedure following a serious accident or incident" are available on the web at the following URLs: Code A9: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337016/LAST_RELEASED Code A10: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337019/LAST_RELEASED Code A11: http://edms.cern.ch/document/337026/LAST_RELEASED Paper copies can also be obtained from the TIS divisional secretariat, e-mail: tis.secretariat@cern.ch. TIS Secretariat

  1. Applying novel technologies and methods to inform the ontology of self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Ian W; Bissett, Patrick G; Canning, Jessica R; Dallery, Jesse; Enkavi, A Zeynep; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gonzalez, Oscar; Green, Alan I; Greene, Mary Ann; Kiernan, Michaela; Kim, Sunny Jung; Li, Jamie; Lowe, Michael R; Mazza, Gina L; Metcalf, Stephen A; Onken, Lisa; Parikh, Sadev S; Peters, Ellen; Prochaska, Judith J; Scherer, Emily A; Stoeckel, Luke E; Valente, Matthew J; Wu, Jialing; Xie, Haiyi; MacKinnon, David P; Marsch, Lisa A; Poldrack, Russell A

    2018-02-01

    Self-regulation is a broad construct representing the general ability to recruit cognitive, motivational and emotional resources to achieve long-term goals. This construct has been implicated in a host of health-risk behaviors, and is a promising target for fostering beneficial behavior change. Despite its clear importance, the behavioral, psychological and neural components of self-regulation remain poorly understood, which contributes to theoretical inconsistencies and hinders maximally effective intervention development. We outline a research program that seeks to define a neuropsychological ontology of self-regulation, articulating the cognitive components that compose self-regulation, their relationships, and their associated measurements. The ontology will be informed by two large-scale approaches to assessing individual differences: first purely behaviorally using data collected via Amazon's Mechanical Turk, then coupled with neuroimaging data collected from a separate population. To validate the ontology and demonstrate its utility, we will then use it to contextualize health risk behaviors in two exemplar behavioral groups: overweight/obese adults who binge eat and smokers. After identifying ontological targets that precipitate maladaptive behavior, we will craft interventions that engage these targets. If successful, this work will provide a structured, holistic account of self-regulation in the form of an explicit ontology, which will better clarify the pattern of deficits related to maladaptive health behavior, and provide direction for more effective behavior change interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulating Cannabis Manufacturing: Applying Public Health Best Practices from Tobacco Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Daniel G; Glantz, Stanton A

    2018-01-01

    State legalization and regulation of cannabis, despite continued federal illegality, is a massive shift in regulatory approach. Manufactured cannabis, including concentrates, extracts, edibles, tinctures, topicals and other products, has received less attention than more commonly used dried flower, but represents emerging regulatory challenges due to additives, potency, consumption methods, and abuse and misuse potential. In November 2017, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) released initial cannabis manufacturing regulations as part of a new state regulatory structure. As the largest U.S. medical cannabis market (and largest legal adult use market in the world beginning in 2018), California's regulatory approach will potentially influence national and global policy. Comparing CDPH's initial regulations to tobacco control best practices reveals that, while the regulations recognize the need to protect public health, prioritizing public health over business interests requires stronger approaches to labeling, packaging, and product formulations. Based on tobacco best practices, we recommend that cannabis regulations incorporate large and proportionately sized informational labels, a prominent universal cannabis symbol, rotating and pictorial health warnings, mandatory plain packaging, a comprehensive ban on characterizing flavors and addictive additives, and strict limits on the potency of inhalable products and those easily confused with non-cannabis products.

  3. Global harmonization of safety regulations for the use of industrial robots-permission of collaborative operation and a related study by JNIOSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Toshiro; Ikeda, Hiroyasu; Okabe, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    In December 2013, the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) partially amended the safety regulations for use of industrial robots so that "collaborative operation" could be performed at Japanese worksites as allowed in the ISO standard for industrial robots. In order to show global harmonization of Japanese legislation on machinery safety and problems with applying ISO safety standards to Japanese worksites, this paper reports the progress of a research study which have been conducted in National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan from 2011 to the present at the request of MHLW to examine the necessity and effect of the amendment. In the first phase of this study, a questionnaire survey was conducted among domestic robot manufacturers and users. The obtained results revealed their potential demand for the collaborative operation and problems concerning their risk assessment and rule-based risk reduction. To solve the problems, we propose a method based on an investigation result of the regulatory framework for safety of machinery in the European Union. Furthermore, a model of robot system capable of demonstrating the collaborative operation and risk reduction measures which is being developed to support appropriate implementation of the amendment is also described.

  4. Electric safety, set-up regulations lightning protection, electromagnetic compatibility (EMC); Elektrische Sicherheit, Errichtungsbestimmungen Blitzschutz, EMV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bopp, G.; Laukamp, H. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme (ISE), Freiburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    This contribution contains a general discussion about the electric safety of photovoltaic plants. It presents the most important technical rules, which need to be followed for the installation of a photovoltaic plant. The focus is put on the general electric installation norm IEC 60634 (VDE 0100) and its new part 7-12 ''photovoltaic plants''. This part was accepted as norm to be published in May 2002 on the IEC-level (International Electro technical Committee). It will be taken over as German norm in 2005. Furthermore, an introduction is provided about lightning protection and about the regulations, which need to be complied with related to the ''electromagnetic compatibility'' (EMC). (orig.)

  5. The cohort of the atomic bomb survivors major basis of radiation safety regulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rühm, W; Nekolla, E A

    2006-01-01

    Since 1950 about 87 000 A-bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been monitored within the framework of the Life Span Study, to quantify radiation-induced late effects. In terms of incidence and mortality, a statistically significant excess was found for leukemia and solid tumors. In another major international effort, neutron and gamma radiation doses were estimated, for those survivors (Dosimetry System DS02). Both studies combined allow the deduction of risk coefficients that serve as a basis for international safety regulations. As an example, current results on all solid tumors combined suggest an excess relative risk of 0.47 per Sievert for an attained age of 70 years, for those who were exposed at an age of 30 years. After exposure to an effective dose of one Sievert the solid tumor mortality would thus be about 50% larger than that expected for a similar cohort not exposed to any ionizing radiation from the bombs.

  6. Self-Regulative Nanogelator Solid Electrolyte: A New Option to Improve the Safety of Lithium Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng; Chen, Nan; Chen, Renjie; Zhu, Qizhen; Tan, Guoqiang; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    The lack of suitable nonflammable electrolytes has delayed battery application in electric vehicles. A new approach to improve the safety performance for lithium battery is proposed here. This technology is based on a nanogelator-based solid electrolyte made of porous oxides and an ionic liquid. The electrolyte is fabricated using an in situ method and the porous oxides serve as a nonflammable "nanogelator" that spontaneously immobilizes the ionic liquid. The electrolyte exhibits a high liquid-like apparent ionic conductivity of 2.93 × 10 -3 S cm -1 at room temperature. The results show that the nanogelator, which possess self-regulating ability, is able to immobilize imidazolium-, pyrrolidinium-, or piperidinium-based ionic liquids, simply by adjusting the ion transport channels. Our prototype batteries made of Ti-nanogeltor solid electrolyte outperform conventional lithium batteries made using ionic liquid and commercial organic liquid electrolytes.

  7. Self‐Regulative Nanogelator Solid Electrolyte: A New Option to Improve the Safety of Lithium Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Feng; Chen, Nan; Zhu, Qizhen; Tan, Guoqiang; Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    The lack of suitable nonflammable electrolytes has delayed battery application in electric vehicles. A new approach to improve the safety performance for lithium battery is proposed here. This technology is based on a nanogelator‐based solid electrolyte made of porous oxides and an ionic liquid. The electrolyte is fabricated using an in situ method and the porous oxides serve as a nonflammable “nanogelator” that spontaneously immobilizes the ionic liquid. The electrolyte exhibits a high liquid‐like apparent ionic conductivity of 2.93 × 10−3 S cm−1 at room temperature. The results show that the nanogelator, which possess self‐regulating ability, is able to immobilize imidazolium‐, pyrrolidinium‐, or piperidinium‐based ionic liquids, simply by adjusting the ion transport channels. Our prototype batteries made of Ti‐nanogeltor solid electrolyte outperform conventional lithium batteries made using ionic liquid and commercial organic liquid electrolytes. PMID:27774385

  8. Implementation of the chemicals regulation REACH : Exploring the impact on occupational health and safety management among Swedish downstream users

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk, Linda; Antonsson, Ann-Beth

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we have examined how the European chemicals regulation Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) has influenced occupational risk management of chemicals at Swedish downstream user companies. The data were collected through interviews with occupational health and safety professionals, safety representatives and authority employees. The results show that most of the informants had scarce knowledge about REACH and that REACH implementation...

  9. Overview of Development and Deployment of Codes, Standards and Regulations Affecting Energy Storage System Safety in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conover, David R.

    2014-08-22

    This report acquaints stakeholders and interested parties involved in the development and/or deployment of energy storage systems (ESS) with the subject of safety-related codes, standards and regulations (CSRs). It is hoped that users of this document gain a more in depth and uniform understanding of safety-related CSR development and deployment that can foster improved communications among all ESS stakeholders and the collaboration needed to realize more timely acceptance and approval of safe ESS technology through appropriate CSR.

  10. The possibilities of applying a risk-oriented approach to the NPP reliability and safety enhancement problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarov, Yu. A.

    2014-10-01

    An analysis and some generalizations of approaches to risk assessments are presented. Interconnection between different interpretations of the "risk" notion is shown, and the possibility of applying the fuzzy set theory to risk assessments is demonstrated. A generalized formulation of the risk assessment notion is proposed in applying risk-oriented approaches to the problem of enhancing reliability and safety in nuclear power engineering. The solution of problems using the developed risk-oriented approaches aimed at achieving more reliable and safe operation of NPPs is described. The results of studies aimed at determining the need (advisability) to modernize/replace NPP elements and systems are presented together with the results obtained from elaborating the methodical principles of introducing the repair concept based on the equipment technical state. The possibility of reducing the scope of tests and altering the NPP systems maintenance strategy is substantiated using the risk-oriented approach. A probabilistic model for estimating the validity of boric acid concentration measurements is developed.

  11. A Development of the Calibration Tool Applied on Analog I/O Modules for Safety-related Controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Kyun; Yun, Dong-Hwa; Lee, Myeong-Kyun; Yoo, Kwan-Woo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop the calibration tool for analog input/output(I/O) modules. Those modules are components in POSAFE-Q which is a programmable logic controller(PLC) that has been developed for the evaluation of safety-related. In this paper, performance improvement of analog I/O modules is presented by developing and applying the calibration tool for each channel in analog I/O modules. With this tool, the input signal to an analog input module and the output signal from an analog output module are able to be satisfied with a reference value of sensor type and an accuracy of all modules. With RS-232 communication, the manual calibration tool is developed for analog I/O modules of an existing and up-to-date version in POSAFE-Q PLC. As a result of applying this tool, the converted value is performant for a type of input sensor and an accuracy of analog I/O modules

  12. 78 FR 49337 - Direct Grant Programs and Definitions That Apply to Department Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) to: improve the Department's ability to evaluate the performance of... use these data to report to the Congress and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on the success... performance measurement requirement and acknowledge that this may appear to disadvantage small local...

  13. Towards a just and fair Internet: applying Rawls’ principles of justice to Internet regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, David

    2015-01-01

    I suggest that the social justice issues raised by Internet regulation be exposed and examined by using a methodology adapted from that described by John Rawls in A Theory of Justice. Rawls’ theory uses the hypothetical scenario of people deliberating about the justice of social institutions from

  14. Towards a High Reliable Enforcement of Safety Regulations - A Workflow Meta Data Model and Probabilistic Failure Management Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Henning Thimm

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Today’s companies are able to automate the enforcement of Environmental, Health and Safety (EH&S duties through the use of workflow management technology. This approach requires to specify activities that are combined to workflow models for EH&S enforcement duties. In order to meet given safety regulations these activities are to be completed correctly and within given deadlines. Otherwise, activity failures emerge which may lead to breaches against safety regulations. A novel domain-specific workflow meta data model is proposed. The model enables a system to detect and predict activity failures through the use of data about the company, failure statistics, and activity proxies. Since the detection and prediction methods are based on the evaluation of constraints specified on EH&S regulations, a system approach is proposed that builds on the integration of a Workflow Management System (WMS with an EH&S Compliance Information System. Main principles of the failure detection and prediction are described. For EH&S managers the system shall provide insights into the current failure situation. This can help to prevent and mitigate critical situations such as safety enforcement measures that are behind their deadlines. As a result a more reliable enforcement of safety regulations can be achieved.

