WorldWideScience

Sample records for apply human senses

  1. THE SIXTH SENSE OF HUMAN?...

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Arulmani, B.E

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Animals and lower animals do not have sixth Sense?... NO…NO….NO… All living organism as well as non-living organism considered also have 6th sense in gradient order. i. Which University mosquito studied to gain Techniques and cleverness to bite on the back beyond the reach of human hands?... ii. How the birds and Animals could predict the signals well in advance and move safely to other elevated places during “TSUNAMI 2004” Which human could not predict?... iii. How the pet dog could steel the chicken waste silently in the kitchen when owner under sleep?... iv. How honey bee, spider construct well defined knitted structure house?... This Scientific research article focus that not only human, all lower animals including Bacteria, Virus have “Intuition Sense” (Wisdom.

  2. Sensing Super-Position: Human Sensing Beyond the Visual Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, David A.; Schipper, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The coming decade of fast, cheap and miniaturized electronics and sensory devices opens new pathways for the development of sophisticated equipment to overcome limitations of the human senses. This paper addresses the technical feasibility of augmenting human vision through Sensing Super-position by mixing natural Human sensing. The current implementation of the device translates visual and other passive or active sensory instruments into sounds, which become relevant when the visual resolution is insufficient for very difficult and particular sensing tasks. A successful Sensing Super-position meets many human and pilot vehicle system requirements. The system can be further developed into cheap, portable, and low power taking into account the limited capabilities of the human user as well as the typical characteristics of his dynamic environment. The system operates in real time, giving the desired information for the particular augmented sensing tasks. The Sensing Super-position device increases the image resolution perception and is obtained via an auditory representation as well as the visual representation. Auditory mapping is performed to distribute an image in time. The three-dimensional spatial brightness and multi-spectral maps of a sensed image are processed using real-time image processing techniques (e.g. histogram normalization) and transformed into a two-dimensional map of an audio signal as a function of frequency and time. This paper details the approach of developing Sensing Super-position systems as a way to augment the human vision system by exploiting the capabilities of Lie human hearing system as an additional neural input. The human hearing system is capable of learning to process and interpret extremely complicated and rapidly changing auditory patterns. The known capabilities of the human hearing system to learn and understand complicated auditory patterns provided the basic motivation for developing an image-to-sound mapping system. The

  3. Understanding and applying open-path optical sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virag, Peter; Kricks, Robert J.

    1999-02-01

    During the last 10 years, open-path air monitors have evolved to yield reliable and effective measurements of single and multiple compounds on a real-time basis. To many individuals within the optical remote sensing community, the attributes of open-path and its the potential uses seem unlimited. Then why has the market has been stagnant for the last few years? The reason may center on how open-path information is applied and how well the end user understands that information. We constantly try to compare open-path data to risk/health or safety levels that are based for use at a single point and for a specific averaging period often far longer than a typical open-path data point. Often this approach is perceived as putting a square peg in a round hole. This perception may be well founded, as open-path data at times may need to go through extensive data manipulation and assumptions before it can be applied. This paper will review pervious open-path monitoring programs and their success in applying the data collected. We will also look at how open-path data is being currently used, some previous pitfalls in data use, alternate methods of data interpretation, and how open-path data can be best practically applied to fit current needs.

  4. Remote sensing applied to numerical modelling. [water resources pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, S.; Lee, S. S.; Veziroglu, T. N.; Bland, R.

    1975-01-01

    Progress and remaining difficulties in the construction of predictive mathematical models of large bodies of water as ecosystems are reviewed. Surface temperature is at present the only variable than can be measured accurately and reliably by remote sensing techniques, but satellite infrared data are of sufficient resolution for macro-scale modeling of oceans and large lakes, and airborne radiometers are useful in meso-scale analysis (of lakes, bays, and thermal plumes). Finite-element and finite-difference techniques applied to the solution of relevant coupled time-dependent nonlinear partial differential equations are compared, and the specific problem of the Biscayne Bay and environs ecosystem is tackled in a finite-differences treatment using the rigid-lid model and a rigid-line grid system.

  5. Detection Performance of Compressive Sensing Applied to Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper some results are presented on detection performance of radar using Compressive Sensing. Compressive sensing is a recently developed theory which allows reconstruction of sparse signals with a number of measurements much lower than implied by the Nyquist rate. In this work the behavior

  6. NASA Remote Sensing Research as Applied to Archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, Marco J.; Thomas, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    The use of remotely sensed images is not new to archaeology. Ever since balloons and airplanes first flew cameras over archaeological sites, researchers have taken advantage of the elevated observation platforms to understand sites better. When viewed from above, crop marks, soil anomalies and buried features revealed new information that was not readily visible from ground level. Since 1974 and initially under the leadership of Dr. Tom Sever, NASA's Stennis Space Center, located on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, pioneered and expanded the application of remote sensing to archaeological topics, including cultural resource management. Building on remote sensing activities initiated by the National Park Service, archaeologists increasingly used this technology to study the past in greater depth. By the early 1980s, there were sufficient accomplishments in the application of remote sensing to anthropology and archaeology that a chapter on the subject was included in fundamental remote sensing references. Remote sensing technology and image analysis are currently undergoing a profound shift in emphasis from broad classification to detection, identification and condition of specific materials, both organic and inorganic. In the last few years, remote sensing platforms have grown increasingly capable and sophisticated. Sensors currently in use, or nearing deployment, offer significantly finer spatial and spectral resolutions than were previously available. Paired with new techniques of image analysis, this technology may make the direct detection of archaeological sites a realistic goal.

  7. Use of Human Senses as Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Sugawara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an overview of our recent findings obtained by the use of human senses as sensors, suggesting that human senses might be indispensable sensors, not only for practical uses but also for gaining a deeper understanding of humans. From this point of view, two kinds of studies, both based on semantic responses of participants, deserve emphasis. One study assessed the efficacy of the photocatalytic elimination of stains or bio-aerosols from an air environment using TiO2 as well as the photocatalytic deodorizing efficacy of a TiO2-type deodorizer; the other study evaluated the changes in perception of a given aroma while inhaling the fragrance of essential oils. In the latter study, we employed a sensory test for evaluating changes in perception of a given aroma. Sensory tests were conducted twice, when participants were undergoing the Kraepelin mental performance test (mental arithmetic or an auditory task (listening to environmental natural sounds, once before the task (pre-task and once after the task (post-task. The perception of fragrance was assessed by 13 contrasting pairs of adjectives as a function of the task assigned to participants. The obtained findings illustrate subtle nuances regarding how essential oils manifest their potency and how olfactory discrimination and responses occur in humans.

  8. Overview of compressive sensing techniques applied in holography [Invited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivenson, Yair; Stern, Adrian; Javidi, Bahram

    2013-01-01

    In recent years compressive sensing (CS) has been successfully introduced in digital holography (DH). Depending on the ability to sparsely represent an object, the CS paradigm provides an accurate object reconstruction framework from a relatively small number of encoded signal samples. DH has proven to be an efficient and physically realizable sensing modality that can exploit the benefits of CS. In this paper, we provide an overview of the theoretical guidelines for application of CS in DH and demonstrate the benefits of compressive digital holographic sensing.

  9. Applying a Common-Sense Approach to Fighting Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Y. Breland

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The obesity epidemic is a threat to the health of millions and to the economic viability of healthcare systems, governments, businesses, and nations. A range of answers come to mind if and when we ask, “What can we, health professionals (physicians, nurses, nutritionists, behavioral psychologists, do about this epidemic?” In this paper, we describe the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation as a framework for organizing existent tools and creating new tools to improve control of the obesity epidemic. Further, we explain how the Common-Sense Model can augment existing behavior-change models, with particular attention to the strength of the Common-Sense Model in addressing assessment and weight maintenance beyond initial weight loss.

  10. Applying a Common-Sense Approach to Fighting Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breland, Jessica Y.; Fox, Ashley M.; Horowitz, Carol R.; Leventhal, Howard

    2012-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a threat to the health of millions and to the economic viability of healthcare systems, governments, businesses, and nations. A range of answers come to mind if and when we ask, “What can we, health professionals (physicians, nurses, nutritionists, behavioral psychologists), do about this epidemic?” In this paper, we describe the Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation as a framework for organizing existent tools and creating new tools to improve control of the obesity epidemic. Further, we explain how the Common-Sense Model can augment existing behavior-change models, with particular attention to the strength of the Common-Sense Model in addressing assessment and weight maintenance beyond initial weight loss. PMID:22811889

  11. Applying bioethical principles to human biomonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Myron

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bioethical principles are widely used as a normative framework in areas of human research and medical care. In recent years there has been increasing formalization of their use in public health decisions. The "traditional bioethical principles" are applied in this discussion to the important issue human biomonitoring for environmental exposures. They are: (1 Autonomy – Also known as the "respect for humans" principle, people understand their own best interests; (2 Beneficence – "do good" for people; (3 Nonmaleficence – "do no harm"; (4 Justice – fair distribution of benefits and costs (including risks to health across stakeholders. Some of the points made are: (1 There is not a single generic bioethical analysis applicable to the use of human biomonitoring data, each specific use requires a separate deliberation; (2 Using unidentified, population-based biomonitoring information for risk assessment or population surveillance raises fewer bioethical concerns than personally identified biomonitoring information such as employed in health screening; (3 Companies should proactively apply normative bioethical principles when considering the disposition of products and by-products in the environment and humans; (4 There is a need for more engagement by scholars on the bioethical issues raised by the use of biomarkers of exposure; (5 Though our scientific knowledge of biology will continue to increase, there will always be a role for methods or frameworks to resolve substantive disagreements in the meaning of this data that are matters of belief rather than knowledge.

  12. Applying bioethical principles to human biomonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrison Myron

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bioethical principles are widely used as a normative framework in areas of human research and medical care. In recent years there has been increasing formalization of their use in public health decisions. The "traditional bioethical principles" are applied in this discussion to the important issue human biomonitoring for environmental exposures. They are: (1 Autonomy – Also known as the "respect for humans" principle, people understand their own best interests; (2 Beneficence – "do good" for people; (3 Nonmaleficence – "do no harm"; (4 Justice – fair distribution of benefits and costs (including risks to health across stakeholders. Some of the points made are: (1 There is not a single generic bioethical analysis applicable to the use of human biomonitoring data, each specific use requires a separate deliberation; (2 Using unidentified, population-based biomonitoring information for risk assessment or population surveillance raises fewer bioethical concerns than personally identified biomonitoring information such as employed in health screening; (3 Companies should proactively apply normative bioethical principles when considering the disposition of products and by-products in the environment and humans; (4 There is a need for more engagement by scholars on the bioethical issues raised by the use of biomarkers of exposure; (5 Though our scientific knowledge of biology will continue to increase, there will always be a role for methods or frameworks to resolve substantive disagreements in the meaning of this data that are matters of belief rather than knowledge.

  13. Compressed Sensing Techniques Applied to Ultrasonic Imaging of Cargo Containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Yuri Álvarez; Lorenzo, José Ángel Martínez

    2017-01-15

    One of the key issues in the fight against the smuggling of goods has been the development of scanners for cargo inspection. X-ray-based radiographic system scanners are the most developed sensing modality. However, they are costly and use bulky sources that emit hazardous, ionizing radiation. Aiming to improve the probability of threat detection, an ultrasonic-based technique, capable of detecting the footprint of metallic containers or compartments concealed within the metallic structure of the inspected cargo, has been proposed. The system consists of an array of acoustic transceivers that is attached to the metallic structure-under-inspection, creating a guided acoustic Lamb wave. Reflections due to discontinuities are detected in the images, provided by an imaging algorithm. Taking into consideration that the majority of those images are sparse, this contribution analyzes the application of Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques in order to reduce the amount of measurements needed, thus achieving faster scanning, without compromising the detection capabilities of the system. A parametric study of the image quality, as a function of the samples needed in spatial and frequency domains, is presented, as well as the dependence on the sampling pattern. For this purpose, realistic cargo inspection scenarios have been simulated.

  14. Compressed Sensing Techniques Applied to Ultrasonic Imaging of Cargo Containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Álvarez López

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key issues in the fight against the smuggling of goods has been the development of scanners for cargo inspection. X-ray-based radiographic system scanners are the most developed sensing modality. However, they are costly and use bulky sources that emit hazardous, ionizing radiation. Aiming to improve the probability of threat detection, an ultrasonic-based technique, capable of detecting the footprint of metallic containers or compartments concealed within the metallic structure of the inspected cargo, has been proposed. The system consists of an array of acoustic transceivers that is attached to the metallic structure-under-inspection, creating a guided acoustic Lamb wave. Reflections due to discontinuities are detected in the images, provided by an imaging algorithm. Taking into consideration that the majority of those images are sparse, this contribution analyzes the application of Compressed Sensing (CS techniques in order to reduce the amount of measurements needed, thus achieving faster scanning, without compromising the detection capabilities of the system. A parametric study of the image quality, as a function of the samples needed in spatial and frequency domains, is presented, as well as the dependence on the sampling pattern. For this purpose, realistic cargo inspection scenarios have been simulated.

  15. Compressed Sensing Techniques Applied to Ultrasonic Imaging of Cargo Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez López, Yuri; Martínez Lorenzo, José Ángel

    2017-01-01

    One of the key issues in the fight against the smuggling of goods has been the development of scanners for cargo inspection. X-ray-based radiographic system scanners are the most developed sensing modality. However, they are costly and use bulky sources that emit hazardous, ionizing radiation. Aiming to improve the probability of threat detection, an ultrasonic-based technique, capable of detecting the footprint of metallic containers or compartments concealed within the metallic structure of the inspected cargo, has been proposed. The system consists of an array of acoustic transceivers that is attached to the metallic structure-under-inspection, creating a guided acoustic Lamb wave. Reflections due to discontinuities are detected in the images, provided by an imaging algorithm. Taking into consideration that the majority of those images are sparse, this contribution analyzes the application of Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques in order to reduce the amount of measurements needed, thus achieving faster scanning, without compromising the detection capabilities of the system. A parametric study of the image quality, as a function of the samples needed in spatial and frequency domains, is presented, as well as the dependence on the sampling pattern. For this purpose, realistic cargo inspection scenarios have been simulated. PMID:28098841

  16. Remote sensing techniques applied to seismic vulnerability assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Arranz, Jose; Torres, Yolanda; Hahgi, Azade; Gaspar-Escribano, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Advances in remote sensing and photogrammetry techniques have increased the degree of accuracy and resolution in the record of the earth's surface. This has expanded the range of possible applications of these data. In this research, we have used these data to document the construction characteristics of the urban environment of Lorca, Spain. An exposure database has been created with the gathered information to be used in seismic vulnerability assessment. To this end, we have used data from photogrammetric flights at different periods, using both orthorectified images in the visible and infrared spectrum. Furthermore, the analysis is completed using LiDAR data. From the combination of these data, it has been possible to delineate the building footprints and characterize the constructions with attributes such as the approximate date of construction, area, type of roof and even building materials. To carry out the calculation, we have developed different algorithms to compare images from different times, segment images, classify LiDAR data, and use the infrared data in order to remove vegetation or to compute roof surfaces with height value, tilt and spectral fingerprint. In addition, the accuracy of our results has been validated with ground truth data. Keywords: LiDAR, remote sensing, seismic vulnerability, Lorca

  17. Applied Nanotechnology for Human Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yowell, Leonard L.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing nanotechnology for human space exploration is shown. The topics include: 1) NASA's Strategic Vision; 2) Exploration Architecture; 3) Future Exploration Mission Requirements Cannot be met with Conventional Materials; 4) Nanomaterials: Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes; 5) Applied Nanotechnology at JSC: Fundamentals to Applications; 6) Technology Readiness Levels (TRL); 7) Growth, Modeling, Diagnostics and Production; 8) Characterization: Purity, Dispersion and Consistency; 9) Processing; 10) Nanoelectronics: Enabling Technologies; 11) Applications for Human Space Exploration; 12) Exploration Life Support: Atmosphere Revitalization System; 13) Advanced and Exploration Life Support: Regenerable CO2 Removal; 14) Exploration Life Support: Water Recovery; 15) Advanced Life Support: Water Disinfection/Recovery; 16) Power and Energy: Supercapacitors and Fuel Cells; 17) Nanomaterials for EMI Shielding; 18) Active Radiation Dosimeter; 19) Advanced Thermal Protection System (TPS) Repair; 20) Thermal Radiation and Impact Protection (TRIPS); 21) Nanotechnology: Astronaut Health Management; 22) JSC Nanomaterials Group Collaborations.

  18. Incorporating Applied Undergraduate Research in Senior to Graduate Level Remote Sensing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Richard B.; Unger, Daniel R.; Kulhavy, David L.; Hung, I-Kuai

    2016-01-01

    An Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture (ATCOFA) senior spatial science undergraduate student engaged in a multi-course undergraduate research project to expand his expertise in remote sensing and assess the applied instruction methodology employed within ATCOFA. The project consisted of performing a change detection…

  19. Applying Human Computation Methods to Information Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Human Computation methods such as crowdsourcing and games with a purpose (GWAP) have each recently drawn considerable attention for their ability to synergize the strengths of people and technology to accomplish tasks that are challenging for either to do well alone. Despite this increased attention, much of this transformation has been focused on…

  20. NASA Applied Sciences' DEVELOP Program Fosters the Next Generation of Earth Remote Sensing Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Lauren M.; Brozen, Madeline W.; Gleason, Jonathan L.; Silcox, Tracey L.; Rea, Mimi; Holley, Sharon D.; Renneboog, Nathan; Underwood, Lauren W.; Ross, Kenton W.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing technology and the science associated with the evaluation of the resulting data are constantly evolving. To meet the growing needs related to this industry, a team of personnel that understands the fundamental science as well as the scientific applications related to remote sensing is essential. Therefore, the workforce that will excel in this field requires individuals who not only have a strong academic background, but who also have practical hands-on experience with remotely sensed data, and have developed knowledge of its real-world applications. NASA's DEVELOP Program has played an integral role in fulfilling this need. DEVELOP is a NASA Science Mission Directorate Applied Sciences training and development program that extends the benefits of NASA Earth science research and technology to society.

  1. Social and Psychological Aspects of Applied Human Genetics: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, James R., Comp.

    This bibliography is a selective compilation of books and articles which focus on the psychological and social issues of applied human genetics. It is centered in particular around problems, issues, and discussions of genetic counseling, the primary mechanism by which human genetics has been applied to date. It includes those entries which, on the…

  2. Inertial and magnetic sensing of human motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roetenberg, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Movement and posture tracking of the human body is of great interest in many different disciplines such as monitoring of activities of daily living, assessment of working load in ergonomics studies, measurement of neurological disorders, computer animation, and virtual reality applications. This the

  3. New trends in applied harmonic analysis sparse representations, compressed sensing, and multifractal analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cabrelli, Carlos; Jaffard, Stephane; Molter, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    This volume is a selection of written notes corresponding to courses taught at the CIMPA School: "New Trends in Applied Harmonic Analysis: Sparse Representations, Compressed Sensing and Multifractal Analysis". New interactions between harmonic analysis and signal and image processing have seen striking development in the last 10 years, and several technological deadlocks have been solved through the resolution of deep theoretical problems in harmonic analysis. New Trends in Applied Harmonic Analysis focuses on two particularly active areas that are representative of such advances: multifractal analysis, and sparse representation and compressed sensing. The contributions are written by leaders in these areas, and covers both theoretical aspects and applications. This work should prove useful not only to PhD students and postdocs in mathematics and signal and image processing, but also to researchers working in related topics.

  4. Sense of presence and anxiety during virtual social interactions between a human and virtual humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nexhmedin Morina

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET has been shown to be effective in treatment of anxiety disorders. Yet, there is lack of research on the extent to which interaction between the individual and virtual humans can be successfully implanted to increase levels of anxiety for therapeutic purposes. This proof-of-concept pilot study aimed at examining levels of the sense of presence and anxiety during exposure to virtual environments involving social interaction with virtual humans and using different virtual reality displays. A non-clinical sample of 38 participants was randomly assigned to either a head-mounted display (HMD with motion tracker and sterescopic view condition or a one-screen projection-based virtual reality display condition. Participants in both conditions engaged in free speech dialogues with virtual humans controlled by research assistants. It was hypothesized that exposure to virtual social interactions will elicit moderate levels of sense of presence and anxiety in both groups. Further it was expected that participants in the HMD condition will report higher scores of sense of presence and anxiety than participants in the one-screen projection-based display condition. Results revealed that in both conditions virtual social interactions were associated with moderate levels of sense of presence and anxiety. Additionally, participants in the HMD condition reported significantly higher levels of presence than those in the one-screen projection-based display condition (p = .001. However, contrary to the expectations neither the average level of anxiety nor the highest level of anxiety during exposure to social virtual environments differed between the groups (p = .97 and p = .75, respectively. The findings suggest that virtual social interactions can be successfully applied in VRET to enhance sense of presence and anxiety. Furthermore, our results indicate that one-screen projection-based displays can successfully activate levels

  5. Assessment of Flooded Areas Projections and Floods Potential Impacts Applying Remote Sensing Imagery and Demographic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D. A.; Carriello, F.; Fernandes, P. J. F.; Garofolo Lopes, L.; Siqueira Júnior, J. L.

    2016-06-01

    Assessing vulnerability and potential impacts associated with extreme discharges requires an accurate topographic description in order to estimate the extension of flooded areas. However, in most populated regions, topographic data obtained by in-situ measurements is not available. In this case, digital elevation models derived from remote sensing date are usually applied. Moreover, this digital elevation models have intrinsic errors that introduce bigger uncertainty in results than the associated to hydrological projections. On the other hand, estimations of flooded areas through remote sensing images provide accurate information, which could be used for the construction of river level-flooded area relationships regarding vulnerability assessment. In this work, this approach is applied for the city of Porto Velho in the Brazilian Amazonia to assess potential vulnerability to floods associated with climate change projections. The approach is validated using census data, provided by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, and information about socio-economical injuries associated to historical floods, provided by the Brazilian Civil Defence. Hydrological projections under climate change are carried out using several downscaling of climate projections as inputs in a hydrological model. Results show more accurate estimation of flood impacts than the obtained using digital elevation models derivate from remote sensing data. This reduces uncertainties in the assessment of vulnerability to floods associated with climate change in the region.

  6. REMOTE SENSING IMAGE CLASSIFICATION APPLIED TO THE FIRST NATIONAL GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION CENSUS OF CHINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Image classification will still be a long way in the future, although it has gone almost half a century. In fact, researchers have gained many fruits in the image classification domain, but there is still a long distance between theory and practice. However, some new methods in the artificial intelligence domain will be absorbed into the image classification domain and draw on the strength of each to offset the weakness of the other, which will open up a new prospect. Usually, networks play the role of a high-level language, as is seen in Artificial Intelligence and statistics, because networks are used to build complex model from simple components. These years, Bayesian Networks, one of probabilistic networks, are a powerful data mining technique for handling uncertainty in complex domains. In this paper, we apply Tree Augmented Naive Bayesian Networks (TAN to texture classification of High-resolution remote sensing images and put up a new method to construct the network topology structure in terms of training accuracy based on the training samples. Since 2013, China government has started the first national geographical information census project, which mainly interprets geographical information based on high-resolution remote sensing images. Therefore, this paper tries to apply Bayesian network to remote sensing image classification, in order to improve image interpretation in the first national geographical information census project. In the experiment, we choose some remote sensing images in Beijing. Experimental results demonstrate TAN outperform than Naive Bayesian Classifier (NBC and Maximum Likelihood Classification Method (MLC in the overall classification accuracy. In addition, the proposed method can reduce the workload of field workers and improve the work efficiency. Although it is time consuming, it will be an attractive and effective method for assisting office operation of image interpretation.

  7. Remote Sensing Image Classification Applied to the First National Geographical Information Census of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Wen, Zongyong; Zhu, Zhaorong; Xia, Qiang; Shun, Lan

    2016-06-01

    Image classification will still be a long way in the future, although it has gone almost half a century. In fact, researchers have gained many fruits in the image classification domain, but there is still a long distance between theory and practice. However, some new methods in the artificial intelligence domain will be absorbed into the image classification domain and draw on the strength of each to offset the weakness of the other, which will open up a new prospect. Usually, networks play the role of a high-level language, as is seen in Artificial Intelligence and statistics, because networks are used to build complex model from simple components. These years, Bayesian Networks, one of probabilistic networks, are a powerful data mining technique for handling uncertainty in complex domains. In this paper, we apply Tree Augmented Naive Bayesian Networks (TAN) to texture classification of High-resolution remote sensing images and put up a new method to construct the network topology structure in terms of training accuracy based on the training samples. Since 2013, China government has started the first national geographical information census project, which mainly interprets geographical information based on high-resolution remote sensing images. Therefore, this paper tries to apply Bayesian network to remote sensing image classification, in order to improve image interpretation in the first national geographical information census project. In the experiment, we choose some remote sensing images in Beijing. Experimental results demonstrate TAN outperform than Naive Bayesian Classifier (NBC) and Maximum Likelihood Classification Method (MLC) in the overall classification accuracy. In addition, the proposed method can reduce the workload of field workers and improve the work efficiency. Although it is time consuming, it will be an attractive and effective method for assisting office operation of image interpretation.

  8. Development of knowledge based operation system for making product matching with requirement by human sense; Kansei tekigo seihinseizo wo mezashita chiteki opereshon shisumtemu ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Hiroyuki [Nagoya University, Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Biotechnology

    1999-12-16

    Knowledge based operation system was developed in order to apply the human sense to process operation. Since beverages such as coffee, beer and sake, are seriously evaluated by human sense, those sensory evaluations or data on those chemical composition were subjected to this research. Fuzzy neural network (FNN) ro its hierarchical structure (HFNN) was superior tool for modeling of human sense. With respect to the determination of the chemical composition from desired sensory evaluation, an innovative tool, CF-GA, was newly developed. Using these tools, construction of knowledge based operation system for making the product matching with requirement by human sense became promising. (author)

  9. From Nose to Brain: Un-Sensed Electrical Currents Applied in the Nose Alter Activity in Deep Brain Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Tali; Shushan, Sagit; Ravia, Aharon; Hahamy, Avital; Secundo, Lavi; Weissbrod, Aharon; Ben-Yakov, Aya; Holtzman, Yael; Cohen-Atsmoni, Smadar; Roth, Yehudah; Sobel, Noam

    2016-09-02

    Rules linking patterns of olfactory receptor neuron activation in the nose to activity patterns in the brain and ensuing odor perception remain poorly understood. Artificially stimulating olfactory neurons with electrical currents and measuring ensuing perception may uncover these rules. We therefore inserted an electrode into the nose of 50 human volunteers and applied various currents for about an hour in each case. This induced assorted non-olfactory sensations but never once the perception of odor. To validate contact with the olfactory path, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure resting-state brain activity in 18 subjects before and after un-sensed stimulation. We observed stimulation-induced neural decorrelation specifically in primary olfactory cortex, implying contact with the olfactory path. These results suggest that indiscriminate olfactory activation does not equate with odor perception. Moreover, this effort serendipitously uncovered a novel path for minimally invasive brain stimulation through the nose.

  10. Report on achievements of research and development of a technology to apply human senses to measurements in fiscal 1993. 4. Research and development of correlation and evaluation technology (Part 1); Ningen kankaku keisoku oyo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu. 4. Sokan hyoka gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    The achievements during fiscal 1993 of research and development on a method to evaluate warm heat comfort by living scenes of workers by using a human body thermal model included completion of a human thermal model introduced with physiological knowledge such as artery-vein anastomosed (AVA) blood vessels and two-system blood circulation net. The effectiveness of the model was experimented and verified. It was made possible to estimate the reversal phenomenon occurring in hot heat environment, in which skin temperatures at peripheral body parts rise higher than those in the body trunk part, and skin temperature distribution. In the correlation study to estimate statistically the sense volume from skin temperatures, it was possible to estimate significantly different sense volumes from face skin temperatures, but the estimation accuracy was low because of such factors as difference in individuals. What is important in enhancing the accuracy is to identify ecological reactions of human being caused from change in the sense volume, select effective parameters, and study the mechanisms. In order to develop stress relaxing scents, discussions were given on degree of subjectivity stress by question papers and cortisol concentration in saliva as the parameters. An experimental system was developed to measure the effects of the scents to relax work stresses. A screening method was developed, whereas effects of 15 kinds of scent materials were investigated. (NEDO)

  11. Sharing NASA Science with Decision Makers: A Perspective from NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training (ARSET) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, A. I.; Blevins, B.; Hook, E.

    2015-12-01

    NASA ARSET http://arset.gsfc.nasa.gov has been providing applied remote sensing training since 2008. The goals of the program are to develop the technical and analytical skills necessary to utilize NASA resources for decision-support. The program has reached over 3500 participants, with 1600 stakeholders from 100 countries in 2015 alone. The target audience for the program are professionals engaged in environmental management in the public and private sectors, such as air quality forecasters, public utilities, water managers and non-governmental organizations engaged in conservation. Many program participants have little or no expertise in NASA remote sensing, and it's frequently their very first exposure to NASA's vast resources. One the key challenges for the program has been the evolution and refinement of its approach to communicating NASA data access, research, and ultimately its value to stakeholders. We discuss ARSET's best practices for sharing NASA science, which include 1) training ARSET staff and other NASA scientists on methods for science communication, 2) communicating the proper amount of scientific information at a level that is commensurate with the technical skills of program participants, 3) communicating the benefit of NASA resources to stakeholders, and 4) getting to know the audience and tailoring the message so that science information is conveyed within the context of agencies' unique environmental challenges.

  12. An applied research on remote sensing classification in the Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Due to complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, the classification accuracy is unsatisfactory when a single supervised classification is used in the remote sensing investigation of the sloping field. Taking the loess hill and gully area of northern Shaanxi Province as a test area, a research was conducted to extract sloping field and other land use categories by applying an integrated classification. Based on an integration of supervised classification and unsupervised classification, sampling method is remarkably improved. The results show that the classification accuracy is satisfactory by the method and is of critical significance in obtaining up-to-date information of the sloping field, which should be helpful in the state key project of converting fiumland to forest and grassland on slope land in this area. This research sought to improve the appfication accuracy of image classification in complex terrain areas.

  13. Applying Organizational Commitment and Human Capital Theories to Emigration Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhohlyad, Olga; McLean, Gary N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to bring some additional insight into the issue of emigration by establishing a relationship between emigration and psychic return of citizens to their human capital investment in the country. Design/methodology/approach: The article adopts a quantitative research strategy. It applies organizational commitment and human…

  14. Lower Limb Wearable Capacitive Sensing and Its Applications to Recognizing Human Gaits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qining Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present an approach to sense human body capacitance and apply it to recognize lower limb locomotion modes. The proposed wearable sensing system includes sensing bands, a signal processing circuit and a gait event detection module. Experiments on long-term working stability, adaptability to disturbance and locomotion mode recognition are carried out to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Twelve able-bodied subjects are recruited, and eleven normal gait modes are investigated. With an event-dependent linear discriminant analysis classifier and feature selection procedure, four time-domain features are used for pattern recognition and satisfactory recognition accuracies (97:3% ± 0:5%, 97:0% ± 0:4%, 95:6% ± 0:9% and 97:0% ± 0:4% for four phases of one gait cycle respectively are obtained. The accuracies are comparable with that from electromyography-based systems and inertial-based systems. The results validate the effectiveness of the proposed lower limb capacitive sensing approach in recognizing human normal gaits.

  15. Human Behavior Recognition Using Foot Pressure Sensing Shoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Chika; Ozaki, Kenji; Ezoe, Ryosuke; Hosaka, Hiroshi; Yamato, Hiroyuki

    To recognize human behavior in unlimited environments, sensing shoes for measuring foot pressure distribution were developed. Seven pressure sensors were installed on an insole, and a measurement module was embedded in the shoe. An analysis for discriminating the user's movements from the foot pressure distribution was examined, considering the movements, walking, running, standing, sitting, going upstairs and downstairs, and cycling. These seven actions were discriminated using feature quantities such as the average, standard deviation, maximum, and difference deviation extracted from the data of three sensors by discriminant analysis. The evaluation results showed highly accurate behavior recognition based on foot pressure at some points. In addition, by canonical discriminant analysis, six discriminant functions which classify the seven actions with an accuracy of 100% were derived by using feature quantities extracted from five sensors. The results confirmed that discriminant analysis can be used for automatically recognizing human behaviors based on foot pressure data.

  16. A Touch Sensing Technique Using the Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Fields on the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfekey, Hatem; Bastawrous, Hany Ayad; Okamoto, Shogo

    2016-12-02

    Touch sensing is a fundamental approach in human-to-machine interfaces, and is currently under widespread use. Many current applications use active touch sensing technologies. Passive touch sensing technologies are, however, more adequate to implement low power or energy harvesting touch sensing interfaces. This paper presents a passive touch sensing technique based on the fact that the human body is affected by the surrounding extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields, such as those of AC power lines. These external ELF fields induce electric potentials on the human body-because human tissues exhibit some conductivity at these frequencies-resulting in what is called AC hum. We therefore propose a passive touch sensing system that detects this hum noise when a human touch occurs, thus distinguishing between touch and non-touch events. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is validated by designing and implementing a flexible touch sensing keyboard.

  17. A Touch Sensing Technique Using the Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Fields on the Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem Elfekey

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Touch sensing is a fundamental approach in human-to-machine interfaces, and is currently under widespread use. Many current applications use active touch sensing technologies. Passive touch sensing technologies are, however, more adequate to implement low power or energy harvesting touch sensing interfaces. This paper presents a passive touch sensing technique based on the fact that the human body is affected by the surrounding extremely low frequency (ELF electromagnetic fields, such as those of AC power lines. These external ELF fields induce electric potentials on the human body—because human tissues exhibit some conductivity at these frequencies—resulting in what is called AC hum. We therefore propose a passive touch sensing system that detects this hum noise when a human touch occurs, thus distinguishing between touch and non-touch events. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is validated by designing and implementing a flexible touch sensing keyboard.

  18. The Concept of Human Functional State in Russian Applied Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna B. Leonova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of human functional states (HFS is considered in the framework of activity regulation approach developed in Russian applied psychology. Aimed at the analysis of changes in regulatory mechanisms of on-going activity, structural methods for multilevel assessment of workers’ states are discussed. Three different strategies of data integration are proposed regarding the types of essential practical problems. Their usability is exemplified with the help of two empirical studies concerned with reliability of fire-fighters’ work in the Chernobyl Zone and effects of interruptions in computerized office environment. A general framework for applied HFS research is proposed in order to develop new ecologically valid psychodiagnostic procedures that can help to create efficient stress-management programs for enhancing human reliability and performance in complex job environment.

  19. Age-related changes in the joint position sense of the human hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalisch T

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tobias Kalisch,1,2,* Jan-Christoph Kattenstroth,2,* Rebecca Kowalewski,2 Martin Tegenthoff,1 Hubert R Dinse21Department of Neurology, BG-Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany; 2Neural Plasticity Lab, Institute for Neuroinformatics, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Age-related changes in lower limb joint position sense and their contributions to postural stability are well documented. In contrast, only a few studies have investigated the effect of age on proprioceptive hand function. Here, we introduce a novel test for measuring joint position sense in the fingers of the human hand. In a concurrent matching task, subjects had to detect volume differences between polystyrene balls grasped with their dominant (seven test stimuli: 126–505 cm3 and their nondominant hand (three reference stimuli: 210, 294, and 505 cm3. A total of 21 comparisons were performed to assess the number of errors, the weight of errors (ie, the volume difference between test and reference stimuli, and the direction of errors (ie, over- or underestimation of test stimulus. The test was applied to 45 healthy subjects aged 21 to 79 years. Our results revealed that all variables changed significantly with age, with the number of errors showing the strongest increase. We also assessed tactile acuity (two-point discrimination thresholds and sensorimotor performance (pegboard performance in a subset of subjects, but these scores did not correlate with joint position sense performance, indicating that the test reveals specific information about joint position sense that is not captured with pure sensory or motor tests. The average test–retest reliability assessed on 3 consecutive days was 0.8 (Cronbach's alpha. Our results demonstrate that this novel test reveals age-related decline in joint position sense acuity that is independent from sensorimotor performance.Keywords: aging, hand

  20. Sense of presence and anxiety during virtual social interactions between a human and virtual humans

    OpenAIRE

    Nexhmedin Morina; Willem-Paul Brinkman; Dwi Hartanto; Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.

    2014-01-01

    Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has been shown to be effective in treatment of anxiety disorders. Yet, there is lack of research on the extent to which interaction between the individual and virtual humans can be successfully implanted to increase levels of anxiety for therapeutic purposes. This proof-of-concept pilot study aimed at examining levels of the sense of presence and anxiety during exposure to virtual environments involving social interaction with virtual humans and using d...

  1. Human factor engineering applied to nuclear power plant design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manrique, A. [TECNATOM SA, BWR General Electric Business Manager, Madrid (Spain); Valdivia, J.C. [TECNATOM SA, Operation Engineering Project Manager, Madrid (Spain); Jimenez, A. [TECNATOM SA, Operation Engineering Div. Manager, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    For the design and construction of new nuclear power plants as well as for maintenance and operation of the existing ones new man-machine interface designs and modifications are been produced. For these new designs Human Factor Engineering must be applied the same as for any other traditional engineering discipline. Advantages of implementing adequate Human Factor Engineering techniques in the design of nuclear reactors have become not only a fact recognized by the majority of engineers and operators but also an explicit requirement regulated and mandatory for the new designs of the so called advanced reactors. Additionally, the big saving achieved by a nuclear power plant having an operating methodology which significantly decreases the risk of operating errors makes it necessary and almost vital its implementation. The first step for this is preparing a plan to incorporate all the Human Factor Engineering principles and developing an integral design of the Instrumentation and Control and Man-machine interface systems. (author)

  2. Reconcilable differences? Human diversity, cultural relativity, and sense of community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Greg; Kloos, Bret; Green, Eric P; Franco, Margarita M

    2011-03-01

    Sense of community (SOC) is one of the most widely used and studied constructs in community psychology. As proposed by Sarason in (The Psychological sense of community: prospects for a community psychology, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 1974), SOC represents the strength of bonding among community members. It is a valuable component of community life, and it has been linked to positive mental health outcomes, citizen participation, and community connectedness. However, promotion of SOC can become problematic in community psychology praxis when it conflicts with other core values proposed to define the field, namely values of human diversity, cultural relativity, and heterogeneity of experience and perspective. Several commentators have noted that promotion of SOC can conflict with multicultural diversity because it tends to emphasize group member similarity and appears to be higher in homogeneous communities. In this paper, we introduce the idea of a community-diversity dialectic as part of praxis and research in community psychology. We argue that systematic consideration of cultural psychology perspectives can guide efforts to address a community-diversity dialectic and revise SOC formulations that ultimately will invigorate community research and action. We provide a working agenda for addressing this dialectic, proposing that systematic consideration of the creative tension between SOC and diversity can be beneficial to community psychology.

  3. At the Limit: Introducing Energy with Human Senses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinken, Lisa; Heusler, Stefan; Carmesin, Hans-Otto

    2016-12-01

    Energy belongs to the core ideas of the physics curriculum. But at the same time, energy is one of the most complex topics in science education since it occurs in multiple ways, such as motion, sound, light, and thermal energy. It can neither be destroyed nor created, but only converted. Due to the variety of relevant scales and abstractness of the term energy, the question arises how to introduce energy at the introductory physics level. The aim of this article is to demonstrate how the concept of energy can become meaningful in the context of the human senses. Three simple experiments to investigate the minimal amount of energy that is required to generate a sensory perception are presented. In this way students can learn that even different sensory perceptions can be compared by using energy as the unifying concept.

  4. Tracking the Evolution of Smartphone Sensing for Monitoring Human Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rosario, Michael B; Redmond, Stephen J; Lovell, Nigel H

    2015-07-31

    Advances in mobile technology have led to the emergence of the "smartphone", a new class of device with more advanced connectivity features that have quickly made it a constant presence in our lives. Smartphones are equipped with comparatively advanced computing capabilities, a global positioning system (GPS) receivers, and sensing capabilities (i.e., an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and more recently magnetometer and barometer) which can be found in wearable ambulatory monitors (WAMs). As a result, algorithms initially developed for WAMs that "count" steps (i.e., pedometers); gauge physical activity levels; indirectly estimate energy expenditure and monitor human movement can be utilised on the smartphone. These algorithms may enable clinicians to "close the loop" by prescribing timely interventions to improve or maintain wellbeing in populations who are at risk of falling or suffer from a chronic disease whose progression is linked to a reduction in movement and mobility. The ubiquitous nature of smartphone technology makes it the ideal platform from which human movement can be remotely monitored without the expense of purchasing, and inconvenience of using, a dedicated WAM. In this paper, an overview of the sensors that can be found in the smartphone are presented, followed by a summary of the developments in this field with an emphasis on the evolution of algorithms used to classify human movement. The limitations identified in the literature will be discussed, as well as suggestions about future research directions.

  5. Tracking the Evolution of Smartphone Sensing for Monitoring Human Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. del Rosario

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in mobile technology have led to the emergence of the “smartphone”, a new class of device with more advanced connectivity features that have quickly made it a constant presence in our lives. Smartphones are equipped with comparatively advanced computing capabilities, a global positioning system (GPS receivers, and sensing capabilities (i.e., an inertial measurement unit (IMU and more recently magnetometer and barometer which can be found in wearable ambulatory monitors (WAMs. As a result, algorithms initially developed for WAMs that “count” steps (i.e., pedometers; gauge physical activity levels; indirectly estimate energy expenditure and monitor human movement can be utilised on the smartphone. These algorithms may enable clinicians to “close the loop” by prescribing timely interventions to improve or maintain wellbeing in populations who are at risk of falling or suffer from a chronic disease whose progression is linked to a reduction in movement and mobility. The ubiquitous nature of smartphone technology makes it the ideal platform from which human movement can be remotely monitored without the expense of purchasing, and inconvenience of using, a dedicated WAM. In this paper, an overview of the sensors that can be found in the smartphone are presented, followed by a summary of the developments in this field with an emphasis on the evolution of algorithms used to classify human movement. The limitations identified in the literature will be discussed, as well as suggestions about future research directions.

  6. Apply an Augmented Reality in a Mobile Guidance to Increase Sense of Place for Heritage Places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Lien; Hou, Huei-Tse; Pan, Chao-Yang; Sung, Yao-Ting; Chang, Kuo-En

    2015-01-01

    Based on the sense of place theory and the design principles of guidance and interpretation, this study developed an augmented reality mobile guidance system that used a historical geo-context-embedded visiting strategy. This tool for heritage guidance and educational activities enhanced visitor sense of place. This study consisted of 3 visitor…

  7. Extracellular calcium sensing receptor in human pancreatic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, G Z; Kittel, Á; Riccardi, D; Case, R M; Elliott, A C; Varga, G

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: The extracellular calcium sensing receptor (CaR) plays a key role in the calcium homeostatic system and is therefore widely expressed in tissues involved in calcium metabolism. However, the CaR has also been identified in other tissues where its role is less clear. We have investigated the presence of the CaR in the human pancreas. Methods: Messenger RNA for the CaR was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the protein was localised by immunostaining. CaR function was assayed in Capan-1 cells by measuring intracellular calcium and [3H] thymidine incorporation. Results: The receptor was highly expressed in human pancreatic ducts. It was also expressed in exocrine acinar cells, in islets of Langerhans, and in intrapancreatic nerves and blood vessels. The CaR was expressed in both normal and neoplastic human tissue samples but was detected in only one of five ductal adenocarcinoma cells lines examined. Experiments on the CaR expressing adenocarcinoma cell line Capan-1 showed that the CaR was functional and was linked to mobilisation of intracellular calcium. Stimulation of the CaR reduced Capan-1 cell proliferation. Conclusions: We propose that the CaR may play multiple functional roles in the human pancreas. In particular, the CaR on the duct luminal membrane may monitor and regulate the Ca2+ concentration in pancreatic juice by triggering ductal electrolyte and fluid secretion. This could help to prevent precipitation of calcium salts in the duct lumen. The CaR may also help to regulate the proliferation of pancreatic ductal cells. PMID:12377811

  8. Observing the Earth from an Astronaut's View - Applied Remote Sensing in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienow, Andreas; Hodam, Henryk; Menz, Gunter; Kerstin, Voß

    2015-04-01

    Since spring 2014, NASA conducts the High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) mission at the International Space Station (ISS). HDEV consists of four cameras mounted at ESA's Columbus laboratory. They continuously observe our earth in three different perspectives. Hence, they provide not only footage showing the Sun and the Moon rising and setting but also regular images of landscapes that are difficult to access, such as mountain ranges, deserts, and tropical rainforests. The German educational project "Columbus Eye", which is executed by the University of Bonn and is funded by the German Aerospace Center (DLR), aims at the implementation of the HDEV imagery and videos in a teaching portal: www.columbuseye.uni-bonn.de. Pupils should be motivated to work with the footage in order to learn about pattern and processes of the coupled human-environment system like volcano eruptions or deforestation. The material is developed on the experiences of the FIS (German abbreviation for "Remote Sensing in Schools") project and its learning portal (www.fis.uni-bonn.de/en). Recognizing that in-depth use of satellite imagery can only be achieved by the means of computer aided learning methods, a sizeable number of e-Learning contents in German and English have been created throughout the last 7 years since FIS' kickoff. The talk presents the educational valorization of ISS and satellite borne imagery data as well as their interactive implementation for teachers and pupils in both learning portals. It will be shown which possibilities the topic of earth observation from space holds ready for teaching the regular STEM curricula. A report of first experiences of a nationwide road show accompanying the mission of the ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst will be given. Among others it involved an event during which pupils from a secondary school in North Rhine-Westphalia have talked to the astronaut via ham radio. Accordingly, the presentation addresses the question of how synergies of human

  9. A comparison of synthetic aperture radars applied for satellite remote sensing of the ocean surface

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tilley, D.G.; Sarma, Y.V.B.

    Doppler imaging radars have orbited the earth aboard several spacecraft for the purpose of monitoring the ocean. Oceanographic applications of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) include measuring ocean wave fields, monitoring current fronts and sensing...

  10. Estimating three-dimensional orientation of human body parts by inertial/magnetic sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2011-01-01

    User-worn sensing units composed of inertial and magnetic sensors are becoming increasingly popular in various domains, including biomedical engineering, robotics, virtual reality, where they can also be applied for real-time tracking of the orientation of human body parts in the three-dimensional (3D) space. Although they are a promising choice as wearable sensors under many respects, the inertial and magnetic sensors currently in use offer measuring performance that are critical in order to achieve and maintain accurate 3D-orientation estimates, anytime and anywhere. This paper reviews the main sensor fusion and filtering techniques proposed for accurate inertial/magnetic orientation tracking of human body parts; it also gives useful recipes for their actual implementation.

  11. Surface-bounded growth modeling applied to human mandibles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Per Rønsholt

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents mathematical and computational techniques for three dimensional growth modeling applied to human mandibles. The longitudinal shape changes make the mandible a complex bone. The teeth erupt and the condylar processes change direction, from pointing predominantly backward...... to yield a spatially dense field. Different methods for constructing the sparse field are compared. Adaptive Gaussian smoothing is the preferred method since it is parameter free and yields good results in practice. A new method, geometry-constrained diffusion, is used to simplify The most successful...... growth model is linear and based on results from shape analysis and principal component analysis. The growth model is tested in a cross validation study with good results. The worst case mean modeling error in the cross validation study is 3.7 mm. It occurs when modeling the shape and size of a 12 years...

  12. Time-domain fluorescence methods as applied to pH sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitsch, Max E.; Draxler, Sonja; Leiner, Marc J. P.

    1993-04-01

    Sensors based on luminescence suffer from the fact that during the operating time of the instrument changes in source intensity, light throughput, detector sensitivity, indicator quantum yield, and indicator concentration are inevitable and have to be overcome by extensive referencing and recalibration procedures. Sensors based on luminescence decay time should not suffer from these drawbacks. Decay-time sensing has relied so far on dynamic quenching, which is not well suited for pH measurements. Several other mechanisms are described in this contribution. The conditions necessary for an indicator to be useful in a decay time based pH sensing scheme are clarified and the suitability of this scheme is demonstrated.

  13. Capturing the fugitive: Applying remote sensing to terrestrial animal distribution and diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leyequien Abarca, E.; Verrelst, J.; Slot, M.; Schaepman-Strub, G.; Heitkönig, I.M.A.; Skidmore, A.K.

    2007-01-01

    Amongst many ongoing initiatives to preserve biodiversity, the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment again shows the importance to slow down the loss of biological diversity. However, there is still a gap in the overview of global patterns of species distributions. This paper reviews how remote sensing ha

  14. Making Human Beings Human: Bioecological Perspectives on Human Development. The SAGE Program on Applied Developmental Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    To a greater extent than any other species, human beings create the environments that, in turn, shape their own development. This book endeavors to demonstrate that human beings can also develop those environments to optimize their most constructive genetic potentials. What makes human beings human, therefore, is both the potential to shape their…

  15. Applying Human Factors during the SIS Life Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, K.

    2010-05-05

    Safety Instrumented Systems (SIS) are widely used in U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities for safety-critical applications. Although use of the SIS technology and computer-based digital controls, can improve performance and safety, it potentially introduces additional complexities, such as failure modes that are not readily detectable. Either automated actions or manual (operator) actions may be required to complete the safety instrumented function to place the process in a safe state or mitigate a hazard in response to an alarm or indication. DOE will issue a new standard, Application of Safety Instrumented Systems Used at DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities, to provide guidance for the design, procurement, installation, testing, maintenance, operation, and quality assurance of SIS used in safety significant functions at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities. The DOE standard focuses on utilizing the process industry consensus standard, American National Standards Institute/ International Society of Automation (ANSI/ISA) 84.00.01, Functional Safety: Safety Instrumented Systems for the Process Industry Sector, to support reliable SIS design throughout the DOE complex. SIS design must take into account human-machine interfaces and their limitations and follow good human factors engineering (HFE) practices. HFE encompasses many diverse areas (e.g., information display, user-system interaction, alarm management, operator response, control room design, and system maintainability), which affect all aspects of system development and modification. This paper presents how the HFE processes and principles apply throughout the SIS life cycle to support the design and use of SIS at DOE nonreactor nuclear facilities.

  16. Archimedean Witness: The Application of Remote Sensing as an Aid to Human Rights Prosecutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, James Robin

    The 21st century has seen a significant increase in the use of remote sensing technology in the international human rights arena for the purposes of documenting crimes against humanity. The nexus between remote sensing, human rights activism, and international criminal prosecutions sits at a significant crossroads within geographic thought, calling attention to the epistemological and geopolitical implications that stem from the "view from nowhere" afforded by satellite imagery. Therefore, this thesis is divided into three sections. The first looks at the geographical questions raised by the expansion of remote sensing use in the context of international activism. The second explores the complications inherent in the presentation of remote sensing data as evidence of war crimes. Building upon the first two, the third section is a case study in alternate forms of analysis, aimed at expanding the utility of remote sensing data in international criminal prosecutions.

  17. Capturing the fugitive: Applying remote sensing to terrestrial animal distribution and diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyequien, Euridice; Verrelst, Jochem; Slot, Martijn; Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela; Heitkönig, Ignas M. A.; Skidmore, Andrew

    2007-02-01

    Amongst many ongoing initiatives to preserve biodiversity, the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment again shows the importance to slow down the loss of biological diversity. However, there is still a gap in the overview of global patterns of species distributions. This paper reviews how remote sensing has been used to assess terrestrial faunal diversity, with emphasis on proxies and methodologies, while exploring prospective challenges for the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. We grouped and discussed papers dealing with the faunal taxa mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates into five classes of surrogates of animal diversity: (1) habitat suitability, (2) photosynthetic productivity, (3) multi-temporal patterns, (4) structural properties of habitat, and (5) forage quality. It is concluded that the most promising approach for the assessment, monitoring, prediction, and conservation of faunal diversity appears to be the synergy of remote sensing products and auxiliary data with ecological biodiversity models, and a subsequent validation of the results using traditional observation techniques.

  18. UAV Flight Experiments Applied to the Remote Sensing of Vegetated Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Salamí

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The miniaturization of electronics, computers and sensors has created new opportunities for remote sensing applications. Despite the current restrictions on regulation, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with small thermal, laser or spectral sensors has emerged as a promising alternative for assisting modeling, mapping and monitoring applications in rangelands, forests and agricultural environments. This review provides an overview of recent research that has reported UAV flight experiments on the remote sensing of vegetated areas. To provide a differential trend to other reviews, this paper is not limited to crops and precision agriculture applications, but also includes forest and rangeland applications. This work follows a top-down categorization strategy and attempts to fill the gap between application requirements and the characteristics of selected tools, payloads and platforms. Furthermore, correlations between common requirements and the most frequently used solutions are highlighted.

  19. Applying lessons learned to enhance human performance and reduce human error for ISS operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R.

    1998-09-01

    A major component of reliability, safety, and mission success for space missions is ensuring that the humans involved (flight crew, ground crew, mission control, etc.) perform their tasks and functions as required. This includes compliance with training and procedures during normal conditions, and successful compensation when malfunctions or unexpected conditions occur. A very significant issue that affects human performance in space flight is human error. Human errors can invalidate carefully designed equipment and procedures. If certain errors combine with equipment failures or design flaws, mission failure or loss of life can occur. The control of human error during operation of the International Space Station (ISS) will be critical to the overall success of the program. As experience from Mir operations has shown, human performance plays a vital role in the success or failure of long duration space missions. The Department of Energy`s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is developed a systematic approach to enhance human performance and reduce human errors for ISS operations. This approach is based on the systematic identification and evaluation of lessons learned from past space missions such as Mir to enhance the design and operation of ISS. This paper describes previous INEEL research on human error sponsored by NASA and how it can be applied to enhance human reliability for ISS.

  20. Airborne Geophysics and Remote Sensing Applied to Study Greenland Ice Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csatho, Beata M.

    2003-01-01

    Overview of project: we combined and jointly analysed geophysical, remote sensing and glaciological data for investigating the temporal changes in ice flow and the role of geologic control on glacial drainage. The project included two different studies, the investigation of recent changes of the Kangerlussuaq glacier and the study of geologic control of ice flow in NW Greenland, around the Humboldt, Petermann and Ryder glaciers.

  1. Ubiquitous Geo-Sensing for Context-Aware Analysis: Exploring Relationships between Environmental and Human Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euro Beinat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitous geo-sensing enables context-aware analyses of physical and social phenomena, i.e., analyzing one phenomenon in the context of another. Although such context-aware analysis can potentially enable a more holistic understanding of spatio-temporal processes, it is rarely documented in the scientific literature yet. In this paper we analyzed the collective human behavior in the context of the weather. We therefore explored the complex relationships between these two spatio-temporal phenomena to provide novel insights into the dynamics of urban systems. Aggregated mobile phone data, which served as a proxy for collective human behavior, was linked with the weather data from climate stations in the case study area, the city of Udine, Northern Italy. To identify and characterize potential patterns within the weather-human relationships, we developed a hybrid approach which integrates several spatio-temporal statistical analysis methods. Thereby we show that explanatory factor analysis, when applied to a number of meteorological variables, can be used to differentiate between normal and adverse weather conditions. Further, we measured the strength of the relationship between the ‘global’ adverse weather conditions and the spatially explicit effective variations in user-generated mobile network traffic for three distinct periods using the Maximal Information Coefficient (MIC. The analyses result in three spatially referenced maps of MICs which reveal interesting insights into collective human dynamics in the context of weather, but also initiate several new scientific challenges.

  2. Remote sensing survey applied to synthetic geological mapping in Ivory Coast (West Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroin, Jean-Paul; Delor, Claude; Simeon, Yves; Yao, Bertin

    1994-12-01

    We have used remote sensing as an additional method in 1:200 000-scale reconnaissance mapping of the Ivory Coast. Landsat imagery was chosen for its low cost, and its interest for relatively small-scale work and its synthetic and multispectral properties. This proved perfectly satisfactory, especially in the bush savanna to the north of latitude 7 deg 30'. The imagery was also compared with aeromagnetic survey results. The lithostructural features revealed by MSS can be directly correlated with field observations. 1) Certain clear facies variations (amphibolites or gabbros among acidic rocks, for example) are spectrally well expressed. Conglomerates are commonly distinctive (on the Katiola sheet for example), when they are sufficiently extensive and they form ridges that can be followed several tens of kilometres. 2) The traces of planar structures can, at least locally, be followed and correlated with a regional schistosity. Certain features mappable on images confirm offset across transcurrent structures identified on the ground (N-S transcurrent fault zones, for example). Our experience in Ivory Coast shows that the use of Landsat MSS imagery should systematically be considered for any small- scale studies in which only a small part of the budget can be attributed to remote sensing.

  3. Applying aerial digital photography as a spectral remote sensing technique for macrophytic cover assessment in small rural streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Y.; Hershkovitz, Y.; Gasith, A.; Ben-Dor, E.

    2011-12-01

    Although remote sensing of fluvial ecosystems is well developed, the tradeoff between spectral and spatial resolutions prevents its application in small streams (cognitive color) and high spatial resolution of aerial photography provides noise filtration and better sub-water detection capabilities than the HSR technique. C. Only the SRGB method applies for habitat and section scales; hence, its application together with in-situ grid transects for validation, may be optimal for use in similar scenarios. The HSR dataset was first degraded to 17 bands with the same spectral range as the RGB dataset and also to a dataset with 3 equivalent bands

  4. AN APPLIED RESEARCH ON APPROACH OF DYADIC WAVELET TRANSFORM FOR REMOTE SENSING IMAGE EDGE DETECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Wei; Xing Guangzhong; Hou Lantian; Qin Qiming; Wang Wenjun

    2006-01-01

    In the edge detection of Remote Sensing (RS) image, the useful detail losing and the spurious edge often appear. To solve the problem, the authors uses the dyadic wavelet to detect the edge of surface features by combining the edge detecting with the multi-resolution analyzing of the wavelet transform. Via the dyadic wavelet decomposing, the RS image of a certain appropriate scale is obtained, and the edge data of the plane and the upright directions are respectively figured out, then the gradient vector module of the surface features is worked out. By tracing them, the authors get the edge data of the object, therefore build the RS image which obtains the checked edge. This method can depress the effect of noise and examine exactly the edge data of the object by rule and line. With an experiment of an RS image which obtains an airport, the authors certificate the feasibility of the application of dyadic wavelet in the object edge detection.

  5. Pathogen sensing, subsequent signalling, and signalosome in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Olivier; Berthet, Julien; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2011-04-01

    Beyond haemostasis, platelets exert a potent role in innate immunity and particularly in its inflammatory arm. The extent of this action remains however debatable, despite clear - and old - evidence of a link between platelets and infection. Platelets can sense infectious pathogens by pathogen recognition receptors and they can even discriminate between various types of infectious signatures. In reply, they can shape their capacity to respond by activating a signalosome and by producing different profiles of pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products. The links between pathogen sensing, signalosome activation and protein production, and their finely tuned regulation are still under investigation since platelets lack a nucleus and thus, canonical molecular biology and genomics apparati.

  6. Best Practices for Improving Capacity Building Outcomes through Professional Training: Insights from NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training (ARSET) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, B.; Mehta, A. V.; Gupta, P.; Prados, A. I.; McCullum, A. J. K.; Schmidt, C.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training Program (ARSET), http://arset.gsfc.nasa.gov, has been providing applied remote sensing training since 2008. To date, the program has reached over 3500 participants, with 1600 stakeholders from 100 countries in 2015 alone. The goals of the program are to develop the technical and analytical skills necessary to utilize NASA resources for decision-support, and to help end-users navigate through the vast, freely available and open data resources. We discuss ARSET's best practices and training approach to improved data access and application of NASA satellite and model data for air quality, water resources, disasters, land, and wildfire management. ARSET follows an iterative approach where the end user community is engaged and data needs input is solicited throughout the training process. End-user data needs and feedback are also incorporated into current and future training content and communicated to NASA Applied Sciences Program principal investigators and data centers responsible for developing NASA tools, portals, data formats, and other data delivery structures. ARSET's success has relied upon 1) targeting outreach to applied science professionals both as training participants and collaborators in developing training activities 2) developing training content tailored to a specific to community's decision support activities and unique environmental challenges 3) promoting interactive forums during trainings to capture and assess end-user needs 4) training scientists within the program in science communication 5) adopting a contextualized gradual learning approach through online and hands-on instruction, and 6) conducting program evaluation, used to assess the benefit of ARSET to program participants and to plan and adapt future training content, methods, and outreach activities.

  7. Automatic Domain Adaptation of Word Sense Disambiguation Based on Sublanguage Semantic Schemata Applied to Clinical Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Domain adaptation of natural language processing systems is challenging because it requires human expertise. While manual effort is effective in creating a high quality knowledge base, it is expensive and time consuming. Clinical text adds another layer of complexity to the task due to privacy and confidentiality restrictions that hinder the…

  8. Digital imaging and remote sensing image generator (DIRSIG) as applied to NVESD sensor performance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Kimberly E.; Choi, Hee-sue S.; Kaur, Balvinder; Olson, Jeffrey T.; Hill, Clayton F.; Hutchinson, James A.

    2016-05-01

    The US Army's Communications Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center (CERDEC) Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (referred to as NVESD) is developing a virtual detection, recognition, and identification (DRI) testing methodology using simulated imagery as a means of augmenting the field testing component of sensor performance evaluation, which is expensive, resource intensive, time consuming, and limited to the available target(s) and existing atmospheric visibility and environmental conditions at the time of testing. Existing simulation capabilities such as the Digital Imaging Remote Sensing Image Generator (DIRSIG) and NVESD's Integrated Performance Model Image Generator (NVIPM-IG) can be combined with existing detection algorithms to reduce cost/time, minimize testing risk, and allow virtual/simulated testing using full spectral and thermal object signatures, as well as those collected in the field. NVESD has developed an end-to-end capability to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. Simple detection algorithms have been used on the degraded images generated by NVIPM-IG to determine the relative performance of the algorithms on both DIRSIG-simulated and collected images. Evaluating the degree to which the algorithm performance agrees between simulated versus field collected imagery is the first step in validating the simulated imagery procedure.

