WorldWideScience

Sample records for applied sciences assessment

  1. Cancer Risk Assessment: Should New Science be Applied? Workgroup summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard J. Bull; Antone L. Brooks

    2002-12-15

    OAK-B135 A symposium discussing the implications of certain phenomena observed in radiation biology for cancer risk assessment in general. In July of 2002 a workshop was convened that explored some of the intercellular phenomena that appear to condition responses to carcinogen exposure. Effects that result from communication between cells that appear to either increase the sphere of damage or to modify the sensitivity of cells to further damage were of particular interest. Much of the discussion focused on the effects of ionizing radiation that were transmitted from cells directly hit to cells not receiving direct exposure to radiation (bystander cells). In cell culture, increased rates of mutation, chromosomal aberration, apoptosis, genomic instability, and decreased clonogenic survival have all been observed in cells that have experienced no direct radiation. In addition, there is evidence that low doses of radiation or certain chemicals give rise to adaptive responses in which the treated cells develop resistance to the effects of high doses given in subsequent exposures. Data were presented at the workshop indicating that low dose exposure of animals to radiation and some chemicals frequently reduces the spontaneous rate of mutation in vitro and tumor responses in vivo. Finally, it was concluded that considerable improvement in understanding of how genetic variation may modify the impact of these phenomena is necessary before the risk implications can be fully appreciated. The workshop participants discussed the substantive challenge that these data present with respect to simple linear methodologies that are currently used in cancer risk assessment and attempted to identify broad strategies by which these phenomena may start to be used to refine cancer risk assessment methods in the future.

  2. [Basic science and applied science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Tamayo, R

    2001-01-01

    A lecture was presented by the author at the Democratic Opinion Forum on Health Teaching and Research, organized by Mexico's National Health Institutes Coordinating Office, at National Cardiology Institute "Ignacio Chavez", where he presented a critical review of the conventional classification of basic and applied science, as well as his personal view on health science teaching and research. According to the author, "well-conducted science" is that "generating reality-checked knowledge" and "mis-conducted science" is that "unproductive or producing 'just lies' and 'non-fundable'. To support his views, the author reviews utilitarian and pejorative definitions of science, as well as those of committed and pure science, useful and useless science, and practical and esoterical science, as synonyms of applied and basic science. He also asserts that, in Mexico, "this classification has been used in the past to justify federal funding cutbacks to basic science, allegedly because it is not targeted at solving 'national problems' or because it was not relevant to priorities set in a given six-year political administration period". Regarding health education and research, the author asserts that the current academic programs are inefficient and ineffective; his proposal to tackle these problems is to carry out a solid scientific study, conducted by a multidisciplinary team of experts, "to design the scientific researcher curricula from recruitment of intelligent young people to retirement or death". Performance assessment of researchers would not be restricted to publication of papers, since "the quality of scientific work and contribution to the development of science is not reflected by the number of published papers". The English version of this paper is available at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html PMID:11547597

  3. English Language Assessment in the Colleges of Applied Sciences in Oman: Thematic Document Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hajri, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Proficiency in English language and how it is measured have become central issues in higher education research as the English language is increasingly used as a medium of instruction and a criterion for admission to education. This study evaluated the English language assessment in the foundation Programme at the Colleges of Applied sciences in…

  4. English Language Assessment in the Colleges of Applied Sciences in Oman: Thematic Document Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma Al Hajri

    2014-01-01

    Proficiency in English language and how it is measured have become central issues in higher education research as the English language is increasingly used as a medium of instruction and a criterion for admission to education. This study evaluated the English language assessment in the foundation Programme at the Colleges of Applied sciences in Oman. It used thematic analysis in studying 118 documents on language assessment. Three main findings were reported: compatibility between what was ta...

  5. West European nuclear power generation research and development. (Foreign Applied Sciences Assessment Center Technical Assessment Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report assesses the current and projected future status of nuclear power generation research and development (R and D) in Western Europe. The primary focus is on light-water reactor technology, but alternative concepts-specifically, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and liquid-metal reactors-are also assessed. Nuclear power R and D for light-water reactors can have immediate commercial significance, and therefore is mostly conducted within single organizations or countries. Thus, the assessments presented in the report are, in most instances, organized around countries rather than Western Europe collectively. The advancement of nuclear power is dependent upon advances in each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle. To bound the study, the assessment includes only the following nuclear fuel cycle stages: fuel fabrication, power generation, and fuel reprocessing. Specific topics addressed within these fuel cycle stages include core reactor physics, materials, instrumentation and control systems, nuclear power safety, power plant fabrication and construction, fuel fabrication, and reprocessing technology. Excluded are the front-end fuel cycle stages of mining and milling, conversion, and enrichment, and the back-end fuel cycle stages of waste conditioning and disposal. Four nations in Western Europe emerge as having the dominant R and D base for light-water reactors: in order of significance, France, Germany, Sweden, and the United Kingdom

  6. Climate research in the former Soviet Union. FASAC: Foreign Applied Sciences Assessment Center technical assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.; Ellsaesser, H.W.; Harshvardhan; Hoffert, M.I.; Randall, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    This report assesses the state of the art in several areas of climate research in the former Soviet Union. This assessment was performed by a group of six internationally recognized US experts in related fields. The areas chosen for review are: large-scale circulation processes in the atmosphere and oceans; atmospheric radiative processes; cloud formation processes; climate effects of natural atmospheric disturbances; and the carbon cycle, paleoclimates, and general circulation model validation. The study found an active research community in each of the above areas. Overall, the quality of climate research in the former Soviet Union is mixed, although the best Soviet work is as good as the best corresponding work in the West. The best Soviet efforts have principally been in theoretical studies or data analysis. However, an apparent lack of access to modern computing facilities has severely hampered the Soviet research. Most of the issues considered in the Soviet literature are known, and have been discussed in the Western literature, although some extraordinary research in paleoclimatology was noted. Little unusual and exceptionally creative material was found in the other areas during the study period (1985 through 1992). Scientists in the former Soviet Union have closely followed the Western literature and technology. Given their strengths in theoretical and analytical methods, as well as their possession of simplified versions of detailed computer models being used in the West, researchers in the former Soviet Union have the potential to make significant contributions if supercomputers, workstations, and software become available. However, given the current state of the economy in the former Soviet Union, it is not clear that the computer gap will be bridged in the foreseeable future.

  7. Technology Readiness Level Assessment Process as Applied to NASA Earth Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leete, Stephen J.; Romero, Raul A.; Dempsey, James A.; Carey, John P.; Cline, Helmut P.; Lively, Carey F.

    2015-01-01

    Technology assessments of fourteen science instruments were conducted within NASA using the NASA Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metric. The instruments were part of three NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey missions in pre-formulation. The Earth Systematic Missions Program (ESMP) Systems Engineering Working Group (SEWG), composed of members of three NASA Centers, provided a newly modified electronic workbook to be completed, with instructions. Each instrument development team performed an internal assessment of its technology status, prepared an overview of its instrument, and completed the workbook with the results of its assessment. A team from the ESMP SEWG met with each instrument team and provided feedback. The instrument teams then reported through the Program Scientist for their respective missions to NASA's Earth Science Division (ESD) on technology readiness, taking the SEWG input into account. The instruments were found to have a range of TRL from 4 to 7. Lessons Learned are presented; however, due to the competition-sensitive nature of the assessments, the results for specific missions are not presented. The assessments were generally successful, and produced useful results for the agency. The SEWG team identified a number of potential improvements to the process. Particular focus was on ensuring traceability to guiding NASA documents, including the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. The TRL Workbook has been substantially modified, and the revised workbook is described.

  8. Social Science at the Center for Adaptive Optics: Synergistic Systems of Program Evaluation, Applied Research, Educational Assessment, and Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goza, B. K.; Hunter, L.; Shaw, J. M.; Metevier, A. J.; Raschke, L.; Espinoza, E.; Geaney, E. R.; Reyes, G.; Rothman, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the interaction of four elements of social science as they have evolved in concert with the Center for Adaptive Optics Professional Development Program (CfAO PDP). We hope these examples persuade early-career scientists and engineers to include social science activities as they develop grant proposals and carry out their research. To frame our discussion we use a metaphor from astronomy. At the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), the CfAO PDP and the Educational Partnership Center (EPC) are two young stars in the process of forming a solar system. Together, they are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust made up of program evaluation, applied research, educational assessment, and pedagogy. An idea from the 2001 PDP intensive workshops program evaluation developed into the Assessing Scientific Inquiry and Leadership Skills (AScILS) applied research project. In iterative cycles, AScILS researchers participated in subsequent PDP intensive workshops, teaching social science while piloting AScILS measurement strategies. Subsequent "orbits" of the PDP program evaluation gathered ideas from the applied research and pedagogy. The denser regions of this disk of social science are in the process of forming new protoplanets as tools for research and teaching are developed. These tools include problem-solving exercises or simulations of adaptive optics explanations and scientific reasoning; rubrics to evaluate the scientific reasoning simulation responses, knowledge regarding inclusive science education, and student explanations of science/engineering inquiry investigations; and a scientific reasoning curriculum. Another applied research project is forming with the design of a study regarding how to assess engineering explanations. To illustrate the mutual shaping of the cross-disciplinary, intergenerational group of educational researchers and their projects, the paper ends with a description of the professional trajectories of some of the

  9. 77 FR 55863 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied... Subcommittee reports to the Earth Science Subcommittee Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. The Meeting will... --Earth Science Data Latency Study Preliminary Update --Capacity Building Assessment Report and...

  10. Toward an Applied Administrative Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Roger L. M.

    1983-01-01

    A study of 65 articles from the 1981 volumes of "Administrative Science Quarterly" and "Harvard Business Review," using smallest space analysis, found that the few studies adopting subjective (instead of objective) approaches to analyzing organizational change were most likely to provide a basis for an applied administrative science. (Author/RW)

  11. Implementing an Applied Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Doug; Presson, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The work implied in the NASA Applied Science Program requires a delicate balancing act for the those doing it. At the implementation level there are multiple tensions intrinsic to the program. For example each application of an existing product to a decision support process requires deep knowledge about the data and deep knowledge about the decision making process. It is highly probable no one person has this range of knowledge. Otherwise the decision making process would already be using the data. Therefore, a team is required. But building a team usually requires time, especially across agencies. Yet the program mandates efforts of relatively short duration. Further, those who know the data are scientists, which makes them essential to the program. But scientists are evaluated on their publication record. Anything which diverts a scientist from the research for his next publication is an anathema to him and potential death to their career. Trying to get another agency to use NASA data does not strike most scientists as material inherently suitable for publication. Also, NASA wishes to rapidly implement often substantial changes to another agency's process. For many reasons, such as budget and program constraints, speed is important. But the owner of a decision making process is tightly constrained, usually by law, regulation, organization and custom. Changes when made are slow, cautious, even hesitant, and always done according a process specific to the situation. To manage this work MSFC must balance these and other tensions. Some things we have relatively little control over, such as budget. These we try to handle by structural techniques. For example by insisting all of our people work on multiple projects simultaneously we inherently have diversification of funding for all of our people. In many cases we explicitly use some elements of tension to be productive. For example the need for the scientists to constantly publish is motivation to keep tasks short and

  12. The Soviet applied information sciences in a time of change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengston, J.; Cronin, R.R.; Davidson, R.B.

    1991-07-01

    The Foreign Applied Sciences Assessment Center (FASAC) conducts reviews of selected areas of foreign basic and applied science by US scientists who are technically expert and active in the fields reviewed. Several of the FASAC assessments of Soviet science have involved various aspects of the information sciences, including enabling technologies and applications, as well as the core information sciences. This report draws upon those FASAC assessment reports, the expert judgment of some of the authors of those reports, and other public sources to characterize the current state of the information sciences in the Soviet Union and the effects of information science capabilities upon other areas of Soviet science and technology. This report also provides estimates of the likely effect of the political and social reforms underway in the Soviet Union on future Soviet progress in the information sciences and, at a more general level, in science and technology. 41 refs., 7 tabs.

  13. Exploring Flexible and Multidisciplinary Approaches to Applied Science Research Project Assessments: Case Studies from the NASA DEVELOP National Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepps, G.; Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Favors, J. E.; Ross, K. W.; Rogers, L.; Allsbrook, K. N.; Ruiz, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Within the NASA DEVELOP National Program, teams conduct rapid prototype and feasibility projects, applying NASA Earth Observations to a broad range of problems in diverse focus areas, including water resources, agriculture, disaster management, and ecological forecasting, with the goal of assisting partner organizations in their decision making processes. Projects vary in scope, design, and satellite data utilized. As a result, there is no "fixed" set of indicators that encompasses all relevant impacts of all projects. Rather, a flexible toolkit of both shared indicators and individualized approaches is needed to capture the diverse outcomes of these projects, while still allowing for comparability of the projects. This has been done through the creation of pre- and post-project partner assessments that capture partner needs, capabilities, and expectations. This provides both baseline data and an overview of project impacts on partners. Selected projects are then individually assessed in greater detail through partner follow-ups and research into the quantification of project impacts utilizing interdisciplinary approaches to fit each project. This process is discussed through three examples of project impact assessments that draw from varied discipline approaches including cost benefit analysis and ecosystem services.

  14. Applied linguistics - a science of culture?

    OpenAIRE

    Benke, Gertraud

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the status of applied linguistics as discipline is questioned and problems of establishing it - and other newly formed scientific enterprises like cultural science - as disciplines are discussed. This discussion is contextualized using the author's own experience as applied linguist working in (the institutional structure of) Austria. Secondly, applied linguistics is presented as complementing cultural science, with both exploring at times the same phenomena albeit under diff...

  15. NASA's Applied Sciences for Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorn, Bradley; Toll, David; Engman, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The Earth Systems Division within NASA has the primary responsibility for the Earth Science Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the Earth Science Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses one of the major problems facing water resources managers, that of having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA?s science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA?s Water Resources Applications Program are described.

  16. Applied linguistics - a science of culture?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benke, Gertraud

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the status of applied linguistics as discipline is questioned and problems of establishing it - and other newly formed scientific enterprises like cultural science - as disciplines are discussed. This discussion is contextualized using the author's own experience as applied linguist working in (the institutional structure of Austria. Secondly, applied linguistics is presented as complementing cultural science, with both exploring at times the same phenomena albeit under different perspectives and focussing on different levels of experience. Two examples of research involving such a joint interest with different foci are discussed.

  17. How Science Is Applied in Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Boon, Mieke

    2006-01-01

    Unlike basic sciences, scientific research in advanced technologies aims to explain, predict, and (mathematically) describe not phenomena in nature, but phenomena in technological artefacts, thereby producing knowledge that is utilized in technological design. This article first explains why the covering-law view of applying science is inadequate for characterizing this research practice. Instead, the covering-law approach and causal explanation are integrated in this practice. Ludwig Prandtl...

  18. Applied Computational Mathematics in Social Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Damaceanu, Romulus-Catalin

    2010-01-01

    Applied Computational Mathematics in Social Sciences adopts a modern scientific approach that combines knowledge from mathematical modeling with various aspects of social science. Special algorithms can be created to simulate an artificial society and a detailed analysis can subsequently be used to project social realities. This Ebook specifically deals with computations using the NetLogo platform, and is intended for researchers interested in advanced human geography and mathematical modeling studies.

  19. H-methods in applied sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høskuldsson, Agnar

    2008-01-01

    The author has developed a framework for mathematical modelling within applied sciences. It is characteristic for data from 'nature and industry' that they have reduced rank for inference. It means that full rank solutions normally do not give satisfactory solutions. The basic idea of H-methods is...... cannot be improved. H-methods have been applied to wide range of fields within applied sciences. In each case, the H-methods provide with superior solutions compared to the traditional ones. A background for the H-methods is presented. The H-principle of mathematical modelling is explained. It is shown...... how the principle leads to well-defined optimisation procedures. This is illustrated in the case of linear regression. The H-methods have been applied in different areas: general linear models, nonlinear models, multi-block methods, path modelling, multi-way data analysis, growth models, dynamic...

  20. Applied Mathematics, Modelling and Computational Science

    CERN Document Server

    Kotsireas, Ilias; Makarov, Roman; Melnik, Roderick; Shodiev, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The Applied Mathematics, Modelling, and Computational Science (AMMCS) conference aims to promote interdisciplinary research and collaboration. The contributions in this volume cover the latest research in mathematical and computational sciences, modeling, and simulation as well as their applications in natural and social sciences, engineering and technology, industry, and finance. The 2013 conference, the second in a series of AMMCS meetings, was held August 26–30 and organized in cooperation with AIMS and SIAM, with support from the Fields Institute in Toronto, and Wilfrid Laurier University. There were many young scientists at AMMCS-2013, both as presenters and as organizers. This proceedings contains refereed papers contributed by the participants of the AMMCS-2013 after the conference. This volume is suitable for researchers and graduate students, mathematicians and engineers, industrialists, and anyone who would like to delve into the interdisciplinary research of applied and computational mathematics ...

  1. Lessons from NASA Applied Sciences Program: Success Factors in Applying Earth Science in Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, L. A.; Cox, L.

    2008-12-01

    The NASA Applied Sciences Program collaborates with organizations to discover and demonstrate applications of NASA Earth science research and technology to decision making. The desired outcome is for public and private organizations to use NASA Earth science products in innovative applications for sustained, operational uses to enhance their decisions. In addition, the program facilitates the end-user feedback to Earth science to improve products and demands for research. The Program thus serves as a bridge between Earth science research and technology and the applied organizations and end-users with management, policy, and business responsibilities. Since 2002, the Applied Sciences Program has sponsored over 115 applications-oriented projects to apply Earth observations and model products to decision making activities. Projects have spanned numerous topics - agriculture, air quality, water resources, disasters, public health, aviation, etc. The projects have involved government agencies, private companies, universities, non-governmental organizations, and foreign entities in multiple types of teaming arrangements. The paper will examine this set of applications projects and present specific examples of successful use of Earth science in decision making. The paper will discuss scientific, organizational, and management factors that contribute to or impede the integration of the Earth science research in policy and management. The paper will also present new methods the Applied Sciences Program plans to implement to improve linkages between science and end users.

  2. International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013) took place in Wuhan, P R China from 26–27 October 2013 at the Military Economics Academy. The conference is regularly organized, alternately in Romania and in P R China, by ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P R China, with the aim to serve as a platform for the exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences, and to promote the communication between the scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The conference has been organized for the first time in 15–16 June 2012 at the Engineering Faculty of Hunedoara, Romania. The topics of the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues: 1. Economical sciences; 2. Engineering sciences; 3. Fundamental sciences; 4. Medical sciences; The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has applicability potential in economics, defense, medicine, etc. The number of registered participants was nearly 90 from 5 countries. During the two days of the conference 4 invited and 36 oral talks were delivered. A few of the speakers deserve a special mention: Mircea Octavian Popoviciu, Academy of Romanian Scientist — Timişoara Branch, Correlations between mechanical properties and cavitation erosion resistance for stainless steels with 12% chromium and variable contents of nickel; Carmen Eleonora Hărău, ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, SWOT analysis of Romania's integration in EU; Ding Hui, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, Design and engineering analysis of material procurement mobile operation platform; Serban Rosu, University of Medicine and Pharmacy ''Victor Babeş'' Timişoara, Cervical and facial infections — a real life threat, among others. Based on the work presented at the conference, 14 selected papers are included in this

  3. International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemle, Ludovic Dan; Jiang, Yiwen

    2014-03-01

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013) took place in Wuhan, P R China from 26-27 October 2013 at the Military Economics Academy. The conference is regularly organized, alternately in Romania and in P R China, by ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P R China, with the aim to serve as a platform for the exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences, and to promote the communication between the scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The conference has been organized for the first time in 15-16 June 2012 at the Engineering Faculty of Hunedoara, Romania. The topics of the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues: Economical sciences Engineering sciences Fundamental sciences Medical sciences The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has applicability potential in economics, defense, medicine, etc. The number of registered participants was nearly 90 from 5 countries. During the two days of the conference 4 invited and 36 oral talks were delivered. A few of the speakers deserve a special mention: Mircea Octavian Popoviciu, Academy of Romanian Scientist — Timişoara Branch, Correlations between mechanical properties and cavitation erosion resistance for stainless steels with 12% chromium and variable contents of nickel; Carmen Eleonora Hărău, ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, SWOT analysis of Romania's integration in EU; Ding Hui, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, Design and engineering analysis of material procurement mobile operation platform; Serban Rosu, University of Medicine and Pharmacy ''Victor Babeş'' Timişoara, Cervical and facial infections — a real life threat, among others. Based on the work presented at the conference, 14 selected papers are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. These papers

  4. 75 FR 60484 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied... Advisory Group. This Subcommittee reports to the Earth Science Subcommittee Committee of the NASA Advisory.... --Report from Earth Science Subcommittee Meeting. It is imperative that the meeting be held on these...

  5. FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C. [eds.

    1991-11-01

    The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

  6. Applied statistics for social and management sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Miah, Abdul Quader

    2016-01-01

    This book addresses the application of statistical techniques and methods across a wide range of disciplines. While its main focus is on the application of statistical methods, theoretical aspects are also provided as fundamental background information. It offers a systematic interpretation of results often discovered in general descriptions of methods and techniques such as linear and non-linear regression. SPSS is also used in all the application aspects. The presentation of data in the form of tables and graphs throughout the book not only guides users, but also explains the statistical application and assists readers in interpreting important features. The analysis of statistical data is presented consistently throughout the text. Academic researchers, practitioners and other users who work with statistical data will benefit from reading Applied Statistics for Social and Management Sciences. .

  7. Applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on several areas of intense topical interest related to applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials. The eleven chapters in the book cover the following areas of interest relating to applied spectroscopy and nanoscience: ·         Raman spectroscopic characterization, modeling and simulation studies of carbon nanotubes, ·         Characterization of plasma discharges using laser optogalvanic spectroscopy, ·         Fluorescence anisotropy in understanding protein conformational disorder and aggregation, ·         Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in nanomedicine, ·         Calculation of Van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale, ·         Theory and simulation associated with adsorption of gases in nanomaterials, ·         Atom-precise metal nanoclusters, ·         Plasmonic properties of metallic nanostructures, two-dimensional materials, and their composites, ·         Applications of graphe...

  8. Applying Undertaker to quality assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archie, John G.; Paluszewski, Martin; Karplus, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Our group tested three quality assessment functions in CASP8: a function which used only distance constraints derived from alignments (SAM-T08-MQAO), a function which added other single-model terms to the distance constraints (SAM-T08-MQAU), and a function which used both single-model and consens...

  9. Advanced Neural Network Applied In Engineering Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Patel*

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The basic idea behind a neural network is to simulate (copy in a simplified but reasonably faithful way lots of densely interconnected brain cells inside a computer so you can get it to learn things, recognize patterns, and make decisions in a humanlike way. The amazing thing about a neural network is that you don't have to program it to learn explicitly: it learns all by itself, just like a brain! But it isn't a brain. It's important to note that neural networks are (generally software simulations: they're made by programming very ordinary computers, working in a very traditional fashion with their ordinary transistors and serially connected logic gates, to behave as though they're built from billions of highly interconnected brain cells working in parallel. This paper is to propose that a neural network applied in engineering science that how a robots that can see, feel, and predict the world around them, improved stock prediction, common usage of self-driving car and much more!

  10. NASA'S Water Resources Element Within the Applied Sciences Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, David; Doorn, Bradley; Engman, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Applied Sciences Program works within NASA Earth sciences to leverage investment of satellite and information systems to increase the benefits to society through the widest practical use of NASA research results. Such observations provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years about the Earth's land surface conditions such as land cover type, vegetation type and health, precipitation, snow, soil moisture, and water levels and radiation. Observations of this type combined with models and analysis enable satellite-based assessment of numerous water resources management activities. The primary goal of the Earth Science Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, model results, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. Water resources is one of eight elements in the Applied Sciences Program and it addresses concerns and decision making related to water quantity and water quality. With increasing population pressure and water usage coupled with climate variability and change, water issues are being reported by numerous groups as the most critical environmental problems facing us in the 21st century. Competitive uses and the prevalence of river basins and aquifers that extend across boundaries engender political tensions between communities, stakeholders and countries. Mitigating these conflicts and meeting water demands requires using existing resources more efficiently. The potential crises and conflicts arise when water is competed among multiple uses. For example, urban areas, environmental and recreational uses, agriculture, and energy production compete for scarce resources, not only in the Western U.S. but throughout much of the U.S. but also in many parts of the world. In addition to water availability issues, water quality related

  11. Science, Skepticism, and Applied Behavior Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Normand, Matthew P.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudoscientific claims concerning medical and psychological treatments of all varieties are commonplace. As behavior analysts, a sound skeptical approach to our science and practice is essential. The present paper offers an overview of science and skepticism and discusses the relationship of skepticism to behavior analysis, with an emphasis on the types of issues concerning behavior analysts in practice.

  12. Research in Applied Mathematics, Fluid Mechanics and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1998 through March 31, 1999.

  13. [Research activities in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period April 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995.

  14. Applied modelling and computing in social science

    CERN Document Server

    Povh, Janez

    2015-01-01

    In social science outstanding results are yielded by advanced simulation methods, based on state of the art software technologies and an appropriate combination of qualitative and quantitative methods. This book presents examples of successful applications of modelling and computing in social science: business and logistic process simulation and optimization, deeper knowledge extractions from big data, better understanding and predicting of social behaviour and modelling health and environment changes.

  15. Applied Social Science, Teaching, and Political Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Edward; Garrido-Pinto, German

    1977-01-01

    Behind differences in style of North and Latin American social scientists lie profound divergences of conceptions of social science and of typical levels of analysis. Important consequences of these differences follow for styles of teaching, research, or community involvement. This paper explores these cleavages and exemplifies how one might teach…

  16. Disaster Preparedness and Response: Applied Exposure Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2007, the ISEA, predecessor to ISES, held a special roundtable to discuss lessons learned for exposure science during and following environmental disasters, especially the 9/11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina. Since then, environmental agencies have been involved in responses to...

  17. Applying Gadamer's Concept of Disposition to Science and Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borda, Emily J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, I recall previous arguments for a hermeneutic approach to science and claim that such an approach necessitates attention to the development of dispositions. I undertake an analysis of Hans-Georg Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics to identify and describe dispositions relevant to a hermeneutic approach to science. I then apply…

  18. Economic effect of applied nuclear-agricultural science in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economic effect of applied nuclear-agricultural science for 40 years in China have been summarized, analyzed and appraised. The economic regularity and features which are followed by research-development-production in the field of applied nuclear agricultural science in China are explored according to the essential characteristics of economics for input-output ratio and the itself-features of nuclear agricultural science. Some propositions for promoting the development and the economic effect of the applied nuclear-agricultural science in China are also given

  19. Applied analysis mathematical methods in natural science

    CERN Document Server

    Senba, Takasi

    2004-01-01

    This book provides a general introduction to applied analysis; vectoranalysis with physical motivation, calculus of variation, Fourieranalysis, eigenfunction expansion, distribution, and so forth,including a catalogue of mathematical theories, such as basicanalysis, topological spaces, complex function theory, real analysis,and abstract analysis. This book also gives fundamental ideas ofapplied mathematics to discuss recent developments in nonlinearscience, such as mathematical modeling of reinforced random motion ofparticles, semi-conductor device equation in applied physics, andchemotaxis in

  20. Applied quantitative analysis in the social sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Petscher, Yaacov; Compton, Donald L

    2013-01-01

    To say that complex data analyses are ubiquitous in the education and social sciences might be an understatement. Funding agencies and peer-review journals alike require that researchers use the most appropriate models and methods for explaining phenomena. Univariate and multivariate data structures often require the application of more rigorous methods than basic correlational or analysis of variance models. Additionally, though a vast set of resources may exist on how to run analysis, difficulties may be encountered when explicit direction is not provided as to how one should run a model

  1. Applied mathematics for science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Glasgow, Larry A

    2014-01-01

    Prepare students for success in using applied mathematics for engineering practice and post-graduate studies moves from one mathematical method to the next sustaining reader interest and easing the application of the techniques Uses different examples from chemical, civil, mechanical and various other engineering fields Based on a decade's worth of the authors lecture notes detailing the topic of applied mathematics for scientists and engineers Concisely writing with numerous examples provided including historical perspectives as well as a solutions manual for academic adopters

  2. SPSS for applied sciences basic statistical testing

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Cole

    2013-01-01

    This book offers a quick and basic guide to using SPSS and provides a general approach to solving problems using statistical tests. It is both comprehensive in terms of the tests covered and the applied settings it refers to, and yet is short and easy to understand. Whether you are a beginner or an intermediate level test user, this book will help you to analyse different types of data in applied settings. It will also give you the confidence to use other statistical software and to extend your expertise to more specific scientific settings as required.The author does not use mathematical form

  3. THE CASE STUDY TASKS AS A BASIS FOR THE FUND OF THE ASSESSMENT TOOLS AT THE MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS FOR THE DIRECTION 01.03.02 APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Aleksandrovna Kirillova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The modern reform of the Russian higher education involves the implementation of competence-based approach, the main idea of which is the practical orientation of education. Mathematics is a universal language of description, modeling and studies of phenomena and processes of different nature. Therefore creating the fund of assessment tools for mathematical disciplines based on the applied problems is actual. The case method is the most appropriate mean of monitoring the learning outcomes, it is aimed at bridging the gap between theory and practice.The aim of the research is the development of methodical materials for the creating the fund of assessment tools that are based on the case-study for the mathematical analisis for direction «Applied Mathematics and Computer Science». The aim follows from the contradiction between the need for the introduction of case-method in the educational process in high school and the lack of study of the theoretical foundations of using of this method as applied to mathematical disciplines, insufficient theoretical basis and the description of the process of creating case-problems for use their in the monitoring of the learning outcomes.

  4. Hormesis in Regulatory risk assessment - Science and Science Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, George

    2010-01-01

    This brief commentary will argue that whether hormesis is considered in regulatory risk assessment is a matter less of science than of science policy. I will first discuss the distinction between science and science policy and their roles in regulatory risk assessment. Then I will focus on factors that influence science policy, especially as it relates to the conduct of risk assessments to inform regulatory decisions, with a focus on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The key que...

  5. Applied and fundamental aspects of fusion science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Alexander V.

    2016-05-01

    Fusion research is driven by the applied goal of energy production from fusion reactions. There is, however, a wealth of fundamental physics to be discovered and studied along the way. This Commentary discusses selected developments in diagnostics and present-day research topics in high-temperature plasma physics.

  6. The DEVELOP Program as a Unique Applied Science Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, J. W.; Schmidt, C. L.; Ruiz, M. L.; Cawthorn, J.

    2004-12-01

    produced by the students. Projects have included Homeland Security in Virginia, Energy Management in New Mexico, Water Management in Mississippi, Air Quality Management in Alabama, Invasive Species mapping in Nevada, Public Health risk assessment in California, Disaster Management in Oklahoma, Agricultural Efficiency in South Dakota, Coastal Management in Louisiana and Carbon Management in Oregon. DEVELOP students gain experience in applied science, computer technology, and project management. Several DEVELOP projects will be demonstrated and discussed during this presentation. DEVELOP is sponsored by the Applications Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  7. Sunlight and shadow in applied science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this, the inaugural Finniston Lecture a plea is made for recognition of the vital importance of a strong scientific and technological base to the long term health of the British economy. The contributions made by Sir Monty Finniston, as Head of the Metallurgy Division at AERE Harwell from 1948 to 1958, to the UK nuclear energy programme are used as an illustration of this theme. Of particular note was his role as a champion of applied scientific research - that is, basic research aimed at a specific application - and there is today an even greater need for powerful defence of such activities against the short term financial criteria applied by government and the City. (Author)

  8. Developing a Framework for Science Performance Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjin; Park, Hyun-Ju; Kang, Ho-Kam; Noh, Suk-Goo

    The purpose of this study was to develop a Framework for Performance Assessment in Science Education (F-PASE). Science educators in the past have paid more attention to science curriculum and teaching strategies than assessment. In recent years attention has turned toward performance assessment which addresses the concerns of science curriculum…

  9. NASA's Applied Sciences: Natural Disasters Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Jason L.

    2010-01-01

    Fully utilize current and near-term airborne and spaceborne assets and capabilities. NASA spaceborne instruments are for research but can be applied to natural disaster response as appropriate. NASA airborne instruments can be targeted specifically for disaster response. Could impact research programs. Better flow of information improves disaster response. Catalog capability, product, applicable disaster, points of contact. Ownership needs to come from the highest level of NASA - unpredictable and irregular nature of disasters requires contingency funding for disaster response. Build-in transfer of applicable natural disaster research capabilities to operational functionality at other agencies (e.g., USFS, NOAA, FEMA...) at the outset, whenever possible. For the Decadal Survey Missions, opportunities exist to identify needs and requirements early in the mission design process. Need to understand additional needs and commitments for meeting the needs of the disaster community. Opportunity to maximize disaster response and mitigation from the Decadal Survey Missions. Additional needs or capabilities may require agency contributions.

  10. Welding As Science: Applying Basic Engineering Principles to the Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum provides sample problems illustrating ways in which basic engineering science has been applied to the discipline of welding. Perhaps inferences may be drawn regarding optimal approaches to particular welding problems, as well as for the optimal education for welding engineers. Perhaps also some readers may be attracted to the science(s) of welding and may make worthwhile contributions to the discipline.

  11. Applied Behavior Analysis Is a Science And, Therefore, Progressive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf, Justin B.; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla; Ross, Robert K.; Smith, Tristram; Weiss, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a science and, therefore, involves progressive approaches and outcomes. In this commentary we argue that the spirit and the method of science should be maintained in order to avoid reductionist procedures, stifled innovation, and rote, unresponsive protocols that become increasingly removed from meaningful…

  12. Ten years of applied labour market research at the Hanze University of Applied Sciences Groningen

    OpenAIRE

    Lieshout, Harm van

    2014-01-01

    Opening chapter of the English version of the book 'Energieke Arbeid' published by the Centre of Applied Labour Market Research and Innovation (durch abbreviation: KCA) to celebrate the 10th anniversary of applied labour market research at Hanze University of Applied Sciences. This first chapter takes a brief look back at the development of KCA over the past ten years.

  13. Free online electronic information resources on applied science and technology

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, T. B.

    2003-01-01

    The paper discusses free online electronic information resources and different means of collection of the resources. The online electronic information resources on “Applied Science and Technology are compiled and linked at URL: http://www.geocities.com/ghosh_svrec and described the different free Internet resource like online electronic journals, online electronic books, online databases, organizations, virtual libraries on Applied Science and Technology and special page on earthquake inform...

  14. Valid and Reliable Science Content Assessments for Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretter, Thomas R.; Brown, Sherri L.; Bush, William S.; Saderholm, Jon C.; Holmes, Vicki-Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Science teachers' content knowledge is an important influence on student learning, highlighting an ongoing need for programs, and assessments of those programs, designed to support teacher learning of science. Valid and reliable assessments of teacher science knowledge are needed for direct measurement of this crucial variable. This paper…

  15. CREATING A FOUNDATION FOR INTERNATIONAL ALUMNI NETWORKS IN THE FINNISH UNIVERSITIES OF APPLIED SCIENCES : Case JAMK University of Applied Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Aarva, Aku; Alijärvi, Pauli

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor’s thesis identifies the theories and structures, which are relevant in the creation of international alumni networks in the Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences. It also includes a vast quantitative survey and analysis, which aims to identify the views, interests and needs, related to the international alumni network, of the current international degree students, i.e. future international alumni, of JAMK University of Applied Sciences. The thesis identifies several bra...

  16. Applying comprehensive geriatric assessment to investigate falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Geraldine

    2016-04-01

    This is the second article in a short series that presents case study examples of the use of comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) in different clinical settings. CGA is a holistic assessment model designed to determine frail older people's medical and mental health status, as well as functional, social and environmental issues. When applied by nurses, it can enable individualised planning for health, safety and wellbeing. This article presents the case of an older man who had a three-month history of falls. After his most recent fall he was admitted to an emergency department, where examination identified no significant abnormal pathology, and subsequently to a nurse-led older person's clinic. The article describes how a CGA approach was adopted to assess the man, establish an underlying diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, and develop a personalised care plan to address immediate falls risk and long-term planning. PMID:27029990

  17. NASA'S Water Resources Element Within the Applied Sciences Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, David; Doorn, Bradley; Engman, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Earth Systems Division has the primary responsibility for the Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the NASA Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses major problems facing water resources managers, including having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA's science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA's Water Resources Applications Program are described.

  18. Applied Statistics for the Social and Health Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, Rachel A A

    2012-01-01

    Applied Statistics for the Social and Health Sciences provides graduate students in the social and health sciences with the basic skills that they need to estimate, interpret, present, and publish statistical models using contemporary standards. The book targets the social and health science branches such as human development, public health, sociology, psychology, education, and social work in which students bring a wide range of mathematical skills and have a wide range of methodological affinities. For these students, a successful course in statistics will not only offer statistical content

  19. Research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized and abstracts of published reports are presented. The major categories of the ICASE research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  20. Students Explaining Science--Assessment of Science Communication Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulgemeyer, Christoph; Schecker, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Science communication competence (SCC) is an important educational goal in the school science curricula of several countries. However, there is a lack of research about the structure and the assessment of SCC. This paper specifies the theoretical framework of SCC by a competence model. We developed a qualitative assessment method for SCC that is…

  1. Global Conference on Applied Computing in Science and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Global Conference on Applied Computing in Science and Engineering is organized by academics and researchers belonging to different scientific areas of the C3i/Polytechnic Institute of Portalegre (Portugal) and the University of Extremadura (Spain) with the technical support of ScienceKnow Conferences. The event has the objective of creating an international forum for academics, researchers and scientists from worldwide to discuss worldwide results and proposals regarding to the soundest issues related to Applied Computing in Science and Engineering. This event will include the participation of renowned keynote speakers, oral presentations, posters sessions and technical conferences related to the topics dealt with in the Scientific Program as well as an attractive social and cultural program. The papers will be published in the Proceedings e-books. The proceedings of the conference will be sent to possible indexing on Thomson Reuters (selective by Thomson Reuters, not all-inclusive) and Google Scholar...

  2. Speaking of food: connecting basic and applied plant science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Briana L; Kellogg, Elizabeth A; Miller, Allison J

    2014-10-01

    The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) predicts that food production must rise 70% over the next 40 years to meet the demands of a growing population that is expected to reach nine billion by the year 2050. Many facets of basic plant science promoted by the Botanical Society of America are important for agriculture; however, more explicit connections are needed to bridge the gap between basic and applied plant research. This special issue, Speaking of Food: Connecting Basic and Applied Plant Science, was conceived to showcase productive overlaps of basic and applied research to address the challenges posed by feeding billions of people and to stimulate more research, fresh connections, and new paradigms. Contributions to this special issue thus illustrate some interactive areas of study in plant science-historical and modern plant-human interaction, crop and weed origins and evolution, and the effects of natural and artificial selection on crops and their wild relatives. These papers provide examples of how research integrating the basic and applied aspects of plant science benefits the pursuit of knowledge and the translation of that knowledge into actions toward sustainable production of crops and conservation of diversity in a changing climate. PMID:25326609

  3. Methods for model selection in applied science and engineering.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Richard V., Jr.

    2004-10-01

    Mathematical models are developed and used to study the properties of complex systems and/or modify these systems to satisfy some performance requirements in just about every area of applied science and engineering. A particular reason for developing a model, e.g., performance assessment or design, is referred to as the model use. Our objective is the development of a methodology for selecting a model that is sufficiently accurate for an intended use. Information on the system being modeled is, in general, incomplete, so that there may be two or more models consistent with the available information. The collection of these models is called the class of candidate models. Methods are developed for selecting the optimal member from a class of candidate models for the system. The optimal model depends on the available information, the selected class of candidate models, and the model use. Classical methods for model selection, including the method of maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, as well as a method employing a decision-theoretic approach, are formulated to select the optimal model for numerous applications. There is no requirement that the candidate models be random. Classical methods for model selection ignore model use and require data to be available. Examples are used to show that these methods can be unreliable when data is limited. The decision-theoretic approach to model selection does not have these limitations, and model use is included through an appropriate utility function. This is especially important when modeling high risk systems, where the consequences of using an inappropriate model for the system can be disastrous. The decision-theoretic method for model selection is developed and applied for a series of complex and diverse applications. These include the selection of the: (1) optimal order of the polynomial chaos approximation for non-Gaussian random variables and stationary stochastic processes, (2) optimal pressure load model to be

  4. Valid and Reliable Science Content Assessments for Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretter, Thomas R.; Brown, Sherri L.; Bush, William S.; Saderholm, Jon C.; Holmes, Vicki-Lynn

    2013-03-01

    Science teachers' content knowledge is an important influence on student learning, highlighting an ongoing need for programs, and assessments of those programs, designed to support teacher learning of science. Valid and reliable assessments of teacher science knowledge are needed for direct measurement of this crucial variable. This paper describes multiple sources of validity and reliability (Cronbach's alpha greater than 0.8) evidence for physical, life, and earth/space science assessments—part of the Diagnostic Teacher Assessments of Mathematics and Science (DTAMS) project. Validity was strengthened by systematic synthesis of relevant documents, extensive use of external reviewers, and field tests with 900 teachers during assessment development process. Subsequent results from 4,400 teachers, analyzed with Rasch IRT modeling techniques, offer construct and concurrent validity evidence.

  5. Applied social and behavioral science to address complex health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingood, William C; Allegrante, John P; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O; Clark, Noreen M; Windsor, Richard C; Zimmerman, Marc A; Green, Lawrence W

    2011-11-01

    Complex and dynamic societal factors continue to challenge the capacity of the social and behavioral sciences in preventive medicine and public health to overcome the most seemingly intractable health problems. This paper proposes a fundamental shift from a research approach that presumes to identify (from highly controlled trials) universally applicable interventions expected to be implemented "with fidelity" by practitioners, to an applied social and behavioral science approach similar to that of engineering. Such a shift would build on and complement the recent recommendations of the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research and require reformulation of the research-practice dichotomy. It would also require disciplines now engaged in preventive medicine and public health practice to develop a better understanding of systems thinking and the science of application that is sensitive to the complexity, interactivity, and unique elements of community and practice settings. Also needed is a modification of health-related education to ensure that those entering the disciplines develop instincts and capacities as applied scientists. PMID:22011425

  6. Managing change : Case study: HAMK University of Applied Sciences, Valkeakoski

    OpenAIRE

    Chau Thi Tra, Mi

    2012-01-01

    In response to changes imposed by the Finnish government on the Univer-sities of Applied Sciences system in the near future, HAMK has proactive-ly adopted several programmes to prepare for future challenges and rein-force the organization’s competitiveness. However, organizational change has never been an easy, straightforward issue and how to manage change effectively has become an interest to the organization. The study aims at providing suggestions for a more successful change im-pleme...

  7. Adaptive Robotic Systems Design in University of Applied Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Gunsing Jos; Gijselhart Fons; Hagemans Nyke; Jonkers Hans; Kivits Eric; Klijn Peter; Kapteijns Bart; Kroeske Diederich; Langen Hans; Oerlemans Bart; Oostindie Jan; van Stuijvenberg Joost

    2016-01-01

    In the industry for highly specialized machine building (small series with high variety and high complexity) and in healthcare a demand for adaptive robotics is rapidly coming up. Technically skilled people are not always available in sufficient numbers. A lot of know how with respect to the required technologies is available but successful adaptive robotic system designs are still rare. In our research at the university of applied sciences we incorporate new available technologies in our edu...

  8. Kymenlaakso University of Applied Sciences Social Media Marketing Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanov, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    The popularity of social media has grown significantly in the course of the last few years and become a beneficial tool for promoting an organisation. Maintaining online presence on social media websites allows a company to reach its target audiences and raise public awareness on a global basis. The purpose of this study was to achieve a better understanding of how social media marketing of Kymenlaakso University of Applied Sciences can be improved and which social media marketing tools ...

  9. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 4 covers articles on single crystal compound semiconductors and complex polycrystalline materials. The book discusses narrow gap semiconductors and solid state batteries. The text then describes the advantages of hot-pressed microcrystalline compacts of oxygen-octahedra ferroelectrics over single crystal materials, as well as heterostructure junction lasers. Solid state physicists, materials scientists, electrical engineers, and graduate students studying the subjects being discussed will find the book invaluable.

  10. Social media marketing & Kymenlaakso University of Applied Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Marketers today have faced the evolvement of social media marketing and the need for education in online marketing has increased. Kymenlaakso University of Applied Sciences has thought of entering different social media sites to be able to reach new applicants for their international courses and degrees. The objective of the thesis was to achieve a better understanding of the social media network and to find out the differences between the old and new media strategies for being able to de...