  15. How changes in drug-safety regulations affect the way drug and biotech companies invest in innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Shelby D; Califf, Robert M; Schulman, Kevin A

    2006-01-01

    Changes in the economics of product development resulting from heightened safety regulations could have a sizable negative impact on drug and biotechnology companies' decisions about investing in innovation. We developed a model to compare the potential economic effects of pre- and postmarketing strategies to identify safety problems with new drugs. Although expanding Phase III clinical testing and postmarketing safety surveillance are not perfect substitutes, our findings suggest that even a large increase in funding for the latter will have a relatively small adverse impact on investment decisions by drug companies and venture capital firms, compared with the former.

  16. Nano-food packaging: an overview of market, migration research, and safety regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbudsanpharoke, Nattinee; Ko, Seonghyuk

    2015-05-01

    Recently, food packages produced with nanoparticles, "nano-food packaging," have become more available in the current market. However, although the use of nanomaterials is increasing in food packaging applications, concern over toxicity affects consumer perceptions and acceptance. Quite a number of commercialized forms of nano-food packaging are coated or composited product with inorganic materials, for example, nanosilver and nanoclay as representative examples. Several studies have shown the possibility of nanomaterial migration from packaging or containers to foodstuff. The debate is still ongoing among researchers about the extent of migration and whether it is negligible and safe. Government agencies and stakeholders must hurry to determine use limitations and release conclusive legislation and regulations as soon as possible since nano-food packaging may have great impacts on human health. This paper aims to review the availability of nano-food packaging in the current market, report case studies on nanomaterial migration, and present the current status of safety regulations and management of nano-food packaging in leading countries across regions. This review should enable governments and researchers to develop further nanomaterial risk assessment studies. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. 34 CFR 222.19 - What other statutes and regulations apply to this part?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 1964 (Pub. L. 88-352) (prohibition of discrimination on the basis of race, color or national origin... for federally connected children with disabilities), 8007 (construction), and 8008 (school facilities...) or section 8008 (school facilities). (ii) Section 75.605 does not apply to payments under section...

  18. Soil temperature regulates phosphorus loss from lysimeters following fall and winter-applied manure application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applying manure in the fall and winter increases the potential that some portion of the nutrients will be lost prior to crop uptake in the spring. In order to minimize the risk of nutrient loss, recommendations are often based on soil temperature, since biological activity has been shown to decrease...

  19. 42 CFR 65a.1 - To what programs do these regulations apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (see parts 63 and 64a of this chapter), or (4) Research training support under the NIH AIDS Research..., INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES BASIC RESEARCH... part apply to the award of grants to support programs for basic research and training directed towards...

  20. Nanotechnology research and regulation: A plan to ensure human and environmental safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Anitha

    The influence of nanotechnology spans numerous fields and is increasing rapidly due to the financial and research contributions to the field. The impact of nanotechnologybased products on human health and the environment is far from being understood. Research output related to environmental, health, and safety issues is too slow and far behind developments to address the vast number of types of nanoparticles and new uses being discovered. This thesis summarizes nanotechnology related regulations, applications, and current research related to environmental and human toxicity in order to put into perspective the gaping holes existing in the safe production, use, and disposal of nanotechnology. There were a number of conclusions that were determined following the literature survey of this thesis. There is currently a lack of international cooperation between regulatory agencies and research institutions who are involved with nanotechnology. The only entities that have made regulatory progress include the United States, European Union, and Australia. The toxicological impacts of nanotechnology are not fully understood due to the dearth of research, as well as the absence of testing and measuring infrastructure. Chapter 6 of this thesis proposes an effective and specific research strategy to expedite the creation of enforceable regulations in order to protect the environment, workers, and general public based on the conclusions described in the paragraph above. The strategy outlines the need for the development of an interagency committee, precationary limits, nanomaterial tracer system, nanomaterial data gathering, priority list, funds for toxicity research, and open database to information and materials. The aspects of the outline strategy will ensure the successful and efficient regulation of nanotechnology.

  1. A primer of drug safety surveillance: an industry perspective. Part I: Information flow, new drug development, and federal regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, M C

    1992-01-01

    To place the fundamentals of clinical drug safety surveillance in a conceptual framework that will facilitate understanding and application of adverse drug event data to protect the health of the public and support a market for pharmaceutical manufacturers' products. Part I of this series provides a background for the discussion of drug safety by defining the basic terms and showing the flow of safety information through a pharmaceutical company. The customers for adverse drug event data are identified to provide a basis for providing quality service. The development of a drug product is briefly reviewed to show the evolution of safety data. Drug development and safety are defined by federal regulations. These regulations are developed by the FDA with information from pharmaceutical manufacturers. The intent of the regulations and the accompanying guidelines is described. An illustration from the news media is cited to show an alternative, positive approach to handling an adverse event report. This review uses primary sources from the federal laws (regulations), commentaries, and summaries. Very complex topics are briefly summarized in the text and additional readings are presented in an appendix. Secondary sources, ranging from newspaper articles to judicial summaries, illustrate the interpretation of adverse drug events and opportunities for drug safety surveillance intervention. The reference materials used were articles theoretically or practically applicable in the day-to-day practice of drug safety surveillance. The role of clinical drug safety surveillance in product monitoring and drug development is described. The process of drug safety surveillance is defined by the Food and Drug Administration regulations, product labeling, product knowledge, and database management. Database management is subdivided into the functions of receipt, retention, retrieval, and review of adverse event reports. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic interaction ;of the components

  2. Probabilistic methods applied to the safety of nuclear power plant: annual report - 1980. Part. 1: theoretical fundaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.F.S. de; Hesles, J.B.S.; Milidiu, R.L.; Maciel, C.C.; Gibelli, S.M.O.; Oliveira, L.C.; Fleming, P.V.; Rivera, R.R.J.

    1981-02-01

    The probabilistic Safety Analysis Group from COPPE was founded in 1980. This first part of the report shows the theoretical fundaments used for reliability analysis of some safety systems for Angra-1 [pt

  3. Analysis of technologies and experiences for reducing occupational radiation dose and study for applying to regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Joo Hyun; Park, Moon Soo; Lee, Un Jang; Song, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Byeong Soo; Kim, Chong Uk [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-01-15

    To reduce Occupational Radiation Dose (ORD) effectively and enhance the radiological safety, the comprehensive assessment of the experiences to reduce ORD should be made by regulatory body as well as utilities. Hence, the objective of this study is to assess the experiences for reducing ORD from the regulatory viewpoint. With the research objective, the followings are performed in this research; analysis of occupational dose trends at domestic and foreign NPPs, identification of the effective technologies for reducing ORD, examination of the effects of the technologies for reducing ORD, derivation of the regulatory means for implementing he research results. From this study, the regulatory means for effective reduction of ORD are derived. Hence, the results can be utilized as a basic materials for ALARA requirements.

  4. On the role of safety culture in risk-informed regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorensen, J.N.; Apostolakis, G.E.; Powers, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    There is a widespread belief that safety culture is an important contributor to safety of operations. The commonly accepted attributes of safety culture include good organizational communications, good organizational learning, and senior management commitment to safety. Safety culture may be particularly important in reducing latent errors in complex, well-defended systems. The role of regulatory bodies in fostering strong safety cultures remains unclear, and additional work is required to define the essential attributes of safety culture and to identify reliable performance indicators. (author)

  5. The Regulated Third Sector: Administrative Practices Of Citizenship And Constitutional Efficiency Applied

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Moura de Oliveira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Beginning from an approach about the evolution of organizational models of the States, this work goals, initially, outline the evolution of these models in the Brazilian State, analyzing the development of the Third Sector as an exponent of the Managing State. Establish afterwards the development of the entities of civil society and the urge for its regulation due to dissemination of its many species. After short report of the most recent regulatory practices, the importance of the Sector concludes itself as apex of the active role of citizenship, whereas advocate the constitutional efficiency in the atuation of such entities.

  6. A practical approach to parameter estimation applied to model predicting heart rate regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olufsen, Mette; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2013-01-01

    baroreceptor feedback regulation of heart rate during head-up tilt. The three methods include: structured analysis of the correlation matrix, analysis via singular value decomposition followed by QR factorization, and identification of the subspace closest to the one spanned by eigenvectors of the model...... Hessian. Results showed that all three methods facilitate identification of a parameter subset. The “best” subset was obtained using the structured correlation method, though this method was also the most computationally intensive. Subsets obtained using the other two methods were easier to compute...

  7. Effective regulation under conditions of scientific uncertainty: how collaborative networks contribute to occupational health and safety regulation for nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichow, Aline

    2015-01-01

    This thesis seeks to understand, and evaluate, the contribution of business associations within the United States (US) and German chemical sector, to the effective regulation of nanomaterials. In the effective regulation of new technologies characterized by high scientific uncertainty, with

  8. Trends in pharmacy staff's perception of patient safety in Swedish community pharmacies after re-regulation of conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälvemark Sporrong, Sofia; Nordén-Hägg, Annika

    2014-10-01

    All changes in the regulation of pharmacies have an impact on the work carried out in pharmacies and also on patient safety, regardless of whether this is the intention or not. To compare staff apprehension regarding some aspects of patient safety and quality in community pharmacies prior to and after the 2009 changes in regulation of the Swedish community pharmacy market. Questionnaires targeted at pharmacy staff before and after the changes in regulation (in 2008, 2011/12, and 2012/13 respectively) used four identical items, making comparisons of some aspects possible. All four items demonstrated a significant decrease in the first survey after the changes as compared to before. In the second survey significant differences were found on the two items representing safety climate whereas the items representing team climate and management showed no significant differences. The comparison carried out in this study indicates a negative effect in Swedish community pharmacies on safety and quality issues, as experienced by pharmacy staff. It is recommended that the possible effects of healthcare reforms are assessed before implementation, in order to counteract conceivable decline in factors including patient safety and working conditions.

  9. Food safety regulations: what we learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Nobuyuki; Ogino, Haruyuki

    2012-09-01

    On 11 March 2011, the magnitude-9.0 earthquake and a substantial tsunami struck off the northeast coast of Japan. The Fukushima nuclear power plants were inundated and stricken, followed by radionuclide releases outside the crippled reactors. Provisional regulation values for radioactivity in food and drink were set on 17 March and were adopted from the preset index values, except that for radioiodines in water and milk ingested by infants. For radiocesiums, uranium, plutonium and transuranic α emitters, index values were defined in all food and drink not to exceed a committed effective dose of 5 mSv/year. Index values for radioiodines were defined not to exceed a committed equivalent dose to the thyroid of 50 mSv/year, and set in water, milk and some vegetables, but not in other foodstuffs. Index values were calculated as radioactive concentrations of indicator radionuclides ((131)I for radioiodines, (134)Cs and (137)Cs for radiocesiums) by postulating the relative radioactive concentration of coexisting radionuclides (e.g., (132)I, (133)I, (134)I, (135)I and (132)Te for (131)I). Surveys were thence conducted to monitor levels of (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs. Provisional regulation values were exceeded in tap water, raw milk and some vegetables, and restrictions on distribution and consumption began on 21 March. Fish contaminated with radioiodines at levels of concern were then detected, so that the provisional regulation value for radioiodines in seafood adopted from that in vegetables were additionally set on 5 April. Overall, restrictions started within 25 days after the first excess in each food or drink item, and maximum levels were detected in leafy vegetables (54,100 Bq/kg for (131)I, and a total of 82,000 Bq/kg for (134)Cs and (137)Cs). This paper focuses on the logic behind such food safety regulations, and discusses its underlying issues. The outlines of the food monitoring results for 24,685 samples and the enforced restrictions will also be described

  10. Self regulation initiative in heavy vehicle transport to address road safety, accelerated road deterioration and transport productivity in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nordengen, Paul A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available with inadequate vehicle maintenance, driver fatigue and poor driver health, contributes significantly to South Africa’s poor road safety record. The Heavy Vehicle Accreditation Scheme (LAP) is an initiative to introduce self-regulation, as opposed to legal...

  11. 76 FR 38077 - Special Local Regulations and Safety Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port New York Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ...: All Zone. waters of Long Island Sound in an area bound by the following points: 40[deg]51'43.5'' N 073... Zone. located in approximate position 40[deg]51'52'' N 073[deg]56'24'' W (NAD 1983), approximately 1750...] RIN 1625-AA00; 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations and Safety Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of...