  9. Humans Need Not Apply: Robotization of Kepler Planet Candidate Vetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Jeffrey; Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Kepler Team

    2015-01-01

    Until now, the vast majority of Kepler planet candidate vetting has been performed by a dedicated team of humans. While human expertise has been invaluable in understanding the nuances of Kepler data, human vetting is very time-consuming and can be inconsistent. Over 20,000 threshold crossing events have been produced by the latest pipeline run on all 17 quarters of Kepler mission data, and many more artificial planet transits have been injected to estimate completeness. Given these large numbers, human vetting is no longer feasible on a reasonable time-scale, and would be difficult to characterize. We have created automated vetting programs known as "robovetters" that are specifically designed to mimic the decision-making process employed by the humans. They analyze both the light curve and pixel-level data in order to produce specific reasons for identifying false positives. We present benchmark tests on the Q1-Q16 Kepler planet catalog, which was vetted by humans, and present preliminary robovetter results based on a recent transit-search of the newly reprocessed Q1-Q17 data set.

  10. Remote sensing technologies applied to the irrigation water management on a golf course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedras, Celestina; Lança, Rui; Martins, Fernando; Soares, Cristina; Guerrero, Carlos; Paixão, Helena

    2015-04-01

    An adequate irrigation water management in a golf course is a complex task that depends upon climate (multiple microclimates) and land cover (where crops differ in morphology, physiology, plant density, sensitivity to water stress, etc.). These factors change both in time and space on a landscape. A direct measurement provides localized values of the evapotranspiration and climate conditions. Therefore this is not a practical or economical methodology for large-scale use due to spatial and temporal variability of vegetation, soils, and irrigation management strategies. Remote sensing technology combines large scale with ground measurement of vegetation indexes. These indexes are mathematical combinations of different spectral bands mostly in the visible and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. They represent the measures of vegetation activity that vary not only with the seasonal variability of green foliage, but also across space, thus they are suitable for detecting spatial landscape variability. The spectral vegetation indexes may enhance irrigation management through the information contained in spectral reflectance data. This study was carried out on the 18th fairway of the Royal Golf Course, Vale do Lobo, Portugal, and it aims to establish the relationship between direct measurements and vegetation indexes. For that it is required (1) to characterize the soil and climatic conditions, (2) to assessment of the irrigation system, (3) to estimate the evapotranspiration (4) and to calculate the vegetation indices. The vegetation indices were determined with basis on spectral bands red, green and blue, RGB, and near Infrared, NIR, obtained from the analysis of images acquired from a unpiloted aerial vehicle, UAV, platform. The measurements of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) were obtained from two meteorological stations located in the study area. The landscape evapotranspiration, ETL, was determined in the fairway with multiple microclimates

  11. Evaluative profiling of arsenic sensing and regulatory systems in the human microbiome project genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isokpehi, Raphael D; Udensi, Udensi K; Simmons, Shaneka S; Hollman, Antoinesha L; Cain, Antia E; Olofinsae, Samson A; Hassan, Oluwabukola A; Kashim, Zainab A; Enejoh, Ojochenemi A; Fasesan, Deborah E; Nashiru, Oyekanmi

    2014-01-01

    The influence of environmental chemicals including arsenic, a type 1 carcinogen, on the composition and function of the human-associated microbiota is of significance in human health and disease. We have developed a suite of bioinformatics and visual analytics methods to evaluate the availability (presence or absence) and abundance of functional annotations in a microbial genome for seven Pfam protein families: As(III)-responsive transcriptional repressor (ArsR), anion-transporting ATPase (ArsA), arsenical pump membrane protein (ArsB), arsenate reductase (ArsC), arsenical resistance operon transacting repressor (ArsD), water/glycerol transport protein (aquaporins), and universal stress protein (USP). These genes encode function for sensing and/or regulating arsenic content in the bacterial cell. The evaluative profiling strategy was applied to 3,274 genomes from which 62 genomes from 18 genera were identified to contain genes for the seven protein families. Our list included 12 genomes in the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) from the following genera: Citrobacter, Escherichia, Lactobacillus, Providencia, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus. Gene neighborhood analysis of the arsenic resistance operon in the genome of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482, a human gut symbiont, revealed the adjacent arrangement of genes for arsenite binding/transfer (ArsD) and cytochrome c biosynthesis (DsbD_2). Visual analytics facilitated evaluation of protein annotations in 367 genomes in the phylum Bacteroidetes identified multiple genomes in which genes for ArsD and DsbD_2 were adjacently arranged. Cytochrome c, produced by a posttranslational process, consists of heme-containing proteins important for cellular energy production and signaling. Further research is desired to elucidate arsenic resistance and arsenic-mediated cellular energy production in the Bacteroidetes.

  12. Artificial intelligence in medicine: humans need not apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diprose, William; Buist, Nicholas

    2016-05-06

    Artificial intelligence (AI) is a rapidly growing field with a wide range of applications. Driven by economic constraints and the potential to reduce human error, we believe that over the coming years AI will perform a significant amount of the diagnostic and treatment decision-making traditionally performed by the doctor. Humans would continue to be an important part of healthcare delivery, but in many situations, less expensive fit-for-purpose healthcare workers could be trained to 'fill the gaps' where AI are less capable. As a result, the role of the doctor as an expensive problem-solver would become redundant.

  13. Applied Developmental Biology: Making Human Pancreatic Beta Cells for Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genes and signaling pathways that determine the differentiation and fate of a cell is a central goal of developmental biology. Using that information to gain mastery over the fates of cells presents new approaches to cell transplantation and drug discovery for human diseases including diabetes.

  14. Applying Human Capital Performance Bonds to Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stacy; Rothschild, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Profound demographic and technological changes are upon us, changes that pose new and evolving challenges requiring fresh approaches from virtually every sector and system. Education is no exception. As fiscal pressures grow, federal, state, and local governments are cutting back where they can, often in human service budgets. Ironically, these…

  15. HUMAN RIGHTS AND PROSPECTS FOR APPLYING CHEMICAL CASTRATION IN RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanna Karoevna ABRAMYAN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available I The paper examined challenges related to applying chemical castration the Russian community has faced, and assessed the prospect for further implementation as well. The issue has triggered an ample debate in various circles as a new probable way to prevent sexual crime events. The authors inferred that chemical castration should be an option of a complex of measures for pre-venting relapse into pedophilia.

  16. Detecting forest canopy layering: applying lidar remote sensing to further understand the role of vertical structure in species habitat preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, A. S.; Dubayah, R.; Swatantran, A.

    2011-12-01

    Full waveform lidar reflects off all forest canopy elements, showing not only height, but also the structure within the canopy from the top to the forest floor, making it an ideal remote sensing technology for research in forest ecosystem dynamics. Vertical stratification or canopy layering has long been noted as an essential element in the forest ecosystem and of importance for species habitat. This project explores the utility of lidar for characterizing forest canopy layering and applying canopy layering information to better understand species habitat preference. Canopy layering will be mapped across the landscape using full-waveform lidar remote sensing data from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). Two methods for quantifying layering have been developed from LVIS data collected during the summer of 2009 for Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire. The two layering datasets (one categorical, one continuous) describe how vertical stratification varies across the forest with canopy height and elevation. The relationships between of canopy layering and avian species habitat preference will also be assessed for bird species within Hubbard Brook Experimental forest. These results will provide ecologically meaningful information and a relevant method for quantifying canopy layering at the landscape scale, which will aid in a better understanding of forest ecosystem dynamics for forest management and species habitat research.

  17. Social Psychology Of Persuasion Applied To Human-agent Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghua Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses and evaluates the application of a social psychologically enriched, user-centered approach to agent architecture design. The major aim is to facilitate human-agent interaction (HAI by making agents not only algorithmically more intelligent but also socially more skillful in communicating with the user. A decision-making model and communicative argumentation strategies have been incorporated into the agent architecture. In the presented content resource management experiments, enhancement of human task performance is demonstrated for users that are supported by a persuasive agent. This superior performance seems to be rooted in a more trusting collaborative relationship between the user and the agent, rather than in the appropriateness of the agent's decision-making suggestions alone. In particular, the second experiment demonstrated that interface interaction design should follow the principles of task-orientation and implicitness. Making the influence of the agent too salient can trigger counterintentional effects, such as users' discomfort and psychological reactance.

  18. Sensing human hand motions for controlling dexterous robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Beth A.; Churchill, Philip J.; Little, Arthur D.

    1988-01-01

    The Dexterous Hand Master (DHM) system is designed to control dexterous robot hands such as the UTAH/MIT and Stanford/JPL hands. It is the first commercially available device which makes it possible to accurately and confortably track the complex motion of the human finger joints. The DHM is adaptable to a wide variety of human hand sizes and shapes, throughout their full range of motion.

  19. A sense of the mysterious science and the human spirit

    CERN Document Server

    Lightman, Alan

    2006-01-01

    From the bestselling author of Einstein's Dreams comes this lyrical and insightful collection of science writing that delves into the mysteries of the scientific process and exposes its beauty and intrigue.In these brilliant essays, Lightman explores the emotional life of science, the power of imagination, the creative moment, and the alternate ways in which scientists and humanists think about the world. Along the way, he provides in-depth portraits of some of the great geniuses of our time, including Albert Einstein, Richard Feynman, Edward Teller, and astronomer Vera Rubin. Thoughtful, beautifully written, and wonderfully original, A Sense of the Mysterious confirms Alan Lightman's unique position at the crossroads of science and art.

  20. Applying cybernetic technology to diagnose human pulmonary sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mei-Yung; Chou, Cheng-Han

    2014-06-01

    Chest auscultation is a crucial and efficient method for diagnosing lung disease; however, it is a subjective process that relies on physician experience and the ability to differentiate between various sound patterns. Because the physiological signals composed of heart sounds and pulmonary sounds (PSs) are greater than 120 Hz and the human ear is not sensitive to low frequencies, successfully making diagnostic classifications is difficult. To solve this problem, we constructed various PS recognition systems for classifying six PS classes: vesicular breath sounds, bronchial breath sounds, tracheal breath sounds, crackles, wheezes, and stridor sounds. First, we used a piezoelectric microphone and data acquisition card to acquire PS signals and perform signal preprocessing. A wavelet transform was used for feature extraction, and the PS signals were decomposed into frequency subbands. Using a statistical method, we extracted 17 features that were used as the input vectors of a neural network. We proposed a 2-stage classifier combined with a back-propagation (BP) neural network and learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network, which improves classification accuracy by using a haploid neural network. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve verifies the high performance level of the neural network. To expand traditional auscultation methods, we constructed various PS diagnostic systems that can correctly classify the six common PSs. The proposed device overcomes the lack of human sensitivity to low-frequency sounds and various PS waves, characteristic values, and a spectral analysis charts are provided to elucidate the design of the human-machine interface.

  1. Research on imaging, sensing, and characterization of cells at Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS), Academia Sinica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hui-Chen; Chang, Chun-Fang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Chu, Chih-Wei; Han, Hsieh-Cheng; Hatanaka, Koji; Hsieh, Tung-Han; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Chung; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Yang, Fu-Liang; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-12-01

    Development of imaging, sensing, and characterization of cells at Research Center for Applied Sciences (RCAS) of Academia Sinica in Taiwan is progressing rapidly. The research on advanced lattice light sheet microscopy for temporal visualization of cells in three dimensions at sub-cellular resolution shows novel imaging results. Label-free observation on filopodial dynamics provides a convenient assay on cancer cell motility. The newly-developed software enables us to track the movement of two types of particles through different channels and reconstruct the co-localized tracks. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for detecting urinary microRNA for diagnosis of acute kidney injury demonstrates excellent sensitivity. A fully automated and integrated portable reader was constructed as a home-based surveillance system for post-operation hepatocellular carcinoma. New microfluidic cell culture devices for fast and accurate characterizations prove various diagnosis capabilities.

  2. Contextual Sensing: Integrating Contextual Information with Human and Technical Geo-Sensor Information for Smart Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagl, Günther; Resch, Bernd; Blaschke, Thomas

    2015-07-14

    In this article we critically discuss the challenge of integrating contextual information, in particular spatiotemporal contextual information, with human and technical sensor information, which we approach from a geospatial perspective. We start by highlighting the significance of context in general and spatiotemporal context in particular and introduce a smart city model of interactions between humans, the environment, and technology, with context at the common interface. We then focus on both the intentional and the unintentional sensing capabilities of today's technologies and discuss current technological trends that we consider have the ability to enrich human and technical geo-sensor information with contextual detail. The different types of sensors used to collect contextual information are analyzed and sorted into three groups on the basis of names considering frequently used related terms, and characteristic contextual parameters. These three groups, namely technical in situ sensors, technical remote sensors, and human sensors are analyzed and linked to three dimensions involved in sensing (data generation, geographic phenomena, and type of sensing). In contrast to other scientific publications, we found a large number of technologies and applications using in situ and mobile technical sensors within the context of smart cities, and surprisingly limited use of remote sensing approaches. In this article we further provide a critical discussion of possible impacts and influences of both technical and human sensing approaches on society, pointing out that a larger number of sensors, increased fusion of information, and the use of standardized data formats and interfaces will not necessarily result in any improvement in the quality of life of the citizens of a smart city. This article seeks to improve our understanding of technical and human geo-sensing capabilities, and to demonstrate that the use of such sensors can facilitate the integration of different

  3. Contributions of skin and muscle afferent input to movement sense in the human hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordo, Paul J; Horn, Jean-Louis; Künster, Daniela; Cherry, Anne; Bratt, Alex; Gurfinkel, Victor

    2011-04-01

    In the stationary hand, static joint-position sense originates from multimodal somatosensory input (e.g., joint, skin, and muscle). In the moving hand, however, it is uncertain how movement sense arises from these different submodalities of proprioceptors. In contrast to static-position sense, movement sense includes multiple parameters such as motion detection, direction, joint angle, and velocity. Because movement sense is both multimodal and multiparametric, it is not known how different movement parameters are represented by different afferent submodalities. In theory, each submodality could redundantly represent all movement parameters, or, alternatively, different afferent submodalities could be tuned to distinctly different movement parameters. The study described in this paper investigated how skin input and muscle input each contributes to movement sense of the hand, in particular, to the movement parameters dynamic position and velocity. Healthy adult subjects were instructed to indicate with the left hand when they sensed the unseen fingers of the right hand being passively flexed at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint through a previously learned target angle. The experimental approach was to suppress input from skin and/or muscle: skin input by anesthetizing the hand, and muscle input by unexpectedly extending the wrist to prevent MCP flexion from stretching the finger extensor muscle. Input from joint afferents was assumed not to play a significant role because the task was carried out with the MCP joints near their neutral positions. We found that, during passive finger movement near the neutral position in healthy adult humans, both skin and muscle receptors contribute to movement sense but qualitatively differently. Whereas skin input contributes to both dynamic position and velocity sense, muscle input may contribute only to velocity sense.

  4. Modeling and remote sensing of human induced water cycle change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Yadu N.

    2016-04-01

    The global water cycle has been profoundly affected by human land-water management especially during the last century. Since the changes in water cycle can affect the functioning of a wide range of biophysical and biogeochemical processes of the Earth system, it is essential to account for human land-water management in land surface models (LSMs) which are used for water resources assessment and to simulate the land surface hydrologic processes within Earth system models (ESMs). During the last two decades, noteworthy progress has been made in modeling human impacts on the water cycle but sufficient advancements have not yet been made, especially in representing human factors in large-scale LSMs toward integrating them into ESMs. In this study, an integrated modeling framework of continental-scale water cycle, with explicit representation of climate and human induced forces (e.g., irrigation, groundwater pumping) is developed and used to reconstruct the observed water cycle changes in the past and to attribute the observed changes to climatic and human factors. The new model builds upon two different previously developed models: a global LSM called the Human Impacts and GroundWater in the MATSIRO (HiGW-MAT) and a high-resolution regional groundwater model called the LEAF-Hydro-Flood. The model is used to retro-simulate the hydrologic stores and fluxes in close dialogue with in-situ and GRACE satellite based observations at a wide range of river basin scales around the world, with a particular focus on the changes in groundwater dynamics in northwest India, Pakistan, and the High Plains and Central Valley aquifers in the US.

  5. Applying the community partnership approach to human biology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenscroft, Julia; Schell, Lawrence M; Cole, Tewentahawih'tha'

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary human biology research employs a unique skillset for biocultural analysis. This skillset is highly appropriate for the study of health disparities because disparities result from the interaction of social and biological factors over one or more generations. Health disparities research almost always involves disadvantaged communities owing to the relationship between social position and health in stratified societies. Successful research with disadvantaged communities involves a specific approach, the community partnership model, which creates a relationship beneficial for researcher and community. Paramount is the need for trust between partners. With trust established, partners share research goals, agree on research methods and produce results of interest and importance to all partners. Results are shared with the community as they are developed; community partners also provide input on analyses and interpretation of findings. This article describes a partnership-based, 20 year relationship between community members of the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation and researchers at the University at Albany. As with many communities facing health disparity issues, research with Native Americans and indigenous peoples generally is inherently politicized. For Akwesasne, the contamination of their lands and waters is an environmental justice issue in which the community has faced unequal exposure to, and harm by environmental toxicants. As human biologists engage in more partnership-type research, it is important to understand the long term goals of the community and what is at stake so the research circle can be closed and 'helicopter' style research avoided.

  6. From Nose to Brain: Un-Sensed Electrical Currents Applied in the Nose Alter Activity in Deep Brain Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Tali; Shushan, Sagit; Ravia, Aharon; Hahamy, Avital; Secundo, Lavi; Weissbrod, Aharon; Ben-Yakov, Aya; Holtzman, Yael; Cohen-Atsmoni, Smadar; Roth, Yehudah; Sobel, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Rules linking patterns of olfactory receptor neuron activation in the nose to activity patterns in the brain and ensuing odor perception remain poorly understood. Artificially stimulating olfactory neurons with electrical currents and measuring ensuing perception may uncover these rules. We therefore inserted an electrode into the nose of 50 human volunteers and applied various currents for about an hour in each case. This induced assorted non-olfactory sensations but never once the perceptio...

  7. Applying Nanotechnology to Human Health: Revolution in Biomedical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Shrivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on biosystems at the nanoscale has created one of the most dynamic science and technology domains at the confluence of physical sciences, molecular engineering, biology, biotechnology, and medicine. This domain includes better understanding of living and thinking systems, revolutionary biotechnology processes, synthesis of new drugs and their targeted delivery, regenerative medicine, neuromorphic engineering, and developing a sustainable environment. Nanobiosystems research is a priority in many countries and its relevance within nanotechnology is expected to increase in the future. The realisation that the nanoscale has certain properties needed to solve important medical challenges and cater to unmet medical needs is driving nanomedical research. The present review explores the significance of nanoscience and latest nanotechnologies for human health. Addressing the associated opportunities, the review also suggests how to manage far-reaching developments in these areas.

  8. Current Human Reliability Analysis Methods Applied to Computerized Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-06-01

    Computerized procedures (CPs) are an emerging technology within nuclear power plant control rooms. While CPs have been implemented internationally in advanced control rooms, to date no US nuclear power plant has implemented CPs in its main control room (Fink et al., 2009). Yet, CPs are a reality of new plant builds and are an area of considerable interest to existing plants, which see advantages in terms of enhanced ease of use and easier records management by omitting the need for updating hardcopy procedures. The overall intent of this paper is to provide a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures. It is beyond the scope of this document to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper serves as a review of current HRA as it may be used for the analysis and review of computerized procedures.

  9. Ambient Assisted Living Systems in the Context of Human Centric Sensing and IoT Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaric, Nicola; Pejanovic-Djurisic, Milica; Mihovska, Albena Dimitrova

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the concept of Human Centric Sensing in the context of Internet of Things and Ambient Assisted Living. The paper uses a case study to present and analyze the proposed idea, and identifies the main challenges and open issues that require research and policy attention....

  10. Ambulatory human motion tracking by fusion of inertial and magnetic sensing with adaptive actuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Roetenberg, Daniel; Veltink, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last years, inertial sensing has proven to be a suitable ambulatory alternative to traditional human motion tracking based on optical position measurement systems, which are generally restricted to a laboratory environment. Besides many advantages, a major drawback is the inherent drift cau

  11. "Literariness," Formalism, and Sense Making: The Line and Stanza Structure of Human Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, James Paul

    1989-01-01

    Uses the "line and stanza" method to analyze and compare texts representing different cultural backgrounds and ages. Proposes that the textual characteristics identified by the Formalists as the measure of literature are actually the hallmarks of a cross-cultural human capacity for making deep sense of experience. (FMW)

  12. Molecular vibration-sensing component in human olfaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Gane

    Full Text Available Whether olfaction recognizes odorants by their shape, their molecular vibrations, or both remains an open and controversial question. A convenient way to address it is to test for odor character differences between deuterated and undeuterated odorant isotopomers, since these have identical ground-state conformations but different vibrational modes. In a previous paper (Franco et al. (2011 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108:9, 3797-802 we showed that fruit flies can recognize the presence of deuterium in odorants by a vibrational mechanism. Here we address the question of whether humans too can distinguish deuterated and undeuterated odorants. A previous report (Keller and Vosshall (2004 Nat Neurosci 7:4, 337-8 indicated that naive subjects are incapable of distinguishing acetophenone and d-8 acetophenone. Here we confirm and extend those results to trained subjects and gas-chromatography [GC]-pure odorants. However, we also show that subjects easily distinguish deuterated and undeuterated musk odorants purified to GC-pure standard. These results are consistent with a vibrational component in human olfaction.

  13. Molecular Vibration-Sensing Component in Human Olfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvakias, Manolis; Ragoussis, Nikitas; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.; Turin, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Whether olfaction recognizes odorants by their shape, their molecular vibrations, or both remains an open and controversial question. A convenient way to address it is to test for odor character differences between deuterated and undeuterated odorant isotopomers, since these have identical ground-state conformations but different vibrational modes. In a previous paper (Franco et al. (2011) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108:9, 3797-802) we showed that fruit flies can recognize the presence of deuterium in odorants by a vibrational mechanism. Here we address the question of whether humans too can distinguish deuterated and undeuterated odorants. A previous report (Keller and Vosshall (2004) Nat Neurosci 7:4, 337-8) indicated that naive subjects are incapable of distinguishing acetophenone and d-8 acetophenone. Here we confirm and extend those results to trained subjects and gas-chromatography [GC]-pure odorants. However, we also show that subjects easily distinguish deuterated and undeuterated musk odorants purified to GC-pure standard. These results are consistent with a vibrational component in human olfaction. PMID:23372854

  14. Matrix metalloproteinase sensing via porous silicon microcavity devices functionalized with human antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Marta; Gergely, Csilla [GES-UMR 5650, CNRS, Universite Montpellier 2, Pl. Eugene Bataillon 34095, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Taleb Bendiab, Chakib; Massif, Laurent; Cuisinier, Frederic [EA4203, Faculte d' Odontologie, Universite Montpellier 1, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Palestino, Gabriela [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Av. Salvador Nava 6, 78000 San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Agarwal, Vivechana [CIICAP, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    Porous silicon microcavity (PSiMc) structures were used as support material for specific sensing of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). For lower concentrations of MMP-8, the structures were tested with two types of functionalization methods. Silanization of the oxidized porous silicon structures, followed by glutaraldehyde chemistry was found to give very inconsistent results. The use of biotinilated bovine serum albumin linked to the naked PSiMc was found to be an alternative method to attach the anti MMP-8 human antibody, previously modified with streptavidin, which was further used to sense MMP-8 (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Sensing human physiological response using wearable carbon nanotube-based fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Loh, Kenneth J.; Koo, Helen S.

    2016-04-01

    Flexible and wearable sensors for human monitoring have received increased attention. Besides detecting motion and physical activity, measuring human vital signals (e.g., respiration rate and body temperature) provide rich data for assessing subjects' physiological or psychological condition. Instead of using conventional, bulky, sensing transducers, the objective of this study was to design and test a wearable, fabric-like sensing system. In particular, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-latex thin films of different MWCNT concentrations were first fabricated using spray coating. Freestanding MWCNT-latex films were then sandwiched between two layers of flexible fabric using iron-on adhesive to form the wearable sensor. Second, to characterize its strain sensing properties, the fabric sensors were subjected to uniaxial and cyclic tensile load tests, and they exhibited relatively stable electromechanical responses. Finally, the wearable sensors were placed on a human subject for monitoring simple motions and for validating their practical strain sensing performance. Overall, the wearable fabric sensor design exhibited advances such as flexibility, ease of fabrication, light weight, low cost, noninvasiveness, and user comfort.

  16. Static Human Detection and Scenario Recognition via Wearable Thermal Sensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingquan Sun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional wearable sensors are mainly used to detect the physiological and activity information of individuals who wear them, but fail to perceive the information of the surrounding environment. This paper presents a wearable thermal sensing system to detect and perceive the information of surrounding human subjects. The proposed system is developed based on a pyroelectric infrared sensor. Such a sensor system aims to provide surrounding information to blind people and people with weak visual capability to help them adapt to the environment and avoid collision. In order to achieve this goal, a low-cost, low-data-throughput binary sampling and analyzing scheme is proposed. We also developed a conditioning sensing circuit with a low-noise signal amplifier and programmable system on chip (PSoC to adjust the amplification gain. Three statistical features in information space are extracted to recognize static humans and human scenarios in indoor environments. The results demonstrate that the proposed wearable thermal sensing system and binary statistical analysis method are efficient in static human detection and human scenario perception.

  17. Human tactile perception as a standard for artificial tactile sensing--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargahi, J; Najarian, S

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the most important features of human skin tactile properties with special emphasis on the characteristics which are vital in the design of artificial systems. Contrary to the visual and auditory senses, the touch signal is not a well-defined quantity. As a result, the researchers of this field are still dealing with the basics of collecting the most relevant data. Following this, mimicking the sense of touch by producing artificial tactile skin is a challenging process. Although the sense of touch is widely distributed all over the human body, the tactile perception in the human hand is of great importance in terms of surgical and medical robotics applications. In this study, the role of various mechanoreceptors in the human hand, such as, RA, SA I, SA II, and PC units are discussed in relation to the stimuli like force, position, softness, and surface texture. Taking human hand as a suitable tactile model, the necessary engineering features of an artificial tactile sensor, such as, spatial and temporal resolutions, force sensitivity, and linearity, are being reviewed. In this work, we also report on the current and possible future applications of tactile sensors in various surgical procedures.

  18. Remote sensing applied to crop disease control, urban planning, and monitoring aquatic plants, oil spills, rangelands, and soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The application of remote sensing techniques to land management, urban planning, agriculture, oceanography, and environmental monitoring is discussed. The results of various projects are presented along with cost effective considerations.

  19. Combining Human Computing and Machine Learning to Make Sense of Big (Aerial) Data for Disaster Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofli, Ferda; Meier, Patrick; Imran, Muhammad; Castillo, Carlos; Tuia, Devis; Rey, Nicolas; Briant, Julien; Millet, Pauline; Reinhard, Friedrich; Parkan, Matthew; Joost, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    Aerial imagery captured via unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is playing an increasingly important role in disaster response. Unlike satellite imagery, aerial imagery can be captured and processed within hours rather than days. In addition, the spatial resolution of aerial imagery is an order of magnitude higher than the imagery produced by the most sophisticated commercial satellites today. Both the United States Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the European Commission's Joint Research Center (JRC) have noted that aerial imagery will inevitably present a big data challenge. The purpose of this article is to get ahead of this future challenge by proposing a hybrid crowdsourcing and real-time machine learning solution to rapidly process large volumes of aerial data for disaster response in a time-sensitive manner. Crowdsourcing can be used to annotate features of interest in aerial images (such as damaged shelters and roads blocked by debris). These human-annotated features can then be used to train a supervised machine learning system to learn to recognize such features in new unseen images. In this article, we describe how this hybrid solution for image analysis can be implemented as a module (i.e., Aerial Clicker) to extend an existing platform called Artificial Intelligence for Disaster Response (AIDR), which has already been deployed to classify microblog messages during disasters using its Text Clicker module and in response to Cyclone Pam, a category 5 cyclone that devastated Vanuatu in March 2015. The hybrid solution we present can be applied to both aerial and satellite imagery and has applications beyond disaster response such as wildlife protection, human rights, and archeological exploration. As a proof of concept, we recently piloted this solution using very high-resolution aerial photographs of a wildlife reserve in Namibia to support rangers with their wildlife conservation efforts (SAVMAP project, http://lasig.epfl.ch/savmap ). The

  20. Assessment of human respiration patterns via noncontact sensing using Doppler multi-radar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changzhan; Li, Changzhi

    2015-03-16

    Human respiratory patterns at chest and abdomen are associated with both physical and emotional states. Accurate measurement of the respiratory patterns provides an approach to assess and analyze the physical and emotional states of the subject persons. Not many research efforts have been made to wirelessly assess different respiration patterns, largely due to the inaccuracy of the conventional continuous-wave radar sensor to track the original signal pattern of slow respiratory movements. This paper presents the accurate assessment of different respiratory patterns based on noncontact Doppler radar sensing. This paper evaluates the feasibility of accurately monitoring different human respiration patterns via noncontact radar sensing. A 2.4 GHz DC coupled multi-radar system was used for accurate measurement of the complete respiration patterns without any signal distortion. Experiments were carried out in the lab environment to measure the different respiration patterns when the subject person performed natural breathing, chest breathing and diaphragmatic breathing. The experimental results showed that accurate assessment of different respiration patterns is feasible using the proposed noncontact radar sensing technique.

  1. From deep-sea volcanoes to human pathogens: a conserved quorum-sensing signal in Epsilonproteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana; Bolognini, Marie; Ricci, Jessica; Bini, Elisabetta; Vetriani, Costantino

    2015-05-01

    Chemosynthetic Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents colonize substrates exposed to steep thermal and redox gradients. In many bacteria, substrate attachment, biofilm formation, expression of virulence genes and host colonization are partly controlled via a cell density-dependent mechanism involving signal molecules, known as quorum sensing. Within the Epsilonproteobacteria, quorum sensing has been investigated only in human pathogens that use the luxS/autoinducer-2 (AI-2) mechanism to control the expression of some of these functions. In this study we showed that luxS is conserved in Epsilonproteobacteria and that pathogenic and mesophilic members of this class inherited this gene from a thermophilic ancestor. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the luxS gene is expressed--and a quorum-sensing signal is produced--during growth of Sulfurovum lithotrophicum and Caminibacter mediatlanticus, two Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Finally, we detected luxS transcripts in Epsilonproteobacteria-dominated biofilm communities collected from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Taken together, our findings indicate that the epsiloproteobacterial lineage of the LuxS enzyme originated in high-temperature geothermal environments and that, in vent Epsilonproteobacteria, luxS expression is linked to the production of AI-2 signals, which are likely produced in situ at deep-sea vents. We conclude that the luxS gene is part of the ancestral epsilonproteobacterial genome and represents an evolutionary link that connects thermophiles to human pathogens.

  2. Fabrication of Anti-human Cardiac Troponin I Immunogold Nanorods for Sensing Acute Myocardial Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z. R.; Gu, C. R.; Fan, X.; Bian, Z. P.; Wu, H. F.; Yang, D.; Gu, N.; Zhang, J. N.

    2009-12-01

    A facile, rapid, solution-phase method of detecting human cardiac troponin I for sensing myocardial damage has been described using gold nanorods-based biosensors. The sensing is demonstrated by the distinct change of the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance wavelength of the gold nanorods to specific antibody-antigen binding events. For a higher sensitivity, the aspect ratio of gold nanorods is increased up to ca 5.5 by simply adding small amount of HCl in seed-mediated growth solution. Experimental results show that the detecting limit of the present method is 10 ng/mL. Contrast tests reveal that these gold nanorods-based plasmonic biosensors hold much higher sensitivity than that of conventionally spherical gold nanoparticles.

  3. Fabrication of Anti-human Cardiac Troponin I Immunogold Nanorods for Sensing Acute Myocardial Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan X

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A facile, rapid, solution-phase method of detecting human cardiac troponin I for sensing myocardial damage has been described using gold nanorods-based biosensors. The sensing is demonstrated by the distinct change of the longitudinal surface plasmon resonance wavelength of the gold nanorods to specific antibody–antigen binding events. For a higher sensitivity, the aspect ratio of gold nanorods is increased up to ca 5.5 by simply adding small amount of HCl in seed-mediated growth solution. Experimental results show that the detecting limit of the present method is 10 ng/mL. Contrast tests reveal that these gold nanorods-based plasmonic biosensors hold much higher sensitivity than that of conventionally spherical gold nanoparticles.

  4. Human oxygen sensing may have origins in prokaryotic elongation factor Tu prolyl-hydroxylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, John S.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.; Ge, Wei; Bentley, Michael A.; Paps, Jordi; Kramer, Holger B.; Lee, Joongoo; Aik, WeiShen; Choi, Hwanho; Paulsen, Steinar M.; Bowman, Lesley A. H.; Loik, Nikita D.; Horita, Shoichiro; Ho, Chia-hua; Kershaw, Nadia J.; Tang, Christoph M.; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Preston, Gail M.; McDonough, Michael A.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases in eukaryotes include collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and translational regulation. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) sensing system is conserved in animals, but not in other organisms. However, bioinformatics imply that 2OG-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) homologous to those acting as sensing components for the HIF system in animals occur in prokaryotes. We report cellular, biochemical, and crystallographic analyses revealing that Pseudomonas prolyl-hydroxylase domain containing protein (PPHD) contain a 2OG oxygenase related in structure and function to the animal PHDs. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa PPHD knockout mutant displays impaired growth in the presence of iron chelators and increased production of the virulence factor pyocyanin. We identify elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as a PPHD substrate, which undergoes prolyl-4-hydroxylation on its switch I loop. A crystal structure of PPHD reveals striking similarity to human PHD2 and a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii prolyl-4-hydroxylase. A crystal structure of PPHD complexed with intact EF-Tu reveals that major conformational changes occur in both PPHD and EF-Tu, including a >20-Å movement of the EF-Tu switch I loop. Comparison of the PPHD structures with those of HIF and collagen PHDs reveals conservation in substrate recognition despite diverse biological roles and origins. The observed changes will be useful in designing new types of 2OG oxygenase inhibitors based on various conformational states, rather than active site iron chelators, which make up most reported 2OG oxygenase inhibitors. Structurally informed phylogenetic analyses suggest that the role of prolyl-hydroxylation in human hypoxia sensing has ancient origins. PMID:25197067

  5. Human oxygen sensing may have origins in prokaryotic elongation factor Tu prolyl-hydroxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, John S; Leung, Ivanhoe K H; Ge, Wei; Bentley, Michael A; Paps, Jordi; Kramer, Holger B; Lee, Joongoo; Aik, WeiShen; Choi, Hwanho; Paulsen, Steinar M; Bowman, Lesley A H; Loik, Nikita D; Horita, Shoichiro; Ho, Chia-hua; Kershaw, Nadia J; Tang, Christoph M; Claridge, Timothy D W; Preston, Gail M; McDonough, Michael A; Schofield, Christopher J

    2014-09-16

    The roles of 2-oxoglutarate (2OG)-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases in eukaryotes include collagen stabilization, hypoxia sensing, and translational regulation. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) sensing system is conserved in animals, but not in other organisms. However, bioinformatics imply that 2OG-dependent prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs) homologous to those acting as sensing components for the HIF system in animals occur in prokaryotes. We report cellular, biochemical, and crystallographic analyses revealing that Pseudomonas prolyl-hydroxylase domain containing protein (PPHD) contain a 2OG oxygenase related in structure and function to the animal PHDs. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa PPHD knockout mutant displays impaired growth in the presence of iron chelators and increased production of the virulence factor pyocyanin. We identify elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) as a PPHD substrate, which undergoes prolyl-4-hydroxylation on its switch I loop. A crystal structure of PPHD reveals striking similarity to human PHD2 and a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii prolyl-4-hydroxylase. A crystal structure of PPHD complexed with intact EF-Tu reveals that major conformational changes occur in both PPHD and EF-Tu, including a >20-Å movement of the EF-Tu switch I loop. Comparison of the PPHD structures with those of HIF and collagen PHDs reveals conservation in substrate recognition despite diverse biological roles and origins. The observed changes will be useful in designing new types of 2OG oxygenase inhibitors based on various conformational states, rather than active site iron chelators, which make up most reported 2OG oxygenase inhibitors. Structurally informed phylogenetic analyses suggest that the role of prolyl-hydroxylation in human hypoxia sensing has ancient origins.

  6. Remote Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Khorram, Siamak; Koch, Frank H; van der Wiele, Cynthia F

    2012-01-01

    Remote Sensing provides information on how remote sensing relates to the natural resources inventory, management, and monitoring, as well as environmental concerns. It explains the role of this new technology in current global challenges. "Remote Sensing" will discuss remotely sensed data application payloads and platforms, along with the methodologies involving image processing techniques as applied to remotely sensed data. This title provides information on image classification techniques and image registration, data integration, and data fusion techniques. How this technology applies to natural resources and environmental concerns will also be discussed.

  7. Endobiont viruses sensed by the human host - beyond conventional antiparasitic therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raina N Fichorova

    Full Text Available Wide-spread protozoan parasites carry endosymbiotic dsRNA viruses with uncharted implications to the human host. Among them, Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasite adapted to the human genitourinary tract, infects globally ∼250 million each year rendering them more susceptible to devastating pregnancy complications (especially preterm birth, HIV infection and HPV-related cancer. While first-line antibiotic treatment (metronidazole commonly kills the protozoan pathogen, it fails to improve reproductive outcome. We show that endosymbiotic Trichomonasvirus, highly prevalent in T. vaginalis clinical isolates, is sensed by the human epithelial cells via Toll-like receptor 3, triggering Interferon Regulating Factor -3, interferon type I and proinflammatory cascades previously implicated in preterm birth and HIV-1 susceptibility. Metronidazole treatment amplified these proinflammatory responses. Thus, a new paradigm targeting the protozoan viruses along with the protozoan host may prevent trichomoniasis-attributable inflammatory sequelae.

  8. Acceptance of evolutionary explanations as they are applied to plants, animals, and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanukos, Anastasia

    , makes it likely that awareness of human evolution is high, compared with plant evolution (which may not even "enter the radar screen" when most people think of evolution). Some aspects of human evolution, such as the basic relationship between all primates, may have become so pedestrian that they do not threaten many individuals' worldviews. However, even for those positively disposed towards evolution, extending the ramifications of human evolution by suggesting that evolution shapes our behaviors and physical traits may pose a threat to their sense of personal agency. This threat is not associated with plant evolution.

  9. Human behavior understanding in networked sensing theory and applications of networks of sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Spagnolo, Paolo; Distante, Cosimo

    2014-01-01

    This unique text/reference provides a broad overview of both the technical challenges in sensor network development, and the real-world applications of distributed sensing. Important aspects of distributed computing in large-scale networked sensor systems are analyzed in the context of human behavior understanding, including such topics as systems design tools and techniques, in-network signals, and information processing. Additionally, the book examines a varied range of application scenarios, covering surveillance, indexing and retrieval, patient care, industrial safety, social and ambient

  10. Spherical harmonic decomposition applied to spatial-temporal analysis of human high-density EEG

    OpenAIRE

    Wingeier, Brett M.; Nunez, Paul L.; Silberstein, Richard B.

    2000-01-01

    We demonstrate an application of spherical harmonic decomposition to analysis of the human electroencephalogram (EEG). We implement two methods and discuss issues specific to analysis of hemispherical, irregularly sampled data. Performance of the methods and spatial sampling requirements are quantified using simulated data. The analysis is applied to experimental EEG data, confirming earlier reports of an approximate frequency-wavenumber relationship in some bands.

  11. The "Human Factor" in Pure and in Applied Mathematics. Systems Everywhere: Their Impact on Mathematics Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Roland

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the impact that the relationship between people and mathematics could have on the development of pure and applied mathematics. Argues for (1) a growing interest in philosophy, history and sociology of science; (2) new models in educational and psychological research; and (3) a growing awareness of the human factor in technology,…

  12. Spherical harmonic decomposition applied to spatial-temporal analysis of human high-density EEG

    CERN Document Server

    Wingeier, B M; Silberstein, R B; Wingeier, Brett M.; Nunez, Paul L.; Silberstein, Richard B.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate an application of spherical harmonic decomposition to analysis of the human electroencephalogram (EEG). We implement two methods and discuss issues specific to analysis of hemispherical, irregularly sampled data. Performance of the methods and spatial sampling requirements are quantified using simulated data. The analysis is applied to experimental EEG data, confirming earlier reports of an approximate frequency-wavenumber relationship in some bands.

  13. Towards a human eye behavior model by applying Data Mining Techniques on Gaze Information from IEC

    CERN Document Server

    Pallez, Denis; Baccino, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we firstly present what is Interactive Evolutionary Computation (IEC) and rapidly how we have combined this artificial intelligence technique with an eye-tracker for visual optimization. Next, in order to correctly parameterize our application, we present results from applying data mining techniques on gaze information coming from experiments conducted on about 80 human individuals.

  14. Making sense of information in noisy networks: human communication, gossip, and distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidre, Mark E; Lamb, Alex; Shultz, Susanne; Olsen, Megan

    2013-01-21

    Information from others can be unreliable. Humans nevertheless act on such information, including gossip, to make various social calculations, thus raising the question of whether individuals can sort through social information to identify what is, in fact, true. Inspired by empirical literature on people's decision-making when considering gossip, we built an agent-based simulation model to examine how well simple decision rules could make sense of information as it propagated through a network. Our simulations revealed that a minimalistic decision-rule 'Bit-wise mode' - which compared information from multiple sources and then sought a consensus majority for each component bit within the message - was consistently the most successful at converging upon the truth. This decision rule attained high relative fitness even in maximally noisy networks, composed entirely of nodes that distorted the message. The rule was also superior to other decision rules regardless of its frequency in the population. Simulations carried out with variable agent memory constraints, different numbers of observers who initiated information propagation, and a variety of network types suggested that the single most important factor in making sense of information was the number of independent sources that agents could consult. Broadly, our model suggests that despite the distortion information is subject to in the real world, it is nevertheless possible to make sense of it based on simple Darwinian computations that integrate multiple sources.

  15. Forensic electrochemistry applied to the sensing of new psychoactive substances: electroanalytical sensing of synthetic cathinones and analytical validation in the quantification of seized street samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jamie P; Metters, Jonathan P; Khreit, Osama I G; Sutcliffe, Oliver B; Banks, Craig E

    2014-10-07

    The electrochemical sensing of new psychoactive substance(s) (NPSs), synthetic cathinone derivatives also termed "legal highs", are explored with the use of metallic modified screen-printed electrochemical sensors (SPES). It is found that no significant electrochemical enhancement is evident with the use of either in situ bismuth or mercury film modified SPES compared to the bare underlying electrode substrate. In fact, the direct electrochemical reduction of the cathinone derivatives mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone; 4-MMC) and 4'-methyl-N-ethylcathinone (4-methylethcathinone; 4-MEC) is found to be possible for the first time, without heavy metal catalysis, giving rise to useful voltammetric electroanalytical signatures in model aqueous buffer solutions. This novel electroanalytical methodology is validated toward the determination of cathinone derivatives (4-MMC and 4-MEC) in three seized street samples that are independently analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) wherein excellent agreement between the two analytical protocols is found. Such an approach provides a validated laboratory tool for the quantification of synthetic cathinone derivatives and holds potential for the basis of a portable analytical sensor for the determination of synthetic cathinone derivatives in seized street samples.

  16. Remote sensing applied to environmental pollution detection and management. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the utilization of remote sensing techniques and equipment to study air and water pollution. Topics include the use of aerial photographs, radar, and spaceborne photography to study oil spills, ocean dumping sites, plume dispersions, and pollution problems in estuaries. Data interpretation and processing techniques are also discussed.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  17. Detecting land use changes affected by human activities using remote sensing (Case study: Karkheh River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Maddah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Population growth and abundant activities in order to achieve maximum well-being has forced human to make a lot of changes in the nature. These changes will be cost-effective when they have the minimum damage on the landscape. One of the activities that human did for obtaining the water and preventing flood was making the dam in the track of running water. Since the dam is established until its impoundment and after impoundment, the condition of ecosystem and the appearance of the upstream and downstream of the dam will undergo changes. In this study, using satellite data and remote sensing, these changes have been studied and the landuse changes in vegetation, arid land, water level and residential and non-residential lands is measured in 1998 and 2014 using Maximum Likelihood method and support vector machine.

  18. Serotype 1 and 8 Pneumococci Evade Sensing by Inflammasomes in Human Lung Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Fatykhova

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis. The pore-forming toxin pneumolysin is a key virulence factor of S. pneumoniae, which can be sensed by the NLRP3 inflammasome. Among the over 90 serotypes, serotype 1 pneumococci (particularly MLST306 have emerged across the globe as a major cause of invasive disease. The cause for its particularity is, however, incompletely understood. We therefore examined pneumococcal infection in human cells and a human lung organ culture system mimicking infection of the lower respiratory tract. We demonstrate that different pneumococcal serotypes differentially activate inflammasome-dependent IL-1β production in human lung tissue and cells. Whereas serotype 2, 3, 6B, 9N pneumococci expressing fully haemolytic pneumolysins activate NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent responses, serotype 1 and 8 strains expressing non-haemolytic toxins are poor activators of IL-1β production. Accordingly, purified haemolytic pneumolysin but not serotype 1-associated non-haemolytic toxin activates strong IL-1β production in human lungs. Our data suggest that the evasion of inflammasome-dependent innate immune responses by serotype 1 pneumococci might contribute to their ability to cause invasive diseases in humans.

  19. A Method for Remotely Sensing Vital Signs of Human Subjects Outdoors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuantao Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available After chemical or nuclear leakage or explosions, finding survivors is a huge challenge. Although human bodies can be found by smart vehicles and drones equipped with cameras, it is difficult to verify if the person is alive or dead this way. This paper describes a continuous wave radar sensor for remotely sensing the vital signs of human subjects. Firstly, a compact and portable 24 GHz Doppler radar system is designed to conduct non-contact detection of respiration signal. Secondly, in order to improve the quality of the respiration signals, the self-correlation and adaptive line enhancer (ALE methods are proposed to minimize the interferences of any moving objects around the human subject. Finally, the detection capabilities of the radar system and the signal processing method are verified through experiments which show that human respiration signals can be extracted when the subject is 7 m away outdoors. The method provided in this paper will be a promising way to search for human subjects outdoors.

  20. Remote sensing captures varying temporal patterns of vegetation between human-altered and natural landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Misha; Roderick, George K

    2015-01-01

    Global change has led to shifts in phenology, potentially disrupting species interactions such as plant-pollinator relationships. Advances in remote sensing techniques allow one to detect vegetation phenological diversity between different land use types, but it is not clear how this translates to other communities in the ecosystem. Here, we investigated the phenological diversity of the vegetation across a human-altered landscape including urban, agricultural, and natural land use types. We found that the patterns of change in the vegetation indices (EVI and NDVI) of human-altered landscapes are out of synchronization with the phenology in neighboring natural California grassland habitat. Comparing these findings to a spatio-temporal pollinator distribution dataset, EVI and NDVI were significant predictors of total bee abundance, a relationship that improved with time lags. This evidence supports the importance of differences in temporal dynamics between land use types. These findings also highlight the potential to utilize remote sensing data to make predictions for components of biodiversity that have tight vegetation associations, such as pollinators.

  1. Estimating the spatial distribution of field-applied mushroom compost in the Brandywine-Christina River Basin using multispectral remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxey, Kelsey A.

    The world's greatest concentration of mushroom farms is settled within the Brandywine-Christina River Basin in Chester County in southeastern Pennsylvania. This industry produces a nutrient-rich byproduct known as spent mushroom compost, which has been traditionally applied to local farm fields as an organic fertilizer and soil amendment. While mushroom compost has beneficial properties, the possible over-application to farm fields could potentially degrade stream water quality. The goal of this study was to estimate the spatial extent and intensity of field-applied mushroom compost. We applied a remote sensing approach using Landsat multispectral imagery. We utilized the soil line technique, using the red and near-infrared bands, to estimate differences in soil wetness as a result of increased soil organic matter content from mushroom compost. We validated soil wetness estimates by examining the spectral response of references sites. We performed a second independent validation analysis using expert knowledge from agricultural extension agents. Our results showed that the soil line based wetness index worked well. The spectral validation illustrated that compost changes the spectral response of soil because of changes in wetness. The independent expert validation analysis produced a strong significant correlation between our remotely-sensed wetness estimates and the empirical ratings of compost application intensities. Overall, the methodology produced realistic spatial distributions of field-applied compost application intensities across the study area. These spatial distributions will be used for follow-up studies to assess the effect of spent mushroom compost on stream water quality.

  2. 76 FR 36543 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Applying Human Factors and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Applying Human Factors and Usability Engineering to Optimize... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Applying Human Factors and Usability Engineering To Optimize Medical Device Design;...

  3. cGAS Senses Human Cytomegalovirus and Induces Type I Interferon Responses in Human Monocyte-Derived Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paijo, Jennifer; Döring, Marius; Spanier, Julia; Grabski, Elena; Nooruzzaman, Mohammed; Schmidt, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Messerle, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Kaever, Volkhard; Kalinke, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections of healthy individuals are mostly unnoticed and result in viral latency. However, HCMV can also cause devastating disease, e.g., upon reactivation in immunocompromised patients. Yet, little is known about human immune cell sensing of DNA-encoded HCMV. Recent studies indicated that during viral infection the cyclic GMP/AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA and catalyzes formation of the cyclic di-nucleotide cGAMP, which triggers stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and thus induces antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. We found that plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) as well as monocyte-derived DC and macrophages constitutively expressed cGAS and STING. HCMV infection further induced cGAS, whereas STING expression was only moderately affected. Although pDC expressed particularly high levels of cGAS, and the cGAS/STING axis was functional down-stream of STING, as indicated by IFN-I induction upon synthetic cGAMP treatment, pDC were not susceptible to HCMV infection and mounted IFN-I responses in a TLR9-dependent manner. Conversely, HCMV infected monocyte-derived cells synthesized abundant cGAMP levels that preceded IFN-I production and that correlated with the extent of infection. CRISPR/Cas9- or siRNA-mediated cGAS ablation in monocytic THP-1 cells and primary monocyte-derived cells, respectively, impeded induction of IFN-I responses following HCMV infection. Thus, cGAS is a key sensor of HCMV for IFN-I induction in primary human monocyte-derived DC and macrophages. PMID:27058035

  4. Collaborative Approaches to Increase the Utility of Spatial Data for the Wildfire Management Community Through NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullum, A. J. K.; Schmidt, C.; Blevins, B.; Weber, K.; Schnase, J. L.; Carroll, M.; Prados, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    The utility of spatial data products and tools to assess risk and effectively manage wildfires has increased, highlighting the need for communicating information about these new capabilities to decision makers, resource managers, and community leaders. NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training (ARSET) program works directly with agencies and policy makers to develop in-person and online training courses that teach end users how to access, visualize, and apply NASA Earth Science data in their profession. The expansion of ARSET into wildfire applications began in 2015 with a webinar and subsequent in-person training hosted in collaboration with Idaho State University's (ISU) GIS Training and Research Center (TReC). These trainings featured presentations from the USDA Forest Service's Remote Sensing Training and Applications Center, the Land Processes DAAC, Northwest Nazarene University, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and ISU's GIS TReC. The webinar focused on providing land managers, non-governmental organizations, and international management agencies with an overview of 1) remote sensing platforms for wildfire applications, 2) products for pre- and post-fire planning and assessment, 3) the use of terrain data, 4) new techniques and technologies such as Unmanned Aircraft Systems and the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP), and 5) the RECOVER Decision Support System. This training highlighted online tools that engage the wildfire community through collaborative monitoring and assessment efforts. Webinar attendance included 278 participants from 178 organizations in 42 countries and 33 US states. The majority of respondents (93%) from a post-webinar survey indicated they displayed improvement in their understanding of specific remote-sensing data products appropriate for their work needs. With collaborative efforts between federal, state, and local agencies and academic institutions, increased use of NASA Earth Observations may lead to improved near real

  5. Design of a Handheld Pseudo Random Coded UWB Radar for Human Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zheng-huan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a handheld pseudo random coded Ultra-WideBand (UWB radar for human sensing. The main tasks of the radar are to track the moving human object and extract the human respiratory frequency. In order to achieve perfect penetrability and good range resolution, m sequence with a carrier of 800 MHz is chosen as the transmitting signal. The modulated m-sequence can be generated directly by the high-speed DAC and FPGA to reduce the size of the radar system, and the mean power of the transmitting signal is 5 dBm. The receiver has two receiving channels based on hybrid sampling, the first receiving channel is to sample the reference signal and the second receiving channel is to obtain the radar echo. The real-time pulse compression is computed in parallel with a group of on-chip DSP48E slices in FPGA to improve the scanning rate of the radar system. Additionally, the algorithms of moving target tracking and life detection are implemented using Intel’s micro-processor, and the detection results are sent to the micro displayer fixed on the helmet. The experimental results show that the moving target located at less than 16 m far away from the wall can be tracked, and the respiratory frequency of the static human at less than 14 m far away from the wall can be extracted.

  6. Position sense at the human elbow joint measured by arm matching or pointing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Anthony; Allen, Trevor J; Proske, Uwe

    2016-10-01

    Position sense at the human elbow joint has traditionally been measured in blindfolded subjects using a forearm matching task. Here we compare position errors in a matching task with errors generated when the subject uses a pointer to indicate the position of a hidden arm. Evidence from muscle vibration during forearm matching supports a role for muscle spindles in position sense. We have recently shown using vibration, as well as muscle conditioning, which takes advantage of muscle's thixotropic property, that position errors generated in a forearm pointing task were not consistent with a role by muscle spindles. In the present study we have used a form of muscle conditioning, where elbow muscles are co-contracted at the test angle, to further explore differences in position sense measured by matching and pointing. For fourteen subjects, in a matching task where the reference arm had elbow flexor and extensor muscles contracted at the test angle and the indicator arm had its flexors conditioned at 90°, matching errors lay in the direction of flexion by 6.2°. After the same conditioning of the reference arm and extension conditioning of the indicator at 0°, matching errors lay in the direction of extension (5.7°). These errors were consistent with predictions based on a role by muscle spindles in determining forearm matching outcomes. In the pointing task subjects moved a pointer to align it with the perceived position of the hidden arm. After conditioning of the reference arm as before, pointing errors all lay in a more extended direction than the actual position of the arm by 2.9°-7.3°, a distribution not consistent with a role by muscle spindles. We propose that in pointing muscle spindles do not play the major role in signalling limb position that they do in matching, but that other sources of sensory input should be given consideration, including afferents from skin and joint.

  7. Automation technology and sense of control: a window on human agency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Berberian

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the perceived times of voluntary actions and their effects are perceived as shifted towards each other, so that the interval between action and outcome seems shortened. This has been referred to as 'intentional binding' (IB. However, the generality of this effect remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that Intentional Binding also occurs in complex control situations. Using an aircraft supervision task with different autopilot settings, our results first indicated a strong relation between measures of IB and different levels of system automation. Second, measures of IB were related to explicit agency judgement in this applied setting. We discuss the implications for the underlying mechanisms, and for sense of agency in automated environments.

  8. Satellite Remote Sensing of Harmful Algal Blooms at the University of Miami Center for Oceans and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, P. J.; Carvalho, G.; Baringer, W.; Banzon, V.

    2007-05-01

    As part of the NSF-NIEHS Center for Oceans and Human Health at the University of Miami, research is being conducted into the remote sensing of ocean color signatures associated with the occurrence of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). Data from the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are down-linked at the University of Miami's Center for Southeastern Tropical Advanced Remote Sensing (CSTARS) and processed in near-real time to produce mapped fields of water leaving radiance in the ocean color bands, derived quantities including inherent optical properties (IOPs) of seawater, chlorophyll concentration, and sea-surface temperature. Images of these fields are available in near-real time on a web-server. The server also provides access to the data files themselves. One of the applications currently being researched using these data is the identification of HABs over the Central West Florida Shelf where blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis have a nearly annual occurance. Since chlorophyll concentration alone cannot be used as a unique variable to determine algal taxonomy, other spectral features or optical properties must be brought into play to discriminate among different phytoplankton types. A published technique developed for SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor) to detect K. brevis (based on high concentration of chlorophyll and low particulate backscatter) was transitioned to measurements of Terra MODIS and replicated the results. These were confirmed by comparisons with in situ measurements. This technique is currently being applied to a multi-year time series of remote measurements from the Aqua MODIS and tested against ship-based data.

  9. Songbirds and humans apply different strategies in a sound sequence discrimination task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimasa eSeki

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The abilities of animals and humans to extract rules from sound sequences have previously been compared using observation of spontaneous responses and conditioning techniques. However, the results were inconsistently interpreted across studies possibly due to methodological and/or species differences. Therefore, we examined the strategies for discrimination of sound sequences in Bengalese finches and humans using the same protocol. Birds were trained on a GO/NOGO task to discriminate between two categories of sound stimulus generated based on an AAB or ABB rule. The sound elements used were taken from a variety of male (M and female (F calls, such that the sequences could be represented as MMF and MFF. In test sessions, FFM and FMM sequences, which were never presented in the training sessions but conformed to the rule, were presented as probe stimuli. The results suggested two discriminative strategies were being applied: 1 memorizing sound patterns of either GO or NOGO stimuli and generating the appropriate responses for only those sounds; and 2 using the repeated element as a cue. There was no evidence that the birds successfully extracted the abstract rule (i.e. AAB and ABB; MMF-GO subjects did not produce a GO response for FFM and vice versa. Next we examined whether those strategies were also applicable for human participants on the same task. The results and questionnaires revealed that participants extracted the abstract rule, and most of them employed it to discriminate the sequences. This strategy was never observed in bird subjects, although some participants used strategies similar to the birds when responding to the probe stimuli. Our results showed that the human participants applied the abstract rule in the task even without instruction but Bengalese finches did not, thereby reconfirming that humans have to extract abstract rules from sound sequences that is distinct from non-human animals.

  10. Analyzing and sense making of human factors in the Malaysian radiation and nuclear emergency planning framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, A. H. A., E-mail: amyhamijah@gmail.com, E-mail: amyhamijah@nm.gov.my [Faculty of Computing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Universiti Malaysia Kelantan (UMK), Pengkalan Chepa, 16100 Kota Bharu, Kelantan (Malaysia); Rozan, M. Z. A., E-mail: drmohdzaidi@gmail.com; Ibrahim, R. [Faculty of Computing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Deris, S. [Universiti Malaysia Kelantan (UMK), Pengkalan Chepa, 16100 Kota Bharu, Kelantan (Malaysia); Abdullah, W. S. W.; Yunus, M. N. M. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency (NM), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahman, A. A. [Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    The evolution of current Radiation and Nuclear Emergency Planning Framework (RANEPF) simulator emphasizes on the human factors to be analyzed and interpreted according to the stakeholder’s tacit and explicit knowledge. These human factor criteria are analyzed and interpreted according to the “sense making theory” and Disaster Emergency Response Management Information System (DERMIS) design premises. These criteria are corroborated by the statistical criteria. In recent findings, there were no differences of distributions among the stakeholders according to gender and organizational expertise. These criteria are incrementally accepted and agreed the research elements indicated in the respective emergency planning frameworks and simulator (i.e. 78.18 to 84.32, p-value <0.05). This paper suggested these human factors criteria in the associated analyses and theoretical perspectives to be further acomodated in the future simulator development. This development is in conjunction with the proposed hypothesis building of the process factors and responses diagram. We proposed that future work which implies the additional functionality of the simulator, as strategized, condensed and concise, comprehensive public disaster preparedness and intervention guidelines, to be a useful and efficient computer simulation.

  11. The importance of the olfactory sense in the human behavior and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafoleanu, C; Mella, C; Georgescu, M; Perederco, C

    2009-01-01

    Not long ago it was believed that the human olfactory sense had a low importance, a vision which turned into the exploration of the environment. Recent studies have shown that, despite the weak representation of the olfactory receptor common in other species too, the cortical areas of integration of the olfactory sensations are very large and have important interconnections with memory, language, and neuro-vegetative areas. In humans, olfaction has a small contribution in identifying objects or other people, but plays an important social and emotional part. People learn to love or to hate certain foods or objects only by appreciating their odor and this proved to be a very important economic factor. The most significant role of olfactory signals in humans appears to be the modulation of their behavior and interpersonal relationships, of their affiliation to certain groups or social classes, having a major influence in their tastes and personality. signal that will be sent to the specialized areas in their tastes and personality.

  12. MSV3d: database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin-Mihai; Walter, Vincent; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Toursel, Thierry; Thompson, Julie D; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the complex relationships linking genotypic and phenotypic variations to protein structure is a major challenge in the post-genomic era. We present MSV3d (Database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure), a new database that contains detailed annotation of missense variants of all human proteins (20 199 proteins). The multi-level characterization includes details of the physico-chemical changes induced by amino acid modification, as well as information related to the conservation of the mutated residue and its position relative to functional features in the available or predicted 3D model. Major releases of the database are automatically generated and updated regularly in line with the dbSNP (database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and SwissVar releases, by exploiting the extensive Décrypthon computational grid resources. The database (http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d) is easily accessible through a simple web interface coupled to a powerful query engine and a standard web service. The content is completely or partially downloadable in XML or flat file formats. Database URL: http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d.