  11. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 1 presents articles about junction electroluminescence; metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) physics; ion implantation in semiconductors; and electron transport through insulating thin films. The book describes the basic physics of carrier injection; energy transfer and recombination mechanisms; state of the art efficiencies; and future prospects for light emitting diodes. The text then discusses solid state spectroscopy, which is the pair spectra observed in gallium phosphide photoluminescence. The extensive studies

  12. PREFACE: International Conference on Applied Sciences 2015 (ICAS2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemle, Ludovic Dan; Jiang, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences ICAS2015 took place in Wuhan, China on June 3-5, 2015 at the Military Economics Academy of Wuhan. The conference is regularly organized, alternatively in Romania and in P.R. China, by Politehnica University of Timişoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P.R. China, with the joint aims to serve as a platform for exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences, and to promote the communication between the scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The topics of the conference cover a comprehensive spectrum of issues from: >Economical Sciences and Defense: Management Sciences, Business Management, Financial Management, Logistics, Human Resources, Crisis Management, Risk Management, Quality Control, Analysis and Prediction, Government Expenditure, Computational Methods in Economics, Military Sciences, National Security, and others... >Fundamental Sciences and Engineering: Interdisciplinary applications of physics, Numerical approximation and analysis, Computational Methods in Engineering, Metallic Materials, Composite Materials, Metal Alloys, Metallurgy, Heat Transfer, Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronics, Reliability, Electrical Engineering, Circuits and Systems, Signal Processing, Software Engineering, Data Bases, Modeling and Simulation, and others... The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has applicability potential in Engineering, Economics, Defense, etc. The number of participants was 120 from 11 countries (China, Romania, Taiwan, Korea, Denmark, France, Italy, Spain, USA, Jamaica, and Bosnia and Herzegovina). During the three days of the conference four invited and 67 oral talks were delivered. Based on the work presented at the conference, 38 selected papers have been included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. These papers present new research

  13. Ciencia básica y ciencia aplicada Basic science and applied science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruy Pérez-Tamayo

    2001-08-01

    ://www.insp.mx/salud/index.htmlA lecture was presented by the author at the Democratic Opinion Forum on Health Teaching and Research, organized by Mexico´s National Health Institutes Coordinating Office, at National Cardiology Institute "Ignacio Chavez", where he presented a critical review of the conventional classification of basic and applied science, as well as his personal view on health science teaching and research. According to the author, "well-conducted science" is that "generating reality-checked knowledge" and "mis-conducted science" is that "unproductive or producing 'just lies' and 'non-fundable'. To support his views, the author reviews utilitarian and pejorative definitions of science, as well as those of committed and pure science, useful and useless science, and practical and esoterical science, as synonyms of applied and basic science. He also asserts that, in Mexico, "this classification has been used in the past to justify federal funding cutbacks to basic science, allegedly because it is not targeted at solving 'national problems' or because it was not relevant to priorities set in a given six-year political administration period". Regarding health education and research, the author asserts that the current academic programs are inefficient and ineffective; his proposal to tackle these problems is to carry out a solid scientific study, conducted by a multidisciplinary team of experts, "to design the scientific researcher curricula from recruitment of intelligent young people to retirement or death". Performance assessment of researchers would not be restricted to publication of papers, since "the quality of scientific work and contribution to the development of science is not reflected by the number of published papers". The English version of this paper is available at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html

  14. Advances in the Science of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shute, Valerie J.; Leighton, Jacqueline P.; Jang, Eunice E.; Chu, Man-Wai

    2016-01-01

    Designing, developing, and administering assessments has remained fairly unchanged across the past century. However, recent developments in instructional technology, learning science theory, and advances in the design of assessments necessitate a newfound perspective on assessment. The objective of the present article is to review the topic of…

  15. Data Science in Educational Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David C.; Webb, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    This article is the second of two articles in this special issue that were developed following discussions of the Assessment Working Group at EDUsummIT 2013. The article extends the analysis of assessments of collaborative problem solving (CPS) to examine the significance of the data concerning this complex assessment problem and then for…

  16. Applying science and mathematics to big data for smarter buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young M; An, Lianjun; Liu, Fei; Horesh, Raya; Chae, Young Tae; Zhang, Rui

    2013-08-01

    Many buildings are now collecting a large amount of data on operations, energy consumption, and activities through systems such as a building management system (BMS), sensors, and meters (e.g., submeters and smart meters). However, the majority of data are not utilized and are thrown away. Science and mathematics can play an important role in utilizing these big data and accurately assessing how energy is consumed in buildings and what can be done to save energy, make buildings energy efficient, and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper discusses an analytical tool that has been developed to assist building owners, facility managers, operators, and tenants of buildings in assessing, benchmarking, diagnosing, tracking, forecasting, and simulating energy consumption in building portfolios. PMID:23819911

  17. APU science assessment in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Chung LEE

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the national assessment survey conducted by the Assessment Performance Unit (APU in the United Kingdom in relation to its background, theoretical framework, assessment categories, the content and context of test items, criteria for item setting, and modes of assessment. Based on the results of the survey, the paper reflects on the performance of the students in the use of science process skills, and how different contextual variables bear on it. The paper also examines the advantages and limitations of this survey, and its impacts on the development of the national science curriculum of the United Kingdom.

  18. APU science assessment in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung Chung LEE

    2008-01-01

    This paper introduces the national assessment survey conducted by the Assessment Performance Unit (APU) in the United Kingdom in relation to its background, theoretical framework, assessment categories, the content and context of test items, criteria for item setting, and modes of assessment. Based on the results of the survey, the paper reflects on the performance of the students in the use of science process skills, and how different contextual variables bear on it. The paper also examines ...

  19. Institutional operating figures in basic and applied sciences: Scientometric analysis of quantitative output benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer Axel; Kölzow Silvana; Kreiter Carolin; Scutaru Cristian; Groneberg-Kloft Beatrix; Quarcoo David

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Institutional operating figures and benchmarking systems are important features for the implementation of efficacy in basic and applied sciences. They are needed for research evaluation and funding policy. However, the current policy settings for research evaluation urgently need review since there may be imbalances present in many areas. Methods The present study assessed benchmarking of research output. By the use of large data bases research output was categorized and a...

  20. Modeling in applied sciences a kinetic theory approach

    CERN Document Server

    Pulvirenti, Mario

    2000-01-01

    Modeling complex biological, chemical, and physical systems, in the context of spatially heterogeneous mediums, is a challenging task for scientists and engineers using traditional methods of analysis Modeling in Applied Sciences is a comprehensive survey of modeling large systems using kinetic equations, and in particular the Boltzmann equation and its generalizations An interdisciplinary group of leading authorities carefully develop the foundations of kinetic models and discuss the connections and interactions between model theories, qualitative and computational analysis and real-world applications This book provides a thoroughly accessible and lucid overview of the different aspects, models, computations, and methodology for the kinetic-theory modeling process Topics and Features * Integrated modeling perspective utilized in all chapters * Fluid dynamics of reacting gases * Self-contained introduction to kinetic models * Becker–Doring equations * Nonlinear kinetic models with chemical reactions * Kinet...

  1. Risk assessment of topically applied products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Tue; Basse, Line Hollesen; Halling-Sørensen, Bent

    2007-01-01

    as model compounds. Tolerable daily intake (TDI) values have been established for BADGE and derivatives. Endocrine disruption was chosen as endpoint for 3-BC and 4-MBC. Skin permeation of the model compounds was investigated in vitro using pig skin membranes. Tape stripping was applied to simulate broken...... skin associated with various skin disorders. BADGE and derivatives had a tendency to permeate pig skin membranes in vitro with higher fluxes in the tape stripped membranes compared to the non-treated membranes. Data from the in vitro skin permeation study and from the literature were used as input....... Both UV filters are endocrine disrupting compounds with 3-BC being the more potent. UV filters in sunscreen are often present in high concentrations, which potentially may lead to high systemic exposure dosages. Thus, the risk associated with use of 3-BC and 4-MBC containing sunscreen with regards...

  2. Applying science and technology to combat WMD terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuest, Craig R.; Werne, Roger W.; Colston, Billy W.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.

    2006-05-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing and fielding advanced strategies that dramatically improve the nation's capabilities to prevent, prepare for, detect, and respond to terrorist use of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) weapons. The science, technology, and integrated systems we provide are informed by and developed with key partners and end users. LLNL's long-standing role as one of the two principle U.S. nuclear weapons design laboratories has led to significant resident expertise for health effects of exposure to radiation, radiation detection technologies, characterization of radioisotopes, and assessment and response capabilities for terrorist nuclear weapons use. This paper provides brief overviews of a number of technologies developed at LLNL that are being used to address national security needs to confront the growing threats of CBRNE terrorism.

  3. Applying Science and Technology to Combat WMD Terrorism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuest, C R; Werne, R W; Colston, B W; Hartmann-Siantar, C L

    2006-05-04

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing and fielding advanced strategies that dramatically improve the nation's capabilities to prevent, prepare for, detect, and respond to terrorist use of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) weapons. The science, technology, and integrated systems we provide are informed by and developed with key partners and end users. LLNL's long-standing role as one of the two principle U.S. nuclear weapons design laboratories has led to significant resident expertise for health effects of exposure to radiation, radiation detection technologies, characterization of radioisotopes, and assessment and response capabilities for terrorist nuclear weapons use. This paper provides brief overviews of a number of technologies developed at LLNL that are being used to address national security needs to confront the growing threats of CBRNE terrorism.

  4. Applying Science and Technology to Combat WMD Terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing and fielding advanced strategies that dramatically improve the nation's capabilities to prevent, prepare for, detect, and respond to terrorist use of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) weapons. The science, technology, and integrated systems we provide are informed by and developed with key partners and end users. LLNL's long-standing role as one of the two principle U.S. nuclear weapons design laboratories has led to significant resident expertise for health effects of exposure to radiation, radiation detection technologies, characterization of radioisotopes, and assessment and response capabilities for terrorist nuclear weapons use. This paper provides brief overviews of a number of technologies developed at LLNL that are being used to address national security needs to confront the growing threats of CBRNE terrorism

  5. 77 FR 26292 - Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy Assessments: Social Science Methodologies to Assess Goals...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... Mitigation Strategy Assessments: Social Science Methodologies to Assess Goals Related to Knowledge.'' The... an issue paper entitled ``Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy Assessments: Social Science...' knowledge about drugs' risks; (2) share current FDA experience regarding social science assessments...

  6. Formative Assessment in Primary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughland, Tony; Kilpatrick, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    This action learning study in a year three classroom explored the implementation of five formative assessment principles to assist students' understandings of the scientific topic of liquids and solids. These principles were employed to give students a greater opportunity to express their understanding of the concepts. The study found that…

  7. Life Science Start-up Activities at the Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Gerda

    2014-12-01

    The universities of applied sciences (UAS) provide several values for the society and economy of a country. Besides education of high level professionals, transfer of knowledge from research to applications in industry or as new start-up companies is an important task. This is done in different ways in the various disciplines. In Life Sciences, a key industry branch in Switzerland, innovation is a competitive success factor and research findings from UAS/Life Sciences contribute to the valorization of new technologies to products, services and to business performance. In order to foster awareness for the innovation need of industry, UAS install processes and support for transfer of research and technology results to marketable applications. Furthermore they may facilitate contacts of researchers and students with entrepreneurs in order to animate start-up founding as a true alternative to being employed. Access to coaching and entrepreneurial training completes the essential basis. PMID:26508606

  8. NASA Applied Sciences Program. Overview Presentation; Discovering and Demonstrating Innovative and Practical Applications of Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Goal 1: Enhance Applications Research Advance the use of NASA Earth science in policy making, resource management and planning, and disaster response. Key Actions: Identify priority needs, conduct applied research to generate innovative applications, and support projects that demonstrate uses of NASA Earth science. Goal 2: Increase Collaboration Establish a flexible program structure to meet diverse partner needs and applications objectives. Key Actions: Pursue partnerships to leverage resources and risks and extend the program s reach and impact. Goal 3:Accelerate Applications Ensure that NASA s flight missions plan for and support applications goals in conjunction with their science goals, starting with mission planning and extending through the mission life cycle. Key Actions: Enable identification of applications early in satellite mission lifecycle and facilitate effective ways to integrate end-user needs into satellite mission planning

  9. Science Outcomes Assessment Plan (SOAP): Design phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Zodiac T.; Gurkas, P.; Shaw, K.

    2009-01-01

    Columbus State University is under pressure to reduce the number of "unproductive grades” in its introductory science classes, to increase the number of STEM majors, and to assess the level of attainment of science outcomes in its general education courses for accreditation documentation. The authors designed a study to examine affective, cognitive, social, and classroom factors as predictors of success in science while also attempting to document the link between introductory "gateway to science major” course outcomes and the general education program. One of the factors probed is the match between students’ understanding of important learning outcomes of the course and the instructor's stated priorities. A very real risk in content focused courses (e.g., astronomy) is the mismatch between the university's stated outcomes for a general education science course (e.g., critical thinking) and the instructor's content related outcomes. This mismatch may become a barrier for students taking `required’ courses as they may not comprehend the rationale for the requirement, fail to engage in the course, and consequently receive a failing grade. Another possible factor affecting student success in science is the student reasoning level. Students who are concrete thinkers may not be as successful in introductory science classes that require advanced logical thinking about unfamiliar concepts. The authors hope to use the results of this study to help inform university practices such as placement into introductory science courses and for future faculty development.

  10. Technology Assessment as a Tool Applied in Science and Technology to Achieve Innovation: Optical Methods for Fuels Quality Assessment [Prospecção Tecnológica como uma Ferramenta Aplicada em Ciência e Tecnologia para se Chegar à Inovação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humbervânia R. G. da Silva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents examples of technological assessment and forecasting of the National Institute of Science and Technology (INCT Energy and Environment, aiming to bring competitive intelligence to Science Technology & Innovation as a contribution for medium and long term to policies, strategies, plans, and processes of decision making. Here is presented the technology assessment of optical methods of analysis for determining oxidative stability, density and viscosity of oils, biodiesel, biofuels, fuels and mixtures thereof.

  11. Technology Assessment as a Tool Applied in Science and Technology to Achieve Innovation: Optical Methods for Fuels Quality Assessment [Prospecção Tecnológica como uma Ferramenta Aplicada em Ciência e Tecnologia para se Chegar à Inovação

    OpenAIRE

    Humbervânia R. G. da Silva; Alessandra dos S. Tanajura; Alexandre K. Guimarães; Marilena Meira; Cristina M. Quintella

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents examples of technological assessment and forecasting of the National Institute of Science and Technology (INCT) Energy and Environment, aiming to bring competitive intelligence to Science Technology & Innovation as a contribution for medium and long term to policies, strategies, plans, and processes of decision making. Here is presented the technology assessment of optical methods of analysis for determining oxidative stability, density and viscosity of oils, biodiesel, bi...

  12. Distance learning in the Applied Sciences of Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The major impediment to the expansion of oncology services is a shortage of personnel. Purpose: To develop a distance learning course for radiation oncology trainees. Materials: Under the sponsorship of the Asia Pacific Regional Cooperative Agreement administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a CD ROM-based Applied Sciences of Oncology (ASOC) distance learning course of 71 modules was created. The course covers communications, critical appraisal, functional anatomy, molecular biology, pathology. The materials include interactive text and illustrations that require students to answer questions before they can progress. The course aims to supplement existing oncology curricula and does not provide a qualification. It aims to assist students in acquiring their own profession's qualification. The course was piloted in seven countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America during 2004. After feedback from the pilot course, a further nine modules were added to cover imaging physics (three modules), informed consent, burnout and coping with death and dying, Economic analysis and cancer care, Nutrition, cachexia and fatigue, radiation-induced second cancers and mathematical tools and background for radiation oncology. The course was widely distributed and can be downloaded from (http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Training/Aso/register.html). ASOC has been downloaded over 1100 times in the first year after it was posted. There is a huge demand for educational materials but the interactive approach is labour-intensive and expensive to compile. The course must be maintained to remain relevant.

  13. Fusion Nuclear Science Pathways Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.E. Kessel, et. al.

    2012-02-23

    With the strong commitment of the US to the success of the ITER burning plasma mission, and the project overall, it is prudent to consider how to take the most advantage of this investment. The production of energy from fusion has been a long sought goal, and the subject of several programmatic investigations and time line proposals [1]. The nuclear aspects of fusion research have largely been avoided experimentally for practical reasons, resulting in a strong emphasis on plasma science. Meanwhile, ITER has brought into focus how the interface between the plasma and engineering/technology, presents the most challenging problems for design. In fact, this situation is becoming the rule and no longer the exception. ITER will demonstrate the deposition of 0.5 GW of neutron heating to the blanket, deliver a heat load of 10-20 MW/m2 or more on the divertor, inject 50-100 MW of heating power to the plasma, all at the expected size scale of a power plant. However, in spite of this, and a number of other technologies relevant power plant, ITER will provide a low neutron exposure compared to the levels expected to a fusion power plant, and will purchase its tritium entirely from world reserves accumulated from decades of CANDU reactor operations. Such a decision for ITER is technically well founded, allowing the use of conventional materials and water coolant, avoiding the thick tritium breeding blankets required for tritium self-sufficiency, and allowing the concentration on burning plasma and plasma-engineering interface issues. The neutron fluence experienced in ITER over its entire lifetime will be ~ 0.3 MW-yr/m2, while a fusion power plant is expected to experience 120-180 MW-yr/m2 over its lifetime. ITER utilizes shielding blanket modules, with no tritium breeding, except in test blanket modules (TBM) located in 3 ports on the midplane [2], which will provide early tests of the fusion nuclear environment with very low tritium production (a few g per year).

  14. Need Assessment of Enhancing the Weightage of Applied Biochemistry in the Undergraduate Curriculum at MGIMS, Sevagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish; Jena, Lingaraja; Vagha, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    In order to review the need assessment of enhancing the weightage of Applied Biochemistry in the undergraduate curriculum at Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences (MGIMS), Sevagram, a validated questionnaire was sent to 453 participants which include 387 undergraduate students, 11 interns, 23 postgraduate students, and 32 faculty members. A…

  15. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized. The Institute conducts unclassified basic research in applied mathematics in order to extend and improve problem solving capabilities in science and engineering, particularly in aeronautics and space.

  16. Adaptive Robotic Systems Design in University of Applied Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunsing Jos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the industry for highly specialized machine building (small series with high variety and high complexity and in healthcare a demand for adaptive robotics is rapidly coming up. Technically skilled people are not always available in sufficient numbers. A lot of know how with respect to the required technologies is available but successful adaptive robotic system designs are still rare. In our research at the university of applied sciences we incorporate new available technologies in our education courses by way of research projects; in these projects students will investigate the application possibilities of new technologies together with companies and teachers. Thus we are able to transfer knowledge to the students including an innovation oriented attitude and skills. Last years we developed several industrial binpicking applications for logistics and machining-factories with different types of 3D vision. Also force feedback gripping has been developed including slip sensing. Especially for healthcare robotics we developed a so-called twisted wire actuator, which is very compact in combination with an underactuated gripper, manufactured in one piece in polyurethane. We work both on modeling and testing the functions of these designs but we work also on complete demonstrator systems. Since the amount of disciplines involved in complex product and machine design increases rapidly we pay a lot of attention with respect to systems engineering methods. Apart from the classical engineering disciplines like mechanical, electrical, software and mechatronics engineering, especially for adaptive robotics more and more disciplines like industrial product design, communication … multimedia design and of course physics and even art are to be involved depending on the specific application to be designed. Design tools like V-model, agile/scrum and design-approaches to obtain the best set of requirements are being implemented in the engineering studies from

  17. Identification of multiple intelligences for high school students in theoretical and applied science courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, D. Kim

    Historically educators in the United States have used the Stanford-Binet intelligence test to measure a students' ability in logical/mathematical and linguistic domains. This measurement is being used by a society that has evolved from agrarian and industrial-based economies to what is presently labeled a technological society. As society has changed so have the educational needs of the students who will live in this technological society. This study assessed the multiple intelligences of high school students enrolled in theoretical and applied science (physics and applied physics) courses. Studies have verified that performance and outcomes of students enrolled in these courses are similar in standardized testing but instructional methodology and processes are dissimilar. Analysis of multiple intelligence profiles collected from this study found significant differences in logical/mathematical, bodily/kinesthetic and intrapersonal multiple intelligences of students in theoretical science courses compared to students in applied science courses. Those differences clearly illustrate why it is imperative for educators to expand the definition of intelligence for students entering the new millennium.

  18. On Location Learning: Authentic Applied Science with Networked Augmented Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Eric; Klopfer, Eric; Perry, Judy

    2007-01-01

    The learning of science can be made more like the practice of science through authentic simulated experiences. We have created a networked handheld Augmented Reality environment that combines the authentic role-playing of Augmented Realities and the underlying models of Participatory Simulations. This game, known as Outbreak @ The Institute, is…

  19. Integrated Instruction in University Methods Courses: Applying Science Technology Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kenneth P.; Milson, Andrew J.

    The science-technology-society (STS) movement represents an attempt to "liberate the student from narrow utilities" (Dewey) through an interdisciplinary approach to the three content areas (science, technology, and society) providing a coherent conceptual scheme for integrating classroom instruction. This action research study sought to identify…

  20. Applying Nanotechnology to Human Health: Revolution in Biomedical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Siddhartha Shrivastava; Debabrata Dash

    2009-01-01

    Recent research on biosystems at the nanoscale has created one of the most dynamic science and technology domains at the confluence of physical sciences, molecular engineering, biology, biotechnology, and medicine. This domain includes better understanding of living and thinking systems, revolutionary biotechnology processes, synthesis of new drugs and their targeted delivery, regenerative medicine, neuromorphic engineering, and developing a sustainable environment. Nanobiosystems research is...

  1. Physical sciences and engineering advances in life sciences and oncology a WTEC global assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Daniel; Gerecht, Sharon; Levine, Ross; Mallick, Parag; McCarty, Owen; Munn, Lance; Reinhart-King, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an Assessment of Physical Sciences and Engineering Advances in Life Sciences and Oncology (APHELION) by a panel of experts. It covers the status and trends of applying physical sciences and engineering principles to oncology research in leading laboratories and organizations in Europe and Asia. The book elaborates on the six topics identified by the panel that have the greatest potential to advance understanding and treatment of cancer, each covered by a chapter in the book. The study was sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the National Institute of Health (NIH), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the NIH in the US under a cooperative agreement with the World Technology Evaluation Center (WTEC).

  2. Does Formative Assessment Improve Student Learning and Performance in Soil Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopittke, Peter M.; Wehr, J. Bernhard; Menzies, Neal W.

    2012-01-01

    Soil science students are required to apply knowledge from a range of disciplines to unfamiliar scenarios to solve complex problems. To encourage deep learning (with student performance an indicator of learning), a formative assessment exercise was introduced to a second-year soil science subject. For the formative assessment exercise, students…

  3. Assessing Middle and High School Mathematics & Science: Differentiating Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Sheryn Spencer

    2010-01-01

    For middle and high school teachers of mathematics and science, this book is filled with examples of instructional strategies that address students' readiness levels, interests, and learning preferences. It shows teachers how to formatively assess their students by addressing differentiated learning targets. Included are detailed examples of…

  4. Unpacking the Relationship Between Science Education and Applied Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Amanda; Schunn, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Scientific literacy has many meanings: it can be thought of as foundational knowledge, foundational critical thinking skills, or the application of these two foundations to everyday decision making. Here, we examine the far transfer scenario: do increases in science education lead to everyday decision-making becoming more consistent with consensus scientific knowledge? We report on a large sample of employees of a mixed urban/rural county representing a diverse range of careers, who completed an anonymous survey about their environmental conservation actions at home, as well as their general education level and their science coursework. Across broad and narrow measures of science education, we find little impact on action. Possible causes of this failure of transfer and the implications for changes in science instruction are discussed.

  5. Applying Historic Science Communication Lessons to Today's Global Change Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocchio, L. E.

    2009-12-01

    As global population surges towards seven billion and anthropogenic impacts ricochet throughout Earth’s environment, effective science communication has become essential. In today’s digital world where science communication must contend with stiff competition for audience attention, it is crucial to understand the lessons gleaned from a century worth of science communication research. Starting in the early part of the twentieth century a cadre of American scientists began to advocate for better public understanding of science, arguing that better understanding of science meant a better quality of life, better public affairs deliberations, and the elevation of democracy and culture. To improve science communication, many models of the communication process have been developed since then. Starting in the 1940s, science communication researchers adopted the linear communication model of electrical engineering. Over time, the one-way scientific communication of the linear model came to be identified with the deficit model approach—which assumes little prior scientific knowledge on the part of the receiver. A major failure of the deficit model was witnessed during the Mad Cow Disease outbreak in the UK: beef safety was over-simplified in the communication process, people were given a false sense of security, many ended up sick, and public trust in government plummeted. Of the many lessons learned from failures of the deficit model, arguably, the most significant lesson is that the public’s prior knowledge and life experience is always brought to bear on the message, i.e. the message must be contextualized. Here, we examine the major science communication lessons of the past century and discuss how they can inform more effective global change communication.

  6. Physiology and applied sciences in Nepal: 1st annual conference

    OpenAIRE

    Thapa, Ghan Bahadur; Mahotra, Narayan Bahadur; Pun, Matiram

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of medical schools in Nepal, there is an expected increase in the number of Nepalese physiologists. The first medical school was established in the 1970s. We report here about the first annual conference of Nepalese physiologists on 27-28 September 2013 organized by the Department of Clinical Physiology of the Nepalese Army Institute of Health Sciences (NAIHS) and Kathmandu University School of Medical Sciences (KUMS). Nepalese physiologists are trying to form their...

  7. Experiences & Tools from Modeling Instruction Applied to Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenec, J.; Landis, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Framework for K-12 Science Education calls for stronger curricular connections within the sciences, greater depth in understanding, and tasks higher on Bloom's Taxonomy. Understanding atmospheric sciences draws on core knowledge traditionally taught in physics, chemistry, and in some cases, biology. If this core knowledge is not conceptually sound, well retained, and transferable to new settings, understanding the causes and consequences of climate changes become a task in memorizing seemingly disparate facts to a student. Fortunately, experiences and conceptual tools have been developed and refined in the nationwide network of Physics Modeling and Chemistry Modeling teachers to build necessary understanding of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, particulate nature of matter, kinetic molecular theory, and particle model of light. Context-rich experiences are first introduced for students to construct an understanding of these principles and then conceptual tools are deployed for students to resolve misconceptions and deepen their understanding. Using these experiences and conceptual tools takes an investment of instructional time, teacher training, and in some cases, re-envisioning the format of a science classroom. There are few financial barriers to implementation and students gain a greater understanding of the nature of science by going through successive cycles of investigation and refinement of their thinking. This presentation shows how these experiences and tools could be used in an Earth Science course to support students developing conceptually rich understanding of the atmosphere and connections happening within.

  8. Applied aerodynamics experience for secondary science teachers and students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbitt, John D., III; Carroll, Bruce F.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics & Engineering Science at the University of Florida in conjunction with the Alachua County, Florida School Board has embarked on a four-year project of university-secondary school collaboration designed to enhance mathematics and science instruction in secondary school classrooms. The goals are to provide teachers with a fundamental knowledge of flight sciences, and to stimulate interest among students, particularly women and minorities, toward careers in engineering, mathematics, and science. In the first year of the project, all thirteen of the eighth grade physical science teachers and all 1200 of the eighth grade physical science students in the county participated. The activities consisted of a three-day seminar taught at the college level for the teachers, several weeks of classroom instruction for all the students, and an airport field trip for a subgroup of about 430 students that included an orientation flight in a Cessna 172 aircraft. The project brought together large numbers of middle school students, teachers, undergraduate and graduate engineering students, school board administrators, and university engineering faculty.

  9. Assessing Students' Skills in Science & Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Orpwood, G

    2006-01-01

    This seminar is co-organised by the Centre for Information Technology in Education (CITE) and The Office of Research, Faculty of Education, HKU. The seminar will describe work in the Canadian province of Ontario to assess students skills in science and technology through a systematically constructed series of performance tasks. In addition, sets of "exemplars" of student performance were developed and are aviable in an on-line multi-media archive that will be shared with participants.

  10. Applying a weed risk assessment approach to GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keese, Paul K; Robold, Andrea V; Myers, Ruth C; Weisman, Sarah; Smith, Joe

    2014-12-01

    Current approaches to environmental risk assessment of genetically modified (GM) plants are modelled on chemical risk assessment methods, which have a strong focus on toxicity. There are additional types of harms posed by plants that have been extensively studied by weed scientists and incorporated into weed risk assessment methods. Weed risk assessment uses robust, validated methods that are widely applied to regulatory decision-making about potentially problematic plants. They are designed to encompass a broad variety of plant forms and traits in different environments, and can provide reliable conclusions even with limited data. The knowledge and experience that underpin weed risk assessment can be harnessed for environmental risk assessment of GM plants. A case study illustrates the application of the Australian post-border weed risk assessment approach to a representative GM plant. This approach is a valuable tool to identify potential risks from GM plants. PMID:24046097

  11. 2013 Final Report: Integrated Science Assessment for Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    lead_isa_cover.jpg" alt="Cover of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Lead" vspace = "5" hspace="5" align="right" border="1" /> EPA released the final report, Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Lead (...

  12. Social assessment of transsexuals who apply for sex reassignment therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, J M

    1990-01-01

    A social worker member of the gender identity team of a Psychiatry Department is responsible for the social assessment of the transsexual who applies for sex reassignment surgery. This paper synthesizes the dynamics and processes in conducting the social assessment for eight male-to-female transsexuals from 1986 to April 1988. Role theory was used as the underlying theoretical framework for the assessment. Social criteria for the eligibility of the surgery are delineated. Three cases demonstrate how the social worker used these criteria for the assessment, the difficulties in the process and ways of resolving them. PMID:2367927

  13. Applying Nano technology to Human Health: Revolution in Biomedical Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research on bio systems at the nano scale has created one of the most dynamic science and technology domains at the confluence of physical sciences, molecular engineering, biology, biotechnology, and medicine. This domain includes better understanding of living and thinking systems, revolutionary biotechnology processes, synthesis of new drugs and their targeted delivery, regenerative medicine, necrophorum engineering, and developing a sustainable environment. Nano bio systems research is a priority in many countries and its relevance within nano technology is expected to increase in the future. The realisation that the nano scale has certain properties needed to solve important medical challenges and cater to unmet medical needs is driving nano medical research. The present review explores the significance of nano science and latest nano technologies for human health. Addressing the associated opportunities, the review also suggests how to manage far-reaching developments in these areas

  14. International Conference on Applied Mathematics, Modeling and Computational Science & Annual meeting of the Canadian Applied and Industrial Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Bélair, Jacques; Kunze, Herb; Makarov, Roman; Melnik, Roderick; Spiteri, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on five main groups of interdisciplinary problems, this book covers a wide range of topics in mathematical modeling, computational science and applied mathematics. It presents a wealth of new results in the development of modeling theories and methods, advancing diverse areas of applications and promoting interdisciplinary interactions between mathematicians, scientists, engineers and representatives from other disciplines. The book offers a valuable source of methods, ideas, and tools developed for a variety of disciplines, including the natural and social sciences, medicine, engineering, and technology. Original results are presented on both the fundamental and applied level, accompanied by an ample number of real-world problems and examples emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature and universality of mathematical modeling, and providing an excellent outline of today’s challenges. Mathematical modeling, with applied and computational methods and tools, plays a fundamental role in modern science a...

  15. Paradigm Shift in Social Sciences and Qualitative Research in Applied Linguistics in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Yüce, Kemal; Çanakale Onsekiz Mart Üniversitesi, Eğitim Fakültesi, Türkçe Eğitimi Bölümü.; Eryaman, Mustafa Yunus; Çanakale Onsekiz Mart Üniversitesi, Eğitim Fakültesi, İlköğrtetim anabilim dalı..; Şahin, Abdullah; Çanakale Onsekiz Mart Üniversitesi, Eğitim Fakültesi, Türkçe Eğitimi Bölümü.; Koçer, Ömer; Çanakale Onsekiz Mart Üniversitesi, Eğitim Fakültesi, Türkçe Eğitimi Bölümü.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the paradigm shift in social sciences and its effects on applied linguistics. As a result of the shift towards a post-positivist paradigm in social sciences, there has been an increasing interest and use of qualitative research in applied linguistics. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between applied linguistics and conventional methodological approaches, as well as the usage of qualitative research designs in applied linguistics. To achieve this...

  16. Unpacking the Relationship between Science Education and Applied Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Amanda; Schunn, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Scientific literacy has many meanings: it can be thought of as foundational knowledge, foundational critical thinking skills, or the application of these two foundations to everyday decision making. Here, we examine the far transfer scenario: do increases in science education lead to everyday decision-making becoming more consistent with consensus…

  17. Data-intensive science applied to broad-scale citizen science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochachka, Wesley M; Fink, Daniel; Hutchinson, Rebecca A; Sheldon, Daniel; Wong, Weng-Keen; Kelling, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Identifying ecological patterns across broad spatial and temporal extents requires novel approaches and methods for acquiring, integrating and modeling massive quantities of diverse data. For example, a growing number of research projects engage continent-wide networks of volunteers ('citizen-scientists') to collect species occurrence data. Although these data are information rich, they present numerous challenges in project design, implementation and analysis, which include: developing data collection tools that maximize data quantity while maintaining high standards of data quality, and applying new analytical and visualization techniques that can accurately reveal patterns in these data. Here, we describe how advances in data-intensive science provide accurate estimates in species distributions at continental scales by identifying complex environmental associations. PMID:22192976

  18. Assessment of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) program with guidance for future program strategy. The overall objective of this study is to prepare an independent assessment of the scientific quality of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences program at the Department of Energy. The Fusion Science Assessment Committee (FuSAC) has been appointed to conduct this study

  19. Attitude level of prospective science teachers towards assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efendi, Ridwan; Rustaman, Nuryani Y.

    2016-02-01

    A descriptive study about attitude level of prospective science teachers towards assessment was conducted with the involvement of 67 prospective science teachers from four state universities in western part of the Indonesian region and middle part of Indonesia region. Data collected by using the questionnaire consisted of four aspects, id est. prospective science teachers attitude towards assessment (cognitive level of assessment, type of assessment, and criterion of evaluation), prospective science teachers instructional practice, internal difficulties that prospective science teachers experienced related to their assessment skills, and the use of assessment process of prospective science teachers. Determination of attitude level detected from prospective science teachers was carried out in descriptive statistics, in the form of respondent average values. Research finding shows that attitude level of prospective science teachers towards assessment can be categorized as "close to constructivist".

  20. Teaching and Learning Methodologies Supported by ICT Applied in Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacho, Jose

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to show a set of new methodologies applied in the teaching of Computer Science using ICT. The methodologies are framed in the conceptual basis of the following sciences: Psychology, Education and Computer Science. The theoretical framework of the research is supported by Behavioral Theory, Gestalt Theory.…

  1. Environmental sustainability assessment of urban systems applying coupled urban metabolism and life cycle assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkved, Morten; Goldstein, Benjamin Paul

    2013-01-01

    urban metabolism (UM) and life cycle assessment (LCA) can be applied to assess the sustainability of urban system, taking into account up- and downstream activities directly or indirectly linked to the metabolism of urban systems. Further we apply the fused UM-LCA approach to assess the absolute...

  2. Applying Nanotechnology to Human Health: Revolution in Biomedical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Shrivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on biosystems at the nanoscale has created one of the most dynamic science and technology domains at the confluence of physical sciences, molecular engineering, biology, biotechnology, and medicine. This domain includes better understanding of living and thinking systems, revolutionary biotechnology processes, synthesis of new drugs and their targeted delivery, regenerative medicine, neuromorphic engineering, and developing a sustainable environment. Nanobiosystems research is a priority in many countries and its relevance within nanotechnology is expected to increase in the future. The realisation that the nanoscale has certain properties needed to solve important medical challenges and cater to unmet medical needs is driving nanomedical research. The present review explores the significance of nanoscience and latest nanotechnologies for human health. Addressing the associated opportunities, the review also suggests how to manage far-reaching developments in these areas.

  3. Measuring and Maximising Research Impact in Applied Social Science Research Settings. Good Practice Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanwick, John; Hargreaves, Jo

    2012-01-01

    This guide describes the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) approach to measuring impact using examples from its own case studies, as well as showing how to maximise the impact of applied social science research. Applied social science research needs to demonstrate that it is relevant and useful both to public policy and…

  4. Computer Science technology applied to data collection and data managament

    OpenAIRE

    Guzmán, O.; González, M.; Carrasco, J. (Juan); Bernal, C.; Vera, C.; Troncoso, M.

    2009-01-01

    IFOP, as non profit marine research institute has the mission to provide to the Under Secretariat of Fisheries in Chile, the technical information and scientific basis for the regulation of Chilean Fisheries. For this purpose it has 150 Scientific Observers distributed throughout the Chilean coast. With the intention to improve the process of data production, a group of scientists has developed a new computer science system for data collection, data management, and automatic publication of f...

  5. Elements of applied probability for engineering, mathematics and systems science

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, David

    2004-01-01

    This book has been designed for senior engineering, mathematics andsystems science students. In addition, the author has used theoptional, advanced sections as the basis for graduate courses inquality control and queueing. It is assumed that the students havetaken a first course in probability but that some need areview. Discrete models are emphasized and examples have been chosenfrom the areas of quality control and telecommunications. The bookprovides correct, modern mathematical methods and at the same timeconveys the excitement of real applications.

  6. Assessing clinical competency in the health sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarella, Karen Joanne

    To test the success of integrated curricula in schools of health sciences, meaningful measurements of student performance are required to assess clinical competency. This research project analyzed a new performance assessment tool, the Integrated Standardized Patient Examination (ISPE), for assessing clinical competency: specifically, to assess Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students' clinical competence as the ability to integrate basic science knowledge with clinical communication skills. Thirty-four DPT students performed two ISPE cases, one of a patient who sustained a stroke and the other a patient with a herniated lumbar disc. Cases were portrayed by standardized patients (SPs) in a simulated clinical setting. Each case was scored by an expert evaluator in the exam room and then by one investigator and the students themselves via videotape. The SPs scored each student on an overall encounter rubric. Written feedback was obtained from all participants in the study. Acceptable reliability was demonstrated via inter-rater agreement as well as inter-rater correlations on items that used a dichotomous scale, whereas the items requiring the use of the 4-point rubric were somewhat less reliable. For the entire scale both cases had a significant correlation between the Expert-Investigator pair of raters, for the CVA case r = .547, p process of developing cases and patient scenarios that were used in this study. Construct validity was obtained from the survey results analyzed from the experts and students. Future studies should examine the effect of rater training upon the reliability. Criterion or predictive validity could be further studied by comparing students' performances on the ISPE with other independent estimates of students' competence. The unique integration questions of the ISPE were judged to have good content validity from experts and students, suggestive that integration, a most crucial element of clinical competence, while done in the mind of the

  7. The Production Of Scientific Knowledge In Italy : Evidence In Theoretical, Applied And Technical Sciences.

    OpenAIRE

    Patrucco, Pier Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents preliminary empirical evidence on the production of scientific knowledge in Italy, in theoretical sciences (physics), applied sciences (chemistry) and technical sciences (engineer ing and petrology). It elaborates on an original dataset of publications and citations for 2,673 Italian researchers, distributed across 61 universities, covering the years between 1990 and 2004. According to a well-established tradition of studies in the economics of science, the results show tha...

  8. The Production of Scientific Knowledge in Italy: Evidence in Theoretical, Applied and Technical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Patrucco, Pier Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents preliminary empirical evidence on the production of scientific knowledge in Italy, in theoretical sciences (physics), applied sciences (chemistry) and technical sciences (engineer ing and petrology). It elaborates on an original dataset of publications and citations for 2,673 Italian researchers, distributed across 61 universities, covering the years between 1990 and 2004. According to a well-established tradition of studies in the economics of science, the results show tha...

  9. The policy chicken and the science egg. Has applied ecology failed the transgenic crops debate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, A J

    2014-12-01

    Ecology has a long history of research relevant to and impacting on real-world issues. Nonetheless problems of communication remain between policy-makers and scientists because they tend to work at different levels of generality (policy deals with broad issues, science prefers specific questions), and complexity (policy-makers want simple answers, ecologists tend to offer multi-factorial solutions) and to different timescales (policy-makers want answers tomorrow, ecologists always seem to want more time). These differences are not unique to the debate about the cultivation of transgenic crops. Research on gene flow is used to illustrate how science and policy are intimately bound together in a value-laden, iterative and messy process unlike that characterised by the 'encounter problem-do science-make policy' model. It also demonstrates how the gap between science and policy is often characterised by value-laden language. Scientists involved in ERA for transgenic crops may find their engagement with policy- and decision-makers clouded by misunderstanding about what one should expect from the other. Not the least of these, that science can define harm, is explored in a discussion of the U.K. Farm Scale Evaluations of herbicide-tolerant GM crops. The varied responses to these extensive trials highlight the problems of linking specific scientific experiments with broad policy objectives. The problems of applied ecology in the transgenic crops debate are not unique but may differ from other areas of environmental policy in the intense politicisation of the debate, the emphasis on assessment of risk and the particularly broad policy objectives. PMID:24150917

  10. On Location Learning: Authentic Applied Science with Networked Augmented Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Eric; Klopfer, Eric; Perry, Judy

    2007-02-01

    The learning of science can be made more like the practice of science through authentic simulated experiences. We have created a networked handheld Augmented Reality environment that combines the authentic role-playing of Augmented Realities and the underlying models of Participatory Simulations. This game, known as Outbreak @ The Institute, is played across a university campus where players take on the roles of doctors, medical technicians, and public health experts to contain a disease outbreak. Players can interact with virtual characters and employ virtual diagnostic tests and medicines. They are challenged to identify the source and prevent the spread of an infectious disease that can spread among real and/or virtual characters according to an underlying model. In this paper, we report on data from three high school classes who played the game. We investigate students' perception of the authenticity of the game in terms of their personal embodiment in the game, their experience playing different roles, and their understanding of the dynamic model underlying the game.

  11. Applied Science Division annual report, Environmental Research Program FY 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, E.J.; Novakov, T.

    1984-05-01

    The primary concern of the Environmental Research Program is the understanding of pollutant formation, transport, and transformation and the impacts of pollutants on the environment. These impacts include global, regional, and local effects on the atmosphere and hydrosphere, and on certain aspects of human health. This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. During FY 1983, research concentrated on atmospheric physics and chemistry, applied physics and laser spectroscopy, combustion theory and phenomena, environmental effects of oil shale processing, freshwater ecology and acid precipitation, trace element analysis for the investigation of present and historical environmental impacts, and a continuing survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring.

  12. Applied Science Division annual report, Environmental Research Program FY 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary concern of the Environmental Research Program is the understanding of pollutant formation, transport, and transformation and the impacts of pollutants on the environment. These impacts include global, regional, and local effects on the atmosphere and hydrosphere, and on certain aspects of human health. This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. During FY 1983, research concentrated on atmospheric physics and chemistry, applied physics and laser spectroscopy, combustion theory and phenomena, environmental effects of oil shale processing, freshwater ecology and acid precipitation, trace element analysis for the investigation of present and historical environmental impacts, and a continuing survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring

  13. Life cycle assessment applied to nanomaterials in solid waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurent, Alexis

    for assessing engineered nanoparticles. To support the impact assessment of engineered nanoparticles in the life cycle of nanoproducts and in solid waste management systems, a comprehensive review of toxicological data for nanosilver and titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles was conducted and it enabled......, thus potentially posing problems on human health, e.g. through occupational exposure to engineered nanoparticles. In that setting, through its holistic quantification of environmental impacts, life cycle assessment (LCA) can be a useful decisionsupport tool for managing environmental sustainability...... of solid waste management systems as well as that of nanoproducts. But how has LCA generally been applied to both fields of solid waste management and nanotechnology until now? In particular, what are the current shortcomings for assessing impacts of released engineered nanoparticles? Is it possible...

  14. Quality Assessment by Science Teachers: Five Focus Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Frances

    2013-01-01

    In order to teach science well, science teachers need to know what to focus on in order to ensure their assessment of student learning is meaningful and useful for the students' on going learning and development. The diversity and range of content and skills within the subject of science mean that the assessment capabilities required by…

  15. Reinforcement of qualitative risk assessment proposals from computer science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last decade a lot of research has been made to evaluate concepts and methos of quantitative risk assessment in order to predict hazards more precisely. Nevertheless, the occurrence of new catastrophes like the Indonesian Tsunami in 2004, the Deepwater Horizon accident in 2010 or recently the Fukushima accidents in 2011 raise the question whether we may underestimate some natural limits of annotative risk assessment or even mistake its significance. Especially in the case of very unlikely events, in combination with uncertainty and severe consequences, may be we would do better to concentrate more on understanding risk than on calculating probability values. In this paper we apply progresses, made in the field of computer science, to tools and modelling concepts used in risk assessment. Regarding computer science, we point out now concepts, that may improve the quality of risk models and the process of model engineering. The goal is to reinforce the importance of qualitative risk assessment with the help of sophisticated tools and modelling. Qualitative risk assessment aims to understand risk and therefore reflects the initial idea of risk assessment. Risk understanding requires understanding systems and relations of components. It is fundamental to comprehend the meaning of components in fault- and event trees, to retrace all applied modifications and to highlight critical aspects. It is important how PSA models are visualized, documented, navigated, how results are presented and how model maintenance, integration and version control are performed. Also, the conjoint usage of different type of models (for example PSA models together with event sequence diagrams) can contribute to quality assurance. We present new concepts for various kind of problems. (author)

  16. How to systematically assess serious games applied to health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graafland, Maurits; Dankbaar, Mary; Mert, Agali; Lagro, Joep; De Wit-Zuurendonk, Laura; Schuit, Stephanie; Schaafstal, Alma; Schijven, Marlies

    2014-01-01

    The usefulness and effectiveness of specific serious games in the medical domain is often unclear. This is caused by a lack of supporting evidence on validity of individual games, as well as a lack of publicly available information. Moreover, insufficient understanding of design principles among the individuals and institutions that develop or apply a medical serious game compromises their use. This article provides the first consensus-based framework for the assessment of specific medical serious games. The framework provides 62 items in 5 main themes, aimed at assessing a serious game's rationale, functionality, validity, and data safety. This will allow caregivers and educators to make balanced choices when applying a serious game for healthcare purposes. Furthermore, the framework provides game manufacturers with standards for the development of new, valid serious games. PMID:25654163

  17. NASA Applied Sciences' DEVELOP National Program: Training the Next Generation of Remote Sensing Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Lauren; Brozen, Madeline; Hillyer, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception over a decade ago, the DEVELOP National Program has provided students with experience in utilizing and integrating satellite remote sensing data into real world-applications. In 1998, DEVELOP began with three students and has evolved into a nationwide internship program with over 200 students participating each year. DEVELOP is a NASA Applied Sciences training and development program extending NASA Earth science research and technology to society. Part of the NASA Science Mission Directorate s Earth Science Division, the Applied Sciences Program focuses on bridging the gap between NASA technology and the public by conducting projects that innovatively use NASA Earth science resources to research environmental issues. Project outcomes focus on assisting communities to better understand environmental change over time. This is accomplished through research with global, national, and regional partners to identify the widest array of practical uses of NASA data. DEVELOP students conduct research in areas that examine how NASA science can better serve society. Projects focus on practical applications of NASA s Earth science research results. Each project is designed to address at least one of the Applied Sciences focus areas, use NASA s Earth observation sources and meet partners needs. DEVELOP research teams partner with end-users and organizations who use project results for policy analysis and decision support, thereby extending the benefits of NASA science and technology to the public.

  18. Students Explaining Science—Assessment of Science Communication Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulgemeyer, Christoph; Schecker, Horst

    2013-12-01

    Science communication competence (SCC) is an important educational goal in the school science curricula of several countries. However, there is a lack of research about the structure and the assessment of SCC. This paper specifies the theoretical framework of SCC by a competence model. We developed a qualitative assessment method for SCC that is based on an expert-novice dialog: an older student (explainer, expert) explains a physics phenomenon to a younger peer (addressee, novice) in a controlled test setting. The explanations are video-recorded and analysed by qualitative content analysis. The method was applied in a study with 46 secondary school students as explainers. Our aims were (a) to evaluate whether our model covers the relevant features of SCC, (b) to validate the assessment method and (c) to find characteristics of addressee-adequate explanations. A performance index was calculated to quantify the explainers' levels of competence on an ordinal scale. We present qualitative and quantitative evidence that the index is adequate for assessment purposes. It correlates with results from a written SCC test and a perspective taking test (convergent validity). Addressee-adequate explanations can be characterized by use of graphical representations and deliberate switches between scientific and everyday language.