  12. The programme of the Minister of the Interior for technical regulations concerning the safety of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    The BMI is responsible for the Atomic Energy Act being implemented. A survey is presented of the BMI's programme for setting up technical safety regulations (bar the KTA) according to the following categories: the structure of objects (hardware); the functions of machinery and human behaviour (software); know-how, abilities, responsibility of humans (live-ware); environment. (HP) [de

  13. Regulator and industry Co-operation on safety research: challenges and opportunities. Final report and answers to questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    A Group has been set up by the CSNI to identify and review the issues which hinder closer co-operation on research between regulators and industry, and to propose possible ways for resolving such issues while maintaining regulatory independence in decision-making. The Group has analyzed the potential advantages and disadvantages of regulator-industry collaboration in safety research and has also provided indications on how to overcome possible difficulties that can arise from such collaboration. The Group focused in particular on the issue of regulator independence, on means to preserve it and ways to demonstrate it to the public while undertaking collaboration with industry

  14. Licensing of safety critical software for nuclear reactors. Common position of seven European nuclear regulators and authorised technical support organisations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the assessment of software cannot be limited to verification and testing of the end product, i.e. the computer code. Other factors such as the quality of the processes and methods for specifying, designing and coding have an important impact on the implementation. Existing standards provide limited guidance on the regulatory and safety assessment of these factors. An undesirable consequence of this situation is that the licensing approaches taken by nuclear safety authorities and by technical support organisations are determined independently with only limited informal technical co-ordination and information exchange. It is notable that several software implementations of nuclear safety systems have been marred by costly delays caused by difficulties in co-ordinating the development and qualification process. It was thus felt necessary to compare the respective licensing approaches, to identify where a consensus already exists, and to see how greater consistency and more mutual acceptance could be introduced into current practices. This report is the result of the work of a group of regulator and safety authorities' experts. The 2007 version was completed at the invitation of the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA). The major result of the work is the identification of consensus and common technical positions on a set of important licensing issues raised by the design and operation of computer based systems used in nuclear power plants for the implementation of safety functions. The purpose is to introduce greater consistency and more mutual acceptance into current practices. To achieve these common positions, detailed consideration was paid to the licensing approaches followed in the different countries represented by the experts of the task force. The report is intended to be useful: - to coordinate regulators' and safety experts' technical viewpoints in the design of regulators' national policies and in revisions

  15. Safety regulation of geological disposal of radioactive waste: progress since Cordoba and remaining challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, A.; Pescatore, C.

    2010-01-01

    Claudio Pescatore, Deputy Division Head (NEA) presented a paper, the purpose of which was to recall where we stood at the time of the Cordoba Workshop (1997) on the regulation of disposal of long-lived radioactive waste, to review developments since then, to present the key existing issues, and reflect on the remaining challenges and possible responses. The overview study on progress in regulation for geological disposal since the Cordoba workshop [NEA/RWMC/RF(2008)6], provides a good list of references regarding the first two issues. The presentation of the existing issues takes advantage of the synthesis of the responses to a questionnaire completed by the regulatory organisations in preparation for this workshop. It warns regulators and implementers that international work to date seems to have created an expectation in the mind of the public and in some organisations that nothing less than a guarantee by the regulator is needed of maintaining current levels of protection of both individuals and populations practically forever, regardless of the impracticality of this. This expectation needs to be replaced with a carefully and clearly explained understanding of the choices involved in dealing with long-lived radioactive waste against a background of our responsibilities to both current and future generations and our practical capacity to deliver them. Concerning the current major challenges faced in regulation, the paper comes back to the issue of the 'guarantee' by the regulator and it observes that there is no doubt that there is a willingness to do the best to comply with the principle of protection and that we are broadly convinced that current concepts for geological disposal, supported by multiple lines of reasoning and application of best available techniques (BAT) will meet that principle. However, we do not have the capacity to prove or guarantee this, nor do we believe that it is possible in practice. Although we are advised that it is neither

  16. Conservation voltage regulation (CVR) applied to energy savings by voltage-adjusting equipment through AMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, B.-R.; Chang, C.-A.; Huang, P.-Y.; Kuo, C.-H.; Ye, Z.-J.; Shen, B.-C.; Chen, B.-K.

    2017-11-01

    Conservation voltage reduction (CVR) includes peak demand reduction, energy conservation, carbon emission reduction, and electricity bill reduction. This paper analyzes the energy-reduction of Siwei Feeders with applying CVR, which are situated in Penghu region and equipped with smart meters. Furthermore, the applicable voltage reduction range for the feeders will be explored. This study will also investigate how the CVR effect and energy conservation are improved with the voltage control devices integrated. The results of this study can serve as a reference for the Taiwan Power Company to promote and implement voltage reduction and energy conservation techniques. This study is expected to enhance the energy-reduction performance of the Penghu Low Carbon Island Project.

  17. 76 FR 31279 - Regulatory Guidance: Applicability of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations to Operators...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice; request for public comment. SUMMARY: FMCSA... factors the States are using in deciding whether farm vehicle drivers transporting agricultural... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 383 and 390...

  18. Organisational culture at the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland's department of Nuclear Reactor Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, T.; Norros, L.

    2001-03-01

    A case study to investigate the organisational culture of the regulatory authority was conducted at the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland's (STUK) Nuclear Reactor Regulation (YTO) - department. Organisational culture is defined as a pattern of shared basic assumptions, which are basically unconscious. Objectives of the study were to conceptualise and describe the main characteristics of YTO's organisational culture and to carry out a tentative core task analysis of the inspectors' work. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used in the research. YTO's culture was identified as a hierarchy-focused culture with less emphasis on innovation or social support. However, the ideal values of the personnel emphasised also social support and goal setting. Ambiguous goals were felt by some personnel as increased uncertainty about the meaningfulness of one's job. Also a lack of feedback was mentioned. The core task analysis identified the critical functions of the regulatory practice. These functions specify the three roles of the regulatory authority, the expert role, the public role and the authority role. The culture must support the fulfilment of the requirements of all the three roles. Development needs in YTO's culture were identified and recommendations were made. (au)

  19. Safety and efficacy of fertility-regulating methods: a decade of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skegg, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    An international venture was launched in 1985 to fill a recognized gap in post-marketing surveillance of fertility-regulating methods. For this purpose a new task force was set up by the Special Programme of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction, which is cosponsored by the United Nations Development Programme, the United Nations Population Fund, the World Bank, and WHO. Research priorities were chosen and epidemiological studies inaugurated, involving a total of 47 countries--mostly from the developing world. Important progress has been made, especially in helping to define the beneficial and possible adverse effects of oral contraceptives on the risk of neoplasia; in showing that the injectable contraceptive depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate protects against endometrial cancer and does not increase the overall risk of breast cancer, in clarifying which groups of women are susceptible to the rare cardiovascular complications of oral contraceptives (myocardial infarction, stroke, and venous thromboembolism); and in establishing the long-term effectiveness and safety of intrauterine devices. The research has already made a significant impact on family planning policies and practice. Critical appraisal of this venture, which has been modestly funded, confirms the value of mission-oriented research. It also illustrates the potential of collaboration that bridges the global divide between developing and developed countries. PMID:10534894

  20. The Self-regulation Model of Illness applied to smoking behavior in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Kristine K; Wewers, Mary Ellen; Ferketich, Amy K; Otterson, Gregory A; Reynolds, Nancy R

    2009-01-01

    Thirteen to 20% of lung cancer patients continue to smoke after diagnosis. Guided by Self-regulation Theory, the purpose of this study was to examine illness perceptions over time in a sample of lung cancer patients. This prospective 1-group descriptive longitudinal design study included participants 18 years or older, with a lung cancer diagnosis within the past 60 days who self-reported smoking within the past 7 days. At baseline, patients completed a sociodemographics and tobacco use history questionnaire. The Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R) was repeated at 3 time points (baseline, 2-4 weeks, and 6 months). Fifty-two participants provided data for the IPQ-R at baseline, 47 at 2 to 4 weeks, and 29 at 6 months. Differences between mean scores for each illness representation attribute of the IPQ-R at repeated time points were calculated by within-subjects repeated-measures analysis of variance and Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Tests. Identity (baseline vs 2-4 weeks: P = .026; baseline vs 6 months: P = .005) and acute/chronic timeline (P = .018) mean scores significantly increased over time; personal and treatment control mean scores significantly decreased over time (P = .007 and P = .047, respectively). Understanding the context in which a patient perceives disease and smoking behavior may contribute to developing interventions that influence behavior change.

  1. ROBUST REGULATION FOR SYSTEMS WITH POLYNOMIAL NONLINEARITY APPLIED TO RAPID THERMAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Aranovskiy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A problem of output robust control for a system with power nonlinearity is considered. The considered problem can be rewritten as a stabilization problem for a system with polynomial nonlinearity by introducing the error term. The problem of temperature regulation is considered as application; the rapid thermal processes in vapor deposition processing are studied. Modern industrial equipment uses complex sensors and control systems; these devices are not available for laboratory setups. The limited amount of available sensors and other technical restrictions for laboratory setups make it an actual problem to design simple low-order output control laws. The problem is solved by the consecutive compensator approach. The paper deals with a new type of restriction which is a combination of linear and power restrictions. It is shown that the polynomial nonlinearity satisfies this restriction. Asymptotical stability of the closed-loop system is proved by the Lyapunov functions approach for the considered nonlinear function; this contribution extends previously known results. Numerical simulation of the vapor deposition processing illustrates that the proposed approach results in zero-mean tracking error with standard deviation less than 1K.

  2. 76 FR 27897 - Security and Safety Zone Regulations, Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Captain of the Port...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... will enforce the security and safety zone in 33 CFR 165.1318 for large passenger vessels operating in... 2011. This action is necessary to ensure the security and safety of the large passenger vessels... person or vessel may enter the security and safety zone without permission from the Captain of the Port...

  3. Emotion regulation during threat: Parsing the time course and consequences of safety signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    HEFNER, KATHRYN R.; VERONA, EDELYN; CURTIN, JOHN. J.

    2017-01-01

    Improved understanding of fear inhibition processes can inform the etiology and treatment of anxiety disorders. Safety signals can reduce fear to threat, but precise mechanisms remain unclear. Safety signals may acquire attentional salience and affective properties (e.g., relief) independent of the threat; alternatively, safety signals may only hold affective value in the presence of simultaneous threat. To clarify such mechanisms, an experimental paradigm assessed independent processing of threat and safety cues. Participants viewed a series of red and green words from two semantic categories. Shocks were administered following red words (cue+). No shocks followed green words (cue−). Words from one category were defined as safety signals (SS); no shocks were administered on cue+ trials. Words from the other (control) category did not provide information regarding shock administration. Threat (cue+ vs. cue−) and safety (SS+ vs. SS−) were fully crossed. Startle response and ERPs were recorded. Startle response was increased during cue+ versus cue−. Safety signals reduced startle response during cue+, but had no effect on startle response during cue−. ERP analyses (PD130 and P3) suggested that participants parsed threat and safety signal information in parallel. Motivated attention was not associated with safety signals in the absence of threat. Overall, these results confirm that fear can be reduced by safety signals. Furthermore, safety signals do not appear to hold inherent hedonic salience independent of their effect during threat. Instead, safety signals appear to enable participants to engage in effective top-down emotion regulatory processes. PMID:27088643

  4. Applying Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Genetics and CFTR2 Data to Facilitate Diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnay, Patrick R; Salinas, Danieli B; White, Terry B; Ren, Clement L; Farrell, Philip M; Raraigh, Karen S; Girodon, Emmanuelle; Castellani, Carlo

    2017-02-01

    As a Mendelian disease, genetics plays an integral role in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF). The identification of 2 disease-causing mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in an individual with a phenotype provides evidence that the disease is CF. However, not all variations in CFTR always result in CF. Therefore, for CFTR genotype to provide the same level of evidence of CFTR dysfunction as shown by direct tests such as sweat chloride or nasal potential difference, the mutations identified must be known to always result in CF. The use of CFTR genetics in CF diagnosis, therefore, relies heavily on mutation interpretation. Progress that has been made on mutation interpretation and annotation was reviewed at the recent CF Foundation Diagnosis Consensus Conference. A modified Delphi method was used to identify consensus statements on the use of genetic analysis in CF diagnosis. The largest recent advance in CF genetics has come through the Clinical and Functional Translation of CFTR (CFTR2) project. This undertaking seeks to characterize CFTR mutations from patients with CF around the world. The project also established guidelines for the clinical, functional, and population/penetrance criteria that can be used to interpret mutations not yet included in CFTR2's review. The use of CFTR genetics to aid in diagnosis of CF requires that the mutations identified have a known disease liability. The demonstration of 2 in trans mutations known to always result in CF is satisfactory evidence of CFTR dysfunction. However, if the identified mutations are known to be associated with variable outcomes, or have unknown consequence, that genotype may not result in a CF phenotype. In these cases, other tests of CFTR function may help. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Specialist-generalist model of body temperature regulation can be applied at the intraspecific level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylska, Anna S; Boratyński, Jan S; Wojciechowski, Michał S; Jefimow, Małgorzata