  13. Engineering the oxygen sensing regulation results in an enhanced recombinant human hemoglobin production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, José L; Liu, Lifang; Petranovic, Dina; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Efficient production of appropriate oxygen carriers for transfusions (blood substitutes or artificial blood) has been pursued for many decades, and to date several strategies have been used, from synthetic polymers to cell-free hemoglobin carriers. The recent advances in the field of metabolic engineering also allowed the generation of different genetically modified organisms for the production of recombinant human hemoglobin. Several studies have showed very promising results using the bacterium Escherichia coli as a production platform, reporting hemoglobin titers above 5% of the total cell protein content. However, there are still certain limitations regarding the protein stability and functionality of the recombinant hemoglobin produced in bacterial systems. In order to overcome these limitations, yeast systems have been proposed as the eukaryal alternative. We recently reported the generation of a set of plasmids to produce functional human hemoglobin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with final titers of active hemoglobin exceeding 4% of the total cell protein. In this study, we propose a strategy for further engineering S. cerevisiae by altering the oxygen sensing pathway by deleting the transcription factor HAP1, which resulted in an increase of the final recombinant active hemoglobin titer exceeding 7% of the total cellular protein.

  14. Quorum sensing communication between bacteria and human cells: signals, targets and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelika eHolm

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Both direct and long-range interactions between pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria and their eukaryotic hosts are important in the outcome of infections. For cell-to-cell communication, these bacteria employ the quorum sensing (QS system to pass on information of the density of the bacterial population and collectively switch on virulence factor production, biofilm formation and resistance development. Thus, QS allows bacteria to behave as a community to perform tasks which would be impossible for individual cells, e.g. to overcome defense and immune systems and establish infections in higher organisms. This review highlights these aspects of QS and our own recent research on how P.aeruginosa communicates with human cells using the small QS signal molecules N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL. We focus on how this conversation changes the behavior and function of neutrophils, macrophages and epithelial cells and on how the signaling machinery in human cells responsible for the recognition of AHL. Understanding the bacteria-host relationships at both cellular and molecular levels is essential for the identification of new targets and for the development of novel strategies to fight bacterial infections in the future.

  15. Solonamide B inhibits quorum sensing and reduces Staphylococcus aureus mediated killing of human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Bojer, Martin S; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O; Novick, Richard P; Frees, Dorte; Frøkiær, Hanne; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a serious human pathogen, and particularly the spread of community associated (CA)-MRSA strains such as USA300 is a concern, as these strains can cause severe infections in otherwise healthy adults. Recently, we reported that a cyclodepsipeptide termed Solonamide B isolated from the marine bacterium, Photobacterium halotolerans strongly reduces expression of RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. Here we show that Solonamide B interferes with the binding of S. aureus autoinducing peptides (AIPs) to sensor histidine kinase, AgrC, of the agr two-component system. The hypervirulence of USA300 has been linked to increased expression of central virulence factors like α-hemolysin and the phenol soluble modulins (PSMs). Importantly, in strain USA300 Solonamide B dramatically reduced the activity of α-hemolysin and the transcription of psma encoding PSMs with an 80% reduction in toxicity of supernatants towards human neutrophils and rabbit erythrocytes. To our knowledge this is the first report of a compound produced naturally by a Gram-negative marine bacterium that interferes with agr and affects both RNAIII and AgrA controlled virulence gene expression in S. aureus.

  16. Involvement of the calcium-sensing receptor in human taste perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsu, Takeaki; Amino, Yusuke; Nagasaki, Hiroaki; Yamanaka, Tomohiko; Takeshita, Sen; Hatanaka, Toshihiro; Maruyama, Yutaka; Miyamura, Naohiro; Eto, Yuzuru

    2010-01-08

    By human sensory analyses, we found that various extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) agonists enhance sweet, salty, and umami tastes, although they have no taste themselves. These characteristics are known as "kokumi taste" and often appear in traditional Japanese cuisine. Although GSH is a typical kokumi taste substance (taste enhancer), its mode of action is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate how the kokumi taste is enhanced by the CaSR, a close relative of the class C G-protein-coupled receptors T1R1, T1R2, and T1R3 (sweet and umami receptors). We identified a large number of CaSR agonist gamma-glutamyl peptides, including GSH (gamma-Glu-Cys-Gly) and gamma-Glu-Val-Gly, and showed that these peptides elicit the kokumi taste. Further analyses revealed that some known CaSR agonists such as Ca(2+), protamine, polylysine, L-histidine, and cinacalcet (a calcium-mimetic drug) also elicit the kokumi taste and that the CaSR-specific antagonist, NPS-2143, significantly suppresses the kokumi taste. This is the first report indicating a distinct function of the CaSR in human taste perception.

  17. Using LDR as Sensing Element for an External Fuzzy Controller Applied in Photovoltaic Pumping Systems with Variable-Speed Drives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Geraldo Neves De A; Brito, Alaan Ubaiara; Leal, Anderson Marques; Fonseca, Jéssica Kelly Silva; Macêdo, Wilson Negrão

    2015-09-22

    In the present paper, a fuzzy controller applied to a Variable-Speed Drive (VSD) for use in Photovoltaic Pumping Systems (PVPS) is proposed. The fuzzy logic system (FLS) used is embedded in a microcontroller and corresponds to a proportional-derivative controller. A Light-Dependent Resistor (LDR) is used to measure, approximately, the irradiance incident on the PV array. Experimental tests are executed using an Arduino board. The experimental results show that the fuzzy controller is capable of operating the system continuously throughout the day and controlling the direct current (DC) voltage level in the VSD with a good performance.

  18. Using LDR as Sensing Element for an External Fuzzy Controller Applied in Photovoltaic Pumping Systems with Variable-Speed Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Neves De A. Maranhão

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a fuzzy controller applied to a Variable-Speed Drive (VSD for use in Photovoltaic Pumping Systems (PVPS is proposed. The fuzzy logic system (FLS used is embedded in a microcontroller and corresponds to a proportional-derivative controller. A Light-Dependent Resistor (LDR is used to measure, approximately, the irradiance incident on the PV array. Experimental tests are executed using an Arduino board. The experimental results show that the fuzzy controller is capable of operating the system continuously throughout the day and controlling the direct current (DC voltage level in the VSD with a good performance.

  19. The senses of force and heaviness at the human elbow joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jack; Allen, Trevor J; Proske, Uwe

    2013-05-01

    The present-day view of the neural basis for the senses of muscle force and heaviness is that they are generated centrally, within the brain, from copies of motor commands. A corollary of the motor discharge generates a sense of effort which underlies these sensations. In recent experiments on force and heaviness sensations using thumb flexor muscles, a rather different explanation has been invoked: Subjects were proposed to rely predominantly on inputs of a peripheral origin, in particular, the signals of muscle spindles. The present experiments have been carried out at the elbow joint to determine whether these new ideas apply more widely. The effects of fatigue of elbow flexor muscles have been studied in force and heaviness matching tasks using three exercise regimes, a sustained maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), a maintained contraction of 35 % MVC, and a maintained contraction of 35 % MVC combined with muscle vibration at 80 Hz. In force-matching experiments, subjects were required to contract both arms and while the reference arm generated the target force under visual control, it was matched by the indicator arm without visual feedback. During the 100 % MVC exercise, force in the exercising reference arm fell rapidly to almost a half of its original value over 90 s while force in the indicator did not fall, leading to a significant overestimation of the reference force. During the 35 % MVC exercise, subjects also overestimated the reference force and this persisted at 5 and 10 min after the exercise. When 35 % MVC was combined with vibration, the amount by which the indicator arm overestimated the reference force was significantly reduced. In heaviness matching experiments, subjects could move their arms through a small range. The reference arm was loaded with a weight, and weights were added or removed from the indicator until heaviness felt the same in the two arms. There was a small, but significant fall in the matching weight used after 100 % MVC

  20. Limb position sense, proprioceptive drift and muscle thixotropy at the human elbow joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, A; Savage, G; Allen, T J; Proske, U

    2014-06-15

    These experiments on the human forearm are based on the hypothesis that drift in the perceived position of a limb over time can be explained by receptor adaptation. Limb position sense was measured in 39 blindfolded subjects using a forearm-matching task. A property of muscle, its thixotropy, a contraction history-dependent passive stiffness, was exploited to place muscle receptors of elbow muscles in a defined state. After the arm had been held flexed and elbow flexors contracted, we observed time-dependent changes in the perceived position of the reference arm by an average of 2.8° in the direction of elbow flexion over 30 s (Experiment 1). The direction of the drift reversed after the arm had been extended and elbow extensors contracted, with a mean shift of 3.5° over 30 s in the direction of elbow extension (Experiment 2). The time-dependent changes could be abolished by conditioning elbow flexors and extensors in the reference arm at the test angle, although this led to large position errors during matching (±10°), depending on how the indicator arm had been conditioned (Experiments 3 and 4). When slack was introduced in the elbow muscles of both arms, by shortening muscles after the conditioning contraction, matching errors became small and there was no drift in position sense (Experiments 5 and 6). These experiments argue for a receptor-based mechanism for proprioceptive drift and suggest that to align the two forearms, the brain monitors the difference between the afferent signals from the two arms.

  1. Aggregation and Disaggregation Techniques Applied on Remotely Sensed Data to Obtain Optimum Resolution for Surface Energy Fluxes Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agam, N.; Kustas, W. P.; Li, F.; Anderson, M. C.

    2006-05-01

    results indicate that disaggregation of the currently available lower resolution LST to field scale sub-pixel resolutions for enabling surface energy flux monitoring for this region (LST range ~20-45C) can induce RMSE of 0.7-2.1C, increasing with resolution. This suggests higher resolution LST data is still valuable at all times and crucial under certain conditions. Errors in flux calculations at the different resolutions will be presented. * Kustas W.P., et al. 2003. Remote Sensing of Environment, 85, 429-440.

  2. Electronic speckle-pattern interferometry (ESPI) applied to the study of mechanical behavior of human jaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Juan F.; Moreno de las Cuevas, Vincente; Salgueiro, Jose R.; Suarez, David; Fernandez, Paula; Gallas, Mercedes; Blanchard, Alain

    1996-01-01

    The study of the mechanical behavior of the human jaw during chewing is helpful in several specific medical fields that cover the maxillo-facial area. In this work, electronic speckle pattern interferometry has been applied to study dead jaw bones under external stress which simulates the deformations induced during chewing. Fringes obtained after subtraction of two images of the jaw, the image of the relaxed jaw and that of the jaw under stress, give us information about the most stressed zones. The interferometric analysis proposed here is attractive as it can be done in real time with the jaw under progressive stress. Image processing can be applied for improving the quality of fringes. This research can be of help in orthognathic surgery, for example in diagnosis and treatment of fractured jaws, in oral surgery, and in orthodontics because it would help us to know the stress dispersion when we insert an osseointegrated implant or place an orthodontic appliance, respectively. Studying fragments of human jaw some results about its elasticity and flexibility were obtained.

  3. Remote Sensing and GIS Applied to the Landscape for the Environmental Restoration of Urbanizations by Means of 3D Virtual Reconstruction and Visualization (Salamanca, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Miguel Martínez-Graña

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The key focus of this paper is to establish a procedure that combines the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS and remote sensing in order to achieve simulation and modeling of the landscape impact caused by construction. The procedure should be easily and inexpensively developed. With the aid of 3D virtual reconstruction and visualization, this paper proposes that the technologies of remote sensing and GIS can be applied to the landscape for post-urbanization environmental restoration. The goal is to create a rural zone in an urban development sector that integrates the residential areas and local infrastructure into the surrounding natural environment in order to measure the changes to the preliminary urban design. The units of the landscape are determined by means of two cartographic methods: (1 indirect, using the components of the landscape; and (2 direct methods, using the landscape’s elements. The visual basins are calculated for the most transited by the population points, while establishing the zones that present major impacts for the urbanization of their landscape. Based on this, the different construction types are distributed (one-family houses, blocks of houses, etc., selecting the types of plant masses either with ornamentals or integration depending on the zone; integrating water channels, creating a water channel in recirculation and green spaces and leisure time facilities. The techniques of remote sensing and GIS allow for the visualization and modeling of the urbanization in 3D, simulating the virtual reality of the infrastructure as well as the actions that need to be taken for restoration, thereby providing at a low cost an understanding of landscape integration before it takes place.

  4. Applied light-side coupling with optimized spiral-patterned zinc oxide nanorod coatings for multiple optical channel alcohol vapor sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Abdul Rahim, Hazli Rafis; Bin Lokman, Muhammad Quisar; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Hornyak, Gabor Louis; Sterckx, Karel; Mohammed, Waleed Soliman; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-07-01

    The width of spiral-patterned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod coatings on plastic optical fiber (POF) was optimized theoretically for light-side coupling and found to be 5 mm. Structured ZnO nanorods were grown on large core POFs for the purpose of alcohol vapor sensing. The aim of the spiral patterns was to enhance signal transmission by reduction of the effective ZnO growth area, thereby minimizing light leakage due to backscattering. The sensing mechanism utilized changes in the output signal due to adsorption of methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol vapors. Three spectral bands consisting of red (620 to 750 nm), green (495 to 570 nm), and blue (450 to 495 nm) were applied in measurements. The range of relative intensity modulation (RIM) was determined to be for concentrations between 25 to 300 ppm. Methanol presented the strongest response compared to ethanol and isopropanol in all three spectral channels. With regard to alcohol detection RIM by spectral band, the green channel demonstrated the highest RIM values followed by the blue and red channels, respectively.

  5. Biological stimulation of the Human skin applying health promoting light and plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awakowicz, P.; Bibinov, N. [Center for Plasma Science and Technology, Ruhr-University, Bochum (Germany); Born, M.; Niemann, U. [Philips Research, Aachen (Germany); Busse, B. [Zell-Kontakt GmbH, Noerten-Hardenberg (Germany); Gesche, R.; Kuehn, S.; Porteanu, H.E. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Helmke, A. [University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Goettingen (Germany); Kaemling, A.; Wandke, D. [CINOGY GmbH, Duderstadt (Germany); Kolb-Bachofen, V.; Liebmann, J. [Institute for Immunobiology, Heinrich-Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Kovacs, R.; Mertens, N.; Scherer, J. [Aurion Anlagentechnik GmbH, Seligenstadt (Germany); Oplaender, C.; Suschek, C. [Clinic for Plastic Surgery, University Clinic, Aachen (Germany); Vioel, W. [Laser-Laboratorium, Goettingen (Germany); University of Applied Sciences and Arts, Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    In the frame of BMBF project ''BioLiP'', new physical treatment techniques aiming at medical treatment of the human skin have been developed. The acronym BioLiP stands for ''Desinfektion, Entkeimung und biologische Stimulation der Haut durch gesundheitsfoerdernde Licht- und Plasmaquellen'' (Disinfection, germ reduction and biological stimulation of the human skin by health promoting light and plasma sources). A source applying a low-temperature dielectric barrier discharge plasma (DBD) has been investigated on its effectiveness for skin disinfection and stimulation of biological material. Alternatively an atmospheric plasma source consisting of a microwave resonator combined with a solid state power oscillator has been examined. This concept which allows for a compact and efficient design avoiding external microwave power supply and matching units has been optimized with respect to nitrogen monoxide (NO) production in high yields. In both cases various application possibilities in the medical and biological domain are opened up. Light sources in the visible spectral range have been investigated with respect to the proliferation of human cell types. Intensive highly selective blue light sources based on LED technology can slow down proliferation rates without inducing toxic effects which offers new opportunities for treatments of so-called hyperproliferative skin conditions (e.g. with psoriasis or in wound healing) using UV-free light. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. The Praxis of Social Enterprise and Human Security: An Applied Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm David Brown

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of social enterprise within development NGO work might lead one to suspect it has been irredeemably corrupted by neo-liberal capitalism. However, using the tools of capitalism is not the same as subscribing to the values of capitalism. This paper is situated at the intersection of five fields: human security, international development, social enterprise, social franchising, and left-wing anti-capitalist thought. It examines the relevance of social en­terprise to human security and to development, the relationship between social enterprise and the anti-capitalist values of the left, and it then focuses on social franchising—a subset of social enterprise that highlights the importance of cooperation—suggesting that it may be a useful methodology for NGOs carrying out educational work in parts of the developing world. It syn­thesises and extends ideas that I have presented elsewhere [1-3], it draws on ethnographic fieldwork on the Thai-Burma border, and it puts forward an agenda for further applied research that is rooted in a sociological analysis of civil society and contributes to the human security paradigm.

  7. An applied research on remote sensing classification in the Loess Plateau%黄土高原遥感分类应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘咏梅; 汤国安; 李天文

    2003-01-01

    Due to complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, the classification accuracy is unsatisfactory when a single supervised classification is used in the remote sensing investigation of the sloping field. Taking the loess hill and gully area of northern Shaanxi Province as a test area, a research was conducted to extract sloping field and other land use categories by applying an integrated classification. Based on an integration of supervised classification and unsupervised classification,sampling method is remarkably improved. The results show that the classification accuracy is satisfactory by the method and is of critical significance in obtaining up-to-date information of the sloping field, which should be helpful in the state key project of converting farmland to forest and grassland on slope land in this area. This research sought to improve the application accuracy of image classification in complex terrain areas.

  8. Food analysis using artificial senses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwińska, Magdalena; Wiśniewska, Paulina; Dymerski, Tomasz; Namieśnik, Jacek; Wardencki, Waldemar

    2014-02-19

    Nowadays, consumers are paying great attention to the characteristics of food such as smell, taste, and appearance. This motivates scientists to imitate human senses using devices known as electronic senses. These include electronic noses, electronic tongues, and computer vision. Thanks to the utilization of various sensors and methods of signal analysis, artificial senses are widely applied in food analysis for process monitoring and determining the quality and authenticity of foods. This paper summarizes achievements in the field of artificial senses. It includes a brief history of these systems, descriptions of most commonly used sensors (conductometric, potentiometric, amperometic/voltammetric, impedimetric, colorimetric, piezoelectric), data analysis methods (for example, artificial neural network (ANN), principal component analysis (PCA), model CIE L*a*b*), and application of artificial senses to food analysis, in particular quality control, authenticity and falsification assessment, and monitoring of production processes.

  9. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P.; Brennan, Sarah C.; Mun, Hee-chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X.; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D.; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Colecraft, Henry M.; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R.

    2016-07-19

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca2+homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca2+and PO43-ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca2+ions stabilize the active state, PO43-ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits.

  10. Improved Sensing Pulses for Increased Human Head Depth Measurement Sensitivity With Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Michael H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes an improved electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) stimulus paradigm, based on dual-energy pulses using the stochastic Gabor function (SGF) that may more sensitively assess deep brain tissue impedance than current single-pulse paradigms. The SGF is a uniformly distributed noise, modulated by a Gaussian envelope, with a wide-frequency spectrum representation regardless of the stimuli energy, and is least compact in the sample frequency phase plane. Numerical results obtained using a realistic human head model confirm that two sequential SGF pulses at different energies can improve EIS depth sensitivity when used in a dual-energy subtraction scheme. Specifically, although the two SGF pulses exhibit different tissue current distributions, they maintain the broadband sensing pulse characteristics needed to generate all the frequencies of interest. Moreover, finite-difference time domain simulations show that this dual-energy excitation scheme is capable of reducing the amplitude of weighted current densities surface directly underneath the electrodes by approximately 3 million times versus single stimulation pulses, while maintaining an acceptable tissue conductivity distribution at depth. This increased sensitivity for the detection of small, deep impedance changes might be of value in potential future EIS applications, such as the portable, point-of-care detection of deep brain hemorrhage or infarction. PMID:24043365

  11. Forest Boundary Extraction Method Applied to High Resolution Remote Sensing Images%高分辨率遥感影像林地边界提取方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡华龙; 吴冰; 秦志远; 赖广陵

    2016-01-01

    由于高分辨率遥感影像上的信息高度细节化,加之噪声的影响,会导致基于像元级纹理特征的林地边界提取方法的效果不理想。为此,提出一种基于种子纹理基元合并的半自动林地边界提取方法。首先利用基于图模型的影像分割算法获取初始基元;然后定义了一种针对非规则基元统计基元级灰度共生矩阵( GLCM)纹理特征的方法;最后在人工给定种子基元的基础上合并具有相似纹理的基元,并对基元合并的结果进行边界提取,得到高分影像上的林地边界。利用多源高分影像对所提方法进行验证及对比分析。实验结果表明,该方法对高分影像上大片典型林地的边界可取得较高的提取精度和计算效率。%Due to the highly detailed information and noise in high resolution remote sensing images, the results of traditional forest boundary extraction algorithms based on pixel-based texture features are not satisfactory. There-fore, a semi-automatic method based on seeded texture primitive merging was proposed in this paper. Firstly, the initial primitives were obtained by the graph-based image segmentation algorithm, and then a new primitive-based Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix ( GLCM) texture feature extraction method was defined and directly applied to the irregular primitives. Based on the seed primitives provided artificially, the proposed algorithm merged primitives with similar texture features and applied a boundary extraction algorithm to the result of texture primitive merging in order to extract the forest boundary. In the experiment, multi-source high resolution remote sensing images were used to validate the proposed method. The comparative analysis with other methods shows that the proposed method can extract the boundary of large typical forests from high resolution remote sensing images with a higher extraction accuracy and computational efficiency.

  12. User experience in libraries applying ethnography and human-centred design

    CERN Document Server

    Borg, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Modern library services can be incredibly complex. Much more so than their forebears, modern librarians must grapple daily with questions of how best to implement innovative new services, while also maintaining and updating the old. The efforts undertaken are immense, but how best to evaluate their success? In this groundbreaking new book from Routledge, library practitioners, anthropologists, and design experts combine to advocate a new focus on User Experience (or UX ) research methods. Through a combination of theoretical discussion and applied case studies, they argue that this ethnographic and human-centred design approach enables library professionals to gather rich evidence-based insights into what is really going on in their libraries, allowing them to look beyond what library users say they do to what they actually do. Edited by the team behind the international UX in Libraries conference, "User Experience in Libraries" will ignite new interest in a rapidly emerging and game-changing area of resear...

  13. Implications of Human Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 8 (TRPM8) Channel Gating from Menthol Binding Studies of the Sensing Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Parthasarathi; Hilton, Jacob K; Sisco, Nicholas J; Van Horn, Wade D

    2016-01-12

    The transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) ion channel is the primary cold sensor in humans. TRPM8 is gated by physiologically relevant cold temperatures and chemical ligands that induce cold sensations, such as the analgesic compound menthol. Characterization of TRPM8 ligand-gated channel activation will lead to a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that underlie TRPM8 function. Here, the direct binding of menthol to the isolated hTRPM8 sensing domain (transmembrane helices S1-S4) is investigated. These data are compared with two mutant sensing domain proteins, Y745H (S2 helix) and R842H (S4 helix), which have been previously identified in full length TRPM8 to be menthol insensitive. The data presented herein show that menthol specifically binds to the wild type, Y745H, and R842H TRPM8 sensing domain proteins. These results are the first to show that menthol directly binds to the TRPM8 sensing domain and indicates that Y745 and R842 residues, previously identified in functional studies as crucial to menthol sensitivity, do not affect menthol binding but instead alter coupling between the sensing domain and the pore domain.

  14. Sensing pressure distribution on a lower-limb exoskeleton physical human-machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rossi, Stefano Marco Maria; Vitiello, Nicola; Lenzi, Tommaso; Ronsse, Renaud; Koopman, Bram; Persichetti, Alessandro; Vecchi, Fabrizio; Ijspeert, Auke Jan; van der Kooij, Herman; Carrozza, Maria Chiara

    2011-01-01

    A sensory apparatus to monitor pressure distribution on the physical human-robot interface of lower-limb exoskeletons is presented. We propose a distributed measure of the interaction pressure over the whole contact area between the user and the machine as an alternative measurement method of human-robot interaction. To obtain this measure, an array of newly-developed soft silicone pressure sensors is inserted between the limb and the mechanical interface that connects the robot to the user, in direct contact with the wearer's skin. Compared to state-of-the-art measures, the advantage of this approach is that it allows for a distributed measure of the interaction pressure, which could be useful for the assessment of safety and comfort of human-robot interaction. This paper presents the new sensor and its characterization, and the development of an interaction measurement apparatus, which is applied to a lower-limb rehabilitation robot. The system is calibrated, and an example its use during a prototypical gait training task is presented.

  15. Sensing Pressure Distribution on a Lower-Limb Exoskeleton Physical Human-Machine Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Carrozza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A sensory apparatus to monitor pressure distribution on the physical human-robot interface of lower-limb exoskeletons is presented. We propose a distributed measure of the interaction pressure over the whole contact area between the user and the machine as an alternative measurement method of human-robot interaction. To obtain this measure, an array of newly-developed soft silicone pressure sensors is inserted between the limb and the mechanical interface that connects the robot to the user, in direct contact with the wearer’s skin. Compared to state-of-the-art measures, the advantage of this approach is that it allows for a distributed measure of the interaction pressure, which could be useful for the assessment of safety and comfort of human-robot interaction. This paper presents the new sensor and its characterization, and the development of an interaction measurement apparatus, which is applied to a lower-limb rehabilitation robot. The system is calibrated, and an example its use during a prototypical gait training task is presented.

  16. Long-term dose measurements applying a human anthropomorphic phantom onboard an aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, T. [DLR-German Aerospace Center, Institute for Aerospace Medicine, Radiation Biology, Linder Hoehe, DE-51147 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: thomas.berger@dlr.de; Meier, M.; Reitz, G. [DLR-German Aerospace Center, Institute for Aerospace Medicine, Radiation Biology, Linder Hoehe, DE-51147 Cologne (Germany); Schridde, M. [Lufthansa Cargo AG, DE-65441 Kelsterbach (Germany)

    2008-02-15

    The exposure of aircrew personnel to cosmic radiation has been considered as occupational exposure in the European Union since the European Council Directive 96/26/EURATOM became effective on 13th May 1996. In Germany the corresponding safety standards for aircrew are regulated by the German Radiation Protection Ordinance, which implemented the European law in 2001. The radiation exposure of the flight crew of the LUFTHANSA group is calculated by the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine in Cologne, applying the calculation program EPCARD in the framework of the aircrew dose determination system CALculated and Verified Aviation DOSimetry (CALVADOS). Besides the operational dose calculations, DLR performs measurements at airflight altitudes using active (e.g. TEPC, DOSTEL, etc.) and passive (Thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs), bubble detectors) radiation detectors to verify the calculation codes. Within these activities the project BOdy DOsimetry (BODO) comprised a long-term exposure of a RANDO anthropomorphic phantom to measure the skin and the depth dose distribution inside a human torso applying TLDs at aviation altitudes for the first time. The torso was flown onboard a LUFTHANSA Cargo aircraft for 3 months from mid of July to mid of October 2004. Over 800 TLDs were positioned for depth dose measurements in the head, the thorax and the abdomen of the torso. In addition dosemeter packages have been distributed on the surface of the torso to measure the skin dose as well as in the transport container and on the flight deck.

  17. Human and remote sensing data to investigate the frontiers of urbanization in the south of Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Lopez, Juan Miguel; Heider, Katharina; Scheffran, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    The data presented here were originally collected for the article "Frontiers of Urbanization: Identifying and Explaining Urbanization Hot Spots in the South of Mexico City Using Human and Remote Sensing" (Rodriguez et al. 2017) [4]. They were divided into three databases (remote sensing, human sensing, and census information), using a multi-method approach with the goal of analyzing the impact of urbanization on protected areas in southern Mexico City. The remote sensing database was prepared as a result of a semi-automatic classification, dividing the land cover data into urban and non-urban classes. The second data set details an alternative view of the phenomena of urbanization by concentrating on illegal settlements in the conservation zone. It was based on voluntary complaints about environmental and land use offences filed at the Procuraduria Ambiental y del Ordenamiento Territorial del Distrito Federal (PAOT), which is a governmental entity responsible for reviewing and processing grievances on five basic topics: illegal land use, deterioration of green areas, waste, noise/vibrations, and animals. Anyone can file a PAOT complaint by phone, electronically, or in person. The complaint ends with a resolution, act of conciliation, or recommendation for action by other actors, such as the police or health office. The third data about unemployment was extracted from Mexico׳s National Census 2010 database available via public access.

  18. In vivo evaluation of the penetration of topically applied drugs into human skin by spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennhenn, B; Giese, K; Plamann, K; Harendt, N; Kölmel, K

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic techniques are reported on which allow to study in vivo the penetration behaviour of topically applied light-absorbing drugs into human skin. Remittance spectroscopy, a purely optical method, provides a good tool in both, skin adaptation by use of a remote viewing head coupled to the spectrometer via optical fibres, and adequate sensitivity for the detection of small amounts of the applied drugs. The measuring depth in the skin is determined by the wavelength-dependent optical penetration depth, which itself depends on light absorption and light scattering. In the UV-spectral region the optical penetration depth is of the order of the thickness of the stratum corneum (UV-A) or of only a superficial part of it (UV-B, UV-C). Fluorescence spectroscopy, another optical method, offers two kinds of drug detection, a direct one in case of self-fluorescent drugs or an indirect one being based on the light absorption of the drug, which may give rise to a screening of the self-fluorescence of the skin itself or of an applied marker. The measuring depth is comparable to that achieved with remittance spectroscopy. A third method is photothermal spectroscopy which is determined by thermal properties of the skin in addition to optical properties. Photothermal spectroscopy is unique in that it allows depth profiles of drug concentration to be measured non-invasively, as the photothermal measuring depth can be changed by varying the modulation frequency of the intensity-modulated incident light. Results of measurements demonstrating the potentials of these spectroscopic methods are presented.

  19. Systems biology of human epilepsy applied to patients with brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Sandeep; Shah, Aashit K; Barkmeier, Daniel T; Loeb, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of recurrent seizures that can be associated with a wide variety of acquired and developmental brain lesions. Current medications for patients with epilepsy can suppress seizures; they do not cure or modify the underlying disease process. On the other hand, surgical removal of focal brain regions that produce seizures can be curative. This surgical procedure can be more precise with the placement of intracranial recording electrodes to identify brain regions that generate seizure activity as well as those that are critical for normal brain function. The detail that goes into these surgeries includes extensive neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and clinical data. Combined with precisely localized tissues removed, these data provide an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the interrelationships of many "systems" in the human brain not possible in just about any other human brain disorder. Herein, we describe a systems biology approach developed to study patients who undergo brain surgery for epilepsy and how we have begun to apply these methods to patients whose seizures are associated with brain tumors. A central goal of this clinical and translational research program is to improve our understanding of epilepsy and brain tumors and to improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes of both.

  20. Documenting genomics: Applying archival theory to preserving the records of the Human Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The Human Genome Archive Project (HGAP) aimed to preserve the documentary heritage of the UK's contribution to the Human Genome Project (HGP) by using archival theory to develop a suitable methodology for capturing the results of modern, collaborative science. After assessing past projects and different archival theories, the HGAP used an approach based on the theory of documentation strategy to try to capture the records of a scientific project that had an influence beyond the purely scientific sphere. The HGAP was an archival survey that ran for two years. It led to ninety scientists being contacted and has, so far, led to six collections being deposited in the Wellcome Library, with additional collections being deposited in other UK repositories. In applying documentation strategy the HGAP was attempting to move away from traditional archival approaches to science, which have generally focused on retired Nobel Prize winners. It has been partially successful in this aim, having managed to secure collections from people who are not ‘big names’, but who made an important contribution to the HGP. However, the attempt to redress the gender imbalance in scientific collections and to improve record-keeping in scientific organisations has continued to be difficult to achieve. PMID:26388555

  1. Documenting genomics: Applying archival theory to preserving the records of the Human Genome Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The Human Genome Archive Project (HGAP) aimed to preserve the documentary heritage of the UK's contribution to the Human Genome Project (HGP) by using archival theory to develop a suitable methodology for capturing the results of modern, collaborative science. After assessing past projects and different archival theories, the HGAP used an approach based on the theory of documentation strategy to try to capture the records of a scientific project that had an influence beyond the purely scientific sphere. The HGAP was an archival survey that ran for two years. It led to ninety scientists being contacted and has, so far, led to six collections being deposited in the Wellcome Library, with additional collections being deposited in other UK repositories. In applying documentation strategy the HGAP was attempting to move away from traditional archival approaches to science, which have generally focused on retired Nobel Prize winners. It has been partially successful in this aim, having managed to secure collections from people who are not 'big names', but who made an important contribution to the HGP. However, the attempt to redress the gender imbalance in scientific collections and to improve record-keeping in scientific organisations has continued to be difficult to achieve.

  2. Applying water quality indexes (WQI to the use of water sources for human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Torres

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring and anthropic contamination of water sources limits the use of water for human consumption. Fast and representative tools, such as water quality indexes (WQI,allow performing an integral assessment of the resource, this being essential when making decisions about the management and control of sanitary risks through different purification processes. A comparative analysis of applying WQINSF,Dinius WQI, ICAUCA and UWQI indexes at five points or stations on the Cauca River located in the Salvajina–Puerto Mallarino water uptake section, gave evidence of growing river deterioration due to the different socio-economic activities carried out in the river basin. This water quality condition brings about the incorporation of additional or specific treatment operations such as activated carbon or adsorption for the destination of the resource for human consumption. The presence of pathogens and particulate material were the variables mostly affecting WQI value. It is thus recommended that the development or adaptation of an index having a similar structure to the DQWI index should be considered to make a thorough river assessment and the additional use of soil which might generate the presence of other substances causing a sanitary risk in the source, considering variation in time and space of the parameters comprising it and its comparison with current legislation.

  3. Human brucellosis mimicking axial spondyloarthritis: a challenge for rheumatologists when applying the 2009 ASAS criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Cong; Shen, Gui-Fen; Li, Shou-Xin; Dong, Ling-Li; Yu, Yi-Kai; Tu, Wei; Zhu, Ying-Zi; Hu, Shao-Xian

    2016-06-01

    Although the development of the 2009 SpA classification criteria by Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) represents an important step towards a better definition of the early disease stage particularly in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), the specificity of the criteria has been criticized these days. As the commonest zoonotic infection worldwide, human brucellosis can mimic a large number of diseases, including SpA. This study was performed to determine the frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with brucellosis and the chance of misdiagnosing them as having axSpA in central China. The results showed that clinical manifestations of axSpA could be observed in brucellosis. Over half of patients had back pain, and one fifth of the patients with back pain were less than 45 years old at onset and had the symptom for more than 3 months. Two young males were falsely classified as suffering from axSpA according to the ASAS criteria, and one with MRI proved sacroiliitis was once given Etanercept for treatment. Therefore, differential diagnosis including human brucellosis should always be kept in mind when applying the ASAS criteria, even in traditionally non-endemic areas.

  4. Remote sensing, paleoecology, and the archaeology of human migration during the Pleistocene in central Asia and western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glantz, Michelle M.; Todd, Lawrence

    2003-07-01

    Remote sensing used in the context of global information systems has enormous applications within archaeology. This technology enables the discovery of new archaeological features and promotes an understanding of the relationship between ecosystem and cultural dynamics. Archaeologists are able to add a time dimension to 'creeping environmental changes' that other areas of scientific inquiry concerned with climate change often lack. Remote sensing and other aerial prospecting has been used successfully to model land use and population expansions during relatively recent archaeological eras, such as the Bronze and Iron Ages. Although satellite image databases exist for numerous areas of the New and Old World, very little research has been conducted in Central Asia or western China. This region is historically significant because of its position along the important trading route called the Silk Road. The purpose of the present research is to investigate another poorly understood period of human history that would benefit from the application of remote sensing and associated ground truthing techniques. The migration of hominids out of Africa during the late Pliocene/early Pleistocene and their subsequent colonization of north-central, east, and south-east Asia is relatively well documented in the archaeological record and marks the beginning of the long-term process of human impacts on the region. However, the trajectory of dispersal of Homo erectus, Neandertals, and early modern humans and the ways by which ecosystem vagaries affected this dispersal across Eurasia is unknown. Our purpose is to summarize what is currently known about the geological indicators of ecosystem changes that remote sensing techniques provide and how ecosystem variables may allow us to model human migration as that of an invasive species through this important geographic crossroads of the Old World.

  5. The opportunistic human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii senses and responds to light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussi, María A; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Cabruja, Matías; Arivett, Brock A; Viale, Alejandro M; Rasia, Rodolfo; Actis, Luis A

    2010-12-01

    Light is a ubiquitous environmental signal that many organisms sense and respond to by modulating their physiological responses accordingly. While this is an expected response among phototrophic microorganisms, the ability of chemotrophic prokaryotes to sense and react to light has become a puzzling and novel issue in bacterial physiology, particularly among bacterial pathogens. In this work, we show that the opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii senses and responds to blue light. Motility and formation of biofilms and pellicles were observed only when bacterial cells were incubated in darkness. In contrast, the killing of Candida albicans filaments was enhanced when they were cocultured with bacteria under light. These bacterial responses depend on the expression of the A. baumannii ATCC 17978 A1S_2225 gene, which codes for an 18.6-kDa protein that contains an N-terminal blue-light-sensing-using flavin (BLUF) domain and lacks a detectable output domain(s). Spectral analyses of the purified recombinant protein showed its ability to sense light by a red shift upon illumination. Therefore, the A1S_2225 gene, which is present in several members of the Acinetobacter genus, was named blue-light-sensing A (blsA). Interestingly, temperature plays a role in the ability of A. baumannii to sense and respond to light via the BlsA photoreceptor protein.

  6. Comparative expression of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in the mouse, rat, and human kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graca, J A Z; Schepelmann, M; Brennan, S C; Reens, J; Chang, W; Yan, P; Toka, H; Riccardi, D; Price, S A

    2016-03-15

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) was cloned over 20 years ago and functionally demonstrated to regulate circulating levels of parathyroid hormone by maintaining physiological serum ionized calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]). The receptor is highly expressed in the kidney; however, intrarenal and intraspecies distribution remains controversial. Recently, additional functions of the CaSR receptor in the kidney have emerged, including parathyroid hormone-independent effects. It is therefore critical to establish unequivocally the localization of the CaSR in the kidney to relate this to its proposed physiological roles. In this study, we determined CaSR expression in mouse, rat, and human kidneys using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry (using 8 different commercially available and custom-made antibodies), and proximity ligation assays. Negative results in mice with kidney-specific CaSR ablation confirmed the specificity of the immunohistochemistry signal. Both in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry showed CaSR expression in the thick ascending limb, distal tubule, and collecting duct of all species, with the thick ascending limb showing the highest levels. Within the collecting ducts, there was significant heterogeneity of expression between cell types. In the proximal tubule, lower levels of immunoreactivity were detected by immunohistochemistry and proximity ligation assays. Proximity ligation assays were the only technique to demonstrate expression within glomeruli. This study demonstrated CaSR expression throughout the kidney with minimal discrepancy between species but with significant variation in the levels of expression between cell and tubule types. These findings clarify the intrarenal distribution of the CaSR and enable elucidation of the full physiological roles of the receptor within this organ.

  7. CALCIUM-SENSING RECEPTORS OF HUMAN NEURAL CELLS PLAY CRUCIAL ROLES IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eChiarini

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In aged subjects, late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD starts in the lateral entorhinal allocortex where a failure of clearance mechanisms triggers an accumulation neurotoxic of amyloid-β42 oligomers (Aβ42-os. In neurons and astrocytes, Aβ42-os enhance the transcription of Aβ precursor protein (APP and β-secretase/BACE1 genes. Thus, by acting together with γ-secretase, the surpluses of APP and BACE1 amplify the endogenous production of Aβ42-os which pile up, damage mitochondria, and are oversecreted. At the plasmalemma, exogenous Aβ42-os bind neurons' and astrocytes' calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs activating a set of intracellular signalling pathways which upkeep Aβ42-os intracellular accumulation and oversecretion by hindering Aβ42-os proteolysis. In addition, Aβ42-os accumulating in the extracellular milieu spread and reach mounting numbers of adjacent and remoter teams of neurons and astrocytes which in turn are recruited, again via Aβ42-osCaSR-governed mechanisms, to produce and release additional Aβ42-os amounts. This relentless self-sustaining mechanism drives AD progression towards upper cortical areas. Later on accumulating Aβ42-os elicit the advent of hyperphosphorylated (p-Tau oligomers which acting together with Aβ42-os and other glial neurotoxins cooperatively destroy wider and wider cognition-related cortical areas. In parallel, Aβ42-osCaSR signals also elicit an excess production and secretion of nitric oxide and vascular endothelial growth factor-A from astrocytes, of Aβ42-os and myelin basic protein from oligodendrocytes, and of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide and (likely Aβ42-os from microglia. Activated astrocytes and microglia survive the toxic onslaught, whereas neurons and oligodendrocytes increasingly die. However, we have shown that highly selective allosteric CaSR antagonists (calcilytics, like NPS 2143 and NPS 89626, efficiently suppress all the neurotoxic effects Aβ42-osCaSR signalling

  8. Radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cell culture applying the comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Vieira, Daniel P.; Okazaki, Kayo; Rogero, Jose R., E-mail: van.biologa@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Aurea S., E-mail: aurcruz@ial.sp.gov.br [Instituto Adolfo Lutz (IAL-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Cancer is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a defense polyphenol, synthesized naturally by a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. In vines this substance is found in elevated concentration. Thus, resveratrol is present in grape juice and wines, especially red wine. Red wines are the best dietary source of resveratrol.The protective effects performed by resveratrol during the process of cell damage, produced by oxidative effects of free radicals, are anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet and anti-carcinogenic activity, prevent or inhibit degenerative diseases, decrease incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol is considered as a radiosensitizing compound. The aim of this work was study in vitro the radiomodifying effect of resveratrol in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells applying the comet assay to evaluate the cellular damage and its repair capacity. In this study RD cells culture was irradiated by gamma radiation at 50 Gy and 100 Gy doses and the used resveratrol concentrations was from 15 μM to 60 μM. The protective and radioprotective effects were observed at 15 μM and 30 μM resveratrol concentrations. The resveratrol concentration of 60 μM showed cytotoxic effect to RD tumor cells and with gamma radiation presence this concentration showed no statistically significant radiosensitizing effects. (author)

  9. Human behavioural research applied to the leprosy control programme of Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P C

    1986-09-01

    In 1984, in Sarawak, there were a total of 1,099 recorded cases of leprosy for a population of 1.3 million. However, for each case recorded, it is estimated that two others remain undiagnosed as a consequence of the stigmatization associated with leprosy. For the five year period, 1979-1983, an average of 29 new cases were detected each year of which 8.6 (30%) were deformed due to the late stages at which it was being reported. To increase the case-finding rate, human behavioural research was applied to the leprosy control programme so as to develop culture-specific health education packages aimed at self diagnosis and self referral in order to detect the large pool of undiagnosed cases hidden behind the veil of aversion, fear and ignorance. This was achieved through anthropological studies to identify how the various major ethnic groups perceived leprosy and their attitudes towards leprosy. Taking into account these findings, health education packages aimed at adults as well as children were developed for the Chinese as well as the non-Chinese, and consisted of newspaper articles, cartoon tape-slides, cartoon story books and posters.

  10. An IMU-to-Body Alignment Method Applied to Human Gait Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Susana Vargas-Valencia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel calibration procedure as a simple, yet powerful, method to place and align inertial sensors with body segments. The calibration can be easily replicated without the need of any additional tools. The proposed method is validated in three different applications: a computer mathematical simulation; a simplified joint composed of two semi-spheres interconnected by a universal goniometer; and a real gait test with five able-bodied subjects. Simulation results demonstrate that, after the calibration method is applied, the joint angles are correctly measured independently of previous sensor placement on the joint, thus validating the proposed procedure. In the cases of a simplified joint and a real gait test with human volunteers, the method also performs correctly, although secondary plane errors appear when compared with the simulation results. We believe that such errors are caused by limitations of the current inertial measurement unit (IMU technology and fusion algorithms. In conclusion, the presented calibration procedure is an interesting option to solve the alignment problem when using IMUs for gait analysis.

  11. Fractional-order viscoelasticity applied to describe uniaxial stress relaxation of human arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craiem, Damian; Armentano, Ricardo L [Facultad de IngenierIa, Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Favaloro University, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rojo, Francisco J; Atienza, Jose Miguel; Guinea, Gustavo V [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: dcraiem@favaloro.edu.ar

    2008-09-07

    Viscoelastic models can be used to better understand arterial wall mechanics in physiological and pathological conditions. The arterial wall reveals very slow time-dependent decays in uniaxial stress-relaxation experiments, coherent with weak power-law functions. Quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory was successfully applied to modeling such responses, but an accurate estimation of the reduced relaxation function parameters can be very difficult. In this work, an alternative relaxation function based on fractional calculus theory is proposed to describe stress relaxation experiments in strips cut from healthy human aortas. Stress relaxation (1 h) was registered at three incremental stress levels. The novel relaxation function with three parameters was integrated into the QLV theory to fit experimental data. It was based in a modified Voigt model, including a fractional element of order {alpha}, called spring-pot. The stress-relaxation prediction was accurate and fast. Sensitivity plots for each parameter presented a minimum near their optimal values. Least-squares errors remained below 2%. Values of order {alpha} = 0.1-0.3 confirmed a predominant elastic behavior. The other two parameters of the model can be associated to elastic and viscous constants that explain the time course of the observed relaxation function. The fractional-order model integrated into the QLV theory proved to capture the essential features of the arterial wall mechanical response.

  12. Pilot-testing an applied competency-based approach to health human resources planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomblin Murphy, Gail; MacKenzie, Adrian; Alder, Rob; Langley, Joanne; Hickey, Marjorie; Cook, Amanda

    2013-10-01

    A competency-based approach to health human resources (HHR) planning is one that explicitly considers the spectrum of knowledge, skills and judgement (competencies) required for the health workforce based on the health needs of the relevant population in some specific circumstances. Such an approach is of particular benefit to planners challenged to make optimal use of limited HHR as it allows them to move beyond simply estimating numbers of certain professionals required and plan instead according to the unique mix of competencies available from the existing health workforce. This kind of flexibility is particularly valuable in contexts where healthcare providers are in short supply generally (e.g. in many developing countries) or temporarily due to a surge in need (e.g. a pandemic or other disease outbreak). A pilot application of this approach using the context of an influenza pandemic in one health district of Nova Scotia, Canada, is described, and key competency gaps identified. The approach is also being applied using other conditions in other Canadian jurisdictions and in Zambia.

  13. Pathogen sensing pathways in human embryonic stem cell derived-endothelial cells: role of NOD1 receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Reed

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell-derived endothelial cells (hESC-EC, as well as other stem cell derived endothelial cells, have a range of applications in cardiovascular research and disease treatment. Endothelial cells sense Gram-negative bacteria via the pattern recognition receptors (PRR Toll-like receptor (TLR-4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerisation domain-containing protein (NOD-1. These pathways are important in terms of sensing infection, but TLR4 is also associated with vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Here, we have compared TLR4 and NOD1 responses in hESC-EC with those of endothelial cells derived from other stem cells and with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. HUVEC, endothelial cells derived from blood progenitors (blood outgrowth endothelial cells; BOEC, and from induced pluripotent stem cells all displayed both a TLR4 and NOD1 response. However, hESC-EC had no TLR4 function, but did have functional NOD1 receptors. In vivo conditioning in nude rats did not confer TLR4 expression in hESC-EC. Despite having no TLR4 function, hESC-EC sensed Gram-negative bacteria, a response that was found to be mediated by NOD1 and the associated RIP2 signalling pathways. Thus, hESC-EC are TLR4 deficient but respond to bacteria via NOD1. This data suggests that hESC-EC may be protected from unwanted TLR4-mediated vascular inflammation, thus offering a potential therapeutic advantage.

  14. Heat Sensing Receptor TRPV1 Is a Mediator of Thermotaxis in Human Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegazzo, Massimo; Magagna, Sabina; Di Nisio, Andrea; Šabović, Iva; Rocca, Maria Santa; Scattolini, Valentina; Filippi, Andrea; Foresta, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The molecular bases of sperm thermotaxis, the temperature-oriented cell motility, are currently under investigation. Thermal perception relies on a subclass of the transient receptor potential [TRP] channels, whose member TRPV1 is acknowledged as the heat sensing receptor. Here we investigated the involvement of TRPV1 in human sperm thermotaxis. We obtained semen samples from 16 normozoospermic subjects attending an infertility survey programme, testis biopsies from 6 patients with testicular germ cell cancer and testis fine needle aspirates from 6 patients with obstructive azoospermia undergoing assisted reproductive technologies. Expression of TRPV1 mRNA was assessed by RT-PCR. Protein expression of TRPV1 was determined by western blot, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence. Sperm motility was assessed by Sperm Class Analyser. Acrosome reaction, apoptosis and intracellular-Ca2+ content were assessed by flow cytometry. We found that TRPV1 mRNA and protein were highly expressed in the testis, in both Sertoli cells and germ-line cells. Moreover, compared to no-gradient controls at 31°C or 37°C (Ctrl 31°C and Ctrl 37°C respectively), sperm migration towards a temperature gradient of 31–37°C (T gradient) in non-capacitated conditions selected a higher number of cells (14,9 ± 4,2×106 cells T gradient vs 5,1± 0,3×106 cells Ctrl 31°C and 5,71±0,74×106 cells Ctrl 37°C; P = 0,039). Capacitation amplified the migrating capability towards the T gradient. Sperms migrated towards the T gradient showed enriched levels of both TRPV1 protein and mRNA. In addition, sperm cells were able to migrate toward a gradient of capsaicin, a specific agonist of TRPV1, whilst capsazepine, a specific agonist of TRPV1, blocked this effect. Finally, capsazepine severely blunted migration towards T gradient without abolishing. These results suggest that TRPV1 may represent a facilitating mediator of sperm thermotaxis. PMID:27992447

  15. Pu-239 organ specific dosimetric model applied to non-human biota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Matthew Jason

    There are few locations throughout the world, like the Maralinga nuclear test site located in south western Australia, where sufficient plutonium contaminate concentration levels exist that they can be utilized for studies of the long-term radionuclide accumulation in non-human biota. The information obtained will be useful for the potential human users of the site while also keeping with international efforts to better understand doses to non-human biota. In particular, this study focuses primarily on a rabbit sample set collected from the population located within the site. Our approach is intended to employ the same dose and dose rate methods selected by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and adapted by the scientific community for similar research questions. These models rely on a series of simplifying assumptions on biota and their geometry; in particular; organisms are treated as spherical and ellipsoidal representations displaying the animal mass and volume. These simplifications assume homogeneity of all animal tissues. In collaborative efforts between Colorado State University and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), we are expanding current knowledge on radionuclide accumulation in specific organs causing organ-specific dose rates, such as Pu-239 accumulating in bone, liver, and lungs. Organ-specific dose models have been developed for humans; however, little has been developed for the dose assessment to biota, in particular rabbits. This study will determine if it is scientifically valid to use standard software, in particular ERICA Tool, as a means to determine organ-specific dosimetry due to Pu-239 accumulation in organs. ERICA Tool is normally applied to whole organisms as a means to determine radiological risk to whole ecosystems. We will focus on the aquatic model within ERICA Tool, as animal organs, like aquatic organisms, can be assumed to lie within an infinite uniform medium. This model would

  16. Improving Human-Computer Interaction by Developing Culture-sensitive Applications based on Common Sense Knowledge

    CERN Document Server

    Anacleto, Junia Coutinho

    2010-01-01

    The advent of Web 3.0, claiming for personalization in interactive systems (Lassila & Hendler, 2007), and the need for systems capable of interacting in a more natural way in the future society flooded with computer systems and devices (Harper et al., 2008) show that great advances in HCI should be done. This chapter presents some contributions of LIA for the future of HCI, defending that using common sense knowledge is a possibility for improving HCI, especially because people assign meaning to their messages based on their common sense and, therefore, the use of this knowledge in developing user interfaces can make them more intuitive to the end-user. Moreover, as common sense knowledge varies from group to group of people, it can be used for developing applications capable of giving different feedback for different target groups, as the applications presented along this chapter illustrate, allowing, in this way, interface personalization taking into account cultural issues. For the purpose of using com...

  17. Human Dignity and the Manipulation of the Sense of Happiness: From the Viewpoint of Bioethics and Philosophy of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Morioka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available If our sense of happiness is closely connected to brain functions, it might become possible to manipulate our brain in a much more refined and effective way than current methods allow. In this paper I will make some remarks on the manipulation of the sense of happiness and illuminate the relationship between human dignity and happiness. The President’s Council on Bioethics discusses this topic in the 2003 report Beyond Therapy, and concludes that the use of SSRIs might make us “feel happy for no good reason at all, or happy even when there remains much in one’s life to be truly unhappy about.” I will extend their line of thought through two thought experiments. In the first, a “perfect happiness” drug is given to a person, and in the second a happiness device with an on/off switch is placed inside a person. The first case leads us to conclude that a life with dignity means a life free from domination by the sense of happiness and the sense of unhappiness. The second case leads us to conclude that a life with dignity requires substantive freedom to choose unhappiness. At the end of this paper, I present a new interpretation of “human dignity,” that is, “a life with dignity means a life in which we are able to explore our own life, equipped with both happiness and unhappiness, without regret, through relationships with others, without being exploited by the desires of anyone, and without being dominated by our own desires.”

  18. Human-machine interfaces based on EMG and EEG applied to robotic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarcinelli-Filho Mario

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two different Human-Machine Interfaces (HMIs were developed, both based on electro-biological signals. One is based on the EMG signal and the other is based on the EEG signal. Two major features of such interfaces are their relatively simple data acquisition and processing systems, which need just a few hardware and software resources, so that they are, computationally and financially speaking, low cost solutions. Both interfaces were applied to robotic systems, and their performances are analyzed here. The EMG-based HMI was tested in a mobile robot, while the EEG-based HMI was tested in a mobile robot and a robotic manipulator as well. Results Experiments using the EMG-based HMI were carried out by eight individuals, who were asked to accomplish ten eye blinks with each eye, in order to test the eye blink detection algorithm. An average rightness rate of about 95% reached by individuals with the ability to blink both eyes allowed to conclude that the system could be used to command devices. Experiments with EEG consisted of inviting 25 people (some of them had suffered cases of meningitis and epilepsy to test the system. All of them managed to deal with the HMI in only one training session. Most of them learnt how to use such HMI in less than 15 minutes. The minimum and maximum training times observed were 3 and 50 minutes, respectively. Conclusion Such works are the initial parts of a system to help people with neuromotor diseases, including those with severe dysfunctions. The next steps are to convert a commercial wheelchair in an autonomous mobile vehicle; to implement the HMI onboard the autonomous wheelchair thus obtained to assist people with motor diseases, and to explore the potentiality of EEG signals, making the EEG-based HMI more robust and faster, aiming at using it to help individuals with severe motor dysfunctions.

  19. Sensing Small Changes in Protein Abundance: Stimulation of Caco-2 Cells by Human Whey Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundiff, Judy K; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Lohe, Kimberly J; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-04

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches have largely facilitated our systemic understanding of cellular processes and biological functions. Cutoffs in protein expression fold changes (FCs) are often arbitrarily determined in MS-based quantification with no demonstrable determination of small magnitude changes in protein expression. Therefore, many biological insights may remain veiled due to high FC cutoffs. Herein, we employ the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line Caco-2 as a model system to demonstrate the dynamicity of tandem-mass-tag (TMT) labeling over a range of 5-40% changes in protein abundance, with the variance controls of ± 5% FC for around 95% of TMT ratios when sampling 9-12 biological replicates. We further applied this procedure to examine the temporal proteome of Caco-2 cells upon exposure to human whey proteins (WP). Pathway assessments predict subtle effects due to WP in moderating xenobiotic metabolism, promoting proliferation and various other cellular functions in differentiating enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This demonstration of a sensitive MS approach may open up new perspectives in the system-wide exploration of elusive or transient biological effects by facilitating scrutiny of narrow windows of proteome abundance changes. Furthermore, we anticipate this study will encourage more investigations of WP on infant gastrointestinal tract development.

  20. Using Satellite Remote Sensing and Household Survey Data to Assess Human Health and Nutrition Response to Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly E.; Grace, Kathryn; Shively, Gerald; Johnson, Kiersten B.; Carroll, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Climate change and degradation of ecosystem services functioning may threaten the ability of current agricultural systems to keep up with demand for adequate and inexpensive food and for clean water, waste disposal and other broader ecosystem services. Human health is likely to be affected by changes occurring across multiple geographic and time scales. Impacts range from increasing transmissibility and the range of vector-borne diseases, such as malaria and yellow fever, to undermining nutrition through deleterious impacts on food production and concomitant increases in food prices. This paper uses case studies to describe methods that make use of satellite remote sensing and Demographic and Health Survey data to better understand individual-level human health and nutrition outcomes. By bringing these diverse datasets together, the connection between environmental change and human health outcomes can be described through new research and analysis.

  1. Human posture experiments under water: ways of applying the findings to microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirlich, Thomas

    For the design and layout human spacecraft interiors the Neutral Body Posture (NBP) in micro-gravity is of great importance. The NBP has been defined as the stable, replicable and nearly constant posture the body "automatically" assumes when a human relaxes in microgravity. Furthermore the NBP, as published, suggests that there is one standard neutral posture for all individuals. Published experiments from space, parabolic flights and under water on the other hand show strong inter-individual variations of neutral (relaxed) postures. This might originate from the quite small sample sizes of subjects analyzed or the different experiment conditions, e. g. space and under water. Since 2008 a collaborative research project focussing on human postures and motions in microgravity has been ongoing at the Technische Univer-sitüt München (TUM). This collaborative effort is undertaken by the Institute of Astronautics a (LRT) and the Institute of Ergonomics (LfE). Several test campaigns have been conducted in simulated microgravity under water using a specially designed standardized experiment setup. Stereo-metric HD video footage and anthropometric data from over 50 subjects (female and male) has been gathered in over 80 experiments. The video data is analyzed using PCMAN software, developed by the LfE, resulting in a 3D volumetric CAD-based model of each subject and posture. Preliminary and ongoing analysis of the data offer evidence for the existence of intra-individually constant neutral postures, as well as continuously recurring relaxation strate-gies. But as with the data published prior the TUM experiments show quite a large variation of inter-individual postures. These variation might be induced or influenced by the special environmental conditions in the underwater experiment. Thus in present paper ways of stan-dardizing data and applying the findings gathered under water to real microgravity are being discussed. The following influences stemming from the

  2. Robust human machine interface based on head movements applied to assistive robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Elisa; López, Natalia; Orosco, Eugenio; Soria, Carlos; Mut, Vicente; Freire-Bastos, Teodiano

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an interface that uses two different sensing techniques and combines both results through a fusion process to obtain the minimum-variance estimator of the orientation of the user's head. Sensing techniques of the interface are based on an inertial sensor and artificial vision. The orientation of the user's head is used to steer the navigation of a robotic wheelchair. Also, a control algorithm for assistive technology system is presented. The system is evaluated by four individuals with severe motors disability and a quantitative index was developed, in order to objectively evaluate the performance. The results obtained are promising since most users could perform the proposed tasks with the robotic wheelchair.

  3. Robust Human Machine Interface Based on Head Movements Applied to Assistive Robotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Perez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interface that uses two different sensing techniques and combines both results through a fusion process to obtain the minimum-variance estimator of the orientation of the user’s head. Sensing techniques of the interface are based on an inertial sensor and artificial vision. The orientation of the user’s head is used to steer the navigation of a robotic wheelchair. Also, a control algorithm for assistive technology system is presented. The system is evaluated by four individuals with severe motors disability and a quantitative index was developed, in order to objectively evaluate the performance. The results obtained are promising since most users could perform the proposed tasks with the robotic wheelchair.

  4. Conversational sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  5. Artificial senses for characterization of food quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yan-bo; LAN Yu-bin; R.E. Lacey

    2004-01-01

    Food quality is of primary concern in the food industry and to the consumer. Systems that mimic human senses have been developed and applied to the characterization of food quality. The five primary senses are: vision, hearing, smell, taste and touch.In the characterization of food quality, people assess the samples sensorially and differentiate "good" from "bad" on a continuum.However, the human sensory system is subjective, with mental and physical inconsistencies, and needs time to work. Artificial senses such as machine vision, the electronic ear, electronic nose, electronic tongue, artificial mouth and even artificial the head have been developed that mimic the human senses. These artificial senses are coordinated individually or collectively by a pattern recognition technique, typically artificial neural networks, which have been developed based on studies of the mechanism of the human brain. Such a structure has been used to formulate methods for rapid characterization of food quality. This research presents and discusses individual artificial sensing systems. With the concept of multi-sensor data fusion these sensor systems can work collectively in some way. Two such fused systems, artificial mouth and artificial head, are described and discussed. It indicates that each of the individual systems has their own artificially sensing ability to differentiate food samples. It further indicates that with a more complete mimic of human intelligence the fused systems are more powerful than the individual systems in differentiation of food samples.

  6. SENSORY, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF THE CHEMICAL SENSES IN HUMAN EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract The examination of the effects of odors on humans is not a simple task. It involves consideration of sensory, psychological, and psychophysiological aspects of the stimulus and the humans studied. Aspects of importance are: 1. Information the subject has ...

  7. Rapid determination of dopamine in human plasma using a gold nanoparticle-based dual-mode sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yali; Qi, Suijian; Liu, Zhonggang; Shi, Yupeng; Yue, Wanqing; Yi, Changqing

    2016-04-01

    Dopamine plays a very important role in biological systems and has a direct relationship with the ability of learning and cognition, human desires, feelings and mental state, as well as motor functions. Traditional methods for the detection of dopamine are complicated and time-consuming, therefore it is necessary to explore rapid and accurate detection of dopamine with high sensitivity and specificity. Herein we report a dual-mode system of colorimetric and fluorometric analyses based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and aptamers specifically targeting dopamine. Aptamers modified with the fluorophore were used as dopamine specific recognition probe and the sensing mechanism is based on the color change of AuNPs and the fluorescence recovery of fluorophore conjugated on the aptamers in the presence of dopamine. The addition of aptamers into AuNPs colloid solution would prevent the AuNPs from aggregation in the high-salt solution. The close distance between AuNPs and fluorophore conjugated on the aptamers would lead to the quenching of fluorescence signal. In the presence of dopamine, the conformation of the aptamers and the inter-particle distance would be changed, leading to the aggregation of AuNPs, which subsequently results in color change from red to blue and fluorescence signal recovery. The dual-mode sensing system demonstrated high specificity towards dopamine with the detection limit as low as 78.7 nM. The sensing system reflects on its simplicity as no surface functionalization is required for the nanoparticles, leading to less laborious and more cost-effective synthesis. The reaction time is only 6 min, demonstrating a simple approach for rapid analysis of dopamine. More importantly, the sensing system allows the detection of dopamine in both aqueous solution and complicated biological sample with sensitive response, illustrating the feasibility and reliability for the potential applications in clinical and biomedical analysis in the future.