  19. Applying science and strategy to operating room workforce management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Victoria; Clinton, Christopher; Sagi, Harsha K; Kenney, Robert; Barsoum, Wael K

    2012-01-01

    The traditional means of planning nurse staffing for operating rooms are either poorly translated to the setting or do not provide decision makers with a platform to defend their needs, especially in an era of health care reform. The surgical operations department of the Cleveland Clinic initiated a quality improvement project aimed at applying a scientific method to operating room staffing. One goal was to provide a defensible plan for allocating direct caregiver positions. A second goal was to provide a quick and easy way for nurse managers and directors to track positions and graphically depict the effect of vacancies and orientation on their staffing budgets. Using an objective, scientific method allows position requests to be approved quickly and allows managers to feel much more comfortable functioning in a "lean" mode because they know needed positions will be approved quickly. Managers and directors also have found that graphically depicting numbers of vacant positions, as well as staff in orientation, could quickly relate a story visually rather than getting "bogged down" in narrative (often losing finance administrators along the way). PMID:23198610

  20. Applying new ways of working in university working environment. A case study: Laurea University of Applied Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Khasu, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to identify New Ways of Working (NWoW) or new work concepts that are applicable for the Laurea University of Applied Sciences working environment. The research focused on the perspective of two different stakeholder groups, which are the employee perspective and management perspective. At present, opportunities offered by modern technologies have reduced importance of time and location with respect to ways of working. Universities or organizations not offering ...

  1. APPLIED SOCIAL SCIENCES, ACTION RESEARCH AND THE RETURNING OF INQUIRY FINDINGS

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to highlight some connections between the applied social sciences, action research, and the returning of inquiry findings. Usually, the applicability of a social science is defined by its openness to the complexity of (psycho-) social change as described by the intervention design meant to trigger this change. We will also see how the social sciences collaborate with action research. This is mainly the case in social psychology, a field in which this orientation is largely con...

  2. Mahajan named director of Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn A.

    2006-01-01

    Roop L. Mahajan, an internationally known researcher with expertise ranging from nanotechnology to bio micro-electro-mechanical systems (Bio-MEMS), will become the director of Virginia Tech's Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), effective July 1.

  3. Food physics as an important part of food science and applied physics

    OpenAIRE

    Szabó A.S.

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with the following topics: main fields of food science and applied physics, food physics as a new interdisciplinary field of science, important parts of food physics,some special questions (e.g. nondestructive testing, radiation methods) of food physics.

  4. Perceptions of Students of Rovaniemi University of Applied Sciences on the Brand of Fazer Food Services

    OpenAIRE

    Kansanaho, Niina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to detect the perceptions of students of Rovaniemi University of Applied Sciences on the brand of Fazer Food Services. The goal of the study was to present Fazer Food Services areas of development to better their brand image. The author used quantitative research method by familiarising herself with brand theory and conducting an online survey among four campuses of Rovaniemi University of Applied Sciences. The two campuses with the highest response rate were chos...

  5. Studying in Australia at The University of Sydney:Bachelor of Applied Science(Medical Radiation Sciences) Diagnostic Radiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria; Fang

    2012-01-01

    <正>The University of Sydney offers a range of undergraduate courses in the area of health sciences,including the Bachelor of Applied Science(MRS) Diagnostic Radiography.The degree prepares students for clinical practice as diagnostic radiographers, working in places such as emergency wards or private clinics.According to a medical practitioner’s request, radiographers aim to work closely with radiologists to

  6. Improving Science Assessments by Situating Them in a Virtual Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younsu Kim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Current science assessments typically present a series of isolated fact-based questions, poorly representing the complexity of how real-world science is constructed. The National Research Council asserts that this needs to change to reflect a more authentic model of science practice. We strongly concur and suggest that good science assessments need to consist of several key factors: integration of science content with scientific inquiry, contextualization of questions, efficiency of grading and statistical validity and reliability. Through our Situated Assessment using Virtual Environments for Science Content and inquiry (SAVE Science research project, we have developed an immersive virtual environment to assess middle school children’s understanding of science content and processes that they have been taught through typical classroom instruction. In the virtual environment, participants complete a problem-based assessment by exploring a game world, interacting with computer-based characters and objects, collecting and analyzing possible clues to the assessment problem. Students can solve the problems situated in the virtual environment in multiple ways; many of these are equally correct while others uncover misconceptions regarding inference-making. In this paper, we discuss stage one in the design and assessment of our project, focusing on our design strategies for integrating content and inquiry assessment and on early implementation results. We conclude that immersive virtual environments do offer the potential for creating effective science assessments based on our framework and that we need to consider engagement as part of the framework.

  7. The Stewardship Science Academic Alliance: A Model of Education for Fundamental and Applied Low-energy Nuclear Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) were inaugurated in 2002 by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U. S. Department of Energy. The purpose is to enhance connections between NNSA laboratories and the activities of university scientists and their students in research areas important to NNSA, including low-energy nuclear science. This paper highlights some of the ways that the SSAA fosters education and training of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in low-energy nuclear science, preparing them for careers in fundamental and applied research and development

  8. The Stewardship Science Academic Alliance: A Model of Education for Fundamental and Applied Low-energy Nuclear Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cizewski, J.A., E-mail: cizewski@rutgers.edu

    2014-06-15

    The Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) were inaugurated in 2002 by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U. S. Department of Energy. The purpose is to enhance connections between NNSA laboratories and the activities of university scientists and their students in research areas important to NNSA, including low-energy nuclear science. This paper highlights some of the ways that the SSAA fosters education and training of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in low-energy nuclear science, preparing them for careers in fundamental and applied research and development.

  9. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  10. Assessment of computer science knowledge, achieved with »Computer Science Unplugged« activities

    OpenAIRE

    Zaviršek, Manca

    2015-01-01

    The master thesis discusses assessment of computer science knowledge, which students achieved with »Computer Science Unplugged« activities. First off we define what exactly computer science knowledge is and what the computer science concepts are. Then we get over to the modern approaches of teaching computer science, where the emphasis is problem solving. These approaches can be realized with »CS Unplugged« activities and Bebras tasks. The aim of the empirical part is to research whether asse...

  11. Fried frailty phenotype assessment components as applied to geriatric inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bieniek J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Joanna Bieniek, Krzysztof Wilczynski, Jan Szewieczek Department of Geriatrics, School of Health Sciences in Katowice, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland Background: Management of geriatric patients would be simplified if a universally accepted definition of frailty for clinical use was defined. Among definitions of frailty, Fried frailty phenotype criteria constitute a common reference frame for many geriatric studies. However, this reference frame has been tested primarily in elderly patients presenting with relatively good health status. Objective: The aim of this article was to assess the usefulness and limitations of Fried frailty phenotype criteria in geriatric inpatients, characterized by comorbidity and functional impairments, and to estimate the frailty phenotype prevalence in this group. Patients and methods: Five hundred consecutive patients of the university hospital subacute geriatric ward, aged 79.0±8.4 years (67% women and 33% men, participated in this cross-sectional study. Comprehensive geriatric assessment and Fried frailty phenotype component evaluation were performed in all patients. Results: Multimorbidity (6.0±2.8 diseases characterized our study group, with a wide range of clinical conditions and functional states (Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living 72.2±28.2 and Mini-Mental State Examination 23.6±7.1 scores. All five Fried frailty components were assessed in 65% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI] =60.8–69.2 (diagnostic group. One or more components were not feasible to be assessed in 35% of the remaining patients (nondiagnostic group because of lack of past patient’s body mass control and/or cognitive or physical impairment. Patients from the nondiagnostic group, as compared to patients from the diagnostic group, presented with more advanced age, higher prevalence of dementia, lower prevalence of hypertension, lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure, body mass index, Mini

  12. Applied mathematical sciences research at Argonne, April 1, 1981-March 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the research activities in Applied Mathematical Sciences at Argonne National Laboratory for the period April 1, 1981, through March 31, 1982. The body of the report discusses various projects carried out in three major areas of research: applied analysis, computational mathematics, and software engineering. Information on section staff, visitors, workshops, and seminars is found in the appendices

  13. Integrating Science in Applied Psychology Programs: A Student-Operated Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonius, Daniel; Brown, Adam D.; Todman, McWelling; Safran, Jeremy D.

    2007-01-01

    As a requirement of APA accreditation, many PhD programs in applied psychology subscribe to some variant of the scientist-practitioner model. However, critics have argued that integrating science into an applied psychology curriculum may be too challenging a task. This article describes the development of The New School Psychology Bulletin, a…

  14. The Effectiveness of an Educational Game for Teaching Optometry Students Basic and Applied Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Richard; Majcher, Carolyn; Rabin, Jeff; Kent, Theresa; Maki, Yutaka; Wingert, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the effectiveness of an educational board game with interactive didactic instruction for teaching optometry students elements of the core optometric curriculum. Methods Forty-two optometry students were divided into two GPA-matched groups and assigned to either 12 hours of game play (game group) or 12 hours of interactive didactic instruction (lecture group). The same material from the core optometric curriculum was delivered to both groups. Game play was accomplished via an original board game. Written examinations assessed change in knowledge level. A post-intervention opinion survey assessed student attitudes. Results There was no significant difference in pre- or post-intervention test scores between the lecture and game groups (Pre-test: p = 0.9; Post-test: p = 0.5). Post-intervention test scores increased significantly from baseline (Game group: 29.3% gain, Didactic group: 31.5% gain; p<0.001 for each). The score increase difference between groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.6). The post-intervention attitude survey did not reveal any significant between group differences (p = 0.5). Conclusions Our results indicate that an educational game and interactive didactic instruction can be equally effective in teaching optometry students basic and applied science. Furthermore, both modes of instruction have the potential to be equally engaging and enjoyable experiences. PMID:27233041

  15. The Effectiveness of an Educational Game for Teaching Optometry Students Basic and Applied Science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Trevino

    Full Text Available To compare the effectiveness of an educational board game with interactive didactic instruction for teaching optometry students elements of the core optometric curriculum.Forty-two optometry students were divided into two GPA-matched groups and assigned to either 12 hours of game play (game group or 12 hours of interactive didactic instruction (lecture group. The same material from the core optometric curriculum was delivered to both groups. Game play was accomplished via an original board game. Written examinations assessed change in knowledge level. A post-intervention opinion survey assessed student attitudes.There was no significant difference in pre- or post-intervention test scores between the lecture and game groups (Pre-test: p = 0.9; Post-test: p = 0.5. Post-intervention test scores increased significantly from baseline (Game group: 29.3% gain, Didactic group: 31.5% gain; p<0.001 for each. The score increase difference between groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.6. The post-intervention attitude survey did not reveal any significant between group differences (p = 0.5.Our results indicate that an educational game and interactive didactic instruction can be equally effective in teaching optometry students basic and applied science. Furthermore, both modes of instruction have the potential to be equally engaging and enjoyable experiences.

  16. Assessing Understanding of the Energy Concept in Different Science Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mihwa; Liu, Xiufeng

    2016-01-01

    Energy is one of the most central and richly connected ideas across all science disciplines. The purpose of this study was to develop a measurement instrument for assessing students' understanding of the energy concept within and across different science disciplines. To achieve this goal, the Inter-Disciplinary Energy concept Assessment (IDEA) was…

  17. National Assessment Program--Science Literacy Year 6 Report, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jenny; Lennon, Melissa; O'Connor, Gayl; Morrissey, Noni

    2008-01-01

    In 2003 the first nationally-comparable science assessment was designed, developed and carried out under the auspices of the national council of education ministers, the Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (MCEETYA). In 2006 a second science assessment was conducted and, for the first time nationally, the…

  18. Designing and Validating Assessments of Complex Thinking in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Kihyun; Linn, Marcia C.

    2015-01-01

    Typical assessment systems often measure isolated ideas rather than the coherent understanding valued in current science classrooms. Such assessments may motivate students to memorize, rather than to use new ideas to solve complex problems. To meet the requirements of the Next Generation Science Standards, instruction needs to emphasize sustained…

  19. Incorporating formative assessment and science content into elementary science methods---A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Derek John

    Just as elementary students enter the science classroom with prior knowledge and experiences, so do preservice elementary teachers who enter the science methods classroom. Elementary science methods instructors recognize the challenges associated with preparing teachers for the science classroom. Two of these challenges include overcoming limited science content understanding and a low science teaching efficacy. Based upon research in science misconceptions, conceptual change theory, formative assessment, and science teaching efficacy, this design experiment explored the use of formative assessment in an authentic learning environment to address some of these challenges. As a case study, the goal was to identify two specific topics in science which the preservice teachers did not understand and to model consistent use of formative assessment to guide instruction in those science topics for six weeks. The research questions for this study sought to explore the design of the class while also exploring students' understanding of the science content and their understanding of formative assessment. One specific question was whether the formative data could differentiate between deeply held student misconceptions in science and incomplete science understanding. In addition, data was collected to measure changes in science teaching efficacy as well as preservice teachers' desire to use formative assessment in their own future classrooms. Based upon student interviews and a final content quiz, the participants in this study did show improved science content understanding in the areas of plant food/energy and plate tectonics. The course design implemented a variety of formative assessment tools including formative assessment probes, student science notebooks, student concept maps, a non-graded quiz, and more. The STEBI-B survey identified improved science teaching efficacy among the participants. Student final essays indicated improved understanding of formative assessment

  20. The origins of pure and applied science in Gilded Age America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucier, Paul

    2012-09-01

    "Pure science" and "applied science" have peculiar histories in the United States. Both terms were in use in the early part of the nineteenth century, but it was only in the last decades that they took on new meanings and became commonplace in the discourse of American scientists. The rise in their currency reflected an acute concern about the corruption of character and the real possibilities of commercializing scientific knowledge. "Pure" was the preference of scientists who wanted to emphasize their nonpecuniary motives and their distance from the marketplace. "Applied" was the choice of scientists who accepted patents and profits as other possible returns on their research. In general, the frequent conjoining of "pure" and "applied" bespoke the inseparable relations of science and capitalism in the Gilded Age. PMID:23286191

  1. 4th International Conference on Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Do, Tien; Thi, Hoai; Nguyen, Ngoc

    2016-01-01

    This proceedings consists of 20 papers which have been selected and invited from the submissions to the 4th International Conference on Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Applications (ICCSAMA 2016) held on 2-3 May, 2016 in Laxenburg, Austria. The conference is organized into 5 sessions: Advanced Optimization Methods and Their Applications, Models for ICT applications, Topics on discrete mathematics, Data Analytic Methods and Applications and Feature Extractio, respectively. All chapters in the book discuss theoretical and practical issues connected with computational methods and optimization methods for knowledge engineering. The editors hope that this volume can be useful for graduate and Ph.D. students and researchers in Applied Sciences, Computer Science and Applied Mathematics. .

  2. The Development and Validation of the Science Learning Assessment (SLA): A Measure of Kindergarten Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarapungavan, Ala; Mantzicopoulos, Panayota; Patrick, Helen; French, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The Science Learning Assessment (SLA) is an individually administered, instructionally sensitive science assessment for kindergarten students. The SLA is a 24-item objective test, broken down into two subtests. The Scientific Inquiry Processes subtest consists of 9 items designed to measure young children's functional understanding of the nature…

  3. NASA Applied Sciences' DEVELOP Program Fosters the Next Generation of Earth Remote Sensing Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Lauren M.; Brozen, Madeline W.; Gleason, Jonathan L.; Silcox, Tracey L.; Rea, Mimi; Holley, Sharon D.; Renneboog, Nathan; Underwood, Lauren W.; Ross, Kenton W.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing technology and the science associated with the evaluation of the resulting data are constantly evolving. To meet the growing needs related to this industry, a team of personnel that understands the fundamental science as well as the scientific applications related to remote sensing is essential. Therefore, the workforce that will excel in this field requires individuals who not only have a strong academic background, but who also have practical hands-on experience with remotely sensed data, and have developed knowledge of its real-world applications. NASA's DEVELOP Program has played an integral role in fulfilling this need. DEVELOP is a NASA Science Mission Directorate Applied Sciences training and development program that extends the benefits of NASA Earth science research and technology to society.

  4. Grass-counters, stock-feeders, and the dual orientation of applied science :the history of range science, 1895-1960

    OpenAIRE

    Heyboer, Maarten

    1992-01-01

    According to the predominant image, applied science is a linear, sequential process, the application of science. First scientists or applied scientists develop knowledge that satisfies the epistemic criteria of science, and applied scientists then find ways to use this certified knowledge to solve society's problems. There is, therefore, a sharp distinction between epistemic or scientific criteria and social criteria. The historical development of the applied ecological discipline called r...

  5. Graph Theory with Algorithms and its Applications In Applied Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Saha Ray, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    The book has many important features which make it suitable for both undergraduate and postgraduate students in various branches of engineering and general and applied sciences. The important topics interrelating Mathematics & Computer Science are also covered briefly. The book is useful to readers with a wide range of backgrounds including Mathematics, Computer Science/Computer Applications and Operational Research. While dealing with theorems and algorithms, emphasis is laid on constructions which consist of formal proofs, examples with applications. Uptill, there is scarcity of books in the open literature which cover all the things including most importantly various algorithms and applications with examples.

  6. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research 3

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 3 covers reviews that are directly related to the two devices which are the epitome of applied solid state science - the transistor and the laser. The book discusses the physics of multilayer-gate IGFET memories; the application of the transient charge technique in drift velocity; and trapping in semiconductors and in materials used in xerography, nuclear particle detectors, and space-charge-limited devices; as well as thin film transistors. The text describes the manipulation of laser beams in solids and discusses

  7. Curriculum design of emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanazi AF

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Foraih AlanaziCollege of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was adapted from the integrated problem-based learning curriculum of Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the major adaptations required for adoption of the full-fledged PBL curriculum, use of sequential blocks, and multilayer alignment of the curriculum.Methods: A logical model and step-by-step approach were used to design the curriculum. Several studies using Delphi methods, focus group interviews, and expert opinions were performed to identify the priority health problems; related competencies, learning objectives, and learning strategies; the web-based curriculum for delivery; student assessment; and program evaluation.Results: Sixty priority health problems were identified for inclusion in different blocks of the curriculum. Identified competencies matched the satisfaction of different stakeholders, and ascertained learning objectives and strategies were aligned with the competencies. A full-fledged web-based curriculum was designed and an assessment was created that aligned with a blueprint of the objectives and the mode of delivery.Conclusion: Step-by-step design ensures the multilayer alignment of the curriculum, including priority health problems, competencies, objectives, student assessment, and program evaluation.Keywords: emergency medical services, problem-based learning, logical model, step-by-step approach, multilayer alignment

  8. Engaging youth of color in applied science education and public health promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague Martinez, Linda; Bowers, Edmond; Reich, Amanda J.; Ndulue, Uchenna J.; Le, Albert An; Peréa, Flavia C.

    2016-03-01

    Participation in inquiry-based science education, which focuses on student-constructed learning, has been linked to academic success. Whereas the benefits of this type of science education are evident, access to such high-quality science curriculum and programming is not equitable. Black and Latino students in particular have less access to supplementary science programming, and fewer opportunities to engage in inquiry-based education. This paper describes outcomes associated with an inquiry-based out-of-school time science education program, Nuestro Futuro: Applied Science Education to Engage Black and Latino Youth (NFASE), which sought to build the capacity of middle school students of color to 'think' like health scientists from diverse disciplinary perspectives. The program was designed with the intent of (1) improving student attitudes toward and motivation for science and (2) increasing active and engaged citizenship (AEC). NFASE students explored health inequity and the social determinants of health locally and engaged in developing health promotion, outreach and education efforts targeted to their peers, parents/families, and community. Interest in the program was high overall, but implementation was not without challenges. Although evaluation outcomes indicate that there were no statistically significant changes in science-related attitudes or motivation, students reported significant increases in neighborhood social connection, as well as overall AEC.

  9. Making practical training a success : case: international practical training process at Lahti University of Applied Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Lahti, Iina

    2013-01-01

    Practical training is the biggest single study entity in all universities of applied sciences’ degree programmes and an important part of studies. High-quality practical training is considered essential for a student’s professional growth and development of expertise. Finding a proper placement corresponding to a student’s competence level as well as developing their professional skills has been seen as problematic by the students. Thus, both Lahti University of Applied Sciences and the autho...

  10. Assessing a Science Graduate School Recruitment Symposium

    OpenAIRE

    González-Espada, Wilson; Díaz-Muñoz, Greetchen; Feliú-Mójer, Mónica; Flores-Otero, Jacqueline; Fortis-Santiago, Yaihara; Guerrero-Medina, Giovanna; López-Casillas, Marcos; Colón-Ramos, Daniel A.; Fernández-Repollet, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Ciencia Puerto Rico, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting science, research and scientific education among Latinos, organized an educational symposium to provide college science majors the tools, opportunities and advice to pursue graduate degrees and succeed in the STEM disciplines. In this article we share our experiences and lessons learned, for others interested in developing large-scale events to recruit underrepresented minorities to STEM and in evaluating ...

  11. Contextual assessment in science education: Background, issues, and policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Stephen

    2006-09-01

    Contemporary assessment practices in science education have undergone significant changes in recent decades. The basis for these changes and the resulting new assessment practices are the subject of this two-part paper. Part 1 considers the basis of assessment that, more than 25 years ago, was driven by the assumptions of decomposability and decontextualization of knowledge, resulting in a low-inference testing system, often described as traditional. This assessment model was replaced not on account of direct criticism, but rather on account of a larger revolution - the change from behavioral to cognitive psychology, developments in the philosophy of science, and the rise of constructivism. Most notably, the study of the active cognitive processes of the individual resulted in a major emphasis on context in learning and assessment. These changes gave rise to the development of various contextual assessment methodologies in science education, for example, concept mapping assessment, performance assessment, and portfolio assessment. In Part 2, the literature relating to the assessment methods identified in Part 1 is reviewed, revealing that there is not much research that supports their validity and reliability. However, encouraging new work on selected-response tests is forming the basis for reconsideration of past criticisms of this technique. Despite the major developments in contextual assessment methodologies in science education, two important questions remain unanswered, namely, whether grades can be considered as genuine numeric quantities and whether the individual student is the appropriate unit of assessment in public accountability. Given these issues and the requirement for science assessment to satisfy the goals of the individual, the classroom, and the society, tentative recommendations are put forward addressing these parallel needs in the assessment of science learning.

  12. Summary of research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 1, 1988 through March 31, 1989 is summarized.

  13. Summary of research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science during the period October 1, 1983 through March 31, 1984 is summarized.

  14. Applying Catastrophe Theory to an Information-Processing Model of Problem Solving in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamovlasis, Dimitrios; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we test an information-processing model (IPM) of problem solving in science education, namely the working memory overload model, by applying catastrophe theory. Changes in students' achievement were modeled as discontinuities within a cusp catastrophe model, where working memory capacity was implemented as asymmetry and the degree…

  15. Kemi-Tornio University of Applied Sciences quality guide for student

    OpenAIRE

    Tuovila, Anja

    2012-01-01

    This quality guide is intended for students at Kemi-Tornio University of Applied Sciences. This guide: • describes how the quality of teaching and other activity is ensured at our University • tells you how to participate in quality work.

  16. Applied Developmental Science, Social Justice, and Socio-Political Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B.; Busch-Rossnagel, Nancy A.; Jopp, Daniela S.; Brown, Joshua L.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present a vision of applied developmental science (ADS) as a means of promoting social justice and socio-political well-being. This vision draws upon the field's significant accomplishments in identifying and strengthening developmental assets in marginalized youth communities, understanding the effects of poverty and racial…

  17. "Analyze, Acquire, Apply, and Write" as a New Learning Model in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jeong V.

    2015-01-01

    I have developed a new teaching and learning model called AAAW, which stand for Analyze, Acquire, Apply and Write. This model grows from action research and unique experience in teaching a biochemistry course to high school students who are talented in math and science. In this model, students first "Analyze" lab data to generate…

  18. Healthy Lifestyle & Quantified Self (QS): Cooperation companies, practical field and University of Applied Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, Johan de; Baas, Harrie

    2013-01-01

    In this presentation for representatives of public and private parties from Groningen en Oldenburg, the cooperation between the Hanze University of Applied Sciences Groningen and ProCare was described. In several innovation projects related to sport, physical activity and quantified self both parties work closely and succesfully together

  19. Teaching Organic Farming and Gardening: Resources for Instructors, 3rd Edition. Part 2 - Applied Soil Science

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Part 2, Applied Soil Science, covers basic information on soil chemistry, soil physical properties, and soil biology and ecology, providing a more detailed overview of the underlying scientific principles that inform many of the organic farming practices covered in Part 1.

  20. A Delphi Study on Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) Applied on Computer Science (CS) Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Marcela; Mas-Machuca, Marta; Martinez-Costa, Carme; Maillet, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) is a new pedagogical domain aiming to study the usage of information and communication technologies to support teaching and learning. The following study investigated how this domain is used to increase technical skills in Computer Science (CS). A Delphi method was applied, using three-rounds of online survey…

  1. In Brief: High-school-age science assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2007-12-01

    Students in Finland had the highest science scores in a 57-country survey of 15-year-olds. According to a 4 December report issued by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), other high-scoring countries included Canada, Japan, New Zealand, Hong Kong-China, Chinese Taipei, and Estonia. More than 400,000 students from 57 countries participated in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a triennial survey of the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds. The study found that on average across OECD countries, 1.3% of 15-year-olds reached level 6, the highest proficiency level on the science scale. These students could consistently identify, explain, and apply scientific knowledge in many situations. The number of students at that level could not be reliably predicted from a country's overall performance. For instance, while Korea had an overall high score of 522 points (above the average 500) and the United States had a score of 489, both countries had similar percentages of students at level 6. For more information, visit the Web site: http://www.oecd.org

  2. Investigation of science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences, a 6-year assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Yadollahi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Science production is one of the main dimensions of sustainable development in any country. Thus, universities as the major centers for science production play a key role in development. The present study aimed to assess the trend of science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences from 2007 to 2012. Method: In this study, the universities’ scores of empowering, governance and leadership, science production, student researches, and number of published articles were computed based on the evaluations of universities of medical sciences by the Ministry of Health, Treatment, and Medical Education from 2007 to 2012. Then, the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the figures were drawn by Excel software. Results: This study assessed science production in Iran’s type I universities of medical sciences and analyzed each university’s proportion in publication of articles. According to the results, most of the published articles were affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. However, considering the role of number of faculty members, different results were obtained. With respect to the evaluation raw scores, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences showed a considerable reduction of scores in 2012, while other universities had a constant or ascending trend. Besides, indexed articles followed an ascending trend in all the universities and most of the articles had been published in index 1. Conclusion: Similar to other studies, the findings of this study revealed an increase in science productions in Iran through the recent years. Yet, the highest scores of the studied indexes, except for student researches, were related to Tehran University of Medical Sciences. This great difference between this university and other universities might be due to accumulation of specific potentials and forces in this region. Overall, science productions followed an ascending trend in all type I universities of

  3. Interim research assessment 2003-2005 - Computer Science

    OpenAIRE

    Mouthaan, A.J.; Hartel, P.H.

    2007-01-01

    This report primarily serves as a source of information for the 2007 Interim Research Assessment Committee for Computer Science at the three technical universities in the Netherlands. The report also provides information for others interested in our research activities.

  4. AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Annual Report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most important research activities of the Faculty are condensed matter physics and physics of elementary particles. Advanced fundamental as well as applied studies are also carried out in the fields of nuclear physics and technology, electronics, environmental physics and medicinal physics. Report presents short descriptions of the results obtained in 2009. It contains also list of 198 papers published in the national and international scientific journals and of 6 book chapters published in 2009. Report contains full list of grants (national and international) realized in 2009

  5. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  6. Planning Science Instruction for Critical Thinking: Two Urban Elementary Teachers’ Responses to a State Science Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Silva Mangiante

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Science education reform standards have shifted focus from exploration and experimentation to evidence-based explanation and argumentation to prepare students with knowledge for a changing workforce and critical thinking skills to evaluate issues requiring increasing scientific literacy. However, in urban schools serving poor, diverse populations, where the priority is on students’ assessment results in reading and math, students may not receive reform-based science. The rationale for this qualitative study was to examine how two elementary teachers from high-poverty urban schools planned for reform-based science in response to a quality state science assessment in conjunction with their training and resources. Their state assessment included an inquiry task requiring students to construct responses to questions based on their investigation data. From evaluating evidence using Zembal-Saul’s continuum for teaching science as argument, the findings indicated that both teachers adopted an investigation-based and evidence-based approach to science teaching to prepare students for the inquiry task. However, one teacher provided argument-based science teaching from her explicit training in that approach. The results suggested that the teachers’ training and resources informed their interpretation of the focus areas on the science assessment inquiry task and influenced the extent to which they offered students an equitable opportunity to develop higher-order thinking from reform-based science.

  7. Bootstrapping in Applied Linguistics: Assessing Its Potential Using Shared Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plonsky, Luke; Egbert, Jesse; Laflair, Geoffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Parametric analyses such as t tests and ANOVAs are the norm--if not the default--statistical tests found in quantitative applied linguistics research (Gass 2009). Applied statisticians and one applied linguist (Larson-Hall 2010, 2012; Larson-Hall and Herrington 2010), however, have argued that this approach may not be appropriate for small samples…

  8. Assessing the Crossdisciplinarity of Technology-Enhanced Learning with Science Overlay Maps and Diversity Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the assessment of the crossdisciplinarity of technology-enhanced learning (TEL). Based on a general discussion of the concept interdisciplinarity and a summary of the discussion in the field, two empirical methods from scientometrics are introduced and applied. Science overlay maps and the Rao-Stirling diversity index are…

  9. What Makes the Finnish Different in Science? Assessing and Comparing Students' Science Learning in Three Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Cornelia; Neumann, Knut; Boone, William J.; Fischer, Hans E.

    2014-12-01

    This manuscript details our efforts to assess and compare students' learning about electricity in three countries. As our world is increasingly driven by technological advancements, the education of future citizens in science becomes one important resource for economic productivity. Not surprisingly international large-scale assessments are viewed as significant sources of information about the effectiveness of science education. However, these assessments do not provide information about the reasons for particular effectiveness-or more importantly a lack thereof-as these assessments are based on one-time measurements of student achievement. In order to identify reasons for the effectiveness of science education, it is necessary to investigate students' learning as a result of science instruction. In this manuscript we report about the development of an instrument to assess students' learning in the field of electricity and the use of this instrument to collect data from N = 2,193 middle school students in Finland, Germany and Switzerland prior to and after instruction on the topic of electricity. Our findings indicate that the differences in students' science achievement as observed in large-scale assessments are a result of differences in students' science learning. And our findings suggest that these differences are more likely to stem from differences in science instruction than from systemic differences: a result that needs to be further explored by analyzing instruction in the three countries and its effect on students' learning.

  10. Assessing Students' Proficiency in Math and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Thomas P.; Keith, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Military Academy (USMA) at West Point is responsible for developing in its graduates literacy in the sciences that renders them capable of solving complex real-world problems. Throughout their careers as officers in the military, graduates will be called upon to view the physical world in a disciplined and objective manner, with an…

  11. Towson University's Professional Science Master's Program in Applied Physics: The first 5 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolagani, Rajeswari

    It is a well-established fact that the scientific knowledge and skills acquired in the process of obtaining a degree in physics meet the needs of a variety of positions in multiple science and technology sectors. However, in addition to scientific competence, challenging careers often call for skills in advanced communication, leadership and team functions. The professional science master's degree, which has been nick-named as the `Science MBA', aims at providing science graduates an edge both in terms of employability and earning levels by imparting such skills. Our Professional Science Master's Program in Applied Physics is designed to develop these `plus' skills through multiple avenues. In addition to advanced courses in Applied Physics, the curriculum includes graduate courses in project management, business and technical writing, together with research and internship components. I will discuss our experience and lessons learned over the 5 years since the inception of the program in 2010. The author acknowledges support from the Elkins Professorship of the University System of Maryland.

  12. Karl Popper’s model under the perspective of the applied social sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton de Abreu Campanario

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8077.2012v14n32p124Karl Popper is the leading philosopher of science in modern times, competing with Thomas Kuhn’s interpretation to the primacy of how to utilize de scientific method. Clearly, there are different versions for a reading of this important author who coined the method called deductive with test. This text recognizes the relevance of Karl Popper’s view of science as a practice in hard and biological fields, where it is widely accepted. However, this popularity is not shared in the applied social sciences area. This is an essay to rescue his contribution in an attempt to translate the concepts he developed in a didactic way. To this end, there will be an introduction to the fundamentals of science as specific form o knowledge, seeking to contrast the deductive and inductive approaches and procedures of what is known as formal science, basic and applied. An attempt to classify the formulation of theoretical propositions is undertaken with the use of different criteria, taking examples in the field of management and economics as an illustration.

  13. Artificial Neural Networks Applied To Landslide Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagli, N.; Catani, F.; Ermini, L.

    Landslide hazard mapping is often performed through the identification and analysis of hillslope instability factors. GIS techniques are widely applied for the manage- ment of hillslope factors as thematic data rated by the attribution of scores based on the assumed role played by each factor controlling the development of a sliding pro- cess. Other more refined methods, based on the principle that the present and the past are keys to the future, have been also developed, thus allowing to perform less sub- jective analyses, in which landslide susceptibility is assessed by statistical relation- ships between the past landslides and the hillslope instability factors. The objective of this research is to define a method able to foresee landslide susceptibility through the application of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). The Riomaggiore catchment, a sub-watershed of the Reno River basin located in the Northern Apennine at half way between Florence and Bologna, was chosen as the test site. The utilized ANN (AiNet 1.25) was trained by vector-based GIS data corresponding to five hillslope factors: a) geology, b) slope, c), curvature, d) land cover e) contributing area. The intersection between the hillslope factors, all ranked in nominal scales, singled out 3263 homoge- neous domains (Unique Condition Unit) containing unique combinations of hillslope factors. The final model was formed by vectors in which the hillslope factors, once organized as Boolean variables, are represented by 20 binary numbers. The compari- son between the most recent inventory of the landslides in the Riomaggiore catchment and the hazardous areas, as predicted by the ANN, showed very satisfactory results and allowed us to validate the methodology.

  14. Assessing performance of orthology detection strategies applied to eukaryotic genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Chen

    Full Text Available Orthology detection is critically important for accurate functional annotation, and has been widely used to facilitate studies on comparative and evolutionary genomics. Although various methods are now available, there has been no comprehensive analysis of performance, due to the lack of a genomic-scale 'gold standard' orthology dataset. Even in the absence of such datasets, the comparison of results from alternative methodologies contains useful information, as agreement enhances confidence and disagreement indicates possible errors. Latent Class Analysis (LCA is a statistical technique that can exploit this information to reasonably infer sensitivities and specificities, and is applied here to evaluate the performance of various orthology detection methods on a eukaryotic dataset. Overall, we observe a trade-off between sensitivity and specificity in orthology detection, with BLAST-based methods characterized by high sensitivity, and tree-based methods by high specificity. Two algorithms exhibit the best overall balance, with both sensitivity and specificity>80%: INPARANOID identifies orthologs across two species while OrthoMCL clusters orthologs from multiple species. Among methods that permit clustering of ortholog groups spanning multiple genomes, the (automated OrthoMCL algorithm exhibits better within-group consistency with respect to protein function and domain architecture than the (manually curated KOG database, and the homolog clustering algorithm TribeMCL as well. By way of using LCA, we are also able to comprehensively assess similarities and statistical dependence between various strategies, and evaluate the effects of parameter settings on performance. In summary, we present a comprehensive evaluation of orthology detection on a divergent set of eukaryotic genomes, thus providing insights and guides for method selection, tuning and development for different applications. Many biological questions have been addressed by multiple

  15. Assessment of the Forensic Sciences Profession: A Legal Study Concerning the Forensic Sciences Personnel. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Oliver, Jr.

    The place and function of forensic sciences personnel in American criminal law and court procedure, and the criteria used by criminal trial judges and lawyers to assess the value of forensic sciences personnel were investigated. Federal, state, Virgin Island, and Puerto Rican laws were examined, and a search of the medical and legal literature…

  16. 76 FR 38650 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... announcing the public comment period was published on May 6, 2011 (76 FR 26284). This assessment document was... instructions provided in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of Federal Register Notice (76 FR 26284). For... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Lead AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency....

  17. 75 FR 8934 - Integrated Science Assessment for Lead (Pb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... AGENCY Integrated Science Assessment for Lead (Pb) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION... (NAAQS) for Lead (Pb). This ISA is intended to update and revise, where appropriate, the scientific assessment presented in the Air Quality Criteria for Lead (EPA/600/R-5/144aF), published on October 1,...

  18. Use of Audio Modification in Science Vocabulary Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiguzel, Tufan

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the utilization of audio modification in vocabulary assessment in school subject areas, specifically in elementary science, and to present a web-based key vocabulary assessment tool for the elementary school level. Audio-recorded readings were used to replace independent student readings as the task…

  19. The science achievement of various subgroups on alternative assessment formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, Frances; Huffman, Douglas; Welch, Wayne

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the science achievement outcomes for different subgroups of students using different assessment formats. A nationally representative sample of approximately 3,500 ninth grade science students from 13 high schools throughout the United States completed a series of science assessments designed to measure their level of achievement on the national science education standards. All of the schools were using a curriculum designed to meet the standards. The assessments included a multiple-choice test, a written open-ended test, a hands-on lab skills test, and a hands-on full investigation. The results show that the student outcomes on the different assessment formats are more highly correlated for higher achieving students than for lower achieving students. Patterns for different cultural groups also vary by assessment format. There were no differences found for sex. The results support the notion that different assessment formats assess different competencies and that the achievement of students from different subgroups varies by assessment format.

  20. Applied data-centric social sciences concepts, data, computation, and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Aki-Hiro

    2014-01-01

    Applied data-centric social sciences aim to develop both methodology and practical applications of various fields of social sciences and businesses with rich data. Specifically, in the social sciences, a vast amount of data on human activities may be useful for understanding collective human nature. In this book, the author introduces several mathematical techniques for handling a huge volume of data and analysing collective human behaviour. The book is constructed from data-oriented investigation, with mathematical methods and expressions used for dealing with data for several specific problems. The fundamental philosophy underlying the book is that both mathematical and physical concepts are determined by the purposes of data analysis. This philosophy is shown throughout exemplar studies of several fields in socio-economic systems. From a data-centric point of view, the author proposes a concept that may change people’s minds and cause them to start thinking from the basis of data. Several goals underlie ...

  1. 2nd International Conference on Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Thi, Hoai; Nguyen, Ngoc

    2014-01-01

    The proceedings consists of 30 papers which have been selected and invited from the submissions to the 2nd International Conference on Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Applications (ICCSAMA 2014) held on 8-9 May, 2014 in Budapest, Hungary. The conference is organized into 7 sessions: Advanced Optimization Methods and Their Applications, Queueing Models and Performance Evaluation, Software Development and Testing, Computational Methods for Mobile and Wireless Networks, Computational Methods for Knowledge Engineering, Logic Based Methods for Decision Making and Data Mining, and Nonlinear Systems and Applications, respectively. All chapters in the book discuss theoretical and practical issues connected with computational methods and optimization methods for knowledge engineering. The editors hope that this volume can be useful for graduate and Ph.D. students and researchers in Computer Science and Applied Mathematics. It is the hope of the editors that readers of this volume can find many inspiring idea...

  2. Neutron transfer reactions: Surrogates for neutron capture for basic and applied nuclear science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on 130,132Sn, 134Te and 75As are discussed

  3. Vertically and Horizontally Mounted Wind Mills : Wind Energy Production in Tampere University of Applied Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Evdokimova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to gather information about vertical and horizontal wind mills and to complete a research on wind power production by wind mills which were installed in Tampere University of Applied Sciences. The horizontally mounted wind mill Windspot 3.5 and vertically mounted wind mill Cypress were installed in summer 2011 but they started functioning and supplying energy only during 2012. In the theoretical part of this thesis wind speed and wind power production is dis...

  4. Applied social science? academic contributions to the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry and their consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Murji, Karim

    2010-01-01

    A decade on from the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry, this article examines the contributions of social scientists to the enquiry on two key issues: the meaning of institutional racism and the police response to racial violence. These academic inputs are characterised as instrumental and reflexive forms of knowledge. While social science applied to social policy is most effective in instrumental mode, rather than reflexively, there are various factors – suchas the interpretation of evidence, media ...

  5. The marketing efficiency of English degree programmes in Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences : case TUAS

    OpenAIRE

    Stenvall, Alex

    2015-01-01

    In 2014 Turku University of Applied Sciences (TUAS) was transformed into a corporation following the Ministry of Education and Culture’s national polytechnic reform. While the main reasons for the overhaul were to better and more independently support the labour market and to facilitate flexibility and internationality, also the financing and government funding of polytechnics in Finland was revamped. This in turn has increased the independence and decision-making of each polytechnic and give...

  6. Applying Tacit Knowledge Management Techniques for Performance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Michel

    2003-01-01

    Performance assessment is an important task in all levels of education, both as input for identifying remedial needs of individual students and for improving general quality of education. Although explicit assessment measures can be obtained through objective standardized testing, it is much more difficult to capture fuzzier, or tacit, performance…

  7. Applied research of landscape ecology in desertification monitoring and assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A preliminary research on landscape ecology in desertification monitoring and assessment was reported. Also, this paper laid stress on the study of landscape diversity, dominance, evenness and Markov Matrix model and their respective landscape ecological meanings in the desertification monitoring and assessment. Concurrently, it took Shazhuyu Experimental Area, Qinghai Province as a specific case study.

  8. Risk assessment - black art or science?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measures of risk can be divided into two categories, those that observe or calculate the risk of a process or project, and those that rely on the level of risk as perceived by the people during the assessment. Collection of data of accidents (where cause and effect are obvious) and experiments on animals which can then be extrapolated to humans, are two ways of risk assessment. Mathematical models and computerized simulations, using either fault tree analysis or Monte Carlo methods are explained simply. Using these methods, experts are able to perceive risk fairly realistically. However, the general public's perception of risk is often quite different, as potential risk is assessed in different ways. The concept of tolerable risk is considered, particularly with reference to nuclear reactors such as Sizewell-B. The need to inform the public of safeguards and safety procedures so they have a better understanding of the risks of nuclear power is stressed. (U.K.)

  9. Innovations in science and scenarios for assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunkel, Kenneth E.; Moss, Richard H.; Parris, Adam

    2016-02-01

    Scenarios for the Third National Climate Assessment (NCA3) were produced for physical climate and sea level rise with substantial input from disciplinary and regional experts. These scenarios underwent extensive review and were published as NOAA Technical Reports. For land use/cover and socioeconomic conditions, scenarios already developed by other agencies were specified for use in the NCA3. Efforts to enhance participatory scenario planning as an assessment activity were pursued, but with limited success. Issues and challenges included the timing of availability of scenarios, the need for guidance in use of scenarios, the need for approaches to nest information within multiple scales and sectors, engagement and collaboration of end users in scenario development, and development of integrated scenarios. Future assessments would benefit from an earlier start to scenarios development, the provision of training in addition to guidance documents, new and flexible approaches for nesting information, ongoing engagement and advice from both scientific and end user communities, and the development of consistent and integrated scenarios.

  10. Assessing The Potential Of Stratospheric Balloons For Planteary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremic, Tibor

    2012-10-01

    Recent developments in high altitude balloon platform capabilities, specifically long duration flights in excess of 50 days at over 100,000 ft and precision pointing with performance at the arc sec level or better have raised the question whether this platform can be utilized for high-value planetary science observations. In January of 2012 a workshop was held at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Oh to explore what planetary science can be achieved utilizing such a platform. Over 40 science concepts were identified by the scientists and engineers attending the workshop. Those ideas were captured and then posted to a public website for all interested planetary scientists to review and comment on. The results of the workshop, and subsequent community review, have demonstrated that this platform appears to have potential for high-value science at very competitive costs. Given these positive results, the assessment process was extended to include 1) examining, in more detail, the requirements for the gondola platform and the mission scenarios 2) identifying technical challenges and 3) developing one or more platform concepts in enough fidelity to enable accurate estimating of development and mission costs. Upon completion, assessment results will be provided to NASA’s planetary science division to help them determine whether to embark on science efforts utilizing this platform. The poster will provide the current status of the assessment efforts.

  11. Open-ended approaches to science assessment using computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singley, Mark K.; Taft, Hessy L.

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the potential role of technology in evaluating learning outcomes in large-scale, widespread science assessments of the kind typically done at ETS, such as the GRE, or the College Board SAT II Subject Tests. We describe the current state-of-the-art in this area, as well as briefly outline the history of technology in large-scale science assessment and ponder possibilities for the future. We present examples from our own work in the domain of chemistry, in which we are designing problem solving interfaces and scoring programs for stoichiometric and other kinds of quantitative problem solving. We also present a new scientific reasoning item type that we are prototyping on the computer. It is our view that the technological infrastructure for large-scale constructed response science assessment is well on its way to being available, although many technical and practical hurdles remain.

  12. Characterizing College Science Assessments: The Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol

    CERN Document Server

    Laverty, James T; Matz, Rebecca L; Posey, Lynmarie A; Carmel, Justin H; Caballero, Marcos D; Fata-Hartley, Cori L; Ebert-May, Diane; Jardeleza, Sarah E; Cooper, Melanie M

    2016-01-01

    Many calls to improve science education in college and university settings have focused on improving instructor pedagogy. Meanwhile, science education at the K-12 level is undergoing significant changes as a result of the emphasis on scientific and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas. This framework of "three-dimensional learning" is based on the literature about how people learn science and how we can help students put their knowledge to use. Recently, calls have been made to bring similar changes to higher education by incorporating three-dimensional learning into college science courses. As these transformations move forward, it will become important to assess three-dimensional learning both to align assessments with the learning environment, and to assess the extent of the transformations. In this paper, we introduce the Three-Dimensional Learning Assessment Protocol (3D-LAP), which is designed to characterize and support the development of assessment tasks in biology...