    2017-07-01

    According to theoretical predictions, endothermic homeotherms can be classified as either thermal specialists or thermal generalists. In high cost environments, thermal specialists are supposed to be more prone to using facultative heterothermy than generalists. We tested this hypothesis at the intraspecific level using male laboratory mice (C57BL/cmdb) fasted under different thermal conditions (20 and 10°C) and for different time periods (12-48 h). We predicted that variability of body temperature ( T b ) and time spent with T b below normothermy would increase with the increase of environmental demands (duration of fasting and cold). To verify the above prediction, we measured T b and energy expenditure of fasted mice. We did not record torpor bouts but we found that variations in T b and time spent in hypothermia increased with environmental demands. In response to fasting, mice also decreased their energy expenditure. Moreover, animals that showed more precise thermoregulation when fed had more variable T b when fasted. We postulate that the prediction of the thermoregulatory generalist-specialist trade-off can be applied at the intraspecific level, offering a valid tool for identifying mechanistic explanations of the differences in animal responses to variations in energy supply. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Innovative modeling approaches for risk assessment in food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food safety involves preventing foodborne illness by describing ways to properly handle, prepare and store food. Regulation of food safety is applied to companies that produce food. Thus, the goal of food safety regulation is to reduce human pathogens to acceptable levels at the processing plant t...

  7. Overview of nuclear safety regulations in countries of Easter Europe and the former Soviet Union. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The document contains a compilation of information on Nuclear Safety Regulations in countries of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union provided by the representatives of Armenia, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia and Ukraine in the Steering Committee of the Extrabudgetary Programme on the Safety of WWER Nuclear Power Plants (the Steering Committee provides co-ordination and guidance to the IAEA on technical matters and serves as a forum for exchange of information with the European Commission and with other international and financial organizations). A separate abstract was prepared for each of the seven individual papers

  8. Collaborative, cross-national studies on health and safety in seafaring for evidence-based Maritime policy and regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Olaf C

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, maritime health and safety policies and regulations were sparsely based on health and safety research, and only a small number of countries contributed to new research. To strengthen maritime health and safety research activities by presenting a study example and discussing the possibilities and needs for more national and cross-national research. In a cross-national epidemiological study example, the seafarers from eleven countries completed small, anonymous questionnaires concerning the working conditions on their latest tours at sea while waiting for their health examinations. Significant disparities were pointed out among the nationalities, e.g., the length of the tours at sea, the proportional distribution of officers and non-officers, the mean age structure, the injury incidence rates, and the differences of occupational safety standards. The analysis of all data together increased the statistical strength of the multivariate analyses and allowed for valid comparisons among the nationalities. The questionnaire data was used successfully in the collaborative study example, but other data sources and methods are useful for health and safety research in seafaring as well. More national and cross-national research on maritime health and safety is warranted.

  9. Transposition of the basic safety standards. Potential impact on French laws and regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godet, J.L.; Perrin, M.M.; Saad, N.; Bardelay, C. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire (ASN), Paris (France)

    2013-07-01

    The new proposal for a Council Directive laying down basic safety standards for protection against the dangers arising from exposure to ionising radiation is about to be adopted. Member States shall bring into force the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive within 4 years after adoption of the final text. As far as France is concerned, these evolutions will mainly impact the labour code (for occupational issues) and the public health code for both legal and regulatory requirements. The most significant improvements of the current version of the project are the introduction of graded approach to regulatory control and the enhancement of requirements for protection against natural radiation sources (in particular exposure to radon and naturally occurring radioactive material). This project also aims at achieving a better harmonisation between Member States for topics such as the organization of radiation protection for workers, the justification of medical devices and non-medical imaging exposure situations. ASN has already identified major issues for the transposition of the Directive concerning both French laws and regulations. Main topics should concern the impact of ICRP terminology (planned exposure situation, existing exposure situation versus lasting exposure situation, reference level versus maximum activity level for exposure to radon..) and the extension of both justification and optimisation principles to new activities involving natural radiation sources, such as industries processing naturally occurring radioactive material. Furthermore, France will have to decide whether it will adjust some positions about the prohibition of nonmedical imaging exposures and the release of materials from regulatory control according to generic values. Indeed, the project mentions the possibility to introduce derogations to those major principles. Finally, and according to the graded approach, the project introduces a new

  10. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  11. Organisational culture at the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland's Nuclear Reactor Regulation department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, T.

    2001-01-01

    A case study to investigate the organisational culture of the regulatory authority was conducted at the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland's (STUK) Nuclear Reactor Regulation (YTO) department. Organisational culture is defined as a pattern of shared basic assumptions, which are basically unconscious. Objectives of the study were to conceptualise and describe the main characteristics of YTO's organisational culture and to carry out a tentative core task analysis of the inspectors' work. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used in the research. In the first phase of the research, an organisational culture survey (FOCUS) was administered. It is base on a theory according to which organisations can be categorised into four main culture types, support-, innovation, goal- and rule-culture. It was tailored to better fit this kind of organisation on the basis of document analysis and preliminary interviews. Data was factor analysed and summated scales were formed. YTO's culture was identified as a hierarchy-focused (rule) culture with less emphasis on innovation, support or goals. However, the ideal values of the personnel emphasised also social support and goal setting. Ambiguous goals were felt by some personnel as increased uncertainty about the meaningfulness of one's job. Also a lack of feedback was mentioned as a weakness in YTO's culture. In the second phase of the research, a development workshop was carried out. The themes of the workshop were identified on the basis of the results of the first phase. Main targets for development that were identified in the workshop were human resources, goal setting and knowledge management. The ideal values of the personnel emphasised support and goal cultures. (orig.)

  12. Methodology for Safety Assessment Applied to Predisposal Waste Management. Report of the Results of the International Project on Safety Assessment Driving Radioactive Waste Management Solutions (SADRWMS) 2004–2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    Report of the Results of the International Project on Safety Assessment Driving Radioactive Waste Management Solutions (SADRWMS) (2004–2010) The IAEA’s progamme on Safety Assessment Driving Radioactive Waste Management Solutions (SADRWMS) focused on approaches and mechanisms for application of safety assessment methodologies for the predisposal management of radioactive waste. The initial outcome of the SADRWMS Project was achieved through the development of flowcharts, which have since been incorporated into IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSG-3, Safety Case and Safety Assessment for Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste. In 2005, an initial specification was developed for the Safety Assessment Framework (SAFRAN) software tool to apply the SADRWMS flowcharts. In 2008, an in-depth application of the SAFRAN tool and the SADRWMS methodology was carried out on the predisposal management facilities of the Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology Radioactive Waste Management Centre (TINT Facility). This publication summarizes the content and outcomes of the SADRWMS programme. The Chairman’s Report of the SADRWMS Project and the Report of the TINT test case are provided on the CD-ROM which accompanies this report

  13. Methodology for Safety Assessment Applied to Predisposal Waste Management. Report of the Results of the International Project on Safety Assessment Driving Radioactive Waste Management Solutions (SADRWMS) 2004–2010). Companion CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-12-01

    Report of the Results of the International Project on Safety Assessment Driving Radioactive Waste Management Solutions (SADRWMS) (2004–2010) The IAEA’s progamme on Safety Assessment Driving Radioactive Waste Management Solutions (SADRWMS) focused on approaches and mechanisms for application of safety assessment methodologies for the predisposal management of radioactive waste. The initial outcome of the SADRWMS Project was achieved through the development of flowcharts, which have since been incorporated into IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSG-3, Safety Case and Safety Assessment for Predisposal Management of Radioactive Waste. In 2005, an initial specification was developed for the Safety Assessment Framework (SAFRAN) software tool to apply the SADRWMS flowcharts. In 2008, an in-depth application of the SAFRAN tool and the SADRWMS methodology was carried out on the predisposal management facilities of the Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology Radioactive Waste Management Centre (TINT Facility). This publication summarizes the content and outcomes of the SADRWMS programme. The Chairman’s Report of the SADRWMS Project and the Report of the TINT test case are provided on this CD-ROM which accompanies the report

  14. Safety problems, symptomatic oriented accident regulations, influence of nuclear energetic on ecology of the Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palenikova, M.

    2002-01-01

    IAEA initiated in 1990 the program on help of the countries of Eastern Europe and of the former Soviet Union at evaluating of the safety of their first generation nuclear power reactors of the type WWER 440/223. The main aim of this program was to identify the main design and operational safety problems, to determine international consensus on priorities of safety improvements, to provide the help in the assessment of completeness and adequacy of programs of safety improvements: What are the safety problems; What is the safety importance of problems; What is done for prevention from damage of nuclear power plant; and of three barriers: the tasks MOD V-2 NPP; What is done for reducing of damage consequences; PHP, PASS (post-accidental directives and post-accidental monitoring). (author)

  15. 75 FR 4305 - Regulatory Guidance Concerning the Applicability of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-27

    ..., safety advocacy groups, senior law enforcement officials, the telecommunications industry, and the transportation industry suggest there is widespread support for a ban against texting while driving. However...

  16. Assessing school disaster preparedness by applying a comprehensive school safety framework: A case of elementary schools in Banda Aceh City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, A.; Bisri, M. B. F.; Oda, T.; Oktari, R. S.; Murayama, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The study assessed the depth of school disaster safety at public elementary schools in Banda Aceh City, Indonesia in terms of comprehensive school safety, especially school location, disaster management and disaster education. The findings indicate that 56% of public elementary schools in Banda Aceh City are exposed to high tsunami risk, and most externally driven school disaster preparedness activities were not continued by the schools due to lack of ownership and funding. To realize comprehensive school safety, disaster preparedness programs should neither be brought in by external donors, nor be in a patchwork. Rather, it should be conducted jointly and sustainably by the local school and the community and supported by multi-sectoral support in the city. Comprehensive school safety of public elementary schools in Banda Aceh City could be realized by reviewing, updating and localizing school disaster preparedness programs by all the education partners in the city with strong political will and commitment.

  17. Development of the safety evaluation system in the respects of organizational factors and workers' consciousness. Pt. 3. On know-how of its applying to an engineering company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasou, Kunihide; Hasegawa, Naoko; Hirose, Ayako; Tsuge, Tadashi; Hayase, Kenichi; Takano, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    'Safety Culture' has been paid attentions since Chernobyl accident in 1986. The criticality accident in 1999 and other kinds of scandals involving big name companies in Japan make them realize the importance of safety culture. CRIEPI is developing a safety evaluation system. The evaluation is based on the answers to the questionnaire and their statistical analysis such as t-test principal component analysis. This report discusses know-how when applying this evaluation technique to an engineering company whose jobs are ranging from production of products to engineering services to customers. About 15% engineers of the company answered the questionnaire and the answers were statistically analyzed. The results show the followings. First, the evaluation technique is not suitable to evaluations between departments with different kinds of jobs in each. That is because risk on the business of each department differs from each other due to the differences in the kinds of jobs. This indicates that the evaluation technique should be applied to groups whose jobs and risks on their business are equal. Second, the technique is applicable to branches with some kinds of jobs. A branch consists of small groups with different jobs but the ratios of the groups in a branch are nearly equal to those in other branches. Therefore, risks in each branch are equal. Finally, the technique should consider the frequency in which risks of a group to be tested realize. The larger the frequency in which workers face them is, the more the workers pay attention to safety issues. These findings indicate that the safety evaluation system needs several kinds of the standards of comparisons to be applied to evaluate safety levels in wide range of industrial companies. (author)

  18. About the necessity to update the Radiological safety and protection regulations of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.