  8. PyzoFlex: a printed piezoelectric pressure sensing foil for human machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirkl, M.; Scheipl, G.; Stadlober, B.; Rendl, C.; Greindl, P.; Haller, M.; Hartmann, P.

    2013-09-01

    Ferroelectric material supports both pyro- and piezoelectric effects that can be used for sensing pressures on large, bended surfaces. We present PyzoFlex, a pressure-sensing input device that is based on a ferroelectric material (PVDF:TrFE). It is constructed by a sandwich structure of four layers that can easily be printed on any substrate. The PyzoFlex foil is sensitive to pressure- and temperature changes, bendable, energy-efficient, and it can easily be produced by a screen-printing routine. Even a hovering input-mode is feasible due to its pyroelectric effect. In this paper, we introduce this novel, fully printed input technology and discuss its benefits and limitations.

  9. Tactile Sensing and Control in Humans and Robotic/Teleoperated Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-04

    Surface Features with Stress Rate Sensing," accepted for publication in the IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation. [Cutkosky and Howe 1990] M.R... Transactions on Robotics and Automation, Vol. 5, No. 2, April, 1989, pp. 151-165. [Kao and Cutkosky 1992] I. Kao and M. R. Cutkosky, "Quasistatic...1992. Additional References [Cutkosky and Kao 1989] M.R. Cutkosky and I. Kao, "Computing and Controlling the Compli- ance of a Robotic Grasp," IEEE

  10. Energy Autonomous Wireless Sensing System Enabled by Energy Generated during Human Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yang; Ruan, Tingwen; Chew, Zheng Jun; Zhu, Meiling

    2016-11-01

    Recently, there has been a huge amount of work devoted to wearable energy harvesting (WEH) in a bid to establish energy autonomous wireless sensing systems for a range of health monitoring applications. However, limited work has been performed to implement and test such systems in real-world settings. This paper reports the development and real-world characterisation of a magnetically plucked wearable knee-joint energy harvester (Mag-WKEH) powered wireless sensing system, which integrates our latest research progresses in WEH, power conditioning and wireless sensing to achieve high energy efficiency. Experimental results demonstrate that with walking speeds of 3∼7 km/h, the Mag-WKEH generates average power of 1.9∼4.5 mW with unnoticeable impact on the wearer and is able to power the wireless sensor node (WSN) with three sensors to work at duty cycles of 6.6%∼13%. In each active period of 2 s, the WSN is able to measure and transmit 482 readings to the base station.

  11. Regulation of skeletal muscle energy/nutrient-sensing pathways during metabolic adaptation to fasting in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijngaarden, Marjolein A; Bakker, Leontine E H; van der Zon, Gerard C; 't Hoen, Peter A C; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Jazet, Ingrid M; Pijl, Hanno; Guigas, Bruno

    2014-11-15

    During fasting, rapid metabolic adaptations are required to maintain energy homeostasis. This occurs by a coordinated regulation of energy/nutrient-sensing pathways leading to transcriptional activation and repression of specific sets of genes. The aim of the study was to investigate how short-term fasting affects whole body energy homeostasis and skeletal muscle energy/nutrient-sensing pathways and transcriptome in humans. For this purpose, 12 young healthy men were studied during a 24-h fast. Whole body glucose/lipid oxidation rates were determined by indirect calorimetry, and blood and skeletal muscle biopsies were collected and analyzed at baseline and after 10 and 24 h of fasting. As expected, fasting induced a time-dependent decrease in plasma insulin and leptin levels, whereas levels of ketone bodies and free fatty acids increased. This was associated with a metabolic shift from glucose toward lipid oxidation. At the molecular level, activation of the protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways was time-dependently reduced in skeletal muscle during fasting, whereas the AMP-activated protein kinase activity remained unaffected. Furthermore, we report some changes in the phosphorylation and/or content of forkhead protein 1, sirtuin 1, and class IIa histone deacetylase 4, suggesting that these pathways might be involved in the transcriptional adaptation to fasting. Finally, transcriptome profiling identified genes that were significantly regulated by fasting in skeletal muscle at both early and late time points. Collectively, our study provides a comprehensive map of the main energy/nutrient-sensing pathways and transcriptomic changes during short-term adaptation to fasting in human skeletal muscle.

  12. Energy expenditure evaluation in humans and non-human primates by SenseWear Armband. Validation of energy expenditure evaluation by SenseWear Armband by direct comparison with indirect calorimetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Casiraghi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to compare and validate the use of SenseWear Armband (SWA placed on the arm (SWA ARM and on the back (SWA BACK in healthy humans during resting and a cycle-ergometer exercise and to evaluate the SWA to estimate Resting Energy Expenditure (REE and Total Energy Expenditure (TEE in healthy baboons. METHODS: We studied 26 (15F/11M human subjects wearing SWA in two different anatomical sites (arm and back during resting and a cycle-ergometer test and directly compared these results with indirect calorimetry evaluation (IC, performed at the same time. We then inserted the SWA in a metabolic jacket for baboons and evaluated the TEE and REE in free living condition for 6 days in 21 (8F/13M non-human primates. RESULTS: In humans we found a good correlation between SWA place on the ARM and on the BACK with IC during the resting experiment (1.1±0.3 SWAs, 1±0.2 IC kcal/min and a slight underestimation in the SWAs data compared with IC during the cycle-ergometer exercise (5±1.9 SWA ARM, 4.5±1.5 SWA BACK and 5.4±2.1 IC kcal/min. In the non-human primate (baboons experiment SWA estimated a TEE of 0.54±0.009 kcal/min during free living and a REE of 0.82±0.06 kcal/min. CONCLUSION: SWA, an extremely simple and inexpensive apparatus, provides quite accurate measurements of energy expenditure in humans and in baboons. Energy expenditure data obtained with SWA are highly correlated with the data obtained with "gold standard", IC, in humans.

  13. Reaching with the sixth sense: Vestibular contributions to voluntary motor control in the human right parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Bresciani, Jean-Pierre; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Thielscher, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system constitutes the silent sixth sense: It automatically triggers a variety of vital reflexes to maintain postural and visual stability. Beyond their role in reflexive behavior, vestibular afferents contribute to several perceptual and cognitive functions and also support voluntary control of movements by complementing the other senses to accomplish the movement goal. Investigations into the neural correlates of vestibular contribution to voluntary action in humans are challenging and have progressed far less than research on corresponding visual and proprioceptive involvement. Here, we demonstrate for the first time with event-related TMS that the posterior part of the right medial intraparietal sulcus processes vestibular signals during a goal-directed reaching task with the dominant right hand. This finding suggests a qualitative difference between the processing of vestibular vs. visual and proprioceptive signals for controlling voluntary movements, which are pre-dominantly processed in the left posterior parietal cortex. Furthermore, this study reveals a neural pathway for vestibular input that might be distinct from the processing for reflexive or cognitive functions, and opens a window into their investigation in humans.

  14. Inhibitory Effects of Anti-sense PTTG on Malignant Phenotype of Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Line SK-OV-3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈刚; 李静; 李辅军; 李箫; 周剑锋; 卢运萍; 马丁

    2004-01-01

    To construct eukaryotic expression vector expressing full length anti-sense pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) mRNA and observe its blocking effect on the potential invasion of human ovarian carcinoma cell line SK-OV-3. PCR primers containing designed enzyme cut sites were used for cloning full-length PTTG gene fragment, and the resulting PCR product was inserted into the eukaryotic vector pcDNA3. 1 in the antisense direction. The recombinant vector was then transfected into SK-OV-3 by Lipofectamine. The positive cell clone was screened by G418, PTTG and bFGF at protein level expression were detected by Western blot. The biological behavior change of transfection positive cells was observed by colony formation in soft agar assay. Our results showed that SK-OV-3 clones stably expressing full-length recombinant pcDNA3. 1-PTTGas were obtained. The expressions of PTTG and bFGF protein in transfected cells were decreased by 61.5 % and 52.3%, respectively as compared with non-transfected ones. The number of colony formation was reduced significantly in transfected cells as compared with empty vector transfected and non-transfected cells. It is concluded that the recombinant vector pcDNA3. 1-PTTGas is a novel tool and provides an alternative anti-sense gene therapy targeted at PTTG in human carcinoma.

  15. When Should We Care About Sustainability? Applying Human Security as the Decisive Criterion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander K. Lautensach

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available It seems intuitively clear that not all human endeavours warrant equal concern over the extent of their sustainability. This raises the question about what criteria might best serve for their prioritisation. We refute, on empirical and theoretical grounds, the counterclaim that sustainability should be of no concern regardless of the circumstances. Human security can serve as a source of criteria that are both widely shared and can be assessed in a reasonably objective manner. Using established classifications, we explore how four forms of sustainability (environmental, economic, social, and cultural relate to the four pillars of human security (environmental, economic, sociopolitical, and health-related. Our findings, based on probable correlations, suggest that the criteria of human security allow for a reliable discrimination between relatively trivial incidences of unsustainable behavior and those that warrant widely shared serious concern. They also confirm that certain sources of human insecurity, such as poverty or violent conflict, tend to perpetuate unsustainable behavior, a useful consideration for the design of development initiatives. Considering that human security enjoys wide and increasing political support among the international community, it is to be hoped that by publicizing the close correlation between human security and sustainability greater attention will be paid to the latter and to its careful definition.

  16. An improved method for producing radiation hybrids applied to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    At the initiation of the grant we had just produced radiation hybrids from a monochromosomal microcell hybrid containing human chromosome 19 as its only human component. Radiation hybrids were produced using doses of radiation ranging from 1000--8000 rads. Lethally irradiated cells were then fused to hamster recipients (CHTG49) and selected for growth in histidinol. Approximately 240 clones were isolated and 75 clones were expanded for the isolation of DNA. This report describes in situ hybridization studies and the introduction of markers into human chromosome 19.

  17. INDICATORS APPLIED TO HIGHLIGHT THE VALORIZATION OF HUMAN CAPITAL IN SHIPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FILIP NISTOR

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the shipping companies reconsidered their position regarding the importance of human capital because of the new trend in shipbuilding in conjunction with the enforcement of tighter regulations in shipping. Increasing profit of shipping companies was the result of valorization of human capital on board ships through acquirement of new skills and knowledge in accordance with technologies implemented on the new ships by training and development. Thus, identification of indicators that can be used to highlight the valorization of human capital in shipping is helpful. Measurement of indicators presented in this article can assist decision makers in identifying the best courses of action to improve human capital in shipping.

  18. The effects of actual human size display and stereoscopic presentation on users' sense of being together with and of psychological immersion in a virtual character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Dohyun; Seo, Youngnam; Kim, Minkyung; Kwon, Joung Huem; Jung, Younbo; Ahn, Jungsun; Lee, Doohwang

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the role of display size and mode in increasing users' sense of being together with and of their psychological immersion in a virtual character. Using a high-resolution three-dimensional virtual character, this study employed a 2×2 (stereoscopic mode vs. monoscopic mode×actual human size vs. small size display) factorial design in an experiment with 144 participants randomly assigned to each condition. Findings showed that stereoscopic mode had a significant effect on both users' sense of being together and psychological immersion. However, display size affected only the sense of being together. Furthermore, display size was not found to moderate the effect of stereoscopic mode.

  19. Gomisin A is a Novel Isoform-Specific Probe for the Selective Sensing of Human Cytochrome P450 3A4 in Liver Microsomes and Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-Jing; Ge, Guang-Bo; He, Yu-Qi; Wang, Ping; Dai, Zi-Ru; Ning, Jing; Hu, Liang-Hai; Yang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of prescription medicines are metabolized by human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A. CYP3A4 and 3A5 are two major isoforms of human CYP3A and share most of the substrate spectrum. A very limited previous study distinguished the activity of CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, identifying the challenge in predicting CYP3A-mediated drug clearance and drug-drug interaction. In the present study, we introduced gomisin A (GA) with a dibenzocyclooctadiene skeleton as a novel selective probe of CYP3A4. The major metabolite of GA was fully characterized as 8-hydroxylated GA by LC-MS and NMR. CYP3A4 was assigned as the predominant isozyme involved in GA 8-hydroxylation by reaction phenotyping assays, chemical inhibition assays, and correlation studies. GA 8-hydroxylation in both recombinant human CYP3A4 and human liver microsomes followed classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The intrinsic clearance values indicated that CYP3A4 contributed 12.8-fold more than CYP3A5 to GA 8-hydroxylation. Molecular docking studies indicated different hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions between CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, which might result in the different catalytic activity for GA 8-hydroxylation. Furthermore, GA exhibited a stronger inhibitory activity towards CYP3A4 than CYP3A5, which further suggested a preferred selectivity of CYP3A4 for the transformation of GA. More importantly, GA has been successfully applied to selectively monitor the modulation of CYP3A4 activities by the inducer rifampin in hepG2 cells, which is consistent with the level change of CYP3A4 mRNA expression. In summary, our results suggested that GA could be used as a novel probe for the selective sensing of CYP3A4 in tissue and cell preparations.

  20. Exoskeleton-Based Robotic Platform Applied in Biomechanical Modelling of the Human Upper Limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres F. Ruiz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the approaches to study the human motor system, and specifically the motor strategies implied during postural tasks of the upper limbs, is to manipulate the mechanical conditions of each joint of the upper limbs independently. At the same time, it is essential to pick up biomechanical signals and bio-potentials generated while the human motor system adapts to the new condition. The aim of this paper is two-fold: first, to describe the design, development and validation of an experimental platform designed to modify or perturb the mechanics of human movement, and simultaneously acquire, process, display and quantify bioelectric and biomechanical signals; second, to characterise the dynamics of the elbow joint during postural control. A main goal of the study was to determine the feasibility of estimating human elbow joint dynamics using EMG-data during maintained posture. In particular, the experimental robotic platform provides data to correlate electromyographic (EMG activity, kinetics and kinematics information from the upper limb motion. The platform aims consists of an upper limb powered exoskeleton, an EMG acquisition module, a control unit and a software system. Important concerns of the platform such as dependability and safety were addressed in the development. The platform was evaluated with 4 subjects to identify, using system identification methods, the human joint dynamics, i.e. visco-elasticity. Results obtained in simulations and experimental phase are introduced.

  1. Applying human factors to the design of control centre and workstation of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti dos; Carvalho, Paulo V.R.; Goncalves, Gabriel de L., E-mail: luquetti@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza, Tamara D.M.F.; Falcao, Mariana A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Desenho Industrial

    2013-07-01

    Human factors is a body of scientific factors about human characteristics, covering biomedical, psychological and psychosocial considerations, including principles and applications in the personnel selection areas, training, job performance aid tools and human performance evaluation. Control Centre is a combination of control rooms, control suites and local control stations which are functionally related and all on the same site. Digital control room includes an arrangement of systems, equipment such as computers and communication terminals and workstations at which control and monitoring functions are conducted by operators. Inadequate integration between control room and operators reduces safety, increases the operation complexity, complicates operator training and increases the likelihood of human errors occurrence. The objective of this paper is to present a specific approach for the conceptual and basic design of the control centre and workstation of a nuclear reactor used to produce radioisotope. The approach is based on human factors standards, guidelines and the participation of a multidisciplinary team in the conceptual and basic phases of the design. Using the information gathered from standards and from the multidisciplinary team, an initial sketch 3D of the control centre and workstation are being developed. (author)

  2. Sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan; Tsai, Shang-Yueh; Otazo, Ricardo; Caprihan, Arvind; Wald, Lawrence L; Belliveau, John W; Posse, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provides spatially resolved metabolite information that is invaluable for both neuroscience studies and clinical applications. However, lengthy data acquisition times, which are a result of time-consuming phase encoding, represent a major challenge for MRSI. Fast MRSI pulse sequences that use echo-planar readout gradients, such as proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI), are capable of fast spectral-spatial encoding and thus enable acceleration of image acquisition times. Combining PEPSI with recent advances in parallel MRI utilizing RF coil arrays can further accelerate MRSI data acquisition. Here we investigate the feasibility of ultrafast spectroscopic imaging at high field (3T and 4T) by combining PEPSI with sensitivity-encoded (SENSE) MRI using eight-channel head coil arrays. We show that the acquisition of single-average SENSE-PEPSI data at a short TE (15 ms) can be accelerated to 32 s or less, depending on the field strength, to obtain metabolic images of choline (Cho), creatine (Cre), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), and J-coupled metabolites (e.g., glutamate (Glu) and inositol (Ino)) with acceptable spectral quality and localization. The experimentally measured reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and Cramer-Rao lower bounds (CRLBs) of metabolite resonances were well explained by both the g-factor and reduced measurement times. Thus, this technology is a promising means of reducing the scan times of 3D acquisitions and time-resolved 2D measurements.

  3. Assessment of Hyperspectral Remote Sensing for Analyzing the Impact of Human Trampling on Alpine Swards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlena Kycko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tourist traffic has been observed to cause changes in vegetation cover, particularly in alpine areas. These changes can be monitored using remote-sensing methods. This paper presents an analysis of the condition of the dominant sward species surrounding the most frequented alpine tourist trails in the Tatra National Park, one of the most visited natural mountain parks in Poland and a UNESCO Man and the Biosphere Reserve. Hyperspectral measurements of interactions between the electromagnetic spectrum and the morphology and physiology of plants were presented. The spectral properties of plants and remote-sensing vegetation indices could be used at a later date for monitoring, for example from the air. The results identified the species' sensitivity and resistance to trampling and allowed an assessment of their physiological condition. Differences were observed in the conditions of trampled and control plants. The alpine swards in the Tatra National Park were assessed as being in good condition, with only small areas located close to the most popular trails showing damage. The proposed method for analyzing the condition of alpine swards could be a useful tool for the future management of protected areas.

  4. Remote sensing change detection and process analysis of long-term land use change and human impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiming; Li, Baolin; Chen, Yumin

    2011-11-01

    This study investigates environmental change over a 30-year period and attempts to gain a better understanding of human impacts on an arid environment and their consequences for regional development. Multitemporal remotely sensed imagery was acquired and integrated to establish the basis for change detection and process analysis. Land cover changes were investigated in two categories, namely categorical change using image classification and quantitative change using a vegetation index. The results show that human-induced land cover changes have been minor in this remote area. However, the pace of growth of human-induced change has been accelerating since the early 1990s. The analysis of the multi-temporal vegetation index also shows no overall trend of rangeland deterioration, although local change of vegetation cover caused by human activities was noticeable. The results suggest that the current trend of rapid growth may not be sustainable and that the implementation of effective counter-measures for environmentally sound development is a rather urgent matter.

  5. Identifying training deficiencies in military pilots by applying the human factors analysis and classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Chin; Harris, Don

    2013-01-01

    Without accurate analysis, it is difficult to identify training needs and develop the content of training programs required for preventing aviation accidents. The human factors analysis and classification system (HFACS) is based on Reason's system-wide model of human error. In this study, 523 accidents from the Republic of China Air Force were analyzed in which 1762 human errors were categorized. The results of the analysis showed that errors of judgment and poor decision-making were commonly reported amongst pilots. As a result, it was concluded that there was a need for military pilots to be trained specifically in making decisions in tactical environments. However, application of HFACS also allowed the identification of systemic training deficiencies within the organization further contributing to the accidents observed.

  6. Brain-Computer Interfaces Applying Our Minds to Human-computer Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Desney S

    2010-01-01

    For generations, humans have fantasized about the ability to create devices that can see into a person's mind and thoughts, or to communicate and interact with machines through thought alone. Such ideas have long captured the imagination of humankind in the form of ancient myths and modern science fiction stories. Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience and brain imaging technologies have started to turn these myths into a reality, and are providing us with the ability to interface directly with the human brain. This ability is made possible through the use of sensors that monitor physical p

  7. Applying systemic-structural activity theory to design of human-computer interaction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bedny, Gregory Z; Bedny, Inna

    2015-01-01

    Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) is an interdisciplinary field that has gained recognition as an important field in ergonomics. HCI draws on ideas and theoretical concepts from computer science, psychology, industrial design, and other fields. Human-Computer Interaction is no longer limited to trained software users. Today people interact with various devices such as mobile phones, tablets, and laptops. How can you make such interaction user friendly, even when user proficiency levels vary? This book explores methods for assessing the psychological complexity of computer-based tasks. It also p

  8. Some aspects of oxidative metabolism in human endometrium after long time of applying the intrauterine contraceptive device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausic, V; Ionescu, N

    1996-01-01

    The paper intends to study the variation of oxidative metabolism of human endometrium (all the components) after applying the intrauterine contraceptive device for a long period of time. The results of the study show that modifications "in situ" of the oxidative enzymes vary according to the: type of the enzymes (NADH2-cytochrome-c-reductase, Lactatdehydrogenase), the hormonal cyclic stage (proliferative phase, or luteal phase), epithelial or connective tissue structures, time of resting the intrauterine contraceptive device (DIU) in uterus.

  9. Brain-Computer Interfaces: Applying our Minds to Human-Computer Interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Desney S.; Nijholt, Anton

    2010-01-01

    For generations, humans have fantasized about the ability to create devices that can see into a person’s mind and thoughts, or to communicate and interact with machines through thought alone. Such ideas have long captured the imagination of humankind in the form of ancient myths and modern science f

  10. Low Temperature Irradiation Applied to Neutron Activation Analysis of Mercury In Human Whole Blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, D.

    1966-02-15

    The distribution of mercury in human whole blood has been studied by means of neutron activation analysis. During the irradiation procedure the samples were kept at low temperature by freezing them in a cooling device in order to prevent interferences caused by volatilization and contamination. The mercury activity was separated by means of distillation and ion exchange techniques.

  11. Should Humanism Approach Be Applied in English as a Second Language (ESL) Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Lee Yi; Jin, Ng Yu; Tong, Chong Seng; Tarmizi, Mohd. Ariff

    2014-01-01

    In the process of learning, many elements fall into place wholly in order to enhance effectiveness. These elements include not only environmental factors but also learners' mentality which involves their feelings, needs and interests. Humanism approach is one which caters these elements required by learners' learning process through emphasis on…

  12. Signatures of a Statistical Computation in the Human Sense of Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Joshua I; Hangya, Balázs; Kepecs, Adam

    2016-05-04

    Human confidence judgments are thought to originate from metacognitive processes that provide a subjective assessment about one's beliefs. Alternatively, confidence is framed in mathematics as an objective statistical quantity: the probability that a chosen hypothesis is correct. Despite similar terminology, it remains unclear whether the subjective feeling of confidence is related to the objective, statistical computation of confidence. To address this, we collected confidence reports from humans performing perceptual and knowledge-based psychometric decision tasks. We observed two counterintuitive patterns relating confidence to choice and evidence: apparent overconfidence in choices based on uninformative evidence, and decreasing confidence with increasing evidence strength for erroneous choices. We show that these patterns lawfully arise from statistical confidence, and therefore occur even for perfectly calibrated confidence measures. Furthermore, statistical confidence quantitatively accounted for human confidence in our tasks without necessitating heuristic operations. Accordingly, we suggest that the human feeling of confidence originates from a mental computation of statistical confidence.

  13. Expression of heparanase mRNA in anti-sense oligonucleotide-transfected human esophageal cancer EC9706 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kui-Sheng Chen; Lan Zhang; Lin Tang; Yun-Han Zhang; Dong-Ling Gao; Liang Yan; Lei Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of anti-sense oligonucleotides (ASODNs) on mRNA expression of heparanase in human esophageal cancer EC9706 cells.METHODS: One non-sense oligonucleotide (N-ODN) and five ASODNs against different heparanase mRNA sites were transfected into EC9706 cells, then the expression of heparanase mRNA in EC9706 cells was studied byin situ hybridization.RESULTS: The expression of heparanase mRNA could be inhibited by ASODNs.There was no significant difference among five ASODNs (P>0.05), but there was a significant difference between ASODNs and N-ODN or non-transfected group (ASODN1: 2.25±0.25, ASODN2: 2.21±0.23, ASODN3:2.23±0.23, ASODN4:2.25±0.24 vs N-ODN: 3.47±2.80 or non- transfected group: 3.51±2.93 respectively, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The expression of heparanase mRNA in EC9706 cells can be inhibited by ASODNs in vivo, and heparanase ASODNs can inhibit metastasis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma or other tumors by inhibiting the expression of heparanase.

  14. Applying aviation factors to oral and maxillofacial surgery--the human element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Leonie; Smith, Dave W; Patel, Anish; Brunt, Howard; Brennan, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    There are many similarities between flying commercial aircraft and surgery, particularly in relation to minimising risk, and managing potentially fatal or catastrophic complications, or both. Since 1979, the development of Crew Resource Management (CRM) has improved air safety significantly by reducing human factors that are responsible for error. Similar developments in the operating theatre have, to a certain extent, lagged behind aviation, and it is well recognised that we can learn much from the industry. An increasing number of publications on aviation factors relate to surgery but to our knowledge there is a lack of research in our own specialty. We discuss how aviation principles related to human factors can be translated to the operating theatre to improve teamwork and safety for patients. Clinical research is clearly needed to develop this fascinating area more fully.

  15. Extending and Applying the EPIC Architecture for Human Cognition and Performance: Auditory and Spatial Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Approved for Publ ic Re lease ; Distribution Unl imited· 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) This is the final report for a project that was in a series of...problems. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Cognitive Architecture, Human Performance Mode ling 55 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION ...18. SECURITY 19. SECURITY 20. LIMITATION OF OF REPORT CLASSIFICATION CLASSIFICATION ABSTRACT OF THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT UL UNCLASS IFIED UNCLASS IFIED

  16. Applying systems biology methods to the study of human physiology in extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lindsay M; Thiele, Ines

    2013-03-22

    Systems biology is defined in this review as 'an iterative process of computational model building and experimental model revision with the aim of understanding or simulating complex biological systems'. We propose that, in practice, systems biology rests on three pillars: computation, the omics disciplines and repeated experimental perturbation of the system of interest. The number of ethical and physiologically relevant perturbations that can be used in experiments on healthy humans is extremely limited and principally comprises exercise, nutrition, infusions (e.g. Intralipid), some drugs and altered environment. Thus, we argue that systems biology and environmental physiology are natural symbionts for those interested in a system-level understanding of human biology. However, despite excellent progress in high-altitude genetics and several proteomics studies, systems biology research into human adaptation to extreme environments is in its infancy. A brief description and overview of systems biology in its current guise is given, followed by a mini review of computational methods used for modelling biological systems. Special attention is given to high-altitude research, metabolic network reconstruction and constraint-based modelling.

  17. "Reconstructing a Sense of Self": Trauma and Coping Among Returned Women Survivors of Human Trafficking in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, PhuongThao D

    2016-05-19

    Survivors of human trafficking who return to their community of origin must cope with the trauma they experienced as victims as well as the conditions that contributed to their trafficking vulnerabilities. In this article, I examine the psychosocial adjustment process among women survivors of trafficking who returned to Vietnam. Supplemented by participation observation, thematic analysis of in-depth interviews with survivors revealed that throughout the trafficking process, the women experienced multiple abuses and changes in relationships and environments. The women coped by navigating a process of "reconstructing a sense of self," seeking congruence between their self-understandings and the changing contextual factors while exhibiting three main coping strategies: regulating emotional expression and thought, creating opportunities within constraints, and relating to cultural schemas. The findings underscore the importance of considering contextual factors such as cultural norms and societal values in efforts to assist trafficked survivors reintegrate into their communities.

  18. 3D Visual Sensing of the Human Hand for the Remote Operation of a Robotic Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Gil

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available New low cost sensors and open free libraries for 3D image processing are making important advances in robot vision applications possible, such as three- dimensional object recognition, semantic mapping, navigation and localization of robots, human detection and/or gesture recognition for human-machine interaction. In this paper, a novel method for recognizing and tracking the fingers of a human hand is presented. This method is based on point clouds from range images captured by a RGBD sensor. It works in real time and it does not require visual marks, camera calibration or previous knowledge of the environment. Moreover, it works successfully even when multiple objects appear in the scene or when the ambient light is changed. Furthermore, this method was designed to develop a human interface to control domestic or industrial devices, remotely. In this paper, the method was tested by operating a robotic hand. Firstly, the human hand was recognized and the fingers were detected. Secondly, the movement of the fingers was analysed and mapped to be imitated by a robotic hand.

  19. Electric impedance sensing in cell-substrates for rapid and selective multipotential differentiation capacity monitoring of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitinger, Stephan; Wissenwasser, Jürgen; Kapferer, Werner; Heer, Rudolf; Lepperdinger, Günter

    2012-04-15

    Biosensor systems which enable impedance measurements on adherent cell layers under label-free conditions are considered powerful tools for monitoring specific biological characteristics. A radio frequency identification-based sensor platform was adopted to characterize cultivation and differentiation of human bone marrow-derived multipotent stem cells (bmMSC) over periods of up to several days and weeks. Electric cell-substrate impedance sensing was achieved through fabrication of sensitive elements onto glass substrates which comprised two comb-shaped interdigitated gold electrodes covering an area of 1.8 mm×2 mm. The sensing systems were placed into the wells of a 6-well tissue culture plate, stacked onto a reader unit and could thus be handled and operated under sterile conditions. Continuous measurements were carried out with a sinusoidal voltage of 35 mV at a frequency of 10 kHz. After seeding of human bmMSC, this sensor was able to trace significant impedance changes contingent upon cell spreading and adhesion. The re-usable system was further proven suitable for live examination of cell-substrate attachment or continuous cell monitoring up to several weeks. Induction of either osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation could be validated in bmMSC cultures within a few days, in contrast to state-of-the-art protocols, which require several weeks of cultivation time. In the context of medical cell production in a GMP-compliant process, the here presented interdigitated electric microsensor technology allows the documentation of MSC quality in a fast, efficient and reliable fashion.

  20. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-11-17

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species' regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF -p53 axis activation.

  1. Design of a Wearable Sensing System for Human Motion Monitoring in Physical Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Cagnoni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human motion monitoring and analysis can be an essential part of a wide spectrum of applications, including physical rehabilitation among other potential areas of interest. Creating non-invasive systems for monitoring patients while performing rehabilitation exercises, to provide them with an objective feedback, is one of the current challenges. In this paper we present a wearable multi-sensor system for human motion monitoring, which has been developed for use in rehabilitation. It is composed of a number of small modules that embed high-precision accelerometers and wireless communications to transmit the information related to the body motion to an acquisition device. The results of a set of experiments we made to assess its performance in real-world setups demonstrate its usefulness in human motion acquisition and tracking, as required, for example, in activity recognition, physical/athletic performance evaluation and rehabilitation.

  2. Applying of hierarchical clustering to analysis of protein patterns in the human cancer-associated liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Petushkova

    Full Text Available There are two ways that statistical methods can learn from biomedical data. One way is to learn classifiers to identify diseases and to predict outcomes using the training dataset with established diagnosis for each sample. When the training dataset is not available the task can be to mine for presence of meaningful groups (clusters of samples and to explore underlying data structure (unsupervised learning.We investigated the proteomic profiles of the cytosolic fraction of human liver samples using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE. Samples were resected upon surgical treatment of hepatic metastases in colorectal cancer. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of 2DE gel images (n = 18 revealed a pair of clusters, containing 11 and 7 samples. Previously we used the same specimens to measure biochemical profiles based on cytochrome P450-dependent enzymatic activities and also found that samples were clearly divided into two well-separated groups by cluster analysis. It turned out that groups by enzyme activity almost perfectly match to the groups identified from proteomic data. Of the 271 reproducible spots on our 2DE gels, we selected 15 to distinguish the human liver cytosolic clusters. Using MALDI-TOF peptide mass fingerprinting, we identified 12 proteins for the selected spots, including known cancer-associated species.Our results highlight the importance of hierarchical cluster analysis of proteomic data, and showed concordance between results of biochemical and proteomic approaches. Grouping of the human liver samples and/or patients into differing clusters may provide insights into possible molecular mechanism of drug metabolism and creates a rationale for personalized treatment.

  3. An Efficient Acoustic Density Estimation Method with Human Detectors Applied to Gibbons in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren Kidney

    Full Text Available Some animal species are hard to see but easy to hear. Standard visual methods for estimating population density for such species are often ineffective or inefficient, but methods based on passive acoustics show more promise. We develop spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR methods for territorial vocalising species, in which humans act as an acoustic detector array. We use SECR and estimated bearing data from a single-occasion acoustic survey of a gibbon population in northeastern Cambodia to estimate the density of calling groups. The properties of the estimator are assessed using a simulation study, in which a variety of survey designs are also investigated. We then present a new form of the SECR likelihood for multi-occasion data which accounts for the stochastic availability of animals. In the context of gibbon surveys this allows model-based estimation of the proportion of groups that produce territorial vocalisations on a given day, thereby enabling the density of groups, instead of the density of calling groups, to be estimated. We illustrate the performance of this new estimator by simulation. We show that it is possible to estimate density reliably from human acoustic detections of visually cryptic species using SECR methods. For gibbon surveys we also show that incorporating observers' estimates of bearings to detected groups substantially improves estimator performance. Using the new form of the SECR likelihood we demonstrate that estimates of availability, in addition to population density and detection function parameters, can be obtained from multi-occasion data, and that the detection function parameters are not confounded with the availability parameter. This acoustic SECR method provides a means of obtaining reliable density estimates for territorial vocalising species. It is also efficient in terms of data requirements since since it only requires routine survey data. We anticipate that the low-tech field requirements will

  4. Applying Human Factors Evaluation and Design Guidance to a Nuclear Power Plant Digital Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Ulrich; Ronald Boring; William Phoenix; Emily Dehority; Tim Whiting; Jonathan Morrell; Rhett Backstrom

    2012-08-01

    The United States (U.S.) nuclear industry, like similar process control industries, has moved toward upgrading its control rooms. The upgraded control rooms typically feature digital control system (DCS) displays embedded in the panels. These displays gather information from the system and represent that information on a single display surface. In this manner, the DCS combines many previously separate analog indicators and controls into a single digital display, whereby the operators can toggle between multiple windows to monitor and control different aspects of the plant. The design of the DCS depends on the function of the system it monitors, but revolves around presenting the information most germane to an operator at any point in time. DCSs require a carefully designed human system interface. This report centers on redesigning existing DCS displays for an example chemical volume control system (CVCS) at a U.S. nuclear power plant. The crucial nature of the CVCS, which controls coolant levels and boration in the primary system, requires a thorough human factors evaluation of its supporting DCS. The initial digital controls being developed for the DCSs tend to directly mimic the former analog controls. There are, however, unique operator interactions with a digital vs. analog interface, and the differences have not always been carefully factored in the translation of an analog interface to a replacement DCS. To ensure safety, efficiency, and usability of the emerging DCSs, a human factors usability evaluation was conducted on a CVCS DCS currently being used and refined at an existing U.S. nuclear power plant. Subject matter experts from process control engineering, software development, and human factors evaluated the DCS displays to document potential usability issues and propose design recommendations. The evaluation yielded 167 potential usability issues with the DCS. These issues should not be considered operator performance problems but rather opportunities

  5. Making Sense of Women as Career Self-Agents: Implications for Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Mary; Ingols, Cynthia; O'Neill, Regina; Blake-Beard, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we explore the shifting career paradigm of managerial women in the United States, what it may indicate for the broader professional workforce, and human resource development's (HRD's) role in supporting that change. We examine the literature on evolving career definitions, women's place in that evolution, the rising use of…

  6. Compensation of Magnetic Disturbances Improves Inertial and Magnetic Sensing of Human Body Segment Orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roetenberg, Daniel; Luinge, Henk; Baten, Chris T.M.; Veltink, Peter H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a complementary Kalman filter design to estimate orientation of human body segments by fusing gyroscope, accelerometer, and magnetometer signals from miniature sensors. Ferromagnetic materials or other magnetic fields near the sensor module disturb the local earth magnetic field

  7. Real-time trace gas sensing of ethylene, propanal and acetaldehyde from human skin in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moeskops, B.W.M.; Steeghs, M.M.L.; Swam, K. van; Cristescu, S.M.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Harren, F.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Trace gases emitted by human skin in vivo are monitored non-invasively and in real time using laser-based photoacoustic detection and proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry. A small quartz cuvette is placed on the skin to create a headspace from which a carrier gas transports the skin emissions

  8. Illusory Sense of Human Touch from a Warm and Soft Artificial Hand

    CERN Document Server

    Cabibihan, John-John; Srinivasa, Yeshwin Mysore; Chan, Mark Aaron; Muruganantham, Arrchana

    2015-01-01

    To touch and be touched are vital to human development, well being, and relationships. However, to those who have lost their arms and hands due to accident or war, touching becomes a serious concern that often leads to psychosocial issues and social stigma. In this paper, we demonstrate that the touch from a warm and soft rubber hand can be perceived by another person as if the touch were coming from a human hand. We describe a three step process toward this goal. First, we made participants select artificial skin samples according to their preferred warmth and softness characteristics. At room temperature, the preferred warmth was found to be 28.4 deg C at the skin surface of a soft silicone rubber material that has a Shore durometer value of 30 at the OO scale. Second, we developed a process to create a rubber hand replica of a human hand. To compare the skin softness of a human hand and artificial hands, a robotic indenter was employed to produce a softness map by recording the displacement data when const...

  9. Quantified self and human movement: a review on the clinical impact of wearable sensing and feedback for gait analysis and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Pete B; Jirattigalachote, Wisit; Hunt, Michael A; Cutkosky, Mark R; Delp, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of miniaturized electronics has fueled a shift toward wearable sensors and feedback devices for the mass population. Quantified self and other similar movements involving wearable systems have gained recent interest. However, it is unclear what the clinical impact of these enabling technologies is on human gait. The purpose of this review is to assess clinical applications of wearable sensing and feedback for human gait and to identify areas of future research. Four electronic databases were searched to find articles employing wearable sensing or feedback for movements of the foot, ankle, shank, thigh, hip, pelvis, and trunk during gait. We retrieved 76 articles that met the inclusion criteria and identified four common clinical applications: (1) identifying movement disorders, (2) assessing surgical outcomes, (3) improving walking stability, and (4) reducing joint loading. Characteristics of knee and trunk motion were the most frequent gait parameters for both wearable sensing and wearable feedback. Most articles performed testing on healthy subjects, and the most prevalent patient populations were osteoarthritis, vestibular loss, Parkinson's disease, and post-stroke hemiplegia. The most widely used wearable sensors were inertial measurement units (accelerometer and gyroscope packaged together) and goniometers. Haptic (touch) and auditory were the most common feedback sensations. This review highlights the current state of the literature and demonstrates substantial potential clinical benefits of wearable sensing and feedback. Future research should focus on wearable sensing and feedback in patient populations, in natural human environments outside the laboratory such as at home or work, and on continuous, long-term monitoring and intervention.

  10. Smart textile sensing system for human respiration monitoring based on fiber Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Miao, Chang-yun; Li, Hong-qiang; Song, Hui-chao; Xu, Fan-jie

    2009-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable aid to diagnosis and treatment. As the doctor cannot accompany the patient, it is essential that the patient be monitored remotely to avoid the risk of respiration being impaired by anesthetic drugs or upper airway obstruction. A smart wearable textile sensing system is described in this paper. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with polymer encapsulation has been woven into an elastic bandage to detect the respiration motion. According to the strain principle of FBG, the breathing rate and intensity can be obtained by measuring the variety of FBG reflected wavelength. In order to eliminate the temperature cross-sensitivity, a FBG temperature sensor has also been woven into the bandage to achieve the temperature compensation computing. Based on the tunable Fabry-Perot filter wavelength demodulated theory, wavelength measuring method and data processing arithmetic have been presented, and the system with ARM microprocessor has been designed to process and display the breathing information. The experiments to the system have proved that the wavelength measuring range is about 40nm, the resolution of wavelength can arrive at 2pm, and the sampling rate is 5Hz.

  11. EUCAST recommendations for antimicrobial susceptibility testing applied to the three main Campylobacter species isolated in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifré, Elodie; Salha, Ben Amor; Ducournau, Astrid; Floch, Pauline; Chardon, Hubert; Mégraud, Francis; Lehours, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Campylobacter isolates is of great importance for treatment options especially in systemic diseases. The European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) recently proposed epidemiological cut-offs (ECOFFs) for a limited number of antimicrobial compounds and for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli only. In the present study, the EUCAST method was used after minor modifications to define antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for, 1997 C. jejuni, 419 C. coli and 100 Campylobacter fetus strains received at the French National Reference Center for Campylobacters and Helicobacters. Our results show that the ECOFFs defined by EUCAST for tetracycline and ciprofloxacin can be used for C. jejuni and C. coli. The same ECOFF can be used for erythromycin for the three species. The C. jejuni and C. coli ECOFFs for ciprofloxacin however cannot be applied to C. fetus. We also provide data to categorise two 2 β-lactams of interest for systemic diseases, ampicillin and amoxicillin+clavulanate, for the three species.

  12. Applying clinically proven human techniques for contraception and fertility to endangered species and zoo animals: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Sherman J; Barbey, Natalie; Lenahan, Kathy; Silber, David Z

    2013-12-01

    Reversible contraception that does not alter natural behavior is a critical need for managing zoo populations. In addition to reversible contraception, other fertility techniques perfected in humans may be useful, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) or oocyte and embryo banking for endangered species like amphibians and Mexican wolves (Canis lupus baileyi). Furthermore, the genetics of human fertility can give a better understanding of fertility in more exotic species. Collaborations were established to apply human fertility techniques to the captive population. Reversible vasectomy might be one solution for reversible contraception that does not alter behavior. Reversible approaches to vasectomy, avoiding secondary epididymal disruption, were attempted in South American bush dogs (Speothos venaticus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), Przewalski's horse (Equus przewalski poliakov), and Sika deer (Cervus nippon) in a variety of zoos around the world. These techniques were first perfected in > 4,000 humans before attempting them in zoo animals. In vitro fertilization with gestational surrogacy was used to attempt to break the vicious cycle of hand rearing of purebred orangutans, and egg and ovary vitrification in humans have led to successful gamete banking for Mexican wolves and disappearing amphibians. The study of the human Y chromosome has even explained a mechanism of extinction related to global climate change. The best results with vasectomy reversal (normal sperm counts, pregnancy, and live offspring) were obtained when the original vasectomy was performed "open-ended," so as to avoid pressure-induced epididymal disruption. The attempt at gestational surrogacy for orangutans failed because of severe male infertility and the lack of success with human ovarian hyperstimulation protocols. Vitrification of oocytes is already being employed for the Amphibian Ark Project and for Mexican wolves. Vasectomy can be a reversible contraception

  13. Novel methods for physical mapping of the human genome applied to the long arm of chromosome 5. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, M.

    1991-12-01

    The object of our current grant is to develop novel methods for mapping of the human genome. The techniques to be assessed were: (1) three methods for the production of unique sequence clones from the region of interest; (2) novel methods for the production and separation of multi-megabase DNA fragments; (3) methods for the production of ``physical linking clones`` that contain rare restriction sites; (4) application of these methods and available resources to map the region of interest. Progress includes: In the first two years methods were developed for physical mapping and the production of arrayed clones; We have concentrated on developing rare- cleavage tools based or restriction endonucleases and methylases; We studied the effect of methylation on enzymes used for PFE mapping of the human genome; we characterized two new isoschizomers of rare cutting endonucleases; we developed a reliable way to produce partial digests of DNA in agarose plugs and applied it to the human genome; and we applied a method to double the apparent specificity of the ``rare-cutter`` endonucleases.

  14. Novel methods for physical mapping of the human genome applied to the long arm of chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, M.

    1991-12-01

    The object of our current grant is to develop novel methods for mapping of the human genome. The techniques to be assessed were: (1) three methods for the production of unique sequence clones from the region of interest; (2) novel methods for the production and separation of multi-megabase DNA fragments; (3) methods for the production of physical linking clones'' that contain rare restriction sites; (4) application of these methods and available resources to map the region of interest. Progress includes: In the first two years methods were developed for physical mapping and the production of arrayed clones; We have concentrated on developing rare- cleavage tools based or restriction endonucleases and methylases; We studied the effect of methylation on enzymes used for PFE mapping of the human genome; we characterized two new isoschizomers of rare cutting endonucleases; we developed a reliable way to produce partial digests of DNA in agarose plugs and applied it to the human genome; and we applied a method to double the apparent specificity of the rare-cutter'' endonucleases.

  15. Human-machine interface based on muscular and brain signals applied to a robotic wheelchair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, A; Silva, R L; Celeste, W C; Filho, T F Bastos; Filho, M Sarcinelli [Electrical Engineering Department, Federal University of Espirito Santo (UFES), Av. Fernando Ferrari, 514, Vitoria, 29075-910 (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    This paper presents a Human-Machine Interface (HMI) based on the signals generated by eye blinks or brain activity. The system structure and the signal acquisition and processing are shown. The signals used in this work are either the signal associated to the muscular movement corresponding to an eye blink or the brain signal corresponding to visual information processing. The variance is the feature extracted from such signals in order to detect the intention of the user. The classification is performed by a variance threshold which is experimentally determined for each user during the training stage. The command options, which are going to be sent to the commanded device, are presented to the user in the screen of a PDA (Personal Digital Assistant). In the experiments here reported, a robotic wheelchair is used as the device being commanded.

  16. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucianna Helene Santos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcriptase (RT is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted.

  17. Fighting the Monster: Applying the Host Damage Framework to Human Central Nervous System Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil A. Panackal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The host damage-response framework states that microbial pathogenesis is a product of microbial virulence factors and collateral damage from host immune responses. Immune-mediated host damage is particularly important within the size-restricted central nervous system (CNS, where immune responses may exacerbate cerebral edema and neurological damage, leading to coma and death. In this review, we compare human host and therapeutic responses in representative nonviral generalized CNS infections that induce archetypal host damage responses: cryptococcal menigoencephalitis and tuberculous meningitis in HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected patients, pneumococcal meningitis, and cerebral malaria. Consideration of the underlying patterns of host responses provides critical insights into host damage and may suggest tailored adjunctive therapeutics to improve disease outcome.

  18. Computational drug design strategies applied to the modelling of human immunodeficiency virus-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lucianna Helene; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl

    2015-11-01

    Reverse transcriptase (RT) is a multifunctional enzyme in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 life cycle and represents a primary target for drug discovery efforts against HIV-1 infection. Two classes of RT inhibitors, the nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) and the nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors are prominently used in the highly active antiretroviral therapy in combination with other anti-HIV drugs. However, the rapid emergence of drug-resistant viral strains has limited the successful rate of the anti-HIV agents. Computational methods are a significant part of the drug design process and indispensable to study drug resistance. In this review, recent advances in computer-aided drug design for the rational design of new compounds against HIV-1 RT using methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics, free energy calculations, quantitative structure-activity relationships, pharmacophore modelling and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity prediction are discussed. Successful applications of these methodologies are also highlighted.

  19. A new technique for fractal analysis applied to human, intracerebrally recorded, ictal electroencephalographic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullmore, E; Brammer, M; Alarcon, G; Binnie, C

    1992-11-09

    Application of a new method of fractal analysis to human, intracerebrally recorded, ictal electroencephalographic (EEG) signals is reported. 'Frameshift-Richardson' (FR) analysis involves estimation of fractal dimension (1 EEG data; it is suggested that this technique offers significant operational advantages over use of algorithms for FD estimation requiring preliminary reconstruction of EEG data in phase space. FR analysis was found to reduce substantially the volume of EEG data, without loss of diagnostically important information concerning onset, propagation and evolution of ictal EEG discharges. Arrhythmic EEG events were correlated with relatively increased FD; rhythmic EEG events with relatively decreased FD. It is proposed that development of this method may lead to: (i) enhanced definition and localisation of initial ictal changes in the EEG presumed due to multi-unit activity; and (ii) synoptic visualisation of long periods of EEG data.

  20. Data Mining Based Skin Pixel Detection Applied On Human Images: A Study Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagandeep Kaur

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Skin segmentation is the process of the identifying the skin pixels in a image in a particular color model and dividing the images into skin and non-skin pixels. It is the process of find the particular skin of the image or video in a color model. Finding the regions of the images in human images to say these pixel regions are part of the image or videos is typically a preprocessing step in skin detection in computer vision, face detection or multi-view face detection. Skin pixel detection model converts the images into appropriate format in a color space and then classification process is being used for labeling of the skin and non-skin pixels. A skin classifier identifies the boundary of the skin image in a skin color model based on the training dataset. Here in this paper, we present the survey of the skin pixel segmentation using the learning algorithms.

  1. Spatially Resolved Two-Color Diffusion Measurements in Human Skin Applied to Transdermal Liposome Penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Kubiak, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    A multiphoton excitation-based fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method, Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), was used to measure the local diffusion coefficients of distinct model fluorescent substances in excised human skin. In combination with structural information obtained...... of the liposome composition (phospholipids or transfersomes), our results show a clear lack of cross-correlation below the skin surface, indicating that the penetration of intact liposomes is highly compromised by the skin barrier.Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication, 6 December 2012...... is very heterogeneous on a microscopic scale. This diffusion-based strategy was further exploited to investigate the integrity of liposomes during transdermal penetration. Specifically, the diffusion of dual-color fluorescently labeled liposomes-containing an amphiphilic fluorophore in the lipid bilayer...

  2. Human terrain exploitation suite: applying visual analytics to open source information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Timothy; Richardson, John; Mittrick, Mark; Dumer, John; Heilman, Eric; Roy, Heather; Kase, Sue

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the concept development and demonstration of the Human Terrain Exploitation Suite (HTES) under development at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory's Tactical Information Fusion Branch. The HTES is an amalgamation of four complementary visual analytic capabilities that target the exploitation of open source information. Open source information, specifically news feeds, blogs and other social media, provide a unique opportunity to collect and examine salient topics and trends. Analysis of open source information provides valuable insights into determining opinions, values, cultural nuances and other socio-political aspects within a military area of interest. The early results of the HTES field study indicate that the tools greatly increased the analysts' ability to exploit open source information, but improvement through greater cross-tool integration and correlation of their results is necessary for further advances.

  3. Sexual rights as human rights: a guide to authoritative sources and principles for applying human rights to sexuality and sexual health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alice M; Kismödi, Eszter; Cottingham, Jane; Gruskin, Sofia

    2015-11-01

    This Guide seeks to provide insight and resources to actors interested in the development of rights claims around sexuality and sexual health. After engaging with the vexed question of the scope of sexual rights, it explores the rules and principles governing the way in which human rights claims are developed and applied to sexuality and sexual health, and how that development is linked to law and made a matter of state obligation. This understanding is critical to policy and programming in sexual health and rights, as it supports calling on the relevant range of human rights, such as privacy, non-discrimination, health or other universally accepted human rights, as well as demanding the action of states under their international and national law obligations to support sexual health.

  4. Whole-Body Human Inverse Dynamics with Distributed Micro-Accelerometers, Gyros and Force Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latella, Claudia; Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Romano, Francesco; Traversaro, Silvio; Nori, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Human motion tracking is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications that require human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of estimation of real-time kinetics information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for a human soft wearable force tracking for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. The early stage of our framework encompasses traditional passive marker based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational technique for estimating dynamic quantities, originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present experimental analysis on subjects performing a two degrees-of-freedom bowing task, and we estimate the motion and kinetics quantities. The results demonstrate the validity of the proposed method. We discuss the possible use of this technique in the design of a novel soft wearable force tracking device and its potential applications. PMID:27213394

  5. Calcium-sensing receptor expression and parathyroid hormone secretion in hyperplastic parathyroid glands from humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadillas, Sagrario; Canalejo, Antonio; Santamaría, Rafael; Rodríguez, Maria E; Estepa, Jose C; Martín-Malo, Alejandro; Bravo, Juan; Ramos, Blanca; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolastico; Rodríguez, Mariano; Almadén, Yolanda

    2005-07-01

    In uremic patients, severe parathyroid hyperplasia is associated with reduced parathyroid calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) expression. Thus, in these patients, a high serum Ca concentration may be required to inhibit parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. This study compares the magnitude of reduction in CaR expression and the degree of the abnormality in Ca-regulated PTH release in vitro. A total of 50 glands from 23 hemodialysis patients with refractory hyperparathyroidism were studied. Tissue slices were incubated in vitro to evaluate (1) the PTH secretory output in a normal Ca concentration (1.25 mM) and (2) the PTH secretory response to high (1.5 mM) and low (0.6 mM) Ca concentration. Tissue aliquots were processed for determination of CaRmRNA expression. The results showed that, corrected for DNA, parathyroid tissue with lowest CaR expression secreted more PTH than that with relatively high CaR expression (146 +/- 23 versus 60 +/- 2 pg/microg DNA; P < 0.01). Furthermore, glands with low CaR expression demonstrated a blunted PTH secretory response to both the inhibitory effect of high Ca and the stimulatory effect of low Ca. The study also showed that the larger the gland, the lower the CaRmRNA expression. Thus, large parathyroid glands produce a large amount of PTH not only as a result of the increased gland size but also because the parathyroid tissue secretory output is increased. These abnormalities in PTH regulation are related to low CaR expression.

  6. Hydrology and Human Health: Predicting Cholera Outbreaks using Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutla, A. S.; Akanda, A. S.; Islam, S.

    2010-12-01

    Cholera bacteria survive and thrive in two distinctively different environments: the micro- and the macro-environmental processes that vary over a range of spatial and temporal scales. While micro-environmental conditions are necessary for maintaining epidemic conditions, macro-environmental conditions set the stage for initial outbreak and endemicity of the disease. As macro-environmental processes provide natural ecological niche for V. cholerae and there is powerful evidence of new biotypes emerging, it is unlikely that cholera will be fully eradicated, a condition which necessitates exploration of alternate means to develop prediction mechanism for cholera outbreaks. Satellite remote sensing data provides reliable estimates of plankton abundance through chlorophyll content which then can be used to understand cholera - chlorophyll relationships. However, the functional nature of association of cholera incidence with chlorophyll and its predictive capabilities are not well understood. Here we show that cholera outbreaks in Bengal Delta can be predicted two to three months in advance with an overall prediction accuracy of greater than 80% using combination of satellite derived chlorophyll and air temperature. Such high prediction accuracy is achievable because the two seasonal peaks of cholera in Bengal Delta are controlled by two distinctive macro-environmental processes. We have found that interannual variability of pre- monsoonal cholera outbreaks is intricately linked with coastal plankton through a cascade of hydro-coastal processes. Post- monsoonal cholera outbreaks, on the other hand, are related with wide spreading flooding and subsequent breakdown of the sanitary conditions. Our results demonstrate that satellite data, with a careful choice of space and time scales, can be very effective to develop a cholera prediction model for the Bengal delta with several months lead time. We anticipate that our modeling framework will provide essential lead time for

  7. Coca and poppy eradication in Colombia: environmental and human health assessment of aerially applied glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Keith R; Anadón, Arturo; Carrasquilla, Gabriel; Cerdeira, Antonio L; Marshall, Jon; Sanin, Luz-Helena

    2007-01-01

    The production of coca and poppy as well as the processing and production of cocaine and heroin involve significant environmental impacts. Both coca and poppy are grown intensively in a process that involves the clearing of land in remote areas, the planting of the crop, and protection against pests such as weeds, insects, and pathogens. The aerial spray program to control coca and poppy production in Colombia with the herbicide glyphosate is conducted with modern state-of-the-art aircraft and spray equipment. As a result of the use of best available spray and navigation technology, the likelihood of accidental off-target spraying is small and is estimated to be less than 1% of the total area sprayed. Estimated exposures in humans resulting from direct overspray, contact with treated foliage after reentry to fields, inhalation, diet, and drinking water were small and infrequent. Analyses of surface waters in five watersheds showed that, on most occasions, glyphosate was not present at measurable concentrations; only two samples had residues just above the method detection limit of 25 microg/L. Concentrations of glyphosate in air were predicted to be very small because of negligible volatility. Glyphosate in soils that are directly sprayed will be tightly bound and biologically unavailable and have no residual activity. Concentrations of glyphosate plus Cosmo-Flux will be relatively large in shallow surface waters that are directly oversprayed (maximum instantaneous concentration of 1,229microgAE/L in water 30cm deep); however, no information was available on the number of fields in close proximity to surface waters, and thus it was not possible to estimate the likelihood of such contamination. The formulation used in Colombia, a mixture of glyphosate and Cosmo-Flux, has low toxicity to mammals by all routes of exposure, although some temporary eye irritation may occur. Published epidemiological studies have not suggested a strong or consistent linkage between

  8. Modeling environmental and human health risks of veterinary medicinal products applied in pond aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Andreu; Geng, Yue; Focks, Andreas; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2013-04-01

    A model called ERA-AQUA was developed to assess the risks posed by the use of veterinary medicinal products (VMPs) applied in aquaculture ponds for the targeted produce, surrounding aquatic ecosystems, consumers, and trade of the aquaculture produce. The model calculates risks by following a risk quotient approach, calculating predicted exposure concentrations (exposure assessment) and predicted no-effect concentrations (effect assessment) for the endpoint under study. The exposure assessment is performed by combining information on the environmental characteristics of the aquaculture pond, characteristics of the cultured species, aquaculture management practices, and physicochemical properties of the compound under study. The model predicts concentrations of VMPs in the pond water, pond sediment, cultured species, and watercourse receiving pond effluent discharges by mass balance equations. The effect assessment is performed by combining (eco)toxicological information and food safety threshold concentrations for the studied compound. In the present study, the scientific background, strengths, and limitations of the ERA-AQUA model are presented together with a sensitivity analysis and an example showing its potential applications.

  9. Topically applied vitamin C increases the density of dermal papillae in aged human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koop Urte

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influence of ageing on the density of the functional entities of the papillae containing nutritive capillaries, here in terms as the papillary index, and the effect of topically applied vitamin C were investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM in vivo. Methods The age dependency of the papillary index was determined by CLSM on 3 different age groups. Additionally, we determined the effect of a topical cream containing 3% vitamin C against the vehicle alone using daily applications for four months on the volar forearm of 33 women. Results There were significant decreases in the papillary index showing a clear dependency on age. Topical vitamin C resulted in a significant increase of the density of dermal papillae from 4 weeks onward compared to its vehicle. Reproducibility was determined in repeated studies. Conclusions Vitamin C has the potential to enhance the density of dermal papillae, perhaps through the mechanism of angiogenesis. Topical vitamin C may have therapeutical effects for partial corrections of the regressive structural changes associated with the aging process.

  10. Photoacoustic evaluation of the penetration of piroxicam gel applied with phonophoresis into human skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, F L F D; Barja, P R [Research and Development Institute, UNIVAP, Av. Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP, 12209-010 (Brazil); Acosta-Avalos, D, E-mail: barja@univap.b [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), R.Xavier Sigaud 150, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2010-03-01

    The photoacoustic (PA) technique has been increasingly employed in biomedical studies, allowing in vivo skin measurements not easily performed with other techniques. It is possible to use PA measurements to evaluate transdermal delivery of products topically applied through manual massage or phonophoresis, that is the utilization of ultrasound waves to enhance drug absorption. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of the period of phonophoresis application in the transdermal penetration of piroxicam gel. In vivo PA measurements employed a tungsten lamp as light source and a thin aluminum foil closing the PA chamber. The PA signals of the arm (i) clean; and (ii) after phonophoresis were utilized to estimate the concentration of piroxicam into skin. For all (4) volunteers, drug concentration in skin after phonophoresis application was the same for the different application times employed; in this way, phonophoresis for one minute seemed to be sufficient to enhance piroxicam penetration into skin. The actual amount of drug delivered into tissue depends on the person, suggesting a dependency with the skin type, which affects the PA signal level [2]. We conclude that drug delivery depends not only on the application method, but also on the specific skin type.

  11. Predicting Causal Relationships from Biological Data: Applying Automated Casual Discovery on Mass Cytometry Data of Human Immune Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Triantafillou, Sofia

    2017-03-31

    Learning the causal relationships that define a molecular system allows us to predict how the system will respond to different interventions. Distinguishing causality from mere association typically requires randomized experiments. Methods for automated causal discovery from limited experiments exist, but have so far rarely been tested in systems biology applications. In this work, we apply state-of-the art causal discovery methods on a large collection of public mass cytometry data sets, measuring intra-cellular signaling proteins of the human immune system and their response to several perturbations. We show how different experimental conditions can be used to facilitate causal discovery, and apply two fundamental methods that produce context-specific causal predictions. Causal predictions were reproducible across independent data sets from two different studies, but often disagree with the KEGG pathway databases. Within this context, we discuss the caveats we need to overcome for automated causal discovery to become a part of the routine data analysis in systems biology.

  12. Performance comparison of digital microRNA profiling technologies applied on human breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Knutsen

    Full Text Available MicroRNA profiling represents an important first-step in deducting individual RNA-based regulatory function in a cell, tissue, or at a specific developmental stage. Currently there are several different platforms to choose from in order to make the initial miRNA profiles. In this study we investigate recently developed digital microRNA high-throughput technologies. Four different platforms were compared including next generation SOLiD ligation sequencing and Illumina HiSeq sequencing, hybridization-based NanoString nCounter, and miRCURY locked nucleic acid RT-qPCR. For all four technologies, full microRNA profiles were generated from human cell lines that represent noninvasive and invasive tumorigenic breast cancer. This study reports the correlation between platforms, as well as a more extensive analysis of the accuracy and sensitivity of data generated when using different platforms and important consideration when verifying results by the use of additional technologies. We found all the platforms to be highly capable for microRNA analysis. Furthermore, the two NGS platforms and RT-qPCR all have equally high sensitivity, and the fold change accuracy is independent of individual miRNA concentration for NGS and RT-qPCR. Based on these findings we propose new guidelines and considerations when performing microRNA profiling.