  13. Applying ethological and health indicators to practical animal welfare assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemelsfelder, F; Mullan, S

    2014-04-01

    There is a growing effort worldwide to develop objective indicators for animal welfare assessment, which provide information on an animal's quality of life, are scientifically trustworthy, and can readily be used in practice by professionals. Animals are sentient beings capable of positive and negative emotion, and so these indicators should be sensitive not only to their physical health, but also to their experience of the conditions in which they live. This paper provides an outline of ethological research aimed at developing practical welfare assessment protocols. The first section focuses on the development and validation of welfare indicators generally, in terms of their relevance to animal well-being, their interobserver reliability, and the confidence with which the prevalence of described features can be estimated. Challenges in this work include accounting for the ways in which welfare measures may fluctuate over time, and identifying measures suited to monitoring positive welfare states. The second section focuses more specifically on qualitative welfare indicators, which assess the 'whole animal' and describe the expressive qualities of its demeanour (e.g. anxious, content). Such indicators must be validated in the same way as other health and behaviour indicators, with the added challenge of finding appropriate methods of measurement. The potential contribution of qualitative indicators, however, is to disclose an emotional richness in animals that helps to interpret information provided by other indicators, thus enhancing the validity of welfare assessment protocols. In conclusion, the paper emphasises the importance of integrating such different perspectives, showing that new knowledge of animals and new ways of relating to animals are both needed for the successful development of practical welfare assessment tools. PMID:25000783

  14. Technology Assessment of Dust Suppression Techniques Applied During Structural Demolition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, J.F.; Ebadian, M.A.; Williams, P.T.; Dua, S.K.

    1998-10-20

    Hanford, Fernald, Savannah River, and other sites are currently reviewing technologies that can be implemented to demolish buildings in a cost-effective manner. In order to demolish a structure properly and, at the same time, minimize the amount of dust generated from a given technology, an evaluation must be conducted to choose the most appropriate dust suppression technology given site-specific conditions. Thus, the purpose of this research, which was carried out at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University, was to conduct an experimental study of dust aerosol abatement (dust suppression) methods as applied to nuclear D and D. This experimental study targeted the problem of dust suppression during the demolition of nuclear facilities. The resulting data were employed to assist in the development of mathematical correlations that can be applied to predict dust generation during structural demolition.

  15. Statistical metidos applied to volcanology and volcanic hazard assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Sobradelo Pérez, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Disasters are large intractable problems that test the ability of communities and nations to effectively protect their populations and infrastructure, to reduce both human and property loss, and to rapidly recover. The randomness of impacts and problems, and uniqueness of incidents demand dynamic, real-time, effective and cost efficient solutions. For this reason, we need quantitative risk-based methods for decision-making under uncertainty to be developed and applied to volcanology....

  16. Applying RESRAD-CHEM for chemical risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RESRAD-CHEM is a multiple pathway analysis computer code to evaluate chemically contaminated sites; it was developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The code is designed to predict human health risks from exposure to hazardous chemicals and to derive cleanup criteria for chemically contaminated soils. It consists of environmental fate and transport models and is capable of predicting chemical concentrations over time in different environmental media. The methodology used in RESRAD-CHEM for exposure assessment and risk characterization follows the US Environmental Protection Agency's guidance on Human Health Evaluation for Superfund. A user-friendly interface is incorporated for entering data, operating the code, and displaying results. RESRAD-CHEM is easy to use and is a powerful tool to assess chemical risk from environmental exposure

  17. Quality assessment of butter cookies applying multispectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenby Andresen, Mette; Dissing, Bjørn Skovlund; Løje, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    A method for characterization of butter cookie quality by assessing the surface browning and water content using multispectral images is presented. Based on evaluations of the browning of butter cookies, cookies were manually divided into groups. From this categorization, reference values were...... in a forced convection electrically heated oven. In addition to the browning score, a model for predicting the average water content based on the same images is presented. This shows how multispectral images of butter cookies may be used for the assessment of different quality parameters. Statistical...... analysis showed that the most significant wavelengths for browning predictions were in the interval 400–700 nm and the wavelengths significant for water prediction were primarily located in the near-infrared spectrum. The water prediction model was found to correctly estimate the average water content with...

  18. Applying Standard Competency Assessment in Vocational Teaching Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Mimi Mohaffyza Mohamad; Nabilah Abu Bakar; Nor Lisa Sulaiman; Kahirol Mohd Salleh; Lai Che Sern

    2015-01-01

    Teaching in vocational education is focused on knowledge and skills. Psychomotor is an aspect that emphasized in teaching competency in vocational education. Teaching based on psychomotor is a way to provide students with the hands on skills. Teachers are the main character in the teaching session. Therefore, this paper explained the differences among teachers in teaching based Standard Competency Assessment with their expertise in particular field. Research used survey design involved 301 te...

  19. Assessing the potential of stratospheric balloons for planetary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremic, T.; Hibbitts, K.; Young, E.; Landis, R.; Noll, K.; Baines, K.

    Recent developments in high altitude balloon platform capabilities, specifically long duration flights in excess of 50 days at over 100,000 ft and precision pointing with performance at the arc sec level or better have raised the question whether this platform can be utilized for high-value planetary science observations. In January of 2012 a workshop was held at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio to explore what planetary science can be achieved utilizing such a platform. Over 40 science concepts were identified by the scientists and engineers attending the workshop. Those ideas were captured and then posted to a public website for all interested planetary scientists to review and give their comments. The results of the workshop, and subsequent community review, have demonstrated that this platform appears to have potential for high-value science at very competitive costs. Given these positive results, the assessment process was extended to include 1) examining, in more detail, the requirements for the gondola platform and the mission scenarios 2) identifying technical challenges and 3) developing one or more platform concepts in enough fidelity to enable accurate estimating of development and mission costs. This paper provides a review of the assessment, a summary of the achievable science and the challenges to make that science a reality with this platform.

  20. Teaching and Assessing Teamwork Skills in Engineering and Computer Science

    OpenAIRE

    Robert W. Lingard

    2010-01-01

    To be successful in today's workplace, engineering and computer science students must possess high levels of teamwork skills. Unfortunately, most engineering programs provide little or no specific instruction in this area. This paper outlines an assessment-driven approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Working with the Industrial Advisory Board for the College, a set of performance criteria for teamwork was developed. This set of criteria was used to build an assessment instrument to measur...

  1. Seminar on the use of research reactors in fundamental and applied sciences. Programme and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document includes the programme and the abstracts of papers presented at the ''Seminar on the use of research reactors in fundamental and applied sciences'' organized by the Tajoura Nuclear Research Centre in cooperation with the IAEA at Tajoura, Tripoli (Libya) between 16-20 September 1984. The abstracts are grouped in seven sessions: reactor physics (five abstracts), research reactor programmes (three abstracts), solid state physics (two abstracts), nuclear physics (two abstracts), radiochemistry (eleven abstracts), activation analysis (five abstracts), diverse topics (six abstracts). Separate indexing was provided for each abstract

  2. 3rd International Conference on Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Ngoc; Do, Tien

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains the extended versions of papers presented at the 3rd International Conference on Computer Science, Applied Mathematics and Applications (ICCSAMA 2015) held on 11-13 May, 2015 in Metz, France. The book contains 5 parts: 1. Mathematical programming and optimization: theory, methods and software, Operational research and decision making, Machine learning, data security, and bioinformatics, Knowledge information system, Software engineering. All chapters in the book discuss theoretical and algorithmic as well as practical issues connected with computation methods & optimization methods for knowledge engineering and machine learning techniques.  

  3. PREFACE: 1st International Conference in Applied Physics and Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    We are delighted to come up with thirty two (32) contributed research papers in these proceedings, focusing on Materials Science and Applied Physics as an output of the 2013 International Conference in Applied Physics and Materials Science (ICAMS2013) held on October 22-24, 2013 at the Ateneo de Davao University, Davao City, Philippines. The conference was set to provide a high level of international forum and had brought together leading academic scientists, industry professionals, researchers and scholars from universities, industries and government agencies who have shared their experiences, research results and discussed the practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted as well as the advances in the fields of Applied Physics and Materials Science. This conference has provided a wide opportunity to establish multidisciplinary collaborations with local and foreign experts. ICAMS2013, held concurrently with 15th Samahang Pisika ng Visayas at Mindanao (SPVM) National Physics Conference and 2013 International Meeting for Complex Systems, was organized by the Samahang Pisika ng Visayas at Mindanao (Physics Society of Visayas and Mindanao) based in MSU-Iligan Institute of Technology, Iligan City, Philippines. The international flavor of converging budding researchers and experts on Materials Science and Applied Physics was the first to be organized in the 19 years of SPVM operation in the Philippines. We highlighted ICAMS2013 gathering by the motivating presence of Dr. Stuart Parkin, a British Physicist, as one of our conference's plenary speakers. Equal measures of gratitude were also due to all other plenary speakers, Dr. Elizabeth Taylor of Institute of Physics (IOP) in London, Dr. Surya Raghu of Advanced Fluidics in Maryland, USA and Prof. Hitoshi Miyata of Niigata University, Japan, Prof. Djulia Onggo of Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia, and Dr. Hironori Katagiri of Nagaoka National College of Technology, Japan. The warm hospitality of the host

  4. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research 2

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 2 covers topics about complex oxide materials such as the garnets, which dominate the field of magnetoelasticity and are among the most important laser hosts, and sodalite, which is one of the classic photochromic materials. The book discusses the physics of the interactions of electromagnetic, elastic, and spin waves in single crystal magnetic insulators. The text then describes the mechanism on which inorganic photochromic materials are based, as observed in a variety of materials in single crystal, powder, and gl

  5. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research 6

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 6 covers the application of composites in electronic systems. The book discusses different types of composite-composite materials consisting of finely dispersed mixtures of metals and insulators; composite devices in which two distinct semiconductor devices are combined in one package; and composite glass fibers with the core and cladding differing in their optical properties. The text describes articles dealing with properties that can be achieved in versatile materials; light-emitting diodes and photodetectors th

  6. Applying real options analysis to assess cleaner energy development strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Ching-Tsung [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71, Chou-Shan Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lo, Shang-Lien, E-mail: sllo@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, 71, Chou-Shan Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, Tyrone T. [Department of International Business, National Dong Hwa University, 1, Sec. 2, Da Hsueh Road, Shou-Feng, Hualien 974, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-15

    The energy industry, accounts for the largest portion of CO{sub 2} emissions, is facing the issue of compliance with the national clean energy policy. The methodology for evaluating the energy mix policy is crucial because of the characteristics of lead time embedded with the power generation facilities investment and the uncertainty of future electricity demand. In this paper, a modified binomial model based on sequential compound options, which may account for the lead time and uncertainty as a whole is established, and a numerical example on evaluating the optional strategies and the strategic value of the cleaner energy policy is also presented. It is found that the optimal decision at some nodes in the binomial tree is path dependent, which is different from the standard sequential compound option model with lead time or time lag concept. The proposed modified binomial sequential compound real options model can be generalized and extensively applied to solve the general decision problems that deal with the long lead time of many government policies as well as capital intensive investments. - Highlights: > Introducing a flexible strategic management approach for government policy making. > Developing a modified binomial real options model based on sequential compound options. > Proposing an innovative model for managing the long term policy with lead time. > Applying to evaluate the options of various scenarios of cleaner energy strategies.

  7. Applying real options analysis to assess cleaner energy development strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The energy industry, accounts for the largest portion of CO2 emissions, is facing the issue of compliance with the national clean energy policy. The methodology for evaluating the energy mix policy is crucial because of the characteristics of lead time embedded with the power generation facilities investment and the uncertainty of future electricity demand. In this paper, a modified binomial model based on sequential compound options, which may account for the lead time and uncertainty as a whole is established, and a numerical example on evaluating the optional strategies and the strategic value of the cleaner energy policy is also presented. It is found that the optimal decision at some nodes in the binomial tree is path dependent, which is different from the standard sequential compound option model with lead time or time lag concept. The proposed modified binomial sequential compound real options model can be generalized and extensively applied to solve the general decision problems that deal with the long lead time of many government policies as well as capital intensive investments. - Highlights: → Introducing a flexible strategic management approach for government policy making. → Developing a modified binomial real options model based on sequential compound options. → Proposing an innovative model for managing the long term policy with lead time. → Applying to evaluate the options of various scenarios of cleaner energy strategies.

  8. Statistical analysis applied to safety culture self-assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interviews and opinion surveys are instruments used to assess the safety culture in an organization as part of the Safety Culture Enhancement Programme. Specific statistical tools are used to analyse the survey results. This paper presents an example of an opinion survey with the corresponding application of the statistical analysis and the conclusions obtained. Survey validation, Frequency statistics, Kolmogorov-Smirnov non-parametric test, Student (T-test) and ANOVA means comparison tests and LSD post-hoc multiple comparison test, are discussed. (author)

  9. Curriculum Assessment in Social Sciences at Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Hanifah Mahat Yazid; Hashim, Mohmadisa; Yaacob, Norazlan Hadi; Kasim, Adnan Jusoh Ahmad Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effectiveness of the curriculum implementation for undergraduate programme in the Faculty of Human Sciences, UPSI producing quality and competitive educators. Curriculum implementation has to go through an assessment process that aims to determine the problem, select relevant information and collect and…

  10. Independent Technology Assessment within the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, A. B.; Robinson, E.; Graybeal, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) is a community of science, data and information technology practitioners. ESIP's mission is to support the networking and data dissemination needs of our members and the global community. We do this by linking the functional sectors of education, observation, research and application with the ultimate use of Earth science. Amongst the services provided to ESIP members is the Testbed; a collaborative forum for the development of technology standards, services, protocols and best practices. ESIP has partnered with the NASA Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program to integrate independent assessment of Testing Readiness Level (TRL) into the ESIP Testbed. In this presentation we will 1) demonstrate TRL assessment in the ESIP Testbed using three AIST projects, 2) discuss challenges and insights into creating an independent validation/verification framework and 3) outline the versatility of the ESIP Testbed as applied to other technology projects.

  11. Technology Assessment of Dust Suppression Techniques applied During Structural Demolition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, J.F.; Ebadian, M.A.; Dua, S.K.

    1997-08-06

    Hanford, Fernald, Savannah River, and other sites are currently reviewing technologies that can be implemented to demolish buildings in a cost-effective manner. In order to demolish a structure and, at the same time, minimize the amount of dust generated by a given technology, an evaluation must be conducted to choose the most appropriate dust suppression technology. Thus, the purpose of this research, which was conducted by the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU), was to perform an experimental study of dust aerosol abatement (dust suppression) methods as applied to nuclear D and D. This experimental study specifically targeted the problem of dust suppression during demolition. The resulting data were used in the development of mathematical correlations that can be applied to structural demolition. In the Fiscal Year 1996 (FY96), the effectiveness of different dust suppressing agents was investigated for different types of concrete blocks. Initial tests were conducted in a broad particle size range. In Fiscal Year 1997 (FY97), additional tests were performed in the size range in which most of the particles were detected. Since particle distribution is an important parameter for predicting deposition in various compartments of the human respiratory tract, various tests were aimed at determining the particle size distribution of the airborne dust particles. The effectiveness of dust suppressing agents for particles of various size was studied. Instead of conducting experiments on various types of blocks, it was thought prudent to carry out additional tests on blocks of the same type. Several refinements were also incorporated in the test procedures and data acquisition system used in FY96.

  12. Integrity and quality assessment applied on laser welded titanium components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wirdelius Håkan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser welding of thin titanium components, a critical component of many gas turbine engines, has demonstrated a tendency of generating pores in clusters with a prescribed orientation. These pores, also known as chain porosities, are often of harmless sizes (of 50–100 micrometer as individuals. Though the cluster as such, depending on the distances and orientations in between the pores, may have an impact on the structural integrity. A recently developed algorithm for 3-D positioning of small pore defects in planar geometries using digital X-ray inspection aims at providing 3-D positions of the defects. This could then be used in-line to assess the welding quality in the manufacturing process. This presentation describes the development of a methodology that aims to incorporate non-destructive evaluation with, in this case, structural integrity.

  13. Life cycle assessment applied to the sector of microelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarazzo, Agata; Ingrao, Carlo; Clasadonte, Maria Teresa

    2016-07-01

    This work is about the application of LCA to the ends of the environmental assessment of pure-silicon wafers production. The input-data quantification is realized studying two microelectronic devices and presenting schematically tables and graphs, to be easily interpreted. This will allow help the reader to individuate, clearly and immediately, the materials flows and the relationships among the different steps of the production process. The material flows, in terms of raw materials use and energy consumption, were studied using the data provided by a firm involved in the microelectronic device production field. The two devices environmental analysis was developed considering potential effects such as Acidification, Eutrophication, Ozone reduction, Global warming, Ozone photochemical formation, Human Toxicity.

  14. Sharing NASA Science with Decision Makers: A Perspective from NASA's Applied Remote Sensing Training (ARSET) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prados, A. I.; Blevins, B.; Hook, E.

    2015-12-01

    NASA ARSET http://arset.gsfc.nasa.gov has been providing applied remote sensing training since 2008. The goals of the program are to develop the technical and analytical skills necessary to utilize NASA resources for decision-support. The program has reached over 3500 participants, with 1600 stakeholders from 100 countries in 2015 alone. The target audience for the program are professionals engaged in environmental management in the public and private sectors, such as air quality forecasters, public utilities, water managers and non-governmental organizations engaged in conservation. Many program participants have little or no expertise in NASA remote sensing, and it's frequently their very first exposure to NASA's vast resources. One the key challenges for the program has been the evolution and refinement of its approach to communicating NASA data access, research, and ultimately its value to stakeholders. We discuss ARSET's best practices for sharing NASA science, which include 1) training ARSET staff and other NASA scientists on methods for science communication, 2) communicating the proper amount of scientific information at a level that is commensurate with the technical skills of program participants, 3) communicating the benefit of NASA resources to stakeholders, and 4) getting to know the audience and tailoring the message so that science information is conveyed within the context of agencies' unique environmental challenges.

  15. Pedagogy of Science Teaching Tests: Formative assessments of science teaching orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobern, William W.; Schuster, David; Adams, Betty; Skjold, Brandy Ann; Zeynep Muğaloğlu, Ebru; Bentz, Amy; Sparks, Kelly

    2014-09-01

    A critical aspect of teacher education is gaining pedagogical content knowledge of how to teach science for conceptual understanding. Given the time limitations of college methods courses, it is difficult to touch on more than a fraction of the science topics potentially taught across grades K-8, particularly in the context of relevant pedagogies. This research and development work centers on constructing a formative assessment resource to help expose pre-service teachers to a greater number of science topics within teaching episodes using various modes of instruction. To this end, 100 problem-based, science pedagogy assessment items were developed via expert group discussions and pilot testing. Each item contains a classroom vignette followed by response choices carefully crafted to include four basic pedagogies (didactic direct, active direct, guided inquiry, and open inquiry). The brief but numerous items allow a substantial increase in the number of science topics that pre-service students may consider. The intention is that students and teachers will be able to share and discuss particular responses to individual items, or else record their responses to collections of items and thereby create a snapshot profile of their teaching orientations. Subsets of items were piloted with students in pre-service science methods courses, and the quantitative results of student responses were spread sufficiently to suggest that the items can be effective for their intended purpose.

  16. Remote sensing techniques applied to seismic vulnerability assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Arranz, Jose; Torres, Yolanda; Hahgi, Azade; Gaspar-Escribano, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Advances in remote sensing and photogrammetry techniques have increased the degree of accuracy and resolution in the record of the earth's surface. This has expanded the range of possible applications of these data. In this research, we have used these data to document the construction characteristics of the urban environment of Lorca, Spain. An exposure database has been created with the gathered information to be used in seismic vulnerability assessment. To this end, we have used data from photogrammetric flights at different periods, using both orthorectified images in the visible and infrared spectrum. Furthermore, the analysis is completed using LiDAR data. From the combination of these data, it has been possible to delineate the building footprints and characterize the constructions with attributes such as the approximate date of construction, area, type of roof and even building materials. To carry out the calculation, we have developed different algorithms to compare images from different times, segment images, classify LiDAR data, and use the infrared data in order to remove vegetation or to compute roof surfaces with height value, tilt and spectral fingerprint. In addition, the accuracy of our results has been validated with ground truth data. Keywords: LiDAR, remote sensing, seismic vulnerability, Lorca

  17. Integrated assessment of emerging science and technologies as creating learning processes among assessment communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Ellen-Marie; Ribeiro, Barbara; Heyen, Nils B; Nielsen, Rasmus Øjvind; Thorstensen, Erik; de Bakker, Erik; Klüver, Lars; Reiss, Thomas; Beekman, Volkert; Millar, Kate

    2016-12-01

    Emerging science and technologies are often characterised by complexity, uncertainty and controversy. Regulation and governance of such scientific and technological developments needs to build on knowledge and evidence that reflect this complicated situation. This insight is sometimes formulated as a call for integrated assessment of emerging science and technologies, and such a call is analysed in this article. The article addresses two overall questions. The first is: to what extent are emerging science and technologies currently assessed in an integrated way. The second is: if there appears to be a need for further integration, what should such integration consist in? In the article we briefly outline the pedigree of the term 'integrated assessment' and present a number of interpretations of the concept that are useful for informing current analyses and discussions of integration in assessment. Based on four case studies of assessment of emerging science and technologies, studies of assessment traditions, literature analysis and dialogues with assessment professionals, currently under-developed integration dimensions are identified. It is suggested how these dimensions can be addressed in a practical approach to assessment where representatives of different assessment communities and stakeholders are involved. We call this approach the Trans Domain Technology Evaluation Process (TranSTEP). PMID:27465504

  18. Photometer Performance Assessment in Kepler Science Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Allen, Christopher; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Clarke, Bruce D.; Gunter, Jay P.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Klaus, Todd C.; Quintana, Elisa V.; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Wohler, Bill; Wu, Hayley

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the algorithms of the Photometer Performance Assessment (PPA) software component in the science data processing pipeline of the Kepler mission. The PPA performs two tasks: One is to analyze the health and performance of the Kepler photometer based on the long cadence science data down-linked via Ka band approximately every 30 days. The second is to determine the attitude of the Kepler spacecraft with high precision at each long cadence. The PPA component is demonstrated to work effectively with the Kepler flight data.

  19. Micro-satellites (~ 50 kg) for the fundamental and applied science. Capacity building for Russian Academy of Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Rodin, V.; Gurevich, A.; Alferov, A.; Getsov, P.

    Design and manufacturing of micro-satellite ( 50 kg) platforms for the fundamental and applied research of the Earth and near-earth outer space is a problem which is complex both scientifically and technically. Main point is to define the scientific task which could be effectively solved by micro-satellite instrumentation. It is necessary also to carry out an integral approach in the course of the spacecraft development: find methods to introduce the contemporary technological-design, use the achievements of advanced physical instrument manufacturing , microelectronics and micromechanics. Technical solutions should provide the required accuracy of spacecraft orientation and stabilization. Space Research and Physical Institutes RAS with participation of Moscow University developed the model composition and technical design of micro satellite "CHIBIS" (small bird LAPWING in Russian) with two options for scientific payload: A. The complex of scientific instruments N1 for the monitoring of Global warming and the electromagnetic environment of the Earth: spectrometer for measurements of the total content of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4); optical camera (spatial resolution 300 m); lowfrequency flux-gate magnetometer (DC - 64 Hz); high-frequency search-coil magnetometer (0.1 - 40 kHz); analyzer of the electromagnetic emissions (0.1 - 40 kHz); detector of ionospheric plasma. B. The complex of scientific instruments N2 for investigation of fine scale physics of lightning discharges: X-ray - gamma detector (range of X-ray and gamma emission - 50-500 keV); UV detector (range UV - emission - 300-450 nm); radiofrequency analyzer (20 - 50 MHz); optical camera. Spacecraft manufacturing and scientific experiments are prepared mostly by the institutes of Russian academy of sciences without traditional involvement of large scale space industry. So this activity serves as a substantial driver of Academic capacity building for the independent research of space science problems

  20. University names Thomas Campbell to postitions at Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Thomas A. Campbell has been named assistant director for research and operations for the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and program manager for the Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science.

  1. Improving Assessment Methods in University Science Education with Negotiated Self- and Peer-Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Wai-Yin; McNaught, Carmel; Lam, Paul; Kwan, H. S.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether, in the Hong Kong context, self- and peer-assessment promote students' self-reflection and enable students to understand their own strengths and weaknesses better. A three-stage assessment strategy was employed in three Science courses at The Chinese University of Hong Kong: (1) students developing…

  2. NASA Applied Sciences' DEVELOP National Program: a unique model cultivating capacity in the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, K. W.; Favors, J. E.; Childs-Gleason, L. M.; Ruiz, M. L.; Rogers, L.; Allsbrook, K. N.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA DEVELOP National Program takes a unique approach to cultivating the next generation of geoscientists through interdisciplinary research projects that address environmental and public policy issues through the application of NASA Earth observations. Competitively selected teams of students, recent graduates, and early career professionals take ownership of project proposals outlining basic application concepts and have ten weeks to research core scientific challenges, engage partners and end-users, demonstrate prototypical solutions, and finalize and document their results and outcomes. In this high pressure, results-driven environment emerging geoscience professionals build strong networks, hone effective communication skills, and learn how to call on the varied strengths of a multidisciplinary team to achieve difficult objectives. The DEVELOP approach to workforce development has a variety of advantages over classic apprenticeship-style internship systems. Foremost is the experiential learning of grappling with real-world applied science challenges as a primary actor instead of as an observer or minor player. DEVELOP participants gain experience that fosters personal strengths and service to others, promoting a balance of leadership and teamwork in order to successfully address community needs. The program also advances understanding of Earth science data and technology amongst participants and partner organizations to cultivate skills in managing schedules, risks and resources to best optimize outcomes. Individuals who come through the program gain experience and networking opportunities working within NASA and partner organizations that other internship and academic activities cannot replicate providing not only skill development but an introduction to future STEM-related career paths. With the competitive nature and growing societal role of science and technology in today's global community, DEVELOP fosters collaboration and advances environmental

  3. IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, I. J. Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society is pleased to announce that the 2013 IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine is awarded to Prof. Marco Durante, Director of the Biophysics Department at GSI Helmholtz Center (Darmstadt, Germany); Professor at the Technical University of Darmstadt (Germany) and Adjunct Professor at the Temple University, Philadelphia, USA. The prize was presented in the closing Session of the INPC 2013 conference by Mr. Thomas Servais, R&D Manager for Accelerator Development at the IBA group, who sponsor the IBA Europhysics Prize. The Prize Diploma was presented by Dr. I J Douglas MacGregor, Chair-elect of the EPS Nuclear Physics Division and Chair of the IBA Prize committee.

  4. Polymer science applied to petroleum production; Ciencia de polimeros aplicada a producao de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, Elizabete F.; Mansur, Claudia R.E.; Garreto, Maria S.E.; Honse, Siller O.; Mazzeo, Claudia P.P. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro/ Instituto de Macromoleculas/ Laboratorio de Macromoleculas e Coloides na Industria de Petroleo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: elucas@ima.ufrj.br

    2011-07-01

    The petroleum production comprises several operations, from well drilling to oil and water treatment, in which polymer science is applied. This work is focused in the phase behavior of asphaltenes that can be evaluated by precipitation tests and particle size determination. Recent researches show that the petroleum can be diluted with a specific model solvent, without causing any changes on asphaltenes phase behavior, and that a representative model system can be obtained if asphaltenes could be extracted using n-alkane as low as C1. The phase behavior of asphaltenes directly depends on the solubility parameter, which can be estimated for petroleum and asphaltenic fractions by microcalorimetry. More polar asphaltenes are not completely stabilized by less polar molecules, and this affects the stability of the A/O emulsions. There is a relationship between the amount of polar groups in the polymer chain and its capability in stabilizing/flocculating the asphaltenes, which interferes in the asphaltenes particle sizes. (author)

  5. Computer Sciences Applied to Management at Open University of Catalonia: Development of Competences of Teamworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisa, Carlos Cabañero; López, Enric Serradell

    Teamwork is considered one of the most important professional skills in today's business environment. More specifically, the collaborative work between professionals and information technology managers from various functional areas is a strategic key in competitive business. Several university-level programs are focusing on developing these skills. This article presents the case of the course Computer Science Applied to Management (hereafter CSAM) that has been designed with the objective to develop the ability to work cooperatively in interdisciplinary teams. For their design and development have been addressed to the key elements of efficiency that appear in the literature, most notably the establishment of shared objectives and a feedback system, the management of the harmony of the team, their level of autonomy, independence, diversity and level of supervision. The final result is a subject in which, through a working virtual platform, interdisciplinary teams solve a problem raised by a case study.

  6. The National Climate Assessment as a Resource for Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, R. C. J.

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 Third National Climate Assessment (NCA3) is scientifically authoritative and features major advances, relative to other assessments produced by several organizations. NCA3 is a valuable resource for communicating climate science to a wide variety of audiences. Other assessments were often overly detailed and laden with scientific jargon that made them appear too complex and technical to many in their intended audiences, especially policymakers, the media, and the broad public. Some other assessments emphasized extensive scientific caveats, quantitative uncertainty estimates and broad consensus support. All these attributes, while valuable in research, carry the risk of impeding science communication to non-specialists. Without compromising scientific accuracy and integrity, NCA3 is written in exceptionally clear and vivid English. It includes outstanding graphics and employs powerful techniques aimed at conveying key results unambiguously to a wide range of audiences. I have used NCA3 as a resource in speaking about climate change in three very different settings: classroom teaching for undergraduate university students, presenting in academia to historians and other non-scientists, and briefing corporate executives working on renewable energy. NCA3 proved the value of developing a climate assessment with communication goals and strategies given a high priority throughout the process, not added on as an afterthought. I draw several lessons. First, producing an outstanding scientific assessment is too complex and demanding a task to be carried out by scientists alone. Many types of specialized expertise are also needed. Second, speaking about science to a variety of audiences requires an assortment of communication skills and tools, all tailored to specific groups of listeners. Third, NCA3 is scientifically impeccable and is also an outstanding example of effective communication as well as a valuable resource for communicators.

  7. IBM Watson: How Cognitive Computing Can Be Applied to Big Data Challenges in Life Sciences Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Elenee Argentinis, J D; Weber, Griff

    2016-04-01

    Life sciences researchers are under pressure to innovate faster than ever. Big data offer the promise of unlocking novel insights and accelerating breakthroughs. Ironically, although more data are available than ever, only a fraction is being integrated, understood, and analyzed. The challenge lies in harnessing volumes of data, integrating the data from hundreds of sources, and understanding their various formats. New technologies such as cognitive computing offer promise for addressing this challenge because cognitive solutions are specifically designed to integrate and analyze big datasets. Cognitive solutions can understand different types of data such as lab values in a structured database or the text of a scientific publication. Cognitive solutions are trained to understand technical, industry-specific content and use advanced reasoning, predictive modeling, and machine learning techniques to advance research faster. Watson, a cognitive computing technology, has been configured to support life sciences research. This version of Watson includes medical literature, patents, genomics, and chemical and pharmacological data that researchers would typically use in their work. Watson has also been developed with specific comprehension of scientific terminology so it can make novel connections in millions of pages of text. Watson has been applied to a few pilot studies in the areas of drug target identification and drug repurposing. The pilot results suggest that Watson can accelerate identification of novel drug candidates and novel drug targets by harnessing the potential of big data. PMID:27130797

  8. Risk assessment and food allergy: the probabilistic model applied to allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjersberg, M.Q.I.; Kruizinga, A.G.; Rennen, M.A.J.; Houben, G.F.

    2007-01-01

    In order to assess the risk of unintended exposure to food allergens, traditional deterministic risk assessment is usually applied, leading to inconsequential conclusions as 'an allergic reaction cannot be excluded'. TNO therefore developed a quantitative risk assessment model for allergens based on

  9. After the Cap: Risk Assessment, Citizen Science and Disaster Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina McCormick

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available I used the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill to examine how crowdsourcing is used as a new form of citizen science that provides real time assessments of health-related exposures. Assessing risks of an oil spill, or disasters more generally, is a challenge complicated by the situated nature of knowledge-generation that results in differential perceptions and responses. These processes are critical in the case of the British Petroleum spill in the Gulf Coast since the identification of risks promises to have ramifications for multiple social actors, as well as the health status and long-term resilience of communities in the area. Qualitative interviews, ethnographic observations, and video data were collected with local social movement organizations, grassroots groups, spill workers, fisherman, local residents, scientists, and government representatives within five months of the spill. Findings suggest that crowdsourcing is a new form of citizen science reflecting a transition from lay mapping to an online data gathering system that allows a broader range of participation and the detection of a broader range of impacts. Outcomes of this research promise to help demonstrate and theorize how citizen science relates to risk assessment processes and affects disaster recovery and long-term response.

  10. Assessing the Impacts of Citizen Participation in Science Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Janus; Allansdottir, Agnes

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore new avenues of analysis on the thorny issue of the impact of participatory technology assessment (PTA). We apply qualitative comparative analysis to data abstracted from a series of detailed country case studies of policy-making on xenotransplantation to explore which fac...... in attempting to account for both permissive and restrictive policies. We conclude that the paper makes both a substantial and a methodological contribution to the literature on public participation in technology assessment and policy-making....

  11. Teaching and Assessing Teamwork Skills in Engineering and Computer Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Lingard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To be successful in today's workplace, engineering and computer science students must possess high levels of teamwork skills. Unfortunately, most engineering programs provide little or no specific instruction in this area. This paper outlines an assessment-driven approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Working with the Industrial Advisory Board for the College, a set of performance criteria for teamwork was developed. This set of criteria was used to build an assessment instrument to measure the extent to which students are able to achieve the necessary skills. This set of criteria provides a clear basis for the development of an approach toward teaching teamwork skills. Furthermore, the results from the assessment can be used to adjust the teaching techniques to address the particular skills where students show some weaknesses. Although this effort is in the early stages, the approach seems promising and will be improved over time.

  12. Can Clinical Scenario Videos Improve Dental Students' Perceptions of the Basic Sciences and Ability to Apply Content Knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cynthia Jayne; Metz, Michael James

    2015-12-01

    Dental students often have difficulty understanding the importance of basic science classes, such as physiology, for their future careers. To help alleviate this problem, the aim of this study was to create and evaluate a series of video modules using simulated patients and custom-designed animations that showcase medical emergencies in the dental practice. First-year students in a dental physiology course formatively assessed their knowledge using embedded questions in each of the three videos; 108 to 114 of the total 120 first-year students answered the questions, for a 90-95% response rate. These responses indicated that while the students could initially recognize the cause of the medical emergency, they had difficulty in applying their knowledge of physiology to the scenario. In two of the three videos, students drastically improved their ability to answer high-level clinical questions at the conclusion of the video. Additionally, when compared to the previous year of the course, there was a significant improvement in unit exam scores on clinically related questions (6.2% increase). Surveys were administered to the first-year students who participated in the video modules and fourth-year students who had completed the course prior to implementation of any clinical material. The response rate for the first-year students was 96% (115/120) and for the fourth-year students was 57% (68/120). The first-year students indicated a more positive perception of the physiology course and its importance for success on board examinations and their dental career than the fourth-year students. The students perceived that the most positive aspects of the modules were the clear applications of physiology to real-life dental situations, the interactive nature of the videos, and the improved student comprehension of course concepts. These results suggest that online modules may be used successfully to improve students' perceptions of the basic sciences and enhance their ability to

  13. The development of holistic professional competence through assessment - applying constructivist and reflective assessment practices in a teacher-training programme

    OpenAIRE

    LORENZI, Francesca; RAMI, Justin

    2012-01-01

    Traditional forms of assessment such, as essays and end of term examinations, are still widely used in higher education in Ireland as the sole assessment methods. These forms of assessment, while the may be valid and reliable methods for collecting evidence of acquisition of theoretical knowledge, they rarely afford students the opportunity to apply knowledge to key professional scenarios. The authors draw on their experience as Lecturers and course designers for the module “Curriculum As...

  14. Applying Physics Concepts--Uncovering the Gender Differences in Assessment of Performance Unit Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bransky, Judith; Qualter, Anne

    1993-01-01

    Describes the findings of secondary analysis of data from the Assessment of Performance Unit (APU) Science. The most striking feature of the study is the extremely low level of scores obtained for questions which invite a written response. The results also clearly show the consistent negative reaction of girls to the technical context of…

  15. Assessment for Effective Intervention: Enrichment Science Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Irit; Cohen, Donita

    2012-11-01

    Israel suffers from a growing problem of socio-economic gaps between those who live in the center of the country and residents of outlying areas. As a result, there is a low level of accessibility to higher education among the peripheral population. The goal of the Sidney Warren Science Education Center for Youth at Tel-Hai College is to strengthen the potential of middle and high school students and encourage them to pursue higher education, with an emphasis on majoring in science and technology. This study investigated the implementation and evaluation of the enrichment science academic program, as an example of informal learning environment, with an emphasis on physics studies. About 500 students conducted feedback survey after participating in science activities in four domains: biology, chemistry, physics, and computer science. Results indicated high level of satisfaction among the students. No differences were found with respect to gender excluding in physics with a positive attitudes advantage among boys. In order to get a deeper understanding of this finding, about 70 additional students conducted special questionnaires, both 1 week before the physics enrichment day and at the end of that day. Questionnaires were intended to assess both their attitudes toward physics and their knowledge and conceptions of the physical concept "pressure." We found that the activity moderately improved boys' attitudes toward physics, but that girls displayed decreased interest in and lower self-efficacy toward physics. Research results were used to the improvement of the instructional design of the physics activity demonstrating internal evaluation process for effective intervention.

  16. Graduate School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences College of Basic And Applied Sciences, University of Ghana - Atomic, Annual Report-2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences 2014 annual report provides an overview of activities undertaken during the year. It also acknowlegdes the contributions of various departments, namely, Department of Medical Physics, Department of Nuclear Agriculture and Radiation Processing, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Department of Nuclear Safety and Security and the Office of International Programmes. Also presented are titles of student research projects and publications of staff.

  17. Planning and Applying Indicators of Resource Allocation in Universities of Medical Sciences: Application of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shariati

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Regarding the importance of health economics in education, it is a bear necessity to justify and organize the process of resource allocation in health allied faculties in all medical universities. Applying the "Principal–Agent Theory", researchers sought to determine indicators for resource allocation in faculties in a university of medical sciences, based on principles of scientific management and economics. Methods: In this qualitative study, using expert panel discussion and Delphi technique, researchers investigated many recourse allocation methods in universities all over the world and did their best to establish localized indicators for resource allocation in the university. Results: Based on the findings of this study, resource allocation in a selected medical university was not in accordance with their performance, number of faculty members, number of students and the types (undergraduate & postgraduate and costs of their programs. In this study, indicators for resource allocation were, mostly, based on last year costs of faculties and authorities. bargaining abilities in each faculty, but not based on their performance. Conclusion: This research showed that bargaining and verbal justifications were replaced by documentation and improved performance in order to receive proper resources in the process of resource allocation. Moreover, this research showed that the best indicator to proportionate the financial resources among faculties in a university is to multiply the number of student by program cost weight in under and postgraduate curriculums. In this study, localized programs cost weights in the selected university were identified

  18. Acoustic teaching apparatus before 1929 at the Case School of Applied Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekje, Peter L.; Fickinger, William

    2001-05-01

    The acoustics apparatus found in the Physics Department of the Case School of Applied Science in the first decades of the 20th century included many items common to other acoustical teaching laboratories, such as organ pipes, tuning forks, Helmholtz resonators, sirens, and manometric flame sound analyzers. The European instrument makers Rudolf Koenig and Max Kohl supplied much of this. Equipment built at Case included the phonodeik, which Dayton C. Miller designed in 1908, and the waveform synthesizer. Miller supplied detailed descriptions of the operations of all this equipment in papers and books. In the phonodeik (to show sound), sound deflects a thin glass diaphragm, which by a silk thread turns a mirror on an axle, causing a spot of light to move across film or a projection screen. A working model of the phonodeik has been reconstructed from pieces of two original ones, and will be demonstrated. Photographs of other extant instruments in the collection, and a selection from Millers lantern slides, will be displayed.

  19. Overeducation among Graduates from Universities of Applied Sciences: Determinants and Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Diem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the phenomenon of qualification mismatch (overeducation among graduates from universities of applied sciences. Using data from the Swiss graduate surveys, it analyses the incidence of mismatch, determinants, and the connections with earnings and job satisfaction. Analyses show that a year after graduating around one sixth of those employed (17% are in a job which does not match, or only partially matches, the qualifications they have acquired, and that this proportion is not diminishing significantly in the medium term. The risk of mismatch varies considerably, however, by subject area and final grade. In addition, the results indicate that employment below the level of qualification on entering professional life significantly raises the probability of mismatch in the following years too. Analyses of the impacts suggest that employment poorly matched to education and training is associated with an income penalty of around 5% in the short to medium term. Graduates in a mismatch situation also demonstrate less job satisfaction than those in a position matched to their qualification.

  20. Models, validation, and applied geochemistry: Issues in science, communication, and philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Models have become so fashionable that many scientists and engineers cannot imagine working without them. The predominant use of computer codes to execute model calculations has blurred the distinction between code and model. The recent controversy regarding model validation has brought into question what we mean by a ‘model’ and by ‘validation.’ It has become apparent that the usual meaning of validation may be common in engineering practice and seems useful in legal practice but it is contrary to scientific practice and brings into question our understanding of science and how it can best be applied to such problems as hazardous waste characterization, remediation, and aqueous geochemistry in general. This review summarizes arguments against using the phrase model validation and examines efforts to validate models for high-level radioactive waste management and for permitting and monitoring open-pit mines. Part of the controversy comes from a misunderstanding of ‘prediction’ and the need to distinguish logical from temporal prediction. Another problem stems from the difference in the engineering approach contrasted with the scientific approach. The reductionist influence on the way we approach environmental investigations also limits our ability to model the interconnected nature of reality. Guidelines are proposed to improve our perceptions and proper utilization of models. Use of the word ‘validation’ is strongly discouraged when discussing model reliability.

  1. POLITICAL SCIENCE TOOLS FOR ASSESSING FEASIBILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY OF REFORMS

    OpenAIRE

    Wimmer, Andreas; De Soysa, Indra; Wagner, Christian

    2003-01-01

    We were asked by the Independent Evaluation Office to outline political science methods for assessing the chances of reform implementation in an ex-ante fashion. We agreed to illustrate how these tools 'work' by using Pakistan as a case study. The recent literature on IMF-sponsored reforms points out that successful implementation not only depends on the nature and severity of the economic crisis and on the design of the reforms, but very much also on the political economy of reform politics....

  2. Promoting Prospective Elementary Teachers' Learning to Use Formative Assessment for Life Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Jaime L.; Forbes, Cory T.; Zangori, Laura

    2015-01-01

    To support elementary students' learning of core, standards-based life science concepts highlighted in the "Next Generation Science Standards," prospective elementary teachers should develop an understanding of life science concepts and learn to apply their content knowledge in instructional practice to craft elementary science learning…

  3. Implementing assessment of inquiry skills in science education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Rask

    2015-01-01

    During the recent years there has been a change in teaching going from teaching content knowledge towards teaching skills and competencies. IBSE seems to be a powerful tool in that process. This paper describes how teachers from lower and upper secondary school approach an assessment of skills and...... competencies acquired through IBSE. The case study describes how 2 teachers (2LS, 2US) used lessons on UV-radiation (LS) and natural selection (US) as structures for assessing skills and competencies and how they in these lessons made use of different scaffolding strategies. We followed the teaching while...... implementation is not from the curriculum but from a content-knowledge focussed identity among science teachers. This area of teacher’s culture could be a fruitful approach for further research....

  4. Implementing assessment of inquiry skills in science education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Rask

    During the recent years there has been a change in teaching going from teaching content knowledge towards teaching skills and competencies. IBSE seems to be a powerful tool in that process. This paper describes how teachers from lower and upper secondary school approach an assessment of skills and...... competencies acquired through IBSE. The case study describes how 2 teachers (2LS, 2US) used lessons on UV-radiation (LS) and natural selection (US) as structures for assessing skills and competencies and how they in these lessons made use of different scaffolding strategies. We followed the teaching while...... implementation is not from the curriculum but from a content-knowledge focussed identity among science teachers. This area of teacher’s culture could be a fruitful approach for further research....

  5. Strategic communication applied to the promotion of science: the communication and society research centre’s case

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, Ricardina Alexandra Silva

    2015-01-01

    Science is an activity that makes possible the technological, social, cultural and economic development. It is important to assess the way the scientific world communicates, including the ability of adequacy to the new tools of communication of science and their respective forms of interaction with the publics. We refer to digital communication that brings increased capabilities, in relation to traditional communication. In fact, we will try to demonstrate that the investment made in online c...

  6. Developing an International Combined Applied Surgical Science and Wet Lab Simulation Course as an Undergraduate Teaching Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail Sideris

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Essential Skills in the Management of Surgical Cases (ESMSC is an international, animal model-based course. It combines interactive lectures with basic ex vivo stations and more advanced wet lab modules, that is, in vivo dissections and Heart Transplant Surgery on a swine model. Materials and Methods. Forty-nine medical students (male, N=27, female N=22, and mean age = 23.7 years from King’s College London (KCL and Greek Medical Schools attended the course. Participants were assessed with Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS, as well as Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs. Paired t-test associations were used to evaluate whether there was statistically significant improvement in their performance. Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness of a combined applied surgical science and wet lab simulation course as a teaching model for surgical skills at the undergraduate level. Results. The mean MCQ score was improved by 2.33/32 (P<0.005. Surgical skills competences, as defined by DOPS scores, were improved in a statically significant manner (P<0.005 for all paired t-test correlations. Conclusions. ESMSC seems to be an effective teaching model, which improves the understanding of the surgical approach and the basic surgical skills. In vivo models could be used potentially as a step further in the Undergraduate Surgical Education.

  7. Experiences of Using Automated Assessment in Computer Science Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John English

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the use of automated assessment in a variety of computer science courses that have been taught at Israel Academic College by the authors. The course assignments were assessed entirely automatically using Checkpoint, a web-based automated assessment framework. The assignments all used free-text questions (where the students type in their own answers. Students were allowed to correct errors based on feedback provided by the system and resubmit their answers. A total of 141 students were surveyed to assess their opinions of this approach, and we analysed their responses. Analysis of the questionnaire showed a low correlation between questions, indicating the statistical independence of the individual questions. As a whole, student feedback on using Checkpoint was very positive, emphasizing the benefits of multiple attempts, impartial marking, and a quick turnaround time for submissions. Many students said that Checkpoint gave them confidence in learning and motivation to practise. Students also said that the detailed feedback that Checkpoint generated when their programs failed helped them understand their mistakes and how to correct them.