    1997-01-01

    It is argued the necessity to update the Radiological safety and Protection regulations (Review 3) of ININ, with the purpose that it implements the ICRU operative magnitudes system. Such a system used with radiological protection purposes. The objective of this system is to do an estimation of the effective equivalent dose H E and/or the Effective dose E, proposed in the ICRP 26 and ICRU 60 dose limits systems respectively. (Author)

  19. Cooperation of technical support organizations of state nuclear regulatory committee of Ukraine in sip safety regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bikov, V.O.; Kyilochits'ka, T.P.; Bogorins'kij, P.; Vasil'chenko, V.M.; Kondrat'jev, S.M.; Smishlyajeva, S.P.; Troter, D.

    2002-01-01

    The main task of the technical support in the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP) licensing process consists in Technical Evaluation of SIP projects and documents submitted by the Licensee to State Nuclear Regulatory Committee to substantiate the safety of Shelter-related work. The goal of this task is to evaluate the submitted materials whether they meet the requirements of nuclear and radiation safety

  20. 75 FR 69360 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Award-Fee Reductions for Health and Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-12

    ... acts with gross negligence or reckless disregard for health or safety, causing serious bodily injury or... which actions of gross negligence or reckless disregard of health or safety by the contractor or its... or death of any civilian or military personnel of the Government through gross negligence or with...

  1. The Role of the EU in Transnational Regulation of Food Safety: Extending Experimentalist Governance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, E.; Weimer, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores how far experimentalist features of the EU’s internal food safety governance regime are being extended to the Union’s external governance of food safety. Hence, it analyses whether and how far the Union’s engagement with both third countries and global institutions displays

  2. Multimegawatt Space Reactor Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanley, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Multimegawatt (MMW) Space Reactor Project supports the Strategic Defense Initiative Office requirement to provide reliable, safe, cost-effective, electrical power in the MMW range. Specifically, power may be used for neutral particle beams, free electron lasers, electromagnetic launchers, and orbital transfer vehicles. This power plant technology may also apply to the electrical power required for other uses such as deep-space probes and planetary exploration. The Multimegawatt Space Reactor Project, the Thermionic Fuel Element Verification Program, and Centaurus Program all support the Multimegawatt Space Nuclear Power Program and form an important part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) space and defense power systems activities. A major objective of the MMW project is the development of a reference flight system design that provides the desired levels of public safety, health protection, and special nuclear material (SNM) protection when used during its designated missions. The safety requirements for the MMW project are a hierarchy of requirements that consist of safety requirements/regulations, a safety policy, general safety criteria, safety technical specifications, safety design specifications, and the system design. This paper describes the strategy and philosophy behind the development of the safety requirements imposed upon the MMW concept developers. The safety organization, safety policy, generic safety issues, general safety criteria, and the safety technical specifications are discussed

  3. International cooperation for the development of consistent and stable transportation regulations to promote and enhance safety and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.

    2004-01-01

    International commerce of radioactive materials crosses national boundaries, linking separate regulatory institutions with a common purpose and making it necessary for these institutions to work together in order to achieve common safety goals in a manner that does not place an undue burden on industry and commerce. Widespread and increasing use of radioactive materials across the world has led to increases in the transport of radioactive materials. The demand for consistency in the oversight of international transport has also increased to prevent unnecessary delays and costs associated with incongruent or redundant regulatory requirements by the various countries through which radioactive material is transported. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is the authority for international regulation of transportation of radioactive materials responsible for promulgation of regulations and guidance for the establishment of acceptable methods of transportation for the international community. As such, the IAEA is seen as the focal point for consensus building between its Member States to develop consistency in transportation regulations and reviews and to ensure the safe and secure transport of radioactive material. International cooperation is also needed to ensure stability in our regulatory processes. Changes to transportation regulations should be based on an anticipated safety benefit supported by risk information and insights gained from continuing experience, evaluation, and research studies. If we keep safety as the principle basis for regulatory changes, regulatory stability will be enhanced. Finally, as we endeavour to maintain consistency and stability in our international regulations, we must be mindful of the new security challenges that lay before the international community as a result of a changing terrorist environment. Terrorism is a problem of global concern that also requires international cooperation and support, as we look for ways to

  4. Safety assessment of a novel active ingredient, acetyl aspartic acid, according to the EU Cosmetics Regulation and the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, P; Moran, G

    2015-10-01

    Acetyl aspartic acid (A-A-A) was proposed as a new novel active ingredient for use in cosmetics. The safety of A-A-A was assessed by following an in-house-developed 'New Ingredient Testing Strategy', which was designed in accordance with the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS) notes of guidance and the requirements of Annex I of the EU Cosmetics Regulation. The aim of the project was to determine whether A-A-A was safe for use in cosmetics and to determine a maximum permitted safe level in the formulations. A literature review was conducted, consulting over 40 different information sources. This highlighted a number of gaps which required testing data. A-A-A was tested for phototoxicity according to OECD test guideline 432, skin irritation according to OECD test guideline 439 and eye irritation according to OECD test guideline 437. Dermal absorption of A-A-A was measured according to OECD test guideline 428 and was used to calculate the margin of safety (MoS). Finally, A-A-A was tested in a human repeat insult patch test (HRIPT) and a 14-day in-use tolerance study. A-A-A was non-phototoxic and was non-irritating to skin and eyes in in vitro testing. Dermal absorption was calculated to be 5%. The MoS for A-A-A was 351, at a level of 5%, for all cosmetic product types, indicating no systemic safety toxicity concern. A-A-A at 5% under occlusive patch on a panel of 50 adult volunteers induced no skin irritation or allergic reaction in the HRIPT study. Finally, repeated application of A-A-A to the periocular area, twice per day for 14 days, in 21 female volunteers, demonstrated that 1% A-A-A was well tolerated following dermatological and ophthalmological assessment in a cosmetic formulation. A-A-A was assessed as safe by the cosmetic safety assessor for use in cosmetics at a level of 5% in all cosmetic product types, in line with the requirements of the EU Cosmetics Regulation and in accordance with the SCCS notes of guidance. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic

  5. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 14, Safety protection measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Nuclear reactor accidents can be caused by three type of errors: failure of reactor components including (1) control and measuring instrumentation, (2) errors in operation procedure, (3) natural disasters. Safety during reactor operation are secured during its design and construction and later during operation. Both construction and administrative procedures are applied to attain safe operation. Technical safety features include fission product barriers, fuel elements cladding, primary reactor components (reactor vessel, primary cooling pipes, heat exchanger in the pump), reactor building. Safety system is the system for safe reactor shutdown and auxiliary safety system. RA reactor operating regulations and instructions are administrative acts applied to avoid possible human error caused accidents [sr

  6. Exchange of information between nuclear safety authorities: Policy of the French regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asty, Michel

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The decree setting up the Nuclear Safety Authority in 1973 entrusted it with international assignments whose objectives are still valid: - develop exchanges of information with foreign counterparts on regulatory systems and practices, on problems encountered in the nuclear safety field and on provisions made, with a view to enhancing its approach, and - becoming better acquainted with the actual operating practice of these Safety Authorities from which lessons could be learned for its own working procedures; - improving its position in the technical discussions with the French operators, since its arguments would be strengthened by practical knowledge of conditions abroad; - make known and explain the French approach and practices in the nuclear safety field and provide information on measures taken to deal with the problems encountered. This approach has several objectives: - promote the circulation of information on French positions on certain issues, such as very low level waste, for instance; - assist some countries wishing to create or modify their Nuclear Safety Authority, such as countries of the former USSR, the Central and Eastern European countries, and emerging countries on other continents; - help, when requested, foreign Safety Authorities required to issue permits for nuclear equipment of French origin; - provide the countries concerned with all relevant information on French nuclear installations located near their frontiers. Examples are given on the way the French Nuclear Safety Authority implements these objectives. (author)

  7. Hand rolling cigarette papers as the reference point for regulating cigarette fire safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugesen, M; Duncanson, M; Fraser, T; McClellan, V; Linehan, B; Shirley, R

    2003-12-01

    To compare the burning characteristics of the tobacco and paper of manufactured and hand rolled cigarettes, and set a fire safety standard of manufacture to largely reduce the fire risk from discarded cigarettes. (1) Cigarette extinction test of ignition strength: 40 cigarettes per brand, lit and placed on 15 layers of filter paper, in accordance with ASTM test standard E2187-02. (2) Citrate extracted by 0.1N hydrochloric acid from cigarette papers and from tobacco in manufactured cigarettes, the supernatant analysed by high performance liquid chromatography using ultraviolet visual light spectrophotometer. (3) Survey of 750 nationally representative adults age 18 years and over, by telephone, including 184 smokers. (a) New Zealand made Holiday, and Horizon, and US made Marlboro manufactured cigarettes; (b) US manufactured Merit with banded paper; (c) Holiday, Horizon and Marlboro hand rolling tobaccos, hand rolled in Rizla cigarette papers; (d) manufactured cigarettes as in (a), reconstructed using Rizla hand rolling cigarette papers. 1. (a) For each brand of manufactured cigarettes, 40/40 burnt full length; (b) for Merit banded paper cigarettes 29/40 (73%) burnt full length; (c) for each brand of hand rolled cigarettes 0/40 burnt full length; (d) 0/40 manufactured cigarettes reconstructed with Rizla hand rolling paper burnt full length. 2. Citrate content: (a) In manufactured cigarette papers: 0.3-0.8 mg; in tobacco of manufactured cigarettes: Holiday 0, Horizon 0, Marlboro 8.8 mg; (b) Merit: in banded paper 0.418 mg; in tobacco 10.23 mg; (c) In hand rolled cigarettes: in the papers cigarettes: cigarettes to compulsorily self-extinguish when left unattended was supported by 67% of smokers, 61% of manufactured cigarette smokers, 82% of hand rolled smokers, and by 68% of non-smokers. The wrapping paper is a key determinant of whether or not unpuffed cigarettes burn their full length. Using international test methods, popular brands of manufactured cigarettes all

  8. How can we characterize nano-specific soft regulation? Lessons from occupational health and safety governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reichow, Aline; Dorbeck-Jung, Barbel R.; Konrad, Kornelia; Coenen, Christopher; Dijkstra, Anne; Milburn, Colin; van Lente, Harro

    2013-01-01

    Soft regulation is a widely used instrument in the governance of emerging technologies, especially in the governance of nanotechnologies. So far, evaluations on the effects of nano-specific soft regulation cannot build on a coherent and consistent typology. Characterization of soft regulation is

  9. Health (Radiation Safety) Regulations 1984 (Victoria), No. 191 of 8 May 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    These Regulations promulgated pursuant to the Health Act 1958, as amended, repeal the Irradiating Apparatus and Radioactive Substances Regulations 1959. The provisions of the Regulations are designed to safeguard the public, patients and employees of registered premises from harmful effects of radiation. (NEA) [fr

  10. Counterfactual simulations applied to SHRP2 crashes: The effect of driver behavior models on safety benefit estimations of intelligent safety systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärgman, Jonas; Boda, Christian-Nils; Dozza, Marco

    2017-05-01

    As the development and deployment of in-vehicle intelligent safety systems (ISS) for crash avoidance and mitigation have rapidly increased in the last decades, the need to evaluate their prospective safety benefits before introduction has never been higher. Counterfactual simulations using relevant mathematical models (for vehicle dynamics, sensors, the environment, ISS algorithms, and models of driver behavior) have been identified as having high potential. However, although most of these models are relatively mature, models of driver behavior in the critical seconds before a crash are still relatively immature. There are also large conceptual differences between different driver models. The objective of this paper is, firstly, to demonstrate the importance of the choice of driver model when counterfactual simulations are used to evaluate two ISS: Forward collision warning (FCW), and autonomous emergency braking (AEB). Secondly, the paper demonstrates how counterfactual simulations can be used to perform sensitivity analyses on parameter settings, both for driver behavior and ISS algorithms. Finally, the paper evaluates the effect of the choice of glance distribution in the driver behavior model on the safety benefit estimation. The paper uses pre-crash kinematics and driver behavior from 34 rear-end crashes from the SHRP2 naturalistic driving study for the demonstrations. The results for FCW show a large difference in the percent of avoided crashes between conceptually different models of driver behavior, while differences were small for conceptually similar models. As expected, the choice of model of driver behavior did not affect AEB benefit much. Based on our results, researchers and others who aim to evaluate ISS with the driver in the loop through counterfactual simulations should be sure to make deliberate and well-grounded choices of driver models: the choice of model matters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY: Views on Proposed Civil Penalties, Security Oversight, and External Safety Regulation Legislation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Gary

    2000-01-01

    .... 3383 would amend the Atomic Energy Act by eliminating the exemption that currently allows certain nonprofit contractors to avoid paying civil penalties if they violate DOE's nuclear safety rules...