  13. [Stem Cells in the Brain of Mammals and Human: Fundamental and Applied Aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, M A; Marey, M V

    2015-01-01

    Brain stem cells represent an extremely intriguing phenomenon. The aim of our review is to present an integrity vision of their role in the brain of mammals and humans, and their clinical perspectives. Over last two decades, investigations of biology of the neural stem cells produced significant changes in general knowledge about the processes of development and functioning of the brain. Researches on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of NSC differentiation and behavior led to new understanding of their involvement in learning and memory. In the regenerative medicine, original therapeutic approaches to neurodegenerative brain diseases have been elaborated due to fundamental achievements in this field. They are based on specific regenerative potential of neural stem cells and progenitor cells, which possess the ability to replace dead cells and express crucially significant biologically active factors that are missing in the pathological brain. For the needs of cell substitution therapy in the neural diseases, adequate methods of maintaining stem cells in culture and their differentiation into different types of neurons and glial cells, have been developed currently. The success of modern cellular technologies has significantly expanded the range of cells used for cell therapy. The near future may bring new perspective and distinct progress in brain cell therapy due to optimizing the cells types most promising for medical needs.

  14. Interaction of a human blood group Sd(a-) Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein with applied lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J H; Watkins, W M; Chen, C P; Song, S C; Wu, A M

    1996-04-22

    Unlike the human blood group Sd(a+) Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (THGP), the Sd(a-) one lacks terminal GalNAcbeta1--> residues at the nonreducing ends. The binding properties of this glycoprotein and its asialo product with lectins were characterized by quantitative precipitin (QPA) and precipitin inhibition assays. Among 20 lectins tested by QPA, both native and asialo Sd(a-) THGP reacted best with Abrus precatorius and Ricinus communis and completely precipitated the lectin added. They also precipitated well Wistaria floribunda (WFA), Glycine max (SBA), Bauhinia purpurea alba, abrin-a and ricin, all of which recognize the Galbeta1--> 4GlcNAcbeta1--> sequence, although at different strength. The lectin-glycan interactions were inhibited by Galbeta1--> 4GlcNAc and Galbeta1--> 4Glc. When the precipitability of Sd(a-) THGP was compared with that of the Sd(a+) phenotype, the native Sd(a-) THGP exhibited a 40% lesser affinity for WFA, SBA, WGA and mistletoe lectin-I (ML-I). Mapping the precipitation and inhibition profiles of the present study and the results of THGP Sd(a+), it is concluded that Sd(a-) THGP showed a strongly diminished affinity for GalNAcbeta1--> active lectins (SBA and WFA) than the Sd(a+) phenotype.

  15. Spatially resolved two-color diffusion measurements in human skin applied to transdermal liposome penetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Kubiak, Jakub; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2013-05-01

    A multiphoton excitation-based fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method, Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), was used to measure the local diffusion coefficients of distinct model fluorescent substances in excised human skin. In combination with structural information obtained by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy imaging, the acquired diffusion information was processed to construct spatially resolved diffusion maps at different depths of the stratum corneum (SC). Experiments using amphiphilic and hydrophilic fluorescently labeled molecules show that their diffusion in SC is very heterogeneous on a microscopic scale. This diffusion-based strategy was further exploited to investigate the integrity of liposomes during transdermal penetration. Specifically, the diffusion of dual-color fluorescently labeled liposomes--containing an amphiphilic fluorophore in the lipid bilayer and a hydrophilic fluorophore encapsulated in the liposome lumen--was measured using cross-correlation RICS. This type of experiment allows discrimination between separate (uncorrelated) and joint (correlated) diffusion of the two different fluorescent probes, giving information about liposome integrity. Independent of the liposome composition (phospholipids or transfersomes), our results show a clear lack of cross-correlation below the skin surface, indicating that the penetration of intact liposomes is highly compromised by the skin barrier.

  16. Dogs'olfactory diagnostics applied on human species: state of the art and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, B; Nardo, B; Lippi, G; Palmieri, L; Vadalà, M; Laurino, C

    2016-01-01

    Dogs'smell ability is about 10000-100000 more developed than humans' one. Dogs smell is usually exploited in forensic medicine, to find missing people and specific substances showing peculiar sensorial features. In clinic, there is the possibility to take advantage of dogs smell, which are conveniently trained, for the screening of cancers and other diseases. The common feature is the presence of molecules in organic samples that may be considered as biomarkers of a specific pathology. In cancer, scientific evidences exist about screening of melanoma, lung, breast, rectum, ovarian, prostate and bladder cancer. Instead, other pathologies manifest the presence of organic volatile compounds in biologic materials, such as spit, faeces and urine that may be studied by dogs smell in order to identify the presence of a specific disease. This review shows the state of the art of actual dogs' olfactory ability based on scientific principles and the advantages and the disadvantages of this method. The authors also reveal some potential pathologies joined by the presence of organic volatile compounds, which may be investigated by dogs smell.

  17. Application of dermal microdialysis for the determination of bioavailability of clobetasol propionate applied to the skin of human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Au, W L; Skinner, M F; Benfeldt, E

    2012-01-01

    Dermal microdialysis was used to assess the bioavailability of a topical corticosteroid, clobetasol propionate, following application onto the skin of human subjects. The penetration of clobetasol propionate from a 4% m/v ethanolic solution applied onto 4 sites on one forearm of healthy human...... drug of interest. Furthermore, the study clearly demonstrated the application of dermal microdialysis as a valuable tool to assess the bioavailability/bioequivalence of clobetasol propionate penetration into the skin following topical application....... volunteers was studied. A lipid emulsion, Intralipid®, was used as the perfusate and linear microdialysis probes with a 2-kDa cutoff were inserted intradermally at the designated sites. The results indicated that Intralipid could be used as a suitable perfusate for in vivo microdialysis of this lipophilic...

  18. 麦蚜灾害遥感监测技术应用研究%STUDY ON APPLYING REMOTE SENSING TECHNOLOGY ON THE MONITORING OF WHEAT APHID INFESTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭永旺; 金晓华; 杨建国; 李国强

    2001-01-01

    Based on the theory of remote sensing technology, comparative studies were carried out between the analysis of satellite remote sensing data and the application of the 4 wavelength infrared radiator (Model EXOTECH - 100, made in USA) on the monitoring of wheat aphid infestation. Results indicated that the 4 wavelength infrared radiator was applicable, a system appliance was developed through the renovation of EXOTECH-100, and it was successfully used on the monitoring of wheat aphid infestation with appropriate efficiency and accuracy. Results also showed that it was impractical for the monitoring of wheat aphid infestation by the analysis of satellite remote sensing data due to the limitation on its accession and high costs.%根据遥感技术原理,对卫星遥感与四波段野外辐射计(EXOTECH-100美国)在麦蚜灾害监测中的使用情况进行了研究比较。结果表明,四波段野外辐射计具有很好的适用性。并在此基础上,通过对四波段野外辐射计EXOTECH-100进行改造,自制了病虫害监测仪,在麦蚜灾害遥感监测中成功使用,提高监测效率和测量的准确率。卫星遥感由于成本高、可用数据有限,不便于在麦蚜灾害监测中应用。

  19. Solonamide B Inhibits Quorum Sensing and Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Mediated Killing of Human Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Bojer, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    histidine kinase, AgrC, of the agr two-component system. The hypervirulence of USA300 has been linked to increased expression of central virulence factors like a-hemolysin and the phenol soluble modulins (PSMs). Importantly, in strain USA300 Solonamide B dramatically reduced the activity of a......-hemolysin and the transcription of psma encoding PSMs with an 80% reduction in toxicity of supernatants towards human neutrophils and rabbit erythrocytes. To our knowledge this is the first report of a compound produced naturally by a Gram-negative marine bacterium that interferes with agr and affects both RNAIII and Agr...

  20. Extraction of human gait signatures: an inverse kinematic approach using Groebner basis theory applied to gait cycle analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barki, Anum; Kendricks, Kimberly; Tuttle, Ronald F.; Bunker, David J.; Borel, Christoph C.

    2013-05-01

    This research highlights the results obtained from applying the method of inverse kinematics, using Groebner basis theory, to the human gait cycle to extract and identify lower extremity gait signatures. The increased threat from suicide bombers and the force protection issues of today have motivated a team at Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) to research pattern recognition in the human gait cycle. The purpose of this research is to identify gait signatures of human subjects and distinguish between subjects carrying a load to those subjects without a load. These signatures were investigated via a model of the lower extremities based on motion capture observations, in particular, foot placement and the joint angles for subjects affected by carrying extra load on the body. The human gait cycle was captured and analyzed using a developed toolkit consisting of an inverse kinematic motion model of the lower extremity and a graphical user interface. Hip, knee, and ankle angles were analyzed to identify gait angle variance and range of motion. Female subjects exhibited the most knee angle variance and produced a proportional correlation between knee flexion and load carriage.

  1. Finite Element Based Solution of Laplace's Equation Applied to Electrical Activity of the Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab T. Baqer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer models are used in the study of electrocardiography to provide insight into physiological phenomena that are difficult to measure in the lab or in a clinical environment. The electrocardiogram is an important tool for the clinician in that it changes characteristically in a number of pathological conditions. Many illnesses can be detected by this measurement. By simulating the electrical activity of the heart one obtains a quantitative relationship between the electrocardiogram and different anomalies. Because of the inhomogeneous fibrous structure of the heart and the irregular geometries of the body, finite element method is used for studying the electrical properties of the heart. This work describes the implementation of the Conjugate Gradient iterative method for the solution of large linear equation systems resulting from the finite element method. A diagonal Jacobi preconditioner is used in order to accelerate the convergence. Gaussian elimination is also implemented and compared with the Precondition Conjugate Gradient (PCG method and with the iterative method. Different types of matrix storage schemes are implemented such as the Compressed Sparse Row (CSR to achieve better performance. In order to demonstrate the validity of the finite element analysis, the technique is adopted to solve Laplace's equation that describes the electrical activity of the human body with Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. An automatic mesh generator is built using C++ programming language. Initially a complete finite element program is built to solve Laplace's equation. The same accuracy is obtained using these methods. The results show that the CSR format reduces computation time compared to the order format. The PCG method is better for the solution of large linear system (sparse matrices than the Gaussian Elimination and back substitution method, while Gaussian elimination is better than iterative method.

  2. Analytic concepts for assessing risk as applied to human space flight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrick, B.J.

    1997-04-30

    Quantitative risk assessment (QRA) principles provide an effective framework for quantifying individual elements of risk, including the risk to astronauts and spacecraft of the radiation environment of space flight. The concept of QRA is based on a structured set of scenarios that could lead to different damage states initiated by either hardware failure, human error, or external events. In the context of a spacecraft risk assessment, radiation may be considered as an external event and analyzed in the same basic way as any other contributor to risk. It is possible to turn up the microscope on any particular contributor to risk and ask more detailed questions than might be necessary to simply assess safety. The methods of QRA allow for as much fine structure in the analysis as is desired. For the purpose of developing a basis for comprehensive risk management and considering the tendency to {open_quotes}fear anything nuclear,{close_quotes} radiation risk is a prime candidate for examination beyond that necessary to answer the basic question of risk. Thus, rather than considering only the customary damage states of fatalities or loss of a spacecraft, it is suggested that the full range of damage be analyzed to quantify radiation risk. Radiation dose levels in the form of a risk curve accomplish such a result. If the risk curve is the complementary cumulative distribution function, then it answers the extended question of what is the likelihood of receiving a specific dose of radiation or greater. Such results can be converted to specific health effects as desired. Knowing the full range of the radiation risk of a space mission and the contributors to that risk provides the information necessary to take risk management actions [operational, design, scheduling of missions around solar particle events (SPE), etc.] that clearly control radiation exposure.

  3. Pervasive sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, David J.

    2000-11-01

    The coordinated exploitation of modern communication, micro- sensor and computer technologies makes it possible to give global reach to our senses. Web-cameras for vision, web- microphones for hearing and web-'noses' for smelling, plus the abilities to sense many factors we cannot ordinarily perceive, are either available or will be soon. Applications include (1) determination of weather and environmental conditions on dense grids or over large areas, (2) monitoring of energy usage in buildings, (3) sensing the condition of hardware in electrical power distribution and information systems, (4) improving process control and other manufacturing, (5) development of intelligent terrestrial, marine, aeronautical and space transportation systems, (6) managing the continuum of routine security monitoring, diverse crises and military actions, and (7) medicine, notably the monitoring of the physiology and living conditions of individuals. Some of the emerging capabilities, such as the ability to measure remotely the conditions inside of people in real time, raise interesting social concerns centered on privacy issues. Methods for sensor data fusion and designs for human-computer interfaces are both crucial for the full realization of the potential of pervasive sensing. Computer-generated virtual reality, augmented with real-time sensor data, should be an effective means for presenting information from distributed sensors.

  4. Making sense of the social: human-nonhuman constellations and the wicked road to sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Hiedanpää

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Social questions become especially tangible in the context of human-nonhuman interrelations. This article focuses on coexistential practices in the context of management, protection, and production and it clarifies how the social in particular empirical cases is enacted. The work is based on three empirical case studies. We explore the conflicts in forestry and urban planning caused by the Siberian flying squirrel; the increased presence of the grey wolf; and the paradox of the domestic pig—a clever animal that is treated harshly by factory-farming practices. As our cases indicate, the social is not a group of people living in a certain setting according to certain norms and traditions. The social is a contingent, activated constellation of interagentivities that emerges together with a shared concern that particular customs and habits are not serving the purpose they are expected to serve. The cases challenge efforts to adopt a human-centered view of the social as the basis for developing the concept of sustainability. They also indicate that there is no one social sustainability, but rather many articulations of the concept.

  5. iSenseStress: Assessing stress through human-smartphone interaction analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Ciman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress condition, if experienced for an extended amount of time, can negatively affect individual's health. Several external sensors monitoring different physiological states correlated with stress, or smartphone apps that monitor individuals context, have been leveraged to assess stress state in everyday life. The less intrusive ''human-smartphone interaction'' have been under-investigated so far. In our research we leverage 'swipe', 'scroll' and 'text input' interactions to assess the stress state of smartphone users. Based on data collected from 13 participants, we leverage 'swipe' and 'scroll' data to assess stress with an average F-measure of 79-85% for a within-subject model, and of 70-80% when building a global model. Moreover, 'text input' via a virtual keyboard has been analyzed, showing how several easy to calculate features enable to differentiate between stress and no-stress state. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to leverage human-smartphone interaction, and in particular 'swipe', 'scroll' and 'text input' interactions, to accurately assess stress state in individuals without using any external sensor or leveraging privacy-sensitive context information.

  6. Epidermal mechano-acoustic sensing electronics for cardiovascular diagnostics and human-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuhao; Norton, James J. S.; Qazi, Raza; Zou, Zhanan; Ammann, Kaitlyn R.; Liu, Hank; Yan, Lingqing; Tran, Phat L.; Jang, Kyung-In; Lee, Jung Woo; Zhang, Douglas; Kilian, Kristopher A.; Jung, Sung Hee; Bretl, Timothy; Xiao, Jianliang; Slepian, Marvin J.; Huang, Yonggang; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Rogers, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Physiological mechano-acoustic signals, often with frequencies and intensities that are beyond those associated with the audible range, provide information of great clinical utility. Stethoscopes and digital accelerometers in conventional packages can capture some relevant data, but neither is suitable for use in a continuous, wearable mode, and both have shortcomings associated with mechanical transduction of signals through the skin. We report a soft, conformal class of device configured specifically for mechano-acoustic recording from the skin, capable of being used on nearly any part of the body, in forms that maximize detectable signals and allow for multimodal operation, such as electrophysiological recording. Experimental and computational studies highlight the key roles of low effective modulus and low areal mass density for effective operation in this type of measurement mode on the skin. Demonstrations involving seismocardiography and heart murmur detection in a series of cardiac patients illustrate utility in advanced clinical diagnostics. Monitoring of pump thrombosis in ventricular assist devices provides an example in characterization of mechanical implants. Speech recognition and human-machine interfaces represent additional demonstrated applications. These and other possibilities suggest broad-ranging uses for soft, skin-integrated digital technologies that can capture human body acoustics. PMID:28138529

  7. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques applied to the noninvasive investigation of mural paintings: a feasibility study carried out on a wall painting by Beato Angelico in Florence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucci, Costanza; Picollo, Marcello; Chiarantini, Leandro; Sereni, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays hyperspectral imaging is a well-established methodology for the non-invasive diagnostics of polychrome surfaces, and is increasingly utilized in museums and conservation laboratories for documentation purposes and in support of restoration procedures. However, so far the applications of hyperspectral imaging have been mainly limited to easel paintings or paper-based artifacts. Indeed, specifically designed hyperspectral imagers, are usually used for applications in museum context. These devices work at short-distances from the targets and cover limited size surfaces. Instead, almost still unexplored remain the applications of hyperspectral imaging to the investigations of frescoes and large size mural paintings. For this type of artworks a remote sensing approach, based on sensors capable of acquiring hyperspectral data from distances of the order of tens of meters, is needed. This paper illustrates an application of hyperspectral remote sensing to an important wall-painting by Beato Angelico, located in the San Marco Museum in Florence. Measurements were carried out using a re-adapted version of the Galileo Avionica Multisensor Hyperspectral System (SIM-GA), an avionic hyperspectral imager originally designed for applications from mobile platforms. This system operates in the 400-2500 nm range with over 700 channels, thus guaranteeing acquisition of high resolution hyperspectral data exploitable for materials identification and mapping. In the present application, the SIM-GA device was mounted on a static scanning platform for ground-based applications. The preliminary results obtained on the Angelico's wall-painting are discussed, with highlights on the main technical issues addressed to optimize the SIM-GA system for new applications on cultural assets.

  8. Full-field bulge test for planar anisotropic tissues: part I--experimental methods applied to human skin tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, Theresa K; Atlan, Lorre S; Voo, Liming M; Nguyen, Thao D

    2013-04-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic properties of human skin tissue were investigated using bulge testing. Full-field displacement data were obtained during testing of human skin tissues procured from the lower back of post-mortem human subjects using 3-D digital image correlation. To measure anisotropy, the dominant fiber direction of the tissue was determined from the deformed geometry of the specimen. Local strains and stress resultants were calculated along both the dominant fiber direction and the perpendicular direction. Variation in anisotropy and stiffness was observed between specimens. The use of stress resultants rather than the membrane stress approximation accounted for bending effects, which are significant for a thick nonlinear tissue. Of the six specimens tested, it was observed that specimens from older donors exhibited a stiffer and more isotropic response than those from younger donors. It was seen that the mechanical response of the tissue was negligibly impacted by preconditioning or the ambient humidity. The methods presented in this work for skin tissue are sufficiently general to be applied to other planar tissues, such as pericardium, gastrointestinal tissue, and fetal membranes. The stress resultant-stretch relations will be used in a companion paper to obtain material parameters for a nonlinear anisotropic hyperelastic model.

  9. "Warmth-insensitive fields": evidence of sparse and irregular innervation of human skin by the warmth sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, B G; Cruz, A

    1998-01-01

    Although more acute in some areas of the body than in others, temperature sensitivity is assumed to be present throughout the skin. Only when very small stimuli have been used (e.g., approximately 1 mm2) has sensitivity to warming or cooling appeared discontinuous. Here we report the discovery of patches of skin several square centimeters in area within which heating cannot be detected until skin temperature exceeds the thresholds of C heat-sensitive nociceptors (>41 degrees C). These warmth-insensitive fields (> or = 5 cm2), which appear to lack low-threshold warm fibers, were also found to have reduced responsiveness to non-painful heating and significantly higher heat pain thresholds compared to surrounding areas of skin. The existence of such sites corroborates reports that warm fibers are rare in human cutaneous nerves and confirms the classical theory that cutaneous innervation by the warmth sense is punctate and sparse. The insensitive areas also provide unique opportunities for assessing the contribution of the low-threshold warmth system to perception of heat and heat pain, and their existence in healthy young adults contraindicates use of warmth sensitivity in neurological assessments of C-fiber function.

  10. The Calcium-Sensing Receptor Is Necessary for the Rapid Development of Hypercalcemia in Human Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendolen Lorch

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR is responsible for the regulation of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o homeostasis. CaR activation has been shown to increase proliferation in several cancer cell lines; however, its presence or function has never been documented in lung cancer. We report that Ca2+o-activated CaR results in MAPK-mediated stimulation of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP production in human lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC lines and humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy (HHM in vivo. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism in CaR identified from a hypercalcemia-inducing lung SCC reduced the receptor's activation threshold leading to increased PTHrP expression and secretion. Increasing the expression of either wild-type CaR or a CaR variant with a single nucleotide polymorphism in the cytoplasmic domain was both necessary and sufficient for lung SCC to induce HHM. Because lung cancer patients who frequently develop HHM and PTHrP expression in lung cancer has been only partially explained, the significance of our findings indicates that CaR variants may provide a positive feedback between PTHrP and calcium and result in the syndrome of HHM.

  11. Calcium sensing receptor suppresses human pancreatic tumorigenesis through a novel NCX1/Ca(2+)/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Chow, Jimmy Y C; Dong, Tobias Xiao; Yang, Shi-Ming; Lu, De-Sheng; Carethers, John M; Dong, Hui

    2016-07-10

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is functionally expressed in normal human pancreases, but its pathological role in pancreatic tumorigenesis is currently unknown. We sought to investigate the role of CaSR in pancreatic cancer (PC) and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We revealed that the expression of CaSR was consistently downregulated in the primary cancer tissues from PC patients, which was correlated with tumor size, differentiation and poor survival of the patients. CaSR activation markedly suppressed pancreatic tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo likely through the Ca(2+) entry mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger 1 (NCX1) to induce Ca(2+) entry into PC cells. Moreover, NCX1-mediated Ca(2+) entry resulted in Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition of β-catenin signaling in PC cells, eventually leading to the inhibition of pancreatic tumorigenesis. Collectively, we demonstrate for the first time that CaSR exerts a suppressive function in pancreatic tumorigenesis through a novel NCX1/Ca(2+)/β-catenin signaling pathway. Targeting this specific signaling pathway could be a potential therapeutic strategy for PC.

  12. Integrated But Not Whole? Applying an Ontological Account of Human Organismal Unity to the Brain Death Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschella, Melissa

    2016-10-01

    As is clear in the 2008 report of the President's Council on Bioethics, the brain death debate is plagued by ambiguity in the use of such key terms as 'integration' and 'wholeness'. Addressing this problem, I offer a plausible ontological account of organismal unity drawing on the work of Hoffman and Rosenkrantz, and then apply that account to the case of brain death, concluding that a brain dead body lacks the unity proper to a human organism, and has therefore undergone a substantial change. I also show how my view can explain hard cases better than one in which biological integration (as understood by Alan Shewmon and the President's Council) is taken to imply ontological wholeness or unity.

  13. Anti-inflammatory and pharmacological effects of topically applied flurbiprofen on human skin 24 hours after ultraviolet B irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, A.K.; Greaves, M.W.; Hensby, C.N.

    1980-11-01

    Human abdominal skin was irradiated, with three minimal erythema doses of ultraviolet B (290 to 320 nm) radiation, producing maximal erythema at 24h, with an associated rise in PGE2 and PGF2 alpha, measured by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry. Topical applications of 5% flurbiprofen, a prostaglandin synthetase inhibiting drug applied immediately after irradiation, partially suppressed the uvB evoked erythema at 24 h but totally prevented elevation of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha, without any associated significant rise in arachidonic acid. These findings support the view that erythema due to uvB is only partly mediated by products of cyclo-oxygenase pathway, and should prompt a search for other mediators, including non-prostaglandin metabolites of arachidonic acid.

  14. An Adaptive Single-Well Stochastic Resonance Algorithm Applied to Trace Analysis of Clenbuterol in Human Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaofei Xie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theory of stochastic resonance, an adaptive single-well stochastic resonance (ASSR coupled with genetic algorithm was developed to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of weak chromatographic signals. In conventional stochastic resonance algorithm, there are two or more parameters needed to be optimized and the proper parameters values were obtained by a universal searching within a given range. In the developed ASSR, the optimization of system parameter was simplified and automatic implemented. The ASSR was applied to the trace analysis of clenbuterol in human urine and it helped to significantly improve the limit of detection and limit of quantification of clenbuterol. Good linearity, precision and accuracy of the proposed method ensure that it could be an effective tool for trace analysis and the improvement of detective sensibility of current detectors.

  15. Applying remote sensing expertise to crop improvement: progress and challenges to scale up high throughput field phenotyping from research to industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouache, David; Beauchêne, Katia; Mini, Agathe; Fournier, Antoine; de Solan, Benoit; Baret, Fred; Comar, Alexis

    2016-05-01

    Digital and image analysis technologies in greenhouses have become commonplace in plant science research and started to move into the plant breeding industry. However, the core of plant breeding work takes place in fields. We will present successive technological developments that have allowed the migration and application of remote sensing approaches at large into the field of crop genetics and physiology research, with a number of projects that have taken place in France. These projects have allowed us to develop combined sensor plus vector systems, from tractor mounted and UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) mounted spectroradiometry to autonomous vehicle mounted spectroradiometry, RGB (red-green-blue) imagery and Lidar. We have tested these systems for deciphering the genetics of complex plant improvement targets such as the robustness to nitrogen and water deficiency of wheat and maize. Our results from wheat experiments indicate that these systems can be used both to screen genetic diversity for nitrogen stress tolerance and to decipher the genetics behind this diversity. We will present our view on the next critical steps in terms of technology and data analysis that will be required to reach cost effective implementation in industrial plant breeding programs. If this can be achieved, these technologies will largely contribute to resolving the equation of increasing food supply in the resource limited world that lies ahead.

  16. Agaricus Blazei Hot Water Extract Shows Anti Quorum Sensing Activity in the Nosocomial Human PathogenPseudomonas Aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokovic, M.; Ciric, A.; Glamoclija, J.; Nicolic, M.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    The edible mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill is known to induce protective immunomodulatory action against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study we report potential anti-quorum sensing properties of A. blazei hot water extract. Quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in virulence,

  17. Nitrogen-doped multiple graphene aerogel/gold nanostar as the electrochemical sensing platform for ultrasensitive detection of circulating free DNA in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiyi, Li; Ling, Liu; Hongxia, Bei; Zaijun, Li

    2016-05-15

    Graphene aerogel has attracted increasing attention due to its large specific surface area, high-conductivity and electronic interaction. The paper reported a facile synthesis of nitrogen-doped multiple graphene aerogel/gold nanostar (termed as N-doped MGA/GNS) and its use as the electrochemical sensing platform for detection of double stranded (dsDNA). On the one hand, the N-doped MGA offers a much better electrochemical performance compared with classical graphene aerogel. Interestingly, the performance can be enhanced by only increasing the cycle number of graphene oxide gelation. On the other hand, the hybridization with GNS further enhances the electrocatalytic activity towards Fe(CN)6(3-/4-). In addition, the N-doped MGA/GNS provides a well-defined three-dimensional architecture. The unique structure make it is easy to combine with dsDNA to form the electroactive bioconjugate. The integration not only triggers an ultrafast DNA electron and charge transfer, but also realizes a significant synergy between N-doped MGA, GNS and dsDNA. As a result, the electrochemical sensor based on the hybrid exhibits highly sensitive differential pulse voltammetric response (DPV) towards dsDNA. The DPV signal linearly increases with the increase of dsDNA concentration in the range from 1.0×10(-)(21) g ml(-)(1) to 1.0×10(-16) g ml(-1) with the detection limit of 3.9×10(-22) g ml(-1) (S/N=3). The sensitivity is much more than that of all reported DNA sensors. The analytical method was successfully applied in the electrochemical detection of circulating free DNA in human serum. The study also opens a window on the electrical properties of multiple graphene aerogel and DNA as well their hybrids to meet the needs of further applications as special nanoelectronics in molecule diagnosis, bioanalysis and catalysis.

  18. HAHA--nothing to laugh about. Measuring the immunogenicity (human anti-human antibody response) induced by humanized monoclonal antibodies applying ELISA and SPR technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechansky, Andreas

    2010-01-05

    Immunogenicity induced by passively applied proteins is a serious issue because it is directly related to the patient's safety. The out-come of an immune reaction to a therapeutic protein can range from transient appearance of antibodies without any clinical significance to severe life threatening conditions. Within this article, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methodology to measure immunogenicity are compared and the pros and cons are discussed.

  19. Towards remote sensing of Arctic ice roads and associated human activities using SUOMI NPP night light images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M.; Smith, L. C.; Stephenson, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Ice roads are often the only cost-effective means of transporting goods and supplies to communities, mines, and other sites in remote parts of the Arctic. Yet, there is no global dataset for Arctic ice roads. However, remotely sensed images from the SUOMI NPP day/night band (DNB) of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) may allow for the construction of such a dataset. The DNB's high sensitivity to low-level light suggests that while it is not feasible to view ice roads at night per se, other prominent features associated with ice roads can serve as proxies. Using a time series of images taken in winter 2012, 2013, and 2014, SUOMI NPP images are compared with Landsat 8 images and an existing map of the Tibbitt to Contwoyto ice road in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, Canada. First results reveal that while the ice road's exact path cannot be discerned, key points of human activity along the way can be made out. This bodes well for future applications of DNB imagery to detect ice roads in places like the Russian Federation, for which there is a dearth of publicly available maps. Knowing the location of ice roads is important for two reasons. First, these data can signal sites of natural resource extraction in places for which information is not widely disseminated, such as in the Russian Far East. Second, new geospatial datasets for ice roads can be combined with models assessing impacts of climate change on circumpolar land accessibility (Stephenson et al. 2011) in order to understand where the structural integrity of ice roads may be at risk. As warming temperatures threaten to shorten the season for ice roads, communities and mines alike will need to prepare for changes to their transportation infrastructure, made out of the changing landscape itself.

  20. NMR investigation of the isolated second voltage-sensing domain of human Nav1.4 channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramonov, A S; Lyukmanova, E N; Myshkin, M Yu; Shulepko, M A; Kulbatskii, D S; Petrosian, N S; Chugunov, A O; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P; Arseniev, A S; Shenkarev, Z O

    2017-03-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels are essential for the functioning of cardiovascular, muscular, and nervous systems. The α-subunit of eukaryotic Na(+) channel consists of ~2000 amino acid residues and encloses 24 transmembrane (TM) helices, which form five membrane domains: four voltage-sensing (VSD) and one pore domain. The structural complexity significantly impedes recombinant production and structural studies of full-sized Na(+) channels. Modular organization of voltage-gated channels gives an idea for studying of the isolated second VSD of human skeletal muscle Nav1.4 channel (VSD-II). Several variants of VSD-II (~150a.a., four TM helices) with different N- and C-termini were produced by cell-free expression. Screening of membrane mimetics revealed low stability of VSD-II samples in media containing phospholipids (bicelles, nanodiscs) associated with the aggregation of electrically neutral domain molecules. The almost complete resonance assignment of (13)C,(15)N-labeled VSD-II was obtained in LPPG micelles. The secondary structure of VSD-II showed similarity with the structures of bacterial Na(+) channels. The fragment of S4 TM helix between the first and second conserved Arg residues probably adopts 310-helical conformation. Water accessibility of S3 helix, observed by the Mn(2+) titration, pointed to the formation of water-filled crevices in the micelle embedded VSD-II. (15)N relaxation data revealed characteristic pattern of μs-ms time scale motions in the VSD-II regions sharing expected interhelical contacts. VSD-II demonstrated enhanced mobility at ps-ns time scale as compared to isolated VSDs of K(+) channels. These results validate structural studies of isolated VSDs of Na(+) channels and show possible pitfalls in application of this 'divide and conquer' approach.

  1. A simple method for assessment of human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies applied to Kawasaki disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vered Padler-Karavani

    Full Text Available N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc is an immunogenic sugar of dietary origin that metabolically incorporates into diverse native glycoconjugates in humans. Anti-Neu5Gc antibodies are detected in all human sera, though with variable levels and epitope-recognition profiles. These antibodies likely play a role in several inflammation-mediated pathologies including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In cancer, they have dualistic and opposing roles, either stimulating or repressing disease, as a function of their dose, and some of these antibodies serve as carcinoma biomarkers. Thus, anti-Neu5Gc antibodies may signify risk of inflammation-mediated diseases, and changes in their levels could potentially be used to monitor disease progression and/or response to therapy. Currently, it is difficult to determine levels of anti-Neu5Gc antibodies in individual human samples because these antibodies recognize multiple Neu5Gc-epitopes. Here we describe a simple and specific method for detection and overall estimation of human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. We exploit the difference between two mouse models that differ only by Neu5Gc-presence (wild-type or Neu5Gc-absence (Cmah(-/- knockout. We characterize mouse serum from both strains by HPLC, lectin and mass-spectrometry analysis and show the target Neu5Gc-epitopes. We then use Cmah(-/- knockout sera to inhibit all non-Neu5Gc-reactivity followed by binding to wild-type sera to detect overall anti-Neu5Gc response in a single assay. We applied this methodology to characterize and quantify anti-Neu5Gc IgG and IgA in sera of patients with Kawasaki disease (KD at various stages compared to controls. KD is an acute childhood febrile disease characterized by inflammation of coronary arteries that untreated may lead to coronary artery aneurysms with risk of thrombosis and myocardial infarction. This estimated response is comparable to the average of detailed anti-Neu5Gc IgG profile analyzed by a sialoglycan microarray

  2. Effectiveness of basin morphometry, remote sensing, and applied geosciences on groundwater recharge potential mapping: a comparative study within a small watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Suvendu; Sahu, Abhay Sankar

    2016-06-01

    A multidisciplinary approach using the integrated field of geosciences (e.g., geomorphology, geotectonics, geophysics, and hydrology) is established to conduct groundwater recharge potential mapping of the Kunur River Basin, India. The relative mean error (RME) calculation of the results of three applied techniques and water table data from twenty-four observation wells in the basin over the 2000-2010 period are presented. Nine subbasins were identified and ranked for the RME calculation, where the observation wells-based ranking was taken as standard order for comparison. A linear model has been developed using six factors (drainage density, surface slope, ruggedness index, lineament density, Bouguer gravity anomaly, and potential maximum water retention capacity) and a grid-wise weighted index. In a separate comparative approach, the sub-basin and grid-wise analyses have been conducted to identify the suitable spatial unit for watershed level hydrological modeling.

  3. Evolution of Microbial Quorum Sensing to Human Global Quorum Sensing: An Insight into How Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Might Be Linked to the Global Metabolic Disease Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, James E

    2016-06-15

    The first anaerobic organism extracted energy for survival and reproduction from its source of nutrients, with the genetic means to ensure protection of its individual genome but also its species survival. While it had a means to communicate with its community via simple secreted molecules ("quorum sensing"), the eventual shift to an aerobic environment led to multi-cellular metazoan organisms, with evolutionary-selected genes to form extracellular matrices, stem cells, stem cell niches, and a family of gap junction or "connexin" genes. These germinal and somatic stem cells responded to extracellular signals that triggered intra-cellular signaling to regulate specific genes out of the total genome. These extra-cellular induced intra-cellular signals also modulated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in order to regulate the new cellular functions of symmetrical and asymmetrical cell division, cell differentiation, modes of cell death, and senescence. Within the hierarchical and cybernetic concepts, differentiated by neurons organized in the brain of the Homo sapiens, the conscious mind led to language, abstract ideas, technology, myth-making, scientific reasoning, and moral decision-making, i.e., the creation of culture. Over thousands of years, this has created the current collision between biological and cultural evolution, leading to the global "metabolic disease" crisis.

  4. Simulating Nationwide Pandemics: Applying the Multi-scale Epidemiologic Simulation and Analysis System to Human Infectious Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dombroski, M; Melius, C; Edmunds, T; Banks, L E; Bates, T; Wheeler, R

    2008-09-24

    This study uses the Multi-scale Epidemiologic Simulation and Analysis (MESA) system developed for foreign animal diseases to assess consequences of nationwide human infectious disease outbreaks. A literature review identified the state of the art in both small-scale regional models and large-scale nationwide models and characterized key aspects of a nationwide epidemiological model. The MESA system offers computational advantages over existing epidemiological models and enables a broader array of stochastic analyses of model runs to be conducted because of those computational advantages. However, it has only been demonstrated on foreign animal diseases. This paper applied the MESA modeling methodology to human epidemiology. The methodology divided 2000 US Census data at the census tract level into school-bound children, work-bound workers, elderly, and stay at home individuals. The model simulated mixing among these groups by incorporating schools, workplaces, households, and long-distance travel via airports. A baseline scenario with fixed input parameters was run for a nationwide influenza outbreak using relatively simple social distancing countermeasures. Analysis from the baseline scenario showed one of three possible results: (1) the outbreak burned itself out before it had a chance to spread regionally, (2) the outbreak spread regionally and lasted a relatively long time, although constrained geography enabled it to eventually be contained without affecting a disproportionately large number of people, or (3) the outbreak spread through air travel and lasted a long time with unconstrained geography, becoming a nationwide pandemic. These results are consistent with empirical influenza outbreak data. The results showed that simply scaling up a regional small-scale model is unlikely to account for all the complex variables and their interactions involved in a nationwide outbreak. There are several limitations of the methodology that should be explored in future

  5. Applying n-bit floating point numbers and integers, and the n-bit filter of HDF5 to reduce file sizes of remote sensing products in memory-sensitive environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinke, Stephan

    2017-02-01

    Memory sensitive applications for remote sensing data require memory-optimized data types in remote sensing products. Hierarchical Data Format version 5 (HDF5) offers user defined floating point numbers and integers and the n-bit filter to create data types optimized for memory consumption. The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) applies a compaction scheme to the disseminated products of the Day and Night Band (DNB) data of Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite's instrument Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) through the EUMETSAT Advanced Retransmission Service, converting the original 32 bits floating point numbers to user defined floating point numbers in combination with the n-bit filter for the radiance dataset of the product. The radiance dataset requires a floating point representation due to the high dynamic range of the DNB. A compression factor of 1.96 is reached by using an automatically determined exponent size and an 8 bits trailing significand and thus reducing the bandwidth requirements for dissemination. It is shown how the parameters needed for user defined floating point numbers are derived or determined automatically based on the data present in a product.

  6. Repression of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 Long Terminal Repeat sense transcription by Sp1 recruitment to novel Sp1 binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauquenoy, Sylvain; Robette, Gwenaëlle; Kula, Anna; Vanhulle, Caroline; Bouchat, Sophie; Delacourt, Nadège; Rodari, Anthony; Marban, Céline; Schwartz, Christian; Burny, Arsène; Rohr, Olivier; Van Driessche, Benoit; Van Lint, Carine

    2017-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is characterized by viral latency in the majority of infected cells and by the absence of viremia. These features are thought to be due to the repression of viral sense transcription in vivo. Here, our in silico analysis of the HTLV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) promoter nucleotide sequence revealed, in addition to the four Sp1 binding sites previously identified, the presence of two additional potential Sp1 sites within the R region. We demonstrated that the Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors bound in vitro to these two sites and compared the binding affinity for Sp1 of all six different HTLV-1 Sp1 sites. By chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we showed Sp1 recruitment in vivo to the newly identified Sp1 sites. We demonstrated in the nucleosomal context of an episomal reporter vector that the Sp1 sites interfered with both the sense and antisense LTR promoter activities. Interestingly, the Sp1 sites exhibited together a repressor effect on the LTR sense transcriptional activity but had no effect on the LTR antisense activity. Thus, our results demonstrate the presence of two new functional Sp1 binding sites in the HTLV-1 LTR, which act as negative cis-regulatory elements of sense viral transcription. PMID:28256531

  7. Magnetization transfer contrast imaging in bovine and human cortical bone applying an ultrashort echo time sequence at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Fabian; Martirosian, Petros; Machann, Jürgen; Schwenzer, Nina F; Claussen, Claus D; Schick, Fritz

    2009-05-01

    Magnetization transfer (MT) contrast imaging reveals interactions between free water molecules and macromolecules in a variety of tissues. The introduction of ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences to clinical whole-body MR scanners expands the possibility of MT imaging to tissues with extremely fast signal decay such as cortical bone. The aim of this study was to investigate the MT effect of bovine cortical bone in vitro on a 3 Tesla whole-body MR unit. A 3D-UTE sequence with a rectangular-shaped on-resonant excitation pulse and a Gaussian-shaped off-resonant saturation pulse for MT preparation was applied. The flip angle and off-resonance frequency of the MT pulse was systematically varied. Measurements on various samples of bovine cortical bone, agar gel, aqueous manganese chloride solutions, and solid polymeric materials (polyurethane) were performed, followed by preliminary applications on human tibial bone in vivo. Direct on-resonant saturation effects of the MT prepulses were calculated numerically by means of Bloch's equations. Corrected for direct saturation effects dry and fresh bovine cortical bone showed "true" MTR values of 0.26 and 0.21, respectively. In vivo data were obtained from three healthy subjects and showed MTR values of 0.30 +/- 0.08. In vivo studies into MT of cortical bone might have the potential to give new insights in musculoskeletal pathologies.

  8. Factors affecting the appreciation generated through applying human factors/ergonomics (HFE) principles to systems of work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, R H Y; Lam, S T

    2014-01-01

    This retrospective study examined the levels of appreciation (applause) given by clients to Human Factors/Ergonomic (HFE) specialists after they have modified the systems of work. Thirteen non-academic projects were chosen because the HFE interventions involved changed the way workers work at their workplaces. Companies involved range from multi-national corporations and military organizations with thousands of employees to small trading companies with less than 10 employees. In 5 cases the HFE recommendations were fully adopted and well appreciated. In 4 they were largely ignored and not appreciated, with partial adoption and some appreciation in the other 4 cases. Three factors that predict appreciation were identified: (i) alignment between the benefits HFE can provide and the project's key performance indices; (ii) awareness of HFE among the client's senior management; and (iii) a team organization appropriate for applying HFE recommendations. Having an HFE specialist on the client's side can greatly increase levels of appreciation, but lack of such a specialist will not affect levels of appreciation. A clear contractual requirement for HFE intervention does not promote appreciation significantly, but its absence can greatly reduce levels of appreciation. These relationships are discussed using the Kano's model of quality. Means to generate greater appreciation of the benefits of HFE are discussed.

  9. Estimation of ocean surface currents from maximum cross correlation applied to GOCI geostationary satellite remote sensing data over the Tsushima (Korea) Straits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, M. A.; Quartly, G. D.; Shutler, J. D.; Miller, P. I.; Yoshikawa, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Attempts to automatically estimate surface current velocities from satellite-derived thermal or visible imagery face the limitations of data occlusion due to cloud cover, the complex evolution of features and the degradation of their surface signature. The Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) provides a chance to reappraise such techniques due to its multiyear record of hourly high-resolution visible spectrum data. Here we present the results of applying a Maximum Cross Correlation (MCC) technique to GOCI data. Using a combination of simulated and real data we derive suitable processing parameters and examine the robustness of different satellite products, those being water-leaving radiance and chlorophyll concentration. These estimates of surface currents are evaluated using High Frequency (HF) radar systems located in the Tsushima (Korea) Strait. We show the performance of the MCC approach varies depending on the amount of missing data and the presence of strong optical contrasts. Using simulated data it was found that patchy cloud cover occupying 25% of the image pair reduces the number of vectors by 20% compared to using perfect images. Root mean square errors between the MCC and HF radar velocities are of the order of 20 cm s-1. Performance varies depending on the wavelength of the data with the blue-green products out-performing the red and near infra-red products. Application of MCC to GOCI chlorophyll data results in similar performance to radiances in the blue-green bands. The technique has been demonstrated using specific examples of an eddy feature and tidal induced features in the region.

  10. Acidosis Decreases c-Myc Oncogene Expression in Human Lymphoma Cells: A Role for the Proton-Sensing G Protein-Coupled Receptor TDAG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65 is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partially rescues c-Myc expression, respectively. Acidic pH alone is insufficient to reduce c-Myc expression, as it does not decrease c-Myc in H1299 lung cancer cells expressing very low levels of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Instead, c-Myc is slightly increased by acidosis in H1299 cells, but this increase is completely inhibited by ectopic overexpression of TDAG8. Interestingly, TDAG8 expression is decreased by more than 50% in human lymphoma samples in comparison to non-tumorous lymph nodes and spleens, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor function of TDAG8 in lymphoma. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Myc regulation by acidosis in the tumor microenvironment and indicate that modulation of TDAG8 and related pH-sensing receptor pathways may be exploited as a new approach to inhibit Myc expression.

  11. Infrared Motion Sensing for Human-Following with Mobile Robots%实现机器人随动的红外感知方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯国栋; 刘敏; 王国利

    2012-01-01

    Considering the requirements for target localization of human-following robots, a hierarchical infrared motion sensing paradigm and its physical implementation using pyroelectric infrared (PIR) sensors are presented. From the perspec-tive of sensing model, the proposed sensing paradigm is structured in two tiers. The bottom tier is the geometric sensing tier, and it is composed of geometric sensing units, which offer multi-view bearing measurements of a moving target within the field of view (FOV) of a robot. The upper tier is the cooperative sensing tier, and it coordinates the geometric sensing units at the bottom tier to localize the moving target. From the perspective of physical implementation, at the bottom tier, the geometric sensing units for measuring the bearing information of the moving target are constructed by combining PIR sensors and Fresnel lens arrays. At the upper tier, the least square optimization is used to fuse the multi-view bearing measurements to obtain the position information of the moving target. The experimental results are given to validate the proposed sensing method in the context of human-following with mobile robots. Compared with the multi-view optical vision techniques, the proposed method has irreplaceable advantages of high sensing efficiency, robustness to illumination and background changes, low-cost and low energy consumption.%结合机器人随动任务对人体运动定位的需求,提出一种分层递阶结构的红外运动感知模式,及基于热释电红外传感器的物理实现方法.在传感模型方面,采用两层递阶结构的感知模式:底层为由多个几何传感单元构成的几何传感层,在机器人视野内实现多视角运动目标的方位测量;上层为协作感知层,用来组织底层各几何传感单元的协作,实现运动目标的定位测量.在物理实现方面,底层组合热释电红外传感阵列与菲涅尔透镜组,构建运动目标方位角测量所需的几何传感单

  12. Human cognition in context: on the biologic, cognitive and social reconsideration of meaning as making sense of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosmelli, Diego; Ibáñez, Agustín

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this special issue of IPBS has been to explore concrete and explicit alternatives to cognitivism. Indeed, in our editorial introduction we set out to give a brief survey of the numerous criticisms that have been made of understanding the mind this way (Ibáñez and Cosmelli, Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Sciences, 2008). Thus in what sense do the contributions here presented succeed in providing novel alternatives, moving into original and potentially generative domains of inquiry? While much remains to be done, we believe that they make significant headway in more than one sense. We do believe, however, that there is one locus that furnishes a convergence ground that is worth considering seriously: the problem of meaning. Meaning as making sense of contextualized action seems to cross the domains of intentionality, intersubjectivity and ecology of mind. The development of multilevel approaches, as the authors here exemplify, argues for a novel research agenda.

  13. Warburg effect's manifestation in aggressive pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas: insights from a mouse cell model applied to human tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M J Fliedner

    Full Text Available A glycolytic profile unifies a group of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs with distinct underlying gene defects, including von Hippel-Lindau (VHL and succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB mutations. Nevertheless, their tumor aggressiveness is distinct: PHEOs/PGLs metastasize rarely in VHL-, but frequently in SDHB-patients. To date, the molecular mechanisms causing the more aggressive phenotype in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs remain largely unknown. Recently, however, an excellent model to study aggressive PHEOs (mouse tumor tissue (MTT cells has been developed from mouse PHEO cells (MPC. We employed this model for a proteomics based approach to identify changes characteristic for tumor aggressiveness, which we then explored in a homogeneous set of human SDHB- and VHL-PHEOs/PGLs. The increase of glucose transporter 1 in VHL, and of hexokinase 2 in VHL and SDHB, confirmed their glycolytic profile. In agreement with the cell model and in support of decoupling of glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, SDHB tumors showed increased lactate dehydrogenase levels. In SDHB-PGLs OXPHOS complex activity was increased at complex III and, as expected, decreased at complex II. Moreover, protein and mRNA expression of all tested OXPHOS-related genes were higher in SDHB- than in VHL-derived tumors. Although there was no direct evidence for increased reactive oxygen species production, elevated superoxide dismutase 2 expression may reflect elevated oxidative stress in SDHB-derived PHEOs/PGLs. For the first time, we show that despite dysfunction in complex II and evidence for a glycolytic phenotype, the Warburg effect does not seem to fully apply to SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs with respect to decreased OXPHOS. In addition, we present evidence for increased LDHA and SOD2 expression in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs, proteins that have been proposed as promising therapeutic targets in other cancers. This study provides new insight into pathogenic mechanisms in

  14. Small amounts of zinc from zinc oxide particles in sunscreens applied outdoors are absorbed through human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulson, Brian; McCall, Maxine; Korsch, Michael; Gomez, Laura; Casey, Philip; Oytam, Yalchin; Taylor, Alan; McCulloch, Malcolm; Trotter, Julie; Kinsley, Leslie; Greenoak, Gavin

    2010-11-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles are commonly used in personal-care formulations as protective agents against exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Although previous research has concluded that nanoparticles do not penetrate healthy skin, it remains contentious whether this conclusion holds under normal conditions of sunscreen use. Humans (n = 20) were exposed to sunscreens containing zinc oxide (ZnO) particles to determine if Zn from the particles was absorbed through skin over five consecutive days under outdoor conditions. Two sunscreens were tested-"nano sunscreen" containing 19-nm nanoparticles and "bulk sunscreen" containing > 100-nm particles. Venous blood and urine samples were collected 8 days before exposure, twice daily during the trial, and 6 days post-exposure. As the first application in nanotechnology studies, stable isotope tracing was used where the ZnO, enriched to > 99% with the stable isotope (68)Zn, allowed dermally absorbed zinc to be distinguished from naturally occurring zinc. The overwhelming majority of applied (68)Zn was not absorbed, although blood and urine samples from all subjects exhibited small increases in levels of tracer (68)Zn. The amount of tracer detected in blood after the 5-day application period was ∼1/1000 th that of total Zn in the blood compartment. Tracer levels in blood continued to increase beyond the 5-day application phase in contrast to those in urine. Levels of (68)Zn in blood and urine from females receiving the nano sunscreen appeared to be higher than males receiving the same treatment and higher than all subjects receiving the bulk sunscreen. It is not known whether (68)Zn has been absorbed as ZnO particles or soluble Zn or both.

  15. Human Urine Derived Stem Cells in Combination with β-TCP Can Be Applied for Bone Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Guan

    Full Text Available Bone tissue engineering requires highly proliferative stem cells that are easy to isolate. Human urine stem cells (USCs are abundant and can be easily harvested without using an invasive procedure. In addition, in our previous studies, USCs have been proved to be able to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Therefore, USCs may have great potential and advantages to be applied as a cell source for tissue engineering. However, there are no published studies that describe the interactions between USCs and biomaterials and applications of USCs for bone tissue engineering. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the interactions between USCs with a typical bone tissue engineering scaffold, beta-Tricalcium Phosphate (β-TCP, and to determine whether the USCs seeded onto β-TCP scaffold can promote bone regeneration in a segmental femoral defect of rats. Primary USCs were isolated from urine and seeded on β-TCP scaffolds. Results showed that USCs remained viable and proliferated within β-TCP. The osteogenic differentiation of USCs within the scaffolds was demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content. Furthermore, β-TCP with adherent USCs (USCs/β-TCP were implanted in a 6-mm critical size femoral defect of rats for 12 weeks. Bone regeneration was determined using X-ray, micro-CT, and histologic analyses. Results further demonstrated that USCs in the scaffolds could enhance new bone formation, which spanned bone defects in 5 out of 11 rats while β-TCP scaffold alone induced modest bone formation. The current study indicated that the USCs can be used as a cell source for bone tissue engineering as they are compatible with bone tissue engineering scaffolds and can stimulate the regeneration of bone in a critical size bone defect.

  16. Human Urine Derived Stem Cells in Combination with β-TCP Can Be Applied for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Junjie; Zhang, Jieyuan; Li, Haiyan; Zhu, Zhenzhong; Guo, Shangchun; Niu, Xin; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering requires highly proliferative stem cells that are easy to isolate. Human urine stem cells (USCs) are abundant and can be easily harvested without using an invasive procedure. In addition, in our previous studies, USCs have been proved to be able to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Therefore, USCs may have great potential and advantages to be applied as a cell source for tissue engineering. However, there are no published studies that describe the interactions between USCs and biomaterials and applications of USCs for bone tissue engineering. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the interactions between USCs with a typical bone tissue engineering scaffold, beta-Tricalcium Phosphate (β-TCP), and to determine whether the USCs seeded onto β-TCP scaffold can promote bone regeneration in a segmental femoral defect of rats. Primary USCs were isolated from urine and seeded on β-TCP scaffolds. Results showed that USCs remained viable and proliferated within β-TCP. The osteogenic differentiation of USCs within the scaffolds was demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content. Furthermore, β-TCP with adherent USCs (USCs/β-TCP) were implanted in a 6-mm critical size femoral defect of rats for 12 weeks. Bone regeneration was determined using X-ray, micro-CT, and histologic analyses. Results further demonstrated that USCs in the scaffolds could enhance new bone formation, which spanned bone defects in 5 out of 11 rats while β-TCP scaffold alone induced modest bone formation. The current study indicated that the USCs can be used as a cell source for bone tissue engineering as they are compatible with bone tissue engineering scaffolds and can stimulate the regeneration of bone in a critical size bone defect.

  17. Quorum-sensing systems LuxS/autoinducer 2 and Com regulate Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilms in a bioreactor with living cultures of human respiratory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jorge E; Howery, Kristen E; Ludewick, Herbert P; Nava, Porfirio; Klugman, Keith P

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae forms organized biofilms in the human upper respiratory tract that may play an essential role in both persistence and acute respiratory infection. However, the production and regulation of biofilms on human cells is not yet fully understood. In this work, we developed a bioreactor with living cultures of human respiratory epithelial cells (HREC) and a continuous flow of nutrients, mimicking the microenvironment of the human respiratory epithelium, to study the production and regulation of S. pneumoniae biofilms (SPB). SPB were also produced under static conditions on immobilized HREC. Our experiments demonstrated that the biomass of SPB increased significantly when grown on HREC compared to the amount on abiotic surfaces. Additionally, pneumococcal strains produced more early biofilms on lung cells than on pharyngeal cells. Utilizing the bioreactor or immobilized human cells, the production of early SPB was found to be regulated by two quorum-sensing systems, Com and LuxS/AI-2, since a mutation in either comC or luxS rendered the pneumococcus unable to produce early biofilms on HREC. Interestingly, while LuxS/autoinducer 2 (AI-2) regulated biofilms on both HREC and abiotic surfaces, Com control was specific for those structures produced on HREC. The biofilm phenotypes of strain D39-derivative ΔcomC and ΔluxS QS mutants were reversed by genetic complementation. Of note, SPB formed on immobilized HREC and incubated under static conditions were completely lysed 24 h postinoculation. Biofilm lysis was also regulated by the Com and LuxS/AI-2 quorum-sensing systems.

  18. Effect of Traditional Chinese Herbs Combined with Low Dose Human Menopausal Gonadotropin Applied in Frozen-thawed Embryo Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess embryo implantation rate (IR) and pregnancy rate (PR) in women who received Bushen Wengong Decoction (补肾温宫汤, BSWGD), a Chinese herbal formula, combined with low dose of human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) prior to frozen-thawed embryo transfer (FET). Methods: A total of 262 subjects (674 transferred embryos) who received FET were analyzed retrospectively. In them,122 women were under 30 years old, 106 between 30-35 years and 32 over 35 years. The 85 subjects with normal ovulation were assigned to Group A, the natural menstruation cycling group, on whom no pre-transfer treatment was applied. The other 177 subjects with abnormal ovulation were assigned to Group B, and subdivided, according to the pre-transfer treatment they received, into three groups, Group B1 (50 cases) received BSWGD, Group B2 (58 cases) received hMG and Group B3 (69 cases) received both BSWGD and low dose hMG. The IR and PR of FET in the four groups were compared, and the effect of the embryo cryotime on PR of FET were compared also. Besides, the influencing factors to FET were analyzed. Results: IR and PR were significantly higher in all age sects of Group B3 than those in Group A, showing significant difference (P< 0.05). IR and PR in subjects in age sects of <30 years and > 35 years in group B3 were signifi cantly higher than those in Group B1 ( P<0.05), but no significant difference was shown in the two parameters between Group B 2 and Group B3 ( P>0.05). PR in the subjects who received embryos with cryo-time of > 200 days was significantly lower than that in those with cryo-time of < 100 days (P<0.05). Embryo cryo-time, endometrial thickness, use of BSWGD and use of hMG were of significance in FET ( P< 0.05).Conclusion: A programmed cycle of BSWGD combined with low dose of hMG could improve the embryo IR and PR of FET. Embryo cryo-time, endometrial thickness, and the use of BSWGD and hMG are of significance for FET.

  19. Quorum sensing in human pathogens%病原菌群体感应系统的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱妩燕; 江涛

    2012-01-01

    群体感应是细菌间依赖细胞密度的一种信息传递方式.细菌通过合成、分泌信号分子感知细菌群体密度,从而控制整个细菌群体行为.目前已在许多革兰阴性菌、革兰阳性菌和真菌中发现群体感应系统,对群体感应系统信号分子结构、信号传导通路进行大量研究后,发现其与细菌生物膜形成、生成分泌毒力因子密切相关.本文就以典型的铜绿假单胞菌、金黄色葡萄球菌、哈氏弧菌、白色念珠菌为例,对群体感应系统相关机制及研究进展予以综述.%Quorum sensing is a density-dependent cell-signaling m(cc)hanism,driven by secreted signaling molecules called autoinducer. Communication enables population of cells to synchronize gene expression.Thus,quorum sensing allows groups of bacteria to act in union by perception of bacterial population density.A number of quorum sensing systems have been found in gram-negative bacteria,grampositive bacteria and fungi,which are commonly associated with biofilm formation and virulence. This review focuses on the lasted mechanism of quorum sensing system based on typical pathogen,including Pseudomonas aeruginosa,Staphylococcus aureus,Vibrio harveyi and Candida albicans.

  20. Agaricus Blazei Hot Water Extract Shows Anti Quorum Sensing Activity in the Nosocomial Human Pathogen Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Soković

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The edible mushroom Agaricus blazei Murill is known to induce protective immunomodulatory action against a variety of infectious diseases. In the present study we report potential anti-quorum sensing properties of A. blazei hot water extract. Quorum sensing (QS plays an important role in virulence, biofilm formation and survival of many pathogenic bacteria, including the Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and is considered as a novel and promising target for anti-infectious agents. In this study, the effect of the sub-MICs of Agaricus blazei water extract on QS regulated virulence factors and biofilm formation was evaluated against P. aeruginosa PAO1. Sub-MIC concentrations of the extract which did not kill P. aeruginosa nor inhibited its growth, demonstrated a statistically significant reduction of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa, such as pyocyanin production, twitching and swimming motility. The biofilm forming capability of P. aeruginosa was also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner at sub-MIC values. Water extract of A. blazei is a promising source of antiquorum sensing and antibacterial compounds.

  1. Quorum Sensing Inhibition, Relevance to Periodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Yada, Sudheer; Kamalesh, B; Sonwane, Siddharth; Guptha, Indra; Swetha, R K

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing helps bacteria to communicate with each other and in coordinating their behavior. Many diseases of human beings, plants, and animals are mediated by quorum sensing. Various approaches are being tried to inhibit this communication to control the diseases caused by bacteria. Periodontal pathogens also communicate through quorum sensing and new approaches to treat periodontal disease using quorum sensing inhibition need to explored.

  2. Quorum sensing inhibition, relevance to periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Sudheer; Kamalesh, B; Sonwane, Siddharth; Guptha, Indra; Swetha, R K

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing helps bacteria to communicate with each other and in coordinating their behavior. Many diseases of human beings, plants, and animals are mediated by quorum sensing. Various approaches are being tried to inhibit this communication to control the diseases caused by bacteria. Periodontal pathogens also communicate through quorum sensing and new approaches to treat periodontal disease using quorum sensing inhibition need to explored.

  3. Cognitive models applied to human effectiveness in national security environments (ergonomics of augmented cognition system design and application).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ntuen, Celestine (North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC); Winchester, Woodrow III (North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC)

    2004-06-01

    In complex simulation systems where humans interact with computer-generated agents, information display and the interplay of virtual agents have become dominant media and modalities of interface design. This design strategy is reflected in augmented reality (AR), an environment where humans interact with computer-generated agents in real-time. AR systems can generate large amount of information, multiple solutions in less time, and perform far better in time-constrained problem solving. The capabilities of AR have been leveraged to augment cognition in human information processing. In this sort of augmented cognition (AC) work system, while technology has become the main source for information acquisition from the environment, the human sensory and memory capacities have failed to cope with the magnitude and scale of information they encounter. This situation generates opportunity for excessive cognitive workloads, a major factor in degraded human performance. From the human effectiveness point of view, research is needed to develop, model, and validate simulation tools that can measure the effectiveness of an AR technology used to support the amplification of human cognition. These tools will allow us to predict human performance for tasks executed under an AC tool construct. This paper presents an exploration of ergonomics issues relevant to AR and AC systems design. Additionally, proposed research to investigate those ergonomic issues is discussed.