  8. Applying Science: Opportunities to Inform Disease Management Policy with Cooperative Research within a One Health Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Jason K; Kracalik, Ian T; Fair, Jeanne Marie

    2015-01-01

    The ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa and the current saiga antelope die off in Kazakhstan each represent very real and difficult to manage public or veterinary health crises. They also illustrate the importance of stable and funded surveillance and sound policy for intervention or disease control. While these two events highlight extreme cases of infectious disease (Ebola) or (possible) environmental exposure (saiga), diseases such as anthrax, brucellosis, tularemia, and plague are all zoonoses that pose risks and present surveillance challenges at the wildlife-livestock-human interfaces. These four diseases are also considered important actors in the threat of biological terror activities and have a long history as legacy biowarfare pathogens. This paper reviews recent studies done cooperatively between American and institutions within nations of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) focused on spatiotemporal, epidemiological, and ecological patterns of these four zoonoses. We examine recent studies and discuss the possible ways in which techniques, including ecological niche modeling, disease risk modeling, and spatiotemporal cluster analysis, can inform disease surveillance, control efforts, and impact policy. Our focus is to posit ways to apply science to disease management policy and actual management or mitigation practices. Across these examples, we illustrate the value of cooperative studies that bring together modern geospatial and epidemiological analyses to improve our understanding of the distribution of pathogens and diseases in livestock, wildlife, and humans. For example, ecological niche modeling can provide national level maps of pathogen distributions for surveillance planning, while space-time models can identify the timing and location of significant outbreak events for defining active control strategies. We advocate for the need to bring the results and the researchers from cooperative studies into the meeting rooms where policy is negotiated and

  9. Thinking science with thinking machines: The multiple realities of basic and applied knowledge in a research border zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Steve G

    2015-04-01

    Some scholars dismiss the distinction between basic and applied science as passé, yet substantive assumptions about this boundary remain obdurate in research policy, popular rhetoric, the sociology and philosophy of science, and, indeed, at the level of bench practice. In this article, I draw on a multiple ontology framework to provide a more stable affirmation of a constructivist position in science and technology studies that cannot be reduced to a matter of competing perspectives on a single reality. The analysis is grounded in ethnographic research in the border zone of Artificial Intelligence science. I translate in-situ moments in which members of neighboring but differently situated labs engage in three distinct repertoires that render the reality of basic and applied science: partitioning, flipping, and collapsing. While the essences of scientific objects are nowhere to be found, the boundary between basic and applied is neither illusion nor mere propaganda. Instead, distinctions among scientific knowledge are made real as a matter of course. PMID:26477207

  10. An initial needs assessment of science inquiry curriculum practices at a local level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottingham, Susan M.

    Frequently, students learn in science classes taught like traditional reading courses in which reading texts and answering questions is the main activity. The problem at one southern middle school is that students are not developing an understanding of science concepts and are doing poorly on standardized testing. Students are seldom given the opportunity model scientific inquiry methods that promote experiential learning in the classroom. The purpose of this project was to create a curriculum for inquiry science (IS) instruction at the seventh-grade level to increase student understanding of science concepts after conducting an initial needs assessment to guide deploying the intervention. Research guiding the IS movement at the national level suggests that many teachers use only the textbook and students do not apply what they have learned. Factors affecting this problem include a lack of integrated curricula for IS learning and teacher understanding and confidence in IS skills. A constructivist view of student learning served as the conceptual framework. The needs analysis for the project questioned if teachers were willing to adopt the IS method and prepared to conduct it through a quantitative survey research design. Results indicated that all teachers supported the IS approach, however it was infrequently used in instruction and only two of five teachers were somewhat comfortable with their IS skills. The local IS project draws from empirically tested elements to develop an integrated IS curricula aligned to the state science criterion. The curricula will be supported through a concurrently deployed professional learning community to support teacher professional development and confidence. This project can positively impact social change by increasing science related academic performance, and ultimately, interest in careers in science among middle school students.

  11. Process Challenges and Learning-Based Interactions in Stage 2 of Doctoral Education: Implications from Two Applied Social Science Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Vicki L.; Pifer, Meghan J.; Flemion, Blair

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on an exploratory study that examined the transition to independence in Stage 2 of the doctoral student experience in two applied social science fields. We rely on an interdisciplinary framework that integrates developmental networks and sociocultural perspectives of learning to better understand the connection between the…

  12. A Trip from a Tube to a Chip Applied Micro and Nanotechnology in Biotechnology, Veterinary and Life Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Dang Duong; Dhumpa, Raghuram; Cao, Cuong; Florian, Laouenan; Berganzo, Javier; Walczak, Rafal; Liu, Yuliang; Bu, Mingiang; Yi, Sun; Dzuiban, Jan; Rruano, Jesus Miguel; Wolff, Anders; Van Toi, Vo; Quang Dang Khoa, Truong

    2010-01-01

    -nanotechnology in life sciences will be given. In addition, examples of DNA micro arrays, micro fabricated integrated PCR chips and total integrated lab-on-chip systems from different National and EU research projects being carried out at the Laboratory of Applied Micro-Nanotechnology (LAMINATE) group at the...

  13. The Research Mission of Universities of Applied Sciences and the Future Configuration of Higher Education Systems in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepori, Benedetto; Kyvik, Svein

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a comparative analysis of the development of research in universities of applied sciences (UAS) in eight European countries and its implications for the configuration of the higher education system. The enhancement of research has mostly been seen as a case of academic drift where UAS attempt to become more similar to…

  14. Does Structural Development Matter? The Third Mission through Teaching and R&D at Finnish Universities of Applied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohtamäki, Vuokko

    2015-01-01

    The latest policy trends of higher education institutions (HEIs) have increasingly highlighted the importance of external stakeholders' expertise and resources. This paper investigated how the third mission through teaching and research and development (R&D) at Finnish universities of applied sciences (UASs) is influenced by the structural…

  15. Applying Service Learning to Computer Science: Attracting and Engaging Under-Represented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, Teresa; Barnes, Tiffany; Buch, Kim; Bean, Karen

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a computer science course that uses service learning as a vehicle to accomplish a range of pedagogical and BPC (broadening participation in computing) goals: (1) to attract a diverse group of students and engage them in outreach to younger students to help build a diverse computer science pipeline, (2) to develop leadership…

  16. Best Available Technique (BAT) assessment applied to ACR-1000 waste and heavy water management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ACR-1000 design is the next evolution of the proven CANDU reactor design. One of the key objectives for this project was to systematically apply the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle to the reactor design. The ACR design team selected the Best Available Technique (BAT) assessment for this purpose to document decisions made during the design of each ACR-1000 waste and heavy water management systems. This paper describes the steps in the BAT assessment that has been applied to the ACR-1000 design. (author)

  17. Integrated science model for assessment of climate change. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Past measurements show that greenhouse gas concentrations, many of which are affected by human related activities, are increasing in the atmosphere. There is wide consensus that this increase influences related activities, are increasing the earth's energy balance and concern that this will cause significant change in climate. Many different policies could be adopted in response to the prospects of greenhouse warming. Models are used by policy markers to analyze the range of possible policy options developed as a response to concerns about climate change. A fully integrated assessment model that spans the many aspects of climate change, including economics, energy options, effects of climate, and impacts of climate change, would be a useful tool. With this goal in mind, the science modules which estimate the effect of emissions of greenhouse gasses on global temperature and sea level are being developed. This is a report of the current characteristics and performance of an Integrated Science Model which consists of coupled modules for carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry of other trace gases, radiative forcing by greenhouse gases, energy balance model for global temperature, and a model for sea level response

  18. Why Portfolio Assessment is Introduced to Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘若芸

    2004-01-01

    The concept of portfolio assessment derived from the field of fine arts. It has been proven an effective learning and assessment tool. In Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, the traditional assessment is still used. After analysing the benefits and disadvantages, the author is eager to introduce it to Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology. The problems are also predicted.

  19. Mission Adaptive Uas Capabilities for Earth Science and Resource Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, S.; Fladeland, M.; Ippolito, C.; Knudson, M.; Young, Z.

    2015-04-01

    Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are important assets for accessing high risk airspace and incorporate technologies for sensor coordination, onboard processing, tele-communication, unconventional flight control, and ground based monitoring and optimization. These capabilities permit adaptive mission management in the face of complex requirements and chaotic external influences. NASA Ames Research Center has led a number of Earth science remote sensing missions directed at the assessment of natural resources and here we describe two resource mapping problems having mission characteristics requiring a mission adaptive capability extensible to other resource assessment challenges. One example involves the requirement for careful control over solar angle geometry for passive reflectance measurements. This constraint exists when collecting imaging spectroscopy data over vegetation for time series analysis or for the coastal ocean where solar angle combines with sea state to produce surface glint that can obscure the signal. Furthermore, the primary flight control imperative to minimize tracking error should compromise with the requirement to minimize aircraft motion artifacts in the spatial measurement distribution. A second example involves mapping of natural resources in the Earth's crust using precision magnetometry. In this case the vehicle flight path must be oriented to optimize magnetic flux gradients over a spatial domain having continually emerging features, while optimizing the efficiency of the spatial mapping task. These requirements were highlighted in recent Earth Science missions including the OCEANIA mission directed at improving the capability for spectral and radiometric reflectance measurements in the coastal ocean, and the Surprise Valley Mission directed at mapping sub-surface mineral composition and faults, using high-sensitivity magnetometry. This paper reports the development of specific aircraft control approaches to incorporate the unusual and

  20. Applying medical discourse in ergonomics courses for students of technical sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Dobreva, Darina; Kavaldzhieva, Boryana; Popov, Lachezar

    2013-01-01

    The present paper explores the role of medical terminology in the teaching of ergonomics to students of technical sciences. it aims to describe and encourage certain positive practices in teaching "ergonomics and ergonomic design" (eed), a course for students of technical sciences in Bulgarian universities, the technical University of Varna in particular. The observations are based on the texbook and study aids for eed used by industrial design students who, in their second year at university...

  1. Life Science Teachers' Discourse on Assessment: A Valuable Insight into the Variable Conceptions of Assessment in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halinen, Katrianna; Ruohoniemi, Mirja; Katajavuori, Nina; Virtanen, Viivi

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' conceptions of teaching, including assessment practices, are substantial in directing student learning. Our article refers to assessment at tertiary level biological education. We studied life science (more specifically microbiology-related) teachers' assessment discourse describing how they understood assessment as part of…

  2. The NASA Applied Science Program Disasters Area: Disaster Applications Research and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, J. J.; Lindsay, F. E.; Stough, T.; Jones, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of the Natural Disaster Application Area is to use NASA's capabilities in spaceborne, airborne, surface observations, higher-level derived data products, and modeling and data analysis to improve natural disaster forecasting, mitigation, and response. The Natural Disaster Application Area applies its remote sensing observations, modeling and analysis capabilities to provide hazard and disaster information where and when it is needed. Our application research activities specifically contribute to 1) Understanding the natural processes that produce hazards, 2)Developing hazard mitigation technologies, and 3)Recognizing vulnerability of interdependent critical infrastructure. The Natural Disasters Application area selects research projects through a rigorous, impartial peer-review process that address a broad spectrum of disasters which afflict populations within the United States, regionally and globally. Currently there are 19 active projects in the research portfolio which address the detection, characterization, forecasting and response to a broad range of natural disasters including earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions and ash dispersion, wildfires, hurricanes, floods, tornado damage assessment, oil spills and disaster data mining. The Disasters team works with federal agencies to aid the government in meeting the challenges associated with natural disaster response and to transfer technologies to agencies as they become operational. Internationally, the Disasters Area also supports the Committee on Earth Observations Working Group on Disasters, and the International Charter on Space and Disasters to increase, strengthen, and coordinate contributions of NASA Earth-observing satellites and applications products to disaster risk management. The CEOS group will lead pilot efforts focused on identifying key systems to support flooding, earthquake, and volcanic events.

  3. Assessing Vital Signs: Applying Two Participatory Evaluation Frameworks to the Evaluation of a College of Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Susan C.; Magilvy, Joan K.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation research has been in progress to clarify the concept of participatory evaluation and to assess its impact. Recently, two theoretical frameworks have been offered--Daigneault and Jacob's participatory evaluation measurement index and Champagne and Smits' model of practical participatory evaluation. In this case report, we apply these…

  4. Assessment of Instructional and Administrative Strategies Applied by Principals to Improve Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiri, Agharuwhe A.

    2014-01-01

    The study is based on the assessment of instructional and administrative strategies applied by principals to improve academic performance of students in schools. This simply means that the individual talents of everyone in school needs to be maximized for the effective benefit of the school, students, parents, and the society at large. It is…

  5. Assessing the feasibility of native fish reintroductions: a framework applied to threatened bull trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Jason B.; Gallo, Kirsten; Shively, Dan; Allen, Chris; Goehring, Brad

    2011-01-01

    Translocations to recover native fishes have resulted in mixed success. One reason for the failure of these actions is inadequate assessments of their feasibility prior to implementation. Here, we provide a framework developed to assess the feasibility of one type of translocation-reintroduction. The framework was founded on two simple components of feasibility: the potential for recipient habitats to support a reintroduction and the potential of available donor populations to support a reintroduction. Within each component, we developed a series of key questions. The final assessment was based on a scoring system that incorporated consideration of uncertainty in available information. The result was a simple yet transparent system for assessing reintroduction feasibility that can be rapidly applied in practice. We applied this assessment framework to the potential reintroduction of threatened bull trout Salvelinus confluentus into the Clackamas River, Oregon. In this case, the assessment suggested that the degree of feasibility for reintroduction was high based on the potential of recipient habitats and available donor populations. The assessment did not provide a comprehensive treatment of all possible factors that would drive an actual decision to implement a reintroduction,

  6. Karl Popper’s model under the perspective of the applied social sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Milton de Abreu Campanario; Milton de Freitas Chagas Junior; Mauro Silva Ruiz

    2012-01-01

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8077.2012v14n32p124Karl Popper is the leading philosopher of science in modern times, competing with Thomas Kuhn’s interpretation to the primacy of how to utilize de scientific method. Clearly, there are different versions for a reading of this important author who coined the method called deductive with test. This text recognizes the relevance of Karl Popper’s view of science as a practice in hard and biological fields, where it is widely accepted. However...

  7. Science Teachers' Thinking about the Nature of Science: A New Methodological Approach to Its Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Alonso, Angel; Garcia-Carmona, Antonio; Manassero-Mas, Maria Antonia; Bennassar-Roig, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes Spanish science teachers' thinking about issues concerning the nature of science (NOS) and the relationships connecting science, technology, and society (STS). The sample consisted of 774 in-service and pre-service teachers. The participants responded to a selection of items from the Questionnaire of Opinions on Science,…

  8. Incorporating Formative Assessment and Science Content into Elementary Science Methods--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Derek John

    2012-01-01

    Just as elementary students enter the science classroom with prior knowledge and experiences, so do preservice elementary teachers who enter the science methods classroom. Elementary science methods instructors recognize the challenges associated with preparing teachers for the science classroom. Two of these challenges include overcoming limited…

  9. SCIENTIFIC METHODOLOGY FOR THE APPLIED SOCIAL SCIENCES: CRITICAL ANALYSES ABOUT RESEARCH METHODS, TYPOLOGIES AND CONTRIBUTIONS FROM MARX, WEBER AND DURKHEIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Corrêa da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to discuss the importance of the scientific method to conduct and advertise research in applied social sciences and research typologies, as well as to highlight contributions from Marx, Weber and Durkheim to the scientific methodology. To reach this objective, we conducted a review of the literature on the term research, the scientific method,the research techniques and the scientific methodologies. The results of the investigation revealed that it is fundamental that the academic investigator uses a scientific method to conduct and advertise his/her academic works in applied social sciences in comparison with the biochemical or computer sciences and in the indicated literature. Regarding the contributions to the scientific methodology, we have Marx, dialogued, the dialectical, striking analysis, explicative of social phenomenon, the need to understand the phenomena as historical and concrete totalities; Weber, the distinction between “facts” and “value judgments” to provide objectivity to the social sciences and Durkheim, the need to conceptualize very well its object of study, reject sensible data and imbue with the spirit of discovery and of being surprised with the results.

  10. RESEARCH ON THE GERMPLASM OF PRUNUS ARMENIACA L. AT THE REGIONAL CENTRE FOR APPLIED SCIENCE, SILISTRA, BULGARIA

    OpenAIRE

    A. LYUBENOV

    2005-01-01

    The selection of individuals adaptable to environment and with high fruit quality in the case of apricot-trees is the main aim presented in this paper. The study of the rich genetic resources (3600 of seedlings) created in the Regional Centre of Applied Science - Silistra, Bulgaria, allows us to enrich the genetic fund of that plant species. By primary estimation of 1217 apricot seedlings are selected apricot elites that are studied through comparative assay with reference cultivars. The next...

  11. SCIENTIFIC METHODOLOGY FOR THE APPLIED SOCIAL SCIENCES: CRITICAL ANALYSES ABOUT RESEARCH METHODS, TYPOLOGIES AND CONTRIBUTIONS FROM MARX, WEBER AND DURKHEIM

    OpenAIRE

    Mauricio Corrêa da Silva; Fábio Resende de Araújo; José Dionísio Gomes da Silva

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to discuss the importance of the scientific method to conduct and advertise research in applied social sciences and research typologies, as well as to highlight contributions from Marx, Weber and Durkheim to the scientific methodology. To reach this objective, we conducted a review of the literature on the term research, the scientific method,the research techniques and the scientific methodologies. The results of the investigation revealed that it is fundamental that the a...

  12. Plagiarism among undergraduate students in the Faculty of Applied Science at a South African Higher Education Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Mapule Patricia Sentleng; Lizette King

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate plagiarism among undergraduate students at a higher education institution inSouth Africa. This study investigated the awareness and causes of plagiarism among undergraduate first, second and thirdyear students of the departments of Chemistry and Mathematical Technology within the Faculty of Applied Science at auniversity of technology. A quantitative research method was used. The results of the study confirm that studentplagiarism is fairly common....

  13. Physical activity level and stress among the students in Satakunta University of Applied Sciences - a quantitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Koskinen, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to compare the stress levels to physical activity levels with the students in Satakunta University of Applied Sciences. The studied period was autumn 2012. Other goals were to find out how the students experience their stress level, and what causes them stress. Also the physical activity level and the attitudes towards physical exercising were to be studied. An additional purpose was to find out if there is a need for further education and promotion of physical ...

  14. Improving Valkeakoski Unit Teachers Professional Development Opportunities Within HAMK : Case: Häme University of Applied Sciences, Valkeakoski Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Kirova, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This study was commissioned by Häme University of Applied Sciences, Valkeakoski Unit. The aim of the study is to give recommendations on how to improve the professional development opportunities for the teach-ers in Valkeakoski Unit. The main objectives of the study are: to collect and analyse learning and development theory, focusing on the professional development for teach-ers and human resource management theories, related to performance management and knowledge management. Based on t...

  15. Analyzing the Role of Corporate Social Responsibility on Reputation Building and Image Formation : Case Lapland University of Applied Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Ghiyaei, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Today Corporate Social Responsibility (henceforth CSR) is gaining cumulative importance among individuals and corporations. CSR is an umbrella word which covers all responsibilities related to economic, environment, society and ethics. Concepts such as green marketing and sustainability have recently been added under the umbrella of CSR. Lapland University of Applied Sciences (hereinafter Lapland UAS) is interested in building reputation. Therefore, the main objective of the current rese...

  16. Fighting bias with statistics: Detecting gender differences in responses to items on a preschool science assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Ariela Caren

    Differential item functioning (DIF) and differential distractor functioning (DDF) are methods used to screen for item bias (Camilli & Shepard, 1994; Penfield, 2008). Using an applied empirical example, this mixed-methods study examined the congruency and relationship of DIF and DDF methods in screening multiple-choice items. Data for Study I were drawn from item responses of 271 female and 236 male low-income children on a preschool science assessment. Item analyses employed a common statistical approach of the Mantel-Haenszel log-odds ratio (MH-LOR) to detect DIF in dichotomously scored items (Holland & Thayer, 1988), and extended the approach to identify DDF (Penfield, 2008). Findings demonstrated that the using MH-LOR to detect DIF and DDF supported the theoretical relationship that the magnitude and form of DIF and are dependent on the DDF effects, and demonstrated the advantages of studying DIF and DDF in multiple-choice items. A total of 4 items with DIF and DDF and 5 items with only DDF were detected. Study II incorporated an item content review, an important but often overlooked and under-published step of DIF and DDF studies (Camilli & Shepard). Interviews with 25 female and 22 male low-income preschool children and an expert review helped to interpret the DIF and DDF results and their comparison, and determined that a content review process of studied items can reveal reasons for potential item bias that are often congruent with the statistical results. Patterns emerged and are discussed in detail. The quantitative and qualitative analyses were conducted in an applied framework of examining the validity of the preschool science assessment scores for evaluating science programs serving low-income children, however, the techniques can be generalized for use with measures across various disciplines of research.

  17. Applying Computer Technology to Substance Abuse Prevention Science Results of a Preliminary Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, Lisa A.; Bickel, Warren K.; Badger, Gary J.

    2007-01-01

    This manuscript reports on the development and evaluation of a computer-based substance abuse prevention program for middle school-aged adolescents, called "HeadOn: Substance Abuse Prevention for Grades 6-8TM". This self-guided program was designed to deliver effective drug abuse prevention science to youth via computer-based educational…

  18. Applying TSOI Hybrid Learning Model to Enhance Blended Learning Experience in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Mun Fie

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Research on the nature of blended learning and its features has led to a variety of approaches to the practice of blended learning. The purpose of this paper is to provide an alternative practice model, the TSOI hybrid learning model (HLM) to enhance the blended learning experiences in science education. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  19. The value of public health research and the division between basic vs. applied science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida-Filho Naomar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We question the movement towards exclusion of population and social health research from the field of science. The background under analysis is contemporary Brazil, where the scientific field that hosts this kind of research is known as Collective Health. First, the problem is formalized on logical grounds, evaluating the pertinence of considering unscientific the many objects and methods of public health research. Secondly, the cases of pulmonary tuberculosis and external causes are brought in as illustrations of the kind of scientific problem faced in health research today. The logical and epistemological basis of different forms of "scientific segregation" based on biomedical reductionism is analyzed, departing from three theses: (i the ethics of the general application of science; (ii the inappropriateness of monopolies for objectivity in the sciences; (iii the specificity of scientific fields. In the current panorama of health research in Brazil, a residual hegemonic position that defends a narrow and specific definition of the object of knowledge was found. The denial of validity and specificity to objects, methods and research techniques that constitute social and population research in health is linked to elements of irrationality in reductionism approaches. Nevertheless, efforts should be directed to overcome this scientific division, in order to develop a pluralist and interdisciplinary national science, committed to the health care realities of our country.

  20. Summary of research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The major categories of current ICASE research programs addressed include: numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; control and parameter identification problems, with emphasis on effective numerical methods; computational problems in engineering and physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  1. 77 FR 36493 - Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; National Assessment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Submission for OMB Review; Institute of Education Sciences; National Assessment of Educational...) SUMMARY: The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is a federally authorized survey...

  2. What Makes the Finnish Different in Science? Assessing and Comparing Students' Science Learning in Three Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Cornelia; Neumann, Knut; Boone, William J.; Fischer, Hans E.

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript details our efforts to assess and compare students' learning about electricity in three countries. As our world is increasingly driven by technological advancements, the education of future citizens in science becomes one important resource for economic productivity. Not surprisingly international large-scale assessments are…

  3. Science-based health innovation in Uganda: creative strategies for applying research to development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daar Abdallah S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uganda has a long history of health research, but still faces critical health problems. It has made a number of recent moves towards building science and technology capacity which could have an impact on local health, if innovation can be fostered and harnessed. Methods Qualitative case study research methodology was used. Data were collected through reviews of academic literature and policy documents and through open-ended, face-to-face interviews with 30 people from across the science-based health innovation system, including government officials, researchers in research institutes and universities, entrepreneurs, international donors, and non-governmental organization representatives. Results Uganda has a range of institutions influencing science-based health innovation, with varying degrees of success. However, the country still lacks a coherent mechanism for effectively coordinating STI policy among all the stakeholders. Classified as a least developed country, Uganda has opted for exemptions from the TRIPS intellectual property protection regime that include permitting parallel importation and providing for compulsory licenses for pharmaceuticals. Uganda is unique in Africa in taking part in the Millennium Science Initiative (MSI, an ambitious though early-stage $30m project, funded jointly by the World Bank and Government of Uganda, to build science capacity and encourage entrepreneurship through funding industry-research collaboration. Two universities – Makerere and Mbarara – stand out in terms of health research, though as yet technology development and commercialization is weak. Uganda has several incubators which are producing low-tech products, and is beginning to move into higher-tech ones like diagnostics. Its pharmaceutical industry has started to create partnerships which encourage innovation. Conclusions Science-based health product innovation is in its early stages in Uganda, as are policies for guiding

  4. Addressing dependability by applying an approach for model-based risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes how an approach for model-based risk assessment (MBRA) can be applied for addressing different dependability factors in a critical application. Dependability factors, such as availability, reliability, safety and security, are important when assessing the dependability degree of total systems involving digital instrumentation and control (I and C) sub-systems. In order to identify risk sources their roles with regard to intentional system aspects such as system functions, component behaviours and intercommunications must be clarified. Traditional risk assessment is based on fault or risk models of the system. In contrast to this, MBRA utilizes success-oriented models describing all intended system aspects, including functional, operational and organizational aspects of the target. The EU-funded CORAS project developed a tool-supported methodology for the application of MBRA in security-critical systems. The methodology has been tried out within the telemedicine and e-commerce areas, and provided through a series of seven trials a sound basis for risk assessments. In this paper the results from the CORAS project are presented, and it is discussed how the approach for applying MBRA meets the needs of a risk-informed Man-Technology-Organization (MTO) model, and how methodology can be applied as a part of a trust case development

  5. Addressing dependability by applying an approach for model-based risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gran, Bjorn Axel [Institutt for energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project, NO-1751 Halden (Norway)]. E-mail: bjorn.axel.gran@hrp.no; Fredriksen, Rune [Institutt for energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project, NO-1751 Halden (Norway)]. E-mail: rune.fredriksen@hrp.no; Thunem, Atoosa P.-J. [Institutt for energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project, NO-1751 Halden (Norway)]. E-mail: atoosa.p-j.thunem@hrp.no

    2007-11-15

    This paper describes how an approach for model-based risk assessment (MBRA) can be applied for addressing different dependability factors in a critical application. Dependability factors, such as availability, reliability, safety and security, are important when assessing the dependability degree of total systems involving digital instrumentation and control (I and C) sub-systems. In order to identify risk sources their roles with regard to intentional system aspects such as system functions, component behaviours and intercommunications must be clarified. Traditional risk assessment is based on fault or risk models of the system. In contrast to this, MBRA utilizes success-oriented models describing all intended system aspects, including functional, operational and organizational aspects of the target. The EU-funded CORAS project developed a tool-supported methodology for the application of MBRA in security-critical systems. The methodology has been tried out within the telemedicine and e-commerce areas, and provided through a series of seven trials a sound basis for risk assessments. In this paper the results from the CORAS project are presented, and it is discussed how the approach for applying MBRA meets the needs of a risk-informed Man-Technology-Organization (MTO) model, and how methodology can be applied as a part of a trust case development.

  6. Secondary Students' Perceptions of Assessments in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chew Cheng; Idris, Noraini; Eu, Leong Kwan

    2014-01-01

    The problems of the decreasing enrolment of science students at secondary school level as well as the lagging science and mathematics achievement and literacy of Malaysian secondary students in international assessment studies point to a serious challenge for the government to improve Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)…

  7. Research-Doctorate Programs in the Biomedical Sciences: Selected Findings from the NRC Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorden, Joan F., Ed.; Kuh, Charlotte V., Ed.; Voytuk, James A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Research Doctorate Programs in the Biomedical Sciences: Selected Findings from the NRC Assessment" examines data on the biomedical sciences programs to gather additional insight about the talent, training environment, outcomes, diversity, and international participation in the biomedical sciences workforce. This report supports an earlier…

  8. From Science to Safety: The Long Way to Risk Management Assessment in Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-nuclear countries started to express their interest in building electronuclear programs in the early 2000s, with the consequence of creating the 'nuclear renaissance' concept. Nuclear reactors involve numerous and highly technical sciences: they cover fields from fundamental neutronics to thermohydraulics, from fuel thermomechanics to radiological gas diffusion. These sciences are in complete interactions with each other and computational tools are often required to simulate their effects on a research reactor safety. As these topics have to be examined together, with interaction between each other and in relation to the specificities of the facility, it is crucial to get a keystone engineer to manage these specialized analyses. Consequently, safety assessment requires also specific skills that are not based only on these sciences and that are not initially held by a nuclear engineer. Thus the first objective program is to define the inherent human, professional, and technical characteristics required by a safety analyst. Formalizing a safety analyst profile imposes to identify a set of applicable knowledge, hard and soft skills requirements in four topics. Several routes can be explored to build a safety analyst from a nuclear engineer, such as implementing nuclear safety into universities programs, theoretical training programs tutoring programs; such topics can be dealt with by dedicated instances such as ENSTTI and 'field-based' approaches emerging from case by case analysis. In this context, it is important to notice that research reactors require the same basic sciences and are not as complex as nuclear power plants. Hence holding a comprehensive set of knowledge allowing the global safety assessment of the reactor is more easily achievable by a safety analyst. Research reactors are the first object on which this set of knowledge will be applied. It would then be eventually extrapolated to any nuclear installation, and profitably nuclear power plants

  9. Assessing CSR and Applying Social Life Cycle Assessment: A case study on Biochemical Oxygen Demand Online Monitor

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, He

    2012-01-01

    Wuhan China and Borlänge Sweden collaborate to promote sustainable business growths. This thesis, being part of sustainable business project, aims to understand how business can contribute to sustainable development and explore mechanisms of social life cycle assessment. In an effort to answer research questions and further to achieve the general purpose, a BOD online monitor case study is described and analyzed by applying both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Data collection is base...

  10. Scientific Caricatures in the Earth Science Classroom: An Alternative Assessment for Meaningful Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee M.; Wandersee, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Archive-based, historical research of materials produced during the Golden Age of Geology (1788-1840) uncovered scientific caricatures (SCs) which may serve as a unique form of knowledge representation for students today. SCs played important roles in the past, stimulating critical inquiry among early geologists and fueling debates that addressed key theoretical issues. When historical SCs were utilized in a large-enrollment college Earth History course, student response was positive. Therefore, we offered SCs as an optional assessment tool. Paired t-tests that compared individual students’ performances with the SC option, as well as without the SC option, showed a significant positive difference favoring scientific caricatures ( α = 0.05). Content analysis of anonymous student survey responses revealed three consistent findings: (a) students enjoyed expressing science content correctly but creatively through SCs, (b) development of SCs required deeper knowledge integration and understanding of the content than conventional test items, and (c) students appreciated having SC item options on their examinations, whether or not they took advantage of them. We think that incorporation of SCs during assessment may effectively expand the variety of methods for probing understanding, thereby increasing the mode validity of current geoscience tests.

  11. Bulletin bibliographique sur la linguistique appliquee a l'informatique (Bibliographic Bulletin on Applied Linguistics and Information Science). Relai, Publication K-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforge, Lorne, Ed.

    This annotated bibliography contains 150 citations of journal articles, conference and research reports, and other publications drawn from the BIBELO database concerning linguistics as applied to the field of information science or information science as applied to linguistics. The bulk of the bibliography consists of the bibliographic citations,…

  12. The Practice of Student Assessment: The Case of College of Natural Science, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soromessa, Teshome

    2015-01-01

    This study attempted to assess the practice of student assessment in the College of Natural Science of Addis Ababa University, specifically aimed at investigating whether or not science instructors are well aware of test blue-print, general principles of evaluation and rule of test construction as anticipated in the new education and training…

  13. Children's Perceptions of Primary Science Assessment in England and Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Colette; Lundy, Laura; Emerson, Lesley; Kerr, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This study builds on and contributes to work on assessment of children in primary school, particularly in science. Previous research has examined primary science assessment from different standpoints, but no studies have specifically addressed children's perspectives. This article provides additional insight into issues surrounding…

  14. 75 FR 69078 - Workshop To Review Draft Materials for the Lead (Pb) Integrated Science Assessment (ISA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... AGENCY Workshop To Review Draft Materials for the Lead (Pb) Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) AGENCY... a workshop to evaluate initial draft materials for the Pb Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) is... within each discipline to assist EPA in integrating within and across disciplines. This workshop...

  15. Using and applying international survey data on mathematics and science education

    OpenAIRE

    MacIntyre, Thomas Gunn

    2014-01-01

    There were two purposes set out in this study, first to identify the principal associations with educational performance of Scottish students as reported in the 2007 wave of the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS2007), and second to evaluate methods of data analysis where sample surveys use plausible value (PV) methodology. Four sets of data were used for the secondary analysis of TIMSS2007, with student's responses to cognitive items and questionnaire data emanating...

  16. Applying gene flow science to environmental policy needs: a boundary work perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Caroline E; Alexander, Laurie C

    2016-08-01

    One application of gene flow science is the policy arena. In this article, we describe two examples in which the topic of gene flow has entered into the U.S. national environmental policymaking process: regulation of genetically engineered crops and clarification of the jurisdictional scope of the Clean Water Act. We summarize both current scientific understanding and the legal context within which gene flow science has relevance. We also discuss the process by which scientific knowledge has been synthesized and communicated to decision-makers in these two contexts utilizing the concept of 'boundary work'. Boundary organizations, the work they engage in to bridge the worlds of science, policy, and practice, and the boundary objects they produce to translate scientific knowledge existed in both examples. However, the specific activities and attributes of the objects produced varied based on the needs of the decision-makers. We close with suggestions for how scientists can contribute to or engage in boundary work with policymakers. PMID:27468309

  17. A suggested approach toward measuring sorption and applying sorption data to repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prediction of radionuclide migration for the purpose of assessing the safety of a nuclear waste repository will be based on a collective knowledge of hydrologic and geochemical properties of the surrounding rock and groundwater. This knowledge along with assumption about the interactions of radionuclides with groundwater and minerals form the scientific basis for a model capable of accurately predicting the repository's performance. Because the interaction of radionuclides in geochemical systems is known to be complicated, several fundamental and empirical approaches to measuring the interaction between radionuclides and the geologic barrier have been developed. The approaches applied to the measurement of sorption involve the use of pure minerals, intact, or crushed rock in dynamic and static experiments. Each approach has its advantages and disadvantages. There is no single best method for providing sorption data for performance assessment models which can be applied without invoking information derived from multiple experiments. 53 refs., 12 figs

  18. Seeking Missing Pieces in Science Concept Assessments: Reevaluating the Brief Electricity and Magnetism Assessment through Rasch Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Discipline-based science concept assessments are powerful tools to measure learners' disciplinary core ideas. Among many such assessments, the Brief Electricity and Magnetism Assessment (BEMA) has been broadly used to gauge student conceptions of key electricity and magnetism (E&M) topics in college-level introductory physics courses.…

  19. Development of a fuzzy qualitative risk assessment model applied to construction industry

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Abel Fernando do Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    The construction industry is plagued by occupational risky situations and poor working conditions. Risk Assessment for Occupational Safety (RAOS) is the first and key step to achieve adequate safety levels, particularly to support decision-making in safety programs. Most construction safety efforts are applied informally under the premise that simply allocating more resources to safety management will improve safety on site. Moreover, there are many traditional methods to address RAOS, but...

  20. Peace journalism applied: An assessment of media coverage of the conflict in Northern Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Nassanga Goretti

    2007-01-01

    The paper explores how peace journalism has been applied in Uganda basing on an assessment of findings from a survey on the media coverage of the conflict in northern Uganda. The paper analyses the findings from the print media coverage of 2 newspapers for 3 years that were used as sample. The analysis considered several quantitative and qualitative variables including: frequency, type of stories (news vs non-news), authors of stories (journalists vs non-journalists), placement/prominence ...

  1. Expert opinion as 'validation' of risk assessment applied to calf welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buist Willem G

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a Risk Assessment methodology was applied to animal welfare issues in a report of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA on intensively housed calves. Methods Because this is a new and potentially influential approach to derive conclusions on animal welfare issues, a so-called semantic-modelling type 'validation' study was conducted by asking expert scientists, who had been involved or quoted in the report, to give welfare scores for housing systems and for welfare hazards. Results Kendall's coefficient of concordance among experts (n = 24 was highly significant (P Systems with the lowest scores were veal calves kept individually in so-called "baby boxes" (veal crates or in small groups, and feedlots. A suckler herd on pasture was rated as the best for calf welfare. The main hazards were related to underfeeding, inadequate colostrum intake, poor stockperson education, insufficient space, inadequate roughage, iron deficiency, inadequate ventilation, poor floor conditions and no bedding. Points for improvement of the Risk Assessment applied to animal welfare include linking information, reporting uncertainty and transparency about underlying values. Conclusion The study provides novel information on expert opinion in relation to calf welfare and shows that Risk Assessment applied to animal welfare can benefit from a semantic modelling approach.

  2. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment in Occupational Settings Applied to the Airborne Human Adenovirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carducci, Annalaura; Donzelli, Gabriele; Cioni, Lorenzo; Verani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) methodology, which has already been applied to drinking water and food safety, may also be applied to risk assessment and management at the workplace. The present study developed a preliminary QMRA model to assess microbial risk that is associated with inhaling bioaerosols that are contaminated with human adenovirus (HAdV). This model has been applied to air contamination data from different occupational settings, including wastewater systems, solid waste landfills, and toilets in healthcare settings and offices, with different exposure times. Virological monitoring showed the presence of HAdVs in all the evaluated settings, thus confirming that HAdV is widespread, but with different average concentrations of the virus. The QMRA results, based on these concentrations, showed that toilets had the highest probability of viral infection, followed by wastewater treatment plants and municipal solid waste landfills. Our QMRA approach in occupational settings is novel, and certain caveats should be considered. Nonetheless, we believe it is worthy of further discussions and investigations. PMID:27447658

  3. Contribution of Radon Exposure to the Risk of Lung Cancer Assessed by Applying a Multifactor Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It is well known that many different carcinogenic risk factors contribute to the development of lung cancer. Smoking, occupational exposure to carcinogens, chronic lung diseases and industrial air pollution are the most significant of them. Indoor radon exposure is considered a weak carcinogenic risk factor in the Urals, Russia. A drawback of traditionally applied monofactor methods of epidemiologic analysis is that different carcinogenic risk factors are analysed separately and their complex effect on public health is not taken into account. With such an approach it is impossible to adequately assess each factor's contribution in the total carcinogenic risk. For this reason it is expedient to apply methods of multifactor analysis in epidemiologic studies. We applied mathematical methods of pattern recognition when analysing the effect of indoor radon exposure on the development of lung cancer in the population of two Ural cities. We assessed the association between radon/thoron exposures and lung cancer using both BEIR VI model and the above-mentioned methods. The results were significantly different. According to BEIR VI model the contribution of radon/thoron in the risk of lung cancer varied from 7.2% to 33%, whereas this contribution assessed in the multifactor analysis was only 0.5%. We think that the contribution assessed in BEIR VI model is overestimated. Our considerable experience in conducting epidemiologic studies using mathematical methods of pattern recognition, gives us grounds to state that the assessment of radon/thoron exposure on lung cancer risk obtained in the multifactor analysis is more adequate and precise. (author)

  4. Science in Service to Society - A Review of Applied Science & Decision Support Development Serving Multiple Economic Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, W. P., III

    2015-12-01

    For more than 30 years, the Research Applications Laboratory (RAL) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) has conducted fundamental and applied research focused on developing decision support tools spanning multiple end-user groups representing a variety of economic sectors. Technology transfer is a primary mission of the laboratory where innovation is a key attribute and multidisciplinary research and development are the norm. Application areas include, aviation, surface transportation, wind and solar energy prediction, climate, weather and health, numerical weather prediction, biological and chemical plume dispersion for homeland security, flood prediction and water resource management, soil condition and crop maturity prediction among other application areas. The majority of the developed capabilities have been operationalized by the public, private, and academic sectors. Several commercial companies have been successfully formed around the technologies (e.g., Weather Information Technologies, Inc., Peak Weather Resources, Inc., and Global Weather Corporation) and many existing companies have improved their products by utilizing the RAL-developed weather system advancements (The Weather Channel, WSI, Schneider Electric, Xcel Energy, United Airlines, Vaisala, Panasonic, Idaho Power, etc.). The economic benefit estimates of implementing these technologies have ranged from billions of dollars in avoided commercial aircraft accidents over the last 30 years to 10s of millions of dollars of annual savings by state departments of transportation via more efficient ice and snow maintenance operations. Research and development at RAL is connected to the Broader Impacts Criterion of NSF and its focus on research that results in significant economic or societal impact. This talk will describe our research-to-operations process and discuss several technology transfer examples that have led to commercial opportunities.

  5. Should Science Teaching Involve the History of Science? An Assessment of Kuhn's View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindi, Vasso

    2005-01-01

    Thomas Kuhn draws the distinction between textbook history of science and history of science proper. The question addressed in the paper is whether Kuhn recommends the inclusion of distortive textbook history in science education. It is argued, pace Fuller, that Kuhn does not make normative suggestions. He does not urge the teaching of bad history…

  6. A Marking Scheme Rubric: To Assess Students' Mathematical Knowledge for Applied Algebra Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Lee Guat Poh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Students' ability in mathematics mainly relies on their performance in the assessment task such as tests, quizzes, assignments and final examinations. However, the grading process depends on the respective mathematics teacher who sets a marking scheme in assessing students' learning. How do these teachers assign grades to their students' problem solving work? What does it mean by five marks or ten marks for a mathematics problem? How does a teacher evaluate a student's mathematical knowledge and skills based on the grades? These questions address the vagueness of the grading process that gives no concrete evidence about a student's mathematical thinking. Hence, this paper aims to discover the effectiveness of using a marking scheme rubric to assess students' mathematical knowledge. The paper begins by reviewing different types of scoring rubrics in assessing mathematical problem solving tasks. A marking scheme rubric was proposed to assess samples of actual students' problem solving work in an applied algebra test. The rubric serves as an assessment instrument to gather information about students' achievement level in demonstrating both knowledge and skills in the test. Based on the findings, the score reflected the quality of the students’ work rather than just a numerical representation. It showed the students’ comprehension of adapting the mathematical concepts and problem solving strategies. In a nutshell, the implementation of rubric marking scheme has improved the consistency in grading and made the scoring points as a "meaningful figure" that describes the quality of a students' performance.  

  7. Measuring relative efficiency of applied science and technology universities in province of Semnan, Iran and providing suggestions for merging units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Danaei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available University of applied science and technology has been designed to create a platform for multilateral activities such as industrial, military and academic in developing countries to promote science and scientific research applications. These universities are responsible to promote practical training in quantitative and qualitative indicators and they provide appropriate infrastructure to implement theoretical graduates to solve practical problems to build necessary infrastructure to transfer modern technology into developing countries. During the past few years, there have been tremendous development on these units but some of them have not been efficient. In this paper, we present an empirical study to measure the relative efficiencies of various units of applied science and technology universities using data envelopment analysis. The proposed model of this paper uses two inputs including human resources as well as total assets and two outputs including the number of graduate students as well as operating profit. The results of the study have indicated that some of the units are inefficient and need to be merged with other units to increase the relative efficiency of these universities.

  8. Recent developments in fluorescence-based microscopy applied in biomedical sciences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The present short review aims to give an overview of the most recent de velopments in fluorescence microscopy and its applications in biomedical science s. Apart from improvements in well-established methods based on conventional fl u orescence microscopy and confocal microscopy (fluorescence in situ hybridisa tion (FISH), tyramide signal amplification (TSA) in immunocytochemistry, new fluorop hores), more recently introduced techniques like fluorescence resonance energy t ransfer (FRET), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), multiphoton m icroscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) will be discussed.

  9. Teaching, learning, and assessing inquiry-based science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoughlin, Eilish; Finlayson, Odilla; van Kampen, Paul; McCabe, Deirdre; Brady, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    During the period 2008-2014, the European Commission funded several large-scale projects in science education that promoted the use of inquiry-based learning for engaging young people in science. All these projects were aimed at the introduction and broader use of inquiry-based science education (IBSE) through enriching the skills of teachers by delivering appropriate teacher education programs at both pre-service and in-service levels. This paper will present on the approach adopted by the SAILS project to support science teachers in the use and dissemination of Inquiry based approaches in their own classrooms with students aged 12-18 years.

  10. Assessing Tourist Resorts Surrounding Metropolitans Applying SWOT- AHP Models Case study: Malaga Resort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Movahed

    2013-01-01

    Development District, No. I, spring summer 2008Mahmoudi, B. (2005, Assessing demand for forest recreational parks in the city of Khorramabad brine and Velvet Mountains (research projects, Lorestan University Research Council, 57 p.Senseless, M. and Naserpour rare. (2003 Assessing barriers to tourism development in the province, Journal of Business Research, No. 28. FallClerk M., Rahmatullah Vmrady, A. (2005, the impact of religious tourism on the physical spaces in Mashhad Journal of Earth Sciences, No. 11.Movahed, A. (2007 Urban Tourism, University of martyr ChamranMehdizadeh, J., (2007, Principles and guidelines for the development of tourism in Iran, Journal of the House, No. 44.Mirabzadeh, P. (1997 Environmental Impact Assessment of Tourism Development, Environmental Issues, No. 2.Nhrly, David and pleasing Dawn (1996 and introduces the capacity range of resorts Journal of Environmental Studies No. 29 Summer 1996Deng, Jinyang, Brianking & Ihomas Bauer (2004: Evaluatig natural attractions for tourism, Annals of Tourism Research, Vol.29, Issue2: 422438Garrod Brian and Roz Wornell, Rey youel (2006 Re- conceptualizing rural resources as countryside capital: the case rural tourism, journal of rural study, V.22 Kim, Yog – Kwam (1988: Tourism Impact Assessment: A Test of Vested Interests Model, A Ph.D Thesie presented to Texas A & M University, UnpublishedLee, Choong – Ki (1992: The Ecoomic Impact of International Inbound Tourism on the South Korean Economy and its Distributional Effects on Income Classes, ASehofield, Peter (1996: Cinematographic Images of a City, Tourism Management, and Vol. 17 No. 5Zahedi, SH (2004: Ecological understanding: a prerequisite of sustainable ecotourism. Department of Managmet, Allameh Tabataba, University, Iran.