  12. Hand rolling cigarette papers as the reference point for regulating cigarette fire safety

    OpenAIRE

    Laugesen, M; Duncanson, M; Fraser, T; McClellan, V; Linehan, B; Shirley, R

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To compare the burning characteristics of the tobacco and paper of manufactured and hand rolled cigarettes, and set a fire safety standard of manufacture to largely reduce the fire risk from discarded cigarettes.

  13. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY: Views on Proposed Civil Penalties, Security Oversight, and External Safety Regulation Legislation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Gary

    2000-01-01

    This report provides the General Accounting Office's views on three bills designed to improve worker and nuclear facility safety and health as well as to enhance security for the Department of Energy (DOE...

  14. The human factor in the organisation and regulation of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordes, F.; Savagner, J.-M.; Snanoudj, G.

    1981-10-01

    The TMI accident has brought to light the importance of the human factor in the safe operation of complex installations such as nuclear power plants. On this basis, the paper outlines the institutional framework for nuclear safety in France and reports on EDF practices in human resources management as well as in the improvement of working premises (control rooms) to optimize human behaviour in accident conditions. Finally, the interaction of labour laws on nuclear law in connection with safety is described. (NEA) [fr

  15. Chemical research projects office functions accomplishments programs. [applied research in the fields of polymer chemistry and polymeric composites with emphasis on fire safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbuch, A. H.; Parker, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Basic and applied research in the fields of polymer chemistry, polymeric composites, chemical engineering, and biophysical chemistry is summarized. Emphasis is placed on fire safety and human survivability as they relate to commercial and military aircraft, high-rise buildings, mines and rapid transit transportation. Materials systems and other fire control systems developed for aerospace applications and applied to national domestic needs are described along with bench-scale and full-scale tests conducted to demonstrate the improvements in performance obtained through the utilization of these materials and fire control measures.

  16. The nuclear safety regulation in Japan and the response to changes of circumstances surrounding the nuclear electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hombu, K.; Hirota, M.; Taniguchi, T.; Tanaka, N.; Akimoto, S.

    2001-01-01

    The influences of external factors on nuclear safety are discussed in this paper, based on the views on the circumstances of nuclear electricity generation. The following external factors, which might have some potential impacts on nuclear safety, are selected for discussion: (1) The deregulation in the electricity generation industry; (2) The modification of approval/certification system in the regulation of electricity generation; (3) The influences on social atmosphere due to the occurrence of a series of troubles; (4) The government reform and the structural adjustment of industry and (5) Others. Our further discussion seems to focus on the following 2 issues: (a) Whether nuclear power and the other electrical sources should compete with each other for short term economical cost, or whether factors of cost stability and competitiveness as well as longer term energy supply security and global environmental issues ranging over several decades should be considered; (b) How to realize the appropriate regulation from the perspective of public acceptance and confidence (when a series of troubles occur) without imposing unnecessary burdens on industry and without jeopardizing safety. These issues may be common among many countries and can be widely discussed. (author)

  17. A Demonstration of Advanced Safety Analysis Tools and Methods Applied to Large Break LOCA and Fuel Analysis for PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo Henriques [Idaho National Laboratory; Smith, Curtis Lee [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently proposing a rulemaking designated as 10 CFR 50.46c to revise the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA)/emergency core cooling system acceptance criteria to include the effects of higher burnup on fuel/cladding performance. We propose a demonstration problem of a representative four-loop PWR plant to study the impact of this new rule in the US nuclear fleet. Within the scope of evaluation for the 10 CFR 50.46c rule, aspects of safety, operations, and economics are considered in the industry application demonstration presented in this paper. An advanced safety analysis approach is used, by integrating the probabilistic element with deterministic methods for LOCA analysis, a novel approach to solving these types of multi-physics, multi-scale problems.

  18. Safety aspects and implications of regulation of probiotic bacteria in food and food supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenaar, Trudy M; Klein, Günter

    2008-08-01

    The application of living bacteria as probiotics in food or food supplements requires a careful safety assessment. This review summarizes key issues concerning the safety aspects of bacteria added to particular products marketed for improvement of general health or treatment of (post)infectious symptoms. The bacteria used in such products should be completely safe; however, it can be challenging to provide evidence for absence of all virulence properties. In some cases, virulence factors have been detected in probiotic bacterial strains, and the implications of these traits for safety assessments are discussed. Horizontal gene transfer can result in acquisition of virulence genes or antimicrobial resistance in probiotic bacteria. Antimicrobial resistance in these bacteria can possibly aid the spread of undesired resistance in intestinal bacterial populations. The relative risk of such gene transfers is considered. The generation of complete bacterial genome sequences can both resolve and create safety issues. Current practices of safety assessment procedures in the United States and the European Union are briefly reviewed and a future outlook is provided.

  19. Development of CHF correlation “MG-NV” for low pressure and low velocity conditions applied to PWR safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumura, T.; Yodo, T.; Makino, Y.; Suemura, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD., Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    The Critical Heat Flux (CHF) is one of the important parameters in the safety analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). If the CHF is reached, an abrupt drop occurs in the heat transfer between the fuel rod cladding and the reactor coolant, which may induce a large temperature excursion of fuel cladding and a subsequent fuel failure. Therefore, accurate prediction of CHF is required in order to assure a sufficient safety margin in the PWR core. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, ltd (MHI) is developing a new series of CHF correlations which covers various fuel designs and wide range of fluid conditions with sufficient reliability. In this paper, a new CHF correlation, MG-NV (Mitsubishi Generalized correlation for Non-Vane grid spacers) is presented. This correlation is one of the basic components of the new correlation series and was developed to cover low pressure and low velocity conditions where the rod bundle CHF data are limited. The CHF correlation was developed based on open CHF database and provides conservative but more reliable rod bundle CHF predictions compared with the conventional CHF correlations used in safety analyses at low pressure condition, such as Main Steam Line Break event. (author)

  20. The safety of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, B.

    1986-04-01

    The book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The central part of the book is devoted to methods and results of safety analysis. Some significant events are described, notably the Three Mile Island accident. The book concludes with a chapter on the PIUS principle of inherent reactor safety as applied to the SECURE type of reactor developed in Sweden. (G.B.)

  1. New Safety rule for Chemical Agents

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Commission

    2010-01-01

    The following Safety rule has been issued on 08-01-2010: Safety Regulation SR-C Chemical Agents This document applies to all persons under the Director General’s authority. It sets out the minimal requirements for the protection of persons from risks to their safety and health arising, or likely to arise, from the effects of hazardous chemical agents used in any CERN activity. All Safety rules are available on the web pages.

  2. A cascade method of training for the revised CEGB Radiological Safety Rules and the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.R.; John, P.G.L.

    1986-01-01

    In order to achieve compliance with the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 the CEGB has introduced a revised set of Radiological Safety Rule. These Rules are for implementation at all sites under the Board's control where ionising radiations are used. It was a requirement that the new Safety Rules be brought into operation on a common date and to a consistent standard of performance throughout the industry; this necessitated a considerable training programme to familiarise and inform some 8,000 staff working at a large number of locations. The training week of identified groups of staff varied widely, according to their different levels of authority and responsibility. The paper sets out the means by which the chosen cascade method of training was selected and developed, and gives details of the modular package of training material which was produced. It also relates how the management objectives were met within the constraints of an uncompromising time schedule. (author)

  3. 77 FR 73311 - Special Local Regulation and Safety Zone; America's Cup Sailing Events, San Francisco, CA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... published a temporary final rule regulating the on-water activities associated with the ``Louis Vuitton Cup... a transit zone created to facilitate the safe transit of vessels needing access to pier space and... operational intentions of the Coast Guard and the America's Cup regulated areas. To ensure that members of the...

  4. Lives saved by laws and regulations that resulted from the Bloomberg road safety program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ted R; Levy, David T; Swedler, David I

    2018-04-01

    To estimate lives saved during 2008-2023 by traffic safety laws passed in six developing countries while participating in the Bloomberg Road Safety Program (BRSP). BRSP-funded local staff identified relevant laws and described enforcement to the study team. We analyzed road crash death estimates for 2004-2013 from the Global Burden of Disease and projected estimates absent intervention forward to 2023. We amalgamated developing country and US literature to estimate crash death reductions by country resulting from laws governing drink driving, motorcycle helmets, safety belt use, and traffic fines. BRSP helped win approval of traffic safety laws in Brazil, China, Kenya, Mexico, Turkey, and Vietnam. In 2008-2013, those laws saved an estimated 19,000 lives. Many laws only took effect in 2014. The laws will save an estimated 90,000 lives in 2014-2023. Of the 109,000 lives saved, drink driving laws will account for 84%, increased motorcyclist protection for 13%, increased fines and penalty points for 2%, and safety belt usage mandates for 1%. Drink driving reductions in China will account for 56% of the savings and reduced drink driving and motorcycling deaths in Vietnam for 35%. The savings in China will result from a narrow intervention with just 4% estimated effectiveness against drink driving deaths. As a percentage of deaths anticipated without BRSP effort, the largest reductions will be 11% in Vietnam and 5% in Kenya. Viewed as a public health measure, improving traffic safety provided large health gains in developing nations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Example of a single national regulator responsible for both transport safety and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karhu, P.; Lahkola, A.; Markkanen, M.; Hellstén, S.

    2016-01-01

    Safety and security in the use of nuclear energy and in the use of radiation, including the transport of nuclear and other radioactive material, share a common objective: to protect people, society, environment, and future generations from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation. Some measures for safety contribute to those for security, and vice versa, while some requirements of one conflict with those of the other. The differences in the requirements arise from the difference in the threat against which the measures are designed: accident vs. intent. A coordinated approach endeavours to take advantage of the similarities and to avoid the problems caused by the differences. One way to implement it is to have one competent authority responsible for the regulatory control of safety and security. It is the experience in Finland that this enables an efficient regulatory system. From the operators’ point of view, a one-stop shop regulatory authority ensures that requirements for safety and security are consistent. Both safety and security require the involvement of and cooperation between several authorities—regulatory, rescue, law enforcement—and operators. The approach in Finland is built on cooperation and a clear division of competences and responsibilities. One regulatory authority provides a fixed point of contact within the professional cooperation network as well as for the public. The one regulatory authority is also easily identifiable, as appropriate, as a point of contact in international cooperation in implementing nuclear and radiation safety and security. Whatever the national regulatory framework and the assignment of responsibilities between authorities, cooperation is essential in house, nationally, and internationally. (author)

  6. Regulation for the radiological safety in the design and operation of industrial Gamma irradiators in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Ghani, A.H.; Hussein, A.Z.

    2000-01-01

    Large gamma irradiators present a high potential irradiation hazard since the amount of radioactivity is of the order of P Bq and a very high dose rate are produced during irradiation. Nevertheless, individuals may accidentally receive a lethal dose within minutes or seconds, due to failure of radiation control and safety systems. The competent authority (NCNSRC) is concerned with the impact of all radiation activities on workers as well as public health and safety. Radiation control of such large irradiation facilities can be achieved by means of strict regulatory procedures during construction, licensing, operation, inspection, maintenance and decommissioning

  7. Exogenously Applied Plant Growth Regulators Enhance the Morpho-Physiological Growth and Yield of Rice under High Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahad, Shah; Hussain, Saddam; Saud, Shah; Hassan, Shah; Ihsan, Zahid; Shah, Adnan N; Wu, Chao; Yousaf, Muhammad; Nasim, Wajid; Alharby, Hesham; Alghabari, Fahad; Huang, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    A 2-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR) on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT) and high night temperature (HNT). Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan) were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc), alpha-tocopherol (Ve), brassinosteroids (Br), methyl jasmonates (MeJA), and triazoles (Tr) were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above-, and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future.