  4. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Ishizuka, Tamotsu, E-mail: tamotsui@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Komachi, Mayumi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Dobashi, Kunio [Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Mori, Masatomo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  5. Effective photoprotection of human skin against infrared A radiation by topically applied antioxidants: results from a vehicle controlled, double-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grether-Beck, Susanne; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Krutmann, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Infrared A radiation (IRA) from solar sunlight contributes to photoaging of human skin, e.g. by upregulating MMP-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts, indicating the need for photoprotection of human skin against IRA. Up to now, however, there has been no controlled study to show that effective protection of human skin against IRA radiation is possible. Here, we have conducted a randomized, controlled, double-blinded prospective study in 30 healthy volunteers to assess the capacity of an SPF 30 sunscreen versus the same sunscreen supplemented with an antioxidant cocktail containing grape seed extract, vitamin E, ubiquinone and vitamin C to protect human skin against IRA radiation-induced MMP-1 upregulation. As expected, exposure to IRA radiation significantly upregulated MMP-1 expression, as compared to unirradiated skin, and this response was significantly reduced, if the SPF30 sunscreen plus the antioxidant cocktail had been applied prior to IRA radiation. In contrast, treatment of human skin with the SPF30 sunscreen alone did not provide significant protection. These results indicate that topically applied antioxidants effectively protect human skin against IRA radiation and that regular sunscreens need to be supplemented with specific antioxidants in order to achieve IRA photoprotection.

  6. Recurrence quantification analysis applied to spatiotemporal pattern analysis in high-density mapping of human atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeemering, Stef; Bonizzi, Pietro; Maesen, Bart; Peeters, Ralf; Schotten, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal complexity of atrial fibrillation (AF) patterns is often quantified by annotated intracardiac contact mapping. We introduce a new approach that applies recurrence plot (RP) construction followed by recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) to epicardial atrial electrograms, recorded wi

  7. The Study of Mining Activities and their Influences in the Almaden Region Applying Remote Sensing Techniques; Estudio de la Influencia de las Actividades Mineras de Mercurio en la Comarca de Almaden Aplicando Tecnicas de Teledeteccion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico, C.; Schmid, T.; Millan, R.; Gumuzzio, J.

    2010-11-17

    This scientific-technical report is a part of an ongoing research work carried out by Celia Rico Fraile in order to obtain the Diploma of Advanced Studies as part of her PhD studies. This work has been developed in collaboration with the Faculty of Science at The Universidad Autonoma de Madrid and the Department of Environment at CIEMAT. The main objective of this work was the characterization and classification of land use in Almaden (Ciudad Real) during cinnabar mineral exploitation and after mining activities ceased in 2002, developing a methodology focused on the integration of remote sensing techniques applying multispectral and hyper spectral satellite data. By means of preprocessing and processing of data from the satellite images as well as data obtained from field campaigns, a spectral library was compiled in order to obtain representative land surfaces within the study area. Monitoring results show that the distribution of areas affected by mining activities is rapidly diminishing in recent years. (Author) 130 refs.

  8. Applying the criteria of Ulrich and Brockbank for the assessment of the role of human resources as a strategic business partner in a mining company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lize de Bruyn

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to apply the 14 criteria of Ulrich and Brockbank for the assessment of the movement of a human-resource function from its current development phase to a strategic business-partner role. A qualitative method, based on casing, was adopted as the research strategy. Data were collected from members of the human-resource forum of an organisation through a semi-structured focus group, individual interviews and solicited document reviews. The collected data were analysed through open coding or thematic analyses. Findings indicated that the organisation’s human-resource function was moving from operational human-resource service provision to a more strategic focus.

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Sensing by Human Trophoblasts Induces Innate Immune Responses and Recruitment of Maternal NK Cells: Potential Implications for Limiting Vertical Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliano, Silvia; Petroff, Margaret G; Warren, Bryce D; Jasti, Susmita; Linscheid, Caitlin; Ward, Ashley; Kramer, Anita; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Sheiko, Melissa A; Gale, Michael; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Winn, Virginia D; Rosen, Hugo R

    2015-10-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the world's most common blood-borne viral infection for which there is no vaccine. The rates of vertical transmission range between 3 and 6% with odds 90% higher in the presence of HIV coinfection. Prevention of vertical transmission is not possible because of lack of an approved therapy for use in pregnancy or an effective vaccine. Recently, HCV has been identified as an independent risk factor for preterm delivery, perinatal mortality, and other complications. In this study, we characterized the immune responses that contribute to the control of viral infection at the maternal-fetal interface (MFI) in the early gestational stages. In this study, we show that primary human trophoblast cells and an extravillous trophoblast cell line (HTR8), from first and second trimester of pregnancy, express receptors relevant for HCV binding/entry and are permissive for HCV uptake. We found that HCV-RNA sensing by human trophoblast cells induces robust upregulation of type I/III IFNs and secretion of multiple chemokines that elicit recruitment and activation of decidual NK cells. Furthermore, we observed that HCV-RNA transfection induces a proapoptotic response within HTR8 that could affect the morphology of the placenta. To our knowledge, for the first time, we demonstrate that HCV-RNA sensing by human trophoblast cells elicits a strong antiviral response that alters the recruitment and activation of innate immune cells at the MFI. This work provides a paradigm shift in our understanding of HCV-specific immunity at the MFI as well as novel insights into mechanisms that limit vertical transmission but may paradoxically lead to virus-related pregnancy complications.

  10. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  11. A Method for Evaluation and Comparison of Parallel Robots for Safe Human Interaction, Applied to Robotic TMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de J.J.; Stienen, A.H.A.; Wijk, van der V.; Wessels, M.; Kooij, van der H.

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive method to modify behaviour of neurons in the brain. TMS is applied by running large currents through a coil close to the scalp. For consistent results it is required to maintain the coil position within millimetres of the targeted location, bu

  12. Applying Learner-Centered Principles to Teaching Human Behavior in the Social Environment in a Baccalaureate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolich, Robert; Ford, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the demographics of American undergraduate students must be addressed by changes in delivery of the curriculum. The learner-centered approach to education helps to recognize and integrate student diversity with class exercises and assignments designed to help students meet course learning outcomes. This article applies the American…

  13. The Backyard Human Performance Technologist: Applying the Development Research Methodology to Develop and Validate a New Instructional Design Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    Development research methodology (DRM) has been recommended as a viable research approach to expand the practice-to-theory/theory-to-practice literature that human performance technology (HPT) practitioners can integrate into the day-to-day work flow they already use to develop instructional products. However, little has been written about how it…

  14. A Question of Agency: Applying Sen's Theory of Human Capability to the Concept of Secondary School Student Career "Choice"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliott, Natal'ya; Graham, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we seek to operationalize Amartya Sen's concept of human capability to guide a scholarly investigation of student career choice capability. We begin by outlining factors affecting youth labour markets in Australia; a prosperous country that is affected by a "two-speed" national economy. We then examine recent government…

  15. The Reinforcement of Ableism: Normality, the Medical Model of Disability, and Humanism in Applied Behavior Analysis and ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyman, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The field of educating individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder has ever been rife with controversy regarding issues ranging from etiology and causation to effective intervention and education options. One such basis for controversy has been between humanism, and humanistic philosophical concepts, and its fundamental differences with behaviorism,…

  16. Why E-Business Must Evolve beyond Market Orientation: Applying Human Interaction Models to Computer-Mediated Corporate Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Kevin McCullough

    2001-01-01

    Considers the design of corporate communications for electronic business and discusses the increasing importance of corporate interaction as companies work in virtual environments. Compares sociological and psychological theories of human interaction and relationship formation with organizational interaction theories of corporate relationship…

  17. Applying Human-performance Models to Designing and Evaluating Nuclear Power Plants: Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.M.

    2009-11-30

    Human performance models (HPMs) are simulations of human behavior with which we can predict human performance. Designers use them to support their human factors engineering (HFE) programs for a wide range of complex systems, including commercial nuclear power plants. Applicants to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) can use HPMs for design certifications, operating licenses, and license amendments. In the context of nuclear-plant safety, it is important to assure that HPMs are verified and validated, and their usage is consistent with their intended purpose. Using HPMs improperly may generate misleading or incorrect information, entailing safety concerns. The objective of this research was to develop guidance to support the NRC staff's reviews of an applicant's use of HPMs in an HFE program. The guidance is divided into three topical areas: (1) HPM Verification, (2) HPM Validation, and (3) User Interface Verification. Following this guidance will help ensure the benefits of HPMs are achieved in a technically sound, defensible manner. During the course of developing this guidance, I identified several issues that could not be addressed; they also are discussed.

  18. Human skin penetration of the major components of Australian tea tree oil applied in its pure form and as a 20% solution in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sheree E; Russell, Michael; Southwell, Ian; Roberts, Michael S

    2008-05-01

    The safety of topical application of Australian tea tree Oil (TTO) is confounded by a lack of transdermal penetration data, which adequately informs opinions and recommendations. In this study we applied TTO in its pure form and as a 20% solution in ethanol in vitro to human epidermal membranes from three different donors, mounted in horizontal Franz-type diffusion cells, using normal 'in use' dosing conditions (10 mg/cm2). In addition, we examined the effect of partially occluding the application site on the penetration of TTO components. Our data showed that only a small quantity of TTO components, 1.1-1.9% and 2-4% of the applied amount following application of a 20% TTO solution and pure TTO, respectively, penetrated into or through human epidermis. The largest TTO component penetrating the skin was terpinen-4-ol. Following partial occlusion of the application site, the penetration of terpinen-4-ol increased to approximately 7% of the applied TTO. Measurement of the rate of evaporation of tea tree oil from filter paper (7.4 mg/cm2) showed that 98% of the oil evaporated in 4 hours. Overall, it is apparent that the penetration of TTO components through human skin is limited.

  19. TLR-9 contributes to the antiviral innate immune sensing of rodent parvoviruses MVMp and H-1PV by normal human immune cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahari Raykov

    Full Text Available The oncotropism of Minute Virus of Mice (MVMp is partially related to the stimulation of an antiviral response mediated by type-I interferons (IFNs in normal but not in transformed mouse cells. The present work was undertaken to assess whether the oncotropism displayed against human cells by MVMp and its rat homolog H-1PV also depends on antiviral mechanisms and to identify the pattern recognition receptor (PRR involved. Despite their low proliferation rate which represents a drawback for parvovirus multiplication, we used human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs as normal model specifically because all known PRRs are functional in this mixed cell population and moreover because some of its subsets are among the main IFN producers upon infections in mammals. Human transformed models consisted in lines and tumor cells more or less permissive to both parvoviruses. Our results show that irrespective of their permissiveness, transformed cells do not produce IFNs nor develop an antiviral response upon parvovirus infection. However, MVMp- or H-1PV-infected hPBMCs trigger such defense mechanisms despite an absence of parvovirus replication and protein expression, pointing to the viral genome as the activating element. Substantial reduction of an inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotide (iODN of the latter IFN production identified TLR-9 as a potential PRR for parvoviruses in hPBMCs. However, neither the iODN treatment nor an antibody-induced neutralization of the IFN-triggered effects restored parvovirus multiplication in these cells as expected by their weak proliferation in culture. Finally, given that a TLR-9 activation could also not be observed in parvovirus-infected human lines reported to be endowed with a functional TLR-9 pathway (Namalwa, Raji, and HEK293-TLR9(+/+, our data suggest that transformed human cells do not sense MVMp or H-1PV either because of an absence of PRR expression or an intrinsic, or virus-driven defect in the endosomal

  20. Using remote sensing technique for analyzing temporal changes of seagrass beds by human impacts in waters of Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh Thu, Phan; Hoang Son, Tong Phuoc; Komatsu, Teruhisa

    2012-10-01

    Seagrass beds/meadows are very productive ecosystems with high biodiversities. However, they have been degraded under high pressures of human activities. Combining depth-invariance index and ground-truthing, distribution of seagrass beds in Cam Ranh Bay was identified by analyses of multi-remote sensing images such as LANDSAT, SPOT and ALOS AVNIR-2. Although coverage of seagrass meadows was1178 ha, the seagrass meadows were being degraded by illegal fishing methods, aquaculture and discharges from industries and living domestics. The reducing ratio of seagrass coverage has been increased in recent years. While the depth-invariance index method would help to detect the areas of seagrass beds, this method requires combination of field trip and absorption library methods to increase classification accuracy. Final maps of the status and changes of seagrass beds could help to integrate the sustainable development of economy with protection of natural resources.

  1. Remote Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Southworth, C. Scott

    1983-01-01

    The Landsat Program became the major event of 1982 in geological remote sensing with the successful launch of Landsat 4. Other 1982 remote sensing accomplishments, research, publications, (including a set of Landsat worldwide reference system index maps), and conferences are highlighted. (JN)

  2. [Clinico-biochemical aspects of human adaptation in central Antarctica as applied to the problems of space biology and medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanov, V V; Khmel'kov, V P; Krupina, T N; Kuznetscv, A G; Kuz'min, M P

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents the results of clinical, physiological and biochemical examination of 27 polar explorer--members of the 17th Soviet Antartic Expedition at the Vostok station. It gives data on the morbidity rate and describes the development of the asthenic-neurotic syndrome. On the basis of studies of catecholamines and serotonin, the role of the sympatho-adrenal system in the human adaptation to the harsh environments of the Central Antarctica has been shown.

  3. Urban versus Rural Return to Human Capital in Portugal, A Cook-Book Recipe for Applying Assignment Models

    OpenAIRE

    Teulings, Coen N.; Vieira, José A.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Portuguese economy has been characterised by modernisation sincethe post-war period. Lisbon and the Tagus Valley is a centre of thisprocess. Hence, this region faces a high demand for highly skilledlabour. This paper analyses rates of return on human capital in theregion of Lisbon and in the rest of the country in the period 1982-1992. An assignment model of heterogeneous workers to heterogeneousjobs is discussed. We also develop a cook-book recipe for itsestimation. The main implication,...

  4. A comparison between the human sense of smell and neural activity in the olfactory bulb of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Zu; Saito, Maki; Kurita, Yuichi; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao; Tsuji, Toshio

    2014-02-01

    Generally, odor qualities are evaluated via sensory tests in which predefined criteria are assessed by panelists and stochastically analyzed to reduce human inconsistencies. Because this method requires multiple, well-trained human subjects, a more convenient approach is required to enable predictions of odor qualities. In this article, we propose an approach involving linking internal states of the olfactory system with perceptual characteristics. In the study, the glomerular responses of rats were taken to represent internal olfactory system states. Similarities between the glomerular responses of rats were quantified by correlations between glomerular activity patterns, overlap rate of strongly activated part across glomerular activity patterns, and the similarity between histograms of the strength of activity. These indices were then compared with perceptual similarities measured from human subjects in sensory tests. The results of experiments involving 22 odorants showed medium strength correlations between each index and perceptual similarity. In addition, when the 3 indices were combined using their Euclidean distance, we observed middle to high correlations (r = 0.65-0.79) to human perceptual similarity. We also report the results of our use of a machine learning technique to classify the odorants into a similar and dissimilar category. Although the correct rate of classification varied from 33.3% to 92.9%, these results support the feasibility of linking the glomerular responses of rats to human perception.

  5. Recurrence quantification analysis applied to spatiotemporal pattern analysis in high-density mapping of human atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeemering, Stef; Bonizzi, Pietro; Maesen, Bart; Peeters, Ralf; Schotten, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal complexity of atrial fibrillation (AF) patterns is often quantified by annotated intracardiac contact mapping. We introduce a new approach that applies recurrence plot (RP) construction followed by recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) to epicardial atrial electrograms, recorded with a high-density grid of electrodes. In 32 patients with no history of AF (aAF, n=11), paroxysmal AF (PAF, n=12) and persistent AF (persAF, n=9), RPs were constructed using a phase space electrogram embedding dimension equal to the estimated AF cycle length. Spatial information was incorporated by 1) averaging the recurrence over all electrodes, and 2) by applying principal component analysis (PCA) to the matrix of embedded electrograms and selecting the first principal component as a representation of spatial diversity. Standard RQA parameters were computed on the constructed RPs and correlated to the number of fibrillation waves per AF cycle (NW). Averaged RP RQA parameters showed no correlation with NW. Correlations improved when applying PCA, with maximum correlation achieved between RP threshold and NW (RR1%, r=0.68, p <; 0.001) and RP determinism (DET, r=-0.64, p <; 0.001). All studied RQA parameters based on the PCA RP were able to discriminate between persAF and aAF/PAF (DET persAF 0.40 ± 0.11 vs. 0.59 ± 0.14/0.62 ± 0.16, p <; 0.01). RP construction and RQA combined with PCA provide a quick and reliable tool to visualize dynamical behaviour and to assess the complexity of contact mapping patterns in AF.

  6. Science & the Senses: Perceptions & Deceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Science requires the acquisition and analysis of empirical (sense-derived) data. Given the same physical objects or phenomena, the sense organs of all people do not respond equally to these stimuli, nor do their minds interpret sensory signals identically. Therefore, teachers should develop lectures on human sensory systems that include some…

  7. Optimizing the Use of an Artificial Tongue-Placed Tactile Biofeedback for Improving Ankle Joint Position Sense in Humans

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, N; Fleury, A; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Chenu, Olivier; Fleury, Anthony; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2006-01-01

    The performance of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback device for improving ankle joint position sense was assessed in 12 young healthy adults using an active matching task. The underlying principle of this system consists of supplying individuals with supplementary information about the position of the matching ankle relative to the reference ankle position through a tongue-placed tactile output device generating electrotactile stimulation on a 36-point (6 X 6) matrix held against the surface of the tongue dorsum. Precisely, (1) no electrodes were activated when both ankles were in a similar angular position within a predetermined "angular dead zone" (ADZ); (2) 12 electrodes (2 X 6) of the anterior and posterior zones of the matrix were activated (corresponding to the stimulation of the front and rear portion of the tongue) when the matching ankle was in a too plantarflexed and dorsiflexed position relative to the reference ankle, respectively. Two ADZ values of 0.5° and 1.5° were...

  8. Optimizing the use of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback for improving ankle joint position sense in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillerme, N; Chenu, O; Fleury, A; Demongeot, J; Payan, Y

    2006-01-01

    The performance of an artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback device for improving ankle joint position sense was assessed in 12 young healthy adults using an active matching task. The underlying principle of this system consisted of supplying individuals with supplementary information about the position of the matching ankle relative to the reference ankle position through a tongue-placed tactile output device generating electrotactile stimulation on a 36- point (6 x 6) matrix held against the surface of the tongue dorsum. Precisely, (1) no electrodes were activated when both ankles were in a similar angular position within predetermined "angular dead zone" (ADZ); (2) 12 electrodes (2 x 6) of the anterior and posterior zones of the matrix were activated (corresponding to the stimulation of the front and rear portion of the tongue) when the matching ankle was in too plantar and dorsiflexed position relative to the reference ankle, respectively. The effects of two ADZ values of 0.5 degrees and 1.5 degrees were evaluated. Results showed (1) more accurate and more consistent matching performances with than without biofeedback and (2) more accurate and more consistent ankle joint matching performances when using the biofeedback device with the smaller ADZ value. These findings suggest that (1) electrotactile stimulation of the tongue can be used to improve ankle joint proprioception and (2) this improvement can be increased through an appropriate specification of the ADZ parameter provided by the biofeedback system. Further investigations are needed to strengthen the potential clinical value of this device.

  9. The problematic of expatriation in international human resource management: studies applied to SMES in central and northern of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Remondes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The human resources management processes associated with initial or further internationalization of companies is increasingly present on the agendas of national companies, due to increasing need for internationalization of the portuguese economy. This article reviews the literature on the national and international human resource management from the perspective of internationalization, thus providing a theoretical contribution to this area of research, and presents the results of an empirical study, based on interviews and questionnaires to managers and employees, which resulted from the study of two portuguese companies, whose aim was to analyze the sensitivity of the process of expatriation and repatriation of its employees. It was found developments in both companies be effective in expatriation, as evidenced by the monitoring of employees and their families, but still continues to neglect the training and performance evaluation that sometimes does not reproduce the work done by expatriates. Given the repatriation companies also do not think in a structured way in charge of assigning the employee upon his return.

  10. Sensing Movement: Microsensors for Body Motion Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansong Zeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of body posture and motion is an important physiological function that can keep the body in balance. Man-made motion sensors have also been widely applied for a broad array of biomedical applications including diagnosis of balance disorders and evaluation of energy expenditure. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art sensing components utilized for body motion measurement. The anatomy and working principles of a natural body motion sensor, the human vestibular system, are first described. Various man-made inertial sensors are then elaborated based on their distinctive sensing mechanisms. In particular, both the conventional solid-state motion sensors and the emerging non solid-state motion sensors are depicted. With their lower cost and increased intelligence, man-made motion sensors are expected to play an increasingly important role in biomedical systems for basic research as well as clinical diagnostics.

  11. FPA-based infrared thermography as applied to the study of cutaneous perspiration and stimulated vascular response in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainer, Boris G [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, 13, Lavrentyev avenue, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2005-12-07

    This review gives an overview of focal plane array (FPA)-based infrared (IR) thermography as a powerful research method in the field of physiology and medicine. Comparison of the gained results with the data previously obtained by other authors with other research tools is given. Outer thermoregulatory manifestations displayed by the human organism subjected to whole-body heating (sauna bath) and physical loads (exercise bicycling) are quantitatively analysed. Some details of human body emotional sweating (psycho-physiological effect) are reported. Particular attention is paid to studying active sweat glands as individual objects. All experimental data were obtained with the help of a high-sensitivity (0.03 {sup 0}C) fast 128 x 128 InAs IR detector-based thermal imaging system operating in the short-wave spectral region (2.5 to 3 {mu}m) and perfectly suiting medical purposes. It is shown that IR thermography makes it possible to overcome limitations inherent to contact measuring means that were traditionally used before in thermal studies. It is also shown that heterogeneous thermograms displayed by organisms with disturbed inner equilibrium can be quantitatively analysed in terms of statistical parameters of related surface-temperature histograms, such as the mean temperature and the standard deviation of temperature (SDT). The increase and the decrease in SDT turned out to be typical of prolonged physical load and subsequent relaxation, and of external whole-body heating, respectively. Explanation of this result based on a hypothesis advanced within the context of the doctrine of human-organism evolution is given. Skin-temperature distribution function accompanying the relaxed organism in normality was found to closely resemble normal-distribution function. Symmetry break down and variation of the shape of this characteristic may serve as an indicator of homeostasis shift and can be used as a quantitative criterion for the latter. A new phenomenon, stable

  12. 人性化护理在患儿人院时的应用%Applied Humane Care to Admission of Sick Children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢芳

    2011-01-01

    目的 提高健康教育达标率及护理工作满意度.方法 在患儿入院时,应用人性化护理.结果 人性化护理,一方面容易被患儿及其家长接受,易于提高其对疾病的认识,能提高其对护理服务的满意度;另一方面更有利于护理人员业务水平的提高.结论 人性化护理是“以人为本,以质量为核心”的服务宗旨的体现,可应用于护理全过程.%Objective; To improve health care education compliance rate and nursing care satisfaction. Method: Applied humane care for the children admitted to hospital at the right time. Result: Humane care, on the one hand, easily accepted by children and their parents, easy - to increase their awareness of the disease, but also can improve their satisfaction for care; on the other hand, is more conducive to raising the level of nursing services. Conclusion: Humane care practiced the service purpose with " people oriented and quality as core" , which can be applied to the whole process of care.

  13. Hype, harmony and human factors: applying user-centered design to achieve sustainable telehealth program adoption and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossos, P G; St-Cyr, O; Purdy, B; Toenjes, C; Masino, C; Chmelnitsky, D

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of international experience with the use of information and communication technologies in healthcare delivery, widespread telehealth adoption remains limited and progress slow. Escalating health system challenges related to access, cost and quality currently coincide with rapid advancement of affordable and reliable internet based communication technologies creating unprecedented opportunities and incentives for telehealth. In this paper, we will describe how Human Factors Engineering (HFE) and user-centric elements have been incorporated into the establishment of telehealth within a large academic medical center to increase acceptance and sustainability. Through examples and lessons learned we wish to increase awareness of HFE and its importance in the successful implementation, innovation and growth of telehealth programs.

  14. Remotely-Sensed Urban Wet-Landscapes AN Indicator of Coupled Effects of Human Impact and Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei

    2016-06-01

    This study proposes the concept of urban wet-landscapes (loosely-defined wetlands) as against dry-landscapes (mainly impervious surfaces). The study is to examine whether the dynamics of urban wet-landscapes is a sensitive indicator of the coupled effects of the two major driving forces of urban landscape change - human built-up impact and climate (precipitation) variation. Using a series of satellite images, the study was conducted in the Kansas City metropolitan area of the United States. A rule-based classification algorithm was developed to identify fine-scale, hidden wetlands that could not be appropriately detected based on their spectral differentiability by a traditional image classification. The spatial analyses of wetland changes were implemented at the scales of metropolitan, watershed, and sub-watershed as well as based on the size of surface water bodies in order to reveal urban wetland change trends in relation to the driving forces. The study identified that wet-landscape dynamics varied in trend and magnitude from the metropolitan, watersheds, to sub-watersheds. The study also found that increased precipitation in the region in the past decades swelled larger wetlands in particular while smaller wetlands decreased mainly due to human development activities. These findings suggest that wet-landscapes, as against the dry-landscapes, can be a more effective indicator of the coupled effects of human impact and climate change.

  15. Word sense disambiguation using semantic relatedness measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Che-Yu

    2006-01-01

    All human languages have words that can mean different things in different contexts, such words with multiple meanings are potentially "ambiguous". The process of "deciding which of several meanings of a term is intended in a given context" is known as "word sense disambiguation (WSD)". This paper presents a method of WSD that assigns a target word the sense that is most related to the senses of its neighbor words. We explore the use of measures of relatedness between word senses based on a novel hybrid approach. First, we investigate how to "literally" and "regularly" express a "concept". We apply set algebra to WordNet's synsets cooperating with WordNet's word ontology. In this way we establish regular rules for constructing various representations (lexical notations) of a concept using Boolean operators and word forms in various synset(s) defined in WordNet. Then we establish a formal mechanism for quantifying and estimating the semantic relatedness between concepts-we facilitate "concept distribution statistics" to determine the degree of semantic relatedness between two lexically expressed concepts. The experimental results showed good performance on Semcor, a subset of Brown corpus. We observe that measures of semantic relatedness are useful sources of information for WSD.

  16. Pitfalls of the Geographic Population Structure (GPS) Approach Applied to Human Genetic History: A Case Study of Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegontov, Pavel; Kassian, Alexei; Thomas, Mark G; Fedchenko, Valentina; Changmai, Piya; Starostin, George

    2016-08-16

    In a recent interdisciplinary study, Das et al. have attempted to trace the homeland of Ashkenazi Jews and of their historical language, Yiddish (Das et al. 2016 Localizing Ashkenazic Jews to Primeval Villages in the Ancient Iranian Lands of Ashkenaz. Genome Biol Evol. 8:1132-1149). Das et al. applied the geographic population structure (GPS) method to autosomal genotyping data and inferred geographic coordinates of populations supposedly ancestral to Ashkenazi Jews, placing them in Eastern Turkey. They argued that this unexpected genetic result goes against the widely accepted notion of Ashkenazi origin in the Levant, and speculated that Yiddish was originally a Slavic language strongly influenced by Iranian and Turkic languages, and later remodeled completely under Germanic influence. In our view, there are major conceptual problems with both the genetic and linguistic parts of the work. We argue that GPS is a provenancing tool suited to inferring the geographic region where a modern and recently unadmixed genome is most likely to arise, but is hardly suitable for admixed populations and for tracing ancestry up to 1,000 years before present, as its authors have previously claimed. Moreover, all methods of historical linguistics concur that Yiddish is a Germanic language, with no reliable evidence for Slavic, Iranian, or Turkic substrata.

  17. Binding properties of a blood group Le(a+) active sialoglycoprotein, purified from human ovarian cyst, with applied lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A M; WU, J H; Watkins, W M; Chen, C P; Tsai, M C

    1996-06-07

    Studies on the structures and binding properties of the glycoproteins, purified from human ovarian cyst fluids, will aid the understanding of the carbohydrate alterations occurring during the biosynthesis of blood group antigens and neoplasm formation. These glycoproteins can also serve as important biological materials to study blood group A, B, H, Le(a), Le(b), Le(x), Le(y), T and Tn determinants, precursor type I and II sequences and cold agglutinin I and i epitopes. In this study, the binding property of a cyst glycoprotein from a human blood group Le(a+) nonsecretor individual, that contains an unusually high amount (18%) of sialic acid (HOC 350) was characterized by quantitative precipitin assay with a panel of lectins exhibiting a broad range of carbohydrate-binding specificities. Native HOC 350 reacted well only with three out of nineteen lectins tested. It precipitated about 80% of Ricinus communis (RCA1), 50% of Triticum vulgaris (WGA) and 37% of Bauhinia purpurea aba (BPA) agglutinins, respectively. However, its asialo product had dramatically enhanced reactivity and reacted well with many I/II (Gal beta1 --> 3/4GcNAc), T(Gal beta1 --> 3GalNAc) and Tn(GaNIAc alphaI --> Ser/Thr) active lectins. It bound best to Jacalin, BPA, and abrin-a and completely precipitated all the lectins added. Asialo-HOC 350 also reacted strongly with Wistaria floribunda, Abrus precatorius agglutinin, ricin and RCA1 and precipitated over 75% of the lectin nitrogen added, and moderately with Arachis hypogaea, Maclura pomifera, WGA, Vicia viosa-B4, Codium fragile tomentosoides and Ulex europaeus-II. But native HOC 350 and its asialo product reacted not at all or poorly with Dolichos biflorus, Helix pomatia, Lotus tetra-gonolobus, Ulex europaeus-I, Lens culinaris lectins and Con A. The lectin-glycoform interactions through bioactive sugars were confirmed by precipitin inhibition assay. Mapping the precipitation profiles of the interactions have led to the conclusion that HOC 350

  18. Applying the workload indicators of staffing need (WISN) method in Namibia: challenges and implications for human resources for health policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction As part of ongoing efforts to restructure the health sector and improve health care quality, the Ministry of Health and Social Services (MoHSS) in Namibia sought to update staffing norms for health facilities. To establish an evidence base for the new norms, the MoHSS supported the first-ever national application of the Workload Indicators of Staffing Need (WISN) method, a human resource management tool developed by the World Health Organization. Application The WISN method calculates the number of health workers per cadre, based on health facility workload. It provides two indicators to assess staffing: (1) the gap/excess between current and required number of staff, and (2) the WISN ratio, a measure of workload pressure. Namibian WISN calculations focused on four cadres (doctors, nurses, pharmacists, pharmacy assistants) and all four levels of public facilities (clinics, health centers, district hospitals, intermediate hospitals). WISN steps included establishing a task force; conducting a regional pilot; holding a national validation workshop; field verifying data; collecting, uploading, processing, and analyzing data; and providing feedback to policy-makers. Challenges The task force faced two challenges requiring time and effort to solve: WISN software-related challenges and unavailability of some data at the national level. Findings WISN findings highlighted health worker shortages and inequities in their distribution. Overall, staff shortages are most profound for doctors and pharmacists. Although the country has an appropriate number of nurses, the nurse workforce is skewed towards hospitals, which are adequately or slightly overstaffed relative to nurses’ workloads. Health centers and, in particular, clinics both have gaps between current and required number of nurses. Inequities in nursing staff also exist between and within regions. Finally, the requirement for nurses varies greatly between less and more busy clinics (range = 1 to 7

  19. Comparative study on the in vitro human skin permeation of monoterpenes and phenylpropanoids applied in rose oil and in form of neat single compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, S; Schaefer, U; Sporer, F; Reichling, J

    2010-02-01

    Essential oils are ingredients of cosmetic and health care products as well as massage oil used in aromatherapy. There is no doubt that essential oils and their components are able to permeate human skin. But information is rare dealing with percutanous absorption of essential oils in more detail. In this paper we investigated the in vitro skin permeation of monoterpenes and phenylpropanoids applied in pure rose oil and in form of neat single substances. We found that the application form had an exceeding influence on the skin permeation behaviour of the compounds. For substances applied in rose oil a clear relationship between their lipophilic character, chemical structure, and skin permeation could be confirmed. Regarding the P(app)-values the substances are ranked in the order: monoterpene hydrocarbons rose oil than in their neat form. This suggests that co-operative interactions between essential oil components may promote skin permeation behaviour of essential oil and its components.

  20. Towards passive brain-computer interfaces: applying brain-computer interface technology to human-machine systems in general

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Thorsten O.; Kothe, Christian

    2011-04-01

    Cognitive monitoring is an approach utilizing realtime brain signal decoding (RBSD) for gaining information on the ongoing cognitive user state. In recent decades this approach has brought valuable insight into the cognition of an interacting human. Automated RBSD can be used to set up a brain-computer interface (BCI) providing a novel input modality for technical systems solely based on brain activity. In BCIs the user usually sends voluntary and directed commands to control the connected computer system or to communicate through it. In this paper we propose an extension of this approach by fusing BCI technology with cognitive monitoring, providing valuable information about the users' intentions, situational interpretations and emotional states to the technical system. We call this approach passive BCI. In the following we give an overview of studies which utilize passive BCI, as well as other novel types of applications resulting from BCI technology. We especially focus on applications for healthy users, and the specific requirements and demands of this user group. Since the presented approach of combining cognitive monitoring with BCI technology is very similar to the concept of BCIs itself we propose a unifying categorization of BCI-based applications, including the novel approach of passive BCI.

  1. Salvinorin-A Induces Intense Dissociative Effects, Blocking External Sensory Perception and Modulating Interoception and Sense of Body Ownership in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqueda, Ana Elda; Valle, Marta; Addy, Peter H.; Antonijoan, Rosa Maria; Puntes, Montserrat; Coimbra, Jimena; Ballester, Maria Rosa; Garrido, Maite; González, Mireia; Claramunt, Judit; Barker, Steven; Johnson, Matthew W.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Salvinorin-A is a terpene with agonist properties at the kappa-opioid receptor, the binding site of endogenous dynorphins. Salvinorin-A is found in Salvia divinorum, a psychoactive plant traditionally used by the Mazatec people of Oaxaca, Mexico, for medicinal and spiritual purposes. Previous studies with the plant and salvinorin-A have reported psychedelic-like changes in perception, but also unusual changes in body awareness and detachment from external reality. Here we comprehensively studied the profiles of subjective effects of increasing doses of salvinorin-A in healthy volunteers, with a special emphasis on interoception. Methods: A placebo and three increasing doses of vaporized salvinorin-A (0.25, 0.50, and 1mg) were administered to eight healthy volunteers with previous experience in the use of psychedelics. Drug effects were assessed using a battery of questionnaires that included, among others, the Hallucinogen Rating Scale, the Altered States of Consciousness, and a new instrument that evaluates different aspects of body awareness: the Multidimensional Assessment for Interoceptive Awareness. Results: Salvinorin-A led to a disconnection from external reality, induced elaborate visions and auditory phenomena, and modified interoception. The lower doses increased somatic sensations, but the highest dose led to a sense of a complete loss of contact with the body. Conclusions: Salvinorin-A induced intense psychotropic effects characterized by a dose-dependent gating of external audio-visual information and an inverted-U dose-response effect on body awareness. These results suggest a prominent role for the kappa opioid receptor in the regulation of sensory perception, interoception, and the sense of body ownership in humans. PMID:26047623

  2. Development And Use Of Advanced Microfabricated Traction Force Sensing Substrates To Study The Effect of Nanosilver On Human Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Daniel Thomas

    While nanoparticles are a natural byproduct of combustion and a number of natural processes, engineered nanoparticles have only recently entered the consumer market. This motivates the development of methods for studying their effects on human cells, thereby indicating how larger models such as animals and humans might react to them. This research develops a method to mechanically characterize cellular traction forces as a measure of exposure to nanoparticles. To do this, 1microm micropillar molds were fabricated in silicon wafers using smooth sidewall reactive ion plasma etching technologies. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), was cured inside the silicon molds, subsequently treated for cell culture and used to measure cellular traction forces over time in live cell time-lapse experiments. For the first time, transmitted light was used to visualize the PDMS micropillars; a force resolution of 5.6 +/-2.1nN was achieved across all experiments using a standard Olympus IX81 confocal microscope affixed with a 60x NA2.1 objective. To initiate cellular movement, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) was conjugated to 1microm latex beads. The effects of 40nm silver nanoparticle exposures were quantified using the micropillar array. Changes in cellular behavior between the control group and cells exposed to nanosilver were not significant, although a comparison between the 5microg/ml and 10microg/ml nanosilver concentrations yielded strong significance using a 2 sided Students t test.

  3. Electroactive polymers for sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Electromechanical coupling in electroactive polymers (EAPs) has been widely applied for actuation and is also being increasingly investigated for sensing chemical and mechanical stimuli. EAPs are a unique class of materials, with low-moduli high-strain capabilities and the ability to conform to surfaces of different shapes. These features make them attractive for applications such as wearable sensors and interfacing with soft tissues. Here, we review the major types of EAPs and their sensing mechanisms. These are divided into two classes depending on the main type of charge carrier: ionic EAPs (such as conducting polymers and ionic polymer–metal composites) and electronic EAPs (such as dielectric elastomers, liquid-crystal polymers and piezoelectric polymers). This review is intended to serve as an introduction to the mechanisms of these materials and as a first step in material selection for both researchers and designers of flexible/bendable devices, biocompatible sensors or even robotic tactile sensing units. PMID:27499846

  4. Macrobend optical sensing for pose measurement in soft robot arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareh, Sina; Noh, Yohan; Li, Min; Ranzani, Tommaso; Liu, Hongbin; Althoefer, Kaspar

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a pose-sensing system for soft robot arms integrating a set of macrobend stretch sensors. The macrobend sensory design in this study consists of optical fibres and is based on the notion that bending an optical fibre modulates the intensity of the light transmitted through the fibre. This sensing method is capable of measuring bending, elongation and compression in soft continuum robots and is also applicable to wearable sensing technologies, e.g. pose sensing in the wrist joint of a human hand. In our arrangement, applied to a cylindrical soft robot arm, the optical fibres for macrobend sensing originate from the base, extend to the tip of the arm, and then loop back to the base. The connectors that link the fibres to the necessary opto-electronics are all placed at the base of the arm, resulting in a simplified overall design. The ability of this custom macrobend stretch sensor to flexibly adapt its configuration allows preserving the inherent softness and compliance of the robot which it is installed on. The macrobend sensing system is immune to electrical noise and magnetic fields, is safe (because no electricity is needed at the sensing site), and is suitable for modular implementation in multi-link soft continuum robotic arms. The measurable light outputs of the proposed stretch sensor vary due to bend-induced light attenuation (macrobend loss), which is a function of the fibre bend radius as well as the number of repeated turns. The experimental study conducted as part of this research revealed that the chosen bend radius has a far greater impact on the measured light intensity values than the number of turns (if greater than five). Taking into account that the bend radius is the only significantly influencing design parameter, the macrobend stretch sensors were developed to create a practical solution to the pose sensing in soft continuum robot arms. Henceforward, the proposed sensing design was benchmarked against an electromagnetic

  5. Human Security: A Thematic Guidance Note for Regional and National Human Development Report Teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. Gómez (Oscar); D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Many important aspects of human development relate also to people’s security: loosely defined as people’s freedom from fear and freedom from want in a broad sense. Applying a human security approach offers an opportunity to analyse many issues in an informative way. This note

  6. Sensitivity and specificity analysis of fringing-field dielectric spectroscopy applied to a multi-layer system modelling the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huclova, Sonja; Baumann, Dirk; Talary, Mark S.; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2011-12-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of dielectric spectroscopy for the detection of dielectric changes inside a multi-layered structure is investigated. We focus on providing a base for sensing physiological changes in the human skin, i.e. in the epidermal and dermal layers. The correlation between changes of the human skin's effective permittivity and changes of dielectric parameters and layer thickness of the epidermal and dermal layers is assessed using numerical simulations. Numerical models include fringing-field probes placed directly on a multi-layer model of the skin. The resulting dielectric spectra in the range from 100 kHz up to 100 MHz for different layer parameters and sensor geometries are used for a sensitivity and specificity analysis of this multi-layer system. First, employing a coaxial probe, a sensitivity analysis is performed for specific variations of the parameters of the epidermal and dermal layers. Second, the specificity of this system is analysed based on the roots and corresponding sign changes of the computed dielectric spectra and their first and second derivatives. The transferability of the derived results is shown by a comparison of the dielectric spectra of a coplanar probe and a scaled coaxial probe. Additionally, a comparison of the sensitivity of a coaxial probe and an interdigitated probe as a function of electrode distance is performed. It is found that the sensitivity for detecting changes of dielectric properties in the epidermal and dermal layers strongly depends on frequency. Based on an analysis of the dielectric spectra, changes in the effective dielectric parameters can theoretically be uniquely assigned to specific changes in permittivity and conductivity. However, in practice, measurement uncertainties may degrade the performance of the system.

  7. A probably minor role for land-applied goat manure in the transmission of Coxiella burnetii to humans in the 2007-2010 Dutch Q fever outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brom, René; Roest, Hendrik-Jan; de Bruin, Arnout; Dercksen, Daan; Santman-Berends, Inge; van der Hoek, Wim; Dinkla, Annemiek; Vellema, Jelmer; Vellema, Piet

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, Q fever started to become a major public health problem in the Netherlands, with small ruminants as most probable source. In order to reduce environmental contamination, control measures for manure were implemented because of the assumption that manure was highly contaminated with Coxiella burnetii. The aims of this study were 1) to clarify the role of C. burnetii contaminated manure from dairy goat farms in the transmission of C. burnetii to humans, 2) to assess the impact of manure storage on temperature profiles in dunghills, and 3) to calculate the decimal reduction time of the Nine Mile RSA 493 reference strain of C. burnetii under experimental conditions in different matrices. For these purposes, records on distribution of manure from case and control herds were mapped and a potential relation to incidences of human Q fever was investigated. Additionally, temperatures in two dunghills were measured and related to heat resistance of C. burnetii. Results of negative binomial regression showed no significant association between the incidence of human Q fever cases and the source of manure. Temperature measurements in the core and shell of dunghills on two farms were above 40°C for at least ten consecutive days which would result in a strong reduction of C. burnetii over time. Our findings indicate that there is no relationship between incidence of human Q fever and land applied manure from dairy goat farms with an abortion wave caused by C. burnetii. Temperature measurements in dunghills on two farms with C. burnetii shedding dairy goat herds further support the very limited role of goat manure as a transmission route during the Dutch human Q fever outbreak. It is very likely that the composting process within a dunghill will result in a clear reduction in the number of viable C. burnetii.

  8. A probably minor role for land-applied goat manure in the transmission of Coxiella burnetii to humans in the 2007-2010 Dutch Q fever outbreak.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René van den Brom

    Full Text Available In 2007, Q fever started to become a major public health problem in the Netherlands, with small ruminants as most probable source. In order to reduce environmental contamination, control measures for manure were implemented because of the assumption that manure was highly contaminated with Coxiella burnetii. The aims of this study were 1 to clarify the role of C. burnetii contaminated manure from dairy goat farms in the transmission of C. burnetii to humans, 2 to assess the impact of manure storage on temperature profiles in dunghills, and 3 to calculate the decimal reduction time of the Nine Mile RSA 493 reference strain of C. burnetii under experimental conditions in different matrices. For these purposes, records on distribution of manure from case and control herds were mapped and a potential relation to incidences of human Q fever was investigated. Additionally, temperatures in two dunghills were measured and related to heat resistance of C. burnetii. Results of negative binomial regression showed no significant association between the incidence of human Q fever cases and the source of manure. Temperature measurements in the core and shell of dunghills on two farms were above 40°C for at least ten consecutive days which would result in a strong reduction of C. burnetii over time. Our findings indicate that there is no relationship between incidence of human Q fever and land applied manure from dairy goat farms with an abortion wave caused by C. burnetii. Temperature measurements in dunghills on two farms with C. burnetii shedding dairy goat herds further support the very limited role of goat manure as a transmission route during the Dutch human Q fever outbreak. It is very likely that the composting process within a dunghill will result in a clear reduction in the number of viable C. burnetii.

  9. Characterization of HIV-1 Infection and Innate Sensing in Different Types of Primary Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth A. Diget

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages play an important role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV pathogenesis and contribute to establishment of a viral reservoir responsible for continuous virus production and virus transmission to T cells. In this study, we investigated the differences between various monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs generated through different differentiation protocols and evaluated different cellular, immunological, and virological properties. We found that elevated and persistent HIV-1 pWT/BaL replication could be obtained only in MDMs grown in RPMI containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. Interestingly, this MDM type was also most responsive to toll-like receptor stimulation. By contrast, all MDM types were activated to a comparable extent by intracellular DNA, and the macrophage serum-free medium-(Mac-SFM-differentiated MDMs responded strongly to membrane fusion through expression of CXCL10. Finally, we found that HIV infection of RPMI/M-CSF-differentiated MDMs induced low-grade expression of two interferon-stimulated genes in some donors. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the differentiation protocol used greatly influences the ability of MDMs to activate innate immune reactions and support HIV-1 replication. Paradoxically, the data show that the MDMs with the strongest innate immune response were also the most permissive for HIV-1 replication.

  10. A triphenyl amine-based solvatofluorochromic dye for the selective and ratiometric sensing of OCl- in human blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Shyamaprosad; Aich, Krishnendu; Das, Sangita; Pakhira, Bholanath; Ghoshal, Kakali; Quah, Ching Kheng; Bhattacharyya, Maitree; Fun, Hoong-Kun; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2015-03-01

    A new visible-light-excitable fluorescence ratiometric probe for OCl(-) has been developed based on a triphenylamine-diamiomaleonitrile (TAM) moiety. The structure of the dye was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray analysis. It behaves as a highly selective and sensitive probe for OCl(-) over other analytes with a fast response time (∼100 s). OCl(-) reacts with the probe leading to the formation of the corresponding aldehyde in a mixed-aqueous system. The detection limit of the probe is in the 10(-8) M range. The probe (TAM) also exhibits solvatofluorochromism. Changing the solvent from non-polar to polar, the emission band of TAM largely red-shifted. Moreover, the probe shows an excellent performance in real-life application in detecting OCl(-) in human blood cells. The experimentally observed changes in the structure and electronic properties of the probe after reaction with OCl(-) were studied by DFT and TDDFT computational calculations.

  11. Picric acid capped silver nanoparticles as a probe for colorimetric sensing of creatinine in human blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Ankita K; Valand, Nikunj N; Solanki, Kalpesh B; Menon, Shobhana K

    2016-02-21

    Creatinine is the most important parameter to be determined in the diagnosis of renal, muscular and thyroid function. The most common method for the determination of creatinine is Jaffe's reaction, a routine practice for blood and urine analysis. However, in cases of icteric and haemolyzed blood samples, interference occurs during the estimation of creatinine by other constituents present in the blood like bilirubin, creatine, and urea, which lead to wrong diagnosis. To overcome such difficulty, we have developed a silver nanoparticle (Ag NPs) based sensor for the selective determination of creatinine. In this study, a new approach has been given to the traditional Jaffe's reaction, by coating Ag NPs with picric acid (PA) to form an assembly that can selectively detect creatinine. The Ag NPs based sensor proficiently and selectively recognizes creatinine due to the ability of picric acid to bind with it and form a complex. The nanoassembly and the interactions were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and ESI-MS, which demonstrated the binding affinity of creatinine with PA-capped Ag NPs. A linear correlation was obtained in the range of 0.01 μM-1 μM with an R(2) value of 0.9998 and a lower detection limit of 8.4 nM. The sensor was successfully applied to different types of blood and CSF samples for the determination of creatinine, and the results were compared to that of the Jaffe's method. With the advantages of high sensitivity, selectivity and low sample volume, this method is potentially suitable for the on-site monitoring of creatinine.

  12. Unveiling the relationship between complex networks metrics and word senses

    CERN Document Server

    Amancio, Diego R; Costa, Luciano da F; 10.1209/0295-5075/98/18002

    2013-01-01

    The automatic disambiguation of word senses (i.e., the identification of which of the meanings is used in a given context for a word that has multiple meanings) is essential for such applications as machine translation and information retrieval, and represents a key step for developing the so-called Semantic Web. Humans disambiguate words in a straightforward fashion, but this does not apply to computers. In this paper we address the problem of Word Sense Disambiguation (WSD) by treating texts as complex networks, and show that word senses can be distinguished upon characterizing the local structure around ambiguous words. Our goal was not to obtain the best possible disambiguation system, but we nevertheless found that in half of the cases our approach outperforms traditional shallow methods. We show that the hierarchical connectivity and clustering of words are usually the most relevant features for WSD. The results reported here shine light on the relationship between semantic and structural parameters of ...

  13. Hydrological response to land cover changes and human activities in arid regions using a geographic information system and remote sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereif H Mahmoud

    Full Text Available The hydrological response to land cover changes induced by human activities in arid regions has attracted increased research interest in recent decades. The study reported herein assessed the spatial and quantitative changes in surface runoff resulting from land cover change in the Al-Baha region of Saudi Arabia between 1990 and 2000 using an ArcGIS-surface runoff model and predicted land cover and surface runoff depth in 2030 using Markov chain analysis. Land cover maps for 1990 and 2000 were derived from satellite images using ArcGIS 10.1. The findings reveal a 26% decrease in forest and shrubland area, 28% increase in irrigated cropland, 1.5% increase in sparsely vegetated land and 0.5% increase in bare soil between 1990 and 2000. Overall, land cover changes resulted in a significant decrease in runoff depth values in most of the region. The decrease in surface runoff depth ranged from 25-106 mm/year in a 7020-km2 area, whereas the increase in such depth reached only 10 mm/year in a 243-km2 area. A maximum increase of 73 mm/year was seen in a limited area. The surface runoff depth decreased to the greatest extent in the central region of the study area due to the huge transition in land cover classes associated with the construction of 25 rainwater harvesting dams. The land cover prediction revealed a greater than twofold increase in irrigated cropland during the 2000-2030 period, whereas forest and shrubland are anticipated to occupy just 225 km2 of land area by 2030, a significant decrease from the 747 km2 they occupied in 2000. Overall, changes in land cover are predicted to result in an annual increase in irrigated cropland and dramatic decline in forest area in the study area over the next few decades. The increase in surface runoff depth is likely to have significant implications for irrigation activities.

  14. Hydrological response to land cover changes and human activities in arid regions using a geographic information system and remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Shereif H; Alazba, A A

    2015-01-01

    The hydrological response to land cover changes induced by human activities in arid regions has attracted increased research interest in recent decades. The study reported herein assessed the spatial and quantitative changes in surface runoff resulting from land cover change in the Al-Baha region of Saudi Arabia between 1990 and 2000 using an ArcGIS-surface runoff model and predicted land cover and surface runoff depth in 2030 using Markov chain analysis. Land cover maps for 1990 and 2000 were derived from satellite images using ArcGIS 10.1. The findings reveal a 26% decrease in forest and shrubland area, 28% increase in irrigated cropland, 1.5% increase in sparsely vegetated land and 0.5% increase in bare soil between 1990 and 2000. Overall, land cover changes resulted in a significant decrease in runoff depth values in most of the region. The decrease in surface runoff depth ranged from 25-106 mm/year in a 7020-km2 area, whereas the increase in such depth reached only 10 mm/year in a 243-km2 area. A maximum increase of 73 mm/year was seen in a limited area. The surface runoff depth decreased to the greatest extent in the central region of the study area due to the huge transition in land cover classes associated with the construction of 25 rainwater harvesting dams. The land cover prediction revealed a greater than twofold increase in irrigated cropland during the 2000-2030 period, whereas forest and shrubland are anticipated to occupy just 225 km2 of land area by 2030, a significant decrease from the 747 km2 they occupied in 2000. Overall, changes in land cover are predicted to result in an annual increase in irrigated cropland and dramatic decline in forest area in the study area over the next few decades. The increase in surface runoff depth is likely to have significant implications for irrigation activities.

  15. A remotely sensed image fusion method based on non-subsampled contourlet transform and human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Zhan, Ying; Zhang, Jingtao

    2010-11-01

    Focusing on the fusion problem of the multispectral (Ms) and panchromatic (Pan) images from the same scene, a novel image fusion method is proposed based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT) and human visual system (HVS). The most traditional fusion methods are IHS, PCA and Brovey transforms, which can bring the phenomenon of spectral distortion. Avoiding this problem, the wavelet transform is usually used in image fusion in recent years, but it only can capture limited directional information. Compared with the wavelet and other transforms, the contourlet transform has the characteristics of multi-scale, time-frequency localization and multi-directions. However, due to the lack of translation invariance of the contourlet transform, this paper uses the nonsubsampled contourlet transform. The basic procedure consists of four steps. Firstly, the NSCT is performed on Pan image and the intensity component I of Ms image with HIS transform, which can obtain the low frequency subband and highpass directional coefficients of each image. Then a new fusion rule is presented based on HVS: corresponding low frequency and highpass components are divided into several blocks, and contrast variance of every block is calculated, followed by a selection of an adaptive threshold which can be used to construct the new low frequency and highpass components. The blocks with higher contrast variance will be chosen. Thirdly, the new intensity component Inew with high spatial resolution is obtained by performing the inverse NSCT on the attained coefficients. Finally, the inverse IHS using Inew component is performed and the new fused multispectral image is obtained. According to the quantitative evaluation criteria, it is shown that the proposed method can effectively preserve spectral information, improve spatial information of the fused image, and outperform the traditional IHS, PCA, Brovey, wavelet and contourlet methods.

  16. Applied Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Han, M; Wang, Anbo

    2004-01-01

    A straightforward theory is presented to accurately model the light inferences in a low-finesse multimode fiber extrinsic Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer. The effect on the fringe visibility of the gap length, sensor structure imperfections, and modal power distributions is explored. The analysis is particularly useful in the design and optimization of sensors that use an extrinsic FP cavity as the sensing element. (C) 2004 Optical Society of America.

  17. The quorum-sensing molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) enhances the host defence by activating human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christof; Zimmermann, Sabine; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Hug, Friederike; Prior, Birgit; Obst, Ursula; Hänsch, Gertrud Maria

    2007-01-01

    The P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) interacts not only with bacteria, but also with mammalian cells, among others with those of the immune defence system. We focussed on the possible interaction of 3OC12-HSL with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), because these cells are the first to enter an infected site. We found that 3OC12-HSL attracts PMN, and up-regulates expression of receptors known to be involved in host defence, including the adhesion proteins CD11b/CD18 and the immunoglobulin receptors CD16 and CD64. Furthermore, the uptake of bacteria (phagocytosis), which is crucial for an efficient defence against infection, was enhanced. Thus, recognising and responding to 3OC12-HSL not only attracts the PMN to the site of a developing biofilm, but also reinforces their defence mechanisms, and hence could be a means to control the infection in an early stage and to prevent biofilm formation.

  18. SIXTH SENSE TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to explain the development of the technology by describing current hot concept in its field. The thesis describes the trend of development and current phase of the technology. The trend was described by explaining the concept of sixth sense technology and the effort that have been applied for this technology. As the concept is new, finding the suitable material related to the subject matter was the challenge for this project. The objective was completed by condu...

  19. High Spatial Resolution Thermal Remote Sensing of the Urban Heat Island Effect: Assessment of Risks to Human Health and Development of Mitigation Strategies for Sustainable Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Laymon, Charles A.; Crosson, William; Howell, Burgess F.; Gillani, Noor V.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and in areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 80% of the world's population will live in cities. One of the more egregious side effects of urbanization is the deterioration in air quality as a result of increased vehicular traffic, industrialization and related activities. In the United States alone, under the more stringent air quality guidelines established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1997, nearly 300 counties in 34 states will not meet the new air quality standards for ground level ozone. The mitigation of one the physical/environmental characteristics of urbanization known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect, is now being looked at more closely as a possible way to bring down ground level ozone levels in cities and assist states in improving air quality. The UHI results from the replacement of "natural" land covers (e.g., trees, grass) with urban land surface types, such as pavement and buildings. Heat stored in these surfaces is released into the air and results in a "dome" of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities. The effect of this dome of elevated air temperatures is known as the UHI, which is most prevalent about 2-3 hours after sunset on days with intense solar radiation and calm winds. Given the local and regional impacts of the UHI, there are significant potential affects on human health, particularly as related to heat stress and ozone on body temperature regulation and on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. In this study we are using airborne and satellite remote sensing data to analyze how differences in the urban landscape influence or drive the development of the UHI over four U.S. cities. Additionally, we are assessing what the potential impact is on risks to human health, and developing mitigation strategies to make urban areas more environmentally sustainable.

  20. Remote Sensing of the Urban Heat Island Effect: Assessment of Risks to Human Health and Development of Mitigation Strategies for Sustainable Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Laymon, Charles A.; Crosson, William; Howell, Burgess F.; Gillani, Noor V.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The growth of cities, both in population and in areal extent, appears as an inexorable process. Urbanization continues at a rapid rate, and it is estimated that by the year 2025, 80% of the world's population will live in cities. One of the more egregious side effects of urbanization is the deterioration in air quality as a result of increased vehicular traffic, industrialization and related activities. In the United States alone, under the more stringent air quality guidelines established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1997, nearly 300 counties in 34 states will not meet the new air quality standards for ground level ozone. The mitigation of one the physical/environmental characteristics of urbanization known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect, is now being looked at more closely as a possible way to bring down ground level ozone levels in cities and assist states in improving air quality. The UHI results from the replacement of "natural" land covers (e.g., trees, grass) with urban land surface types, such as pavement and buildings. Heat stored in these surfaces is released into the air and results in a "dome" of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities. The effect of this dome of elevated air temperatures is known as the UHI, which is most prevalent about 2-3 hours after sunset on days with intense solar radiation and calm winds. Given the local and regional impacts of the UHI, there are significant potential affects on human health, particularly as related to heat stress and ozone on body temperature regulation and on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. In this study we are using airborne and satellite remote sensing data to analyze how differences in the urban landscape influence or drive the development of the UHI over four U.S. cities. Additionally, we are assessing what the potential impact is on risks to human health, and developing mitigation strategies to make urban areas more environmentally sustainable.

  1. Electrical engineering is an applied mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainal, Yuda Bakti; Sambasri, Susanto; Widodo, Rohani Jahja

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents developments and applications of Electrical Engieering (EE) as an Applied Mathematic (AM). Several characteristics of EE can be linked to human behavior. EE can "think" in the sense that they can replace to some extent, human operation. It is a concept or principle that seems to fundamental in nature and not necessarily peculiar to engineering. EE theory can be discussed from four viewpoints as: an intellectual discipline within science and the philosophy of science, a part of engineering, with industrial applications and Social Systems (SS) of the present and the future. In global communication, developed countries and developing countries should build several attractive and sound symbiosis bridges, to prevent loss of universe balances. EE applications have social impacts not only in developed countries but also in developing countries.

  2. A study of Yoshimoto Banana : Focusing on expression of sense

    OpenAIRE

    李, 銀炯

    2003-01-01

    Yoshimoto Banana's 'expression of sense' is based on human five senses (seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting, touching). And her 'expression of sense' seems to be connected to the theme of her works by describing or implying mood, consciousness and feeling. 'Expression of sense' can reveal the individuality of a writer more than any other lingual expression because it is based on human subjectivity. In that point of view, I considered how her 'expression of sense'(which intend to bring great ef...

  3. Mechanics of localized slippage in tactile sensing and application to soft sensing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Anh-Van

    2014-01-01

    Localized slippage occurs during any relative sliding of soft contacts, ranging from human fingertips to robotic fingertips. Although this phenomenon is dominant for a very short time prior to gross slippage, localized slippage is a crucial factor for any to-be-developed soft sensing system to respond to slippage before it occurs. The content of this book addresses all aspects of localized slippage, including modeling and simulating it, as well as applying it to the construction of novel sensors with slip tactile perception.

  4. A tactile sensing element based on a hetero-core optical fiber for force measurement and texture detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Koyama, Yuya; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-05-01

    Tactile sensing technology can measure a given property of an object through physical contact between a sensing element and the object. Various tactile sensing techniques have been developed for several applications such as intelligent robots, tactile interface, medical support and nursing care support. A desirable tactile sensing element for supporting human daily life can be embedded in the soft material with high sensitivity and accuracy in order to prevent from damaging to human or object physically. This report describes a new tactile sensing element. Hetero-core optical fibers have high sensitivity of macro-bending at local sensor portion and temperature independency, including advantages of optical fiber itself; thin size, light weight, flexible transmission line, and immunity to electro-magnetic interference. The proposed tactile sensing element could detect textures of touched objects through the optical loss caused by the force applied to the sensing element. The characteristics of the sensing element have been evaluated, in which the sensing element has the monotonic and non-linear sensitivity against the normal force ranged from 0 to 5 N with lower accuracy than 0.25 dB. Additionally, texture detection have been successfully demonstrated in which small surface figures of 0.1 mm in height were detected with spatial resolution of 0.4 mm.