  11. Applied nuclear science research and development: Progress report, December 1, 1985-June 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diverse theoretical and experimental research in the field of applied nuclear physics is reviewed by presenting brief synopses of each research project. These research projects are organized into sections dealing with the theory and evaluation of nuclear cross sections, nuclear cross-section processing and testing, neutron activation, fission products, actinides, and applications. 30 refs., 90 figs., 13 tabs

  12. Developments in life cycle assessment applied to evaluate the environmental performance of construction and demolition wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovea, M D; Powell, J C

    2016-04-01

    This paper provides a review of the literature that applies the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology to the assessment of the environmental performance of the life cycle of construction and demolition waste (CDW) management systems. This article is focused on generating a general mapping of the literature and on identifying the best practices in compliance with LCA framework and proposing directions for future LCA studies in this field. The temporal evolution of the research in this field and the aim of the studies have grown in parallel with the legal framework related to waste and energy efficiency of buildings. Most studies have been published in Europe, followed by USA. Asia and Australia, being at an incipient application stage to the rest of the world. Topics related to "LCA of buildings, including their EoL" and "LCA of general CDW management strategies" are the most frequently analysed, followed by "LCA of EoL of construction elements" and "LCA of natural material vs recycled material". Regarding the strategies, recycling off-site and incineration, both combined with landfill for the rejected fractions, are the most commonly applied. Re-use or recycling on-site is the strategy least applied. The key aspect when LCA is applied to evaluate CDW management systems is the need to normalise which processes to include in the system boundary and the functional unit, the use of inventory data adapted to the context of the case study and the definition of a common set of appropriate impact assessment categories. Also, it is important to obtain results disaggregated by unit processes. This will allow the comparison between case studies. PMID:26919970

  13. Assessment of Student Memo Assignments in Management Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julie Ann Stuart; Stanny, Claudia J.; Reid, Randall C.; Hill, Christopher J.; Rosa, Katie Martin

    2015-01-01

    Frequently in Management Science courses, instructors focus primarily on teaching students the mathematics of linear programming models. However, the ability to discuss mathematical expressions in business terms is an important professional skill. The authors present an analysis of student abilities to discuss management science concepts through…

  14. Biotechnology: An Assessment of Agricultural Science Teachers' Knowledge and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowen, Diana L.; Roberts, T. Grady; Wingenbach, Gary J.; Harlin, Julie F.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore agricultural science teachers' knowledge levels and attitudes toward biotechnology topics. The average agricultural science teacher in this study was a 37-year-old male who had taught for 12 years. He had a bachelor's degree and had lived or worked on a farm or ranch. He had not attended…

  15. Assessment of Examinations in Computer Science Doctoral Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article surveys the examination requirements for attaining degree candidate (candidacy) status in computer science doctoral programs at all of the computer science doctoral granting institutions in the United States. It presents a framework for program examination requirement categorization, and categorizes these programs by the type or types…

  16. Decision Analysis Science Modeling for Application and Fielding Selection Applied to Concrete Decontamination Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concrete surfaces contaminated with radionuclides present a significant challenge during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) process. As structures undergo D and D, coating layers and/or surface layers of the concrete containing the contaminants must be removed for disposal in such a way as to present little to no risk to human health or the environment. The selection of a concrete decontamination technology that is safe, efficient, and cost-effective is critical to the successful D and D of contaminated sites. To support U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management objectives and to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the best-suited concrete floor decontamination technology(s) for a given site, two innovative and three baseline technologies have been assessed under standard, non-nuclear conditions at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU). The innovative technologies assessed include the Pegasus Coating Removal System and Textron's Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling System. The three baseline technologies assessed include: the Wheelabrator Blastrac model 1-15D, the NELCO Porta Shot Blast trademark model GPx-1O-18 HO Rider, and the NELCO Porta Shot Blasttrademark model EC-7-2. These decontamination technology assessments provide directly comparable performance data that have previously been available for only a limited number of technologies under restrictive site-specific constraints. Some of the performance data collected during these technology assessments include: removal capability, production rate, removal gap, primary and secondary waste volumes, and operation and maintenance requirements. The performance data generated by this project is intended to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the safest, most efficient, and cost-effective decontamination technologies to accomplish their remediation objectives

  17. Decision Analysis Science Modeling for Application and Fielding Selection Applied to Concrete Decontamination Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A. Ross, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    Concrete surfaces contaminated with radionuclides present a significant challenge during the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) process. As structures undergo D and D, coating layers and/or surface layers of the concrete containing the contaminants must be removed for disposal in such a way as to present little to no risk to human health or the environment. The selection of a concrete decontamination technology that is safe, efficient, and cost-effective is critical to the successful D and D of contaminated sites. To support U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management objectives and to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the best-suited concrete floor decontamination technology(s) for a given site, two innovative and three baseline technologies have been assessed under standard, non-nuclear conditions at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University (FIU). The innovative technologies assessed include the Pegasus Coating Removal System and Textron's Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling System. The three baseline technologies assessed include: the Wheelabrator Blastrac model 1-15D, the NELCO Porta Shot Blast{trademark} model GPx-1O-18 HO Rider, and the NELCO Porta Shot Blast{trademark} model EC-7-2. These decontamination technology assessments provide directly comparable performance data that have previously been available for only a limited number of technologies under restrictive site-specific constraints. Some of the performance data collected during these technology assessments include: removal capability, production rate, removal gap, primary and secondary waste volumes, and operation and maintenance requirements. The performance data generated by this project is intended to assist DOE site managers in the selection of the safest, most efficient, and cost-effective decontamination technologies to accomplish their remediation objectives.

  18. Will our children be healthy adults? Applying science to public health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Catherine

    2010-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is predicted to be a leading cause of death and disability worldwide for the foreseeable future. Observational studies link a variety of prevalent early life experiences (for example, smoking in pregnancy, child poverty) to increased risk of adult cardiovascular disease. Experimental animal studies suggest plausible causal relationships. However, there has been little consideration of how to use this wealth of information to benefit children's futures. Policy documents have drawn on research evidence to recognise that early experience influences life chances, the development of human capital, and long-term health. This has led to a general policy emphasis on prevention and early intervention. To date, there are few examples of the evidence base being useful in shaping specific policies, despite potential to do so, and some examples of policy misunderstanding of science. Minor changes to the perspectives of epidemiological research in this area might greatly increase the potential for evidence-based policy. PMID:21413485

  19. Pseudo-science: A meaningful context for assessing nature of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Ana Sofia; Gilbert, John K.

    2010-02-01

    Although an understanding of nature of science is a core element in scientific literacy, there is considerable evidence that school and university students hold naïve conceptions about it. It is argued that, whilst the failure to learn about nature of science arises from its neglect in formal science education, a major reason is the adherence to the precepts of pseudo-science, a set of beliefs that have wide cultural currency in the general population. University science and non-science students were interviewed about their beliefs in and explanations for "water dowsing", a pseudo-scientific approach to finding groundwater. The demarcation criteria between science and pseudo-science and students' research designs into "water dowsing" were also enquired into. The results show that many students believed in the working efficacy of water dowsing and stated pseudo-scientific explanations for it. Furthermore, they were unaware of the demarcation criteria between science and pseudo-science, and designed naïve research studies to enquire into "water dowsing".

  20. Applying an improved rapid impact assessment matrix method to strategic environmental assessment of urban planning in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) has become an increasingly important decision-support tool for providing information on the environmental implications of a policy, plan, or program. The goal is to safeguard the environment and promote sustainable development at the strategic level. Despite major progress in implementing SEA practices internationally, developing countries, such as China, often lag behind in applying SEA methodology. Lack of available data and time constraints arising from tight schedules create problems. The rapid impact assessment matrix (RIAM) is a potential resource for breaking through such difficulties. Our analysis of RIAM applications suggested that it could become a tool for evaluating strategic alternatives because of its applicability in interdisciplinary settings, its transparency, and its short implementation timeframe. To make it more suitable for the SEA context, we have developed two major improvements to the conventional RIAM process: assignment of weights to assessment indicators and the development of an integrated environmental assessment score (IES). The improved RIAM process was employed in an SEA of the development plan for the Nansha District in Guangzhou, the capital city of Guangdong Province in China. It was used to assess five alternatives for development in Wanqingsha (WQS), a subunit of Nansha, where important ecological resources are located and where industrial development could impact the air quality in the neighboring Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR). The evaluation identified WQS-A04 as the preferred alternative. This alternative involved a minimal amount of industrial development – 10% compared with the most intense development alternative – and included important wetland preservation plans. The assessment results have been incorporated into the officially approved development plan for Nansha. The improved RIAM methodology is well adapted to the technical aims of SEA and decision

  1. Appraising and applying evidence about a diagnostic test during a performance-based assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Ellen

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The practice of Evidence-based Medicine requires that clinicians assess the validity of published research and then apply the results to patient care. We wanted to assess whether our soon-to-graduate medical students could appraise and apply research about a diagnostic test within a clinical context and to compare our students with peers trained at other institutions. Methods 4th year medical students who previously had demonstrated competency at probability revision and just starting first-year Internal Medicine residents were used for this research. Following an encounter with a simulated patient, subjects critically appraised a paper about an applicable diagnostic test and revised the patient's pretest probability given the test result. Results The medical students and residents demonstrated similar skills at critical appraisal, correctly answering 4.7 and 4.9, respectively, of 6 questions (p = 0.67. Only one out of 28 (3% medical students and none of the 15 residents were able to correctly complete the probability revision task (p = 1.00. Conclusions This study found that most students completing medical school are able to appraise an article about a diagnostic test but few are able to apply the information from the article to a patient. These findings raise questions about the clinical usefulness of the EBM skills possessed by graduating medical students within the area of diagnostic testing.

  2. Applying Physically Representative Watershed Modelling to Assess Peak and Low Flow Response to Timber Harvest: Application for Watershed Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, R. J.; Anderson, A.; Silins, U.; Craig, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Forest harvesting, insects, disease, wildfire, and other disturbances can combine with climate change to cause unknown changes to the amount and timing of streamflow from critical forested watersheds. Southern Alberta forest and alpine areas provide downstream water supply for agriculture and water utilities that supply approximately two thirds of the Alberta population. This project uses datasets from intensely monitored study watersheds and hydrological model platforms to extend our understanding of how disturbances and climate change may impact various aspects of the streamflow regime that are of importance to downstream users. The objectives are 1) to use the model output of watershed response to disturbances to inform assessments of forested watersheds in the region, and 2) to investigate the use of a new flexible modelling platform as a tool for detailed watershed assessments and hypothesis testing. Here we applied the RAVEN hydrological modelling framework to quantify changes in key hydrological processes driving peak and low flows in a headwater catchment along the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rocky Mountains. The model was applied to simulate the period from 2006 to 2011 using data from the Star Creek watershed in southwestern Alberta. The representation of relevant hydrological processes was verified using snow survey, meteorological, and vegetation data collected through the Southern Rockies Watershed Project. Timber harvest scenarios were developed to estimate the effects of cut levels ranging from 20 to 100% over a range of elevations, slopes, and aspects. We quantified changes in the timing and magnitude of low flow and high flow events during the 2006 to 2011 period. Future work will assess changes in the probability of low and high flow events using a long-term meteorological record. This modelling framework enables relevant processes at the watershed scale to be accounted in a physically robust and computational efficient manner. Hydrologic

  3. The Safety Assessment of OPR-1000 for Station Blackout Applying Combined Deterministic and Probabilistic Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dong Gu; Ahn, Seung-Hoon; Cho, Dae-Hyung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This is termed station blackout (SBO). However, it does not generally include the loss of available AC power to safety buses fed by station batteries through inverters or by alternate AC sources. Historically, risk analysis results have indicated that SBO was a significant contributor to overall core damage frequency. In this study, the safety assessment of OPR-1000 nuclear power plant for SBO accident, which is a typical beyond design basis accident and important contributor to overall plant risk, is performed by applying the combined deterministic and probabilistic procedure (CDPP). In addition, discussions are made for reevaluation of SBO risk at OPR-1000 by eliminating excessive conservatism in existing PSA. The safety assessment of OPR-1000 for SBO accident, which is a typical BDBA and significant contributor to overall plant risk, was performed by applying the combined deterministic and probabilistic procedure. However, the reference analysis showed that the CDF and CCDP did not meet the acceptable risk, and it was confirmed that the SBO risk should be reevaluated. By estimating the offsite power restoration time appropriately, the SBO risk was reevaluated, and it was finally confirmed that current OPR-1000 system lies in the acceptable risk against the SBO. In addition, it was demonstrated that the proposed CDPP is applicable to safety assessment of BDBAs in nuclear power plants without significant erosion of the safety margin.

  4. RESEARCH ON THE GERMPLASM OF PRUNUS ARMENIACA L. AT THE REGIONAL CENTRE FOR APPLIED SCIENCE, SILISTRA, BULGARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. LYUBENOV

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The selection of individuals adaptable to environment and with high fruit quality in the case of apricot-trees is the main aim presented in this paper. The study of the rich genetic resources (3600 of seedlings created in the Regional Centre of Applied Science - Silistra, Bulgaria, allows us to enrich the genetic fund of that plant species. By primary estimation of 1217 apricot seedlings are selected apricot elites that are studied through comparative assay with reference cultivars. The next step of the selection cycle will be the official registration of the elites for commercial aim by the State Variety Committee and a forthcoming dissemination.

  5. Real-time transit tracking system to evolve and facilitate the transportation process at the Applied Science University

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Shkoukani; Fadi Ajjam, Hamza Ali; Hisham Salah

    2016-01-01

    Travel and transportation are important for most people and play a major role in the human life; therefore this paper describes a prototype system called eBus which is a tracking system for campus buses at the Applied Science University. This system consists of two parts an Android application that is used by both the driver and the student which provides the ability for the students to track the buses’ movements on a specific route and show their information on the map and it also enables th...

  6. Initiation of the students from the life sciences faculties into the informatics reference search methodology. Applied librarianship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Isvoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a few useful modalities of reference searching for students taking into account their scientific maturity and with illustrative examples for the students involved in life sciences realms. Using a statistical analysis of the answers obtained for a questioner applied to 268 undergraduate, master degree and PhD students from our faculty, the necessity to create and maintain a strong connection between the university and the library is argued. It is benefic for both library, to develop a marketing oriented to the users, and students, to enlarge their scientific and cultural horizon.

  7. An Applied Framework for Incorporating Multiple Sources of Uncertainty in Fisheries Stock Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Finlay; Jardim, Ernesto; Millar, Colin P.; Cerviño, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    Estimating fish stock status is very challenging given the many sources and high levels of uncertainty surrounding the biological processes (e.g. natural variability in the demographic rates), model selection (e.g. choosing growth or stock assessment models) and parameter estimation. Incorporating multiple sources of uncertainty in a stock assessment allows advice to better account for the risks associated with proposed management options, promoting decisions that are more robust to such uncertainty. However, a typical assessment only reports the model fit and variance of estimated parameters, thereby underreporting the overall uncertainty. Additionally, although multiple candidate models may be considered, only one is selected as the ‘best’ result, effectively rejecting the plausible assumptions behind the other models. We present an applied framework to integrate multiple sources of uncertainty in the stock assessment process. The first step is the generation and conditioning of a suite of stock assessment models that contain different assumptions about the stock and the fishery. The second step is the estimation of parameters, including fitting of the stock assessment models. The final step integrates across all of the results to reconcile the multi-model outcome. The framework is flexible enough to be tailored to particular stocks and fisheries and can draw on information from multiple sources to implement a broad variety of assumptions, making it applicable to stocks with varying levels of data availability The Iberian hake stock in International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) Divisions VIIIc and IXa is used to demonstrate the framework, starting from length-based stock and indices data. Process and model uncertainty are considered through the growth, natural mortality, fishing mortality, survey catchability and stock-recruitment relationship. Estimation uncertainty is included as part of the fitting process. Simple model averaging is used

  8. Seismic risk assessment in the Mexican Nuclear Center applying the Gumbel-I distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A licensing requirement for the operation of nuclear facilities is the performance of different kinds of studies, one of which is seismic risk assessment. This study is useful for the validation of the seismic coefficient applied in the structural design of the facilities. Thus, for the construction of a pilot nuclear fuel plant at Mexico Nuclear Centre of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), was necessary to make such study. The seismicity data for the period between 1912 and 1990 were used and the extreme values Gumbel-I distribution was applied to them. With this, ground acceleration seismic risk maps for recurrence periods of 1, 25 and 50 years were drawn up, showing maximum values of 1.2, 4.25, and 5.0 gales, respectively. (Author)

  9. The IPY Education, Outreach and Communication Assessment: How IPY is shaping the future of science outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencher, J. F.; Baeseman, J. L.; Carlson, D. J.; Timm, K.

    2011-12-01

    The International Polar Year 2007-2008 (IPY) saw unprecedented polar collaboration between scientists, educators and communities, and prioritized science communication alongside a diverse science program. This global effort represents one of the largest investments in polar science outreach to date with IPY outreach occurring in more than 70 countries and involving millions of people, representing a microcosm of science outreach knowledge. In order to understand and learn from the many IPY education, outreach and communication (EOC) projects an ICSU sponsored IPY EOC assessment, managed by the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS), conducted a global inventory and assessment of IPY EOC programs at the end of the IPY. As a result the project has now gathered information on more than 530 outreach events including endorsed outreach programmes, science partnered outreach projects and simply IPY inspired science outreach events. By talking to communicators and scientists around the world many lessons can be learned on how to engage and actively involve the public, students and early career scientists in polar research in a meaningful way. Through the integration of science outreach from budget to results, dedication of outreach personnel and an inclusive approach to all aspects of science outreach, IPY has demonstrated that the public wants to be engaged in polar issues, and how science can incorporate both good science and effective outreach. This type of public engagement is not only critical for science literacy, it is this level of involvement in science that helps to keep science in the forefront of people's minds, and thus high on the agenda of governments and organizations funding research. At the conclusion of this latest IPY, polar science outreach programs not only supported science that expanded our knowledge of the Polar Regions, it integrated essential, and called for, science education, outreach and communication to a global community.

  10. Collected Wisdom: Assessment Tools for Computer Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kathryn E.; McCartney, Robert

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the question of what assessment tools are being used in practice by United States computing programs and what the faculty doing the assessment think of the tools they use. After presenting some background with regard to the design, implementation, and use of assessment, with particular attention to assessment tools,…

  11. Assessment of teachers' ability to integrate science concepts into secondary agriculture programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Jason A.

    For the past two decades, the idea of integrating more science concepts into the agricultural education curriculum has been gaining support. The purposes of this study were two fold: (1) To assess the knowledge base and interest levels among agriculture instructors in teaching concepts related to science; (2) To assess how such a change in the curriculum would impact current agricultural education programs. The sample was derived from the population of agriculture instructors teaching in Missouri secondary schools. For this descriptive correlational research, an instrument was developed to assess the instructors' perceived level of competence to teach selected science grade level expectations (GLE) and their relationship to the agricultural education curriculum and programs. A second instrument, solicited from the American Board for Certification in Teacher Excellence, was used to assess the general biological science knowledge of the teachers. Agriculture instructors perceive that they are competent to teach and integrate science GLEs into the agriculture curriculum. However, their scores on the examination of knowledge of biological science brings into question their competence to teach this subject matter. Teachers believe integrating science into the agriculture curriculum will benefit their program and their students; however, they unsure if their classes should count for science credit or if FFA programs and activities are a good match for a more science-based curriculum.

  12. Visual Representations on High School Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDue, Nicole D.; Libarkin, Julie C.; Thomas, Stephen R.

    2015-12-01

    The pervasive use of visual representations in textbooks, curricula, and assessments underscores their importance in K-12 science education. For example, visual representations figure prominently in the recent publication of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States in Next generation science standards: for states, by states. Achieve, Inc. on behalf of the twenty-six states and partners that collaborated on the NGSS, 2013). Although assessments of the NGSS have yet to be developed, most students are currently evaluated on their ability to interpret science visuals. While numerous studies exist on particular visuals, it is unclear whether the same types of visuals are emphasized in all science disciplines. The present study is an evaluation of the similarities and differences of visuals used to assess students' knowledge of chemistry, earth science, living environment (biology), and physics on the New York State Regents examination. Analysis of 266 distinct visual representations categorized across the four content examinations reveals that the frequency and type of visuals vary greatly between disciplines. Diagrams, Graphs, Tables, and Maps are the most prevalent across all science disciplines. Maps, Cartograms, and Time Charts are unique to the Earth Science examination, and Network Diagrams are unique to the living environment (biology) examination. This study identifies which representations are most critical for training students across the science disciplines in anticipation of the implementation and eventual assessment of the NGSS.

  13. Seismic risk assessment as applied to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its licensing and evaluation role, the NRC funded the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the goal of developing tools and data bases to evaluate the risk of earthquake caused radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. This paper describes the SSMRP risk assessment methodology and the results generated by applying this methodology to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station. In addition to describing the failure probabilities and risk values, the effects of assumptions about plant configuration, plant operation, and dependence will be given

  14. Applying organizational science to health care: a framework for collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Alan W; DiazGranados, Deborah; Mazmanian, Paul E; Retchin, Sheldon M

    2013-07-01

    Developing interprofessional education (IPE) curricula that improve collaborative practice across professions has proven challenging. A theoretical basis for understanding collaborative practice in health care settings is needed to guide the education and evaluation of health professions trainees and practitioners and support the team-based delivery of care. IPE should incorporate theory-driven, evidence-based methods and build competency toward effective collaboration.In this article, the authors review several concepts from the organizational science literature and propose using these as a framework for understanding how health care teams function. Specifically, they outline the team process model of action and planning phases in collaborative work; discuss leadership and followership, including how locus (a leader's integration into a team's usual work) and formality (a leader's responsibility conferred by the traditional hierarchy) affect team functions; and describe dynamic delegation, an approach to conceptualizing escalation and delegation within health care teams. For each concept, they identify competencies for knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors to aid in the development of innovative curricula to improve collaborative practice. They suggest that gaining an understanding of these principles will prepare health care trainees, whether team leaders or members, to analyze team performance, adapt behaviors that improve collaboration, and create team-based health care delivery processes that lead to improved clinical outcomes. PMID:23702530

  15. Improving Geoscience Students' Spatial Thinking Skills: Applying Cognitive Science Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormand, C. J.; Shipley, T. F.; Manduca, C. A.; Tikoff, B.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial thinking skills are critical to success in many subdisciplines of the geosciences (and beyond). There are many components of spatial thinking, such as mental rotation, penetrative visualization, disembedding, perspective taking, and navigation. Undergraduate students in introductory and upper-level geoscience courses bring a wide variety of spatial skill levels to the classroom, as measured by psychometric tests of many of these components of spatial thinking. Furthermore, it is not unusual for individual students to excel in some of these areas while struggling in others. Although pre- and post-test comparisons show that student skill levels typically improve over the course of an academic term, average gains are quite modest. This suggests that it may be valuable to develop interventions to help undergraduate students develop a range of spatial skills that can be used to solve geoscience problems. Cognitive science research suggests a number of strong strategies for building students' spatial skills. Practice is essential, and time on task is correlated to improvement. Progressive alignment may be used to scaffold students' successes on simpler problems, allowing them to see how more complex problems are related to those they can solve. Gesturing has proven effective in moving younger students from incorrect problem-solving strategies to correct strategies in other disciplines. These principles can be used to design instructional materials to improve undergraduate geoscience students' spatial skills; we will present some examples of such materials.

  16. Ultra fast timing MMRPC: a versatile detector for basic and applied science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three decades ago the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) was invented to overcome several problems of parallel plate chambers. Unlike parallel plate chambers, electrodes of RPCs are made of resistive material like Bakelite or float glass. This has the effect that only a limited part of the electrode is discharged during the passage of an ionizing particle with subsequent avalanches or streamers, while the rest of the electrode remains unchanged. Wide and/or single gap RPC detectors are used in many large scale experiments to explore various directions of science. This includes fundamental research in particle physics, in astrophysics, in cosmology etc,. In India, RPC detectors array (INO) will play a vital role in the measurement of mass hierarchy of three flavors of neutrino mass. To improve timing resolution, Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) is an intelligent modification of an RPC by increasing the electric field across the gap and creating thinner layers of gas gap by inserting (electrostatically) floating glasses between anode and cathode. It can be shown that a resolution in the range of 50-100 ps is achievable with gaps of 200-300 mm. Moreover, RPCs are insensitive to the magnetic field. Finally timing RPCs have already proved in the last years to be a reliable and stable detector with sensitive larger and regularly used in a large number of experiments

  17. A comparison of student and teacher perceptions of assessment in science classrooms in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhader, Virginia

    Assessments have been a central topic of concern in the American educational system for the past several years. With the enactment of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act into law (P.L.107-110), student assessment has become a high stakes event in all school districts. This study was timely with the onset of testing and state reporting of performance in science this year. The purpose of this dissertation was to study and compare students' and teachers' perceptions of assessment practices in science classrooms. Using survey instruments designed for each group, high school students enrolled in science classes and teachers providing instruction in these classes provided demographic information and their perceptions of the science assessment practices in these classrooms. Students were administered the Students Perception Assessment Questionnaire and teachers were administered a researcher modified version of this instrument. A total of 447 students enrolled in five South Dakota school district high schools completed the student survey with 15 matched teacher surveys. Survey results indicated there was inconsistency between how the classroom teacher and students perceived assessments in the science classrooms. Only Congruence for Planning Learning and Transparency in Assessment responses were positively related between the teachers and students. Some 60% of the categorical assessment variables were not significantly related indicating teachers and students are not perceiving the science classroom assessment practices similarly. Individual science disciplines were also analyzed separately. Students in biology classes perceived assessment practices differently based on the grades they were earning in the class. High achieving students saw these practices as more similar to their teachers' perceptions than the low achieving students. Chemistry students who liked science also perceived the science assessments more similar to teacher perceptions than did students who were

  18. The Effects of Motivation on Student Performance on Science Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Tina Heard

    Academic achievement of public school students in the United States has significantly fallen behind other countries. Students' lack of knowledge of, or interest in, basic science and math has led to fewer graduates of science, technology, engineering, and math-related fields (STEM), a factor that may affect their career success and will certainly affect the numbers in the workforce who are prepared for some STEM jobs. Drawing from self-determination theory and achievement theory, the purpose of this correlational study was to determine whether there were significant relationships between high school academic performance in science classes, motivations (self-efficacy, self-regulation, and intrinsic and extrinsic goal orientation), and academic performance in an introductory online college biology class. Data were obtained at 2 points in time from a convenience multiethnic sample of adult male ( n =16) and female (n = 49) community college students in the southeast United States. Correlational analyses indicated no statistically significant relationships for intrinsic or extrinsic goal orientation, self-efficacy, or self-regulation with high school science mean-GPA nor college biology final course grade. However, high school academic performance in science classes significantly predicted college performance in an entry-level online biology class. The implications of positive social change include knowledge useful for educational institutions to explore additional factors that may motivate students to enroll in science courses, potentially leading to an increase in scientific knowledge and STEM careers.

  19. Improving Science Attitude and Creative Thinking through Science Education Project: A Design, Implementation and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sener, Nilay; Türk, Cumhur; Tas, Erol

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a science education project implemented in different learning environments on secondary school students' creative thinking skills and their attitudes to science lesson. Within this scope, a total of 50 students who participated in the nature education project in Samsun City in 2014 make up the…

  20. Using Educative Assessments to Support Science Teaching for Middle School English-language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Cory A.; Allexsaht-Snider, Martha; Suriel, Regina; Kayumova, Shakhnoza; Choi, Youn-jeng; Bouton, Bobette; Baker, Melissa

    2013-03-01

    Grounded in Hallidayan perspectives on academic language, we report on our development of an educative science assessment as one component of the language-rich inquiry science for English-language learners teacher professional learning project for middle school science teachers. The project emphasizes the role of content-area writing to support teachers in diagnosing their students' emergent understandings of science inquiry practices, science content knowledge, and the academic language of science, with a particular focus on the needs of English-language learners. In our current school policy context, writing for meaningful purposes has received decreased attention as teachers struggle to cover large numbers of discrete content standards. Additionally, high-stakes assessments presented in multiple-choice format have become the definitive measure of student science learning, further de-emphasizing the value of academic writing for developing and expressing understanding. To counter these trends, we examine the implementation of educative assessment materials—writing-rich assessments designed to support teachers' instructional decision making. We report on the qualities of our educative assessment that supported teachers in diagnosing their students' emergent understandings, and how teacher-researcher collaborative scoring sessions and interpretation of assessment results led to changes in teachers' instructional decision making to better support students in expressing their scientific understandings. We conclude with implications of this work for theory, research, and practice.

  1. Overall welfare assessment of laying hens: Comparing science-based, environmental-based and animal-based assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimmura, T.; Bracke, M.B.M.; Mol, de R.M.; Hirahara, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2011-01-01

    To increase the validity of evaluations and facilitate expansion and maintenance of assessment systems, we constructed a database of studies on the welfare of laying hens around the world. On the basis of this database, we devised a science-based welfare assessment model. Our model includes measurem

  2. Advanced lasers laser physics and technology for applied and fundamental science

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhoivanov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Presenting a blend of applied and fundamental research in highly interdisciplinary subjects of rapidly developing areas, this book contains contributions on the frontiers and hot topics of laser physics, laser technology and laser engineering, and covers a wide range of laser topics, from all-optical signal processing and chaotic optical communication to production of superwicking surfaces, correction of extremely high-power beams, and generation of ultrabroadband spectra. It presents both review-type contributions and well researched and documented case studies, and is intended for graduate students, young scientist, and emeritus scientist working/studying in laser physics, optoelectronics, optics, photonics, and adjacent areas. The book contains both experimental and theoretical studies, as well as combinations of these two, which is known to be a most useful and interesting form of reporting scientific results, allowing students to really learn from each contribution. The book contains over 130 illustratio...

  3. Outdoor Air Scrubbing - Back to Basics: Fundamental Science Applied to NOA Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, J. A.; Bauman, J.; Kawamoto, C.

    2012-12-01

    When released in an outdoor environment, air contaminants, such as dust, organic vapors, and small particulates, including naturally occurring asbestos. Present an increased complexity over indoor environments. The number of factors that need to be considered in their control and mitigation is increased by an order of magnitude. These additional complexities include the ever changing weather, including temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction; all variable and completely out of the direct control of those attempting to successfully mitigate these air contaminants. It is important to consider the most relevant and significant factors and to apply good fundamental scientific principals when implementing techniques and approaches to outdoor air scrubbing. This paper will discuss the evolution of mitigation techniques and engineering controls, and the application of these engineering controls that are based on fundamental scientific principals to mitigate naturally occurring asbestos.

  4. The role of science in environmental impact assessment: process and procedure versus purpose in the development of theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing emphasis has been placed in recent years on development of the theory of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), primarily as a consequence of increasing recognition that the theoretical basis of 'state-of-the-art' EIA is inadequately developed and detailed. This study reviews consideration given in the research literature to the role of science in EIA in order to identify implicit theories. It is suggested that there are two main interpretations of the role of science in EIA (EIA as applied science and EIA as civic science) and five distinct models are identified within these paradigms. These models appear to be based predominantly on existing philosophies of science (such as positivism or relativism) and simplistic and ill-defined conceptions of the purposes of EIA. A broad model is proposed for the advancement of theory regarding the role of science in EIA which emphasises conceptual consideration and empirical investigation of the purposes, and hence outcomes, of EIA and the causal processes utilised to achieve these purposes. The model necessitates a reorientation of the research agenda, away from process and procedure to focus on substantive purposes, and this will require more integrative and connective research than has been commonplace in the past. The EIA research agenda must evolve and mature if this globally significant decision tool is to fulfil its potential

  5. The Quantitative Reasoning for College Science (QuaRCS) Assessment, 1: Development and Validation

    CERN Document Server

    Follette, Katherine B; Dokter, Erin; Buxner, Sanlyn; Prather, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Science is an inherently quantitative endeavor, and general education science courses are taken by a majority of college students. As such, they are a powerful venue for advancing students' skills and attitudes toward mathematics. This article reports on the development and validation of the Quantitative Reasoning for College Science (QuaRCS) Assessment, a numeracy assessment instrument designed for college-level general education science students. It has been administered to more than four thousand students over eight semesters of refinement. We show that the QuaRCS is able to distinguish varying levels of quantitative literacy and present performance statistics for both individual items and the instrument as a whole. Responses from a survey of forty-eight Astronomy and Mathematics educators show that these two groups share views regarding which quantitative skills are most important in the contexts of science literacy and educated citizenship, and the skills assessed with the QuaRCS are drawn from these ran...

  6. Educational use assessment of Geomorphosites applied to the Picos de Europa National Park (Northern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazán, Héctor; Serrano, Enrique; Ruiz-Flaño, Purificación

    2014-05-01

    information have been applied after assess 51 geomorphosites in Picos de Europa. Applying the accessibility criteria, 15 geomorphosites have an educational value and so the educational assessment has been made. Each geomorphosite shows educational qualities for different topics and educational or leisure levels, all of them based in experiential education. The educational assessment sheets of geomorphosites allow greater accuracy of the didactic use in the National Park of the Picos de Europa and they are a tool to be used in the teaching task as well as leisure activities. The results permit to make use of the relief in educational curricula and develop leisure strategies to divulgation and interpretation of geomorphosites in NPA.

  7. Understanding the challenges to the implementation of assessment reform in science classrooms: A case study of science teachers' conceptions and practices of assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydeniz, Mehmet

    The purpose of this study is to understand the professional and structural, political and cultural factors that present challenges to the implementation of assessment reform in science classrooms. An analysis of recent science education literature and national science education reform documents suggests that change in schools is a complex process that does not happen overnight and is subject to the influence of many professional and structural attributes (Berliner, 2006; Brooks, 2005; Cuban, 1990; Duschl, 1990; Gess-Newsome, Southerland, Johnston & Woodbury, 2003; Southerland & Hutner, in press; Tyack & Cuban, 1995). Structural components include school culture; bell schedule, administration policies and mandates, standards, curriculum and accountability measures. Professional components involve teachers' epistemic views of science, their pedagogical conceptions and their conceptions of assessment along with knowledge necessary to translate these conceptions into practice (Barnett & Hodson, 2001; Gess-Newsome & Lederman, 1999; Gess-Newsome et al., 2003; Mortimer & Scott, 2003; Shulman, 1986). Education literature suggests both of these components, professional and structural components, shape how teaching takes place, thus, what students learn in science classrooms (Brickhouse, 2006; Duschl, 1990; Gallagher, 2006; Gess-Newsome & Lederman, 1999; Gess-Newsome et al., 2003; Southerland & Hutner, in press). Assessment plays a significant role in efforts to bring about improvements in the educational system (Brickhouse, 2006; Davis, Genc & Aydeniz, in press; NAS, 2006; NRC, 2001; 2005; Southerland & Hutner, in press). Assessment serves multiple purposes. Assessment can be used to support learning (Abell & Volkmann, 2006; Bell & Cowie, 2001; Black & William, 1998; Brookhart, 2006; Davis et al., in press; Klassen, 2006; Shepard, 2000), to monitor the effectiveness of a particular curriculum (NAS, 2006; NRC, 2005), to evaluate the quality and effectiveness of instruction

  8. What PISA measures: some remarks on standardized assessment and science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehl, Tobias

    2015-12-01

    Drawing on a sociocultural perspective on educational assessment the empirical examples of Margareta Serder and Anders Jakobsson serve as a starting point for a critical analysis of PISA and the image of science education it perpetuates. While PISA claims to neutrally measure competencies relevant to science education, I argue that the test questions enact a very narrow definition of science and fail to account for the social context of testing.

  9. Assessment and mitigation of the environmental burdens to air from land applied food-based digestate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of putrescible urban waste for energy recovery has seen rapid growth over recent years. In order to ascertain its systems scale sustainability, however, determination of the environmental fate of the large volume of digestate generated during the process is indispensable. This paper evaluates the environmental burdens to air associated with land applied food-based digestate in terms of primary pollutants (ammonia, nitrogen dioxide) and greenhouse gases (methane and nitrous oxide). The assessments have been made in two stages – first, the emissions from surface application of food-based digestate are quantified for the business as usual (BAU). In the next step, environmental burden minimisation potentials for the following three mitigation measures are estimated – mixed waste digestate (MWD), soil-incorporated digestate (SID), and post-methanated digestate (PMD). Overall, the mitigation scenarios demonstrated considerable NH3, CH4 and N2O burden minimisation potentials, with positive implications for both climate change and urban pollution. - Highlights: • In situ air pollution assessment of land applied digestate is performed. • Environmental burden minimisation scenarios for digestate bio fertiliser presented. • Food-based digestate show high ammonia volatilisation potential. • Soil incorporated digestate effectively reduces NH3 but elevates N2O emissions. • Managing digestate emissions mitigate both climate change and air pollution. - In situ monitoring and analyses demonstrate the role of post-processing in greenhouse gases and air pollution mitigation from food-based digestate use as bio fertiliser

  10. Basic and Applied Materials Science Research Efforts at MSFC Germane to NASA Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Presently, a number of investigations are ongoing that blend basic research with engineering applications in support of NASA goals. These include (1) "Pore Formation and Mobility (PFMI) " An ISS Glovebox Investigation" NASA Selected Project - 400-34-3D; (2) "Interactions Between Rotating Bodies" Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) Project - 279-62-00-16; (3) "Molybdenum - Rhenium (Mo-Re) Alloys for Nuclear Fuel Containment" TD Collaboration - 800-11-02; (4) "Fabrication of Alumina - Metal Composites for Propulsion Components" ED Collaboration - 090-50-10; (5) "Radiation Shielding for Deep-Space Missions" SD Effort; (6) "Other Research". In brief, "Pore Formation and Mobility" is an experiment to be conducted in the ISS Microgravity Science Glovebox that will systematically investigate the development, movement, and interactions of bubbles (porosity) during the controlled directional solidification of a transparent material. In addition to promoting our general knowledge of porosity physics, this work will serve as a guide to future ISS experiments utilizing metal alloys. "Interactions Between Rotating Bodies" is a CDDF sponsored project that is critically examining, through theory and experiment, claims of "new" physics relating to gravity modification and electric field effects. "Molybdenum - Rhenium Alloys for Nuclear Fuel Containment" is a TD collaboration in support of nuclear propulsion. Mo-Re alloys are being evaluated and developed for nuclear fuel containment. "Fabrication of Alumina - Metal Composites for Propulsion Components" is an ED collaboration with the intent of increasing strength and decreasing weight of metal engine components through the incorporation of nanometer-sized alumina fibers. "Radiation Shielding for Deep-Space Missions" is an SD effort aimed at minimizing the health risk from radiation to human space voyagers; work to date has been primarily programmatic but experiments to develop hydrogen-rich materials for shielding are

  11. Causal modelling applied to the risk assessment of a wastewater discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Warren L; Rokahr, Pat A; Webb, Jeff M; Rees, Gavin N; Clune, Tim S

    2016-03-01

    Bayesian networks (BNs), or causal Bayesian networks, have become quite popular in ecological risk assessment and natural resource management because of their utility as a communication and decision-support tool. Since their development in the field of artificial intelligence in the 1980s, however, Bayesian networks have evolved and merged with structural equation modelling (SEM). Unlike BNs, which are constrained to encode causal knowledge in conditional probability tables, SEMs encode this knowledge in structural equations, which is thought to be a more natural language for expressing causal information. This merger has clarified the causal content of SEMs and generalised the method such that it can now be performed using standard statistical techniques. As it was with BNs, the utility of this new generation of SEM in ecological risk assessment will need to be demonstrated with examples to foster an understanding and acceptance of the method. Here, we applied SEM to the risk assessment of a wastewater discharge to a stream, with a particular focus on the process of translating a causal diagram (conceptual model) into a statistical model which might then be used in the decision-making and evaluation stages of the risk assessment. The process of building and testing a spatial causal model is demonstrated using data from a spatial sampling design, and the implications of the resulting model are discussed in terms of the risk assessment. It is argued that a spatiotemporal causal model would have greater external validity than the spatial model, enabling broader generalisations to be made regarding the impact of a discharge, and greater value as a tool for evaluating the effects of potential treatment plant upgrades. Suggestions are made on how the causal model could be augmented to include temporal as well as spatial information, including suggestions for appropriate statistical models and analyses. PMID:26832914

  12. Spiral and Project-Based Learning with Peer Assessment in a Computer Science Project Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime, Arturo; Blanco, José Miguel; Domínguez, César; Sánchez, Ana; Heras, Jónathan; Usandizaga, Imanol

    2016-01-01

    Different learning methods such as project-based learning, spiral learning and peer assessment have been implemented in science disciplines with different outcomes. This paper presents a proposal for a project management course in the context of a computer science degree. Our proposal combines three well-known methods: project-based learning,…

  13. International Assessment: A Rasch Model and Teachers' Evaluation of TIMSS Science Achievement Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, Shawn M.

    2012-01-01

    The Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) is a comparative assessment of the achievement of students in many countries. In the present study, a rigorous independent evaluation was conducted of a representative sample of TIMSS science test items because item quality influences the validity of the scores used to inform…

  14. Assessing Information-Seeking Behavior of Computer Science and Engineering Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Valerie K.

    2011-01-01

    This study, the first phase of a multi-phase effort, was undertaken to assess and provide for the information needs of the Faculty of the Schools of Science and Engineering at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ) in the digital age. The objectives of this phase were to: 1) gain an in-depth understanding of how computer science and engineering faculty…

  15. Assessing the Impact of Gender and Race on Earnings in the Library Science Labor Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeper, Darren; Smith, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the 2003 National Survey of College Graduates, this paper examines earnings in the library science labor market and assesses the impact of gender on the income attainment process. We use this cross-sectional dataset to determine if there are significant income differences between male and female library science professionals. The…

  16. A safety assessment methodology applied to CNS/ATM-based air traffic control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decades, the air traffic system has been changing to adapt itself to new social demands, mainly the safe growth of worldwide traffic capacity. Those changes are ruled by the Communication, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) paradigm , based on digital communication technologies (mainly satellites) as a way of improving communication, surveillance, navigation and air traffic management services. However, CNS/ATM poses new challenges and needs, mainly related to the safety assessment process. In face of these new challenges, and considering the main characteristics of the CNS/ATM, a methodology is proposed at this work by combining 'absolute' and 'relative' safety assessment methods adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in ICAO Doc.9689 , using Fluid Stochastic Petri Nets (FSPN) as the modeling formalism, and compares the safety metrics estimated from the simulation of both the proposed (in analysis) and the legacy system models. To demonstrate its usefulness, the proposed methodology was applied to the 'Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcasting' (ADS-B) based air traffic control system. As conclusions, the proposed methodology assured to assess CNS/ATM system safety properties, in which FSPN formalism provides important modeling capabilities, and discrete event simulation allowing the estimation of the desired safety metric.

  17. Impact of formative assessment to summative achievement in pre-graduate students of health sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Sánchez, Jorge; Baillès, Eva; Carrillo de la Peña, María Teresa; Caseras Vives, Francesc Xavier; Ortet i Fabregat, Generós

    2009-01-01

    Although educational experts recommend the use of formative assessment, there is a dearth of empirical studies on its impact on academic achievement. In this research the authors analyse to what extent participation and performance in formative assessment are associated with positive academic outcomes of pre-graduate students of health sciences. A total of 548 students from three health science degrees (Medicine, Psychology and Biology) from four Spanish universities were invol...

  18. Summary of the NASA Science Instrument, Observatories and Sensor Systems (SIOSS) Technology Assessment Roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    In August 2010, the NASA Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) commissioned an assessment of 15 different technology areas of importance to the future of NASA. Technology Assessment #8 (TA8) was Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems (SIOSS). SIOSS assessed the needs for optical technology ranging from detectors to lasers, x-ray mirrors to microwave antenna, in-situ spectrographs for on-surface planetary sample characterization to large space telescopes. This needs assessment looked across the entirety of NASA and not just the Science Mission Directorate. This paper summarizes the SIOSS findings and recommendations.

  19. Student’s Motivation and level of Satisfaction : A case of Inholland University of Applied Sciences, (Aeronautical Engineering De-partment), Delft Holland

    OpenAIRE

    Obano, Hilda

    2012-01-01

    Authors: Hilda Obano Claire Group POBBA 08 The title Student Motivation and Level of Satisfaction Inholland University of Applied Sciences, Holland Number of pages & Appendices 46+5 Supervisors: Evariste Habiyakare and Johanna Heinonen The aims and objectives of this research were to find out the level of motivation amongst students of Inholland University of Applied Sciences Aeronautical Department. The Research problems were: -What factors affect students’ motiva...

  20. Review of the volume Applied Social Sciences: Sociology, edited by Patricia-Luciana Runcan, Georgeta Rata and Mihai-Bogdan Iovu, published by Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana CARAS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at presenting the main ideas of the volume Applied Social Sciences: Sociology, appeared as a result of the International Conference of Applied Sciences, which emerged as a multidisciplinary forum. The volume structured in 6 chapters exposes gradually themes such as culture and identity, emigration and immigration, school organisation and educational opportunities, vulnerable people, groups and populations, communication and social relations and perceptions, attitudes, values, all those aspects being treated in a sociological context.

  1. 76 FR 26284 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Lead (Pb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... Criteria Document). On February 26, 2010 (75 FR 8934), EPA formally initiated its current review of the air... workshop was held on May 10-11, 2010 (75 FR 20843) to discuss policy- relevant science to inform EPA's... accessible teleconference consultation on May 5, 2011 (76 FR 21346). In December 2010, EPA held a...