  8. Exogenously applied plant growth regulators enhance the morpho-physiological growth and yield of rice under high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Fahad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A two-year experiment was conducted to ascertain the effects of exogenously applied plant growth regulators (PGR on rice growth and yield attributes under high day (HDT and high night temperature (HNT. Two rice cultivars (IR-64 and Huanghuazhan were subjected to temperature treatments in controlled growth chambers and four different combinations of ascorbic acid (Vc, alpha-tocopherol (Ve, brassinosteroids (Br, methyl jasmonates (MeJA and triazoles (Tr were applied. High temperature severely affected rice morphology, and also reduced leaf area, above- and below-ground biomass, photosynthesis, and water use efficiency, while increased the leaf water potential of both rice cultivars. Grain yield and its related attributes except number of panicles, were reduced under high temperature. The HDT posed more negative effects on rice physiological attributes, while HNT was more detrimental for grain formation and yield. The Huanghuazhan performed better than IR-64 under high temperature stress with better growth and higher grain yield. Exogenous application of PGRs was helpful in alleviating the adverse effects of high temperature. Among PGR combinations, the Vc+Ve+MejA+Br was the most effective treatment for both cultivars under high temperature stress. The highest grain production by Vc+Ve+MejA+Br treated plants was due to enhanced photosynthesis, spikelet fertility and grain filling, which compensated the adversities of high temperature stress. Taken together, these results will be of worth for further understanding the adaptation and survival mechanisms of rice to high temperature and will assist in developing heat-resistant rice germplasm in future.

  9. Evaluation of Seismic Safety for Existing Nuclear Installations. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to establish safety standards to protect health and minimize danger to life and property - standards which the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which a State can apply by means of its regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. A comprehensive body of safety standards under regular review, together with the IAEA's assistance in their application, has become a key element in a global safety regime. In the mid-1990s, a major overhaul of the IAEA's safety standards programme was initiated, with a revised oversight committee structure and a systematic approach to updating the entire corpus of standards. The new standards that have resulted are of a high calibre and reflect best practices in Member States. With the assistance of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its safety standards. Safety standards are only effective, however, if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services - which range in scope from engineering safety, operational safety, and radiation, transport and waste safety to regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations - assist Member States in applying the standards and appraise their effectiveness. These safety services enable valuable insights to be shared and I continue to urge all Member States to make use of them. Regulating nuclear and radiation safety is a national responsibility, and many Member States have decided to adopt the IAEA's safety standards for use in their national regulations. For the contracting parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions. The standards are also applied by designers, manufacturers and operators around the world to enhance nuclear and radiation safety in power generation, medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education

  10. The Impact of Safety Regulations on the Incidence of Upper-Extremity Power Saw Injuries in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosbikian, Michael M; Harper, Carl M; Byers, Ashlyn; Gutman, Adva; Novack, Victor; Iorio, Matthew L

    2017-04-01

    Over 50,000 power saw-related injuries occur annually in the United States. Numerous safety measures have been implemented to protect the users of these tools. This study was designed to determine which interventions, if any, have had a positive impact on the safety of the consumer or laborer. We queried the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database for hand and upper-extremity injuries attributed to power saws from 1997 to 2014. Demographic information including age, sex, date of injury, device, location, body part involved, diagnosis, and disposition was recorded. We performed statistical analysis using interrupted time series analysis to evaluate the incidence of injury with respect to specific safety guidelines as well as temporal trends including patients' age. An 18% increase in power saw-related injuries was noted from 1997 (44,877) to 2005 (75,037). From 2006 to 2015 an annual decrease of 5.8% was observed. This was correlated with regulations for power saw use by the Consumer Safety Product Commission (CPSC) and Underwriters Laboratories. Mean age of injured patients increased from 48.8 to 52.9 years whereas the proportion of subjects aged less than 50 years decreased from 52.8% to 41.9%. These trends were most pronounced after the 2006 CPSC regulations. The incidence of power saw injuries increased from 1997 to 2005, with a subsequent decrease from 2006 to 2015. The guidelines for safer operation and improvements in equipment, mandated by the CPSC and Underwriters Laboratories, appeared to have been successful in precipitating a decrease in the incidence of power saw injuries to the upper extremity, particularly in the younger population. The publication of safety regulations has been noted to have an association with a decreased incidence in power saw injuries. Based on this, clinicians should take an active role in their practice as well as in their professional societies to educate and counsel patients to prevent further injury. Copyright

  11. Technical regulations on the general design and safety criteria for design and construction of nuclear reactors of May 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    These Technical Regulations published on 5th September 1975 were made in implementation of Section 33 of Decree No 7/9141 on the procedure for the licensing of nuclear installations. They serve as a guide to licensing authorities, project designers and operators in the nuclear field and therefore provide general criteria for safety standards, engineering codes, siting considerations, design bases for overall environmental radiation protection, and also deal with reactor core design, instrumentation, control, alarm systems, including an emergency core cooling system. Finally, the safe design of fuel elements must be ensured and fuel storage and handling techniques complied with. (NEA) [fr

  12. Review of the safety concept for fusion reactor concepts and transferability of the nuclear fission regulation to potential fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeder, Juergen; Weller, Arthur; Wolf, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), Garching (Germany); Jin, Xue Zhou; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Stieglitz, Robert; Carloni, Dario [Karlsruher Institute fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Pistner, Christoph [Oeko-Institut e.V., Darmstadt (Germany); Herb, Joachim [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Koeln (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    This paper summarizes the current state of the art in science and technology of the safety concept for future fusion power plants (FPPs) and examines the transferability of the current nuclear fission regulation to the concepts of future fusion power plants. At the moment there exist only conceptual designs of future fusion power plants. The most detailed concepts with regards to safety aspects were found in the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS). The plant concepts discussed in the PPCS are based on magnetic confinement of the plasma. The safety concept of fusion power plants, which has been developed during the last decades, is based on the safety concepts of installations with radioactive inventories, especially nuclear fission power plants. It applies the concept of defence in depth. However, there are specific differences between the implementations of the safety concepts due to the physical and technological characteristics of fusion and fission. It is analysed whether for fusion a safety concept is required comparable to the one of fission. For this the consequences of a purely hypothetical release of large amounts of the radioactive inventory of a fusion power plant and a fission power plant are compared. In such an event the evacuation criterion outside the plant is exceeded by several orders of magnitude for a fission power plant. For a fusion power plant the expected radiological consequences are of the order of the evacuation criterion. Therefore, a safety concept is also necessary for fusion to guarantee the confinement of the radioactive inventory. The comparison between the safety concepts for fusion and fission shows that the fundamental safety function ''confinement of the radioactive materials'' can be transferred directly in a methodical way. For a fusion power plant this fundamental safety function is based on both, physical barriers as well as on active retention functions. After the termination of the fusion

  13. Efficacy of Web-Based Instruction to Provide Training on Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the current state-of-the-art Web-based instruction (WBI), reviews the current computer platforms of potential users of WBI, reviews the current status of WBI applications for Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administ...

  14. 76 FR 50433 - Regulatory Guidance: Applicability of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations to Operators...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... hours of service of employees of, and safety of operation and equipment of, a motor carrier; and (2) qualifications and maximum hours of service of employees of, and standards of equipment of, a motor private... market; (2) farmers who rent their land for cash and haul their crops to market; and (3) farmers who rent...

  15. Scientific Method and the Regulation of Health and Nutritional Claims by the European Food Safety Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoad, Darren

    2011-01-01

    The protection of European consumers from the false or misleading scientific and nutritional claims of food manufacturers took a step forward with the recent opinions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). As a risk assessment agency, the EFSA recently assessed and rejected a vast number of food claim forcing the withdrawal of many claims…

  16. Introduction of the probabilistic safety as regulating requirement for Juragua Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valhuerdi, C.; Rivero, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The paper gives a general overview of current state of development of the safety probabilistic analysis (SPA) in Cuba. The introduction of the SPA requirement as an additional; regulatory demand for the operation permit of Juragua nuclear power plant is described as a corverstone for the development of a regulatory policy directed to the residual risk of nuclear facilities

  17. Coordination and collaboration between National Regulators for the Safety and Security of International Shipments of Radioactive Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittingham, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The safety record of transporting radioactive material is remarkable; globally with tens of millions of packages transported; each year with approximately 2-3% is related to the nuclear industry. Much of this success is due to the ongoing commitment made by the IAEA and its Member States to maintain over the past 50 years the prescriptive regulations for the transport of radioactive material (TS-R-1) and its associated guidance documents. TS-R-1 is by far the most popular IAEA document in terms of downloads and sales with some Member States adopting them directly into their domestic legal framework whilst others adopt them due to all of the TS-R-1 requirements being incorporated into the UN Model Regulations

  18. Safety assessment and environmental impact assessment: Application to regulation of nuclear and radiation safety, with special consideration to Lepse related operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, V.G.; Smith, G.M.; Stone, D.M.

    2000-11-01

    This report discusses the links between safety assessment and environmental impact assessment as applied to operations for unloading of spent nuclear fuel from the Lepse storage vessel. Regulatory responsibilities and regulatory requirements in these areas are under discussion and development in the Russian Federation and in other countries. The authors provide a briefing, based on inputs from Russian and western organisations, of their understanding of the situation at the time the work was done. They also make a variety of suggestions according to their perspectives. These suggestions should be relevant to the Lepse situation and to some other nuclear activities, bur do not represent the position of any particular organisation. Accordingly, this report is published by the SSI with the intention to promote discussion and interaction among relevant authorities

  19. Safety assessment and environmental impact assessment: Application to regulation of nuclear and radiation safety, with special consideration to Lepse related operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarov, V.G. [Gosatomnadzor (Russian Federation); Smith, G.M.; Stone, D.M. [QuantiSci Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2000-11-01

    This report discusses the links between safety assessment and environmental impact assessment as applied to operations for unloading of spent nuclear fuel from the Lepse storage vessel. Regulatory responsibilities and regulatory requirements in these areas are under discussion and development in the Russian Federation and in other countries. The authors provide a briefing, based on inputs from Russian and western organisations, of their understanding of the situation at the time the work was done. They also make a variety of suggestions according to their perspectives. These suggestions should be relevant to the Lepse situation and to some other nuclear activities, bur do not represent the position of any particular organisation. Accordingly, this report is published by the SSI with the intention to promote discussion and interaction among relevant authorities.

  20. A review of state regulations to promote physical activity and safety on playgrounds in child care centers and family child care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cradock, Angie L I; O'Donnell, Emily M; Benjamin, Sara E; Walker, Elizabeth; Slining, Meghan

    2010-03-01

    As interventions increasingly emphasize early child care settings, it is necessary to understand the state regulatory context that provides guidelines for outdoor physical activity and safety and sets standards for child care environments. Researchers reviewed regulations for child care facilities for 50 states, the District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands. We compared state regulations with national standards for 17 physical activity- and safety-related items for outdoor playground settings outlined in Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards: Guidelines for Out-of-Home Child Care Programs (CFOC). State regulations were coded as fully, partially or not addressing the CFOC standard and state-level summary scores were calculated. On average, state regulations fully addressed one-third of 17 CFOC standards in regulations for centers (34%) and family child care homes (27%). Data suggest insufficient attention to outdoor play area proximity and size, equipment height, surfacing, and inspections. Considerable variation exists among state regulations related to physical activity promotion and injury prevention within outdoor play areas. Many states' regulations do not comply with published national health and safety standards. Enhancing regulations is one component of a policy approach to promoting safe, physically active child care settings.

  1. NRC safety research in support of regulation. Volume 8, FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This report, the ninth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1993. A special emphasis on accomplishments in nuclear power plant aging research reflects recognition that number of plants are entering the final portion of their original 40-year operating licenses and that, in addition to current aging effects, a focus on safety considerations for license renewal becomes timely. The primary purpose of performing regulatory research is to develop and provide the Commission and its staff with sound technical bases for regulatory decisions on the safe operation of licensed nuclear reactors and facilities, to find unknown or unexpected safety problems, and to develop data and related information for the purpose of revising the Commission`s rules, regulatory guides, or other guidance.

  2. Regulations for the safe transport of radioactive material, 2005 edition. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This publication includes amendments to the 1996 Edition (As Amended 2003) arising from the second cycle of the biennial review and revision process, as agreed by the Transport Safety Standards Committee (TRANSSC) at its ninth meeting in March 2004, as endorsed by the Commission on Safety Standards at its meeting in June 2004 and as approved by the IAEA Board of Governors in November 2004. Although this publication is identified as a new edition, there are no changes that affect the administrative and approval requirements in Section VIII. The fields covered are General Provisions (radiation protection; emergency response; quality assurance; compliance assurance; non-compliance; special arrangement and training); Activity Limits and Materials Restrictions, Requirement and Controls for Transport , Requirements for Radioactive Materials and for Packagings and Packages, Test Procedures, Approval and Administrative Requirements

  3. Regulatory risks associated with nuclear safety legislation after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident in Japan. Focus on legal structure of the nuclear reactor regulation act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Tomoyuki; Maruyama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear safety regulations enforced after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident under the Nuclear Reactor Regulation Act face the following regulatory problems that involve potential risk factors for nuclear businesses; 1) 'entity based regulation' unable to cope with business cessation or bankruptcy of the entity subject of regulation, 2) potential risk of the Nuclear Regulation Authority's inappropriate involvement in nuclear industry policy beyond their duty, and 3) compliance of backfits under vague regulations. In order to alleviate them, this report, through analyzing these regulatory problems from the view point of sound development of the nuclear industry, proposes the following regulatory reforms; (1) To clarify the rule for industry policy in nuclear regulations and enable the authority, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, to choose most appropriate industrial policy measure. (2) Through establishing safety goals as measures to promote continuous improvement of nuclear safety regulations, to stimulate timely adjustments of the regulations, and to introduce a legal mechanism into the nuclear regulation systems under which validity of administrative law and its application can be checked. (author)

  4. Safety and ethical aspects on retrievability: A Swedish nuclear regulator's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toverud, Oe.; Wingefors, S.