  5. Role of receptor activity modifying protein 1 in function of the calcium sensing receptor in the human TT thyroid carcinoma cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya J Desai

    Full Text Available The Calcium Sensing Receptor (CaSR plays a role in calcium homeostasis by sensing minute changes in serum Ca(2+ and modulating secretion of calciotropic hormones. It has been shown in transfected cells that accessory proteins known as Receptor Activity Modifying Proteins (RAMPs, specifically RAMPs 1 and 3, are required for cell-surface trafficking of the CaSR. These effects have only been demonstrated in transfected cells, so their physiological relevance is unclear. Here we explored CaSR/RAMP interactions in detail, and showed that in thyroid human carcinoma cells, RAMP1 is required for trafficking of the CaSR. Furthermore, we show that normal RAMP1 function is required for intracellular responses to ligands. Specifically, to confirm earlier studies with tagged constructs, and to provide the additional benefit of quantitative stoichiometric analysis, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer to show equal abilities of RAMP1 and 3 to chaperone CaSR to the cell surface, though RAMP3 interacted more efficiently with the receptor. Furthermore, a higher fraction of RAMP3 than RAMP1 was observed in CaSR-complexes on the cell-surface, suggesting different ratios of RAMPs to CaSR. In order to determine relevance of these findings in an endogenous expression system we assessed the effect of RAMP1 siRNA knock-down in medullary thyroid carcinoma TT cells, (which express RAMP1, but not RAMP3 constitutively and measured a significant 50% attenuation of signalling in response to CaSR ligands Cinacalcet and neomycin. Blockade of RAMP1 using specific antibodies induced a concentration-dependent reduction in CaSR-mediated signalling in response to Cinacalcet in TT cells, suggesting a novel functional role for RAMP1 in regulation of CaSR signalling in addition to its known role in receptor trafficking. These data provide evidence that RAMPs traffic the CaSR as higher-level oligomers and play a role in CaSR signalling even after cell surface localisation has

  6. Micellar Enhanced Spectrofluorimetric Method for the Determination of Ponatinib in Human Plasma and Urine via Cremophor RH 40 as Sensing Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Hany W.; Bakheit, Ahmed H.; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; AlKhairallah, Amer S.

    2015-01-01

    An impressively simple and precise spectrofluorimetric procedure was established and validated for ponatinib (PTB) quantitation in biological fluids such as human plasma and human urine. This method depends on examining the fluorescence characteristics of PTB in a micellar system of Cremophor RH 40 (Cr RH 40). Cr RH 40 enhanced the intrinsic fluorescence of PTB distinctly in aqueous water. The fluorescence spectra of PTB was recorded at 457 nm following its excitation at 305 nm. Maximum fluorescence intensity was attained by addition of 0.7 mL of Cr RH 40 and one mL of phosphate buffer to PTB aliquots and then dilution with distilled water. There is a linear relationship between the fluorescence intensity of PTB and its concentration over the range 5–120 ngmL−1, with limit of detection and limit of quantification equal to 0.905 ngmL−1 and 2.742 ngmL−1, respectively. The accuracy and the precisions of the proposed method were checked and gave adequate results. The adopted method was applied with a great success for PTB quantitation in different biological matrices (spiked human plasma and urine) giving high recovery values. PMID:26880920

  7. Designing experiments through compressed sensing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Joseph G.; Ridzal, Denis

    2013-06-01

    In the following paper, we discuss how to design an ensemble of experiments through the use of compressed sensing. Specifically, we show how to conduct a small number of physical experiments and then use compressed sensing to reconstruct a larger set of data. In order to accomplish this, we organize our results into four sections. We begin by extending the theory of compressed sensing to a finite product of Hilbert spaces. Then, we show how these results apply to experiment design. Next, we develop an efficient reconstruction algorithm that allows us to reconstruct experimental data projected onto a finite element basis. Finally, we verify our approach with two computational experiments.

  8. Making sense of elephants in the shamba

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bond, Jennifer Lauren

    This article applies sensemaking theory to instances of human-elephant interaction to understand how farmers make sense of elephants in their crops and how this fits into a broader discussion of human-wildlife coexistence. The concept of sensemaking is extended to discuss the institutional context...... of wildlife management and the role this has on the individual farmers’ enacting and selection when confronted with an elephant in their crop. Analysis showed that respondents who had come into direct physical contact with an elephant reported to be more likely to refrain from attempting to scare elephants...... in the future and viewed them as dangerous. In comparison, farmers who had not experienced direct physical contact and subsequent injury from an elephant reported that they would continue to engage in interactions with elephants to remove them from their crops, viewing the elephants primarily as a pest...

  9. Applied Literature for Healing,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Marie Anderson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this qualitative research study interviews conducted with elite participants serve to reveal the underlying elements that unite the richly diverse emerging field of Applied Literature. The basic interpretative qualitative method included a thematic analysis of data from the interviews yielding numerous common elements that were then distilled into key themes that elucidated the beneficial effects of engaging consciously with literature. These themes included developing a stronger sense of self in balance with an increasing connection with community; providing a safe container to engage challenging and potentially overwhelming issues from a stance of empowered action; and fostering a healing space for creativity. The findings provide grounds for uniting the work being done in a range of helping professions into a cohesive field of Applied Literature, which offers effective tools for healing, transformation and empowerment. Keywords: Applied Literature, Bibliotherapy, Poetry Therapy, Arts in Corrections, Arts in Medicine

  10. Scores of amino acid 0D-3D information as applied in cleavage site prediction and better specificity elucidation for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new set of descriptors,namely score vectors of the zero dimension,one dimension,two dimensions and three dimensions(SZOTT),was derived from principle component analysis of a matrix of 1369 structural variables including 0D,1D,2D and 3D information for the 20 coded amino acids. SZOTT scales were then used in cleavage site prediction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease. Linear discriminant analysis(LDA) and support vector machines(SVM) were applied to developing models to predict the cleavage sites. The results obtained by linear discriminant analysis(LDA) and support vector machines(SVM) are as follows. The Matthews correlation coefficients(MCC) by the resubstitution test,leave-one-out cross validation(LOOCV) and external validation are 0.879 and 0.911,0.849 and 0.901,0.822 and 0.846,respectively. The receiver operating characteristic(ROC) analysis showed that the SVM model possesses better simulative and predictive ability in comparison with the LDA model. Satisfactory results show that SZOTT descriptors can be further used to predict cleavage sites of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

  11. The Latin American School of Human and Medical Genetics: promoting education and collaboration in genetics and ethics applied to health sciences across the continent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliani, Roberto; Baldo, Guilherme; Vairo, Filippo; Lujan Lopez, Monica; Matte, Ursula

    2015-07-01

    The Latin American Network of Human Genetics (RELAGH) created the Latin American School of Human and Medical Genetics (ELAG) to prepare young researchers and professionals of Latin America to deal with the growing challenge of the genomic medicine. ELAG promotes an annually course since 2005, which received 838 students from 17 Latin American countries over these 10 years. ELAG plays an important role to provide education in genetics applied to health sciences to fellows who live in countries with a less favorable economic situation. Influenced, among others, by the humanitarian perspective of José Maria Cantú, one of its founders, ELAG has always favored the discussion of ethical and social issues related to genetics in Latin America. Few initiatives in Latin America lasted 10 consecutive years. One of the factors responsible for the ELAG's success has been its group of faculty members, who contribute to a friendly environment prone to facilitating the exchange of their own experiences with young researchers.

  12. Scores of amino acid 0D-3D information as applied in cleavage site prediction and better specificity elucidation for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG LiFang; LIANG GuiZhao; SHU Mao; YANG ShanBin; LI ZhiLiang

    2008-01-01

    A new set of descriptors, namely score vectors of the zero dimension, one dimension, two dimensions and three dimensions (SZOTT), was derived from principle component analysis of a matrix of 1369 structural variables including 0D, 1D, 2D and 3D information for the 20 coded amino acids. SZOTT scales were then used in cleavage site prediction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machines (SVM) were applied to developing models to predict the cleavage sites. The results obtained by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and support vector machines (SVM) are as follows. The Matthews correlation coefficients (MCC) by the resubstitution test, leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) and external validation are 0.879 and 0.911, 0.649 and 0.901, 0.822 and 0.846, respectively. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that the SVM model possesses better simulative and predictive ability in comparison with the LDA model. Satisfactory results show that SZOTT descriptors can be further used to predict cleavage sites of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

  13. Kite Aerial Photography as a Tool for Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Jeff; Meier, Lesley R.

    2010-01-01

    As humans, we perform remote sensing nearly all the time. This is because we acquire most of our information about our surroundings through the senses of sight and hearing. Whether viewed by the unenhanced eye or a military satellite, remote sensing is observing objects from a distance. With our current technology, remote sensing has become a part…

  14. Applied superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Newhouse, Vernon L

    1975-01-01

    Applied Superconductivity, Volume II, is part of a two-volume series on applied superconductivity. The first volume dealt with electronic applications and radiation detection, and contains a chapter on liquid helium refrigeration. The present volume discusses magnets, electromechanical applications, accelerators, and microwave and rf devices. The book opens with a chapter on high-field superconducting magnets, covering applications and magnet design. Subsequent chapters discuss superconductive machinery such as superconductive bearings and motors; rf superconducting devices; and future prospec

  15. Induction of calcium sensing receptor in human colon cancer cells by calcium, vitamin D and aquamin: Promotion of a more differentiated, less malignant and indolent phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Navneet; Aslam, Muhammad N; Varani, James; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2015-07-01

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is a robust promoter of differentiation in colonic epithelial cells and functions as a tumor suppressor. Cancer cells that do not express CaSR (termed CaSR null) are highly malignant while acquisition of CaSR expression in these cells circumvents the malignant phenotype. We hypothesize that chemopreventive agents mediate their action through the induction of CaSR. Here, we compare the effectiveness of Ca(2+), vitamin D, and Aquamin (a marine algae product containing Ca(2+), magnesium and detectable levels of 72 additional minerals) on the induction of CaSR in the CBS and HCT116 human colon carcinoma cell lines and the corresponding CaSR null cells isolated from these lines. All three agonists induced CaSR mRNA and protein expression and inhibited cellular proliferation in the parental and CaSR null cells. Aquamin was found to be most potent in this regard. Induction of CaSR expression by these agonists resulted in demethylation of the CaSR gene promoter with a concurrent increase in CaSR promoter reporter activity. However, demethylation per se did not induce CaSR transcription. Induction of CaSR expression resulted in a down-regulated expression of tumor inducers and up-regulated expression of tumor suppressors. Again, Aquamin was found to be most potent in these biologic effects. This study provides a rationale for the use of a multi-mineral approach in the chemoprevention of colon cancer and suggests that induction of CaSR may be a measure of the effectiveness of chemopreventive agents.

  16. The immune system as the sixth sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, J E

    2005-02-01

    One of the truly remarkable discoveries in modern biology is the finding that the nervous system and immune system use a common chemical language for intra- and inter-system communication. This review will discuss some of the pivotal results that deciphered this chemical language. Specifically the nervous and immune systems produce a common set of peptide and nonpeptide neurotransmitters and cytokines that act on a common repertoire of receptors in the two systems. The paper will also review more recent studies that have delineated hardwired and humoral pathways for such bidirectional communication. This is discussed in the context of the idea that the sharing of ligands and receptors allows the immune system to serve as the sixth sense that notifies the nervous system of the presence of entities, such as viruses and bacteria, that are imperceptible to the classic senses. Lastly, this review will suggest ways to apply the newfound knowledge of the sixth sense to understand a placebo effect and to treat human disease.

  17. An Optical Flow Method Applied to Co-Registration of Remote Sensing Images: Example for SAR/SAR, SAR/LIDAR, SAR/Optical Images of BIOSAR 2010 Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin-Koeniguer, Elise

    2016-08-01

    This article proposes an optical flow type method for coregistration of forest remote sensing images. The principle of the algorithm called GeFolki is first explained. Results are shown on the images of the BioSAR 3 campaign, for the production of SAR interferograms, the coregistration a SAR and LIDAR image, and the coregistration an optical image and SAR image.The advantages of such an algorithm over conventional algorithms are explained. Finally, we propose various applications within the operating data for future BIOMASS mission: massive interferometry, ground truth production, upscaling by fusion of LIDAR and SAR data, and image mining.

  18. Water column correction for coral reef studies by remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoffoli, Maria Laura; Frouin, Robert; Kampel, Milton

    2014-09-11

    Human activity and natural climate trends constitute a major threat to coral reefs worldwide. Models predict a significant reduction in reef spatial extension together with a decline in biodiversity in the relatively near future. In this context, monitoring programs to detect changes in reef ecosystems are essential. In recent years, coral reef mapping using remote sensing data has benefited from instruments with better resolution and computational advances in storage and processing capabilities. However, the water column represents an additional complexity when extracting information from submerged substrates by remote sensing that demands a correction of its effect. In this article, the basic concepts of bottom substrate remote sensing and water column interference are presented. A compendium of methodologies developed to reduce water column effects in coral ecosystems studied by remote sensing that include their salient features, advantages and drawbacks is provided. Finally, algorithms to retrieve the bottom reflectance are applied to simulated data and actual remote sensing imagery and their performance is compared. The available methods are not able to completely eliminate the water column effect, but they can minimize its influence. Choosing the best method depends on the marine environment, available input data and desired outcome or scientific application.

  19. HORIZON SENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-03-18

    With the aid of a DOE grant (No. DE-FC26-01NT41050), Stolar Research Corporation (Stolar) developed the Horizon Sensor (HS) to distinguish between the different layers of a coal seam. Mounted on mining machine cutter drums, HS units can detect or sense the horizon between the coal seam and the roof and floor rock, providing the opportunity to accurately mine the section of the seam most desired. HS also enables accurate cutting of minimum height if that is the operator's objective. Often when cutting is done out-of-seam, the head-positioning function facilitates a fixed mining height to minimize dilution. With this technology, miners can still be at a remote location, yet cut only the clean coal, resulting in a much more efficient overall process. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate the feasibility of horizon sensing on mining machines and demonstrate that Horizon Sensing can allow coal to be cut cleaner and more efficiently. Stolar's primary goal was to develop the Horizon Sensor (HS) into an enabling technology for full or partial automation or ''agile mining''. This technical innovation (R&D 100 Award Winner) is quickly demonstrating improvements in productivity and miner safety at several prominent coal mines in the United States. In addition, the HS system can enable the cutting of cleaner coal. Stolar has driven the HS program on the philosophy that cutting cleaner coal means burning cleaner coal. The sensor, located inches from the cutting bits, is based upon the physics principles of a Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA). When it is in proximity of the rock-coal interface, the RMPA impedance varies depending on the thickness of uncut coal. The impedance is measured by the computer-controlled electronics and then sent by radio waves to the mining machine. The worker at the machine can read the data via a Graphical User Interface, displaying a color-coded image of the coal being cut, and direct the machine

  20. Applied mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Logan, J David

    2013-01-01

    Praise for the Third Edition"Future mathematicians, scientists, and engineers should find the book to be an excellent introductory text for coursework or self-study as well as worth its shelf space for reference." -MAA Reviews Applied Mathematics, Fourth Edition is a thoroughly updated and revised edition on the applications of modeling and analyzing natural, social, and technological processes. The book covers a wide range of key topics in mathematical methods and modeling and highlights the connections between mathematics and the applied and nat

  1. Prototypes-Extraction Spectral Clustering Ensemble Algorithm Applied to Remote Sensing Image Segmentation%应用于遥感图像分割的原型提取谱聚类集成算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵凤; 刘汉强; 范九伦; 潘晓英

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at the huge data amount and pixel complex ownership of remote sensing images,a prototypes-extraction spectral clustering algorithm for remote sensing image segmentation was proposed.Firstly,the generalized fuzzy c-means algorithm was adopted to perform an over-segmentation of the image,and the obtained clustering prototypes were regarded as the representative points of segmentation regions to reduce the data amount of original image.Secondly,the similarity matrix between the representative points was constructed,and then the spectral graph partitioning method was utilized to cluster the representative points.Eventually,based on the clustering result of representative points,the image pixels were reclassified to obtain the final image segmentation results.There are three parameters in the prototypes-extraction spectral clustering algorithm.In order to overcome the parameter sensitivity and inherent randomness of this method,an ensemble strategy was further introduced into the method and its ensemble algorithm is presented.The segmentation experiments on artificial texture and remote sensing images show that this proposed ensemble method behaves well in segmentation performance.%针对遥感图像数据量大、类别归属复杂的特点,提出了一种用于遥感图像分割的原型提取谱聚类算法。该算法首先采用广义模糊c-均值聚类算法对遥感图像进行过分割,将得到的聚类中心作为每个分割区域的代表点;然后,通过构造代表点之间的相似性矩阵,利用谱图划分方法对代表点进行聚类;最后,根据代表点的聚类结果对图像像素点进行重新归类来获得遥感图像的最终分割结果。此算法涉及到3个参数,为了克服算法对于参数的敏感性和内在的随机性,进一步引入集成策略,给出了原型提取谱聚类的集成算法。

  2. Applied Enzymology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Asha; Dreisbach, Joseph H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes some examples of chemical and industrial applications of enzymes. Includes a background, a discussion of structure and reactivity, enzymes as therapeutic agents, enzyme replacement, enzymes used in diagnosis, industrial applications of enzymes, and immobilizing enzymes. Concludes that applied enzymology is an important factor in…

  3. Attempt on construction of human friendly man-machine interface. Study and apply about human communication; Human friendly na man machine interface kochiku no kokoromi. Ningen no communication no kento to sono oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuno, J. [Tokyo University of Agriculture, Tokyo (Japan); Kokubo, Y.; Matsumura, I.; Kobayashi, H. [Hosei University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes an attempt on a construction way of human friendly man-machine interface. At first, we do a simple experiment to find out the characteristic of human verbal communication. From the experimental results, we get some rules in case in human verbal communication. We construct the man-machine interface which is based on these rules. Through teaching process, we examine our verbal communication interface comparing with conventional interfaces. From this comparison, we recognize that the verbal communication interface is valid to construct the user-friendly man-machine interface. 12 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. FeltRadio: Sensing and Making Sense of Wireless Traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronvall, Erik; Fritsch, Jonas; Vallgårda, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Radio waves surround us but still they remain largely undetected by our senses. Unless we use specifically tuned hardware, such as FM radios, cell phones or WiFi modems, human beings cannot perceive wirelessly transmitted data. This paper presents FeltRadio, a portable and wireless technology...... that makes it possible to turn radio signals into visual and tactile stimuli as a form of sensorial augmentation. FeltRadio explores and makes us reflect upon what it would be like if we could sense, and feel, wireless traffic such as WiFi or Bluetooth. We present the technological design behind FeltRadio...... and the outcome of two exploratory studies with the technology focused on people's experience of being able to suddenly sense and make sense of wireless traffic. We discuss the possible qualities of this embodied experience of FeltRadio and point to future experiments with the technology....

  5. Clinical trials and E-health: impact of new information technology applied to clinical trials (including source data-medical records) and to human and drug research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhier, Jehan-Michel; Reynier, Jean-Charles; Bertoye, Pierre-Henri; Vray, Muriel

    2010-01-01

    Within the last few years, new technology has come to play an important part in our professional and private daily environment. Healthcare has not escaped this progressive mutation with computers reaching the bedside. Clinical research has also shown growing interest in these new tools available to the clinical investigator, the patient, as well as to specialist departments for diagnosis and follow-up of patients, and to the different professions in clinical research. If the use of new technology seems to make life easier, by centralizing data or by simplifying data-sharing between different teams, it is still a matter of private data which must remain reliable, confidential and secure, whether it is being used in ordinary healthcare or in academic or industrial research. The aim of the round table was to estimate the impact of new information technology applied to clinical trials (including source data-medical records) and to human and drug research. First, an inventory was made of the development of these new technologies in the healthcare system. The second point developed was identification of expected benefits in order to issue guidelines for their good use and hazard warnings in clinical trials. Finally, the impact of these new technologies on the investigator as well as the project manager was analysed.

  6. The in-vitro antiproliferative effect of PRI-2191 and imatinib applied in combined treatment with cisplatin, idarubicin, or docetaxel on human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switalska, Marta; Nasulewicz-Goldeman, Anna; Opolska, Aleksandra; Maciejewska, Magdalena; Kutner, Andrzej; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, STI571) is a specific inhibitor of the Bcr/Abl fusion tyrosine kinase that exhibits potent antileukemic effects in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Bcr/Abl-positive K562 and Bcr/Abl-negative HL-60 human leukemia cells were used to investigate the effect of PRI-2191, a calcitriol analog, on the biological effects of imatinib combined with other anticancer drugs. The results show that PRI-2191 enhances the antiproliferative effect of imatinib on HL-60 cells. When these two agents together are applied with either docetaxel or cisplatin, but not with idarubicin, the antiproliferative effect could still be enhanced. Moreover, when the interaction between the chemotherapy agents was antagonistic or additive, PRI-2191 could even shift it to synergism. This effect correlated with an accumulation of HL-60 cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and a decrease in the percentage of cells in the G2/M and S stage in the ternary combinations used. PRI-2191 did not influence apoptosis induced by imatinib alone or in ternary combinations with all the chemotherapy agents used. These results may suggest that the stronger antiproliferative effect of the combined treatment with PRI-2191 on HL-60 cells is related to cell cycle arrest rather than to the induction of apoptosis.

  7. Mapping sense(s) of place

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovse, Astrid Ravn; Hovy, Dirk; Johannsen, Anders Trærup

    2016-01-01

    , the question of how to tap into this constitutes a methodological challenge to researchers (Latham 2003, Hall 2009). This paper presents an experimental method aimed at eliciting data on sense of place and everyday mobility in a feasible and low-tech manner through the use of mental maps and mobility maps...... aspects of the informants’ place-making processes. Drawing on insights from humanistic geography and urban sociology, Skovse developed and applied a modified mapping method. After the initial data collection, Skovse, Hovy, and Johannsen employed open-source, GIS-based software to digitalize and process...... the mapping data, pairing it with data from other sources such as questionnaires and participant observations to build a comprehensive and adaptable data set, applicable for a wide range of inquiries into the data. When combined with linguistic data, the method ultimately helps provide an empirical basis...

  8. Applied dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schiehlen, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Applied Dynamics is an important branch of engineering mechanics widely applied to mechanical and automotive engineering, aerospace and biomechanics as well as control engineering and mechatronics. The computational methods presented are based on common fundamentals. For this purpose analytical mechanics turns out to be very useful where D’Alembert’s principle in the Lagrangian formulation proves to be most efficient. The method of multibody systems, finite element systems and continuous systems are treated consistently. Thus, students get a much better understanding of dynamical phenomena, and engineers in design and development departments using computer codes may check the results more easily by choosing models of different complexity for vibration and stress analysis.

  9. Making Sense of Austerity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Riisbjerg Thomsen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    elements are part of a sensemaking process where people are trying to understand their personal situation, changes to their households, and the national economy. We apply this logic to a study of online comments’ sections for 240 newspaper articles on austerity in Denmark and the United Kingdom. Characters...... such as ‘scroungers’ and ‘corporate criminals’ are identified, as are scenes such as the decline of the welfare state and the rise of technocracy. We link the storysets, story-lines, and plots together to understand how Brits and Danes are making sense of austerity. Their explanations and frustrations improve our...

  10. Latest Trends in Acoustic Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinzia Caliendo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acoustics-based methods offer a powerful tool for sensing applications. Acoustic sensors can be applied in many fields ranging from materials characterization, structural health monitoring, acoustic imaging, defect characterization, etc., to name just a few. A proper selection of the acoustic wave frequency over a wide spectrum that extends from infrasound (<20 Hz up to ultrasound (in the GHz–band, together with a number of different propagating modes, including bulk longitudinal and shear waves, surface waves, plate modes, etc., allow acoustic tools to be successfully applied to the characterization of gaseous, solid and liquid environments. The purpose of this special issue is to provide an overview of the research trends in acoustic wave sensing through some cases that are representative of specific applications in different sensing fields.

  11. 多感官人机交互界面的视觉设计原则%Discussion on the Visual Design Pinciples of Multi-Sense Human-Computer Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖红; 郭歌

    2012-01-01

    通过阐述多感官人机交互界面的概念,分析了交互界面的视觉设计发展趋势——动态化、多维化、综合化。在此基础上,提出了人机交互界面的视觉设计应遵守"简洁易用"的总原则,并根据多感官人机交互界面的功能与特点,依次提出了:简洁性与美观性并存,统一性与多样性并存,易用性与交互性并存,静态与动态并存,理性与感性并存这5条设计原则。%Through expounding the concept and definition of "Multi-Sense Human-Computer Interface",it analyzed the visual trend of interface design was interactive,dynamic,comprehensiveness.On this basis,according to the functions and features of the multi-sense human-computer interface,it proposed the human-computer interface design should comply with the general principles of "Keep It Simple And Stupid".To put it concretely,the visual design of multi-sense human-computer interface should: simplicity and aesthetic property;unity and diversity;ease of use and interactive;statics and dynamic;rational and perceptual.

  12. Infrastructure sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kenichi; Schooling, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    Design, construction, maintenance and upgrading of civil engineering infrastructure requires fresh thinking to minimize use of materials, energy and labour. This can only be achieved by understanding the performance of the infrastructure, both during its construction and throughout its design life, through innovative monitoring. Advances in sensor systems offer intriguing possibilities to radically alter methods of condition assessment and monitoring of infrastructure. In this paper, it is hypothesized that the future of infrastructure relies on smarter information; the rich information obtained from embedded sensors within infrastructure will act as a catalyst for new design, construction, operation and maintenance processes for integrated infrastructure systems linked directly with user behaviour patterns. Some examples of emerging sensor technologies for infrastructure sensing are given. They include distributed fibre-optics sensors, computer vision, wireless sensor networks, low-power micro-electromechanical systems, energy harvesting and citizens as sensors.

  13. Sensing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Piali; Garrity, Paul

    2013-04-22

    Temperature is an omnipresent physical variable reflecting the rotational, vibrational and translational motion of matter, what Richard Feynman called the "jiggling" of atoms. Temperature varies across space and time, and this variation has dramatic effects on the physiology of living cells. It changes the rate and nature of chemical reactions, and it alters the configuration of the atoms that make up nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and other biomolecules, significantly affecting their activity. While life may have started in a "warm little pond", as Charles Darwin mused, the organisms that surround us today have only made it this far by devising sophisticated systems for sensing and responding to variations in temperature, and by using these systems in ways that allow them to persist and thrive in the face of thermal fluctuation.

  14. Remote sensing in soil science.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides coverage of remote sensing techniques and their application in soil science. A clear, step-by-step approach to the various aspects ensures that the reader will gain a good grasp of the subject so that he can apply the techniques to his own field of study. The book opens with an in

  15. Observed Differences in the Human Footprint and Forest Fragmentation in the Primary Forest Area of the Democratic Republic of Congo: A Remote Sensing Study for 2000-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinario, G.

    2015-12-01

    Conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and neighboring countries has caused the displacement of people internally and internationally sometimes leading to drastic changes in the impact that traditional slash and burn shifting cultivation has on the forest ecosystem. In other areas, the lack of infrastructure and governance has isolated and protected areas of core forest from large scale exploitation. Observing specific patterns of forest fragmentation caused either by the expansion of existing rural complex areas or of isolated forest perforations has allowed us to track the differential growth of the human footprint throughout forested area of the country during the period 2000-2010. Our methodological approach involved the development of a model of shifting cultivation and forest fragmentation in which spatial rules applied morphological image processing to the Forets d'Afrique Central Evaluee par Teledetection (FACET) product. The result is a disaggregated classification of the primary forest into patch, edge, perforated, fragmented and core forest subtypes which we subsequently re-aggregated into homogenous anthropogenic macro-areas of rural complex and isolated forest perforations. We tracked how subsequent forest loss observed in 2005 and 2010 grew or shrunk these areas, presumably with differential impacts on the forest ecosystem. Using this approach we were able to map forest degradation by contextualizing the contribution of forest loss to change in different types of areas, highlighting how it can be greatly underestimated by a non contextualized per-pixel assessment of forest cover loss.

  16. Humanized Management and Staff Sense of Happiness in Vocational Colleges%试论高职院校人性化管理与教职工幸福感提升

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷海芳

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of vocational colleges,promoting connotative construction is the most important. Strengthening talents construction and developing human resource are key to the promotion of vocational college competence. The article is to research humanized management and implementation and the enhancement of the sense of happiness,and to discuss the implementation of humanized management is necessary condition,effective way and guarantee to the enhancement of sense of happiness.%在高职院校快速发展时期,提高学院的内涵建设已成为重中之重,而实现学院核心竞争力的提升,就必须注重人才队伍建设,开发学院人力资源的潜能。本文就高职院校人性化管理的实施和教职工幸福感的提升进行探究,阐述了实施人性化管理是提升教职工幸福感的必要条件、有效途径和重要保证。

  17. Calcium and calcium sensing receptor modulates the expression of thymidylate synthase, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and survivin in human colon carcinoma cells: promotion of cytotoxic response to mitomycin C and fluorouracil

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Guangming; Hu, Xin; Varani, James; Chakrabarty, Subhas

    2009-01-01

    Ca2+ and the cell-surface calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) constitute a novel and robust ligand/receptor system in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of colonic epithelial cells. Here we show that activation of CaSR by extracellular Ca2+ (or CaSR agonists) enhanced the sensitivity of human colon carcinoma cells to mitomycin C (MMC) and fluorouracil (5-FU). Activation of CaSR up-regulated the expression of MMC activating enzyme, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and down-re...

  18. Design and simulation of power panel applied in remote sensing imaging system%一种应用于遥感成像系统电源板的设计与仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李闻先; 尤元; 刘栋斌

    2015-01-01

    航天遥感任务中,为了得到较高的信噪比及系统稳定性,对二次电源供电系统具有较高的性能要求。DC⁃DC模块具有高可靠性、高集成度、高效率等优点,广泛应用于航空航天工程项目。然而,DC⁃DC模块在转换过程中,其固有噪声和外界引入噪声会对整个成像系统的EMI产生很大影响。综合EMI/EMC考虑,系统采用母线电源经滤波器进入电源系统,输出单元与负载间引入滤波电路减小输出纹波。最后,针对整个电源板的直流压降及电流密度分布进行仿真分析,确保了工程应用中的稳定性与可靠性。%To obtain higher SNR and better system stability in space remote sensing missions,the higher performance re⁃quirements are put forward for secondary power supply system. DC⁃DC converter has the advantages of high reliability,high inte⁃gration and high efficiency,and is widely used in aerospace engineering′s projects. In conversion process of DC⁃DC module,the inherent noise and ambient noise have significant impact on EMI of entire imaging system. Considering EMI/EMC comprehensively, the busbar power supply adopted by the system is entered into power supply system through the filter. Filtering circuit between output unit and the load is introduced to eliminate output ripple. DC voltage⁃drop and current density distribution of the entire power panel are proceeded with simulation and analysis. The stability and reliability in engineering applications are ensured.

  19. Applied combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    From the title, the reader is led to expect a broad practical treatise on combustion and combustion devices. Remarkably, for a book of modest dimension, the author is able to deliver. The text is organized into 12 Chapters, broadly treating three major areas: combustion fundamentals -- introduction (Ch. 1), thermodynamics (Ch. 2), fluid mechanics (Ch. 7), and kinetics (Ch. 8); fuels -- coal, municipal solid waste, and other solid fuels (Ch. 4), liquid (Ch. 5) and gaseous (Ch. 6) fuels; and combustion devices -- fuel cells (Ch. 3), boilers (Ch. 4), Otto (Ch. 10), diesel (Ch. 11), and Wankel (Ch. 10) engines and gas turbines (Ch. 12). Although each topic could warrant a complete text on its own, the author addresses each of these major themes with reasonable thoroughness. Also, the book is well documented with a bibliography, references, a good index, and many helpful tables and appendices. In short, Applied Combustion does admirably fulfill the author`s goal for a wide engineering science introduction to the general subject of combustion.

  20. Estimation of the effective and functional human cortical connectivity with structural equation modeling and directed transfer function applied to high-resolution EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, Laura; Cincotti, Febo; Mattia, Donatella; Salinari, Serenella; Babiloni, Claudio; Basilisco, Alessandra; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Ding, Lei; Ni, Ying; He, Bin; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Babiloni, Fabio

    2004-12-01

    Different brain imaging devices are presently available to provide images of the human functional cortical activity, based on hemodynamic, metabolic or electromagnetic measurements. However, static images of brain regions activated during particular tasks do not convey the information of how these regions are interconnected. The concept of brain connectivity plays a central role in the neuroscience, and different definitions of connectivity, functional and effective, have been adopted in literature. While the functional connectivity is defined as the temporal coherence among the activities of different brain areas, the effective connectivity is defined as the simplest brain circuit that would produce the same temporal relationship as observed experimentally among cortical sites. The structural equation modeling (SEM) is the most used method to estimate effective connectivity in neuroscience, and its typical application is on data related to brain hemodynamic behavior tested by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), whereas the directed transfer function (DTF) method is a frequency-domain approach based on both a multivariate autoregressive (MVAR) modeling of time series and on the concept of Granger causality. This study presents advanced methods for the estimation of cortical connectivity by applying SEM and DTF on the cortical signals estimated from high-resolution electroencephalography (EEG) recordings, since these signals exhibit a higher spatial resolution than conventional cerebral electromagnetic measures. To estimate correctly the cortical signals, we used a subject's multicompartment head model (scalp, skull, dura mater, cortex) constructed from individual MRI, a distributed source model and a regularized linear inverse source estimates of cortical current density. Before the application of SEM and DTF methodology to the cortical waveforms estimated from high-resolution EEG data, we performed a simulation study, in which different main factors

  1. Conceptual development of the immune system as a sixth sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, J Edwin; Smith, Eric M

    2007-01-01

    Understanding how and why the immune and nervous systems communicate in a bidirectional pathway has been fundamental to the development of the psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) field. This review will discuss some of the pivotal results that found the nervous and immune systems use a common chemical language for intra and inter-system communication. Specifically the nervous and immune systems produce a common set of peptide and nonpeptide neurotransmitters and cytokines that provides a common repertoire of receptors and ligands between the two systems. These studies led to the concept that through the sharing of ligands and receptors the immune system could serve as a sixth sense to detect things the body cannot otherwise hear, see, smell, taste or touch. Pathogens, tumors, and allergens are detected with great sensitivity and specificity by the immune system. As a sixth sense the immune system is a means to signal and mobilize the body to respond to these types of challenges. The paper will also review in a chronological manner some of the PNI-related studies important to validating the sixth sense concept. Finally, the review will suggest ways to apply the new found knowledge of the sixth sense to understanding a placebo effect and developing new therapeutic approaches for treatment of human diseases.

  2. Applied Ethics in Nowadays Society

    OpenAIRE

    Tomita CIULEI

    2013-01-01

    This special issue is dedicated to Nowadays Applied Ethics in Society, and falls in the field of social sciences and humanities, being hosted both theoretical approaches and empirical research in various areas of applied ethics. Applied ethics analyzes of a series of morally concrete situations of social or professional practice in order to make / adopt decisions. In the field of applied ethics are integrated medical ethics, legal ethics, media ethics, professional ethics, environmental ethic...

  3. Interactive Display under the Influence of Tactile Sense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ge-yang; YAO Jing

    2010-01-01

    Humans have a variety of sense in dynamic environment,and tactile sensation is an important way apperceiving the world.It enhances the process of experience and the interaction between humans and environment.However,vision as a dominant sense impairs the variety of sense.In the display design,current designers often put more emphasi on structure,form,color,such other visual elements,consequently neglect the importance of the tactile sensation,which weakens real experience of humans.

  4. Detection of xenobiotic-induced DNA damage by the comet assay applied to human and rat precision-cut liver slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plazar, Janja; Hrejac, Irena; Pirih, Primoz; Filipic, Metka; Groothuis, Geny M. M.

    2007-01-01

    The comet assay is a simple and sensitive method for measuring DNA damage at the level of individual cells and is extensively used in genotoxicity studies. It is commonly applied to cultured cells. The aim of this study was to apply the comet assay for use in fresh liver tissue, where metabolic acti

  5. People-centric sensing in assistive healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannetsos, Thanassis; Dimitriou, Tassos; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2011-01-01

    sensing devices enabling thousands new personal, social, and public sensing applications. In this paper, we discuss our vision for people-centric sensing in assistive healthcare environments and study the security challenges it brings. This highly dynamic and mobile setting presents new challenges...... follows a more passive approach and has focused on collecting and processing data using a static-topology and an application-aware infrastructure. However, with the technological advances in sensing, computation, storage, and communications, a new era is about to emerge changing the traditional view...... of sensor-based assistive environments where people are passive data consumers, with one where people carry mobile sensing elements involving large volumes of data related to everyday human activities. This evolution will be driven by people-centric sensing and will turn mobile phones into global mobile...

  6. Structured IR illumination for relative depth sensing in virtual interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Bernard; Raulot, Victorien; Grossman, Michel

    2012-06-01

    Depth mapping or depth sensing has become a popular field, applied not only to automotive sensing for collision avoidance (radar) but also to gesture sensing for gaming and virtual interfaces (optical). Popular gesture sensing devices such as the Kinect from Microsoft's Xbox gaming device produce a full absolute depth map, which is in most cases not adapted to the task on hand (relative gesture sensing). We propose in this paper a new gesture sensing technique through structured IR illumination to provide a relative depth mapping rather than an absolute one, and this reducing the requirements on computing power and therefore enabling this technology for wearable computing such as see through display.

  7. Finite element analysis of (SA) mechanoreceptors in tactile sensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    N, Syamimi; Yahud, S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses the structural design of a fingertip model in order to analyse the sensory function of slow adapting (SA) mechanoreceptors by using the finite element analysis (FEA) method. A biologically inspired tactile sensor was designed to mimic a similar response of the human mechanoreceptors in the human glabrous skin. The simulation work was done by using COMSOL Multiphysics. The artificial skin was modelled as a solid square block of silicone elastomer with a semi cylinder protrusion on top. It was modelled as a nearly incompressible and linear hyperelastic material defined by Neo Hookean constitutive law. The sensing element on the other hand was modelled by using constantan alloy mimicking the SA1 receptor. Boundary loads of 1 N/m² to 4 N/m² with the increment of 1 N/m² were applied to the top surface of the protrusion in z and x-direction for normal and shear stress, respectively. The epidermal model base was constrained to maintain the same boundary conditions throughout all simulations. The changes of length experienced by the sensing element were calculated. The simulations result in terms of strain was identified. The simulated result was plotted in terms of sensing element strain against the boundary load and the graph should produce a linear response.

  8. The Art of Tactile Sensing: A State of Art Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Royson Donate D’Souza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes about tactile sensors, its transduction methods, state-of-art and various application areas of these sensors. Here we are taking in consideration the sense of touch. This provides the robots with tactile perception. In most of the robotic application the sense of touch is very helpful. The ability of robots to touch and feel the object, grasping an object by controlled pressure, mainly to categorize the surface textures. Tactile sensors can measure the force been applied on an area of touch. The data which is interpreted from the sensor is accumulated by the array of coordinated group of touch sensors. The sense of touch in human is distributed in four kinds by tactile receptors: Meissner corpuscles, the Merkel cells, the Rufina endings, and the Pacinian corpuscles. There has many innovations done to mimic the behaviour of human touch. The contact forces are measured by the sensor and this data is used to determine the manipulation of the robot.

  9. TACTILE SENSING FOR OBJECT IDENTIFICATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drimus, Alin; Marian, Nicolae; Bilberg, Arne

    2009-01-01

    in unstructured environments, tactile sensing can provide more than valuable to complementary vision information about mechanical properties such as recognition and characterization, force, pressure, torque, compliance, friction, and mass as well as object shape, texture, position and pose. In this paper, we......The artificial sense of touch is a research area that can be considered still in demand, compared with the human dexterity of grasping a wide variety of shapes and sizes, perform complex tasks, and switch between grasps in response to changing task requirements. For handling unknown objects...... described the working principles of a few types of tactile sensing cells, focusing on the piezoresistive materials. Starting from a set of requirements for developing a high resolution flexible array sensor we have investigated if CSA pressure sensitive conductive rubber could be a proper candidate and can...

  10. Use resources of human exometabolites of different oxidation levels for higher plants cultivation on the soil-like substrate as applied to closed ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Kudenko, Yurii; Ushakova, Sofya; Tirranen, Lyalya; Gribovskaya, Illiada; Gros, Jean-Bernard; Lasseur, Christophe

    The technology of ‘wet incineration' of human exometabolites and inedible plants biomass by means of H2 O2 in alternating electromagnetic field to increase a closure of mass exchange processes in bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) was developed at the Institute of Biophysics of the Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (Krasnoyarsk, Russia). Human exometabolites mineralized can be used in a nutrient solution for plants cultivation in the BLSS phototrophic link. The objective of the given work appears to be the study of use resources of human exometabolites of different oxidation levels processed by the abovementioned method for higher plants cultivation on the soil-like substrate (SLS). The mineralized human wastes were tested for the purpose of their sterility. Then the effect of human exometabolites of different oxidation levels both on wheat productivity and on the SLS microflora composition was examined. The SLS extract with a definite amount of human mineralized wastes was used as an irrigation solution. The conducted experiments demonstrated that the H2 O2 decreasing to 1 ml on 1 g of feces and to 0.25 ml on 1 ml of urine had not affected the sterility of mineralized human wastes. Wheat cultivation on the SLS with the addition in an irrigation solution of mineralized human wastes in the amount simulating 1/6 of a daily human diet showed the absence of basic dependence of plants productivity on oxidation level of human exometabolites. Yet the analysis of the microflora composition of the irrigation solutions demonstrated its dependence on the oxidation level of the exometabolites introduced. The amount of yeast-like fungi increased in 20 times in the solutions containing less oxidized exometabolites in comparison with the variant in which the human wastes were subjected to a full-scale oxidation. Besides, the solutions with less oxidized exometabolites displayed a bigger content of plant pathogenic bacteria and denitrifies. Consequently the

  11. An improved method for producing radiation hybrids applied to human chromosome 19. Technical progress report, March 1, 1991--February 28, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, C.L.

    1992-04-01

    At the initiation of the grant we had just produced radiation hybrids from a monochromosomal microcell hybrid containing human chromosome 19 as its only human component. Radiation hybrids were produced using doses of radiation ranging from 1000--8000 rads. Lethally irradiated cells were then fused to hamster recipients (CHTG49) and selected for growth in histidinol. Approximately 240 clones were isolated and 75 clones were expanded for the isolation of DNA. This report describes in situ hybridization studies and the introduction of markers into human chromosome 19.

  12. COMMON SENSE BIBLICAL HERMENEUTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Mangini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the noetics of moderate realism provide a firm foundation upon which to build a hermeneutic of common sense, in the first part of his paper the author adopts Thomas Howe’s argument that the noetical aspect of moderate realism is a necessary condition for correct, universally valid biblical interpretation, but he adds, “insofar as it gives us hope in discovering the true meaning of a given passage.” In the second part, the author relies on John Deely’s work to show how semiotics may help interpreters go beyond meaning and seek the significance of the persons, places, events, ideas, etc., of which the meaning of the text has presented as objects to be interpreted. It is in significance that the unity of Scripture is found. The chief aim is what every passage of the Bible signifies. Considered as a genus, Scripture is composed of many parts/species that are ordered to a chief aim. This is the structure of common sense hermeneutics; therefore in the third part the author restates Peter Redpath’s exposition of Aristotle and St. Thomas’s ontology of the one and the many and analogously applies it to the question of how an exegete can discern the proper significance and faithfully interpret the word of God.

  13. Overview on Processing and Applying on the SMOS Satellite Remotely Sensed Sea Surface Salinity Products%SMOS卫星遥感海表盐度资料处理应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建; 张韧; 安玉柱; 马强; 杨代恒

    2013-01-01

    土壤湿度和海洋盐度卫星首次提供了覆盖全球的高频率、高精度、业务化的海表盐度产品,但其处理和延伸应用仍处于初级阶段,后续校准校正工作还将持续数年,如何及时把握其发展轨迹成为一个重要的科学问题.本研究从SMOS计划、数据概况、盐度反演算法、格点产品制作、多源数据融合和产品应用等方面,介绍和评述了SMOS计划及其海表盐度产品应用研究进展,着重分析了反演算法中的各种误差来源,对在轨2 a的运行情况进行了回顾、对未来的发展重点进行了展望,旨在为开发和应用SMOS产品提供参考.%SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite has,for the first time,provided operational global-scale sea surface salinity products with high-frequency and high-precision,but their processing and application are still in a preliminary stage and the relevant calibration / validation may be sustained for several years.How to grasp the current status and future tendency has been an important scientific issue.An overview of SMOS project is given from several aspects,including general context,release products,inversion algorithm,gridding process,multi-source data fusion and application,and the analysis of error sources in the inversion algorithm are emphasized.Finally,the running performances of the products during the past two years are reviewed and their future development is prospected,aiming at offering valuable references for developing and applying the SMOS products.

  14. Role of remote sensing in the evaluation of anthropogenic activity and its effect on environment and human econonomic development: an Indian example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perni, Venkateswarlu

    In the scenario of a exponential growth of world population, changes in land use and evaluating the domestication and rearing of aquatic animals and plants; Remote Sensing has the role of an emerging discipline and provides essential tools of trade to the environmental scientist. Ecologically sustainable development of the aqua resources requires that management and use as compatible with the attributes of exploited resources. Aquaculture plays a crucial role in the development of fishing industry and contributes in rural development, increased foreign reserves besides replenishment of important aquatic species. The synoptivity, repititivity and multi spectral vision are the significant edges of Remote Sensing over conventional practices in the application domain. The present study aimed at mapping and monitoring of damages to the ecologically sensitive land farms like mangroves, sand deserts, wetlands, marshy areas etc., due to the development of aquaculture ponds and to analyze and understand the impact of pond aquaculture on water course, ground water quality, drinking water source etc. Indian Remote Sensing satellite:1D - Liss-III + PAN sensors merged data of two seasons is used to carry out change detection studies of mangroves, lakes/lagoons and coastal wetlands. To generate microscopic information of Machilipatnam and to monitor the water circulation in creeks the very high resolution IKONOS Panchromatic data is used. Geometrically rectified digital base map covering the study area is prepared on 1:63,630 scale. Satellite data of Land Sat TM, IRS Liss - II, Liss - III and PAN were used. Satellite data geometrically rectified with reference to base map using standard image-to-image tie up procedure besides necessary enhancement techniques for better interpretation. The economic impact of aquaculture is critically analyzed considering certain statistics and the resultant affects are presented. Tropical brackish water and saltwater aquaculture have contributed

  15. Longitudinal chromatic aberration of the human eye in the visible and near infrared from wavefront sensing, double-pass and psychophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Maria; Dorronsoro, Carlos; Cortes, Daniel; Pascual, Daniel; Marcos, Susana

    2015-03-01

    Longitudinal Chromatic Aberration (LCA) influences the optical quality of the eye. However, the reported LCA varies across studies, likely associated to differences in the measurement techniques. We present LCA measured in subjects using wavefront sensing, double-pass retinal images, and psychophysical methods with a custom-developed polychromatic Adaptive Optics system in a wide spectral range (450-950 nm), with control of subjects' natural aberrations. LCA measured psychophysically was significantly higher than that from reflectometric techniques (1.51 D vs 1.00 D in the 488-700 nm range). Ours results indicate that the presence of natural aberrations is not the cause for the discrepancies across techniques.

  16. Optical display for radar sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Willey, Jefferson; Landa, Joseph; Hsieh, Minder; Larsen, Louis V.; Krzywicki, Alan T.; Tran, Binh Q.; Hoekstra, Philip; Dillard, John T.; Krapels, Keith A.; Wardlaw, Michael; Chu, Kai-Dee

    2015-05-01

    Boltzmann headstone S = kB Log W turns out to be the Rosette stone for Greek physics translation optical display of the microwave sensing hieroglyphics. The LHS is the molecular entropy S measuring the degree of uniformity scattering off the sensing cross sections. The RHS is the inverse relationship (equation) predicting the Planck radiation spectral distribution parameterized by the Kelvin temperature T. Use is made of the conservation energy law of the heat capacity of Reservoir (RV) change T Δ S = -ΔE equals to the internal energy change of black box (bb) subsystem. Moreover, an irreversible thermodynamics Δ S > 0 for collision mixing toward totally larger uniformity of heat death, asserted by Boltzmann, that derived the so-called Maxwell-Boltzmann canonical probability. Given the zero boundary condition black box, Planck solved a discrete standing wave eigenstates (equation). Together with the canonical partition function (equation) an average ensemble average of all possible internal energy yielded the celebrated Planck radiation spectral (equation) where the density of states (equation). In summary, given the multispectral sensing data (equation), we applied Lagrange Constraint Neural Network (LCNN) to solve the Blind Sources Separation (BSS) for a set of equivalent bb target temperatures. From the measurements of specific value, slopes and shapes we can fit a set of Kelvin temperatures T's for each bb targets. As a result, we could apply the analytical continuation for each entropy sources along the temperature-unique Planck spectral curves always toward the RGB color temperature display for any sensing probing frequency.

  17. Sensing at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    properties are an important indicator for sensing. In search of a better understanding of these systems Zhang et al from Southern Illinois University inspect the role of Joule heating, exothermal reactions and heat dissipation in gas sensing using nanowires [7]. The mechanisms behind electrical chemical sensors are also further scrutinized in a kinetics study by Joan Ramon Morante from the University of Barcelona in Spain. 'In spite of the growing commercial success many basic issues remain still open and under discussion limiting the broad use of this technology,' he explains. He discusses surface chemical reaction kinetics and the experimental results for different representative gas molecules to gain an insight into the chemical to electrical transduction mechanisms taking place [8]. Perhaps one of the most persistent targets in sensing research is increasing the sensitivity. Gauging environmental health issues around the commercial use of nanomaterials places high demands on low-level detection and spurred a collaboration of researchers in the UK, Croatia and Canada to look into the use of particle-impact voltammetry for detecting nanoparticles in environmental media [9]. At the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in the US, researchers have applied wave transform analysis techniques to the oscillations of an atomic force microscopy cantilever and tailored a time-frequency-domain filter to identify the region of highest vibrational energy [10]. The approach allows them to improve the signal to noise ratio by a factor 32 on current high-performance devices. In addition, researchers in Korea report how doping NiO nanofibres can improve the sensitivity to a number of gases, including ethanol, where the response was enhanced by as much as a factor of 217.86 [11]. Biomedicine is one of the largest industries for the application of nanotechnology in sensing. Demonstrating the state of the art, researchers in China use silicon wafers decorated with gold nanoparticles for

  18. Food, water, and fault lines: Remote sensing opportunities for earthquake-response management of agricultural water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Jenna, E-mail: jmmartin@ucdavis.edu; Ustin, Susan; Sandoval-Solis, Samuel; O' Geen, Anthony Toby

    2016-09-15

    Earthquakes often cause destructive and unpredictable changes that can affect local hydrology (e.g. groundwater elevation or reduction) and thus disrupt land uses and human activities. Prolific agricultural regions overlie seismically active areas, emphasizing the importance to improve our understanding and monitoring of hydrologic and agricultural systems following a seismic event. A thorough data collection is necessary for adequate post-earthquake crop management response; however, the large spatial extent of earthquake's impact makes challenging the collection of robust data sets for identifying locations and magnitude of these impacts. Observing hydrologic responses to earthquakes is not a novel concept, yet there is a lack of methods and tools for assessing earthquake's impacts upon the regional hydrology and agricultural systems. The objective of this paper is to describe how remote sensing imagery, methods and tools allow detecting crop responses and damage incurred after earthquakes because a change in the regional hydrology. Many remote sensing datasets are long archived with extensive coverage and with well-documented methods to assess plant-water relations. We thus connect remote sensing of plant water relations to its utility in agriculture using a post-earthquake agrohydrologic remote sensing (PEARS) framework; specifically in agro-hydrologic relationships associated with recent earthquake events that will lead to improved water management. - Highlights: • Remote sensing to improve agricultural disaster management • Introduce post-earthquake agrohydrologic remote sensing (PEARS) framework • Apply PEARS framework to 2010 Maule Earthquake in Central Chile.

  19. Applying an agent-based model of agricultural terraces coupled with a landscape evolution model to explore the impact of human decision-making on terraced terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaubius, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural terraces impact landscape evolution as a result of long-term human-landscape interactions, including decisions regarding terrace maintenance and abandonment. Modeling simulations are often employed to examine the sensitivity of landscapes to various factors, such as rainfall and land cover. Landscape evolution models, erosion models, and hydrological models have all previously been used to simulate the impact of agricultural terrace construction on terrain evolution, soil erosion, and hydrological connectivity. Human choices regarding individual terraces have not been included in these models to this point, despite recent recognition that maintenance and abandonment decisions alter transport and storage patterns of soil and water in terraced terrain. An agent-based model of human decisions related to agricultural terraces is implemented based on a conceptual model of agricultural terrace life cycle stages created from a literature review of terracing impacts. The agricultural terracing agent-based model is then coupled with a landscape evolution model to explore the role of human decisions in the evolution of terraced landscapes. To fully explore this type of co-evolved landscape, human decision-making and its feedbacks must be included in landscape evolution models. Project results may also have implications for management of terraced terrain based on how human choices in these environments affect soil loss and land degradation.

  20. A generalized sense of number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Roberto; Togoli, Irene; Burr, David C

    2014-12-22

    Much evidence has accumulated to suggest that many animals, including young human infants, possess an abstract sense of approximate quantity, a number sense. Most research has concentrated on apparent numerosity of spatial arrays of dots or other objects, but a truly abstract sense of number should be capable of encoding the numerosity of any set of discrete elements, however displayed and in whatever sensory modality. Here, we use the psychophysical technique of adaptation to study the sense of number for serially presented items. We show that numerosity of both auditory and visual sequences is greatly affected by prior adaptation to slow or rapid sequences of events. The adaptation to visual stimuli was spatially selective (in external, not retinal coordinates), pointing to a sensory rather than cognitive process. However, adaptation generalized across modalities, from auditory to visual and vice versa. Adaptation also generalized across formats: adapting to sequential streams of flashes affected the perceived numerosity of spatial arrays. All these results point to a perceptual system that transcends vision and audition to encode an abstract sense of number in space and in time.

  1. Transition metal sensing by Toll-like receptor-4: next to nickel, cobalt and palladium are potent human dendritic cell stimulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rachmawati, D.; Bontkes, H.J.; Verstege, M.I.; Muris, J.; von Blomberg, B.M.E.; Scheper, R.J.; van Hoogstraten, I.M.W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nickel was recently identified as a potent activator of dendritic cells through ligating with human Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4. Objectives Here, we studied an extended panel of transition metals neighbouring nickel in the periodic table of elements, for their capacity to activate human mo

  2. Sensing via optical interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Bailey

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and biological sensing are problems of tremendous contemporary technological importance in multiple regulatory and human health contexts, including environmental monitoring, water quality assurance, workplace air quality assessment, food quality control, many aspects of biodiagnostics, and, of course, homeland security. Frequently, what is needed, or at least wanted, are sensors that are simultaneously cheap, fast, reliable, selective, sensitive, robust, and easy to use. Unfortunately, these are often conflicting requirements. Over the past few years, however, a number of promising ideas based on optical interference effects have emerged. Each is based to some extent on advances in the design and fabrication of functional materials. Generally, the advances are of two kinds: chemo- and bio-selective recognition and binding, and efficient methods for micropatterning or microstructuring.

  3. TEM Video Compressive Sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Kovarik, Libor; Abellan, Patricia; Yuan, Xin; Carin, Lawrence; Browning, Nigel D.

    2015-08-02

    One of the main limitations of imaging at high spatial and temporal resolution during in-situ TEM experiments is the frame rate of the camera being used to image the dynamic process. While the recent development of direct detectors has provided the hardware to achieve frame rates approaching 0.1ms, the cameras are expensive and must replace existing detectors. In this paper, we examine the use of coded aperture compressive sensing methods [1, 2, 3, 4] to increase the framerate of any camera with simple, low-cost hardware modifications. The coded aperture approach allows multiple sub-frames to be coded and integrated into a single camera frame during the acquisition process, and then extracted upon readout using statistical compressive sensing inversion. Our simulations show that it should be possible to increase the speed of any camera by at least an order of magnitude. Compressive Sensing (CS) combines sensing and compression in one operation, and thus provides an approach that could further improve the temporal resolution while correspondingly reducing the electron dose rate. Because the signal is measured in a compressive manner, fewer total measurements are required. When applied to TEM video capture, compressive imaging couled improve acquisition speed and reduce the electron dose rate. CS is a recent concept, and has come to the forefront due the seminal work of Candès [5]. Since the publication of Candès, there has been enormous growth in the application of CS and development of CS variants. For electron microscopy applications, the concept of CS has also been recently applied to electron tomography [6], and reduction of electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging [7]. To demonstrate the applicability of coded aperture CS video reconstruction for atomic level imaging, we simulate compressive sensing on observations of Pd nanoparticles and Ag nanoparticles during exposure to high temperatures and other environmental

  4. Optical Waveguide Sensing and Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bock, Wojtek J; Tanev, Stoyan

    2008-01-01

    The book explores various aspects of existing and emerging fiber and waveguide optics sensing and imaging technologies including recent advances in nanobiophotonics. The focus is both on fundamental and applied research as well as on applications in civil engineering, biomedical sciences, environment, security and defence. The main goal of the multi-disciplinarry team of Editors was to provide an useful reference of state-of-the-art overviews covering a variety of complementary topics on the interface of engineering and biomedical sciences.

  5. Dry adhesives with sensing features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, J.; Menon, C.

    2013-08-01

    Geckos are capable of detecting detachment of their feet. Inspired by this basic observation, a novel functional dry adhesive is proposed, which can be used to measure the instantaneous forces and torques acting on an adhesive pad. Such a novel sensing dry adhesive could potentially be used by climbing robots to quickly realize and respond appropriately to catastrophic detachment conditions. The proposed torque and force sensing dry adhesive was fabricated by mixing Carbon Black (CB) and Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to form a functionalized adhesive with mushroom caps. The addition of CB to PDMS resulted in conductive PDMS which, when under compression, tension or torque, resulted in a change in the resistance across the adhesive patch terminals. The proposed design of the functionalized dry adhesive enables distinguishing an applied torque from a compressive force in a single adhesive pad. A model based on beam theory was used to predict the change in resistance across the terminals as either a torque or compressive force was applied to the adhesive patch. Under a compressive force, the sensing dry adhesive was capable of measuring compression stresses from 0.11 Pa to 20.9 kPa. The torque measured by the adhesive patch ranged from 2.6 to 10 mN m, at which point the dry adhesives became detached. The adhesive strength was 1.75 kPa under an applied preload of 1.65 kPa for an adhesive patch with an adhesive contact area of 7.07 cm2.

  6. [Research progress on remote sensing of ecological and environmental changes in the Three Gorges Reservoir area, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ming-jun; Zeng, Li-xiong; Xiao, Wen-fa; Zhou, Zhi-xiang; Huang, Zhi-lin; Wang, Peng-cheng; Dian, Yuan-yong

    2014-12-01

    The Three Gorges Reservoir area (TGR area) , one of the most sensitive ecological zones in China, has dramatically changes in ecosystem configurations and services driven by the Three Gorges Engineering Project and its related human activities. Thus, understanding the dynamics of ecosystem configurations, ecological processes and ecosystem services is an attractive and critical issue to promote regional ecological security of the TGR area. The remote sensing of environment is a promising approach to the target and is thus increasingly applied to and ecosystem dynamics of the TGR area on mid- and macro-scales. However, current researches often showed controversial results in ecological and environmental changes in the TGR area due to the differences in remote sensing data, scale, and land-use/cover classification. Due to the complexity of ecological configurations and human activities, challenges still exist in the remote-sensing based research of ecological and environmental changes in the TGR area. The purpose of this review was to summarize the research advances in remote sensing of ecological and environmental changes in the TGR area. The status, challenges and trends of ecological and environmental remote-sensing in the TGR area were further discussed and concluded in the aspect of land-use/land-cover, vegetation dynamics, soil and water security, ecosystem services, ecosystem health and its management. The further researches on the remote sensing of ecological and environmental changes were proposed to improve the ecosystem management of the TGR area.

  7. Quantum limited particle sensing in optical tweezers

    CERN Document Server

    Tay, Jian Wei; Bowen, Warwick P

    2009-01-01

    Particle sensing in optical tweezers systems provides information on the position, velocity and force of the specimen particles. The conventional quadrant detection scheme is applied ubiquitously in optical tweezers experiments to quantify these parameters. In this paper we show that quadrant detection is non-optimal for particle sensing in optical tweezers and propose an alternative optimal particle sensing scheme based on spatial homodyne detection. A formalism for particle sensing in terms of transverse spatial modes is developed and numerical simulations of the efficacy of both quadrant and spatial homodyne detection are shown. We demonstrate that an order of magnitude improvement in particle sensing sensitivity can be achieved using spatial homodyne over quadrant detection.

  8. Mobile Sensing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Macias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high.

  9. Mobile Sensing Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Elsa; Suarez, Alvaro; Lloret, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Rich-sensor smart phones have made possible the recent birth of the mobile sensing research area as part of ubiquitous sensing which integrates other areas such as wireless sensor networks and web sensing. There are several types of mobile sensing: individual, participatory, opportunistic, crowd, social, etc. The object of sensing can be people-centered or environment-centered. The sensing domain can be home, urban, vehicular… Currently there are barriers that limit the social acceptance of mobile sensing systems. Examples of social barriers are privacy concerns, restrictive laws in some countries and the absence of economic incentives that might encourage people to participate in a sensing campaign. Several technical barriers are phone energy savings and the variety of sensors and software for their management. Some existing surveys partially tackle the topic of mobile sensing systems. Published papers theoretically or partially solve the above barriers. We complete the above surveys with new works, review the barriers of mobile sensing systems and propose some ideas for efficiently implementing sensing, fusion, learning, security, privacy and energy saving for any type of mobile sensing system, and propose several realistic research challenges. The main objective is to reduce the learning curve in mobile sensing systems where the complexity is very high. PMID:24351637

  10. 7th International Conference on Sensing Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Jayasundera, Krishanthi

    2015-01-01

    This book contains a collection of selected works stemming from the 2013 International Conference on Sensing Technology (ICST), which was held in Wellington, New Zealand. The purpose of the book is to distill the highlights of the conference, and therefore track the latest developments in sensing technologies. The book contents are broad, since sensors can be applied in many different areas. Therefore the book gives a broad overview of the latest developments, in addition to discussing the process through which researchers go through in order to develop sensors, or related systems, which will become more widespread in the future.The book is written for academic and industry professionals working in the field of sensing, instrumentation and related fields, and is positioned to give a snapshot of the current state of the art in sensing technology, particularly from the applied perspective. 