  2. Assessment of a Bioinformatics across Life Science Curricula Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, David R.; Miskowski, Jennifer A.; Grunwald, Sandra K.; Abler, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, we have undertaken a program to integrate the study of bioinformatics across the undergraduate life science curricula. Our efforts have included incorporating bioinformatics exercises into courses in the biology, microbiology, and chemistry departments, as well as coordinating the efforts of faculty within…

  3. Applying Risk Science and Stakeholder Engagement to Overcome Environmental Barriers to Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Anderson, Richard M.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-09-20

    The production of electricity from the moving waters of the ocean has the potential to be a viable addition to the portfolio of renewable energy sources worldwide. The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) industry faces many hurdles, including technology development, challenges of offshore deployments, and financing; however, the barrier most commonly identified by industry, regulators, and stakeholders is the uncertainty surrounding potential environmental effects of devices placed in the water and the permitting processes associated with real or potential impacts. Regulatory processes are not well positioned to judge the severity of harm due to turbines or wave generators. Risks from MHK devices to endangered or protected animals in coastal waters and rivers, as well as the habitats that support them, are poorly understood. This uncertainty raises concerns about catastrophic interactions between spinning turbine blades or slack mooring lines and marine mammals, birds and fish. In order to accelerate the deployment of tidal and wave devices, there is a need to sort through the extensive list of potential interactions that may cause harm to marine organisms and ecosystems, to set priorities for regulatory triggers, and to direct future research. Identifying the risk of MHK technology components on specific marine organisms and ecosystem components can separate perceived from real risk-relevant interactions. Scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are developing an Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) to assess environmental effects associated with MHK technologies and projects through a systematic analytical process, with specific input from key stakeholder groups. The array of stakeholders interested in the development of MHK is broad, segmenting into those whose involvement is essential for the success of the MHK project, those that are influential, and those that are interested. PNNL and their partners have engaged these groups, gaining

  4. Assessing Science Students' Attitudes to Mathematics: A Case Study on a Modelling Project with Mathematical Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, L. L.; Tso, T. -Y.; Lin, F. L.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the attitudes of students towards mathematics after they had participated in an applied mathematical modelling project that was part of an Applied Mathematics course. The students were majoring in Earth Science at the National Taiwan Normal University. Twenty-six students took part in the project. It was the first time a…

  5. Information sources in biomedical science and medical journalism: methodological approaches and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Giovanna F; Vercellesi, Luisa; Bruno, Flavia

    2004-09-01

    Throughout the world the public is showing increasing interest in medical and scientific subjects and journalists largely spread this information, with an important impact on knowledge and health. Clearly, therefore, the relationship between the journalist and his sources is delicate: freedom and independence of information depend on the independence and truthfulness of the sources. The new "precision journalism" holds that scientific methods should be applied to journalism, so authoritative sources are a common need for journalists and scientists. We therefore compared the individual classifications and methods of assessing of sources in biomedical science and medical journalism to try to extrapolate scientific methods of evaluation to journalism. In journalism and science terms used to classify sources of information show some similarities, but their meanings are different. In science primary and secondary classes of information, for instance, refer to the levels of processing, but in journalism to the official nature of the source itself. Scientists and journalists must both always consult as many sources as possible and check their authoritativeness, reliability, completeness, up-to-dateness and balance. In journalism, however, there are some important differences and limits: too many sources can sometimes diminish the quality of the information. The sources serve a first filter between the event and the journalist, who is not providing the reader with the fact, but with its projection. Journalists have time constraints and lack the objective criteria for searching, the specific background knowledge, and the expertise to fully assess sources. To assist in understanding the wealth of sources of information in journalism, we have prepared a checklist of items and questions. There are at least four fundamental points that a good journalist, like any scientist, should know: how to find the latest information (the sources), how to assess it (the quality and

  6. Assessment for Learning in Inquiry Based Science Education:From Individualistic to Socio-cultural Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Fornaguera, Cristina Carulla

    2014-01-01

    The study looks at assessment for learning and Inquiry Based Science Education —IBSE— as concepts established in a diversity of geographical areas, where the traditional summative assessment shapes what most individuals share as being experienced as assessment. Based on Leontiev and Radford’s activity theory perspectives, this study looks critically at assessment for learning within IBSE activity research shaped by an individualistic approach to learning. The thesis proposed a movement toward...

  7. Welfare assessment: correlations and integration between a Qualitative Behavioural Assessment and a clinical/ health protocol applied in veal calves farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis G. Van Reenen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at finding correlations and possible integration among Qualitative Behavioural Assessment (QBA and a specific protocol of clinical/health evaluation. Both welfare assessment methods were based on direct animal observation and were applied in 24 Italian veal calves farms at 3 weeks (wks of rearing. Principal component analysis (PCA summarized 20 QBA descriptors on two main components (PC1 and PC2 with eigenvalues above 4 and explaining 29.6 and 20.3% of the variation respectively. PCA on residuals obtained after correcting for housing condition yielded highly similar results, indicating that the rearing environment of the calves was not an important determinant of the observer reliability of QBA. A relationship was found between QBA PC2 and the presence of signs of cross-sucking recorded during the clinical visit (presence PC2=1.11 vs. absence PC2=-1.55, P<0.001. There were no other relations between the quantitative clinical measures and QBA PC’s. The frequency of farmer, veterinarian, or industry technician visits to the veal unit significantly affected QBA PC1 and PC2 scores. These results suggest that the 2 methods provide complementary types of information and can each make valid a contribution to an integrated animal welfare monitoring scheme.

  8. Developing scenarios to assess future landslide risks: a model-based approach applied to mountainous regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacquie, Laure; Houet, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In the last century, European mountain landscapes have experienced significant transformations. Natural and anthropogenic changes, climate changes, touristic and industrial development, socio-economic interactions, and their implications in terms of LUCC (land use and land cover changes) have directly influenced the spatial organization and vulnerability of mountain landscapes. This study is conducted as part of the SAMCO project founded by the French National Science Agency (ANR). It aims at developing a methodological approach, combining various tools, modelling platforms and methods, to identify vulnerable regions to landslide hazards accounting for futures LUCC. It presents an integrated approach combining participative scenarios and a LULC changes simulation models to assess the combined effects of LUCC and climate change on landslide risks in the Cauterets valley (French Pyrenees Mountains) up to 2100. Through vulnerability and risk mapping, the objective is to gather information to support landscape planning and implement land use strategies with local stakeholders for risk management. Four contrasting scenarios are developed and exhibit contrasting trajectories of socio-economic development. Prospective scenarios are based on national and international socio-economic contexts relying on existing assessment reports. The methodological approach integrates knowledge from local stakeholders to refine each scenario during their construction and to reinforce their plausibility and relevance by accounting for local specificities, e.g. logging and pastoral activities, touristic development, urban planning, etc. A process-based model, the Forecasting Scenarios for Mountains (ForeSceM) model, developed on the Dinamica Ego modelling platform is used to spatially allocate futures LUCC for each prospective scenario. Concurrently, a spatial decision support tool, i.e. the SYLVACCESS model, is used to identify accessible areas for forestry in scenario projecting logging

  9. Enabling Wide-Scale Computer Science Education through Improved Automated Assessment Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boe, Bryce A.

    There is a proliferating demand for newly trained computer scientists as the number of computer science related jobs continues to increase. University programs will only be able to train enough new computer scientists to meet this demand when two things happen: when there are more primary and secondary school students interested in computer science, and when university departments have the resources to handle the resulting increase in enrollment. To meet these goals, significant effort is being made to both incorporate computational thinking into existing primary school education, and to support larger university computer science class sizes. We contribute to this effort through the creation and use of improved automated assessment tools. To enable wide-scale computer science education we do two things. First, we create a framework called Hairball to support the static analysis of Scratch programs targeted for fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students. Scratch is a popular building-block language utilized to pique interest in and teach the basics of computer science. We observe that Hairball allows for rapid curriculum alterations and thus contributes to wide-scale deployment of computer science curriculum. Second, we create a real-time feedback and assessment system utilized in university computer science classes to provide better feedback to students while reducing assessment time. Insights from our analysis of student submission data show that modifications to the system configuration support the way students learn and progress through course material, making it possible for instructors to tailor assignments to optimize learning in growing computer science classes.

  10. Characterization modelling of aquatic ecotoxicity from metal emission to be applied in Life Cycle Impact Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yan

    that form stable hydroxides in slightly alkaline waters (Al(III), Be, Cr(III), Cu(II) and Fe(III)), but it varies less than one order of magnitude for the other metals (Ba, Cd, Co, Cs, Fe(II), Mn(II), Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn), showing a much lower relevance of water archetype differentiation. In slightly......Following the Apeldoorn Declaration (Aboussouan et al. 2004) and Clearwater Consensus (Diamond et al. 2010), Gandhi et al. (2010) developed a new method to calculate metals Characterization Factor (CF) in freshwater and applied it on six metals, considering metals speciation and its impacts on...... bioavailability. However, ecotoxicity of several metals that commonly appear in Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) have not yet been characterized in freshwater by the novel method. Ecotoxicity CF in marine ecosystem has received even less attention. In the previous Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) model, marine CF is...

  11. 1st International Conference on Engineering and Applied Sciences Optimization : Dedicated to the Memory of Professor M.G. Karlaftis

    CERN Document Server

    Papadrakakis, Manolis; OPT-i

    2015-01-01

    The chapters which appear in this volume are selected studies presented at the First International Conference on Engineering and Applied Sciences Optimization (OPT-i), Kos, Greece, 4-6 June 2014,  and works written by friends, former colleagues and students of the late Professor M. G. Karlaftis; all in the area of optimization that he loved and published so much in himself. The subject areas represented here range from structural optimization, logistics, transportation, traffic and telecommunication networks to operational research, metaheuristics, multidisciplinary and multiphysics design optimization, etc.  This volume is dedicated to the life and the memory of Professor Matthew G. Karlaftis, who passed away a few hours before he was to give the opening speech at OPT-i. All contributions reflect the warmth and genuine friendship which he enjoyed from his associates and show how much his scientific contribution has been appreciated. He will be greatly missed and it is hoped that this volume will be receive...

  12. Plagiarism among undergraduate students in the Faculty of Applied Science at a South African Higher Education Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mapule Patricia Sentleng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate plagiarism among undergraduate students at a higher education institution inSouth Africa. This study investigated the awareness and causes of plagiarism among undergraduate first, second and thirdyear students of the departments of Chemistry and Mathematical Technology within the Faculty of Applied Science at auniversity of technology. A quantitative research method was used. The results of the study confirm that studentplagiarism is fairly common. The study shows that 41% of undergraduate students think that plagiarism is very serious,but plagiarism is still being practised within these departments. It was also found that 71.9% of students admit to usingthe Internet to compile their assignments. This implies that the Internet is the most possible source of plagiarism.Students also used books and journal articles as possible sources to plagiarise.

  13. The Global Youth Service Team: students applying science and technology in remote, developing region of the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollinger, Doug

    2012-03-01

    Eh Kalu, director of the Karen Department of Health and Welfare along the border region between Thailand and Burma said, ``It is very difficult to attend to a medical emergency at night when all you have are candles for light.'' The Global Youth Service Team (GYST) provides high school and college students with the opportunity to apply science that they have learned in the performance of international humanitarian service. Volunteers with the GYST build solar powered electrical systems, ultraviolet water purifiers, provide training and education to people who are most in need due to energy poverty, lack access to resources, natural disasters or human rights violations. GYST volunteers train with photovoltaic materials and equipment to become solar energy technicians. They then travel to remote communities in developing countries where we are able to catalyze improvements in education and health care, promote sustainable energy initiatives and help communities develop the capacity to use their own resources by which to create opportunity.

  14. A quantitative model to assess Social Responsibility in Environmental Science and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcárcel, M; Lucena, R

    2014-01-01

    The awareness of the impact of human activities in society and environment is known as "Social Responsibility" (SR). It has been a topic of growing interest in many enterprises since the fifties of the past Century, and its implementation/assessment is nowadays supported by international standards. There is a tendency to amplify its scope of application to other areas of the human activities, such as Research, Development and Innovation (R + D + I). In this paper, a model of quantitative assessment of Social Responsibility in Environmental Science and Technology (SR EST) is described in detail. This model is based on well established written standards as the EFQM Excellence model and the ISO 26000:2010 Guidance on SR. The definition of five hierarchies of indicators, the transformation of qualitative information into quantitative data and the dual procedure of self-evaluation and external evaluation are the milestones of the proposed model, which can be applied to Environmental Research Centres and institutions. In addition, a simplified model that facilitates its implementation is presented in the article. PMID:23892022

  15. Risk assessment of land-applied biosolids-borne triclocarban (TCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Elizabeth Hodges; O'Connor, George A

    2013-01-01

    Triclocarban (TCC) is monitored under the USEPA High Production Volume (HPV) chemical program and is predominantly used as the active ingredient in select antibacterial bar soaps and other personal care products. The compound commonly occurs at parts-per-million concentrations in processed wastewater treatment residuals (i.e. biosolids), which are frequently land-applied as fertilizers and soil conditioners. Human and ecological risk assessment parameters measured by the authors in previous studies were integrated with existing data to perform a two-tiered human health and ecological risk assessment of land-applied biosolids-borne TCC. The 14 exposure pathways identified in the Part 503 Biosolids Rule were expanded, and conservative screening-level hazard quotients (HQ values) were first calculated to estimate risk to humans and a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms (Tier 1). The majority of biosolids-borne TCC exposure pathways resulted in no screening-level HQ values indicative of significant risks to exposed organisms (including humans), even under worst-case land application scenarios. The two pathways for which the conservative screening-level HQ values exceeded one (i.e. Pathway 10: biosolids➔soil➔soil organism➔predator, and Pathway 16: biosolids➔soil➔surface water➔aquatic organism) were then reexamined using modified parameters and scenarios (Tier 2). Adjusted HQ values remained greater than one for Exposure Pathway 10, with the exception of the final adjusted HQ values under a one-time 5 Mg ha(-1) (agronomic) biosolids loading rate scenario for the American woodcock (Scolopax minor) and short-tailed shrew (Blarina brevicauda). Results were used to prioritize recommendations for future biosolids-borne TCC research, which include additional measurements of toxicological effects and TCC concentrations in environmental matrices at the field level. PMID:23183124

  16. Probabilistic risk assessment of veterinary medicines applied to four major aquaculture species produced in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Andreu; Van den Brink, Paul J

    2014-01-15

    Aquaculture production constitutes one of the main sources of pollution with veterinary medicines into the environment. About 90% of the global aquaculture production is produced in Asia and the potential environmental risks associated with the use of veterinary medicines in Asian aquaculture have not yet been properly evaluated. In this study we performed a probabilistic risk assessment for eight different aquaculture production scenarios in Asia by combining up-to-date information on the use of veterinary medicines and aquaculture production characteristics. The ERA-AQUA model was used to perform mass balances of veterinary medicinal treatments applied to aquaculture ponds and to characterize risks for primary producers, invertebrates, and fish potentially exposed to chemical residues through aquaculture effluents. The mass balance calculations showed that, on average, about 25% of the applied drug mass to aquaculture ponds is released into the environment, although this percentage varies with the chemical's properties, the mode of application, the cultured species density, and the water exchange rates in the aquaculture pond scenario. In general, the highest potential environmental risks were calculated for parasitic treatments, followed by disinfection and antibiotic treatments. Pangasius catfish production in Vietnam, followed by shrimp production in China, constitute possible hot-spots for environmental pollution due to the intensity of the aquaculture production and considerable discharge of toxic chemical residues into surrounding aquatic ecosystems. A risk-based ranking of compounds is provided for each of the evaluated scenarios, which offers crucial information for conducting further chemical and biological field and laboratory monitoring research. In addition, we discuss general knowledge gaps and research priorities for performing refined risk assessments of aquaculture medicines in the near future. PMID:24061054

  17. Assessments of emerging science and technologies: Mapping the landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forsberg, E.M.; Thorstensen, E.; Nielsen, R.O.; Bakker, de E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents comparative work from the EST-Frame project on technology appraisal. It focuses on studies of 'advisory domains' (more or less distinct traditions for assessment of technologies, such as risk analysis, foresight and ethical assessments). The purpose of the study was to increase t

  18. River basin soil-vegetation condition assessment applying mathematic simulation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Natalia; Trifonova, Tatiana; Shirkin, Leonid

    2013-04-01

    Meticulous attention paid nowadays to the problem of vegetation cover productivity changes is connected also to climate global transformation. At the same time ecosystems anthropogenic transformation, basically connected to the changes of land use structure and human impact on soil fertility, is developing to a great extent independently from climatic processes and can seriously influence vegetation cover productivity not only at the local and regional levels but also globally. Analysis results of land use structure and soil cover condition influence on river basin ecosystems productive potential is presented in the research. The analysis is carried out applying integrated characteristics of ecosystems functioning, space images processing results and mathematic simulation methods. The possibility of making permanent functional simulator defining connection between macroparameters of "phytocenosis-soil" system condition on the basis of basin approach is shown. Ecosystems of river catchment basins of various degrees located in European part of Russia were chosen as research objects. For the integrated assessment of ecosystems soil and vegetation conditions the following characteristics have been applied: 1. Soil-productional potential, characterizing the ability of natural and natural-anthropogenic ecosystem in certain soil-bioclimatic conditions for long term reproduction. This indicator allows for specific phytomass characteristics and ecosystem produce, humus content in soil and bioclimatic parameters. 2. Normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) has been applied as an efficient, remotely defined, monitoring indicator characterizing spatio-temporal unsteadiness of soil-productional potential. To design mathematic simulator functional simulation methods and principles on the basis of regression, correlation and factor analysis have been applied in the research. Coefficients values defining in the designed static model of phytoproductivity distribution has been

  19. Assessing the adequacy of future science and engineering degree awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, M.G.; Baker, J.G.

    1992-11-01

    There has long been a continuing need for occupational demand and supply projections for purposes of educational planning. In recent years, however, concerns over ``shortages`` of technical labor, international competitiveness, changing workforce demographics and other issues have intensified this debate, especially regarding scientists and engineers. In 1990, the National Science Foundation (NSF) published a projection of a ``cumulative shortfall`` of 675,000 bachelors degrees in the natural science and engineering (NS&E) fields by the year 2006. The NSF study based this finding largely on demographics: college age population was forecast to decline through the projection period. NS&E degree production from this shrinking base would ``fall short`` of historical levels of NS&E degree production. This projection had previously been circulated in draft form; the size of the ``cumulative shortfall`` resulted in considerable attention and the draft was used in statements in support of programs that were perceived to enhance NS&E degree production.

  20. Assessment of the performance of the spectral element method applied to neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The spectral element method (SEM) is applied to various transport models. • The results allow to assess the performance of SEM when applied to neutron transport problems in reactor physics. • The method is validated against benchmark results and manufactured solutions. • The results presented prove the effectiveness of the method and the high level of accuracy that can be attained. - Abstract: The spectral element method can be used to deal with the spatial operators of neutron transport problems with high efficiency, as shown recently in the framework of the second-order AN transport approximation. The results highlight interesting computational features and show the appeal of the scheme for reactor physics applications. In this paper we investigate the numerical performance of the method in detail. In order to carry out an accurate monitoring of the error behavior to levels close to numerical round-off, we use benchmark problems with known analytical solutions, or with manufactured solutions. Manufactured solutions can easily be obtained for source-injected problems, by tailoring the external neutron source and the boundary conditions to a pre-established analytical solution for a given system. The results presented prove the effectiveness of the method and the high level of accuracy that can be attained

  1. Assessing nanocellulose developments using science and technology indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas Henrique Milanez; Roniberto Morato do Amaral; Leandro Innocentini Lopes de Faria; José Angelo Rodrigues Gregolin

    2013-01-01

    This research aims to examine scientific and technological trends of developments in nanocellulose based on scientometric and patent indicators obtained from the Science Citation Index and Derwent Innovations Index in 2001-2010. The overall nanocellulose activity indicators were compared to nanotechnology and other selected nanomaterials. Scientific and technological future developments in nanocellulose were forecasted using extrapolation growth curves and the main countries were also mapped....

  2. The development of a science process assessment for fourth-grade students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathleen A.; Welliver, Paul W.

    In this study, a multiple-choice test entitled the Science Process Assessment was developed to measure the science process skills of students in grade four. Based on the Recommended Science Competency Continuum for Grades K to 6 for Pennsylvania Schools, this instrument measured the skills of (1) observing, (2) classifying, (3) inferring, (4) predicting, (5) measuring, (6) communicating, (7) using space/time relations, (8) defining operationally, (9) formulating hypotheses, (10) experimenting, (11) recognizing variables, (12) interpreting data, and (13) formulating models. To prepare the instrument, classroom teachers and science educators were invited to participate in two science education workshops designed to develop an item bank of test questions applicable to measuring process skill learning. Participants formed writing teams and generated 65 test items representing the 13 process skills. After a comprehensive group critique of each item, 61 items were identified for inclusion into the Science Process Assessment item bank. To establish content validity, the item bank was submitted to a select panel of science educators for the purpose of judging item acceptability. This analysis yielded 55 acceptable test items and produced the Science Process Assessment, Pilot 1. Pilot 1 was administered to 184 fourth-grade students. Students were given a copy of the test booklet; teachers read each test aloud to the students. Upon completion of this first administration, data from the item analysis yielded a reliability coefficient of 0.73. Subsequently, 40 test items were identified for the Science Process Assessment, Pilot 2. Using the test-retest method, the Science Process Assessment, Pilot 2 (Test 1 and Test 2) was administered to 113 fourth-grade students. Reliability coefficients of 0.80 and 0.82, respectively, were ascertained. The correlation between Test 1 and Test 2 was 0.77. The results of this study indicate that (1) the Science Process Assessment, Pilot 2, is

  3. Integration of classroom science performance assessment tasks by participants of the Wisconsin Performance Assessment Development Project (WPADP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonnis, Dorothy Ann

    The goals of this interpretive study were to examine selected Wisconsin science teachers' perceptions of teaching and learning science, to describe the scope of classroom performance assessment practices, and to gain an understanding of teachers' personal and professional experiences that influenced their belief systems of teaching, learning and assessment. The study was designed to answer the research questions: (1) How does the integration of performance assessment relate to the teachers' views of teaching and learning? (2) How are the selected teachers integrating performance assessment in their teaching? (3) What past personal and professional experiences have influenced teachers' attitudes and beliefs related to their classroom performance assessment practices? Purposeful sampling was used to select seven Wisconsin elementary, middle and high school science teachers who participated in the WPADP initiative from 1993-1995. Data collection methods included a Teaching Practices Inventory (TPI), semi-structured interviews, teacher developed portfolios, portfolio conferences, and classroom observations. Four themes and multiple categories emerged through data analysis to answer the research questions and to describe the results. Several conclusions were drawn from this research. First, science teachers who appeared to effectively integrate performance assessment, demonstrated transformational thinking in their attitudes and beliefs about teaching and learning science. In addition, these teachers viewed assessment and instructional practices as interdependent. Third, transformational teachers generally used well defined criteria to judge student work and made it public to the students. Transformational teachers provided students with real-world performance assessment tasks that were also learning events. Furthermore, student task responses informed the transformational teachers about effectiveness of instruction, students' complex thinking skills, quality of

  4. Dire necessity and transformation: entry-points for modern science in Islamic bioethical assessment of porcine products in vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Furber, Steven W; Kholwadia, Mohammad A; Moosa, Ebrahim

    2014-02-01

    The field of medicine provides an important window through which to examine the encounters between religion and science, and between modernity and tradition. While both religion and science consider health to be a 'good' that is to be preserved, and promoted, religious and science-based teachings may differ in their conception of what constitutes good health, and how that health is to be achieved. This paper analyzes the way the Islamic ethico-legal tradition assesses the permissibility of using vaccines that contain porcine-derived components by referencing opinions of several Islamic authorities. In the Islamic ethico-legal tradition controversy surrounds the use of proteins from an animal (pig) that is considered to be impure by Islamic law. As we discuss the Islamic ethico-legal constructs used to argue for or against the use of porcine-based vaccines we will call attention to areas where modern medical data may make the arguments more precise. By highlighting areas where science can buttress and clarify the ethico-legal arguments we hope to spur an enhanced applied Islamic bioethics discourse where religious scholars and medical experts use modern science in a way that remains faithful to the epistemology of Islamic ethics to clarify what Islam requires of Muslim patients and healthcare workers. PMID:23445524

  5. Applying the risk-based corrective action process to ecological assessment of contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk-Based Corrective Action (RBCA) is a process in which site investigation and corrective action are focused on the goals of minimizing human health and environmental risk. A basic framework for the RBCA process is outlined in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Emergency Standard Guide ES 38-94, Risk-Based Corrective Action Applied at Petroleum Release Sites . This presentation will include discussion of the critical features and, framework of the RBCA process, and will introduce a propose or RBCA which is specifically tailored to the problem of evaluating and responding to environmental risks. The RBCA process includes a number of useful features which expedite and streamline the site assessment and corrective action selection process. Of particular interest, with respect to environmental risk, is a tiered approach to site investigation. This new proposal includes a tiered methodology for investigating environmental risk which begins with a simple, generic analysis and progresses to a more detailed, site-specific analysis, if warranted. The discussion will also cover an example RBCA assessment of a site contaminated with weathered crude oil, and will include results from a laboratory investigation of the ecological toxicity of the contaminated site soils

  6. Life cycle assessment applied to wastewater treatment: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, Ll; Foley, J; Guest, J S; Hospido, A; Larsen, H F; Morera, S; Shaw, A

    2013-10-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a technique to quantify the impacts associated with a product, service or process from cradle-to-grave perspective. Within the field of wastewater treatment (WWT) LCA was first applied in the 1990s. In the pursuit of more environmentally sustainable WWT, it is clear that LCA is a valuable tool to elucidate the broader environmental impacts of design and operation decisions. With growing interest from utilities, practitioners, and researchers in the use of LCA in WWT systems, it is important to make a review of what has been achieved and describe the challenges for the forthcoming years. This work presents a comprehensive review of 45 papers dealing with WWT and LCA. The analysis of the papers showed that within the constraints of the ISO standards, there is variability in the definition of the functional unit and the system boundaries, the selection of the impact assessment methodology and the procedure followed for interpreting the results. The need for stricter adherence to ISO methodological standards to ensure quality and transparency is made clear and emerging challenges for LCA applications in WWT are discussed, including: a paradigm shift from pollutant removal to resource recovery, the adaptation of LCA methodologies to new target compounds, the development of regional factors, the improvement of the data quality and the reduction of uncertainty. Finally, the need for better integration and communication with decision-makers is highlighted. PMID:23969400

  7. Methodology for risk assessment and reliability applied for pipeline engineering design and industrial valves operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Dierci [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia Industrial e Metalurgia. Lab. de Sistemas de Producao e Petroleo e Gas], e-mail: dsilveira@metal.eeimvr.uff.br; Batista, Fabiano [CICERO, Rio das Ostras, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Two kinds of situations may be distinguished for estimating the operating reliability when maneuvering industrial valves and the probability of undesired events in pipelines and industrial plants: situations in which the risk is identified in repetitive cycles of operations and situations in which there is a permanent hazard due to project configurations introduced by decisions during the engineering design definition stage. The estimation of reliability based on the influence of design options requires the choice of a numerical index, which may include a composite of human operating parameters based on biomechanics and ergonomics data. We first consider the design conditions under which the plant or pipeline operator reliability concepts can be applied when operating industrial valves, and then describe in details the ergonomics and biomechanics risks that would lend itself to engineering design database development and human reliability modeling and assessment. This engineering design database development and reliability modeling is based on a group of engineering design and biomechanics parameters likely to lead to over-exertion forces and working postures, which are themselves associated with the functioning of a particular plant or pipeline. This approach to construct based on ergonomics and biomechanics for a more common industrial valve positioning in the plant layout is proposed through the development of a methodology to assess physical efforts and operator reach, combining various elementary operations situations. These procedures can be combined with the genetic algorithm modeling and four elements of the man-machine systems: the individual, the task, the machinery and the environment. The proposed methodology should be viewed not as competing to traditional reliability and risk assessment bur rather as complementary, since it provides parameters related to physical efforts values for valves operation and workspace design and usability. (author)

  8. Phosphorus recycling potential assessment by a biological test applied to wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braak, Etienne; Auby, Sarah; Piveteau, Simon; Guilayn, Felipe; Daumer, Marie-Line

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) recycling as mineral fertilizer from wastewater activated sludge (WAS) depends on the amount that can be dissolved and separated from the organic matter before the final crystallization step. The aim of the biological phosphorus dissolution potential (BPDP) test developed here was to assess the maximum amount of P that could be biologically released from WAS prior that the liquid phase enters the recovery process. It was first developed for sludge combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride. Because carbohydrates are known to induce acidification during the first stage of anaerobic digestion, sucrose was used as a co-substrate. Best results were obtained after 24-48 h, without inoculum, with a sugar/sludge ratio of 0.5 gCOD/gVS and under strict anaerobic conditions. Up to 75% of the total phosphorus in sludge from a wastewater treatment plant combining enhanced biological phosphorus removal and iron chloride phosphorus removal could be dissolved. Finally, the test was applied to assess BPDP from different sludge using alum compounds for P removal. No dissolution was observed when alum polychloride was used and less than 20% when alum sulphate was used. In all the cases, comparison to chemical acidification showed that the biological process was a major contributor to P dissolution. The possibility to crystallize struvite was discussed from the composition of the liquids obtained. The BPDP will be used not only to assess the potential for phosphorus recycling from sludge, but also to study the influence of the co-substrates available for anaerobic digestion of sludge. PMID:26786893

  9. Preface to ISIF 2009 special issue of Journal of Applied Physics : science and technology of integrated functionalities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auciello, O.; Dey, S.; Paz de Araujo, C. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( MSD); (Arizona State Univ.); (Symetrix Corp.)

    2011-05-01

    sessions. Thanks to the great efforts made by the ISIF organization committee and the session chairs, the conference successfully achieved its objectives and the work presented reflected very well the most recent advances of integrated ferroelectrics and their applications, as well as advances in other areas related to the new theme of Integrated Functionalities. Many aspects of ferroelectric, piezoelectric, high-K dielectric, magnetic, and phase change materials, including the science and technology of these materials in thin film form, integration with other thin film materials (metals or oxide electrodes), and fabrication of micro- and nanostructures based on these heterostructure layers, and device architecture and physics, were addressed from the experimental point of view. Work on theory and computer simulations of the mentioned materials and devices were discussed also with a view to the promising applications to multifunctional devices. In addition, the ISIF 2009 featured discussions of alternative nonvolatile memory concepts and materials, such as phase change memories, research on multiferroics and magnetoelectric materials, ferroelectric photovoltaics, and new directions on the science of perovskites such as biomolecular/polarizable interfaces, and bio-ferroelectric and other oxide interfaces. Following the standard submission and peer review process of Journal of Applied Physics, the selected papers presented in ISIF 2009 in Colorado Springs are published in this special issue. We believe that the papers in this special issue represent the forefront contributions to ISIF 2009 in the various areas of fundamental and applied science of integrated ferroelectrics and functionalities and their applications. We would like to take this opportunity to thank the following organizations and companies for their support and sponsorship for ISIF 2009, namely: Aixact Systems GMBH, Radiant Technologies, Symetrix Corporation, and Taylor and Francis Publishers. We would also

  10. Designing Interdisciplinary Assessments in Sciences for College Students: An Example on Osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji; Liu, Ou Lydia; Sung, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    College science education needs to foster students' habit of mind beyond disciplinary constraints. However, little research has been devoted to assessing students' interdisciplinary understanding. To address this problem, we formed a team of experts from different disciplines to develop interdisciplinary assessments that target…

  11. Drawing and Writing in Digital Science Notebooks: Sources of Formative Assessment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Angi; Smith, Andrew; Wiebe, Eric; Behrle, Courtney; Sirkin, Ruth; Lester, James

    2016-01-01

    Formative assessment strategies are used to direct instruction by establishing where learners' understanding is, how it is developing, informing teachers and students alike as to how they might get to their next set of goals of conceptual understanding. For the science classroom, one rich source of formative assessment data about scientific…

  12. INCORPORATING CATASTROPHES INTO INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT: SCIENCE, IMPACTS, AND ADAPTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incorporating potential catastrophic consequences into integrated assessment models of climate change has been a top priority of policymakers and modelers alike. We review the current state of scientific understanding regarding three frequently mentioned geophysical catastrophes,...

  13. Library and Information Science Journal Prestige as Assessed by Library and Information Science Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzari, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This prestige study surveyed full-time faculty of American Library Association (ALA)-accredited programs in library and information studies regarding library and information science (LIS) journals. Faculty were asked to rate a list of eighty-nine LIS journals on a scale from 1 to 5 based on each journal's importance to their research and teaching.…

  14. NASA and the National Climate Assessment: Promoting awareness of NASA Earth science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidner, A. K.

    2014-12-01

    NASA Earth science observations, models, analyses, and applications made significant contributions to numerous aspects of the Third National Climate Assessment (NCA) report and are contributing to sustained climate assessment activities. The agency's goal in participating in the NCA was to ensure that NASA scientific resources were made available to understand the current state of climate change science and climate change impacts. By working with federal agency partners and stakeholder communities to develop and write the report, the agency was able to raise awareness of NASA climate science with audiences beyond the traditional NASA community. To support assessment activities within the NASA community, the agency sponsored two competitive programs that not only funded research and tools for current and future assessments, but also increased capacity within our community to conduct assessment-relevant science and to participate in writing assessments. Such activities fostered the ability of graduate students, post-docs, and senior researchers to learn about the science needs of climate assessors and end-users, which can guide future research activities. NASA also contributed to developing the Global Change Information System, which deploys information from the NCA to scientists, decision makers, and the public, and thus contributes to climate literacy. Finally, NASA satellite imagery and animations used in the Third NCA helped the pubic and decision makers visualize climate changes and were frequently used in social media to communicate report key findings. These resources are also key for developing educational materials that help teachers and students explore regional climate change impacts and opportunities for responses.

  15. Confidence assessment in the teaching of basic science

    OpenAIRE

    A. R. Gardner-Medwin

    2011-01-01

    Automated assessment suffers from two problems that are considered here. Firstly, it seldom makes use of information about how confident a student is in the answer given, which is part of what we take into account in assessing students person-to-person. Secondly, it often involves the construction of complex questions to ensure that students cannot get good marks by a combination of partial knowledge and guesswork. Such questions can be ambiguous and open to different levels of interpretation...

  16. Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning (NLP/ML): Applying Advances in Biomedicine to the Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, R.; Myers, S.; Palmer, M.; Jenkins, C. J.; Thessen, A.; Martin, J.

    2015-12-01

    Semantics underlie many of the tools and services available from and on the web. From improving search results to enabling data mashups and other forms of interoperability, semantic technologies have proven themselves. But creating semantic resources, especially re-usable semantic resources, is extremely time consuming and labor intensive. Why? Because it is not just a matter of technology but also of obtaining rough consensus if not full agreement amongst community members on the meaning and order of things. One way to develop these resources in a more automated way would be to use NLP/ML techniques to extract the required resources from large corpora of subject-specific text such as peer-reviewed papers where presumably a rough consensus has been achieved at least about the basics of the particular discipline involved. While not generally applied to Earth Sciences, considerable resources have been spent in other fields such as medicine on these types of techniques with some success. The NSF-funded ClearEarth project is applying the techniques developed for biomedicine to the cryosphere, geology, and biology in order to spur faster development of the semantic resources needed in these fields. The first area being addressed by the project is the cryosphere, specifically sea ice nomenclature where an existing set of sea ice ontologies are being used as the "Gold Standard" against which to test and validate the NLP/ML techniques. The processes being used, lessons learned and early results will be described.

  17. Analyzing the technical quality of a rubric used to assess science fair projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Melissa C.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting science fair projects gave students an opportunity to complete a performance assessment that comprised a meaningful task focused on process and subject to standards-based assessment. Students presented science inquiry and engineering design projects to judges at a regional science fair. The judges used the domains of the Potter Rubrics to assess the students' work and assigned a Quality score to each project. Using multiple regression, this study found that the mean scores on the Methods and Analysis domains predicted the mean Quality scores. Analyzing the technical quality of the Potter Rubrics addressed some of the measurement and generalizability concerns about performance assessments. Recommendations for future research and implications for practice were examined.

  18. On the assessment of risks in technical science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of risk forms the interface between engineering and law. It therefore must not only be uniquely defined but also explained in a way to be understood by non-professionals. In colloquial language risk is a venture, in science it is the product of consequence times frequence of damage events. There are no risk-free states. For extremely rare events human imagination does not suffice. The admissible risk is implicitly described by technical rules which are established by participation of public authorities. Omissions may be just as risky as actions. (orig.)

  19. Assessment report of research and development activities. Activity: Quantum Beam Science Research' (Interim report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consulted an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Quantum Beam Science Research (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for interim assessment of 'Quantum Beam Science Research', in accordance with General Guideline for Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research program of the Quantum Beam Science Research, which includes the management of the Quantum Beam Science Directorate (hereinafter referred to as 'QuBS') and the research activities in the area of Quantum Beam Science during October, 2005 to September, 2007. The Committee evaluated the management and research activities in Quantum Beam Science based on the documents and oral presentations prepared by QuBS. This evaluation report presents the summary and the submitted by the Committee. (author)

  20. Applying the Science of Science Communication to Climate Change and Clean Energy: Lessons Learned from the NSF- and PBS-supported "Earth: The Operators' Manual"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.; Sanford, C.

    2014-12-01

    Yale legal scholar and professor of psychology Dan Kahan has criticized the climate change science community for not applying what's known about effective communications strategies to topics with potentially controversial content. "Earth: The Operators' Manual," funded by NSF's Informal Science Education program and appearing on PBS was hosted by Penn State geoscientist Richard Alley. From the initial proposal forward into airing on public television in 2011 and 2012, ETOM aimed to be authoritative and apolitical while still being engaging to general audiences. Based on social scientific insights from project Advisor, Suzanne Moser, and others, ETOM aimed to avoid "climate porn" scare tactics and over-used footage, and to enlist a diverse group of "messengers" in addition to Alley. An important design criterion was to give equal time to clean energy solutions while pulling no punches as to the consensus findings of leading climate scientists. With the ETOM project now completed and final reports submitted to NSF, what results can be shared to inform future efforts? And how did ETOM compare in audience impact with other major media efforts such as Al Gore's "An Inconvenient Truth" or Showtime's more recent "Years of Living Dangerously"? Results reported draw on the external evaluation by Rockman Et Al, and include both quantitative and qualitative data. Key findings are the importance of including Texan ranchers enthusiastic about wind power alongside Navy Admirals adamant that climate change is human-caused and Marines implementing solar energy to reduce casualties incurred while transporting fossil fuels. In-person presentations by Alley and others at science centers served as de facto focus groups for scripting the TV programs, along with actual focus groups convened by Rockman. The 3rd program, ENERGY QUEST USA, documented 5 quite different communities, from Alaska to Forth Worth, Baltimore, Portland and Kansas, all using competition, local values, and economic

  1. The science of adaptation. A framework for assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines what is meant by 'adaptation' to climate change, and how it might be addressed in the IPCC Assessments. Two roles of adaptation in the climate change field are identified: adaptation as part of impact assessment (where the key question is: what adaptations are likely?), and adaptation as part of the policy response (where the central question is: what adaptations are recommended?). The concept of adaptation has been adopted in several fields including climate impact assessment and policy development, risk management, and natural hazards research. A framework for systematically defining adaptations is based on three questions: (1) adaptation to what? (2) who or what adapts? and (3) how does adaptation occur? The paper demonstrates that, for adaptation purposes, climate extremes and variability are integral parts of climate change, along with shifts in mean conditions. Attributes for differentiating adaptations include purposefulness, timing, temporal and spatial scope, effects, form and performance. The framework provides a guide for the treatment of adaptation in the IPCC assessments, both in the assessment of impacts and in the evaluation of adaptive policy options. 64 refs

  2. Using Assessments to Investigate and Compare the Nature of Learning in Undergraduate Science Courses

    OpenAIRE

    Momsen, Jennifer; Offerdahl, Erika; Kryjevskaia, Mila; Montplaisir, Lisa; Anderson, Elizabeth; Grosz, Nate

    2013-01-01

    Assessments and student expectations can drive learning: students selectively study and learn the content and skills they believe critical to passing an exam in a given subject. Evaluating the nature of assessments in undergraduate science education can, therefore, provide substantial insight into student learning. We characterized and compared the cognitive skills routinely assessed by introductory biology and calculus-based physics sequences, using the cognitive domain of Bloom's taxonomy o...

  3. Assessment for Learning in Inquiry Based Science Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornaguera, Cristina Carulla

    ’s activity theory perspectives, this study looks critically at assessment for learning within IBSE activity research shaped by an individualistic approach to learning. The thesis proposed a movement towards an approach using a socio-cultural perspective. The researcher's process of learning structured the...... analytical process. The main contribution was the analysis and the results of researcher movement from a view of assessment considering learning as a psychological process in the mind, independent of the everyday life of individuals, towards one considering the inseparability of collective and individual...

  4. 76 FR 30705 - Problem Formulation for Human Health Risk Assessments of Pathogens in Land-Applied Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... the public and an independent, external panel of scientific experts (73 FR 54400). Dated: May 18, 2011... AGENCY Problem Formulation for Human Health Risk Assessments of Pathogens in Land-Applied Biosolids... the availability of a final report titled, ``Problem Formulation for Human Health Risk Assessments...

  5. Qualified Presumption of Safety (QPS) is a generic risk assessment approach applied by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leuschner, R. G. K.; Robinson, T. P.; Hugas, M.; Cocconcelli, P. S.; Richard-Forget, F.; Klein, G.; Licht, Tine Rask; Nguyen-The, C.; Querol, A.; Richardson, M.; Suarez, J.E.; Thrane, Ulf; Vlak, J. M.; von Wright, A.

    2010-01-01

    Qualified Presumption of Safety (QPS) is a generic risk assessment approach applied by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) to notified biological agents aiming at simplifying risk assessments across different scientific Panels and Units. The aim of this review is to outline the implementation...

  6. 49 CFR 1540.117 - Threat assessments regarding aliens holding or applying for FAA certificates, ratings, or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Threat assessments regarding aliens holding or... Passengers and Other Individuals and Persons § 1540.117 Threat assessments regarding aliens holding or... security threat. (b) Definitions. The following terms apply in this section: Assistant Administrator...

  7. 49 CFR 1540.115 - Threat assessments regarding citizens of the United States holding or applying for FAA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Threat assessments regarding citizens of the... Responsibilities of Passengers and Other Individuals and Persons § 1540.115 Threat assessments regarding citizens... Administrator, poses a security threat. (b) Definitions. The following terms apply in this...

  8. How the biodiversity sciences may aid biological tools and ecological engineering to assess the impact of climatic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, S; Guégan, J-F

    2008-08-01

    This paper addresses how climate changes interact with other global changes caused by humans (habitat fragmentation, changes in land use, bioinvasions) to affect biodiversity. Changes in biodiversity at all levels (genetic, population and community) affect the functioning of ecosystems, in particular host-pathogen interactions, with major consequences in health ecology (emergence and re-emergence; the evolution of virulence and resistance). In this paper, the authors demonstrate that the biodiversity sciences, epidemiological theory and evolutionary ecology are indispensable in assessing the impact of climate changes, and also for modelling the evolution of host-pathogen interactions in a changing environment. The next step is to apply health ecology to the science of ecological engineering. PMID:18819665

  9. Back-end Science Model Integration for Ecological Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) relies on a number of ecological risk assessment models that have been developed over 30-plus years of regulating pesticide exposure and risks under Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Endangered Spe...

  10. Exploring the impact of the IPCC Assessment Reports on science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasileiadou, E.; Heimeriks, G.J.; Petersen, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Even though critique to IPCC is certainly not new, the climate controversies of 2009 and 2010 brought this critique again to the fore in public media. The paper contributes to this ongoing debate, and investigates empirically the impact of the four Assessment Reports of the IPCC on scientific public

  11. Incorporating exposure science into life-cycle assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is used to estimate the potential for environmental damage that may be caused by a product or process, ideally before the product or process begins. LCA includes all of the steps from extracting natural resources through manufacturing through product u...

  12. Hiroshima and Nagasaki: from fear through science to risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation summarises the data of Japanese epidemiological studies in the light of the recent progresses made in radiation biology which do not support the present radiation paradigm for cancer risk assessment at low doses. The possible paradigm shift and its effect on the dose limits for protection of individuals is also discussed. (author). 27 refs., 1 tab

  13. Assessing nano cellulose developments using science and technology indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milanez, Douglas Henrique; Amaral, Roniberto Morato do; Faria, Leandro Innocentini Lopes de; Gregolin, Jose Angelo Rodrigues, E-mail: douglasmilanez@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Informacao Tecnologica em Materiais. Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2013-11-01

    This research aims to examine scientific and technological trends of developments in nano cellulose based on scientometric and patent indicators obtained from the Science Citation Index and Derwent Innovations Index in 2001-2010. The overall nano cellulose activity indicators were compared to nanotechnology and other selected nano materials. Scientific and technological future developments in nano cellulose were forecasted using extrapolation growth curves and the main countries were also mapped. The results showed that nano cellulose publications and patent documents have increased rapidly over the last five years with an average growth rate higher than that of nanotechnology and fullerene. The USA, Japan, France, Sweden and Finland all played a significant role in nano cellulose development and the extrapolation growth curves suggested that nano cellulose scientific and technological activities are still emerging. Finally, the evidence from this study recommends monitoring nano cellulose S and T advances in the coming years. (author)

  14. Assessing nano cellulose developments using science and technology indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research aims to examine scientific and technological trends of developments in nano cellulose based on scientometric and patent indicators obtained from the Science Citation Index and Derwent Innovations Index in 2001-2010. The overall nano cellulose activity indicators were compared to nanotechnology and other selected nano materials. Scientific and technological future developments in nano cellulose were forecasted using extrapolation growth curves and the main countries were also mapped. The results showed that nano cellulose publications and patent documents have increased rapidly over the last five years with an average growth rate higher than that of nanotechnology and fullerene. The USA, Japan, France, Sweden and Finland all played a significant role in nano cellulose development and the extrapolation growth curves suggested that nano cellulose scientific and technological activities are still emerging. Finally, the evidence from this study recommends monitoring nano cellulose S and T advances in the coming years. (author)

  15. Assessing nanocellulose developments using science and technology indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Henrique Milanez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to examine scientific and technological trends of developments in nanocellulose based on scientometric and patent indicators obtained from the Science Citation Index and Derwent Innovations Index in 2001-2010. The overall nanocellulose activity indicators were compared to nanotechnology and other selected nanomaterials. Scientific and technological future developments in nanocellulose were forecasted using extrapolation growth curves and the main countries were also mapped. The results showed that nanocellulose publications and patent documents have increased rapidly over the last five years with an average growth rate higher than that of nanotechnology and fullerene. The USA, Japan, France, Sweden and Finland all played a significant role in nanocellulose development and the extrapolation growth curves suggested that nanocellulose scientific and technological activities are still emerging. Finally, the evidence from this study recommends monitoring nanocellulose S&T advances in the coming years.