    2000-01-01

    An important contribution to the discussion on retrieval in Sweden has been the ethical principle of the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste (KASAM). ''The KASAM Principle'' means that the present generation, which has reaped the benefits of nuclear energy, must also take care of the waste and not transfer the responsibility to future generations; a repository should be designed and constructed so that monitoring and remedial actions are not necessary in the future. However, future generations, probably with better knowledge and other values, must still have the freedom to make their own decisions; we should therefore not make monitoring and remedial action unnecessarily difficult. SKI generally supports the KASAM principle but its application in the individual case should be based on solid evidence that both aspects have been covered in a suggested repository design. There may be a number of possible reasons for retrieval of spent nuclear fuel from a repository and they range from technical to purely political. SKI supports that the repository shall not be designed so that it unnecessarily impairs future attempts to retrieve the waste, monitor or ''repair'' the repository. However, measures to facilitate any kind of access to the repository must not reduce the long term safety of the repository. SKI concludes that: Future generations may wish to retrieve the spent fuel from a sealed repository. Disposal method and repository design should consider this and not make such retrieval unnecessarily difficult. On the other hand, any measures taken to facilitate retrieval must not significantly impair the long term safety functions of the repository. It must be shown that the safety aspects have been adequately considered. Retrievability must always be discussed with caution, so that it will not give the impression of doubts concerning the safety of the repository. (author)

  5. A framework for a architecture cognitive applied to the safety supervision in the nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souto, Kelling Cabral; Schirru, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    An architecture cognitive was developed as the start to the elaboration of a system for safety supervision. This architecture, that was made with a class of problem, was based in expert system theory. In this theory the inference motor is of the kind of backward chaining associated with a process of search in profundity and the representation of knowledge is based in rules that are grouped in a kind of grafo structure and include in the context of object orientation. A environment of test for this architecture was built to permit show its operation and in this way to indicate its potential utilization as basis for future nuclear power plant operation support systems. (author)

  6. Risk-informed regulation: handling uncertainty for a rational management of safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zio, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    A risk-informed regulatory approach implies that risk insights be used as supplement of deterministic information for safety decision-making purposes. In this view, the use of risk assessment techniques is expected to lead to improved safety and a more rational allocation of the limited resources available. On the other hand, it is recognized that uncertainties affect both the deterministic safety analyses and the risk assessments. In order for the risk-informed decision making process to be effective, the adequate representation and treatment of such uncertainties is mandatory. In this paper, the risk-informed regulatory framework is considered under the focus of the uncertainty issue. Traditionally, probability theory has provided the language and mathematics for the representation and treatment of uncertainty. More recently, other mathematical structures have been introduced. In particular, the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence is here illustrated as a generalized framework encompassing probability theory and possibility theory. The special case of probability theory is only addressed as term of comparison, given that it is a well known subject. On the other hand, the special case of possibility theory is amply illustrated. An example of the combination of probability and possibility for treating the uncertainty in the parameters of an event tree is illustrated

  7. Safety assessment and verification for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This publication supports the Safety Requirements on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. This Safety Guide was prepared on the basis of a systematic review of all the relevant publications including the Safety Fundamentals, Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, current and ongoing revisions of other Safety Guides, INSAG reports and other publications that have addressed the safety of nuclear power plants. This Safety Guide also provides guidance for Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety in meeting their obligations under Article 14 on Assessment and Verification of Safety. The Safety Requirements publication entitled Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design states that a comprehensive safety assessment and an independent verification of the safety assessment shall be carried out before the design is submitted to the regulatory body. This publication provides guidance on how this requirement should be met. This Safety Guide provides recommendations to designers for carrying out a safety assessment during the initial design process and design modifications, as well as to the operating organization in carrying out independent verification of the safety assessment of new nuclear power plants with a new or already existing design. The recommendations for performing a safety assessment are suitable also as guidance for the safety review of an existing plant. The objective of reviewing existing plants against current standards and practices is to determine whether there are any deviations which would have an impact on plant safety. The methods and the recommendations of this Safety Guide can also be used by regulatory bodies for the conduct of the regulatory review and assessment. Although most recommendations of this Safety Guide are general and applicable to all types of nuclear reactors, some specific recommendations and examples apply mostly to water cooled reactors. Terms such as 'safety assessment', 'safety analysis' and 'independent

  8. Radiation safety in the nuclear medicine department: impact of the UK Ionising Radiations Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, L.K.

    1987-01-01

    The new 1985 regulations and guidance on radiation protection in the U.K. are discussed in relation to the needs for controlled areas in the nuclear medicine department and patient wards, admittance to hospital to comply with legislation, classification of workers, patient waiting rooms, handling flood sources, pregnancy and breast feeding. (U.K.)

  9. Food plant toxicants and safety: risk assessment and regulation of inherent toxicants in plant foods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essers, A.J.; Alink, G.M.; Speijers, G.J.A.; Alexander, J.; Bouwmeister, P.J.; Brandt, van den P.A.; Ciere, S.; Gry, J.; Herrman, J.; Kuiper, H.A.; Mortby, E.; Renwickn, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    The ADI as a tool for risk management and regulation of food additives and pesticide residues is not readily applicable to inherent food plant toxicants: The margin between actual intake and potentially toxic levels is often small; application of the default uncertainty factors used to derive ADI

  10. 76 FR 17530 - Special Local Regulations and Safety Zones; Recurring Events in Northern New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... available in the docket, are part of docket USCG-2010-0110 and are available online by going to http://www...[deg] 21'36'' W. 7.7 Friendship Lobster Boat Races. Event Type: Power Boat Race. Sponsor: Friendship...: The regulated area includes all waters of Friendship Harbor, Maine within the following points (NAD 83...

  11. 76 FR 38597 - Regulatory Guidance: Applicability of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations to Operators...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... commercial driver's license regulations; and, (3) proposed guidance to determine whether off-road farm equipment or implements of husbandry operated on public roads for limited distances are considered... industry acknowledged the importance of the issues covered by the notice and requested additional time to...

  12. 77 FR 4501 - Special Local Regulation and Safety Zone; America's Cup Sailing Events, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ... body of your document so that we can contact you if we have questions regarding your submission. To... media. In San Francisco, they propose to take advantage of the natural amphitheater that the Central Bay... exceptional circumstances subject to COTP determination. Images of the primary and contingent regulated areas...

  13. The Politics of Systematization in EU Product Safety Regulation: Market, State, Collectivity, and Integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purnhagen, K.

    2013-01-01

    This book examines the increasing role of the legal method of systematisation in European Union (EU) law. It argues that the legal method of systematisation that has been developed in a welfare-state context is increasingly used as a regulative tool to functionally integrate the market. The book

  14. Improving Food Safety in Meat and Poultry: Will New Regulations Benefit Consumers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnevehr, Laurian J.; Roberts, Tanya; Jensen, Helen H.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System for meat and poultry processing will benefit consumers by reducing food-borne illnesses. The benefits are likely to exceed the additional costs from implementing the regulations. (SK)

  15. Proposals for the Radioactive Substances (Basic Safety Standards) (England and Wales) Regulations 2000 and the Radioactive Substances (Basic Safety Standards) (England and Wales) Direction 2000. Consultative document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This document contains proposals for changes to the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 (RSA 93) and proposals for a Direction to be given to the Environment Agency in order to implement aspects of the European Directive 96/29/Euratom concerned with the control of radioactive waste. The Directive lays down basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionising radiation. With the Government pledged to making government more accessible and responsive, an important feature of this approach is effective consultation with all interested organisations. This leads to more realistic and robust proposals, which is particularly important when dealing with proposed legislation. In March this year, the Government published a consultation paper 'The Radioactive Substances Act 1993: Implementing the Revised Basic Safety Standards Directive Euratom 96/29.' This sought comments on the basic principles for change - including the setting of levels of radioactivity below which radioactive material should be considered outside the framework of regulatory control. This document forms the second stage of the consultation process with the aim of gathering views on the proposed legal instruments to implement the Directive. This document: explains the background to the proposed regulations (paragraphs 8-13); summarises the results of the consultation on principles (paragraphs 14-24); describes the proposed changes (paragraphs 25-36); includes draft Regulations (paragraphs 27-29); includes a draft Direction to the Environment Agency (paragraphs 30-36); describes the next steps (paragraphs 37-39); includes a draft Regulatory Impact Assessment (paragraphs 40-41). In general, the devolved administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland have assumed responsibility for environmental issues and hence management of radioactive waste policies and legislation affecting their respective countries. However, this

  16. Organization and liability of British regulating authorities involved in nuclear safety and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbison, S.

    1995-01-01

    In Great Britain, nuclear safety juridic basis is made of two law: HSWA (1974) for hygiene and security in working environment, and NIA (1965) specific to nuclear sites. The HSWA law created an HSC (Hygiene and Security Commission) in charge of workers and public security. HSC executive organ is HSE, whose nuclear office is NSD. Nevertheless, the general philosophy remains the one of HSWA, which results in the liability of operators in nuclear matters, as well as for any other industrial matter. (D.L.). 1 fig., 1 map

  17. NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] safety research in support of regulation, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    This report, the third in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during 1987. The goal of this office is to ensure that research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  18. The Determinants of Federal and State Enforcement of Workplace Safety Regulations: OSHA Inspections 1990-2010*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    We explore the determinants of inspection outcomes across 1.6 million Occupational Safety and Health Agency (OSHA) audits from 1990 through 2010. We find that discretion in enforcement differs in state and federally conducted inspections. State agencies are more sensitive to local economic conditions, finding fewer standard violations and fewer serious violations as unemployment increases. Larger companies receive greater lenience in multiple dimensions. Inspector issued fines and final fines, after negotiated reductions, are both smaller during Republican presidencies. Quantile regression analysis reveals that Presidential and Congressional party affiliations have their greatest impact on the largest negotiated reductions in fines. PMID:24659856

  19. The use of PSA numerical results in the regulation of nuclear safety in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Installations Inspectorate receives a variety of probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) for review. Each appears as part of an overall safety case, most of which is made in terms of the quality of the engineering. The PSAs are assessed against the probabilistic criteria, which are described, together with some likely features of a revision which is currently underway. The generation of low probability values in a PSA is related to the criteria adopted. The significance and use of these low values is discussed and the assessment process is illustrated by some examples. Emphasis is placed on the importance of relating the numerical results to specific engineering features of the plant, and in forming a judgment, jointly with engineering colleagues, as to whether the indications from the PSA represent real weaknesses in the plant or whether they are artifacts of the PSA itself. The question of whether reasonably practicable improvements can be made to the plant is then taken up with the licensee. An indication is given as to how the problem of the risk from external events is handled and a suggestion is made for a possible approach to the probabilistic criteria for such events which might bypass the need to estimate their frequency

  20. How compliant are beverage employees to occupational health and safety regulations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chetty

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This observational study was undertaken to identify thehealth and safety violations of employees at a specific beverage manufac-turing company.  A  site inspection and observation of all employees employedat this specific beverage company was conducted by the researcher over 2 days. Employees were observed for 12 hours per day with the morningshift on Day 1 and the afternoon shift on Day 2. A  sample of conveniencewas used in that every employee who was present on those days was included. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data set. There were a total of 212 employees and 332 behaviours observed during thisstudy period. Unsafe handling and behaviour was observed in 55% of observations. Incorrect manual lifting techniques was the most frequent health and safety violation observed. In the 48 manual lifting behaviours observed, correct practice was observed in only three cases.  It is clear thatmore healthcare education and practical training is required in the area of manual lifting techniques. It is clear that more practical training is required in the area of manual handling.