  11. Discriminating word senses with tourist walks in complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Thiago C

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of topological arrangement are widely used for both animal and human brains in the learning process. Nevertheless, automatic learning techniques frequently overlook these patterns. In this paper, we apply a learning technique based on the structural organization of the data in the attribute space to the problem of discriminating the senses of 10 polysemous words. Using two types of characterization of meanings, namely semantical and topological approaches, we have observed significative accuracy rates in identifying the suitable meanings in both techniques. Most importantly, we have found that the characterization based on the deterministic tourist walk improves the disambiguation process when one compares with the discrimination achieved with traditional complex networks measurements such as assortativity and clustering coefficient. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such deterministic walk has been applied to such a kind of problem. Therefore, our finding suggests that the tourist walk c...

  12. 7th International Conference on Sensing Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas; Jayasundera, Krishanthi

    2015-01-01

    This book is written for academic and industry professionals working in the field of sensing, instrumentation and related fields, and is positioned to give a snapshot of the current state of the art in sensing technology, particularly from the applied perspective. The book is intended to give broad overview of the latest developments, in addition to discussing the process through which researchers go through in order to develop sensors, or related systems, which will become more widespread in the future.

  13. Normal Human Gingival Epithelial Cells Sense C. parapsilosis by Toll-Like Receptors and Module Its Pathogenesis through Antimicrobial Peptides and Proinflammatory Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf Bahri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the interaction between C. parapsilosis and human epithelial cells using monolayer cultures and an engineered human oral mucosa (EHOM. C. parapsilosis was able to adhere to gingival epithelial cells and to adopt the hyphal form in the presence of serum. Interestingly, when cultured onto the engineered human oral mucosa (EHOM, C. parapsilosis formed small biofilm and invaded the connective tissue. Following contact with C. parapsilosis, normal human gingival epithelial cells expressed high levels of Toll-like receptors (TLR-2, -4, and -6, but not TLR-9 mRNA. The upregulation of TLRs was paralleled by an increase of IL-1β, TNFα, and IFNγ mRNA expression, suggesting the involvement of these cytokines in the defense against infection with C. parapsilosis. The active role of epithelial cells in the innate immunity against C. parapsilosis infection was enhanced by their capacity to express high levels of human beta-defensin-1, -2, and -3. The upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptide expression may explain the growth inhibition of C. parapsilosis by the gingival epithelial cells. Overall results provide additional evidence of the involvement of epithelial cells in the innate immunity against C. parapsilosis infections.

  14. LiDAR remote sensing applied to forest resources assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Landa, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Disponer de información precisa y actualizada de inventario forestal es una pieza clave para mejorar la gestión forestal sostenible y para proponer y evaluar políticas de conservación de bosques que permitan la reducción de emisiones de carbono debidas a la deforestación y degradación forestal (REDD). En este sentido, la tecnología LiDAR ha demostrado ser una herramienta perfecta para caracterizar y estimar de forma continua y en áreas extensas la estructura del bosque y las principales vari...

  15. The Agr-like quorum-sensing system regulates sporulation and production of enterotoxin and beta2 toxin by Clostridium perfringens type A non-food-borne human gastrointestinal disease strain F5603.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jihong; Chen, Jianming; Vidal, Jorge E; McClane, Bruce A

    2011-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A strains producing enterotoxin (CPE) cause one of the most common bacterial food-borne illnesses, as well as many cases of non-food-borne human gastrointestinal disease. Recent studies have shown that an Agr-like quorum-sensing system controls production of chromosomally encoded alpha-toxin and perfringolysin O by C. perfringens, as well as sporulation by Clostridium botulinum and Clostridium sporogenes. The current study explored whether the Agr-like quorum-sensing system also regulates sporulation and production of two plasmid-encoded toxins (CPE and beta2 toxin) that may contribute to the pathogenesis of non-food-borne human gastrointestinal disease strain F5603. An isogenic agrB null mutant was inhibited for production of beta2 toxin during vegetative growth and in sporulating culture, providing the first evidence that, in C. perfringens, this system can control production of plasmid-encoded toxins as well as chromosomally encoded toxins. This mutant also showed reduced production of alpha-toxin and perfringolysin O during vegetative growth. Importantly, when cultured in sporulation medium, the mutant failed to efficiently form spores and was blocked for CPE production. Complementation partially or fully reversed all phenotypic changes in the mutant, confirming that they were specifically due to inactivation of the agr locus. Western blots suggest that this loss of sporulation and sporulation-specific CPE production for the agrB null mutant involves, at least in part, Agr-mediated regulation of production of Spo0A and alternative sigma factors, which are essential for C. perfringens sporulation.

  16. Introduction to remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Cracknell, Arthur P

    2007-01-01

    Addressing the need for updated information in remote sensing, Introduction to Remote Sensing, Second Edition provides a full and authoritative introduction for scientists who need to know the scope, potential, and limitations in the field. The authors discuss the physical principles of common remote sensing systems and examine the processing, interpretation, and applications of data. This new edition features updated and expanded material, including greater coverage of applications from across earth, environmental, atmospheric, and oceanographic sciences. Illustrated with remotely sensed colo

  17. Building Sense of Community at a Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred P. Rovai

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This article challenges the belief that strong sense of community is limited to the traditional classroom and proposes that the virtual classroom has the potential of building and sustaining sense of community at levels that are comparable to the traditional classroom. Drawing on research literature, the concept of learning community is applied to the virtual classroom by taking on the issue of how best to design and conduct an online course that fosters community among learners who are physically separated from each other. Course design principles are described that facilitate dialogue and decrease psychological distance, thereby increasing a sense of community among learners.

  18. Cloud Computing Technology Applied in the Human Resource Management System%云计算技术在人力资源管理系统中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王燕

    2013-01-01

      随着科技的发展和知识经济时代的来临,企业管理者逐步认识到人力资源管理的信息化将成为未来发展的必然趋势。云计算技术作为新一代的资源共享利用模式,具有需求服务自助化、服务可计量化的特点。将云计算技术引入人力资源管理系统,可对人才招聘、绩效管理和薪酬管理等方面产生重大影响,人力资源管理工作将更加流程化、标准化和透明化。%With the development of technology and the knowledge economy era coming,enterprise managers gradually realize that human resource management information technology will become a trend.As one of the next generation of resource sharing modes,cloud computing technology has the feature that demand service is on self and can be measured.Putting the cloud computing technology into human resource management system,it will have significant impact on talent recruitment,performance management and compensation management so that human resources management will be more streamlined,standardized and transparent.

  19. Applied Research in Human Resource Management System Computer%人力资源管理系统中计算机应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛航

    2014-01-01

    Information technology continues to develop, businesses are increasingly using computer technology management busi-ness, human resource management as the foundation for enterprise development management module to enhance the management efficiency has greatly changed. Based on the current status of the analysis of human resource management, and describes the applica-tion of computer technology in human resources management in the hope of contributing to the development of enterprises.%信息化技术不断发展,各行各业都在逐渐应用计算机技术管理企业,人力资源管理作为企业发展的基础管理模块,对于管理效率的提升也有很大改变。该文根据目前我国人力资源管理现状进行分析,并且阐述了计算机技术在人力管理中的应用,希望为企业发展做出贡献。

  20. Sense of moving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Grünbaum, Thor

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we assume the existence of a sense of “movement activity” that arises when a person actively moves a body part. This sense is usually supposed to be part of sense of agency (SoA). The purpose of the chapter is to determine whether the already existing experimental paradigms can...

  1. Applying evolutionary anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Mhairi A; Lawson, David W

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary anthropology provides a powerful theoretical framework for understanding how both current environments and legacies of past selection shape human behavioral diversity. This integrative and pluralistic field, combining ethnographic, demographic, and sociological methods, has provided new insights into the ultimate forces and proximate pathways that guide human adaptation and variation. Here, we present the argument that evolutionary anthropological studies of human behavior also hold great, largely untapped, potential to guide the design, implementation, and evaluation of social and public health policy. Focusing on the key anthropological themes of reproduction, production, and distribution we highlight classic and recent research demonstrating the value of an evolutionary perspective to improving human well-being. The challenge now comes in transforming relevance into action and, for that, evolutionary behavioral anthropologists will need to forge deeper connections with other applied social scientists and policy-makers. We are hopeful that these developments are underway and that, with the current tide of enthusiasm for evidence-based approaches to policy, evolutionary anthropology is well positioned to make a strong contribution.

  2. Role of Climate Variability and Human Activity on Poopó Lake Droughts between 1990 and 2015 Assessed Using Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Satgé

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In 2015, an emergency state was declared in Bolivia when Poopó Lake dried up. Climate variability and the increasing need for water are potential factors responsible for this situation. Because field data are missing over the region, no statements are possible about the influence of mentioned factors. This study is a preliminary step toward the understanding of Poopó Lake drought using remote sensing data. First, atmospheric corrections for Landsat (FLAASH and L8SR, seven satellite derived indexes for extracting water bodies, MOD16 evapotranspiration, PERSIANN-CDR and MSWEP rainfall products potentiality were assessed. Then, the fluctuations of Poopó Lake extent over the last 26 years are presented for the first time jointly, with the mean regional annual rainfall. Three main droughts are highlighted between 1990 and 2015: two are associated with negative annual rainfall anomalies in 1994 and 1995 and one associated with positive annual rainfall anomaly in 2015. This suggests that other factors than rainfall influenced the recent disappearance of the lake. The regional evapotranspiration increased by 12.8% between 2000 and 2014. Evapotranspiration increase is not homogeneous over the watershed but limited over the main agriculture regions. Agriculture activity is one of the major factors contributing to the regional desertification and recent disappearance of Poopó Lake.

  3. Arsenic biogeochemistry and human health risk assessment in organo-arsenical pesticide-applied acidic and alkaline soils: an incubation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Rupali; Sarkar, Dibyendu; Sharma, Saurabh; Sand, Kumarswamy

    2006-12-15

    Organo-arsenical compounds are considered non-carcinogenic, and hence, are still allowed by the regulatory agencies for use in agriculture as pesticides. Due to rapid encroachment of suburban areas into former agricultural lands, the potential for human exposure to soil-arsenic has increased tremendously in recent years. However, insufficient data is available on the stability of organo-arsenicals in soils; as to whether they remain in an organic form, or are converted over time to potentially carcinogenic inorganic forms. A static incubation study was conducted to estimate soil speciation and in-vitro bioavailability (i.e., bioaccessibility) of arsenic as a function of soil properties. Two chemically variant soil types were chosen, based on their potential differences with respect to arsenic reactivity: an acid sand with minimal arsenic retention capacity and an alkaline clay loam with relatively high concentrations of Fe/Al and Ca/Mg. The soils were amended with dimethylarsenic acid (DMA) at three rates, 45, 225 and 450 mg/kg, and incubated for 1 year. A sequential extraction scheme was employed to identify the geochemical forms of arsenic in soils, which were correlated with the in-vitro bioavailable fractions of arsenic. Human health risk calculated in terms of excess cancer risk (ECR) showed that risk assessment based on bioaccessible arsenic concentrations instead of the traditional total soil arsenic is a more realistic approach. Results showed that soil properties (such as pH, Fe/Al content and soil texture) of the two soils dictated the geochemical speciation, and hence, bioaccessibility of arsenic from DMA, indicating that the use of organic arsenicals as pesticides in mineral soils may not be a safe practice from a human health risk perspective.

  4. The Hypothesis of the Human iNKT/Innate CD8(+) T-Cell Axis Applied to Cancer: Evidence for a Deficiency in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacomet, Florence; Cayssials, Emilie; Barbarin, Alice; Desmier, Deborah; Basbous, Sara; Lefèvre, Lucie; Levescot, Anaïs; Robin, Aurélie; Piccirilli, Nathalie; Giraud, Christine; Guilhot, François; Roy, Lydia; Herbelin, André; Gombert, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    We recently identified a new human subset of NK-like [KIR/NKG2A(+)] CD8(+) T cells with a marked/memory phenotype, high Eomesodermin expression, potent antigen-independent cytotoxic activity, and the capacity to generate IFN-γ rapidly after exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines. These features support the hypothesis that this new member of the innate T cell family in humans, hereafter referred to as innate CD8(+) T cells, has a role in cancer immune surveillance analogous to invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Here, we report the first quantitative and functional analysis of innate CD8(+) T cells in a physiopathological context in humans, namely chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a well-characterized myeloproliferative disorder. We have chosen CML based on our previous report that IL-4 production by iNKT cells was deficient in CML patients at diagnosis and considering the recent evidence in mice that IL-4 promotes the generation/differentiation of innate CD8(+) T cells. We found that the pool of innate CD8(+) T cells was severely reduced in the blood of CML patients at diagnosis. Moreover, like iNKT and NK cells, innate CD8(+) T cells were functionally impaired, as attested by their loss of antigen-independent cytotoxic activity and IFN-γ production in response to innate-like stimulation with IL-12 + IL-18. Remarkably, as previously reported for IL-4 production by iNKT cells, both quantitative and functional deficiencies of innate CD8(+) T cells were at least partially corrected in patients having achieved complete cytogenetic remission following tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Finally, direct correlation between the functional potential of innate CD8(+) T and iNKT cells was found when considering all healthy donors and CML patients in diagnosis and remission, in accordance with the iNKT cell-dependent generation of innate CD8(+) T cells reported in mice. All in all, our data demonstrate that CML is associated with deficiencies of innate CD8(+) T cells

  5. Applying generalized hydrophobicity scale of amino acids to quantitative prediction of human leukocyte antigen-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Peng; TIAN Feifei; ZHANG Mengjun; LI Zhiliang

    2006-01-01

    Derived from 149 hydrophobic factors of 20 natural amino acids, a novel amino acid descriptor termed as generalized hydrophobicity scale (GH-scale) was proposed by principal component analysis (PCA). Via genetic algorithm-partial least square (GPLS) method, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was constructed by GH-scale for 152 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes with the model estimated and cross-validated correlative coefficients of R2 = 0.813 and Q2 = 0.725, respectively. It was indicated that hydrophobic interaction played an important role in HLA-A*0201-CTL interaction, prominently at anchor residues.

  6. Applied Ethics in Nowadays Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomita CIULEI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This special issue is dedicated to Nowadays Applied Ethics in Society, and falls in the field of social sciences and humanities, being hosted both theoretical approaches and empirical research in various areas of applied ethics. Applied ethics analyzes of a series of morally concrete situations of social or professional practice in order to make / adopt decisions. In the field of applied ethics are integrated medical ethics, legal ethics, media ethics, professional ethics, environmental ethics, business ethics etc. Classification-JEL: A23

  7. Noisy neighbourhoods: quorum sensing in fungal-polymicrobial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Emily F; Hall, Rebecca A

    2015-10-01

    Quorum sensing was once considered a way in which a species was able to sense its cell density and regulate gene expression accordingly. However, it is now becoming apparent that multiple microbes can sense particular quorum-sensing molecules, enabling them to sense and respond to other microbes in their neighbourhood. Such interactions are significant within the context of polymicrobial disease, in which the competition or cooperation of microbes can alter disease progression. Fungi comprise a small but important component of the human microbiome and are in constant contact with bacteria and viruses. The discovery of quorum-sensing pathways in fungi has led to the characterization of a number of interkingdom quorum-sensing interactions. Here, we review the recent developments in quorum sensing in medically important fungi, and the implications these interactions have on the host's innate immune response.

  8. Applied Mathematics in the Humanities: Review of Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences by Sidney Siegel and N. John Castellan, Jr. (2nd ed., 1988

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H. Grawe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sydney Siegel and N. John Castellan, Jr. Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences, Second Edition (New York NY: McGraw Hill, 1988. 399 pp. ISBN: 9780070573574. Almost 60 years ago, Sidney Siegel wrote a stellar book helping anyone in academe to use nonparametric statistics, but ironically, 60 years after that achievement, American higher education confesses itself to be in the worst Quantitative Teaching Crisis of all time. The key clue to solving that crisis may be in Siegel and Castellan’s title, Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences, which quietly and perhaps unconsciously excludes the Humanities. Yet it is in humanistic realities that students read, write, and think. This book review considers what could be done if the Humanities were made aware of the enormous power of nonparametric statistics for advancing both their disciplines and their students’ ability to think quantitatively. A potentially revolutionary, humanistic, nonparametric finding is considered in detail along with a brief account of tens of humanistic discoveries deriving from Siegel and Castellan’s impetus.

  9. Models of plasma membrane organization can be applied to mitochondrial membranes to target human health and disease with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza Shaikh, Saame; Brown, David A

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), abundant in fish oil, have potential for treating symptoms associated with inflammatory and metabolic disorders; therefore, it is essential to determine their fundamental molecular mechanisms. Recently, several labs have demonstrated the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts anti-inflammatory effects by targeting the molecular organization of plasma membrane microdomains. Here we briefly review the evidence that DHA reorganizes the spatial distribution of microdomains in several model systems. We then emphasize how models on DHA and plasma membrane microdomains can be applied to mitochondrial membranes. We discuss the role of DHA acyl chains in regulating mitochondrial lipid-protein clustering, and how these changes alter several aspects of mitochondrial function. In particular, we summarize effects of DHA on mitochondrial respiration, electron leak, permeability transition, and mitochondrial calcium handling. Finally, we conclude by postulating future experiments that will augment our understanding of DHA-dependent membrane organization in health and disease.

  10. cAMP target sequences enhCRE and CNRE sense low-salt intake to increase human renin gene expression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Michael; Harlander, Sabine; Neubauer, Björn; Gerl, Melanie; Germain, Stephane; Castrop, Hayo; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of cAMP target sequences enhancer cAMP response element (enhCRE) and cAMP and overlapping negative response element (CNRE) in the control of human renin gene (REN) in vivo. enhCRE and CNRE were silenced by mutations in a 12.2-kb human renin promoter fused to LacZ reporter gene. This construct was used to generate transgenic mice (RENMut-LacZ). The expression of the transgene was correctly targeted to the juxtaglomerular portions of renal afferent arterioles which express endogenous mouse renin. Therefore, enhCRE and CNRE do not seem to be relevant for the control of the cell-specific expression of the human renin gene. The β-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol (10 mg/kg/day, for 2 days) stimulated the endogenous renin, but not the LacZ mRNA expression. Treatment of RENMut-LacZ mice with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril 10 mg/kg/day, for 7 days) or their crossing to angiotensin receptor type 1a knockout mice led to increased renin and LacZ mRNA levels. Renin expression was upregulated by low-salt diet (0.03% NaCl, for 10 days) and downregulated by high-salt diet (4% NaCl, for 10 days). In contrast, low-salt diet did not influence, while high-salt diet inhibited the expression of LacZ. In summary, enhCRE and CNRE appear to be necessary for the transactivation of the human renin gene through β-adrenoreceptors and by low-salt diet. Our data also suggest that different intracellular mechanisms mediate the effect of low- and high-salt intake on renin expression in vivo.

  11. A common-sense probabilistic approach to assessing inadvertent human intrusion into low-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, P.; Hooten, M.; Black, K. [Neptune and Co., Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, B. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Nevada Operations Office; Crowe, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Rawlinson, S.; Barker, L. [Bechtel Nevada Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Each site disposing of low-level radioactive waste is required to prepare and maintain a site-specific performance assessment (1) to determine potential risks posed by waste management systems to the public, and the environment, and (2) to compare these risks to established performance objectives. The DOE Nevada Operations Office, Waste Management Program recently completed a one-year study of site-specific scenarios for inadvertent human intrusion by drilling into buried low-level radioactive waste sites, as part of ongoing performance assessment studies. Intrusion scenarios focus on possible penetration of buried waste through drilling for sources of groundwater. The probability of drilling penetration into waste was judged to be driven primarily by two settlement scenarios: (1) scattered individual homesteaders, and (2) a community scenario consisting of a cluster of settlers that share drilling and distribution systems for groundwater. Management control factors include institutional control, site knowledge, placards and markers, surface barriers, and subsurface barriers. The Subject Matter Experts concluded that institutional control and site knowledge may be important factors for the first few centuries, but are not significant over the evaluation period of 10,000 years. Surface barriers can be designed that would deter the siting of a drill rig over the waste site to an effectiveness of 95%. Subsurface barriers and placards and markers will not as effectively prevent inadvertent human intrusion. Homestead and community scenarios were considered by the panel to render a site-specific probability of around 10% for inadvertent human intrusion. If management controls are designed and implemented effectively, then the probability of inadvertent human intrusion can be reduced to less than 1%.

  12. In vitro detection of human breast cancer cells (SK-BR3) using herceptin-conjugated liquid crystal microdroplets as a sensing platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wang; Gupta, Kailash Chandra; Park, Soo-Young; Kim, Young-Kyoo; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2016-10-20

    The present study utilizes antibody-protein interactions to develop an LC microdroplet based biosensor for naked eye detection of SK-BR3 human breast cancer cells. The herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets were fabricated using 4-cyano-4'-pentyl biphenyl (5CB) as the liquid crystalline phase and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as the surfactant. The poly (styrene-b-acrylic acid) amphiphilic block copolymer (PS-b-PA) played a role as a modifier for the liquid crystalline interfaces. The 5CB molecules in the herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets have shown an orientation transition from radial to bipolar on selective interactions with targeted SK-BR3 breast cancer cells, which are over expressed by the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2). The herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets are found to be highly selective in the detection of SK-BR3 cancer cells in the presence of control cells, such as KB cancer cells and fibroblast (FB), and also in the presence of 10% human blood plasma. The interaction forces of the SK-BR3 cancer cells were only effective in causing orientation transitions in 5CB molecules in the LC microdroplets, which clearly suggested that the herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets could be used as a selective biosensor for a real-time detection of SK-BR3 cancer cells in biological fluids.

  13. The Page You Are Attempting to Access Has Been Blocked in Accordance with National Laws: Applying a Corporate Responsibility Framework to Human Rights Issues Facing Internet Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily C. Miletello

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available According to the OpenNet Intiative, at least 40 countries engage in some degree of Internet censorship. 1 While censorship may be considered justifiable for various reasons—including national security, blocking child pornography, or protecting intellectual property—some authoritative states, most notably China, censor the Internet in order to control the activities of political dissidents, international human rights groups, or those who may be otherwise critical of the government. Potentially more troubling, both authoritative nations and liberal democracies alike frequently request  user-data information from Internet companies, which may infringe on individual rights to privacy and free speech, and may even lead to arbitrary detention and torture.

  14. Optimizing the teaching of human anatomy by applying non-verbal communicative approaches%运用非语言交际优化解剖教学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭新庆; 梁邦领; 王旭; 吴效普; 皮全民

    2011-01-01

    菏泽医学专科学校解剖学教研室在教学改革中,提出了一种新的解剖学教学手段——非语言交际教学.合理地运用副语言、表情语、目光语、手势语、姿势语等非语言交际手段,可以优化解剖学教学,取得良好的教学效果.%In the teaching reform of anatomy,department of human anatomy in Heze medical college put forward a new teaching means-Non-verbal communication teaching.The reasonable use of the paralanguage,gesture,posture,eye contact,facial expressions can optimize the teaching of anatomy and achieve good teaching effect.

  15. Mesoporous Silicate Materials in Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Charles

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silicas, especially those exhibiting ordered pore systems and uniform pore diameters, have shown great potential for sensing applications in recent years. Morphological control grants them versatility in the method of deployment whether as bulk powders, monoliths, thin films, or embedded in coatings. High surface areas and pore sizes greater than 2 nm make them effective as adsorbent coatings for humidity sensors. The pore networks also provide the potential for immobilization of enzymes within the materials. Functionalization of materials by silane grafting or through cocondensation of silicate precursors can be used to provide mesoporous materials with a variety of fluorescent probes as well as surface properties that aid in selective detection of specific analytes. This review will illustrate how mesoporous silicas have been applied to sensing changes in relative humidity, changes in pH, metal cations, toxic industrial compounds, volatile organic compounds, small molecules and ions, nitroenergetic compounds, and biologically relevant molecules.

  16. Remote Sensing Information Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Keith C.; Scepan, Joseph; Hemphill, Jeffrey; Herold, Martin; Husak, Gregory; Kline, Karen; Knight, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    This document is the final report summarizing research conducted by the Remote Sensing Research Unit, Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara under National Aeronautics and Space Administration Research Grant NAG5-10457. This document describes work performed during the period of 1 March 2001 thorough 30 September 2002. This report includes a survey of research proposed and performed within RSRU and the UCSB Geography Department during the past 25 years. A broad suite of RSRU research conducted under NAG5-10457 is also described under themes of Applied Research Activities and Information Science Research. This research includes: 1. NASA ESA Research Grant Performance Metrics Reporting. 2. Global Data Set Thematic Accuracy Analysis. 3. ISCGM/Global Map Project Support. 4. Cooperative International Activities. 5. User Model Study of Global Environmental Data Sets. 6. Global Spatial Data Infrastructure. 7. CIESIN Collaboration. 8. On the Value of Coordinating Landsat Operations. 10. The California Marine Protected Areas Database: Compilation and Accuracy Issues. 11. Assessing Landslide Hazard Over a 130-Year Period for La Conchita, California Remote Sensing and Spatial Metrics for Applied Urban Area Analysis, including: (1) IKONOS Data Processing for Urban Analysis. (2) Image Segmentation and Object Oriented Classification. (3) Spectral Properties of Urban Materials. (4) Spatial Scale in Urban Mapping. (5) Variable Scale Spatial and Temporal Urban Growth Signatures. (6) Interpretation and Verification of SLEUTH Modeling Results. (7) Spatial Land Cover Pattern Analysis for Representing Urban Land Use and Socioeconomic Structures. 12. Colorado River Flood Plain Remote Sensing Study Support. 13. African Rainfall Modeling and Assessment. 14. Remote Sensing and GIS Integration.

  17. CAPABILITIES OF REMOTE SENSING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES FOR THE DETECTION OF LEAD CONTAMINATION: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Maliki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances in remote sensing technologies are increasingly becoming more useful for resource, ecosystem and agricultural management applications to the extent that these techniques can now also be applied for monitoring of soil contamination and human health risk assessment. While, extensive previous studies have shown that Visible and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (VNIRS in the spectral range 400–2500 nm can be used to quantify various soil constituents simultaneously, the direct determination of metal concentrations by remote sensing and reflectance spectroscopy is not as well examined as other soil parameters. The application of VNIRS, including laboratory hyperpectral measurements, field spectrometer measurements or image spectroscopy, generally achieves a good prediction of metal concentrations when compared to traditional wet chemical methods and has the advantage of being relatively less expensive and faster, allowing chemical assessment of contamination in close to real time. Furthermore, imaging spectroscopy can potentially provide significantly more samples over a larger spatial extent than traditional ground sampling methods. Thus the development of remote sensing techniques (field based and either airborne or satellite hyperspectral imaging can support the monitoring and efficient mapping of metal contamination (in dust and soil for environmental and health impact assessment. This review is concerned with the application of remote sensing and reflectance spectroscopy to the detection of heavy metals and discusses how current methods could be applied for the quantification of Pb contaminated soil surrounding mines and smelters.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Four Human Longbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-30

    Ultimate Properties of Compact Bone Tissue," J. Biomechanics, 1975, pp. 393-405. 41. Bass, William M., Human Osteology: A Laboratory and Field Manual of...bone’s proximal and distal epiphyses. Most of the measurements used can be found in the antropological literature [1, 2, 4, 5, 61. Those that cannot...using strain sensing load cells connected to j a manual switch and balance unit and digital display. The torque applied was inferred by the tensile

  19. A new method for automated high-dimensional lesion segmentation evaluated in vascular injury and applied to the human occipital lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Yee-Haur; Jager, Rolf; Kennard, Christopher; Husain, Masud; Nachev, Parashkev

    2014-07-01

    Making robust inferences about the functional neuroanatomy of the brain is critically dependent on experimental techniques that examine the consequences of focal loss of brain function. Unfortunately, the use of the most comprehensive such technique-lesion-function mapping-is complicated by the need for time-consuming and subjective manual delineation of the lesions, greatly limiting the practicability of the approach. Here we exploit a recently-described general measure of statistical anomaly, zeta, to devise a fully-automated, high-dimensional algorithm for identifying the parameters of lesions within a brain image given a reference set of normal brain images. We proceed to evaluate such an algorithm in the context of diffusion-weighted imaging of the commonest type of lesion used in neuroanatomical research: ischaemic damage. Summary performance metrics exceed those previously published for diffusion-weighted imaging and approach the current gold standard-manual segmentation-sufficiently closely for fully-automated lesion-mapping studies to become a possibility. We apply the new method to 435 unselected images of patients with ischaemic stroke to derive a probabilistic map of the pattern of damage in lesions involving the occipital lobe, demonstrating the variation of anatomical resolvability of occipital areas so as to guide future lesion-function studies of the region.

  20. 基于人类视觉系统区域分裂的图割遥感图像分割算法研究%Remote Sensing Image Segmentation Based on Human Visual System Region Splitting and Graph Cut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋华; 温静; 王玉斌

    2011-01-01

    Aiming at the problem of poor real-time ability of Normalized Cut (NO , this paper suggests a remote sensing image segmentation algorithm based on region splitting and graph within human visual system(HVS). According to the features of HVS,the algorithm uses region splitting method to segment the remote sensing image into a large number of small regions. By integrating gray feature and spatial location of each region,NC is used to segment the image among regions from global view,by which the final segmented image can be generated. Experimental result shows that compared with the traditional NC,operating speed is significantly improved as getting close to the segmentation quality,and this is a kind of effective method of image segmentation.%针对传统Normalized Cut(NC)在分割图像过程中实时性差的特点,提出一种使用人类视觉系统(HVS)区域分裂的图割方法.根据HVS特性用区域分裂算法将遥感图像分割成多个小区域,再结合各个小区域的灰度和空间信息从全局角度用NC方法在区域间进行划分,完成图像的最终分割.实验表明,相对于传统的NC方法,该算法在获得相近分割质量的同时,分割速度有了显著提高,是一种有效的图像分割方法.

  1. Applying a highly specific and reproducible cDNA RDA method to clone garlic up-regulated genes in human gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Li; You-Yong Lu

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To develop and optimize cDNA representationaldifference analysis (cDNA RDA) method and to identify andclone garlic up-regulated genes in human gastric cancer(HGC) cells.METHODS: We performed cDNA RDA method by usingabundant double-stranded cDNA messages provided by twoself-constructed cDNA libraries (Allitridi-trested and paternalHGC cell line BGC823 cells cDNA libraries respectively).BamH Ⅰ and Xho I restriction sites harbored in the libraryvector were used to select representations. Northern andSlot blots analyses were employed to identify the obtaineddifference products.RESJLTS: Fragments released from the cDNA library vectorafter restriction endonuclease digestion acted as goodmarker indicating the appropriate digestion degree for libraryDNA. Two novel expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and arecombinant gene were obtained. Slot blots result showed a8-fold increase of gila-derived nexin/protease nexin 1 (GDN/PN1 ) gene expression level and 4-fold increase of hepatitis Bvirus x-interacting protein (XIP) mRNA level in BGC823 cellsafter Allitridi treatment for 72 h.CONCLUSION: Elevated levels of GDN/PN1 and XIP mRNAsinduced by Allitridi provide valuable molecular evidence forelucidating the garlic' s efficacies against neurodegenerativeand inflammatory diseases. Isolation of a recombinant geneand two novel ESTs further show cDNA RDA based on cDNAlibraries to be a powerful method with high specificity andreproducibility in cloning differentially expressed genes.

  2. Distinct kinetics of human DNA ligases I, IIIalpha, IIIbeta, and IV reveal direct DNA sensing ability and differential physiological functions in DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi; Ballin, Jeff D.; Della-Maria, Julie; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; White, Elizabeth J.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2009-05-11

    The three human LIG genes encode polypeptides that catalyze phosphodiester bond formation during DNA replication, recombination and repair. While numerous studies have identified protein partners of the human DNA ligases (hLigs), there has been little characterization of the catalytic properties of these enzymes. In this study, we developed and optimized a fluorescence-based DNA ligation assay to characterize the activities of purified hLigs. Although hLigI joins DNA nicks, it has no detectable activity on linear duplex DNA substrates with short, cohesive single-strand ends. By contrast, hLigIII{beta} and the hLigIII{alpha}/XRCC1 and hLigIV/XRCC4 complexes are active on both nicked and linear duplex DNA substrates. Surprisingly, hLigIV/XRCC4, which is a key component of the major non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway, is significantly less active than hLigIII on a linear duplex DNA substrate. Notably, hLigIV/XRCC4 molecules only catalyze a single ligation event in the absence or presence of ATP. The failure to catalyze subsequent ligation events reflects a defect in the enzyme-adenylation step of the next ligation reaction and suggests that, unless there is an in vivo mechanism to reactivate DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 following phosphodiester bond formation, the cellular NHEJ capacity will be determined by the number of adenylated DNA ligaseIV/XRCC4 molecules.

  3. Adaptive compressive sensing camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Charles; Hsu, Ming K.; Cha, Jae; Iwamura, Tomo; Landa, Joseph; Nguyen, Charles; Szu, Harold

    2013-05-01

    We have embedded Adaptive Compressive Sensing (ACS) algorithm on Charge-Coupled-Device (CCD) camera based on the simplest concept that each pixel is a charge bucket, and the charges comes from Einstein photoelectric conversion effect. Applying the manufactory design principle, we only allow altering each working component at a minimum one step. We then simulated what would be such a camera can do for real world persistent surveillance taking into account of diurnal, all weather, and seasonal variations. The data storage has saved immensely, and the order of magnitude of saving is inversely proportional to target angular speed. We did design two new components of CCD camera. Due to the matured CMOS (Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) technology, the on-chip Sample and Hold (SAH) circuitry can be designed for a dual Photon Detector (PD) analog circuitry for changedetection that predicts skipping or going forward at a sufficient sampling frame rate. For an admitted frame, there is a purely random sparse matrix [Φ] which is implemented at each bucket pixel level the charge transport bias voltage toward its neighborhood buckets or not, and if not, it goes to the ground drainage. Since the snapshot image is not a video, we could not apply the usual MPEG video compression and Hoffman entropy codec as well as powerful WaveNet Wrapper on sensor level. We shall compare (i) Pre-Processing FFT and a threshold of significant Fourier mode components and inverse FFT to check PSNR; (ii) Post-Processing image recovery will be selectively done by CDT&D adaptive version of linear programming at L1 minimization and L2 similarity. For (ii) we need to determine in new frames selection by SAH circuitry (i) the degree of information (d.o.i) K(t) dictates the purely random linear sparse combination of measurement data a la [Φ]M,N M(t) = K(t) Log N(t).

  4. Number sense how the mind creates mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Dehaene, Stanislas

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of how the human brain performs mathematical calculations is far from complete, but in recent years there have been many exciting breakthroughs by scientists all over the world. Now, in The Number Sense, Stanislas Dehaene offers a fascinating look at this recent research, in an enlightening exploration of the mathematical mind. Dehaene begins with the eye-opening discovery that animals--including rats, pigeons, raccoons, and chimpanzees--can perform simple mathematical calculations, and that human infants also have a rudimentary number sense. Dehaene suggests that this rudime

  5. 人体解剖生理学课程引入虚拟现实技术的教改探索%Applying Virtual Reality Technology in"Human Anatomy ;and Physiology"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范敏; 戴培山

    2014-01-01

    "Human Anatomy and Physiology" is a course with many teaching contents, it contains complex anatomy structures. The course needs rich spatial imagination. It is very difficult for non-medical students in higher education institutions to under-stand human anatomy structure and physiology. In this paper, virtual reality technology was applied in "Human Anatomy and Physiology" teaching, and human eye, ear and cardiovascular system were taken as examples to show how to apply virtual real-ity technology in teaching. By contrast, we found that with its characters of intuitive and vivid, the virtual reality technology in creased students' interest in the course,improved the teaching effect.%人体解剖生理学课程教学内容多,涉及的人体结构复杂,需要较强的空间想象能力。非医学院校的学生理解人体解剖结构和生理功能比较困难。本文将虚拟现实技术引入到人体解剖生理学的教学当中,以人眼、耳和心血管系统的教学内容为例分析了如何在教学过程中引入虚拟现实技术。通过对比,我们发现虚拟现实技术利用其直观、形象的特点,增加了学生对课程的兴趣,提高了教学效果。

  6. Compressive Sensing Over Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Feizi, Soheil; Effros, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate some applications of compressive sensing over networks. We make a connection between compressive sensing and traditional information theoretic techniques in source coding and channel coding. Our results provide an explicit trade-off between the rate and the decoding complexity. The key difference of compressive sensing and traditional information theoretic approaches is at their decoding side. Although optimal decoders to recover the original signal, compressed by source coding have high complexity, the compressive sensing decoder is a linear or convex optimization. First, we investigate applications of compressive sensing on distributed compression of correlated sources. Here, by using compressive sensing, we propose a compression scheme for a family of correlated sources with a modularized decoder, providing a trade-off between the compression rate and the decoding complexity. We call this scheme Sparse Distributed Compression. We use this compression scheme for a general multi...

  7. A Portable Array-Type Optical Fiber Sensing Instrument for Real-Time Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Shan Hung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel optical fiber array-type of sensing instrument with temperature compensation for real-time detection was developed to measure oxygen, carbon dioxide, and ammonia simultaneously. The proposed instrument is multi-sensing array integrated with real-time measurement module for portable applications. The sensing optical fibers were etched and polished before coating to increase sensitivities. The ammonia and temperature sensors were each composed of a dye-coated single-mode fiber with constructing a fiber Bragg grating and a long-period filter grating for detecting light intensity. Both carbon dioxide and oxygen sensing structures use multimode fibers where 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrene trisulfonic acid trisodium salt is coated for carbon dioxide sensing and Tris(2,2′-bipyridyl dichlororuthenium(II hexahydrate and Tris(bipyridineruthenium(II chloride are coated for oxygen sensing. Gas-induced fluorescent light intensity variation was applied to detect gas concentration. The portable gas sensing array was set up by integrating with photo-electronic measurement modules and a human-machine interface to detect gases in real time. The measured data have been processed using piecewise-linear method. The sensitivity of the oxygen sensor were 1.54%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 1.5% and for concentrations between 1.5% and 6%, respectively. The sensitivity of the carbon dioxide sensor were 8.33%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 2% and for concentrations between 2% and 5%, respectively. For the ammonia sensor, the sensitivity was 27.78%/V, while ammonia concentration was less than 2%.

  8. A Portable Array-Type Optical Fiber Sensing Instrument for Real-Time Gas Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, San-Shan; Chang, Hsing-Cheng; Chang, I-Nan

    2016-12-08

    A novel optical fiber array-type of sensing instrument with temperature compensation for real-time detection was developed to measure oxygen, carbon dioxide, and ammonia simultaneously. The proposed instrument is multi-sensing array integrated with real-time measurement module for portable applications. The sensing optical fibers were etched and polished before coating to increase sensitivities. The ammonia and temperature sensors were each composed of a dye-coated single-mode fiber with constructing a fiber Bragg grating and a long-period filter grating for detecting light intensity. Both carbon dioxide and oxygen sensing structures use multimode fibers where 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrene trisulfonic acid trisodium salt is coated for carbon dioxide sensing and Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate and Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) chloride are coated for oxygen sensing. Gas-induced fluorescent light intensity variation was applied to detect gas concentration. The portable gas sensing array was set up by integrating with photo-electronic measurement modules and a human-machine interface to detect gases in real time. The measured data have been processed using piecewise-linear method. The sensitivity of the oxygen sensor were 1.54%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 1.5% and for concentrations between 1.5% and 6%, respectively. The sensitivity of the carbon dioxide sensor were 8.33%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 2% and for concentrations between 2% and 5%, respectively. For the ammonia sensor, the sensitivity was 27.78%/V, while ammonia concentration was less than 2%.

  9. The perfect time to be stressed: a differential modulation of human memory by stress applied in the morning or in the afternoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheu, Françoise S; Collicutt, Patrick; Kornik, Rachel; Moszkowski, Robin; Lupien, Sonia J

    2005-12-01

    We measured the effects of a stressful experience on memory for emotionally arousing and neutral material learned after exposure to a stressor which induces a significant increase in corticosteroid stress hormones. Because memory performance can be influenced by circadian changes in corticosteroid levels, subjects were tested either in the morning or in the afternoon. Nineteen healthy men (9 in the morning group and 10 in the afternoon group) were submitted to a psychological stress task before viewing a story composed of emotionally negative and neutral segments, while another 20 healthy males (10 in the morning group and 10 in the afternoon group) viewed the story without being exposed to the psychological stressor. Salivary cortisol levels were measured before and after the stressor. Memory performance was assessed by a one week post learning delayed recall. Results show that stress-induced increases in salivary cortisol levels impaired delayed free recall of emotionally arousing material in the morning group, but not in the afternoon group. There was no effect of stress on memory for neutral material. Altogether, these findings suggest that stressing participants in the morning, at a time of high circulating levels of corticosteroids, over stimulated the corticosteroid receptors in the brain, impairing declarative memory for emotionally arousing material unrelated to the stressor. These findings suggest that the experimental context, i.e., time of day at which the experiment occurs, the nature of the to-be-remembered material (remembering the stressful event itself or material unrelated to the stressor) and the valence of the to-be-remembered material (emotionally arousing vs. neutral), modulates the effects of stress on human declarative memory.

  10. Word sense disambiguation in evolutionary manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan Abed, Saad; Tiun, Sabrina; Omar, Nazlia

    2016-07-01

    The task of assigning proper meaning to an ambiguous word in a particular context is termed word sense disambiguation (WSD). We propose a genetic algorithm, improved by local search techniques, to maximise the overall semantic similarity or relatedness of a given text. Local search is used because of the inefficiency of population-based algorithms (e.g. genetic algorithm) in exploiting the search space. Firstly, the proposed method assigns all potential senses for each word using a WordNet sense inventory. Then, the improved genetic algorithm is applied to determine a coherent set of senses that carries maximum similarity or relatedness score based on information content and gloss overlap methods, namely extended Lesk algorithm and Jiang and Conrath (jcn). The obtained results outperformed other unsupervised methods, which are related to the proposed method, when tested on the same benchmark dataset. It can be concluded that the proposed method is an effective solution for unsupervised WSD.

  11. Statistical Compressive Sensing of Gaussian Mixture Models

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Guoshen

    2010-01-01

    A new framework of compressive sensing (CS), namely statistical compressive sensing (SCS), that aims at efficiently sampling a collection of signals that follow a statistical distribution and achieving accurate reconstruction on average, is introduced. For signals following a Gaussian distribution, with Gaussian or Bernoulli sensing matrices of O(k) measurements, considerably smaller than the O(k log(N/k)) required by conventional CS, where N is the signal dimension, and with an optimal decoder implemented with linear filtering, significantly faster than the pursuit decoders applied in conventional CS, the error of SCS is shown tightly upper bounded by a constant times the k-best term approximation error, with overwhelming probability. The failure probability is also significantly smaller than that of conventional CS. Stronger yet simpler results further show that for any sensing matrix, the error of Gaussian SCS is upper bounded by a constant times the k-best term approximation with probability one, and the ...

  12. Statistical Compressed Sensing of Gaussian Mixture Models

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Guoshen

    2011-01-01

    A novel framework of compressed sensing, namely statistical compressed sensing (SCS), that aims at efficiently sampling a collection of signals that follow a statistical distribution, and achieving accurate reconstruction on average, is introduced. SCS based on Gaussian models is investigated in depth. For signals that follow a single Gaussian model, with Gaussian or Bernoulli sensing matrices of O(k) measurements, considerably smaller than the O(k log(N/k)) required by conventional CS based on sparse models, where N is the signal dimension, and with an optimal decoder implemented via linear filtering, significantly faster than the pursuit decoders applied in conventional CS, the error of SCS is shown tightly upper bounded by a constant times the best k-term approximation error, with overwhelming probability. The failure probability is also significantly smaller than that of conventional sparsity-oriented CS. Stronger yet simpler results further show that for any sensing matrix, the error of Gaussian SCS is u...

  13. Compressed Sensing with Rank Deficient Dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Lundgaard; Johansen, Daniel Højrup; Jørgensen, Peter Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    In compressed sensing it is generally assumed that the dictionary matrix constitutes a (possibly overcomplete) basis of the signal space. In this paper we consider dictionaries that do not span the signal space, i.e. rank deficient dictionaries. We show that in this case the signal-to-noise ratio...... (SNR) in the compressed samples can be increased by selecting the rows of the measurement matrix from the column space of the dictionary. As an example application of compressed sensing with a rank deficient dictionary, we present a case study of compressed sensing applied to the Coarse Acquisition (C....../A) step in a GPS receiver. Simulations show that for this application the proposed choice of measurement matrix yields an increase in SNR performance of up to 5 − 10 dB, compared to the conventional choice of a fully random measurement matrix. Furthermore, the compressed sensing based C/A step is compared...

  14. Corpus-Based Word Sense Disambiguation

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, A

    1998-01-01

    Resolution of lexical ambiguity, commonly termed ``word sense disambiguation'', is expected to improve the analytical accuracy for tasks which are sensitive to lexical semantics. Such tasks include machine translation, information retrieval, parsing, natural language understanding and lexicography. Reflecting the growth in utilization of machine readable texts, word sense disambiguation techniques have been explored variously in the context of corpus-based approaches. Within one corpus-based framework, that is the similarity-based method, systems use a database, in which example sentences are manually annotated with correct word senses. Given an input, systems search the database for the most similar example to the input. The lexical ambiguity of a word contained in the input is resolved by selecting the sense annotation of the retrieved example. In this research, we apply this method of resolution of verbal polysemy, in which the similarity between two examples is computed as the weighted average of the simi...

  15. REMOTE SENSING IN OCEANOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    remote sensing from satellites. Sensing of oceanographic variables from aircraft began with the photographing of waves and ice. Since then remote measurement of sea surface temperatures and wave heights have become routine. Sensors tested for oceanographic applications include multi-band color cameras, radar scatterometers, infrared spectrometers and scanners, passive microwave radiometers, and radar imagers. Remote sensing has found its greatest application in providing rapid coverage of large oceanographic areas for synoptic and analysis and

  16. Optical remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Saurabh; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Optical remote sensing relies on exploiting multispectral and hyper spectral imagery possessing high spatial and spectral resolutions respectively. These modalities, although useful for most remote sensing tasks, often present challenges that must be addressed for their effective exploitation. This book presents current state-of-the-art algorithms that address the following key challenges encountered in representation and analysis of such optical remotely sensed data: challenges in pre-processing images, storing and representing high dimensional data, fusing different sensor modalities, patter

  17. Optimized Reputable Sensing Participants Extraction for Participatory Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By collecting data via sensors embedded personal smart devices, sensing participants play a key role in participatory sensor networks. Using information provided by reputable sensing participants ensures the reliability of participatory sensing data. Setting a threshold for the reputation, and those whose reputations are bigger than this value are regarded as reputable. The bigger the threshold value is, the more reliable the extracted reputable sensing participant is. However, if the threshold value is too big, only very limited participatory sensing data can be involved. This may cause unexpected bias in information collection. Existing works did not consider the relationship between the reliability of extracted reputable sensing participants and the ratio of usable participatory sensing data. In this work, we propose a criterion for optimized reputable sensing participant extraction in participatory sensor networks. This is achieved based on the mathematical analysis on the ratio of available participatory sensing data and the reliability of extracted reputable sensing participants. Our suggested threshold value for reputable sensing participant extraction is only related to the power of sensing participant’s reputation distribution. It is easy to be applied in real applications. Simulation results tested on real application data further verified the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  18. Common sense codified

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    At CERN, people of more than a hundred different nationalities and hundreds of different professions work together towards a common goal. The new Code of Conduct is a tool that has been designed to help us keep our workplace pleasant and productive through common standards of behaviour. Its basic principle is mutual respect and common sense. This is only natural, but not trivial…  The Director-General announced it in his speech at the beginning of the year, and the Bulletin wrote about it immediately afterwards. "It" is the new Code of Conduct, the document that lists our Organization's values and describes the basic standards of behaviour that we should both adopt and expect from others. "The Code of Conduct is not going to establish new rights or new obligations," explains Anne-Sylvie Catherin, Head of the Human Resources Department (HR). But what it will do is provide a framework for our existing rights and obligations." The aim of a co...

  19. Intelligent environmental sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Subhas

    2015-01-01

    Developing environmental sensing and monitoring technologies become essential especially for industries that may cause severe contamination. Intelligent environmental sensing uses novel sensor techniques, intelligent signal and data processing algorithms, and wireless sensor networks to enhance environmental sensing and monitoring. It finds applications in many environmental problems such as oil and gas, water quality, and agriculture. This book addresses issues related to three main approaches to intelligent environmental sensing and discusses their latest technological developments. Key contents of the book include:   Agricultural monitoring Classification, detection, and estimation Data fusion Geological monitoring Motor monitoring Multi-sensor systems Oil reservoirs monitoring Sensor motes Water quality monitoring Wireless sensor network protocol  

  20. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  1. Human Technology and Human Affects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2009-01-01

    - is the prophecy. This personification or anthropomorphism is important for the branding of new technology. The technology is seen as creating a technotranscendens towards a more qualified humanity, which is in contact with the fundamental human values like intuition, vision, and sensing; all the qualities...

  2. Interface potential sensing from adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) on carbon nanotube (CNT) monitored by zero current potentiometry for HSA determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Wu, Yi; Song, Jun-Feng

    2015-10-15

    In this work, the adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) on the bare multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) was investigated by a new electrochemical method, termed as zero current potentiometry. For this, a MWNT strip was prepared by directly adhering MWNTs on the transparent adhesive tape surface. Moreover, when HSA adsorbed onto MWNT at the MWNT/solution interface, an interface potential Ψ yielded. The interface potential Ψ as the zero current potential Ezcp simply related to it was monitored by zero current potentiometry. The relationship between the zero current potential Ezcp, the HSA concentration and others was established in simple stoichiometric relation. Based on this, both the adsorption of HSA on MWNT and the HSA determination can be studied. For the HSA determination, the theoretic conclusion consisted with experimental results. The zero current potential Ezcp was proportional to the HSA concentration in the range of 2.8 × 10(-8) - 3.4 × 10(-7)M with the limit of detection 2 × 10(-8)M. The linear regression equation was Ezcp/V (vs, SCE) = (0.159 ± 0.01) + (0.358 ± 0.02) × 10(6)CHSA (µM). This determination was fast, high sensitive and good selective.

  3. Infrared Sensing of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with laboratory experiments on buoyant surface plumes where heat is the source of buoyancy. Temperature distributions were measured at the water surface using infra-red sensing, and inside the waterbody a computer based measurement system was applied. The plume is described...

  4. The discussion of different varieties of remote sensing images' frequent applying and essentials of processing in the forestry's daily work%浅谈林业工作中常用的遥感影像及处理要点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆钦锋

    2012-01-01

    在遥感影像定义的基础之上,讨论了遥感影像的四个基本特征。对林业工作中常用的中分辨率遥感影像Landsate TM5、中巴资源卫星以及常用的高分辨率遥感影像Spot5、Rapideye、Alos、QuickBird、WorldviewⅠ、WorldviewⅡ等进行了介绍并做了对比分析,总结各种遥感影像的优缺点;并讨论了遥感影像基础数据准备,DOM与DEM参考数据准备以及的遥感影像正射纠正,并以ALOS为例,对算法及图像增强等工作进行了探讨。%According to the definition of remote sensing images (RSI) , four basic characteristics have been disscussed. Mid-resolution varieties of RSI that include Landsate TM5 and CBERS, and high-resolution varieties of RSI that include SpotS, Rapideye, Alos, QuickBird, Worldview I , Worldview II etc.,which have been introduced and frequently applied in inspection work of forestry. This article concluded merits and drawbacks of different varieties of RSI via comparing and analyzing based on mid-resolution and high-resolution varieties of RSI. Meanwhile, basic data's preparation of RSI, DOM and DEM, ortho-rectification.of RSI have been discussed. At last, taking Alos as a case, discussion and research of RSI's processing, enhancement and algorithm have been done as well.

  5. Sense of participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohorques Montemayor, L.; Nevejan, C.I.M.; Brazier, F.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the sense of participation of a spatially distributed individual—in the intersections of physical and mediated networks. This sense is fundamental to an individuals’ experience as a participant in systems designed to this purpose including today’s social media and new media gener

  6. Hyperspectral remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Eismann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing is an emerging, multidisciplinary field with diverse applications that builds on the principles of material spectroscopy, radiative transfer, imaging spectrometry, and hyperspectral data processing. This book provides a holistic treatment that captures its multidisciplinary nature, emphasizing the physical principles of hyperspectral remote sensing.

  7. The sense of agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina

    investigate the sense of agency. The central aspect of the thesis work was to understand if brain lesioned children, diagnosed with hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy (CP), have an altered sense of agency, and if this different experience has an influence on the feeling of control of their movements and their actual...

  8. Sense and Sensibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Austen, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Two sisters of opposing temperament but who share the pangs of tragic love provide the subjects for Sense and Sensibility. Elinor, practical and conventional, the epitome of sense, desires a man who is promised to another woman. Marianne, emotional and sentimental, the epitome of sensibility, loses

  9. Visually weighted reconstruction of compressive sensing MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Heeseok; Lee, Sanghoon

    2014-04-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) enables the reconstruction of a magnetic resonance (MR) image from undersampled data in k-space with relatively low-quality distortion when compared to the original image. In addition, CS allows the scan time to be significantly reduced. Along with a reduction in the computational overhead, we investigate an effective way to improve visual quality through the use of a weighted optimization algorithm for reconstruction after variable density random undersampling in the phase encoding direction over k-space. In contrast to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reconstruction methods, the visual weight, in particular, the region of interest (ROI), is investigated here for quality improvement. In addition, we employ a wavelet transform to analyze the reconstructed image in the space domain and fully utilize data sparsity over the spatial and frequency domains. The visual weight is constructed by reflecting the perceptual characteristics of the human visual system (HVS), and then applied to ℓ1 norm minimization, which gives priority to each coefficient during the reconstruction process. Using objective quality assessment metrics, it was found that an image reconstructed using the visual weight has higher local and global quality than those processed by conventional methods.

  10. EIT-Based Fabric Pressure Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents EIT-based fabric sensors that aim to provide a pressure mapping using the current carrying and voltage sensing electrodes attached to the boundary of the fabric patch. Pressure-induced shape change over the sensor area makes a change in the conductivity distribution which can be conveyed to the change of boundary current-voltage data. This boundary data is obtained through electrode measurements in EIT system. The corresponding inverse problem is to reconstruct the pressure and deformation map from the relationship between the applied current and the measured voltage on the fabric boundary. Taking advantage of EIT in providing dynamical images of conductivity changes due to pressure induced shape change, the pressure map can be estimated. In this paper, the EIT-based fabric sensor was presented for circular and rectangular sensor geometry. A stretch sensitive fabric was used in circular sensor with 16 electrodes and a pressure sensitive fabric was used in a rectangular sensor with 32 electrodes. A preliminary human test was carried out with the rectangular sensor for foot pressure mapping showing promising results.

  11. Orientation decoding: Sense in spirals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Colin W G; Mannion, Damien J

    2015-04-15

    The orientation of a visual stimulus can be successfully decoded from the multivariate pattern of fMRI activity in human visual cortex. Whether this capacity requires coarse-scale orientation biases is controversial. We and others have advocated the use of spiral stimuli to eliminate a potential coarse-scale bias-the radial bias toward local orientations that are collinear with the centre of gaze-and hence narrow down the potential coarse-scale biases that could contribute to orientation decoding. The usefulness of this strategy is challenged by the computational simulations of Carlson (2014), who reported the ability to successfully decode spirals of opposite sense (opening clockwise or counter-clockwise) from the pooled output of purportedly unbiased orientation filters. Here, we elaborate the mathematical relationship between spirals of opposite sense to confirm that they cannot be discriminated on the basis of the pooled output of unbiased or radially biased orientation filters. We then demonstrate that Carlson's (2014) reported decoding ability is consistent with the presence of inadvertent biases in the set of orientation filters; biases introduced by their digital implementation and unrelated to the brain's processing of orientation. These analyses demonstrate that spirals must be processed with an orientation bias other than the radial bias for successful decoding of spiral sense.

  12. Enabling Virtual Sensing as a Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In many situations, placing a physical sensor in the ideal position in or on the human body to acquire sensing data is incredibly difficult. Virtual sensors, in contrast to physical sensors, can provide indirect measurements by making use of other available sensor data. In this paper, we demonstrate a virtual sensing application developed as a service on top of a cloud-based health sensor data management platform called Wiki-Health. The proposed application “implants” virtual sensors in the human body by integrating environmental, geographic and personal sensor data with physiological models to compute temperature estimations of various parts of the body. The feasibility of the proposed virtual sensing service is supported by a case study. The ability to share computational models relevant to do calculations on measured data on the go is also discussed.

  13. MONK Project and the Reference for Text Mining Applied to the Humanities in China%MONK项目及其对我国人文领域文本挖掘的借鉴

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许鑫; 郭金龙; 蔚海燕

    2012-01-01

    MONK is a crossdisciplinary text mining project in the humanities undertaken by several universities and research institutes from America and Canada. This paper mainly discusses the text mining process of MONK as well as relevant tools, techniques and algorithm. Two case studies based on MONK are introduced to give details about the application of text mining to the humanities. Finally the authors summarize some unique applications of text mining applied to the humanities and discuss what we can learn from the MONK projeet.%针对美国和加拿大等高校共同承担的大型跨学科人文文本挖掘项目MONK,详细介绍其文本挖掘流程及相应的工具、技术和算法,并具体探讨利用MONK提供的工具进行文学文本挖掘研究的应用实例。最后总结人文领域文本挖掘方法的几类应用,提出该项目对我国人文领域应用文本挖掘的启示。

  14. The Applied Connection for Sociology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Alexander

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the 76 graduates of Kent State's applied sociology masters program, designed to prepare students for employment outside academe, found one graduate employed outside her field, four who continued their education and became practicing sociologists, and a majority who used their training as human service practitioners. (MSE)

  15. Prospects for the regulation of nanotechnology applied to food and biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Engelmann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the possibilities for nanotechnology regulation applied to food and biofuels. In this sense, we seek to study the risks and hazards of this junction, as well as some alternative regulatory taking as reference formulas, not derived from the State and the Legislature, but coming from international agencies, the companies involved and programs voluntary compliance with the rules and principles already in place, but not directly related to nanotechnology. Thus, the study address law possibilities to join the perspectives opened by the Nanotechnology Revolution, encouraging the ful-fillment of standards which have mainly focused on the health and safety of human and environmental preservation.

  16. Detection efficiency of cooperative spectrum sensing in cognitive radio network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xing; BIE Zhi-song; WU Wei-ling

    2008-01-01

    Sensing the spectrum in a reliable and efficient manner is crucial to cognitive radio. To combat the channel fading suffered by the single radio, cooperative spectrum sensing is employed, to associate the detection of multiple radios. In this article, the optimization problem of detection efficiency under the constraint of detection probability is investigated, and an algorithm to evaluate the required radio number and sensing time for maximal detection efficiency is presented. To show the effect of cooperation on the detection efficiency, the proposed algorithm is applied to cooperative sensing using the spectral correlation detector under the Rayleigh flat fading channel.

  17. Plasmon-Enhanced Sensing: Current Status and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangtao Lv

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By combining different plasmonic nanostructures with conventional sensing configurations, chemical/biosensors with significantly enhanced device performance can be achieved. The fast development of plasmon-assisted devices benefits from the advance of nanofabrication technology. In this review, we first briefly show the experimental configurations for testing plasmon enhanced sensing signals and then summarize the classic nanogeometries which are extensively used in sensing applications. By design, dramatic increment of optical signals can be obtained and further applied to gas, refractive index and liquid sensing.

  18. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  19. Wind farm related mortality among avian migrants - a remote sensing study and model analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desholm, M.

    ,136 migrating sea ducks only 47 individuals were predicted to collide with the wind turbine rotor-blades, equivalent to an overall mean collision risk of c. 0.02%. This thesis shows the added value of modelling in supplementing sound empirical studies in accessing the effects of major human development......-2006) of migrating birds at the Nysted offshore wind farm in the Baltic Sea, Denmark. This thesis poses and answers the following questions: a) what hazard factors do offshore wind farming pose to wild birds, b) how should one choose the key focal species to study, c) how can remote sensing techniques be applied...

  20. Integration of force reflection with tactile sensing for minimally invasive robotics-assisted tumor localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talasaz, A; Patel, R V

    2013-01-01

    Tactile sensing and force reflection have been the subject of considerable research for tumor localization in soft-tissue palpation. The work presented in this paper investigates the relevance of force feedback (presented visually as well as directly) during tactile sensing (presented visually only) for tumor localization using an experimental setup close to one that could be applied for real robotics-assisted minimally invasive surgery. The setup is a teleoperated (master-slave) system facilitated with a state-of-the-art minimally invasive probe with a rigidly mounted tactile sensor at the tip and an externally mounted force sensor at the base of the probe. The objective is to capture the tactile information and measure the interaction forces between the probe and tissue during palpation and to explore how they can be integrated to improve the performance of tumor localization. To quantitatively explore the effect of force feedback on tactile sensing tumor localization, several experiments were conducted by human subjects to locate artificial tumors embedded in the ex vivo bovine livers. The results show that using tactile sensing in a force-controlled environment can realize, on average, 57 percent decrease in the maximum force and 55 percent decrease in the average force applied to tissue while increasing the tumor detection accuracy by up to 50 percent compared to the case of using tactile feedback alone. The results also show that while visual presentation of force feedback gives straightforward quantitative measures, improved performance of tactile sensing tumor localization is achieved at the expense of longer times for the user. Also, the quickness and intuitive data mapping of direct force feedback makes it more appealing to experienced users.