  16. Assessment of radiobiological metrics applied to patient-specific QA process of VMAT prostate treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente-Gutiérrez, Francisco; Pérez-Vara, Consuelo; Clavo-Herranz, María H; López-Carrizosa, Concepción; Pérez-Regadera, José; Ibáñez-Villoslada, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    VMAT is a powerful technique to deliver hypofractionated prostate treatments. The lack of correlations between usual 2D pretreatment QA results and the clini-cal impact of possible mistakes has allowed the development of 3D verification systems. Dose determination on patient anatomy has provided clinical predictive capability to patient-specific QA process. Dose-volume metrics, as evaluation crite-ria, should be replaced or complemented by radiobiological indices. These metrics can be incorporated into individualized QA extracting the information for response parameters (gEUD, TCP, NTCP) from DVHs. The aim of this study is to assess the role of two 3D verification systems dealing with radiobiological metrics applied to a prostate VMAT QA program. Radiobiological calculations were performed for AAPM TG-166 test cases. Maximum differences were 9.3% for gEUD, -1.3% for TCP, and 5.3% for NTCP calculations. Gamma tests and DVH-based comparisons were carried out for both systems in order to assess their performance in 3D dose determination for prostate treatments (high-, intermediate-, and low-risk, as well as prostate bed patients). Mean gamma passing rates for all structures were bet-ter than 92.0% and 99.1% for both 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm criteria. Maximum discrepancies were (2.4% ± 0.8%) and (6.2% ± 1.3%) for targets and normal tis-sues, respectively. Values for gEUD, TCP, and NTCP were extracted from TPS and compared to the results obtained with the two systems. Three models were used for TCP calculations (Poisson, sigmoidal, and Niemierko) and two models for NTCP determinations (LKB and Niemierko). The maximum mean difference for gEUD calculations was (4.7% ± 1.3%); for TCP, the maximum discrepancy was (-2.4% ± 1.1%); and NTCP comparisons led to a maximum deviation of (1.5% ± 0.5%). The potential usefulness of biological metrics in patient-specific QA has been explored. Both systems have been successfully assessed as potential tools for evaluating the clinical

  17. Developing a tool for assessing scientists' views about, knowledge of, and skills in science communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewenstein, B. V.; Baram-Tsabari, A.

    2011-12-01

    Although much effort is being invested in science communication training, the efforts are rarely accompanied by systematic evaluation of learning outcomes; existing evaluations are mainly anecdotal, or specific to a particular program. Standardized assessments will allow comparisons across programs and identification of best practices. This presentation describes the development and piloting of a tool for measuring scientists' views about, knowledge of, and skills in science communication. The instrument collects four types of data: (1) background information, (2) communication skills, (3) views about science communication, and (4) knowledge about the context of science communication. In the specific area of communication skills, a rationale is proposed for establishing learning goals in seven areas: content, knowledge organization, clarity and language, style, analogy, narrative, and dialogue. The resulting instrument may be used as a baseline survey or as a tool for pre-post evaluation of the learning outcomes of a wide range of science communication training programs and courses.

  18. Written assessment of knowledge in natural sciences in special school with lower educational standard

    OpenAIRE

    Vlahinja, Kaja

    2012-01-01

    The importance and means of assessment of knowledge in natural science differs from teacher to teacher. We can notice the emerging trend towards more modern methods of teaching. There is a shift from traditional ways of teaching towards more modern and children friendly ways of teaching natural science topics. Focus is shifted towards learning and teaching with physical objects, outside the classroom, practical work, developing processes skills and active participation of all students. Examin...

  19. A protocol to assess insect resistance to heat waves, applied to bumblebees (Bombus Latreille, 1802.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baptiste Martinet

    Full Text Available Insect decline results from numerous interacting factors including climate change. One of the major phenomena related to climate change is the increase of the frequency of extreme events such as heat waves. Since heat waves are suspected to dramatically increase insect mortality, there is an urgent need to assess their potential impact. Here, we determined and compared the resistance to heat waves of insects under hyperthermic stress through their time before heat stupor (THS when they are exposed to an extreme temperature (40°C. For this, we used a new experimental standardised device available in the field or in locations close to the field collecting sites. We applied this approach on different Arctic, Boreo-Alpine and Widespread bumblebee species in order to predict consequences of heat waves. Our results show a heat resistance gradient: the heat stress resistance of species with a centred arctic distribution is weaker than the heat resistance of the Boreo-Alpine species with a larger distribution which is itself lower than the heat stress resistance of the ubiquitous species.

  20. An assessment of econometric models applied to fossil fuel power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this report is to provide a general view of those studies, in which the econometric approach is applied to the selection of fuel in fossil fired power generation, focusing the attention to the key role played by the fuel prices. The report consists of a methodological analysis and a survey of the studies available in literature. The methodological analysis allows to assess the adequateness of the econometric approach, in the electrical power utilities policy. With this purpose, the fundamentals of microeconomics, which are the basis of the econometric models, are pointed out and discussed, and then the hypotheses, which are needed to be assumed for complying the economic theory, are verified in their actual implementation in the power generation sector. The survey of the available studies provides a detailed description of the Translog and Logit models, and the results achieved with their application. From these results, the estimated models show to fit the data with good approximation, a certain degree of interfuel substitution and a meaningful reaction to prices on demand side

  1. Applying analytic hierarchy process to assess healthcare-oriented cloud computing service systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wen-Hwa; Qiu, Wan-Li

    2016-01-01

    Numerous differences exist between the healthcare industry and other industries. Difficulties in the business operation of the healthcare industry have continually increased because of the volatility and importance of health care, changes to and requirements of health insurance policies, and the statuses of healthcare providers, which are typically considered not-for-profit organizations. Moreover, because of the financial risks associated with constant changes in healthcare payment methods and constantly evolving information technology, healthcare organizations must continually adjust their business operation objectives; therefore, cloud computing presents both a challenge and an opportunity. As a response to aging populations and the prevalence of the Internet in fast-paced contemporary societies, cloud computing can be used to facilitate the task of balancing the quality and costs of health care. To evaluate cloud computing service systems for use in health care, providing decision makers with a comprehensive assessment method for prioritizing decision-making factors is highly beneficial. Hence, this study applied the analytic hierarchy process, compared items related to cloud computing and health care, executed a questionnaire survey, and then classified the critical factors influencing healthcare cloud computing service systems on the basis of statistical analyses of the questionnaire results. The results indicate that the primary factor affecting the design or implementation of optimal cloud computing healthcare service systems is cost effectiveness, with the secondary factors being practical considerations such as software design and system architecture. PMID:27441149

  2. Bridges between science, society and policy technology assessment : methods and impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Ladikas, Miltos

    2004-01-01

    This book summarises the results of the project TAMI (Technology Assessment in Europe; between Method and Impact). This was a two-year project that brought together the main institutes of technology assessment in Europe, both parliamentary and non-parliamentary. TAMI created a structured dialogue between technology assessment experts and policymakers on current methodologies and their impact on policymaking. The TAMI team explored and assessed the whole spectrum of methodologies from the "classical" to the "interactive/participatory" and "communicative," identified good practices in project implementation and set the stage for impact evaluation based on objective criteria. Finally this report offers a series of policy recommendations based on the findings of the project. Science, Society and Policy, are three areas that technology assessment functions within and works for; this book is an attempt to improve the interaction amongst them for a more socially and economically sustainable Science and Technology p...

  3. On the Science-Policy Bridge: Do Spatial Heat Vulnerability Assessment Studies Influence Policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Tanja; Chuang, Wen-Ching; McGregor, Glenn

    2015-10-01

    Human vulnerability to heat varies at a range of spatial scales, especially within cities where there can be noticeable intra-urban differences in heat risk factors. Mapping and visualizing intra-urban heat vulnerability offers opportunities for presenting information to support decision-making. For example the visualization of the spatial variation of heat vulnerability has the potential to enable local governments to identify hot spots of vulnerability and allocate resources and increase assistance to people in areas of greatest need. Recently there has been a proliferation of heat vulnerability mapping studies, all of which, to varying degrees, justify the process of vulnerability mapping in a policy context. However, to date, there has not been a systematic review of the extent to which the results of vulnerability mapping studies have been applied in decision-making. Accordingly we undertook a comprehensive review of 37 recently published papers that use geospatial techniques for assessing human vulnerability to heat. In addition, we conducted an anonymous survey of the lead authors of the 37 papers in order to establish the level of interaction between the researchers as science information producers and local authorities as information users. Both paper review and author survey results show that heat vulnerability mapping has been used in an attempt to communicate policy recommendations, raise awareness and induce institutional networking and learning, but has not as yet had a substantive influence on policymaking or preventive action. PMID:26512681

  4. On the Science-Policy Bridge: Do Spatial Heat Vulnerability Assessment Studies Influence Policy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Wolf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human vulnerability to heat varies at a range of spatial scales, especially within cities where there can be noticeable intra-urban differences in heat risk factors. Mapping and visualizing intra-urban heat vulnerability offers opportunities for presenting information to support decision-making. For example the visualization of the spatial variation of heat vulnerability has the potential to enable local governments to identify hot spots of vulnerability and allocate resources and increase assistance to people in areas of greatest need. Recently there has been a proliferation of heat vulnerability mapping studies, all of which, to varying degrees, justify the process of vulnerability mapping in a policy context. However, to date, there has not been a systematic review of the extent to which the results of vulnerability mapping studies have been applied in decision-making. Accordingly we undertook a comprehensive review of 37 recently published papers that use geospatial techniques for assessing human vulnerability to heat. In addition, we conducted an anonymous survey of the lead authors of the 37 papers in order to establish the level of interaction between the researchers as science information producers and local authorities as information users. Both paper review and author survey results show that heat vulnerability mapping has been used in an attempt to communicate policy recommendations, raise awareness and induce institutional networking and learning, but has not as yet had a substantive influence on policymaking or preventive action.

  5. Assessing accuracy in citizen science-based plant phenology monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuccillo, Kerissa K.; Crimmins, Theresa M.; de Rivera, Catherine E.; Elder, Timothy S.

    2015-07-01

    In the USA, thousands of volunteers are engaged in tracking plant and animal phenology through a variety of citizen science programs for the purpose of amassing spatially and temporally comprehensive datasets useful to scientists and resource managers. The quality of these observations and their suitability for scientific analysis, however, remains largely unevaluated. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of plant phenology observations collected by citizen scientist volunteers following protocols designed by the USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN). Phenology observations made by volunteers receiving several hours of formal training were compared to those collected independently by a professional ecologist. Approximately 11,000 observations were recorded by 28 volunteers over the course of one field season. Volunteers consistently identified phenophases correctly (91 % overall) for the 19 species observed. Volunteers demonstrated greatest overall accuracy identifying unfolded leaves, ripe fruits, and open flowers. Transitional accuracy decreased for some species/phenophase combinations (70 % average), and accuracy varied significantly by phenophase and species ( p training can provide reliable observations when following explicit, standardized protocols. Future studies should investigate different observation models (i.e., group/individual, online/in-person training) over subsequent seasons with multiple expert comparisons to further substantiate the ability of these monitoring programs to supply accurate broadscale datasets capable of answering pressing ecological questions about global change.

  6. Applying Support Vector Machine in classifying satellite images for the assessment of urban sprawl

    Science.gov (United States)

    murgante, Beniamino; Nolè, Gabriele; Lasaponara, Rosa; Lanorte, Antonio; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2013-04-01

    , in south eastern Italy (Puglia region). Bari, one of the major cities of southern Italy, is characterized by a considerable urban sprawl. The analysis is focused on a rectangular shaped region covering the urban area of three different cities, namely Polignano a Mare and Monopoli (and Conversano minority part) which, in 2011, had a population density comprised in the range of 140-319 people per Km2(istat ). The area of interest has a surface of approximately 253 Km2 , is characterized by three urban areas (Polignano a Mare, Conversano and Monopoli) and has a coastline of almost 17 Km. References Lanorte, A., Danese M., Lasaponara R., Murgante B. (2011) "Multiscale mapping of burn area and severity using multisensor satellite data and spatial autocorrelation analysis" International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, Elsevier, doi:10.1016/j.jag.2011.09.005 Murgante B. Danese M. (2011) "Urban versus Rural: the decrease of agricultural areas and the development of urban zones analyzed with spatial statistics" Special Issue on "Environmental and agricultural data processing for water and territory management" International Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Information Systems (IJAEIS) volume 2(2) pp. 16-28 IGI Global, ISSN 1947-3192, DOI: 10.4018/jaeis.2011070102. Murgante, B., Las Casas, G., Danese, M., (2012), "Analyzing Neighbourhoods Suitable for Urban Renewal Programs with Autocorrelation Techniques" In Burian J. (Eds.) "Advances in Spatial Planning" InTech - Open Access DOI: 10.5772/33747 ISBN:978-953-51-0377-6 Nolè G., Danese M., Murgante B., Lasaponara R., Lanorte, A., (2012) "Using Spatial Autocorrelation Techniques and Multi-temporal Satellite Data for Analyzing Urban Sprawl" Lecture Notes in Computer Science vol. 7335, pp. 512-527. Springer-Verlag, Berlin. ISSN: 0302-9743, doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-31137-6_39

  7. Recent developments in X-ray projection microscopy and X-ray microtomography applied to materials science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a long period of sleeping, there is recently a spectacular revival of X-ray microscopy due to the progress in X-ray sources (synchrotron radiation), X-ray optics, and X-ray detectors. However most of the attempts in this field concern the use of soft X-rays to observe, with an improved resolution, biological specimens in their wet environment. In opposition to these trends, we try to demonstrate in this paper the interest of using X-ray microscopy to materials science by applying the old principle of shadow microscopy (but with modern detectors such as CCD cameras) with harder X-rays. The excellent linearity, speed of acquisition and large dynamic of CCD cameras combined to the intrinsic advantage of X-rays ''to see'' inside thick specimens allows one to obtain digital images (for quantification), to follow dynamic processes (such as solid / solid diffusion) and to perform 3 - dimensional reconstruction of the object by X-ray microtomography. The performance of this renewed technique is indicated and illustrated by various examples. (orig.)

  8. TEQUILA—The use of a structured pre-lecture programme in physics for first-year applied science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Peter; Legge, Katherine

    1997-03-01

    Many students find the transition from secondary to tertiary education difficult. White et al. (1) have considered some of the difficulties encountered by Australian students that include the change from a small personal secondary school to a large impersonal university, as well as the shift in responsibility for learning from teacher to student. The teaching strategy outlined in this paper was designed to address the latter issue by encouraging new university students to take more responsibility for their own learning. The students considered in the study were enrolled in Physics 110, a one semester non-calculus unit that is part of the Applied Science degree at La Trobe University, Bendigo, and covers a basic introduction to mechanics, SHM and wave motion, fluids and heat. The authors were the teacher/researchers for the subject, presenting both the classroom and laboratory sections to 32 students in 1995 and 14 students in 1996. All students enrolled in Physics 110 had completed Year 12 Physics (or equivalent) at secondary school.

  9. Peace journalism applied: An assessment of media coverage of the conflict in Northern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Nassanga Goretti

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores how peace journalism has been applied in Uganda basing on an assessment of findings from a survey on the media coverage of the conflict in northern Uganda. The paper analyses the findings from the print media coverage of 2 newspapers for 3 years that were used as sample. The analysis considered several quantitative and qualitative variables including: frequency, type of stories (news vs non-news, authors of stories (journalists vs non-journalists, placement/prominence of story, balance in the story, information sources, language and tone, focus, peace initiatives and use of photographs. The introduction gives an overview of the concept of conflict and why we continue to have conflicts in society. The paper posits that since all people in society cannot have the same definition of a situation all the time, especially regarding the distribution of power and resources, disagreements and conflicts arise, which in extreme cases escalate into armed conflicts or wars. The paper looks at the major causes of conflicts in Africa and gives a background to the conflict/war in Northern Uganda, where the fighting has been going on since 1986, when President Museveni took over power. A synopsis of the findings showed that most of the coverage on the war was done by journalists in the form of news stories, with a few feature articles. This implies that journalists are largely responsible for what people get to learn about the war. Depending on the way journalists report about the conflict, people's perceptions will be influenced accordingly. The analysis showed that the government paper was largely biased towards government and confrontational in its reports, while the private paper used a more conciliatory tone and was more balanced by using various sources for their stories. There was fair coverage of peace initiatives, although this focused most on government efforts. An evaluation of the coverage showed that this had its strengths and

  10. Applying Retrospective Demographic Models to Assess Sustainable Use: the Maya Management of Xa’an Palms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Caballero

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Xa’an palm (Sabal yapa has been used to thatch traditional Maya houses for over 3000 years. In the Yucatan Peninsula, this palm has been introduced to pasturelands, maize fields (milpas, and homegardens. These and other traditional management systems are usually believed to be sustainable, but there is as yet little evidence to support this hypothesis. Demographic models have been used for this purpose, mainly focusing on population growth rate (λ. So far, retrospective analysis has not been applied, even though it examines how changes in the the life cycle of a species, caused by different management regimes, affect its λ. In this study, we assess whether ecologically sustainable use of xa’an occurs in homegardens, pasturelands, and milpas, and if so, how it is achieved. We constructed matrix population models for four populations of xa’an that were followed for 3 years, and then conducted a retrospective analysis on them. Management in homegardens seems to be oriented to increasing the availability of xa’an leaves, favoring the survival of seedlings, and increasing the density of harvestable-sized palms. However, in the milpa and the pastureland, the population size structure resembles that of unmanaged populations. Our λ values suggest that the traditional use of xa’an in all the studied management regimes is sustainable. Nevertheless, the processes that lead to sustainable use are different in each system, as shown by our retrospective analysis. Although fecundity contributes positively to λ only in homegardens, permanence and growth maintain palm populations at an equilibrium in the pastureland and in the milpa, respectively. Between-year climatic differences had a smaller impact on λ than management practices, which may vary from one year to another, leading to different balances in the sustainable use of the populations involved. Even though no significant differences were found in λ values, Maya achieve sustainable use of

  11. Applied Time Domain Stability Margin Assessment for Nonlinear Time-Varying Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, J. M.; Johnson, M. D.; Wall, J. H.; Dominguez, A.

    2016-01-01

    margins. At each time point, the system was linearized about the current operating point using Simulink's built-in solver. Each linearized system in time was evaluated for its rigid-body gain margin (high frequency gain margin), rigid-body phase margin, and aero gain margin (low frequency gain margin) for each control axis. Using the stability margins derived from the baseline linearization approach, the time domain derived stability margins were determined by executing time domain simulations in which axis-specific incremental gain and phase adjustments were made to the nominal system about the expected neutral stability point at specific flight times. The baseline stability margin time histories were used to shift the system gain to various values around the zero margin point such that a precise amount of expected gain margin was maintained throughout flight. When assessing the gain margins, the gain was applied starting at the time point under consideration, thereafter following the variation in the margin found in the linear analysis. When assessing the rigid-body phase margin, a constant time delay was applied to the system starting at the time point under consideration. If the baseline stability margins were correctly determined via the linear analysis, the time domain simulation results should contain unstable behavior at certain gain and phase values. Examples will be shown from repeated simulations with variable added gain and phase lag. Faithfulness of margins calculated from the linear analysis to the nonlinear system will be demonstrated.

  12. Adventures in supercomputing, a K-12 program in computational science: An assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, C.E.; Hicks, H.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Iles-Brechak, K.D. [Vanderbilt Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Honey, M.; McMillan, K. [Education Development Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1994-10-01

    In this paper, the authors describe only those elements of the Department of Energy Adventures in Supercomputing (AiS) program for high school teachers, such as school selection, which have a direct bearing on assessment. Schools submit an application to participate in the AiS program. They propose a team of at least two teachers to implement the AiS curriculum. The applications are evaluated by selection committees in each of the five participating states to determine which schools are the most qualified to carry out the program and reach a significant number of women, minorities, and economically disadvantaged students, all of whom have historically been underrepresented in the sciences. Typically, selected schools either have a large disadvantaged student population, or the applying teachers propose specific means to attract these segments of their student body into AiS classes. Some areas with AiS schools have significant numbers of minority students, some have economically disadvantaged, usually rural, students, and all areas have the potential to reach a higher proportion of women than technical classes usually attract. This report presents preliminary findings based on three types of data: demographic, student journals, and contextual. Demographic information is obtained for both students and teachers. Students have been asked to maintain journals which include replies to specific questions that are posed each month. An analysis of the answers to these questions helps to form a picture of how students progress through the course of the school year. Onsite visits by assessment professionals conducting student and teacher interviews, provide a more in depth, qualitative basis for understanding student motivations.

  13. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for building 878, manufacturing science and technology, organization 14100.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klossner, Kristin Ann

    2004-05-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a preliminary assessment carried out for activities and operations at Sandia National Laboratories Building 878, Manufacturing Science and Technology, Organization 14100. The goal of this assessment is to evaluate processes being carried out within the building to determine ways to reduce waste generation and resource use. The ultimate purpose of this assessment is to analyze and prioritize processes within Building 878 for more in-depth assessments and to identify projects that can be implemented immediately.

  14. Quality assurance manual for the environmental survey and site assessment program, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-21

    The purpose of this manual is to provide Program policy and oversight for the maintenance of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) within the Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. This manual describes administrative systems, as well as specific quality control procedures, which apply to all functional groups in ESSAP. The sites surveyed under this program are primarily those where residual contamination from previous operations may pose a potential risk to the environment or to the health and safety of those in the immediate vicinity. Other major activities include environmental assessments, training related to decommissioning survey activities, effluent sampling and monitoring, special laboratory analyses, program appraisals and document reviews, consulting on environment-related topics, and technical assistance for guideline development. The methodology for performance of particular field and laboratory activities is presented in the ESSAP Survey Procedures Manual and the Laboratory Procedures Manual.

  15. Science courses in the online environment: A needs assessment of instructor attitudes that affect the design process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Diane F.

    The purpose of this study was to identify the attitudes of college and university science instructors regarding the online delivery of science courses as part of the needs assessment process. Instructor attitudes regarding science courses were examined in three areas: curriculum, instructional design of the course, and the laboratory component. A quantitative research methodology was followed to identify the attitudes of science instructors regarding the online delivery of general introductory science courses as part of the needs assessment process. The study utilized descriptive research to identify common patterns in the attitudes of science instructors. An online survey questionnaire (STOIC) was developed and administered to 103 science instructors currently teaching in one of the four science disciplines (biology, chemistry, geology, or physics) at a public community college or university. Pearson chi square test of independence was performed using the four different science disciplines as variables. The results of the study showed no significant relationship between the science disciplines and the attitudes of instructors regarding the online delivery of science courses in the areas of curriculum, instructional design, or the laboratory component. It was also found that no significant relationship existed between the science disciplines and the instructor acceptance of science courses offered online for non-science majors. The study concluded that science instructors in all four science disciplines were unified in their opinions regarding the laboratory component of an online science course. The majority believe that the laboratory component should be conducted on campus in a live setting as opposed to alternative scenarios, such as simulations or in the student's home. Science instructors do not perceive a science course designed for online delivery to be capable of including the same instructional design components utilized in a science course delivered live

  16. A Framework for Determining the Authenticity of Assessment Tasks: Applied to an Example in Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Kelley

    2011-01-01

    Authentic assessment tasks enhance engagement, retention and the aspirations of students. This paper explores the discipline-generic features of authentic assessment, which reflect what students need to achieve in the real world. Some assessment tasks are more authentic than others and this paper designs a proposed framework supported by the…

  17. Assessment report of research and development activities. Activity: 'Quantum beam science research' (Result evaluation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consulted an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Quantum Beam Science Research' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for result evaluation of 'Quantum Beam Science Research', in accordance with 'General Guideline for Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research activities of the Quantum Beam Science Research, which includes the management of the Quantum Beam Science Directorate (hereinafter referred to as 'QuBS') from October, 2005 to June, 2009. The Committee evaluated the management and research activities in Quantum Beam Science based on the documents and oral presentations prepared by QuBS. This report presents the results of the evaluation by the Committee. (author)

  18. Assessment report of research and development activities. Activity: 'Nuclear science and engineering research' (Interim report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consults an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Nuclear Science and Engineering' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for interim assessment of 'Nuclear Science and Engineering,' in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by the JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research program of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate (hereinafter referred to as 'NSED') and Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (hereinafter referred to as 'CCSE') during the period of about four years from September 2008 to September 2012. The Committee evaluated the management and research activities of the NSED and the CCSE based on explanatory documents prepared by the NSED and the CCSE, and oral presentations with questions-and-answers by unit managers etc. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  19. Post-Normal Science in Practice at the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    About a decade ago, the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) unwittingly embarked on a transition from a technocratic model of science advising to the paradigm of “post-normal science” (PNS). In response to a scandal around uncertainty management in 1999, a Guidance for “Uncertainty Assessment and Communication” was developed with advice from the initiators of the PNS concept and was introduced in 2003. This was followed in 2007 by a “Stakeholder Participation” Guidance. In this ...

  20. Assessing urology and nephrology research activity in Arab countries using ISI web of science bibliometric database

    OpenAIRE

    Waleed M. Sweileh; Zyoud, Sa’ed H.; Al-Jabi, Samah W.; Sawalha, Ansam F

    2014-01-01

    Background Bibliometric analysis is increasingly being used for research assessment. The main objective of this study was to assess research output in Urology and Nephrology subject from the Arab countries. Original scientific articles or reviews published from the 21 Arab countries in “Urology and Nephrology” subject were screened using the ISI Web of Science database. Research productivity was evaluated based on a methodology developed and used in other bibliometric studies by analyzing the...

  1. Integrated online formative assessments in the biomedical sciences for medical students: benefits for learning

    OpenAIRE

    McNeil H Patrick; Jones Philip; Velan Gary M; Kumar Rakesh K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Online formative assessments have a sound theoretical basis, and are prevalent and popular in higher education settings, but data to establish their educational benefits are lacking. This study attempts to determine whether participation and performance in integrated online formative assessments in the biomedical sciences has measurable effects on learning by junior medical students. Methods Students enrolled in Phase 1 (Years 1 and 2) of an undergraduate Medicine program ...

  2. Assessing the Natural Values of Fresh Waters: Science or Art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, C. M.; Boon, P. J.

    2005-05-01

    If conservation is to be effective, there needs to be agreement on how priorities are assessed - especially among scientists, resource managers, and policy-makers. Although tensions remain between some sectors, considerable progress has been made. In the UK, for example, the recent implementation of the EC Water Framework Directive has brought the aspirations of 'freshwater management' and 'freshwater conservation' closer, although there are still legitimate differences between the two. Effective conservation also requires robust and objective methods of assigning 'value' to fresh waters. To compare approaches used in the UK and the US, a survey was conducted among selected individuals, classified within three broad affiliations: universities and research institutes, conservation bodies, and resource managers. Respondents assigned scores to reflect the importance attached to each of 27 features, grouped within broad conservation criteria. Naturalness and rarity were ranked the highest both in the UK and the US, with representativeness and diversity rated significantly lower. The naturalness of channels and banks, and littoral and shoreline zones, respectively, were considered the most important features for rivers and lakes. Results indicate much common ground between the two countries, suggesting that some 'core' features are essential components in determinations of freshwater conservation value.

  3. Assessing culturally sensitive factors in the learning environment of science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Darrell L.; Waldrip, Bruce G.

    1997-03-01

    As schools are becoming increasingly diverse in their scope and clientele, any examination of the interaction of culturally sensitive factors of students' learning environments with learning science assumes critical importance. The purpose of this exploratory study was to develop an instrument to assess learning environment factors that are culturally sensitive, to provide initial validation information on the instrument and to examine associations between students' perceptions of their learning environments and their attitudes towards science and achievement of enquiry skills. A measure of these factors of science student's learning environment, namely the Cultural Learning Environment Questionnaire (CLEQ), was developed from past learning environment instruments and influenced by Hofstede's four dimensions of culture (Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, Individualism, and Masculinity/Femininity). The reliability and discriminant validity for each scale were obtained and associations between learning environment, attitude to science and enquiry skills achievement were found.

  4. Bulgarian Contribution to World Science and Main Criteria for Assessing the Achievements of Scientists [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V. Toshev

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The status and the new developments in world science are both discussed. The transition from the ‘normal science’ (Kuhn to the ‘post-normal science’ (Funtowicz & Ravetz is commented. The integration processes in science, the mass higher education and its mcdonaldization are also considered. The difference between ‘science’ and ‘surrogate science’ is explained. The existence of marginal journals as an attribute of the surrogate science is discussed. Such a broad-based consideration allows a realistic assess of the contribution of Bulgarian scientists in the development of world science to be made. Some of the most important scientific achievements made by Bulgarians are listed.

  5. Formation of image direction «applied computer science» through the development of an educational portal

    OpenAIRE

    Новикова, Т. Б.; ДАВЛЕТКИРЕЕВА Л.З.; Novikova, T. B.; Davletkireeva, L. Z.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the structure and content of the educational portal for image formation areas of training in «Applied Computer Science» and the educational institution as a whole. Details presented portal layout and interaction of participants of the process В данной статье рассматриваются структура и содержание образовательного портала для формирования имиджа направления подготовки «Прикладная информатика» и образовательного учреждения в целом. Подробно представлена схема портала и...

  6. Exploring the Assessment of and Relationship between Elementary Students' Scientific Creativity and Science Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuay-Keng; Lin, Shu-Fen; Hong, Zuway-R; Lin, Huann-shyang

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) develop and validate instruments to assess elementary students' scientific creativity and science inquiry, (b) investigate the relationship between the two competencies, and (c) compare the two competencies among different grade level students. The scientific creativity test was composed of 7 open-ended items…

  7. Assessment report on research and development activities. Activity: 'Advanced science research' (Interim report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as “JAEA”) consulted an assessment committee, “Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Advanced Science Research” (hereinafter referred to as “Committee”) for interim assessment of “Advanced Science Research,” in accordance with “General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities” by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, “Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology” and “Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities” by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research programs and activities of the Advanced Science Research Center (hereinafter referred to as “ASRC”) for the period of two years from April 2010. The Committee evaluated the management and the research programs of the ASRC based on the explanatory documents prepared by the ASRC and the oral presentations with questions-and-answers by the Director and the research group leaders. This report summarizes the result of the assessment by the Committee with the Committee report attached from page 7. (author)

  8. Teaching and Assessing Ethics and Social Responsibility in Undergraduate Science: A Position Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Madeleine

    2014-01-01

    Institutional graduate capabilities and discipline threshold learning outcomes require science students to demonstrate ethical conduct and social responsibility. However, the teaching and assessment of these concepts are not straightforward. Australian chemistry academics participated in a workshop in 2013 to discuss and develop teaching and…

  9. Business Statistics and Management Science Online: Teaching Strategies and Assessment of Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastianelli, Rose; Tamimi, Nabil

    2011-01-01

    Given the expected rise in the number of online business degrees, issues regarding quality and assessment in online courses will become increasingly important. The authors focus on the suitability of online delivery for quantitative business courses, specifically business statistics and management science. They use multiple approaches to assess…

  10. Development of Performance Assessments in Science: Conceptual, Practical, and Logistical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Shavelson, Richard J.

    1997-01-01

    Conceptual, practical, and logistical issues in the development of science performance assessments (SPAs) are discussed. The conceptual framework identifies task, response format, and scoring system as components, and conceives of SPAs as tasks that attempt to recreate conditions in which scientists work. Developing SPAs is a sophisticated effort…

  11. Assessment report of research and development activities. Activity: 'Advanced science research' (Pre-review report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consulted an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Advanced Science Research' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for prior assessment of 'Advanced Science Research,' in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research program and activities of the Advanced Science Research Center (hereinafter referred to as 'ASRC') for the period of five years from April 2010. The Committee evaluated the management and the research program of the ASRC based on the explanatory documents prepared by the ASRC and the oral presentations with questions-and-answers by the Director and the research group leaders. This report summarizes the result of the assessment by the Committee with the Committee report attached from page 7. (author)

  12. Assessing Earth and Environmental Science Enrollment Trends in Texas Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Joan G.

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: This study assesses the status of Earth and environmental sciences education in Texas Public High Schools by analyzing enrollment proportions of 11th and 12th grade students in 607 Independent School Districts (ISD) for the 2010-2011 academic school year using a quantitative, non-experimental alpha research design. This…

  13. Measuring beyond Content: A Rubric Bank for Assessing Skills in Authentic Research Assignments in the Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishbaugh, Tara L. S.; Cessna, Stephen; Horst, S. Jeanne; Leaman, Lori; Flanagan, Toni; Neufeld, Doug Graber; Siderhurst, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report the development of an analytic rubric bank to assess non-content learning, namely higher order cognitive skills, the understanding of the nature of science, and effective scientific communication skills in student research projects. Preliminary findings indicate that use of this tool enhances our students' learning in these areas,…

  14. Draft Plan for Development of the Integrated Science Assessment for Nitrogen Oxides - Health Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has announced a draft development plan for the next Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for the health effects of nitrogen oxides (NOX) which will serve as the scientific basis for review of the primary (health-based) National Ambient Air Quality Standard for nitrogen dioxide...

  15. 78 FR 70040 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Nitrogen Oxides-Health Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... nitrogen oxides (77 FR 7149). EPA's ``Draft Plan for Development of the Integrated Science Assessment for Nitrogen Oxides--Health Criteria'' was made available for public comment on May 3, 2013 (78 FR 26026), and... of EPA's air quality criteria. On February 10, 2012 (77 FR 7149), EPA formally initiated its...

  16. Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria (Second External Review Draft, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has announced that the Second External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft ISA document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation...

  17. Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria (First External Review Draft, 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has announced that the First External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria has been made available for independent peer review and public review. This draft ISA document represents a concise synthesis and eva...

  18. Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria (First External Review Draft, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is announcing the availability of the First External Review Draft of the Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen – Health Criteria for public comment and independent peer review. This draft document provides EPA’s evaluation and synthesis of the most polic...

  19. What about Language while Equitably Assessing Science?: Case Studies of Preservice Teachers' Evolving Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Edward G.

    2013-01-01

    The three case studies, drawing on qualitative analysis of surveys, interviews, program artifacts, and classroom observation, describe secondary science preservice teachers' evolving expertise at providing opportunities for linguistically diverse students to learn and demonstrate what they have learned (i.e., equitable assessment). The teachers…

  20. National Assessment Program--Science Literacy Year 6 School Release Materials, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jenny; Hutton, Penny; Lennon, Melissa; O'Connor, Gayl; Morrissey, Noni

    2008-01-01

    In July 2001, the Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (MCEETYA) agreed to the development of assessment instruments and key performance measures for reporting on student skills, knowledge and understandings in primary science. It directed the newly established Performance Measurement and Reporting Taskforce…

  1. Handheld tools that 'Informate' Assessment of Student Learning in Science: A Requirements Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Penuel, William R.; Yarnall, Louise; Shechtman, Nicole; Tatar, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    An important challenge faced by many teachers as they involve students in science investigations is measuring (assessing) students' progress. Our detailed requirements analysis in a particular school district led to the idea that what teachers need most are ways to increase the quality of the information they have about what students know and can…

  2. A Model for Integrating Assessment across an Undergraduate Political Science Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Shala; Bennett, Bryan; Crawford, C. B.; Gould, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    A call to engagement at Fort Hays State University (FHSU) led to significant curricular and assessment changes in the university's Department of Political Science. The university unveiled the Year of the Department (YOTD) as "an ongoing strategic initiative for orchestrating change and aligning people, systems and culture at the basic unit level…

  3. Career Preparedness Survey Outcomes of Food Science Graduates--A Follow-Up Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlscheid, Jeffri; Clark, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-eight recent graduates (1998-2008) from the joint Washington State University (WSU) and University of Idaho (UI) BiState School of Food Science program and 27 of their employers participated in a survey assessing learning outcomes based on the 2001 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) core competencies for undergraduate food science…

  4. A Needs Assessment for the Introduction of a Food Science Program at the Univ. of Guyana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Donna

    2012-01-01

    This research describes the outcome of a needs assessment to determine whether the Univ. of Guyana should introduce a Food Science program. The research design utilized interviews and questionnaires to large manufacturing organizations and agroprocessors to determine if the required skills are available for the manufacturing process. Results…

  5. 78 FR 79707 - Office of the Assistant Secretary-Water and Science; Environmental Assessment of the Olmsted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... Office of the Assistant Secretary--Water and Science; Environmental Assessment of the Olmsted... Conservancy District (District), as joint leads, are preparing an Environmental Assessment (EA) to evaluate... the necessary analysis for determining potential environmental impacts associated with replacement...

  6. Applying the Lost-Letter Technique to Assess IT Risk Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lastdrager, E.E.H.; Montoya, Lorena; Hartel, Pieter; Junger, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Information security policies are used to mitigate threats for which a technical prevention is not feasible. Compliance with information security policies is a notoriously difficult issue. Social sciences could provide tools to empirically study compliance with policies. We use a variation of the lo

  7. Evaluation of Policy and Research Interventions in Science and Technology: Consequence Assessment of Regulatory and Technology Transfer Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Mary Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    This research contributes to efforts in assessment studies related to science and technology interventions. The work presented in this thesis focuses on understanding the effects of policies that influence science and technology interventions, and determining the impact of science and technology interventions themselves. Chapter 1 explores how…

  8. Editors' Conclusion: Child, Youth, and Parent Responses to the Terrorism of September 11, 2001--Implications for Applied Developmental Science and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aber, J. Lawrence; Gershoff, Elizabeth T.

    2004-01-01

    Even as the events of September 11, 2001 recede into the past, the need for applied developmental science to lend its expertise to assist with one's understanding of and coping with civilian responses to terrorism has never been greater. What has the field learned from studies of the effects of events of September 11th on children, youths, and…

  9. Call Numbers and Holdings of Journals Listed in Applied Science & Technology Index Located in the Libraries of North Carolina State University. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Frank, Comp.

    This document consists of the call numbers and holdings of journals listed in the "Applied Science and Technology Index" (ASTI) located in the libraries of North Carolina State University (NCSU). In addition to helping ASTI users at NCSU, it may also be used for regional and national purposes. As a regional resource it may help libraries with…

  10. Teaching Scientists to Communicate: Evidence-based assessment for undergraduate science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer-Mapstone, Lucy; Kuchel, Louise

    2015-07-01

    Communication skills are one of five nationally recognised learning outcomes for an Australian Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree. Previous evidence indicates that communication skills taught in Australian undergraduate science degrees are not developed sufficiently to meet the requirements of the modern-day workplace-a problem faced in the UK and USA also. Curriculum development in this area, however, hinges on first evaluating how communication skills are taught currently as a base from which to make effective changes. This study aimed to quantify the current standard of communication education within BSc degrees at Australian research-intensive universities. A detailed evidential baseline for not only what but also how communication skills are being taught was established. We quantified which communication skills were taught and assessed explicitly, implicitly, or were absent in a range of undergraduate science assessment tasks (n = 35) from four research-intensive Australian universities. Results indicate that 10 of the 12 core science communication skills used for evaluation were absent from more than 50% of assessment tasks and 77.14% of all assessment tasks taught less than 5 core communication skills explicitly. The design of assessment tasks significantly affected whether communication skills were taught explicitly. Prominent trends were that communication skills in tasks aimed at non-scientific audiences were taught more explicitly than in tasks aimed at scientific audiences, and the majority of group and multimedia tasks taught communication elements more explicitly than individual, or written and oral tasks. Implications for science communication in the BSc and further research are discussed.

  11. Debunking the Computer Science Digital Library: Lessons Learned in Collection Development at Seneca College of Applied Arts & Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buczynski, James Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Developing a library collection to support the curriculum of Canada's largest computer studies school has debunked many myths about collecting computer science and technology information resources. Computer science students are among the heaviest print book and e-book users in the library. Circulation statistics indicate that the demand for print…

  12. Archival Science as an Applied Branch of Information Science / A ARQUIVÍSTICA COMO DISCIPLINA APLICADA NO CAMPO DA CIÊNCIA DA INFORMAÇÃO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Ribeiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn spite of archives have ancient roots, that can be confused with the origins of the writing itself, Archival Science as a discipline only in the 19th century began to be settled in the scope of historicism and positivism and in a perspective of “auxiliary science” of History. This historical and custodial perspective gained new shapes by the end of the century, because of the importance of technicism that has been improved along the 20th century, by the effect of social, economic and cultural conditions, derived from the technological revolution in progress. In this paper the traditional paradigm, designated as historicist, custodial and technicist, is put forward to a new and emergent paradigm, named post-custodial, informational and scientific, that understands this discipline as an applied branch of Information Science’s field. The epistemological, theoretical and methodological groundings of the proposed view are exposed. --------------------- Resumo: Apesar de os arquivos terem origens muito remotas, que se podem confundir com as origens da própria escrita, a Arquivística como disciplina só no século XIX e no quadro do historicismo e do positivismo, se começou a afirmar, numa perspectiva de “ciência auxiliar” da História. Esta perspectiva historicista e custodial adquiriu novos contornos por alturas da viragem do século, graças à afirmação da vertente tecnicista, que se desenvolveu ao longo de todo o século XX, por efeito das condições sociais, económicas e culturais derivadas da revolução tecnológica em curso. Neste texto põe-se em confronto o tradicional paradigma historicista, custodial e tecnicista da Arquivística com um novo paradigma emergente, apelidado de pós-custodial, informacional e científico que entende esta disciplina como um saber aplicado do campo da Ciência da Informação, sendo apresentados os fundamentos epistemológicos, teóricos e metodológicos da abordagem proposta.

  13. Substantiating the need to apply a sociocultural lens to the preparation of teachers in an effort to achieve science reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Mara

    2013-12-01

    This qualitative, sociocultural study examines how teacher preparation programs may have deliberate impact on science reform by unearthing the complex layers of diversity inherent in the contextual reality of education. This study was conducted in one of the largest school districts in the Southeastern United States, serving a predominately Hispanic population comprising 65 % of its student body, followed by African Americans at 24 %. The representative subjects utilized for this study were elementary education undergraduate students and later a percentage of the same subjects, as practicing teachers in the field. All subjects were exposed to inquiry based methodology in science teaching as part of their undergraduate studies with emphasis on the learning cycle, facilitation of student voice and exposure to the nature of science. The goal of science education was emphasized to students as purposeful in promoting scientific literacy. This study is framed by sociocultural theory grounded in a social constructivist paradigm with the understanding that science learning takes place within social and collaborative processes leading to internalization and greater sense of self-efficacy. The study examines the perception of education students' beliefs about scientists as well as reflections on their own learning of science as elementary students themselves. As present practicing teachers, perspectives from their position in the field were obtained via interviews. Interviews served to elicit reflections on present practice as related to previous perceptions, in order to analyze whether these were pervasive in framing practice as well as self-perceptions related to science. A lack of change of these perceptions may underscore the importance of an emphasis on issues of gender, culture and social factors within teacher preparation, specific to science teaching and learning. Cognizance of such factors are believed to support internalization and hence greater understanding of

  14. Assessing the impact participation in science journalism activities has on scientific literacy among high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrar, Cathy

    As part of the National Science Foundation Science Literacy through Science Journalism (SciJourn) research and development initiative (http://www.scijourn.org ; Polman, Saul, Newman, and Farrar, 2008) a quasi-experimental design was used to investigate what impact incorporating science journalism activities had on students' scientific literacy. Over the course of a school year students participated in a variety of activities culminating in the production of science news articles for Scijourner, a regional print and online high school science news magazine. Participating teachers and SciJourn team members collaboratively developed activities focused on five aspects of scientific literacy: placing information into context, recognizing relevance, evaluating factual accuracy, use of multiple credible sources and information seeking processes. This study details the development process for the Scientific Literacy Assessment (SLA) including validity and reliability studies, evaluates student scientific literacy using the SLA, examines student SLA responses to provide a description of high school students' scientific literacy, and outlines implications of the findings in relation to the National Research Council's A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas (2012) and classroom science teaching practices. Scientifically literate adults acting as experts in the assessment development phase informed the creation of a scoring guide that was used to analyze student responses. Experts tended to draw on both their understanding of science concepts and life experiences to formulate answers; paying close attention to scientific factual inaccuracies, sources of information, how new information fit into their view of science and society as well as targeted strategies for information seeking. Novices (i.e., students), in contrast, tended to ignore factual inaccuracies, showed little understanding about source credibility and suggested

  15. Gender differences in national assessment of educational progress science items: What does i don't know really mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Marcia C.; de Benedictis, Tina; Delucchi, Kevin; Harris, Abigail; Stage, Elizabeth

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress Science Assessment has consistently revealed small gender differences on science content items but not on science inquiry items. This assessment differs from others in that respondents can choose I don't know rather than guessing. This paper examines explanations for the gender differences including (a) differential prior instruction, (b) differential response to uncertainty and use of the I don't know response, (c) differential response to figurally presented items, and (d) different attitudes towards science. Of these possible explanations, the first two received support. Females are more likely to use the I don't know response, especially for items with physical science content or masculine themes such as football. To ameliorate this situation we need more effective science instruction and more gender-neutral assessment items.

  16. Applying Comprehensive Environmental Assessment to Research Planning for Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes: Refinements to Inform Future Stakeholder Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    We previously described our collective judgment methods to engage expert stakeholders in the Comprehensive Environmental Assessment (CEA) workshop process applied to nano-TiO2 and nano-Ag research planning. We identified several lessons learned in engaging stakeholders to identif...

  17. Life Cycle Assessments Applied to First Generation Biofuels Used in France. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    a national calculation method parallel to that defined by the Commission. This work presents here a global consistency with the Directive, namely in term of allocation principle based on energy pro-rata, but was also performed in a finer, step by step detail level. The objective of the study is to realize the life cycle assessment of the current biofuel pathways (also called 'first generation') by applying the principles retained in the 2008 methodological guide. This work was performed with the technical support of industrial actors, technical institutes, research centers, and environmental associations. Integrating the European context and wishing to put the results in perspective, this study performs, in a second step, an analysis of the results obtained with other methodologies, including those from the Directive. This critical and constructive aspect emphasizes points of vigilance to keep in mind in the European discussions with regards to quantify biofuel sustainability

  18. The efficacy assessment of water repellent agent POLYMEMBRAN applied on natural stone and hardened lime mortar

    OpenAIRE

    Hasníková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    The subject of the study was assess the influence of water repellent agent on the properties of four different natural stones that are frequently used building material in the Czech Republic. Besides color change were primarily assessed changes in the microstructure, which significantly influences the transport of water and water vapour through treated material.

  19. Peer and Self-Assessment Applied to Oral Presentations from a Multidisciplinary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suñol, Joan Josep; Arbat, Gerard; Pujol, Joan; Feliu, Lidia; Fraguell, Rosa Maria; Planas-Lladó, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses the use of peer and self-assessment in oral presentations as complementary tools to assessment by the professor. The analysis is based on a study conducted at the University of Girona (Spain) in seven different degree subjects and fields of knowledge. We designed and implemented two instruments to measure students' peer and…

  20. Applying Evidence-Centered Design for the Development of Game-Based Assessments in Physics Playground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jeon; Almond, Russell G.; Shute, Valerie J.

    2016-01-01

    Game-based assessment (GBA) is a specific use of educational games that employs game activities to elicit evidence for educationally valuable skills and knowledge. While this approach can provide individualized and diagnostic information about students, the design and development of assessment mechanics for a GBA is a nontrivial task. In this…